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11th Regiment Artillery (Heavy), New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

COL. BARNES,
11th Reg't
Heavy Artillery.
LIEUT.DEXTER,
Formerly of the 100th N. Y. V., has received orders to recruit for the 11th Regiment Heavy Artillery, and has opened his office at the West end of the IRON BR1DGE, where he has already enlisted a few men. Any one desirous of entering service can now have a chance to enlist, in an important branch. Lieut. Dexter has been in service a long time, is a good officer and a gentleman. He pays the highest bounties offered. Give him a call and see what he can do for you.
His regiment is for garrison duty especially.
ap27d8te.o.d

RECRUITS FOR THE ARMY WANTED.
11th Heavy Artillery.
Capt. A. MOORE,
Formerly of the 105th Regiment N. Y. Vol., having received authority to recruit a Company to be attached to this Regiment, is prepared to offer to good men, inducements to enlist in his Company.
HEAD-QUARTERS,
OPPOSITE POST-OFFICE, BROCKPORT.
Bounties, Clothing, and Subsistence, furnished the same as by other recruiting officers.
This Regiment is organized expressly for the defence of N. Y. Harbor.
Capt. A. MOORE,
ap15dtf Recruiting Officer.

11th N. Y. Heavy Artillery.
COL. W. B. BARNES, COMMANDING.
Read this and think of it.
CAPT. I. E. PREVOST,
Is now organizing a Company in this favorite branch of the service, and with none of the detririments which detract so much from the infantry service to contend with.
The Captain having been connected with the army for the last year is fully qualified to command a company in the field.
The First Lieutenant has been eighteen months in the infantry service as Lieutenant in the 100th Regiment, and has been wounded and honorably discharged.
Volunteers in this Company will receive ALL GOVERNMENT AND STATE BOUNTIES paid by any regiment now organizing in the State. Pay, Rations and Clothing furnished immediately.
Several good men wanted as non-commissioned officers.
Head-quarters, Company C, First Battallion, No. 4 EXCHANGE PLACE, and Tent No. 1, in front of the Court House.
1st Lieut.—RODNEY DEXTER.
2d Lieuts.—Henry S. Mackie, Francis Forbes,
Recruiting Sergeant G. W. Clark. ap24deodim

The 11th N. Y. Heavy Artillery.
LIEUT. F. L. AMBROSE,
HAVING RECEIVED AUTHORITY to recruit for the ELEVENTH NEW YORK HEAVY ARTILLERY, has now opened his office at 18 Exchange st., near the Clinton Hotel, Where he will be pleased to see those who wish to enlist in this branch of the service. Those who enlist in this Regiment will be exempt from the fatiguing labor and exposure which attend a compaign in the field, and we have the assurance from proper authority, that this Regiment will not go out of the state; but will garrison the Forts around New York Harbor.
This Regiment is commanded by COL. W. B. BARNES.
Who has served as an Artillery commander from the commencement of the war.
The Company is commanded by Capt. WM. CHURCH, a gentleman of experience and ability.
Clothing, Rations, and Lodging furnished immediately, and all Government Bounties that are offered. March 18, 1863. -- dtf

11th New York
HEAVY ARTILLERY!
COL. W. B. BARNES.
THE UNDERSIGNED-A graduate of the Royal Military College, lately Adjutant of the Rankin Lancers, having received authority from the Adutant General of the State of New York, to raise a Company for this favorite branch of the service, hereby gives notice that he will be found at his Head-quarters,
NO. 133 STATE STREET,
Where he will receive all good, true, and able-bodied men:
Two Lieutenantcies and several non-commissioned offices still vacant.
Now is your time before the draft. God save the Union.
mh30 GEORGE WARDE,
Recruiting Officer, 11th Heavy Artillery.

HEAVY ARTILLERY!
A Rare Chance!
Now is the time for those wishing to enlist and avoid the draft, which will surely come this time.
Col. W. B. BARNES,
Having received a n t h o r i t y to raise a Regiment of Heavy Artillery, has now established his Headquarters, No. 14 Reynolds' Arcade,
Where he will be pleased to see those wishing authority to recruit for this Regiment.
It is for Garrison duty especially, and will garrison the
Forts in New York Harbor.

Notice was received this morning from Adjt. General Sprague that the Regiment would not go out of the State, but would be kept for the defence of New York Harbor, where the men will have good, comfortable barracks to stay in. No picket duty to perform, no long marches to make, and very light guard duty. Who would not rather volunteer in such a Regiment than to be drafted and put under strange officers, and immediately sent to the front to endure all the hardships of a Soldier's life.
W. B. BARNES,
mh14dtf Col. 11th Reg't N.Y. Heavy Artillery.

ELEVENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY,—Lieut. James C. Root has recently opened a recruiting office in the Morning Express office building, for this crack regiment. As Col. W. B. Barnes, commander of the Regiment, has received positive assurance from the Adjutant General, that the regiment will not leave the State, but will be retained for the purpose of garrisoning the forts in New York Harbor, those who join it can be assured of excellent quarters, good pay, and light work, besides $175 bounty.

BARNES' HEAVY ARTILLERY.—This regiment is now filling up rapidly, about six hundred men having already been enrolled. Col. B. is making preparations to go into camp at the Fair grounds—probably next week.
Capt. Dickinson has a letter from Albany stating from the Adjutant General, that each man who enters the army will receive a State bounty, under the recent act of the Legislature—$10 at the time of enlistment and $65 on joining his regiment. This will be an inducement to men to go into the ranks beyond what they have had heretofore. Capt. Dickinson has 102 men on his rolls, and is taking in more every day.

