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2nd Regiment Artillery (Heavy), NY Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

SECOND REGIMENT, NEW YORK ARTILLERY.
Absent Without Leave.
Martin Burke Corp. Jos Hamberger
Sergt. Laurence Breen Edward Jones
Henry Balous Frank Lally
William Balcomb Patrick Minnihan
Jacob Curry William Mulligan
George Dean John Moran
Henry Flood James McEvoy
William Gorman Frank Margraff
Powles Goold Martin McDonald
John Gillman C. D. Morrison
Michael Hopkins Alex. Shull
Samuel Hooper  

A private despatch from Washington states that Capt. GEO. S. DAWSON, of the Second Heavy Artillery, wounded in the recent engagements before Petersburg, has arrived at Seminary Hospital, Georgetown. The nature of his injuries is not stated.

CAPT. DAWSON, of the Second New York Artillery, a son of the editor of the Albany Journal, who was severely wounded at Petersburg, but who is convalescent, has received a commission as Major for gallant and meritorious service in the battles from the Wilderness to Petersburg.

Capt. Dawson.--Capt. Geo. S. DAWSON was, at last accounts, doing tolerably well. A note from his father informs us that he bears his sufferings with great fortitude, and that, although his case is critical, he continues plucky and hopeful.

CAPT. GEORGE DAWSON.—We regret to learn that Capt. George Dawson, who was wounded in the battle of 16th inst., before Petersburg, was compelled to suffer amputation. At last account he was doing well.

Capt. DAWSON'S PROMOTION.--A dispatch was put forth from Washington a few days ago to the effect that Capt. Dawson, son of "G. D." of the Albany Journal, had been promoted to Major for gallant and meritorious service in the battles from the Wilderness to Petersburg." The reader was left to infer that the promotion has been made by the federal authorities, and the fact that it was Gov. Seymour who advanced the young man was carefully suppressed.

Personal.—Capt. JOHN JONES, of the 2d artillery, who was wounded in the hand at Cold Harbor, and who has been home on leave, started yesterday for Petersburg, although seven days of his leave was unexpired. He has lost the use of the middle finger of his hand.

Second Heavy Artillery.—The following casualties occurred on the 15th, north of the James river: Nicholas Van Pelt, B, shoulder, flesh; Adam Cline, D, left hand; James F. Morrison; left foot; Thomas Dugan, knee, slightly; Alvin Peck, Left foot; Andrew Nolan, right shoulder; Francis Heney, finger.
Died in Hampton hospital, G. H. McNeil.

Lieut. Kenyon Missing.--A letter received from Arthur Estes, of the 2d heavy artillery, yesterday, states that Lieutenant Marcus Kenyon, of this city, is either killed or wounded, and in the hands of the rebels. We hope this report will prove as incorrect as was the impression which recently prevailed that he was killed in the battle of the Wilderness.—Observer, yesterday.

THE SECOND ARTILLERY.—The 2d N. Y. (Morgan) Artillery left their Washington camp to join GRANT'S army Saturday afternoon, in the midst of a severe rain storm, cheering in the heartiest manner. Capt. HULSER desires us to say to those having friends in the regiment, that their letters will not reach them for the present. The regiment is 1,900 strong.
Lieut. Gifford.--Mrs. Gifford, daughter of Rev. Dr. Bristol, of this city, has received letters from her husband of as late date as the 17th. So the statement of Mr. GEO. DAWSON'S letter, quoted by us yesterday, that the Lieutenant was killed on the 15th, is erroneous. The Herald this morning says that there is another Lieut. GIFFORD in the Second artillery.
This is a mistake. Mr. DAWSON undoubtedly referred to Lieut. W. P. GIFFORD, but he must have been misinformed as to his death.

Personal.—Capt. JOHN JONES, of the 2d artillery, who was wounded in the hand at Cold Harbor, and who has been home on leave, started yesterday for Petersburg, although seven days of his leave was unexpired. He has lost the use of the middle finger of his hand.
— Major REYNOLDS, of the 14th artillery, was at Rock House prison, Petersburg, on the 18th. He was to be removed to Andersonville, Georgia.

Second Heavy Artillery.—Among the wounded soldiers arrived at Washington, we find the names of the following members of the Morgan artillery:
Winfield M. Perry, of Utica; and Lovelace, (residence not stated) the latter badly wounded, also A. Vanbront, wounded in the shoulder.

Second Artillery.—Capts. GEO. KLINCK and JOHN JONES, of this city, are reported among the wounded.

RECRUITING.—A. Z. MCCARTY, Jr., will open a recruiting office immediately, in Pulaski, for the 2d New York Heavy Artillery. The organization is one of the best in the service, and volunteers will find it a desirable one to identify themselves with. Those proposing to join it should do so at once, as the government bounties diminish in a few days.

THE NATIONAL RANGERS.
This fine regiment now numbers about nine hundred men. They are under the command of Colonel John W. Latson. The men are and have been for a long time been quartered at the corner of Seventh avenue and Twenty-eighth street, at the expense of the Colonel and a few personal friends. Colonel Latson expects his regiment will be accepted by the United States government as soon as full, the number required being one thousand. Heretofore the regiment has been known as the National Union Rangers, but for reasons before stated the name was changed to the one they now bear.

RECRUITS WANTED.--Lieut. Niles wants 200 old recruits for the Seventh Artillery. We can recommend the Lieutenant to the public as entirely worthy of their confidence. The Lieutenant-Colonel of the Regiment is John Hustings,—one of the well-known brothers Hastings, of the Albany Knickerbocker. Several of the family are in the service, and we have the utmost confidence in recommending the Lieut.-Colonel to those desiring to enlist, as a gentleman and an officer. He belongs to the fighting officers and not to the political ones.

THE MORGAN LIGHT ARTILLERY.
This regiment will have a fete champetre and flag raising this afternoon at their camp, Elm Park, Staten Island. The boat will leave with the guests of the occasion from the foot of Cortlandt street at eleven A. M.

ARTILLERY ACCEPTED.
A regiment of Horse Artillery, offered by John W. Latson, for three years or the war, have been accepted by the War Department. Col. Latson reports that he will be ready to move forward by the first of next week. (July 27, 1861)

SECOND HEAVY ARTILLERY.--The following casualties occurred in this regiment during the fighting of the 15th:
Capt. J. C. Tellinghast, right leg; John Hanlin, knee fractured; Ed. Rearder, leg, flesh; J. Welch, left shoulder; Phil. Yokey, thigh, slightly; Thos. Jones, foot fractured; Lt. James Zoller, hip; Wm. Smizer, bowels penetrated; R. Wheelhouse, testicle; B. Shear, right arm and breast; N. Van Kirk, left shoulder, flesh; Erastus Brightman, face, severely; W. Konshaffeskey, shoulder, severely; H. Bloomer, right lung penetrated, mortal; J. S. Brown, right leg. flesh; T. J. Davis, left hip, flesh; A. J. Birdsall, right forearm, flesh; John Waffle, left arm, slightly; Sam. H. Miller, left leg, slightly; Reuben Alexander, right leg, fractured; Pat. Sweeney, left leg, flesh; Jas. Browne, little finger; A. McVey, left hip fractured; Lt Chas. Martin, leg fractured; Thomas Carlyle, knee fractured; John Dunn, both knees; Edward Passum, right ankle; Ed. B. Smith, left arm and side.

