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Broome County, New York
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

The Pecuniary Belief of Poor Men.
Town Meeting in Maine—Approval of the Evening Post.
The pecuniary relief of poor men affected by the draft meets the approval of such a leading print as the New York Eve. Post, which, in yesterday's issue, pronounces "The True Plan" the action of a town meeting at Cape Elizabeth, Me., on Saturday, in voting to pay three hundred and fifty dollars to every drafted man who goes to the war or procures a substitute.

DETROIT.
An ordinance to raise $300,000 has been introduced in the Detroit Common Council and referred to the proper committee under the rules.

CHICAGO.
In Chicago they are moving by wards.—The citizens of the fifth ward held a meeting Wednesday night and resolved to raise funds for the relief of the drafted poor. Addresses were made by Comptroller Hayes, City Attorney Adams, Alderman Sheridan and Barrett and Col. R. M. Hough.
The Common Council, too, is moving. An ordinance to appropriate $120,000 has been introduced.

ALBANY.
In Albany, where several hundred thousand dollars have already been voted, the Statesman (Rep.), which emphatically approves the measure, argues that the draft is unnecessary. One of the editors of that paper, commenting on statements of the Journal that "there are only fragments of armies left to the rebels," that "the rebellion is nearly crushed," that "if we only take advantage of our recent victories, the war may be ended in less than ninety days," &c. says:
If the rebellion is "already crushed," if the rebels only have "fragments of armies," if the insurrection can be put down in ninety days, why in the name of heaven is it necessary to enforce a draft for 300,000 fresh men, seeing 300,000 fresh men cannot be made fit to take the field inside of four months, which is just one month more than the Journal says is necessary to put down the rebellion. Admit the statements made by the Journal, and it becomes at once self-evident that there is no more necessity for enforcing the draft at the present time than there is for getting up an invasion of Nova Scotia.
During the past three weeks we have killed or captured 91,000 rebel soldiers and officers. This is equal to all the rebels now in the field, and more than one-third of the standing army of Great Britian [sic]. The army of the rebels at the present moment does not exceed 100,000 men. This 40,000 less men than Grant has in his single command. Why then have a draft? Why draft when volunteering will give us more troops than we can possible want or use. I understand from a clerk in Majors Wallace's office that we are recruiting in this State at this very moment at the rate of 800 per day. This is equal to about five regiments per week, or 20,000 men per month. If other states are doing as well as this, it will be seen that volunteering and bounties are giving to the government over 100,000 men per month. Why draft, then?

THE MEETING.
The Meeting at Brigham Hall last Thursday evening was large and enthusiastic—Hon. D. S. Dickinson was selected Chairman Hon. John Clapp, soon after the organization of the meeting, presented, in a neat and appropriate speech, a beautiful silk flag to Mr. Montgomery. The flag was got up by several ladies of Binghamton, in admiration of the spirit manifested by Mrs. Montgomery by refusing to allow a secesh flag to be placed upon her house in Vicksburg, for which she and her family suffered banishment from friends, and home.
Mr. Montgomery accepted the flag in a feeling and appropriate speech. He said the flag should be taken to Vicksburg, and wo'd soon wave over their residence, and he believed the glorious Stars and Stripes would soon wave over the entire South. His heart was filled with gratitude for the kindness and liberality bestowed upon his family and himself during his sojourn at the North.
Mr. Montgomery then gave a history of his troubles in the South, and the injuries inflicted upon himself and family because they remained true to the Government of the United States. He had been arrested, tried and sentenced to be executed for no crime but loyalty to the Government that had always protected him. He was thrown into a loathsome prison to await the day of execution; an opportunity presenting itself, he succeeded in escaping to our fleet on the river, but was returned to the rebels by a young upstart in the Union service. He was again thrown into prison, but, through the kindness of the keeper, he was permitted to escape. Taking his wife and two little children, he left the city in the night, with barely sufficient clothing to cover them, and but little money, traveling on foot, hungry and weary, the feet of his little ones bleeding at every pore, he at last reached the Union lines, and fell among friends.