ANOTHER COMPANY FOR THE ELEVENTH ARTILLERY.—A company is being organized for the 11th Artillery, as will be seen by an advertisement, with headquarters in Exchange Place and at Tent in front of City Hall. This company is officered as follows: Captain, I. E. Provost; 1st Lieutenant, Rodney Dexter; Senior 2d Lieutenant, Henry S. Mackie; Junior do, Francis Forbes. (April 24, 1863)

GARRISON FOR NEW YORK HARBOR FORTS.—Lieut. Oliver B. Reeves, recruiting officer for Capt. H. P. Morrell's company, of the 11th Heavy Artillery, has opened an office near the Salina street bridge, and offers unequalled advantages to good men wishing to enlist. He offers $40 bounty in advance, and all other government and state bounties.—
This regiment is being organized, expressly to garrison the Forts around New York Harbor, and we are authorized to say that it will be permanently stationed at that point.

THE ELEVENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—Capt. I. E. Prevost is filling up his company for the 11th Heavy Artillery Regiment rapidly. He has now men enough enlisted to muster in a 1st Lieutenant, and has presented to Col. Barnes his muster roll to be sent to Albany. At the present rate of recruiting, he will soon have men enough to complete the organization of his company. His 1st Lieutenant, Rodney Dexter, has been in the service about eighteen months, and passed through the seven days' battles before Richmond. He has ability and experience, and will make an efficient officer. Capt. Prevost invites those who wish to enlist and avoid the draft, to call on him at his office, No. 4 Exchange Place.

NOTICE —11TH REGIMENT NEW YORK HEAVY ARTILLERY.--Whereas, several persons have heretofore enlisted in Capt. Church's company, 11th Regiment New York Heavy Artillery, some of whom have entirely failed to report at the regimental camp, and some who have so reported have absconded therefrom; notice is hereby given, that if absentees report themselves within two weeks from this date, at the headquarters of the regiment, they will be again received into their company without any punishment being inflicted, besides receiving such bounty as is now being paid, together with their pay from the date of their enlistment. Shall they fail to so report themselves within the above time designated, they will be reported and published as deserters, and upon arrest will be punished with the utmost rigor of the law.
By command of Col. W. B. BARNES.
WM. CHURCH, Captain.
Camp Sprague, Rochester, May 8, 1863.

GETTING READY TO MARCH.—Yesterday almost every train of cars brought in furloughed soldiers of the 11th Heavy Artillery Regiment, who had seen Col. Barnes' order in the papers calling his men together, to go to the defence of Pennsylvania whose soil is invaded by traitors. A large majority of the men respond with alacrity to the call. There are, however, a few deserters, and men who enlisted for bounty, who are clamoring at this sudden order to march; but these are few. Last night the camp was properly guarded by the 54th Regiment, as, it was on the previous evening. Knapsacks, canteens, haversacks and equipments were to arrive yesterday, and it is expected that the regiment will leave this afternoon on the Genesee Valley Railroad for Harrisburg.

REGIMENTAL COLORS.—On Saturday last Col. Barnes of the 11th Heavy Artillery, received from Albany three spendid flags for his regiment. One of them, the colors of the regiment, is really a very beautiful flag. It is composed of red, white and blue silk, and was constructed at great expense. The regimental flag is of yellow silk, and has, on blue ground, the words, Eleventh Heavy Artillery, N. Y. S. Vols.
These flags were on exhibition Saturday in Karnes' banking office. The other flag was of bunting, and is in use at the camp as a garrison flag.

AFFAIRS AT CAMP SPRAGUE—ATTEMPTS TO RUN THE GUARD—DESERTIONS'—TIME OF THE REGIMENT'S DEPARTURE.—The 54th Regiment performed guard duty at the camp of the 11th Heavy Artillery, on Saturday night, and the importance of that service was fully manifest before morning. Four desertions occurred during the night, and two other men were detected and placed under arrest while making the attempt. In a third instance, a sentry fired his musket at an "artful dodger," but without effect.
The muster-in took place yesterday P. M. One company, to the number of sixty-five, declined to take the oath until they should receive the promised bounty. They however yielded, after considerable persuasion—with the exception of seven, who were hand cuffed and placed in the guard house. There were many visitors to the camp during the day, composed mostly of the friends of the enlisted men. At the time the mutiny above referred to occurred, the civilians were ordered off the grounds, and not subsequently admitted.
About one hundred men of the 54th remained on duty last night. It was thought the regiment would depart this forenoon, but the time had not been definitely fixed.