Second Heavy Artillery.-- A letter to the Evening Journal from its editor, Mr. Geo. Dawson, who is sojourning in Washington, makes the following allusion to the Second heavy artillery regiment, in which his son, who lost a limb at Cold Harbor, was Captain:
The losses of a regiment are not conclusive of its bravery. But when such losses occur from sturdy resistance to the enemy in the geld, the fact is always cited as complimentary. By applying this test to the Second New York artillery, that regiment appears to great advantage. On Monday last Captain Hooker and Lieut. Gifford were killed, and Capt. Tillinghast and Lieuts. Martin, Zolly, and Wheelhouse were wounded. These casualties make the aggregate of killed and wounded officers in this regiment twetp-one, including the Colonel, since its first fight in the Wilderness; and out of eighteen hundred men, less than four hundred are to-day under arms. And the record of this regiment is the record of a half dozen other artillery regiments taken from the defences last May. No "tight place" was found during the entire campaign into which "the Heavies" were not pushed. Their work, from first to last, has been to "charge."
When they took the field in May, every artillery regiment numbered, over seventeen hundred--the equal of many brigades; and just the material with which to charge. They were taken out to do that work, and no troops in the world ever did it better.

Second Heavy Artillery.--A letter from Valentine J. Down, of the Second artillery, to his parents in this city says, out of twelve Captains in that regiment, only one is left, and that "most all the men are killed or wounded." The following extract from Mr. DOWN'S letter compares favorably with an anonymous communication received at this office, purporting to come from a soldier in the 42d regiment, complaining of the army being deprived of rations, and stating that pork had only been issued twice since leaving the Rapidan.
We get good rations here; the best of pork, pickles, cabbage, cucumbers, beans, rice, sugar, coffee, hard tack, dried apples, and fresh meats almost every day.

FLUSHING LIGHT ARTILLERY.—This Company was at Crab Orchard, Ky., on the 29th of May. At that date the boys were all well. Capt. Roemer furnishes us with the following list of all who have died since the Battery left Flushing, Dec. 2d, 1861:
Sergt. Adam Worth, Sept. 25th, 1862.
Charles Weideman, Nov. 22, 1862.
Benjamin Covert, Nov. 26th, 1862.
Joseph Kiersted, Dec. 13th, 1862.
Jacob Friendle, Dec, 6th, 1862.
Peter Kimmler, Dec. 30th, 1862.
John Hodges, Jan. 5th, 1863.
Lewis Gilbert, March 30th, 1863.
The papers of the above named persons were sent to the Adjt.-General, and their relations or friends who wish to draw the pay and bounty which is due to them, should call upon Adjt.-Gen. Thomas, of the United States, or to the 2d Auditor of the U. S., to receive their pay, as none of them have drawn their bounty.

PERSONAL—Capt. E. P. Halsted, formerly of this city, who raised a battery for the 2d N. Y. Artillery, and was afterwards made Assistant Adjutant General on the staff of Maj. Gen. Doubleday, has just been appointed a member of the Board for the examination of candidates for commissions in the negro regiments. Gen. Case is president of the Board.—Utica Telegraph.
It was our fortune, while in the army to form the acquaintance of Capt. Halsted, being in Gen. Doubleday's Brigade. It is with great pleasure that we learn of his appointment upon this Board, for he is one of the most capable officers in the service, and one we most sincerely respect and love. He is everywhere the true gentleman, never disposed to avoid labor when duty demands it, and by his generosity and kindness makes all who know him friends. We hope he may receive promotion in the service as he so richly deserves it.

SECOND HEAVY ARTILLERY.—A Mistake.—The Telegraph publishes an extract from a letter written by Geo. Dawson of the Albany Journal, a portion of which we subjoin:
The losses regiment are not conclusive of its bravery. But when such losses occur from sturdy resistance to the enemy in the field, the fact is always cited as complimentary. By applying this test to the Second New York artillery, that regiment appears to great advantage. On Monday last, Captain Hooker and Lieut. Gifford were killed, and Capt. Tillinghast and Lieuts. Martin, Zolly, and Wheelhouse were wounded. These casualties make the aggregate of killed and wounded officers in this regiment twenty-one, including the Colonel, since its first fight in the wilderness; and out of eighteen hundred men, less than four hundred are to-day under arms.
The Telegraph concludes that the Lieut. Gifford reported killed is Wm. P. Gifford, son of Rev. Dr. D. W. Britol of this city. This is evidently a mistake, for the extract states that the casualties occurred on Monday, that is, on the 15th, whereas Dr. BRISTOL'S family have received a letter from Lieut. Wm. P. GIFFORD, dated at Deep Bottom on the 17th, two days later. At that time he was uninjured and in good health. There is another Lieut Gifford in the Seeond Artillery.

Deserters.
DETACHMENT 2D N. Y. Artillery.
DEFENCES SOUTH POTOMAC,
FORT DEKALB, Va., Oct. 12, 1863.
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:
In what better way (providing the Marshals do their duty) can I assist in reducing the Copperhead vote at home, at the coming election, than by publishing the following list of "deserters" from my company, who undoubtedly will, if permitted to remain at home, vote the Copperhead ticket. Besides, Uncle Samuel wants more help the coming Winter, down at the Rip Raps, a fine healthy place to work, where they can get in out of the draft. John Patterson, of Amboy Center, Oswego Co., John Warren, Amboy Center, Oswego county, James Whaley, West Amboy, Oswego county, Charles F. Kline, Utica, Oneida county, Samuel Denn, Little Falls, Herkimer county, John Mixter, Little Falls, Herkimer county, Thomas Smith, Little Falls, Herkimer county, Gustavus Cornish, Lee Center, Oneida county, Michael Schear, Russsia, Herkimer county, Jacob Heinheit, Utica, Oneida county, Lorenzo Lamphier, Utica, Oneida county, Henry Heild, Utica, Oneida county,
John Hufftill, Oppenheim, Herkimer county, George Secknor, Little Falls, Herkimer county, Henry E. Gardner, West Vienna, Oneida county, John Casey, Little Falls, Herkimer county, Barnard Wager, Canajoharie, Montgomery county, Daniel H. Wager, Canajoharie Montgomery county.
I certify that the above named persons are deserters from my company, and that each of them have been subsisted, clothed, and transported at the expense of the United States to the amount of at least thirty dollars; according to company books. Oscar F. HULSER,
Captain Com'dg Comp'y M., 2d N. Y. V. Artillery.
Herkimer County Journal please copy.