He could never forget the hospitality and benevolence of the people of the North; he could not conceive how they had ever received the reputation of being unhospitable; he hoped when the war was over the South could be peopled with Northern citizens and extend over the country the refinement, christianity, industry and enterprise which the glorious North had always known. The poor whites of the South would become elevated if slavery was abolished—that institution had always been a curse to the South, and retarded her progress; she was three hundred years behind the age, but with the benefit of Northern enterprise and experience, the resources of the South would be developed, and the country become what the Almighty intended it should be.
Three years ago, the speaker said, he was a strong Conservative—believed in Slavery, and was an ardent supporter of the institution and probably never would have changed if Slavery had behaved herself. When that institution attempted to destroy the Government, he was led to open his eyes, and now, he was proud to say, he is a radical abolitionist. There can be no peace in this country while Slavery exists—the country must destroy Slavery or Slavery will destroy the Government. All thinking men had become, or would become, abolitionists, and in order to obtain a permanent peace the cause was to be removed.
Mr. Montgomery was extremely bitter towards Copperheads. They would not, he said, be tolerated in Vicksburg—there they would be compelled to take their position, either for or against the Government. He urged that the North accept no peace except on the basis of the abolition of Slavery—the carrying out of the President's Proclamation. When Mississippi went to war with the Government, she forfeited all her rights, and if she was defeated she could not expect to receive all the rights she formerly enjoyed. Treason must be punished, and the institution which caused the rebellion must be crushed out of existence or we could have no peace that God would justify.
The speaker in conclusion said he was on his way to Vicksburg, where he intended to start an out-and-out abolition paper. He could now return to his home with a feeling of security, knowing he would be protected by the flag of his country.
We have given but an imperfect synopsis of his speech, which was listened to with intense interest.
Hon. D. S. Dickinson was then called upon, who made one of his best speeches.—The following is an extract:
The recent conservative meeting in the city of New-York, called by some RADICAL ill-natured people a RIOT and a MOB, it will be seen, came off about the time of Lee's movement into Pennsylvania, and the raids of Morgan and others into Ohio and Indiana. There are a thousand evidences combining to prove that these several movements had an intimate relation to each other, and that is no answer or offset to the evidence of what was so obviously the original arrangement and intention. The movement was contrived by Copperhead politicians, and was designed to be turned entirely to political advantage in aid of the rebel cause. It was supposed that it would early assume political proportions—claim to act mainly in resistance to the usurpations and unconstitutional acts of the Administration—that it would call loudly for the vindication of the Constitution and Laws! and would embody a large force, &c; and while it was yet heated, and at the right point, those who set it on foot were to appear at its head, preaching moderation with all the sincerity of Mark Antony, but leading it at first in opposition to the Administration—then in resistance to the Government, and finally in open aid of the rebellion. But the surrender of Vicksburg and Port Hudson—the failure of Johnston and the retreat of Bragg—the gloomy prospects of Morgan and the chances of his capture—the fact that Lee came too soon and ran away too early, and that the draft came too late to have the riot on hand while Lee was threatening Harrisburg and Philadelphia and Baltimore and Washington, and that military forces began to assemble and adduce weighty arguments, proved very serious impediments. There was, however, one obstacle more serious still, and to this are the public chiefly indebted for the early and signal failure of that part of the performance assigned to the Copperhead politicians of New-York, and but for which they would have pressed it further. An ancient legend, which I have never seen authentically contradicted, tells us of a girl engaged in the carrying trade for Fairies, who was sent from one point to another with a box of charmed and mysterious contents. It was not the box of Pandora, filled with plagues and the ills of life, but a box filled with miniature human existences in every department and calling and ramification known to men. The girl having been directed not to open the box, and told that alarming consequences would follow if she did so, by a process as natural and a desire as irresistable as that by which our common mother eat first of the fruit she was forbidden to taste, on her way, in a secluded field, opened the box, and its, contents escaped, and each one commenced to operate their trade or pursuit or business—the cook plied her spit; the tailor heated his goose; the cobler pounded his lap-stone; the doctor administered his medicine; the fidler drew his bow; the dancers balanced in the cotillon; the artisan wielded his hammer; the scholar poured over his volumes, and the mathematician solved his problem, and probably, though that is not certain, the reformed Freesoilers abused the Abolitionists, and the Know-Nothings were engaged in the reorganization of the  Democratic party. The poor girl in vain endeavored to induce them to return to the box again. She made, a speech to them—called them her FRIENDS and IMPLORED them to return; but they were bent upon their own enjoyment rather than hers, and laughed all her efforts and entreaties to scorn; and, scattering far and near, spread over the whole face of the earth, and were gone beyond her influence and control forever.—