Affairs at Camp Sprague—Col. Barnes' Regiment Nearly Full.
It is worth one's while to take a stroll into any military camp where the organization of a regiment is in progress. We availed ourselves of such an opportunity last week, and were truly surprised at the changed appearance of affairs from the time the regiment first went into camp at that place. The grounds are kept in excellent condition, and the quarters for the soldiers extend the whole length of the southern side of the grounds. Each apartment contains two cots—two for each cot. They are frequently inspected, and the occupants take especial pride in the neat appearance of the quarters.
There are two large mess halls, with sitting room combined, for 1,500 men. The rationing of the men is in charge of what better man than O. S. Hulburt? An inspection of his kitchen is well worth the trouble of a walk to camp. The cooking is entirely done by steam. The bill of fare for the men excels in variety that of any camp provider in the United States.
Hulburt has an oven in which he can bake, in a few minutes, beans for 1000 men. The meats and soups are excellent. In the morning beefsteak is served, together with coffee equal to Norris' best. The refreshment department is under the charge of J. R. Gaskill and ex-policeman Lyman Johnson, and is well managed.
A view of the Quartermaster's department convinces one immediately that that important branch of the recruiting service is in good hands. Quartermaster Eagan has been fortunate in the receipt of clothing of the very best quality and material, and the comfort and appearance of the men is greatly enhanced thereby.—They have in addition to their other clothing an extra quality rubber blanket.
In the hospital there are but five sick, and but one of them confined to his bed. This speaks well for the regulation of the men, and the scrupulous neatness of the camp.
Evening parade takes place every afternoon at 5 P. M. Religious services are observed at the camp on Sunday.
Col. Barnes is entitled one of the most successful recruiting officers in the State, and has recruited more men for this war than any other man in said state. He commenced at the outbreak of the rebellion, and recruited at first a company for the Sixth Cavalry. He afterwards raised two companies for the 4th Heavy Artillery, and was stationed, at Fort Ethan Allen, where he remained until the beginning of the present year, when he was called upon to raise the 11th Heavy Artillery Regiment. Although without the assistance of any field or staff officers, excepting the Adjutant (Hatch,) he has carried alone the burden of raising the men; sustaining discipline at the camp, and in fact acted as Colonel, field and staff. How well he has managed needs no comment at our hands. It is sufficient to say that he has the men; they are well clothed, and fed and in camp. Not a few have deserted, but they are gradually restored and all the while recruiting goes on. Yesterday fifty men where mustered into the regiment, recruited since Sunday. Before the present week, for a month or more the average was 100 men per week.

GOODWIN'S BATTERY.—Capt. GOODWIN is recruiting in this city for a Battery to be attached to the 11th Artillery. His company is nearly half full, and he hopes, in the course of a few weeks, to be in position to take the field.
His guns—his own invention—have been warmly approved by leading artillery officers and accepted by the Government. They are breech-loaders, and are claimed to have the widest range of any in the world. They have projected a ball the enormous distance of six miles and can be fired at the rate of fifteen times a minute. Capt. G. assures us that they can be fired fifteen hundred rounds without cleaning or swabbing.
Capt. Goodwin is an officer of high character and large experience in the science of gunnery, and his Battery is destined to make its mark.

RECRUITS FROM BUFFALO.--First Lieut. H. E. Richmond arrived on Thursday night with a squad of men enlisted at No. 158 Main street, Buffalo, for Capt. Church's company, Eleventh Heavy Artillery.
They are fine looking body of men, better than Buffalo usually sends out.—Roch. Dem.
That's so as far as Rochester is concerned. The people from here who visit that city are for the most part robbers and gamblers who find there a congenial home. Few of our respectable citizens dare to pay more than a railroad visit to Murderville. Our gallant volunteers dread a sojourn there more than they do the rebel hordes of Jeff. Davis.

ANOTHER VICTIM OF THE WAR.—William Van Gaasbeek a member of the Eleventh Artillery (Havelock Battery) died on Morris Island, near New York, yesterday morning. On the 12th inst. he was wounded in the arm by a Rebel sharpshooter, and afterwards suffered amputation of the limb at the shoulder blade. Although he received every attention, his physician could not rally him, and he sank steadily and calmly into the slumbers of death. He was a young man possessed of many social and agreeable qualities, and beloved by his comrades. He was a brave and accomplished soldier, and, enlisted in the defence of his country with mingled feelings of patriotism and justice. His death will cast a gloom over a large circle of relatives and friends in this city, by whom he was loved and beloved.

11th Heavy Artillery.
We are pleased to learn that Lieut. H. C. Furniss is doing well in recruiting men. He has already recruited some sixteen men, and has been to work about three weeks. He is an industrious goahead young man, and has a good military education. He has passed an examination as to his capability for an officer, and gave good satisfaction. Young men could not do better than to call upon the Lieut. and see him before going abroad to enlist. This will be a fine regiment, and will not go out of the State. The Lieut. has an official notice that the regiment will be raised to garrison the forts in New York Harbor.—

The Examination of Conscripts.
The following is a schedule of the work of the Board of Enrollment from the commencement up to noon to-day:
Number examined.........................................81
Accepted.........................................................33
Rejected,.........................................................48
Substitutes accepted,.....................................14
Substitutes rejected,....................................... 7

The substitutes who have been accepted and mustered in, it is expected, will go to Elmira to-night, accompanied by a guard of the 11th Heavy Artillery, under command of Lieut. Foote.

ELEVENTH ARTILLERY.—It is announced on reliable authority, that the line officers of the Eleventh Artillery will be allowed to retain their commissions and go with their companies into another regiment. The Field Officers of this regiment have been dismissed, as stated the other day.
This will be gratifying to the friends of the young men in the regiment who have labored so industriously to get up companies to go into the service. The order given to dismiss them was regarded as harsh, and a reconsideration of the matter has induced the War Department to revoke so much as relates to them.

*** Lieut. BELLOWS is still in town obtaining Recruits for the 11th Heavy Artillery. Office under Concert Block.

RECRUITS ROM BUFFALO.--First Lieut. H. E. Richmond arrived on Thursday night with a squad of men enlists 1 at No. 158 Main street, Buffalo, for Capt. Church's company, Eleventh Heavy Artillery. They are a fine looking body of men, better than Buffalo usually sends out.
Rochester Democrat.