The Accident at Fort Lyon.
Though Fort Lyon is situated about two miles beyond Alexandria, the explosion was sensibly felt in that city, and was distinctly heard in Washington.
Eight thousand six-pound cartridges were exploded, beside a large amount of small ammunition. Several men were thrown a hundred yards from the Fort, and one two hundred yards into the air.
The following is a correct list of the killed and injured so far as known, all belonging to the 3d battalion of New York Artillery. They are shockingly mangled.
Killed--Lieut. Leo Kuhne; H. Hildebrand, D; C. Ritter, B; X. Hein, C; Corpl. Entemann, E; Kuhn, E; Chas. Shield, C; Kunze E. Dillman, C; Chas. Wendt, A; Ord. Lieut. Fred Leber, B; 1st Sergt, J. King, A; V. Emerich, E; A. Moritz, A; Sergt. E. Thiel, C; Biewald, D; J. Jones, A; F. Lutz, A; ____ Wetteral, D; ____ Friedrichs, B.
Injured--Corp. Messenger, E, severely; Sergt. Chas Born, B, leg; J. Eckert, leg, A; Corp. J. Ribberger, C, leg amp.; J. Debold, D, burned; Brevt. Lieut. Engels, slight; 1st Sergt. Weinbrenner, D, slight; Sergt. Goebel, C; Private Magler, A; Escher, A; Newbald, C; Renner, E; Riesner, E; Mrs. Mhartmann, adjutant's wife, arm; Chas. Riesner, E.

EXPLOSION AT FORT LYONS—TWENTY MEN KILLED.--There was an explosion at Fort Lyons, two miles from Alexandria, on the afternoon of the 9th inst. It appears that the men attached to the 3d New York Independent Battalion were engaged in examining artillery ammunition at the open door of the north magazine, when, from some cause, one shell exploded, followed by a few others, and then the magazine. No damage was done to the guns or gun carriages. About twenty men were killed, and quite as many wounded, who have been removed to the hospital at Alexandria.

MAGAZINE EXPLOSION AT FORT LTON.—There was an explosion at Fort Lyon, which is about two miles from Alexandria, Va., Tuesday afternoon. It appears that at that time men attached to the 2d N. Y. Artillery (Col. Palmer's Reg't) were engaged in examining artillery ammunition at the open door of the North magazine, when one shell exploded, followed by a few others, and then the magazine. About 20 men were killed and quite as many wounded. The latter have been removed to the hospital in Alexandria. The explosion is supposed to have been caused by a spark from the pipe of a German engaged in filling shells. We have no further particulars, so that we are unable to say if any of the killed or maimed are from this city.

THE EXPLOSION AT FORT LYON.—The Times' Washington dispatch thus describes this terrible affair:
The President and Secretary of War to-day visited the scene of explosion at Fort Lyon. The incidents of this disaster deserve historical mention.—A detail of twenty-six careful men were in the magazine, engaged in the examining, airing, and refilling the shells. Friction upon the powder of one fired it in the hands of a soldier, and it unfortunately flew through the open vent right into the magazine. One shell, and another exploded; then the whole store of ammunition blew up. Twenty-one of the detailed were instantly killed. Two have since died; the remaining three are frightfully injured. Officers' tents parallel to the magazine were blown to lint, almost. The officers within them were unharmed.—Everything exposed to the lateral force of the explosion was translated. Private Musser, while pacing his beat on the parapet, was hurled through the air one hundred yards beyond the fort into a clump of bushes; with his musket in his hands. It is a positive fact that he sustained no serious injuries, and in ten minutes afterward he was back again upon his path, walking with his piece at his shoulder.
Another sentinel was thrown fifty yards out of the fort into the ditch with his musket in his grasp. Some officers happening to pass, he gathered himself up, face and hands begrimed with powder and his clothes in shreds, and, with soldierly habit, presented arms. Another sentinel, knocked endwise, arose unharmed, with his musket blown off by a piece of shell, the barrel only remaining in his hands.
The wife of Adjutant Hartman, seated in a tent seventy yards distant from the magazine, was struck by a fragment of shell in the arm, breaking it in two places. Ordnance Sergeant Murphy was seated with his family at dinner in a board tent, distant from the magazine twenty yards. The tent was shivered, into splinters, yet none of the inmates were injured. Most of the temporary buildings inside the fort were demolished, and the large logs forming the roof of the magazine were scattered over the grounds. The force of the explosion was so great as to prostrate everybody in the fort.

FROM VIRGINIA.
FAIRFAX CO., Va., June 9.
MR. EDITOR:—The most melancholy and distressing occurrences at Fort Lyon, which took place about three hours ago, and of which your readers will have been apprized before this reaches you, has cast a feeling of deep sadness over our household, and will cause many a sigh and tear of sorrow when the afflicting news is received in the far-distant northern homes, made desolate by the fearful accident. The explosion was felt sensibly here, a distance of about four miles, in the jarring of the houses, and in Alexandria the window-lights were broken, and the houses shaken to their foundation, by the vehemence of the shock. I am not yet informed in regard to the origin of the accident, or the number of killed and wounded.
We have had no rain, of consequence, for nearly a month, and, as might be expected, the few gardens and cornfields in this desolate region are not in a very flourishing condition. The roads, too, are so thick with dust as to be very annoying to travelers, If the drouth continues throughout Virginia there will be very little raised for the support of the rebels in arms, who still resist the forward march of our forces, and boldly flaunt their traitorous flag in this ancient Commonwealth, which should ever have remained sacred to "Liberty and Union" for the sake of the illustrious dead whose ashes mingle with her soil. The "Mother of States" has already been sorely punished for her apostasy from the Union, and the principles of her early statesmen, whose splendid abilities, united with a genuine love of justice and liberty, and an earnest devotion to the Federal Union, form such a striking contrast to the character of her degenerated Mason, Floyds and Wises of the present day. But who shall dare say that her punishment is not justly merited, when, for so many years, her politicians and divines have ignored the teachings of her Washington and Jefferson putting "darkness and light" and "bitter for sweet," and the mass of her people have ignorantly and wilfully sustained them in the perversion of truth and justice. The just reward of those many years of outrage on the rights of humanity is now being reaped in the general ruin and devastation which has swept over the State; and I sometimes wonder when I reflect on the crimes agajst God and human nature, which have been so long perpetuated under the sanction of law, that the punishment should have been so long delayed. The late election, held in those portions of the State not under Confederate rule, resulted very favorably to the Union cause. Mr. Kitchen, of Berkely county, was chosen as our representative in Congress, being a firm supporter of the policy of the Government, emancipation included. He received 730 votes in his own county, which speaks well for the citizens of Berkley. Many in this county, who had previously been committed to secession, came to the polls and voted the Union ticket, the oath of allegiance being first administered to them by the commissioners. Some of them, doubtless, were actuated by selfish motives alone; but others, let us hope, are at last convinced of the right way, and mean to atone, as far as possible, for the errors of the past by loyalty to the Government in future.
That the restoration of peace, for which we all so earnestly hope, may bring with it a return to those great principles of liberty and equality in natural rights which animated the founders of the republic, and gave dignity and lustre to the Old Diminion, should be the prayer of every loyal heart.
Yours, for the Union,
VIRGINIA.

