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6th Independent Battery, NY Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

ADVENTURES OF A TROY SOLDIER IN REBELDOM.
James H. Ingraham, of Troy, a member of the Sixth New York Independent Battery, was taken prisoner during the recent cavalry engagement near Brandy Station, Va. After being captured, he succeeded in making his escape, but was again taken and conveyed to Richmond. Having been paroled, he arrived at Annapolis, Md., a few days since from which place he writes an interesting letter to his father, detailing his experience in "Dixie" and the manner of his capture. After the battle he writes: "We tried to get our piece off, but we had but two horses left, and one of them was wounded—We lost the gun. We then tried to escape ourselves, but it was hard work, as the rebels were all around us. We scattered away, and I and my partner were taken prisoners before we had proceeded 100 yards. The rebels sent us off in charge of one man, and we succeeded in getting away from him, and started for the woods. There we wandered for some time, when we were captured again, and that time for good. We were taken to Culpepper, where there were about 300 of our men, among them ten members of our battery. They took us from there to Gordonsville, and thence to Richmond, where we were confined in Libby prison. They treated us rather harshly, taking our money and everything valuable from us, and giving us but little to eat. We were kept there for three days, when we were paroled and sent to this place. We will probably remain here three months before we are exchanged. We have nothing to do. Our battery lost heavy during the engagement. We lost three guns, and one burst. Out of forty-five men, only seven or eight came out all right. The others were either killed, wounded or taken prisoners.

JAMES H. INGRAM, a son of Henry Ingram, a quiet youth of tall prospects, at about the commencement of the war enlisted in Bramhall's New York artillery. The battery went through several campaigns, Ingram coming off scot free each time, down to the affair at Brandy Station, on the 6th of June, when he, with others, was made a prisoner. He made the pilgrimage to Richmond, and staid there five days, but didn't see much, for the reason that he arrived in the night, and left before morning, staying the five days intervening at the Libby prison. He was paroled and sent back to Annapolis, but is not yet exchanged. He arrived home yesterday morning on a furlough, which will probably give him a visit of a couple of weeks. He looks well, has extended himself about a foot in height, during his absence, and evidently likes the service.

A TROY FIREMAN TAKEN PRISONER.—James H. Ingram, of Troy, formerly foreman of Engine Co. No. 2, of that city, and now attached to the 6th N. Y. Independent Battery, was taken prisoner during the recent cavalry engagement near Brandy Station, Va. After being captured, he succeeded in making his escape, but was again taken, and conveyed to Richmond. Having been paroled, he arrived at Annapolis, Md., a few days since.

Back to the 6th Independent Battery during the Civil War

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: May 4, 2006
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/battery/6thIndBat/6thIndBatCWN.htm

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