CARD FROM COL. BARNES.—The following card has been sent us for publication by Col. Barnes, of the 11th Artillery:
ROCHESTER, N. Y., June 25.
EDITORS DEMOCRAT:—Will you allow me through the medium of your valuable paper, to acknowledge my great indebtedness to the officers and members of the 54th New York Militia, for their late services at Camp Sprague. Owing to unavoidable delays, the departure of the 11th Heavy Artillery was deferred several days, to the great inconvenience of the regiment detailed for guard duty at the Camp. A just sense of the valuable services rendered will not allow me to leave Rochester without returning my sincere thanks for the same.
Respectfully yours,
W. B. BARNES, Colonel Com'g
11th N. Y. Heavy Artillery.

DESERTER ARRESTED.—Saturday morning, a man named James G. Davy, a deserter from the 11th N. Y. heavy artillery, was arrested on the steamer in our harbor, just before her departure down the lake. Lieut. M. J. Ellerbeck recognized the man, and upon enquiring his destination was told he was going to visit his friends in the North Woods, somewhere in the vicinity of Watertown. He had no furlough. An inspection of his steamboat ticket was demanded, when Davy made an attempt to swallow it. He was prevented from accomplishing this, and the ticket was secured. It was for Kingston, C. W., and was purchased at Charlotte. He was immediately placed in the hands of Provost Marshal Scott, who sent him to jail to await disposition.

*** Capt. H. Z. WELLS has opened a Recruiting office under Concert Block, for the 11th N.Y. Heavy Artillery. Call and see him, all who wish to Volunteer and avoid the draft.

The Frauds in the Eleventh Artillery.
The frauds in an artillery regiment, alluded to in yesterday's News, were committed in the Eleventh Regiment, New York Volunteer Artillery, and positive orders have been received by the officials here, from the War Department, to dishonorably discharge from the service all the officers of the regiment, and transfer the men to the Tenth New York Volunteer Artillery. The regiment was mustered into the United States service in June last, and the men having mutinied in Pennsylvania, were returned to Fort Hamilton, where they now are.—[New York News, Saturday.
The above does injustice to the men of the Eleventh Artillery. They were not returned to Fort Hamilton for having mutinied, for they had not been to that Fort or any other. The men were enlisted in this city and vicinity to go into Fort Hamilton and other forts of New York Harbor. They were sent to Harrisburg during the late rebel raid in that vicinity, and so far as we can learn, did their duty. The danger there being over they were sent to their original destination.
As to the dishonorable discharge of the officers of the regiment, it is true—as stated in this paper on Saturday—that such an order went from the War Office. On Saturday evening we were informed that Gov. Seymour had requested the War Department to suspend the order till there could be an investigation, and the request has been complied with.

DON'T SEE IT, OR WILL NOT.--The Democrat goes over a great deal of useless ground in reference to the ward of Jeff Davis, Capt. Merrill, and the officers of the 11th Artillery, and does not answer the question put. It is simply: If Stanton can dismiss the officers from an entire regiment from New York State, can he not dismiss a single one of another regiment, even though that one be a ward of Jeff Davis? If he does not dismiss him when he has the power then he is responsible for his remaining in the service.
Our cotemporary is ready to make Governor Seymour responsible for the action of the War Department at Washington, when by so doing, it can make him appear in a bad light before his readers. In alluding to the draft in this district, the Democrat says: "If Governor Seymour will give due credit for the number of enlistments claimed, Rochester will not have to furnish a man."
Now, in the name of all the gods at once, we ask what has Governor Seymour to do with giving this credit? If he has anything to do with it, we'll engage that Rochester will have credit for every man that she can show that she has furnished to the Federal army.

Goodwin's Battery.--Capt. Goodwin is recruiting in this city for a Battery to be attached to the 11th Artillery. His company is nearly half full, and he hopes, in the course of a few weeks, to be in position to take the field. His guns—his own invention—have been warmly approved by leading artillery officers and accepted by the Government. They are breech-loaders, and are claimed to have the widest range of any in the world. They have projected a ball the enormous distance of six miles, and can be fired at the rate of fifteen times a minute. Capt. G. assures us that they can be fired fifteen hundred rounds without cleaning or swabbing. Capt. Goodwin is an officer of high character and large experience in the science of gunnery, and his Battery is destined to make its mark.

THE ELEVENTH ARTILLERY.—An order has been received here to cease recruiting for the 11th Heavy Artillery, and we suppose the quarters of the several companies will at once be closed, and men here will be sent forward to Harrisburg.

TROUBLE AMONG THE VOLUNTEERS AT ROCHESTER—ONE OF THEM KILLED.—The Volunteer shot at the camp at Rochester when attempting to run the guard, died during the night. The shooting produced intense excitement, and an additional militia force—artillery and cavalry—was sent to the camp. The Volunteers attempted to burn the barracks, but were overpowered, without much difficulty. The Volunteer shot was one of sixteen boys from the House of Refuge. The guard who inflicted the wound, fled as soon as he fired and could not afterwards be found.