THE FORT LYON CASUALTY.
The explosion of the magazine at Fort Lyon yesterday was one of the most singular events of the kind recorded. How it occurred cannot now be fully explained, but it seems that Col. Schuman, the commandant at the fort, fearing the damaging influence of moisture in the magazine upon the ammunition in store there, ordered an examination with a view to replace any that had become useless. There were in it at the time 116,000 pounds of powder, besides a large quantity of shell and canister.
Twenty-six men were detailed for this work, selected on account of their reliability. While re-filling one of the shells or examining its fuse, by some means it exploded, instantly killing the man who had hold of it. The flames from this shell were soon through the vent of the magazine, and in eight seconds from the time of the explosion of the shell the whole magazine was blown up. Twenty-one of the twenty-six men were instantly killed; the others, together with fourteen men in another part of the works, were badly wounded. Some of the escapes are almost miraculous. Officers' tents in the fort were torn to shreds, but the officers were uninjured. One sentinel was thrown more than one hundred and fifty yards, into a clump of bushes. He clung instinctively to his musket during his sudden flight, and finding himself unhurt, he coolly walked back to his post, shouldered arms and saluted an officer who was just hurrying back from a similar aerial trip. A piece of shell struck a musket resting across the arm of another sentinel, cut off the stock between his hand and his body, passed under his arm and left hand, remaining in his other hand, without doing him any injury whatever. The family of the Ordnance Sergeant was at dinner in a small frame house in the fort. The house was torn to splinters, not a piece being left standing, and yet, strange to say, not one of the inmates received a hurt. The force of the explosion seemed to be upward rather than outward, which may be explained by the fact that the magazine has a deep excavation, covered with earth and logs. President Lincoln, Secretary Stanton and Gen. Hrintzelman, visited the fort to-day.

FURTHER PARTICULARS OF THE TERRIBLE EXPOLSION AT FORT LYON.
The explosion at Fort Lyon yesterday afternoon, some particulars of which we gave yesterday, took place at 2:15 p. m.
One of the magazines was blown up, killing instantly every person who was ordered to duty about it--one lieutenant, two sergeants and twenty men.
Lt. Col. Schuman, 3d N. Y. Art'y, in charge of the fort, had ordered the ammunition, which he thought in bad order, to be taken out into the air. He was leaving Washington at the time of the accident, leaving Capt. Schaumberger in command, who was at dinner when the accident occurred.
Several guns were dismounted by the shock, the offices being in ruins also.
The bodies of the killed were greatly mutilated; a portion of one body being blown nearly half a mile. So also were shells, huge pieces of timber, &c., blown a great distance some of the former exploding. Besides the killed, 17 were wounded. All the killed were Germans. The damage to the fort is being rapidly repaired.

The Terrific Explosion at Fort Lyon.
The explosion of the magazine at Fort Lyon, Alexandria, was one of the most singular events of the kind on record, and some of the incidents of the sad disaster deserve historical mention. There were 11,600 pounds of powder and a large quantity of shell and canister in the magazine. A detail of twenty-six careful men were in it, engaged in examining, airing and re-filling the shells. An account says:
Friction upon the powder of one fired it in the hands of a soldier, and it unfortunately flew through the open vent right into the magazine. One shell, and another, exploded; then the whole store of ammunition blew up. Twenty-one of the detail were instantly killed. Two have since died; the remaining three are frightfully injured. Officers' tents parallel to the magazine were blown to lint, almost. The officers within them were unharmed. Everything exposed to the lateral force explosion was translated. Private Musser, while pacing his beat on the parapet, was hurled through the air one hundred yards beyond the fort into a clump of bushes, with his musket in his hands. It is a positive fact that he sustained no serious injuries, and in ten minutes afterwards he was back again upon his path, walking with his piece at his shoulder.
Another sentinel was thrown fifty yards out of the fort into the ditch, with his musket in his grasp. Some officers happened to pass, he gathered himself up, face and hands begrimed with powder, and his clothes in shreds, and with soldierly habit, presented arms. Another sentinel, knocked endwise, arose unharmed, with the stock of his musket blown off by a piece of shell, the barrel only remaining in his hands.
The wife of Adjutant Hartman, seated in a tent seventy yards distant from the magazine, was struck by a fragment of shell in the arm, breaking it in two places. Ordnance Sergeant Murphy was seated with his family at dinner in a board tent, distant from the magazine twenty yards. The tent was shivered into splinters, yet none of the inmates were injured. Most of the temporary buildings inside the fort were demolished, and the large logs forming the roof of the magazine were scattered over the grounds. The force of the explosion was so great as to prostrate everybody in the fort.

Something Worth Consideration.
DEFENSES SOUTH OF THE POTOMAC,
FORT STRONG, Va., Dec. 23, 1863.
To the Editor of the Utica Evening Telegraph:
May I not, through your columns, ask some of the big hearted patriots of Oneida county, why they are not willing that the soldiers now in the service, who enlist in the veteran corps, and who are residents of the county, and are credited to make up the quota, shall have the benefit of the county bounties? Is it because they have not earned it by their two years' service?—or is it because they volunteered two years ago without waiting for big bounty? and are expected to volunteer for three years more, because we know the county needs us now as much as then. Really, it does seem as though some people think they are entitled to all of the good things, to the detriment of those who have saved them in saving their country. Two years ago last October and November, my company, numbering 164 men, volunteered from Oneida county and vicinity, because we believed the county needed our services. Now we know it needs us as much as then, and we are willing to stay three years more.—Under the circumstances, will not your generosity let you consent that we may share in the bounties, while you get the benefit of our numbers? If you can not so consent, keep your money, and set to work immediately, hunt up all cripples and the hollow chested individuals—with the weak kneed boobies. Give them your money, and send them down here for us to feed all winter with a spoon; and in the spring we will send them back to you, all with tickets for disabilities. Within the last two weeks, forty of my men have re-enlisted for three years longer—fifteen of of them live in Oneida county. I am quite certain seventy-five per cent. of my company will re-enlist before the time expires wherein they can do so. By signs like these, men of "easy patriotism" can see whether the Union is to be saved or not. How are you, " Copperheads "? O. F. HULSER,
Capt. Co. M, 2d N. Y. Artillery.
We take the liberty to print also the following private note, which was appended to Captain Hulser's letter:
If there is nothing wrong about the above letter, publish it. Perhaps I am mistaken, but it does seem to me as though my boys, who live in Oneida county, and re-enlist, should share in the bounties this time at least. They have ever, heretofore, stood square to the front, bounties or no bounties. I will pay $50 towards the fund if all can share alike. To-day a letter came here from Utica in answer to enquiries made by one of my men, in relation to the bounty, saying the money was raised for men not already in the service. Big consolation, that, for good and true men!

