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1st Artillery Regiment (Light)
Battery L
George Breck columns
Chapter I
Table of Contents
Transcribed and donated by bob Marcotte

II. Introduction, Page 1

III. Editor’s note, Page 8

IV. “Who wouldn’t be a soldier?”
Elmira and Albany, Oct. 25, 1861 – Nov. 21, 1861, Page 9

V. “Mud, mud, mud”
Encamped at Washington, Jan. 25, 1862 – Feb. 24, 1862, Page 23

VI. “Too good to be True”
Interlude at Baltimore, Feb. 26, 1862 – May 25, 1862, Page 41

VII. "Soldiering in good earnest
Into the Shenandoah, May 27, 1862 – June 25, 1862, Page 91

VIII. "Under the new arrangement”
The Army of Virginia, June 30, 1862 – July 30, 1862, Page 117

IX. "Roughing it now as never before”
Battle at Cedar Mountain, Aug. 10, 1862 – Aug. 13, 1862, Page 141

X. "A battle of blunders”
Second Bull Run, Aug. 20, 1862 – Sept. 4, 1862, Page 151

XI. "The roar of artillery shook the earth”
Antietam, Sept. 10, 1862 – Sept. 22, 1862, Page 175

XII. “Why are we lying still so long”
Too quiet along the Potomac, Sept. 29, 1862 – Nov. 4, 1862, Page 198

XIII. “A sad sorrowful day”
McClellan is relieved of command, Nov. 11, 1862, Page 222

XIV. "What a sacrifice of human life is this!”
Fredericksburg, Nov. 20, 1862 – Dec. 18, 1862, Page 226

XV. "The soldiers fail to see”
Musings on emancipation, Dec. 30, 1862 – Jan. 22, 1863, Page 247

XVI. "Mortifying, isn’t it?"
The Mud March, Jan. 24, 1863, Page 260

XVII. “Keep trying men until the right one is found”
Hooker takes command, Jan. 30, 1863 – April 24, 1863, Page 266

XVIII. “They will cross the Rappahannock again and again.”
The Battle of Chancellorsville, April 29, 1863 — May 8, 1863, Page 305

XIX. “A willingness to tarry”
A break in the action, May 15, 1863 – June 10, 1863, Page 327

XX. “The most desperate and bloody battle….”
Gettysburg, June 15, 1863 – July 11, 1863 , Page 339

XXI. “An army of observation
All quiet on the Rappahannock, July 28, 1863 – Oct. 7, 1863, Page 358

XXII. “Expeditious marching
Bristoe Campaign, Oct. 15, 1863 – Nov. 13, 1863, Page 375

XXIII. “We bade goodbye to General Lee’s Army
Mine Run campaign, Nov. 25, 1863 – Dec. 4, 1863, Page 390

XXIV. “Every man is the architect of his own house
Winter quarters, Dec. 17, 1863 – March 16, 1864, Page 396

XXV.“They will stand by him through ‘thick and thin’”
Grant takes command, March 30, 1864 — May 1, 1864, Page 416

XXVI. “Such terrible fighting
Grant’s overland campaign, May 13, 1864 – June 22, 1864, Page 425

XXVII. “Tired of the war
Siege at Petersburg, June 29, 1864 – Sept. 12, 1864, Page 460

XXVIII. “Politics are running high
The presidential election, Oct. 5, 1864 – Nov. 16, 1864, Page 477

XXVIX. “The federal skies never looked so bright
Confederate death throes, Nov. 28, 1864 – Feb. 25, 1865, Page 488

XXX. “The rebellion is played out!
Lee surrenders, April 4, 1865 – April 27, 1865, Page 508

XXXI. “Never were marching orders hailed with greater delight
The last march, May 12, 1865 – June 8, 1865, Page 521

XXXII. Breck’s life after the war
Page 534

XXXIII. Appendix A
Battery L: Where it served, Page 536

XXXIV. Appendix B
Battery L’s battle reports, Page 538

XXXV. Appendix C
Breck’s address at Gettysburg, Page 548

XXXVI. Appendix D
Roster, Page 554

XXXVII. Appendix E
Palmyra and Battery L, Page 561

XXXVIII. Endnotes

XXXIX. Bibliography

XL. Index

 

The table of contents and index both reflect page numbers of the printed versions of Breck’s War. However, you can easily use both to check for references in the text-only version and then look them up.
If you are searching for references to Col. Samuel Alford, for example, the index shows he can be found on page 73. The table of contents indicates that page is part of section VI. By calling up that section, you can do a word search for Alford and find the reference.
By having Section XXXVIII (endnotes) up on your screen as you read other sections of the text, you can switch back and forth to check footnoted material.

 

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