PRESENTATION TO LIEUT. KELLY.—Lieut. Howard J. Kelly, of the 11th Artillery, who has lately left this office to join the army, was this day the recipient of an elegant sword, sash and belt presented him by his friends in this office. At twelve o'clock the proprietors and employees gathered at the counting room and the presentation took place--Lieut. K. having been summoned to be present. The address was made by G. G. Cooper, who said:
LT. KELLY: You see before you the proprietors and employes of the Daily Union and Advertiser office who have assembled to give you a token of their respect and confidence, as well as of their approval of your purpose to enter the service of your country at this time when she needs the support of every loyal heart and strong arm. They regret that pleasant associations should be severed, but love of country and the cause of the Union outweighs all personal considerations, and they bid you go where duty and love of the cause of American liberty invites every brave and gallant young man. But you must not go, my young friend, without bearing with you the prayers for your success of friends at home, and this sword—the gift of ?your associates of the Union & Advertiser, Take it then as a memento of friendship, and use it as an emblem of authority wherever duty calls you, never faltering in the sacred cause in which you have engaged, and never doubting that you carry with you the fullest confidence of those friends on whose behalf I present it.
Lieut. Kelly accepted the offering, and said in response:
MY FRIENDS OF THE UNION AND ADVERTISER:
I feel that I am scarcely able to do more now than thank you, as I do most gratefully for this testimonial of your confidence and good will. It shall be my aim and purpose to do nothing while in the service which may cause you to regret that you have given me this elegant sword. I say again I thank you.
The sword was purchased at Stillwell's, and is inscribed as follows:
To Lieut. Howard L. Kelly, from his friends in the Union and Advertiser Office. Rochester, June 20th, 1863.
Lieut. Kelly is a young man, yet in his minority, but he has entered the army with an ambition and purpose to succeed, as we have no doubt he will. He is in Capt. Gould's company of the 11th.

CAPT. MERRILL DISMISSED.—The telegraph last night brought a list of officers dismissed from the service. Among them we notice the name of Capt. H. P. Merrill of the 11th Artillery, who is charged with uttering treasonable sentiments.
We know Capt. Merrill very well, and know that a more loyal man to the cause of the Union does not remain in the army. He is a Democrat in politics and does not go the abolition programme. He rendered himself obnoxious to some members of the secret Union League of this city, by speaking as Democrats everywhere speak. They sought to crush him, and have succeeded in depriving him of his commission. They can manufacture testimony to order by the means of agents, whom they have constantly employed, and can get any man removed who may become obnoxious to them personally or as a partisan. Capt. Merrill has been an active and efficient recruiting officer, and his removal will be no disgrace to him here where he is known and where the agencies brought to bear to produce this result are understood.
No man of Democratic politics or Democratic antecedents now serving in the regiments from this locality can depend upon holding his commission one hour unless he has made friends with the grand cabal in our midst known as the Union League—those midnight plotters who boast what they can accomplish as a body and not be known as individuals. Every officer from this locality holds his commission at their pleasure, and some of them are silly enough to boast of the power of the League.
While a true Union man like Captain Merrill is deprived of his commission a Ward of Jeff. Davis, who owes that man more than any other living in gratitude, is held in a responsible military position through the influence of relatives who are prominent Republicans. This is a fact well known to our citizens. It is no disgrace to be dismissed from the army now. Mind that, fellow citizens, when you read of the dismissal of men from the service. It is partizan, and what is worse, personal malice, that controls such action in many cases, perhaps all.

ELEVENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—Col. Barnes arrived here from New York this morning. He reports his command, the 11th Artillery, in good condition in the several forts of New York harbor, where they are expected to remain. After going to Harrisburg the men readily engaged in the work of defending the place and worked in the trenches. Just before leaving Harrisburg the bounty was paid to the men.
After going to New York, when the riots occurred, Col. Barnes tendered his services to General Wool, who directed him to pick a company of old soldiers from the regiment, arm them as infantry and go to the city. Col. B. took sixty men of the right sort and led them into the infected districts. He had three engagements with the mob, and did not lose a man. The company was highly complimented for its behavior in the city.
Col. Barnes says the men of his command are now feeling very well and contented. He hopes to have orders to fill up his regiment soon.

THE 11TH ARTILLERY.—This regiment having had some 6 or 700 men mustered into service, were to have left Rochester, to-day, for Harrisburg. Yesterday, there was quite a disturbance in camp. The men were dissatisfied by an order to go to Pennsylvania to serve as Infantry, when they had been enlisted to go into forts as heavy artillery. Desertions were frequent, and it became necessary to procure a guard outside of the regiment. A soldier, at noon, undertook to run the guard, and was fired upon by one of the 54th. The man was wounded in his limbs, and died soon after.—This act of firing upon the man was resented by a considerable number of the men of the 11th, and a riot ensued. The men of the 54th rallied to protect the guard who fired, and the soldiers of the 11th threatened to seize and hang him. So matters stood when messengers were sent to the city for help. A detachment of one hundred men of the 54th went up to the grounds, and the riot was squelched without further loss of life. When the men reach the borders of Pennsylvania, they will then have an excellent opportunity to ventilate their bloody proclivities.

THE ELEVENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—The correspondents of the New York papers notice the arrival at Harrisburg of the 11th Artillery, Col. Barnes. We learn indirectly that the regiment expect to be engaged in the coming battle near that city. The Elmira papers notice the passage through that village of the regiment with cannon and caissons. All right, with the exception of cannon and caissons. They were to be supplied with them on their arrival at Harrisburg.

UNFORTUNATE RECRUITS.— Yesterday Col. Marshall mustered out about 170 recruits that had been enlisted in the 11th Heavy Artillery Regiment, and were rejected for various reasons. Transportation was refused them to their homes, and many of them are here in destitute circumstances. About thirty of them, who had money, took the train last evening for the East. The balance are wandering about town. Several of these men were recruited in New York city, some at Syracuse, a few at Lewiston, Niagara Falls and other places.
The nine men who refused to leave with the Regiment on account of the non-payment of their bounties, will be sent forward to rejoin their companies, by Col. Marshall, to-day.