Now, as we have already seen, the outbreak in New-York originated with politicians, acting upon and inflaming and encouraging the very worst elements that ever disfigured society—thieves, ruffians and cutthroats; bawds, pimps and burglars; house breakers and murderers; assassins and the settlings and skimmings of loaferdom, after the marketable lazaroni had been substracted [sic]. The contrivers and leaders who opened the box, and turned loose these offscourings, expected them to act politically—in pretended furtherance of a great conservative movement—to damn Lincoln and his administration; to hurra for their FRIENDS; to clamor for the Constitution and Laws—for free speeches and the wrongs of Vallandingham and their Southern brethren, while they, the managers, would fan this flame to madness and add the true Copperhead virus to the popular fury by descanting upon the hardships and oppressions of legal restraints, until they might defy the power of the  Government and openly assist the rebellion.—But no sooner had the outbreak commenced than, as in the legend, each interest entered upon its own work, more intent on personal gain than on "postponing the draft:"—the thieves and robbers were willing to act politically with the great conservative party! and advance the interests of their leaders, and vindicate the Constitution, after they had for a season looked to their own interests and robbed and sacked stores and houses, and carried home the spoil, but not before. They had been accustomed from a supposed cruel necessity, to steal and rob in darkness and secrecy, and they were not disposed to so far neglect their own material interests as to let an occasion pass which permitted them to steal in open day, from the choicest assortments with Governors and Judges standing by proclaiming their friendship! merely to advance the political fortunes of others or to support the Constitution! House-breaking and burning were necessary to successful theft and robbery, and hence the votaries of burglary and arson were primarily engaged in their respective avocations. Theft first and politics afterwards was their motto! Those who had been taught by their conservative leaders that it would disgrace white men if negroes were accepted as soldiers, and taught, too, that it would be unjust and aggressive for white men to be drafted into the service, sought to solve the problem by murdering every negro they could find, old or young, male or female; while others, determined to give practical proofs of their conservatism and of their devotion to the Constitution and Laws, burned and demolished an Orphan Asym, erected by the influences of a holy charity, and destroyed the houses of homeless children. In short, this "movement of the people" was a "house divided against itself," and for that reason it failed to stand. It was set on foot by political leaders, primarily to aid their fortunes and to encourage the rebellion; it was prosecuted by most of their followers to gather supplies for themselves, and the MATERIAL proved paramount over the POLITICAL interests; and hence, while it brought rich rewards to its RANK AND FILE it was a barren victory to the "COMMANDERS IN CHIEF." It was a great success to all but those who got it up by two years' clamor against Government usurpation, and apology for rebellion—denouncing everything as unconstitutional except Jeff. Davis' rebellion and Copperhead politics. It was the Carnival of thieves. A hungry loafer in Neal's Charcoal Sketches is made to long for the time to come when roast pigs would run about with knives and forks stuck in their backs, waiting for some one to eat them, and when Governors and Judges attend such mob gatherings, and proclaim, at the top of their voices, their friendship, and tender promises of what they will do officially, the reason for running, living roast pigs, with knives and forks in their backs, ought not to be far off. Governor Seymour seems to have made a postponement of the draft an issue with the General Government, and is said to have predicted, that if it was not postponed all the Irish chamber and kitchen maids would turn incendiaries, and burn the city. I do not believe the public either fear the chamber maids or favor the postponement. But, whatever these gentle maids may do to others, as we cannot spare our worthy Governor in such times as these, I IMPLORE them, as my FRIENDS, not to lay violent hands on the Commander-in-Chief, or burn his lodgings, for, according to high authority, it is better to marry than to burn. Go Seymour has not unfrequently reminded the public that he had taken an oath of rare solemnity to "EXECUTE THE LAWS." This oath he has now fulfilled, if not before. He has certainly "EXECUTED THE LAWS" upon this occasion, for he has literally crucified them between thieves. Although this murderous and thieving outbreak will not prove available as Copperhead capital, the rebels, with savage ferocity, already gloat over what they term the "blood soaked ashes" of our commercial metropolis, and France and England, anxious to aid the rebellion against our Government, by all the means in their power, will probably “recognize" the New York mob as a "belligerent [sic] power." They can do so with as much propriety as they recognized the rebellion as such; and if they do not "RECOGNIZE" it as a Government that prince of charlatans, Louis Napoleon, and the knaves and fools of the British Parliament, ought at least to take the matter into consideration.