Headquarters 2d N. Y. Artillery,
Fort Corcoran, Va., Dec. 26, 1862.
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald.
Please grant me space enough in your widely read paper to say a few words to the good people at home. I desire to remind them of the many promises they made to the soldiers now in the army, who enlisted over one year ago. I am quite often shown letters by men in my company, which they have received from home, telling us of the hunger and want their families are enduring because they have not had any assistance since our regiment was last paid. We all know the bulk of the army is composed of men whose families are dependent upon them for their daily bread. Our regiment has now six months pay due, and our business, as good soldiers, is not to complain when we see the magnitude of the call upon the Government for funds to pay other liabilities. Sixteen months ago, when we enlisted, the bounties were not as large as they have been since then; neither did we wait to see them rise. You only gave to us the bare promise that none of the families of the men should want for food or clothing. All I ask now is that you make good those promises, be seeing that the families of my men, who live near you, do not suffer until we are paid off and send our money home. By so doing you will relieve me of much anxiety and greatly lighten my burdens; and the soldiers will pray for you just as cheerfully as though you had given everything you could spare to the famishing poor of England.
O. F. H., Capt., 2d N. Y. Artillery.

MILTARY ITEMS.--Lieut. J. D. __mond, of the 2d N. Y. Artillery relieves Lieut. Jas. Haver of 2d N. Y. Artillery, in command of Patrol Guard.
The following important orders are especially worthy of the attention of soldiers and civilians:
" All recruits, drafted men and substitutes now in this city, not detailed for duty by special orders will immediately report to the commanding officer of Barrackes, at which recruits for their respective regiments are stationed. All papers heretofore granted to enlisted men of this command, are hereby annulled. Passes for detailed men will be granted, upon application at these headquarters."
" The patrol guard will arrest all soldiers found in this city not wearing the prescribed uniform."
" Sec. 23. And be it further enacted: That the clothes, arms, military outfits, and accoutrements furnished by the U. S to any soldier, shall not be sold, bartered, exchanged, pledged, loaned, or given away; and no person not a soldier, or duly authorized officer of the United States, who has possession of any such clothes, arms, military outfits or accoutrements, furnished as aforesaid, and which have been the subject of any such sale, barter, exchange, pledge, loan or gift, shall have any right, title, or interest therein, but the same may be seized and taken wherever found, by any officer of the U. S., civil or military, and shall thereupon be delivered to any Quartermaster or other officer authorized to receive the same; and the possessor of any clothes, arms, military outfits, or accoutrements, by any person not a soldier or officer of the U. S., shall be prima focia evidence of such sale, barter, loan, exchange, pledge or gift, aforesaid. (Elmira, April 1, 1864.)

Tribute to Maj. George S. Dawson, from his former Company.
Headquarters SECOND N. Y. ARTILERY.
At a meeting of the officers and privates of Co. F, Second New York Artillery, held at camp near Petersburg, Va., on the evening of December 9th, 1864, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, It would indeed be difficult to imagine anything calculated to diffuse or cast a deeper gloom amongst us, than the intelligence of the death of our late company commander, Major George S. Dawson, long our associate in arms. In his skill and integrity our confidence was implicit. Ever ready to alleviate our sufferings and contribute to our comfort, he nobly stood as the champion of our rights, and the defender of our honor. On many a well contested field (ever in the van) he has shared our dangers and participated in our glory. In him we have lost an able an efficient officer, whose military skill and courage has won our confidence and admiration. Our loss is irreparable inasmuch as, by long association, he became blended in our welfare. The noble and refined bearing which he at all times practiced towards us, made us feel toward and look to him as a companion rather than a superior; and
Whereas, It has pleased the Almighty Ruler of the Universe to take from us our late commander, George S. Dawson, it is unanimously
Resolved, That his memory shall live with us. It will be nourished by the recollection of his virtues, and his valor shall ever be held as a pattern worthy of imitation.
Resolved that we fully concur in the sentiment of our Colonel, that "the Second Artillery has, by the death of George S. Dawson, lost one of its best and bravest officers."
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be duly forwarded to the family of deceased.
(Signed) Lieut. JAMES CHICHESTER,
and others, members of Co. F.

Casualties.--Company M, 2d Artillery.
The following is a list of names of the killed, wounded, and missing in company M, 2d N. Y. V. artillery, from May 15th to June 29th:
Killed--Sergts J C Dawnes, A A Rust. Privates James Wicks, Wm Keene, Levern Staring, David Lapham. Corporals Jason C Harris, Thos Digan.
Wounded--Sergts Charles E Moore, J C Dawley, W H Foster. Corporals Henry Spencer, N H Elliott, Addison Shepard, James A Church, Fred Marshal, J R Kenyon.
Commissioned officers, E. E. Woodard, Henry Lacy. Privates, G. K. Drew, J. H. Dutchers, O. C. Holt, Charles Hart, John Fenton, Harry Leet, Joseph Lester, Ascel McIntyre, John Newland, Chauncey Newman, John Oliver, W. H. Perry, E. J. Kenyon, John E. Roberts, R. H. Storing, War Spencer, E. E. Stanley, Willet Thayer, C. W. Lowen, Charles Wiswell, James Whalen, Mingo Youle, A. Wilson, Frank Russell, Ephraim Gable, Charles Carpenter, D. O. Day, Oakes Fox, James Jobs, H. B. Nelson, Jacob Piper, Alexander Thrasher, John B. Tracy, L. C. Hines, John Wallas, Samuel Lucas, Thomas Plunkett, Wm. Williams.
Missing—Alvin Howard, Albert Pierce, Merrit Richer, Alford Semans, Cyrus Tuthill, Wm. Wolf, W. Norton, Benjamin Gilmore.