From the 11th Heavy Artillery.
The following is the first intelligence we have received from the 11th artillery since its departure on Wednesday night last. It is a brief note from Lieut. Kelley to his father:
HARRISBURG, Pa., June 26, 1863.
DEAR FATHER: We are here all safe, arrived at 11 o'clock last night. It has rained all the time since I arrived. Business is almost suspended, the stores are all closing and martial law is to be proclaimed to-day. We expect marching orders to cross the river to-day.
Yours, H.

The 11th Heavy Artillery in Pennsylvania.
The Harrisburg correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer speaks as follows of the "difficulty that occurred between the 11m heavy Artillery and the authorities":
It seems that numerous complaints against the men of this regiment and other regiments from New York were entered by the farmers at Bridgeport and vicinity for robbing and pillaging. In one instance the door of a farmer's house was broken into, and everything of value either taken or destroyed. Chickens and pigs were confiscated in every direction. At this conduct the residents of the valley have become very indignant, and high words on both sides has been the consequence. Yesterday, the Eleventh Regiment was drawn up in line and informed by the Colonel, Wm. B. Barnes, that the Governor had requested them to advance to the front, acting temporarily as an infantry regiment, the muskets having been provided for them. At this intelligence the men became highly indignant, passing no very complimentary remarks and phrases in regard to the disposition to be made of them. They broke ranks and positively refused to advance. The regiment was then ordered to New York city, to report to Gen. Wool, and left last night over the Reading and Allentown route. No reason can be assigned for their unaccountable action except, perhaps, in the excuse their apologists offer, that they arrived here to defend the State of Pennsylvania from invasion; that they were treated with ingratitude by the citizens of Harrisburg and vicinity; that they were charged exorbitant prices for every necessary of life, and in addition, were abused.
The experience with the 11th artillery should serve as a warning against future deception in recruiting men. The insubordination of that regiment did not arise directly from the fact that it was sent to "defend the State of Pennsylvania from invasion," but from the promises made its members that they were to be employed exclusively in garrisoning forts and upon no other duty.

The 11th Heavy Artillery.
It will be seen by the following paragraph from a Harrisburg letter to the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated July 10th, that the 11th Heavy Artillery, is not obtaining much credit by its conduct in Pennsylvania. The same lack of discipline which was noticed while the command was in camp here, has characterized the conduct of the men since, if we may credit this correspondent's statement. We had hoped that the officers would learn a lesson from the occurrences which took place at home just before the regiment left, but fear that they did not.
Some difficulty has occurred between the members of the 11th regiment New York Heavy Artillery and the authorities here. It seems that numerous complaints against the men of this regiment and other regiments from New York, were entered by the farmers at Bridgeport and vicinity, for robbing and pillaging. In one instance the door of a farmer's house was broken into, and everything of value either taken or destroyed. Chickens and pigs were confiscated in every direction. At this conduct the residents of the Valley have become very indignant and high words on both sides has been the consequence. Yesterday the 11th regiment was drawn up in line and informed by Col. Barnes that the Governor had requested them to advance to the front, acting temporarily as an infantry regiment, the muskets having been provided for them. At this intelligence the men became highly indignant, passing no very complimentary remarks and phrases in regard to the disposition to be made of them. They broke ranks and positively refused to advance. The regiment was then ordered to New York city, to report to General Wool, and left last night over the Reading and Allentown route.
No reason can be assigned for their unaccountable action, except perhaps, in the excuse their apologists offer, that they arrived here to defend the State of Pennsylvania from invasion; that they were treated with ingratitude by the citizens of Harrisburg and vicinity; that they were charged exorbitant prices for every necessary of life, and in addition, were abused by numerous "Copperheads."
Further of crimination and recrimination I have no desire to write.
One serious mistake was made in recruiting these men. They should have been informed that though enlisted as artillerists they were liable, if the exigencies of the service demanded it, to be employed in the field as infantry. Many of them imagined that they could be required to do nothing but go into garrison to defend fortifications.

DAILY UNION & ADVERTISER
MONDAY EVENING, JUNE 22, 1863.
LOCAL MATTERS.
Trouble in the Camp of the 11th Artillery—Man Shot by the Guard--
Assistance Called For!
About noon to-day messages came to the city from the Camp of the 11th Artillery, three miles out, stating that a serious disturbance had taken place at the Camp, and that assistance was required to restore order. Not having time to send a reporter to get the facts in season for this issue, we give the current report in town as to the situation of affairs at the Camp, hoping that it is not so bad as stated.
For some days and nights past a detachment of the 54th Regiment N. Y. N. G. has been doling guard duty at this camp to prevent desertions. The men were dissatisfied by an order to go to Pennsylvania to serve as infantry, when they had been enlisted to go into forts as heavy artillery. Desertions were frequent, and it became necessary to procure a guard outside of the regiment. About one hundred of the 54th were on duty as guard this morning, pursuant to an order from the Adjutant General at Albany.
A soldier undertook to run the guard at the lower gate this forenoon and was fired upon by one of the 54th—a member of a German Company. The man was wounded in his limbs, but not dangerously. This act of firing upon the man was resented by a considerable number of the men of the 11th, and a riot ensued. The men of the 54th rallied to protect the guard who fired, and the soldiers of the 11th threatened to seize and hang him. So matters stood when messengers were sent to the city for help. A detachment of one hundred men of the 54th has gone up to the grounds, and it is hoped that they will restore order without bloodshed.
On Saturday night a number of soldiers escaped from camp notwithstanding the vigilance of the guard. Some were fired upon without effect. Others were caught and locked up.
Col. Marshall mustered the men in the afternoon— in all between six and seven hundred. One company of sixty or more refused to take the oath till their bounty money had all been paid. This could not be done. After considerable parleying the most of the men assented to take the oath and a few who stood out were put in irons, to reflect upon it There were lots of visitors at the camp to witness the muster and it was thought that their presence did not help to allay the ill feeling which was apparent. So the Colonel ordered all visitors to leave the grounds, and they did so.
It is now said that, this regiment will leave for Harrisburg by the Southern Road at ten tomorrow forenoon. It is quite time it was on the road if it is to go at all. We presume that the men will find things more pleasant after they get away, and their objections to rendering Uncle Sam and Gov. Curtin a little temporary service as infantrymen, will be overcome when they reach the scene of operations. The regiment contains many excellent men for the service, and it is a pity that any misunderstandings should arise to impair their usefulness to the country.