117th N. Y. V.--The following is a complete list of casualties in this regiment from June 20th to July 4th, inclusive:
Killed--Private Albert Richmond, Co. F; privates Jason Harger and Joseph Brooks, company I.
Company B—Wounded—Privates Frederick Rackner, thigh, mortal; George T. Hunt, head, slight; T. B. Simmons, leg, severe; Marcus M. Adams, arm, severe; C—Wounded--1st sergt. Peter Lane, leg, severe; privates Ira E. Miller, arm, slight; Casper Rehrig, shoulder; J. Treen, breast, slight. Missing, since June 23d--Privates Joseph Hurlburt, Jeremiah C. Jones, captured on picket at Bermuda Hundreds.
Company D--Wounded--Captain Wm. J. Hunt, leg, severe.
Company F--Wounded—Privates Henry Squires, arm, severe; Geo. W. Boardman, arm, slight; Joseph Morrell, arm and side, severe.
Company G--Wounded--Corp. Thomas Gray, leg, severe; privates James Quinn, leg, severe; Henry C. King, arm, slightly; B Daboll, arm, severe; Geo. L. Potter, head, severe.
Company H--Wounded--Corporal Geo. R. Waid, face, slight; corporal Robert Parks, arm, severe; corporal George C. Stone, head, slight; privates Lewis Langer, side, slight; Dennis Monahan, head, severe; William Boswell, head, slight; A. Rice, leg, severe.
Company I--Wounded--Second Lieutenant Spencer C. Myer, head, severe; private Charles McDowell, leg, very severe.
Company K--Wounded--Corporal Harvey Platt, leg, slight; privates Henry Walker, arm, side, severe; Samuel Dustan, shoulder, severe; John Stanuard, leg, slight; Richard Flynn, leg, severe.

146th.--The following are the casualties in this regiment from the 17th to the 20th insts.:
Killed--Sergt. H. Walters, Co. B; Michael Flynn, Geo. Mottz, Ira Simmons, Co. F; Louis Polex, Joseph Davis, Co. K.
Wounded—Co. A—Matthew O'Connor, wounded, cheek and wrist, shell; Corp. John E. Newman, wounded, foot.
Co. B--C. Chamoile Martin Dean, Richard Roberts, wounded.
Co. C--Christian A. Nuber, wounded, leg; George Myers, wounded, leg.
Co. F--W. Owens, wounded, face, shell; Jacob Martin, wounded, leg; Richard Tillman, wounded, side.
Co. G--E. A. Babcock, wounded, foot.
Co. H--Chas. Risley, wounded, leg.

Second Artillery.—This regiment has suffered very severely of late. We give below a list of its wounded in the actions of the 16th and 17th, before Petersburg:
Company A—Capt. Will. Barney, Geo. Willis, J. Brindle, D. Manning, T. Garvin, thigh; corp. Israel Nolan, hand; E. Rickson, leg; Evan E. Thomas, foot; Pat. Ferris, shoulder; H. Wallace, T. S. Upson, T. Farrell, C. Marselis, N. Ledie, J. Walsh, J. Farrell, J. Wolen, T. Drummond, Chas. Marsellas, hand; Norman Leday, back.
Company B—G. Pearce, leg; W. H. Brower, W. Wilcox, Martin Caldwell, E. Hayden, J. H. Weed, sergt. J. Bradley, M. Baker, A. Opper, J. Boorfield, E. Gold, G. H. Young, W. H. Corney.
Company C—D. H. Humphries, sergt. W. Brown, N. Hunter, C. Basked, D. Lee, P. Reilly, M. P. Sheridan, T. Patten, E. Magner, D. M. Healey, J. Riley, A. E. Wore, T. Robinson, Wm. Engalls, left hand; Neal Hunter, arm; Lewis Glover, H. Nelson, J. Woods.
Company D—J. Fairbrother, G. W. Francis, A. Signor, J. G. Moore, D. Curey, corp. John C. Moore, arm; W. H. Pratt, left arm; A. Signer, wrist.
Company E--J. Parkhurst, G. W. Bradley, W. H. Brown, J. Gardner, J. Porter, __. Gautize, J. Hastings, T. Carr, G. _anthe, side; G. Coy, thigh; E. M. Moore, knee and thigh; L. L. Butler, John E. Edmonds, E. Musson.
Company F.—Corp. J. Rutledge, hand; _. Fitzgerald, back and hip; J. Robbins, hip; Peter Simon, head; W. H. Nestell, face; Jas. O'Connell, J. Malstine, C. A. _oorhees, L. Vaustze, J. Blair, H. Van _etten, A. Dawsen, R. Clement, D. Zon, _ew Vanstym, hand.
Company G—Second Lieut. C. A. Peet, arm; T. L. Wood, shoulder; Thos. Robinson, finger; Geo. Smith, A Woodward, M. W. Kelsey, Thomas Wood, W. O. Hawkins, W. D. Hawkins, arm; G. W. Jones, E. Townsend, L. G. Jones, W. D. Dann, _. Heelan, T. Davy, S. Mills, W. Bart, S. Green, J. Morrison, N. Vosburg, L. L. Jones, leg.
Company H--J. Roach, J. Lyons, O. Smith, knee; J. Brechenberg, J. Brashett, W. Ouslone, knee; sergt. R. Warren, thigh; L. Thurston, foot; Ed. Smith.
Company K--C. Henry, hand; D. C. Tolbert, left hand; Henry Adams, hand; J. Wood, head; sergt. W. H. Tyson, severe; W. E. Widsack, sergt. H. H. Sysann, side and thigh.
Company I---J. W. Brosmer, G. W. Bradley, J. H. Skarny, sergt. C. Rathbone, C. Griggs, H. J. Sampson, L. C. Sanders, A. W. Bellman, T. Sullivan, J. Conklin.
Company L--J. Kemp, M. F. Ward, J. Martin, J. Gibner, right ankle; J. Harris, back.
Company M—H. Andrews, hand, slight; Charles Carpenter, hand; Jacob Piper, facel F. Markle, H. Nelson, sergeant J. C. Dunley, Mich Reynor, J. B. Tracy, slight; H. Andrews, slight; R. Kenyon,
J. Gibner, J. Harris.
Company not given.—G. Pierce, P. McVame, D. Gifford, H. P. Davis, W. Ralston, B. Smith, H. Adam, J. Skiffington.

On the 19th, Lieut. Col JERE. PALMER, of Oriskany, commanding the regiment, was wounded in the back. Nothing is said as to the nature or severity of his wound.

Co. I, 2d Artillery.--Capt. J. M. Hulser sends from Petersburg the following list of sick, wounded, and prisoners in Co. I, 2d Artillery:
Wounded.--1st Lieut. Marcus Kenyon, of Utica, wounded and prisoner, 2d Lieut. John P. Clapsuttle, Wm. A. Austin, W. Zelloe, A. B. Frank, James Aldinger, F. Andrews, H. Cuple, Wm. Van Duesen, M. Deven, __ Dodge, of Schuyler, John F. Ferington, Paul J. Clapsuttle, James Gibney, C. Hadsell, Joseph Martin, G. R. Morris, James Mekins, N. Myers, V. Rubins, R. W. Spoonburg, James M. Tolcott, Benjamin Thompson, Wilber V. Minott, Elish Town, C. Warner, J. Waterman, J. Winner.
Prisoners—John Barber, Lewis Labar, E. Frank, J. Chismore, R. Devendorf, W. W. Diggert, Frank Field, A. R. Hadsel, W. Riley, H. Martin, Magy Martin, Daniel Ross, N. Wilds, M. Wood.
Sick in Hospital—John Davis, E. L. Warner, Burton Brown, J. Holdridge, William Bishop, __ Bliss, James T. Brown, Abel Bunnell, David M. Butts, A. Campbell, John E. Clapsuttle, David Clemons, D. Davis.
Died in Hospital,—Oliver Church, James Archer.

SECOND HEAVY ARTILLERY.--The following casualties occurred in this regiment during the fighting of the 15th:
Capt. J. C. Tellinghash, right leg; John Hanlin, knee fractured; Ed. Rearder, leg, flesh; J. Welch, left shoulder; Phil. Yokey, thigh, slightly; Thos. Jones, foot fractured; Lt. James Zollar, hip; Wm. Smizer, bowels penetrated; R. Wheelhouse, testicle; B. Shear, right arm and breast; N. Van Kirk, left shoulder flesh; Erastus Brightman, face, severely; W. Konshafleskey, shoulder, severely; H. Bloomer, right lung penetrated, mortal; J. S. Brown, right leg, flesh; T. J. Davis, left hip, flesh; A. J. Birdsall, right fore-arm, flesh; John Waffle, left arm slightly; Sam H. Miller, left leg, slightly; Reuben Alexander, right leg fractured; Pat. Sweeney, left leg, flesh; James Browne, little finger; A. McVey, left hip fractured; Lt. Chas. Martin, leg fractured; Thomas Carlyle, knee fractured; John Dunn, both knees; Edward Passum, right ankle; Ed. B. Smith, left arm and side.

Second Heavy Artillery.
Quartermaster General's Office
Washington, D. C. June 7, 1864.
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald.
Thinking information from company E, 2d regiment N. Y. heavy artillery, would interest your readers, as the company is composed mostly of men from Utica, I herewith transmit you what reliable information I am in possession of at this writing.
They left Fort Bennett, Va., Sunday, May 15th, and from that time to the present have endured a continuous routine of marching and fighting, and I am justified in stating have always conducted themselves in a manner to command the respect and receive the commendation of their commanding officer, having been complimented by the commanding general in general orders for their bravery and universal good conduct. The following are the killed to Sunday morning, June 5th: L. E. Tubbs, Daniel Fish, Albert Fish, Phillip Evans, M. J. Curtis, Lewis Lewis, Stephen Beat, (wounded and since died,) Henry Crandall. The following are among the wounded: Dennis S. Moan, G. M. Austin, Daniel Sullivan, Augustus Green, Chauncey Bowers, Wm. Alsop, Sergt. John Tyler, (since returned to duty,) M. J. Cook, George Tyrrell, J. H. Rogers, R. Slater, (since returned to duty.) At daylight Sunday morning,
June 5th, while in command of brigade picket, Capt. George Klinck received three wounds, one an ugly one in the left leg, which disabled him, and he was sent to the city, where he arrived this P. M., in good spirits. He is at the residence of Mr. Joseph Dixon of Utica, and being well cared for. He will be sent to Utica as soon as he is able to endure the fatigues of the journey. All the remaining officers of the company are worn out and sick, excepting Lieut. Joseph Nelson of Troy, who is in command of the company. Yours truly,
John W. Armitage.

Mr. M. M. Jones sends the following list of wounded in this regiment, who have arrived in Washington;
Capts. Klinck and Jones, not dangerously; Chas. Moore, (not a prisoner, as reported;) Thos. Digan, badly; Lieut. Williamson, lost a leg; Laverne Staring, killed; Joseph Downer, killed; George Staring, wounded; Wm. Kena, killed; Edward Ryan, wounded; Warren Spencer, wounded; Henry Spencer, wounded; Chauncey Newman, wounded; Orlando C. Holt, wounded in foot; Joseph Lester, wounded; Benjamin Gillman, missing; Joseph Dewhurst, wounded, toe off; H Osborn and S Baker, Co H, wounded; J M Tallcott, L, wounded in chest; Everett Stanley, wounded; Menzo Yale, wounded; Ad Shepherd, wounded; Adelbert Church, wounded; John E Roberts, wounded; James Whalen, wounded; Winfield M Perry, wounded in hip; John Oliver, wounded badly; James Dutcher, wounded; Charles Sponenberg, wounded; Arick Borden, wounded; Dolphas Eggleston, not wounded, as before reported.