Trouble at Camp Sprague.
Some disturbance, which looked quite serious at first, took place at Camp Sprague this morning. A portion of the 54th regiment, National Guard, has been on duty at the camp, as patrol. They have had orders to be strict in preventing the recruits from evading the guard, and allowed no one to get out of the lines without the pass.
This morning, one of the men started to run past the guard, and when ordered to halt, paid no attention to it. The guard fired at him, the shot passing through his wrist. This summary process of bringing the man to a halt aroused the anger of the recruits, and they rushed upon the guard, disarmed, and threatened to hang him. Col. Barnes was immediately summoned, and an order was issued for the Grays and Dragoons to repair to the Camp. Up to this writing, we have not learned further particulars.
The prompt measures adopted will prevent any further violence. There has been some dissatisfaction among the men, arising from consolidation of companies and consequent change of officer, which gives more consequence to an outbreak of this kind; but good sense and proper discipline will in the end prevail, without doubt.

Departure of the 11th Heavy Artillery.
We learn from Col. Barnes that the time of the departure of his Artillery Regiment is now definitely fixed at Sunday noon. The Regiment will leave via the New York & Erie Railway for the South. The cars for the troops are already here. Col. Barnes returned from Albany last evening, whither he had been to make his final arrangements before the departure of the Regiment. All the necessary arms will be furnished at Harrisburg.
Col. Barnes will take with him five companies of one hundred and forty-two men each, and will leave officers from each company to recruit for the purpose of filling up the Regiment to the maximum number. The Union Blues will escort the Regiment to the depot.
Last evening a portion of the 54th Regiment collected at the Armory to go to camp to act as guard, when, we are informed, Major Thompson ordered the men to disperse. We are not advised as to the reasons actuating Major T. in giving this order. Upon learning the facts in the case, Col. Barnes immediately telegraphed to Gov. Seymour, stating that the 54th had disobeyed his order, and asking for instructions.—
Up to 11 o'clock he had received no reply. The prospect is that a few of the men will make their escape.

The 11th Artillery to go To-Morrow.
The "mustering-in" of the 11th Heavy Artillery having been completed, Col. Barnes will depart with his men for Harrisburg tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock, via Genesee Valley Railroad. The mustering officer has thrown out quite a number of the recruits, on account of their youth or physical imperfection, and the regiment is thereby reduced to four companies. These are stout, capable men, who will make good soldiers; and are more numerous than many veteran regiments which have been decimated by the casualties of camp and battle-field. Among them are some members of returned regiments, and others who have served and been discharged on account of sickness or for other reasons.
Col. Barnes was fast filling up his regiment, and would soon have had a thousand men enrolled, had not the order came to report with what he already had to Gen. Couch. The exigency of the service requires a change of the original design in raising this force, and gives a different destination to the regiment, for the present. But being brave and loyal men, they will be ready to perform their duty in whatever position they may be placed. Whatever disappointment may have been occasioned by the new aspect of affairs in the field, it will not change the nature of these soldiers, who have enlisted to fight the battles of their country.—
The Government will fulfil all its promises, and give them all the advantages of its most favored troops.
Col. Barnes will march his regiment to the city, and take the cars from the depot on Exchange street, so that citizens may have an opportunity to see the men and cheer them on their way to the scene of danger and the fields where honor is to be won.

The Departure of the 11th Heavy Artillery--They will not Leave before To-Morrow Night.
The news of the departure of the 11th Heavy Artillery Regiment created quite a little stir at camp, but the majority of the regiment were rejoiced at the prospect of being relieved of the tedium of camp life. Companies B and D of the 54th N. G., performed guard duty at the camp last night, but their services were not needed as far any attempts to escape were concerned.
Col. Marshal commences the mustering-in today, and it is thought that this business will occupy a portion of the day to-morrow.
All the trains arriving in the city this morning contained members of the regiment who had been home on furlough and were returning to camp. There are now over 750 men at camp, and before night this number will be swelled by at least one hundred.

ELEVENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—This regiment, recruited here under Col. Barnes, has had considerable difficulty and there has been doubt as to what disposition would be made of officers and men. We are now able to give something definite as to the regiment. It has been united with the 4th Heavy Artillery and has become the 3d battalion in the consolidated regiment. It is now in Fort Ethan Allen, one of the defences of Washington, on the south side of the Potomac.
The line officers of the 11th were cited before the examining board under an order from the War Department directing that such as were not sufficiently posted in the drill, &c., be honorably dismissed. The result of the examination was that all the officers but three passed succesfully in the following order: Capt. Church, Lieut. Hatch, Lieut. Kelly, Lieut. Dexter, Lieut. Lillie, Lieut. Richmond, Lieut. Brown, 2nd Lieut. A. J. Smith.
The rejected were Capt. Gould, Lieut. Dewey, Lieut. Curtis.

Our Army Correspondence.
To the Editor of the Evening Telegraph:
FORT HAMILTON, Friday July 16, 1863.
Who has not heard of the 11th New York Heavy Artillery? No one, we presume. About this locality their renown is wide-spread and imperishable; and wherever their feet have touched, they have left "their mark." Their name and exploits will not soon be forgotten by the denizens of any city, place or town, through which they have passed or in which they have halted. We perceive that some of the leading journals in Pennsylvania and New York are "down" upon them rather strong, and more than one press has given them a wipe in no very gentle or measured terms. Their notoriety undeniable—that point is clear. It is equally clear that the reputation they have acquired is not an enviable one—indeed it is something similar to that attached to Satan in Milton's immortal epic. Being in a situation that qualifies us to speak advisedly concerning the regiment, its organization, destination and discipline, and being also interested in having justice shown them and truth vindicated, we shall devote a very brief space in the columns of the TELEGRAPH to this subject, trusting that the few words that we have to say will not prove wholly indifferent to your readers.
The 11th, as is pretty well known, had its inception at Rochester, and, as its name indicates, was organized for the exclusive purpose of doing Artillery duty. Under this express understanding enlistments were made. Although it had its headquarters at Rochester, by far the greater portion of its members were volunteers from other parts of the State—New York, Albany, Oswego, Syracuse, Elmira, &c. It cannot be disputed that among its members are some most hardened cases—ruffians and scoundrels, in the fullest sense and spirit of those words. But, whether or not it has more than its fair average of such worthless characters, may well be doubted. Be that as it may, it is certain that these "black sheep" of the dock have committed such excesses and evinced such shameless and disorderly conduct, that it has, as a natural consequence, covered whole regiment with unmerited reproach dishonor. yet the main part of the 11th, is composed of orderly, peaceable and intelligent men, and we venture to say that in no regiment can there be found better soldiers. But, like Tray, they have the misfortune to be caught in bad company; and like the posterity of Adam and Eve, to whom sin is imputed for the transgression of our first father and mother, they suffer for the crimes of their comrades, and, innocent themselves, are confounded with guilty.
Having the assurance of Gen. Wool, they should be permanently stationed in some of the forts or about New York Harbor, and as Pennsylvania was then in imminent peril through the recent rebel raid therein, and was imploring assistance from all quarters, the 11th volunteered to proceed to Harrisburg to aid our sister State, and whilst there assisted citizens in digging entrenchments, erecting barricades, felling trees, &c, &c.
Within a day or two, came orders for them to move to Carlisle, about 18 miles westwardly from Harrisburg. As now, it was perfectly plain to dullest comprehension, that it the design, at headquarters, to convert into Infantry, and that if this order was obeyed, the next might send them to Virginia, or even North Carolina, as infantry, the men unanimously refused to move, on sole ground that they were artillery would not act as infantry. And in this determination they were sustained by their own officers, after due consultation. And a just tribute praise should be awarded to those officers, who are gentlemen every sense; for from the beginning, used their utmost exertions to build up, improve sustain regiment discipline and reputation. After remaining at Harrisburg some days, we were ordered this place, Fort Hamilton, situated on the Sound, and about 9 miles ... ful and commodiou... tion is uncertain. New York in consequence ...
the regiment has been sent to Sandy Hook, part to Fort Richmond and part to the city—and at present there are but a very few of the 11th in this garrison.
As we said before the conduct of some portion of the 11th has been most disgraceful and we are all experiencing its evil effects—but let us remember the Latin maxim:
" Fiat justitia ruat, coelum."
" Let justice be done tho' the heavens fall."
We trust the community, will not look upon us as totally depraved, nor that they will bestow upon us any ungrateful condemnation, because we are so unlucky as to be associated with individuals who have thus far shown themselves unworthy of the name of soldiers—and unfit to be entrusted with the protection and defence of our country and our Union.

ACCIDENT IN THE 11TH ARTILLERY.—A serious accident occurred on Thursday last in the 11th Heavy Artillery, which went from this city to Fort Hamilton, New York harbor, the particulars of which are sent us by a correspondent there.
Capt. Goodwin went out upon the shore of the island to practice with his guns--twelve pound breech loading pieces—preparatory to the arrival of Gen. Dix to inspect the guns. He fired solid shot for some time and then began to fire blank cartridges and was trying an experiment at rapid filing. He put in a cartridge at the breech before another had fairly left the muzzle, and it ignited, the whole charge blowing out at the breech. The face and right shoulder of Capt. Goodwin were badly burned. The copper plug was driven through the hand of Richard Fitzgerald, shattering it badly, and it passed between the legs of Lt. Ferris, who was sitting upon a fence near by.
The two injured men were taken to the hospital. Fitzgerald suffered the amputation of his arm at the shoulder. Capt. Goodwin's wounds were dressed, but it was difficult to determine what the result would be, but it is probable that he will lose the sight of his right eye.

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