Letter from the Army of the Potomac.
Near Petersburg, Va., Sept. 1864.
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:
Having a little leisure time I concluded that I could employ it no better than by writing a few lines to you and the patrons of the HERALD. You are aware that I am attached to the 2d N. Y. Heavy Artillery, or as the boys here call it, the 2d Weighty, 1st brigade, 1st division, 2d corps, under the command of Gen. Hancock; sometimes called King of the Woods, and by all odds, one of the finest looking soldiers in this or any other country, and what is better, the boys all love him, and he is proud of his corps, and well he may be, for it is certainly one of the best in the army.
We are in camp about midway between City Point and Reams' Station, and the corps is recruiting up very rapidly. The recruits and convalescents are pouring in by thousands, and we shall soon have a grand army again, and then look out for the splinters. Johnny Reb must talk differently or find his last ditch. The impression here seems to gain ground that the rebellion is about played out, and that there will be but few more months of fighting. Some try to argue differently, but there is more feint on the "back seats" since the fall of Atlanta, and one of their best holds is broken, and it would not be surprising if their last one had slipped before the close of this campaign. If Grant can hold his own now, (and we are quite sure he can,) what can stop him, when his army is filled up to what he wished it? We sometimes hear grumbling down here and words of discouragement, but this is not to be wondered at after their long and rapid marches, heavy fighting and hard fatigue duty; but a few days of rest and quiet will help them to think and talk differently. But for those men of the North, who have aided the rebellion by their cries against the government, and by their cries of peace have helped to prolong the war, there is not the shadow of an excuse, and this is the general impression of the fair thinking portion of the army. There always has been a strong feeling amongst the soldiers for McClellan, but they find it quite difficult to reconcile Mac's West Point speech, with several planks in the Chicago platform; they cannot understand it, and consequently do not exactly know how to frame their arguments, but here is one of them. While standing around our camp fire a few evenings since, one of Mac's admirers got off the following: "George B. is the boy for me." Another asked why. "Oh," says Charley, "he'd give us one good fight, and then lay off five or six weeks, and then we'd have a bully time." How is that for an argument? I think I can discover quite a change in their talk in the last few days, and as there is six weeks between this time and the election we may confidently look for still greater changes. The boys here are beginning to realize the object of the peace men, and hold no very enviable feelings toward them. The boys generally think that the best plan for them (the peace men) to gain what they have talked so much about, is to shoulder their muskets, and prevail on their friends to do the same, then take the shortest known route to Dixie, and help our noble boys to close the work which they have so nearly finished. They will by this means help to gain an honorable peace, which is something their talk will never do. They might also get a peep at the last ditch of which their friends have spoken. They would undoubtedly make a great many friends from amongst those who have been and are daily laying down their lives for them. Don't you think this plan far preferable to the one of talking peace? Within the past few days the City point railroad has been extended several miles on our left, and where a few days since no signs of a track were visible, large trains are running regularly. It is certainly very astonishing, but that is a way they have of doing business down here.
Ten or twelve days since, our corps was ordered to the left of where we now are. Arrived there after dark, and halted on a flat open space with a fine pine wood on our left. In the morning the woods had almost entirely disappeared, and in our front a splendid line of breastworks had sprung up as if by magic. Those who have never been in the business can have no correct conception of how quickly and quietly an order is executed at the front. Our new railroad runs but a few rods in front of our camp, and it seems like old times to see the trains moving and to hear the whistle and bell. This forenoon all the bands and drum corps of the division were ordered to report to division head-quarters, which we did. Numbering in all about one hundred and seventy-five, and under the leadership Mr. Higgins, of the division band, played "Hail to Chief," and "Hail Columbia," after which the brass bands played the "Grand March from Belisaria," "Garry Owen," "Larry O'Gaff" and "Yankee Doodle," and if there was any lack of harmony there certainly was not of noise. We were then dismissed, with an invitation to repeat the thing at some future day.
The weather here is delightful, the days warm and pleasant, and the nights cool enough to make blankets necessary. As fast as the new recruits arrive they are set to drilling, and you can see them in all directions going through the different evolutions, and it will take but a short time to have the corps in fine trim for anything that soldiers can do, and so with the whole army. So you may look out for stirring news shortly. Speaking of news, reminds me of the many complaints of the boys. They cannot get enough to read, and would be very thankful for anything in the way of old books, magazines and papers, in fact anything which contains stories would be very acceptable, and a few books and magazines would afford reading for several hundred, and while away many a tedious hour. If it is not asking too much, won't some of the friends of the 2d Heavy do something for the boys? They have not been paid off for the last six months, and many of them have not seen any money for a still longer time, and there is no telling when they will be paid, and there are few who have the means to purchase the Washington Chronicle, New York Herald, or Philadelphia Enquirer, which are brought to camp daily.
We had the pleasure of witnessing a sham fight made up of the different brigades of the 1st division. It took place near the headquarters of Gen. Hancock, and was a very fine affair. They went through the regular business of skirmishing, charging, securing prisoners, taking battle flags, the same as in battle, with the exception that there was no powder or balls used, and to the uninitiated was a very fine sight. After this our brigade was ordered farther to the left and front, where we are now. It is nearly time for the band's morning rehearsal, and I must close, wishing the Administration the most unqualified success. I remain yours, A. F. M.

Second N. Y. Artillery.
Headquarters 2d N. Y. Artillery,
Near Petersburg, Va., Nov. 25, 1864. To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:
Sir: There being many friends of this Regiment in Oneida and adjoining counties, perhaps the subjoined copy of a letter recently received by the commanding officer of the Regiment, may be of sufficient interest to merit and insertion in the Herald. If you so consider it, I would like its publication.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
B. F. Stedman,
Adjutant 2d N. Y. Artillery.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Albany, Nov. 15, 1864.
Major Geo. Hogg, commanding 2d regiment New York Vol. Artillery.
Major: A communication has been received at these Headquarters from Brigadier General T. W. Egan, commanding 2d Division 2d Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, dated October 29th, 1864, wherein he speaks in the highest terms of the conduct of the 2d Regiment of Artillery, New York State Volunteers in the late operations before Petersburg.
I am directed by His Excellency, Governor Seymour, to express his gratification, and to tender his thanks of the officers and men of the Regiment, for this additional evidence of the good conduct of New York troops in the discharge of their duties.
I am, major, very respectfully your obedient servant,
JOHN T. SPRAGUE, Adj. General.

SECOND N. Y. ARTILLERY.
The following is a list of the men enlisted for Co. A, 2d N. Y. Artillery, by Lieut. A. Z. McCarty, Jr., of this Village, with their ages and occupations:
Richland--George Nicholson, 30, James Omans, 44, Hillman Pierce, 44, Lewis O. Pierce, 18, Farmers.
Albion--Richard I. paddock, 18, Gerathman Martin, 18, Farmers.
Sandy Creek--Jas. A. Baldwin, 20, Chas. H. Orr, 18, Joseph Jeroy, 25, Jas. N. O'Neil, 40, Farmers; Wm. E. Orr, 23, Sailor.
Redfield--George Strader, 40, Mechanic.
Constaulia--Thos. W. Morrison, 21, Wm. P. Montgomery, 33, Farmers; Wm. Sheldon, 38, Boatman; Henry C. Cary, 33, Blacksmith; Wm. H. Coney, 34, Boatman; Jas. M. Marcellas, 19, Cooper; Chas. Marcellas,
24, Boatman; Henry Ames, 29, Painter.
Parish--Leonard House, 36, Farmer.
Oswego City and other Towns--Alex J. ___, 35, John Sharpe, 18, Farmers; Barnard Garrett, 35, Sailor; Jas. Killai, 40, Laborer; Chas. Ellis, 18, Boatman; Thos. Parkinson, 19, Seaman; Geo. Hall, 18, Boatman; Jas. Otis, Jr., 25, Carpenter; Henry Wallace, 29, sailor; Daniel Carson, Jr., 34, Boatman; Henry D. Dubois, Jr., 37, Jas. McDermott, 19, Farmers; John Farrell, 18, Boatman; Thos. Corlett, 31, Sailor; Wm. I. Tabor, 18, Farmer; ____ Thompson, 18, Boatman; Horace Duell, 18, Jas. Armstrong, 22, Farmers; Lewis ____, 18, Teamsters; ____ ____, 18, Laborer; Almon Woolridge, 43, Daniel Dumper, 18, Farmers; Henry Fish, 33, Sailor; Edward Van Etten, 18, Farmer; John Ross, 29, Laborer; Nicholas Conners, 18, Jerome Lun, 18, Eugene M. Pelham, 18, Farmers.

 

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