Mr. Dickinson was followed by Mr. Courtney, of New York, who made a stirring and eloquent appeal in behalf of the country. Mr. Mygatt also made a few appropriate remarks, and was heartily applauded. The meeting adjourned at a late hour, the audience leaving with the best of feeling.

Speech of D. S. Dickinson.
In Binghamton on Thursday evening last, a large and enthusiastic Union meeting was held. Among other speakers was Hon. D. S. Dickinson who, in alluding to the late Riot in New York, handled our copperhead sympathizers without gloves. We give a few extracts:
"The recent conservative meeting in the city of New-York, called by some radical ill-natured people a riot and a mob, it will be seen, came off about the time of Lee's movement into Pennsylvania, and the raids of Moran and others into Ohio and Indiana. There are a thousand evidences combining to prove that these several movements had an intimate relation to each other, and that each one was well understood by every other, or rather by those who helped plan the whole. The ominous givings out which preceded  them—the foreign recognition thermometer in England and France, where the mercury rose so speedily at this juncture and simultaneously—the confident and insolent tone of the Confederate press—the mission of the rebel Stephens to Washington—the Copperhead complacency as the movements were inaugurated and progressing, and its malignity on their failure—the mutterings of Lee in his inglorious retreat, that he had not been received and supported by his Northern friends, as he expected, and a whole cloud of witnesses besides, proves that the New York movement was a part of, and intended to be directly in aid of the cause of rebellion. The draft was a mere pretence. The movement was contrived by Copperhead politicians, and was designed to be turned entirely to political advantage in aid of the rebel cause.
Now, as we have already seen, the outbreak in New-York originated with politicians, acting upon and inflaming and encouraging the very worst elements that ever disfigured society—thieves, ruffians and cut-throats; bawds, pimps and burglars; house breakers and murderers; assassins and the settlings and skimmings of loaferdom, after the marketable lazaroni had been substracted [sic]. The contrivers and leaders who opened the box, and turned loose these offscourings, expected them to act politically—in pretended furtherance of a great conservative movement—to damn Lincoln and his administration, to hurra for their friends; to clamor for the Constitution and Laws—for free speeches and the wrongs of Vallandigham and their Southern brethren while they, the managers, would fan the flame to madness and add the true Copperhead virus to the popular fury by descanting upon the hardships and oppressions of legal restraints, until they might defy the power of the Government and openly assist the rebellion. But the motley crew could not be restrained or confined to political action by the leaders. Theft first and politics afterward was their motto! Those who had been taught by their conservative leaders that it would disgrace white men if negroes were accepted as soldiers, and taught, too, that it would be unjust and aggressive for white men to be drafted into the service, sought to solve the problem by murdering every negro they could find, old or young, male or female; while others, determined to give practical proofs of their  conservatism and of their devotion to the Constitution and Laws, burned and demolished an Orphan Asylum, erected by the influences of a holy charity and destroyed the houses of homeless children. In short, this "movement of the people" was a "house divided against itself," and for that reason it failed to stand. It was set on foot by political leaders, primarily to aid their fortunes and to encourage the rebellion; it was prosecuted by most of their followers to gather supplies for themselves, and the material proved paramount over the political interests; and hence, while it brought rich rewards to its rank and file it was a barren victory to the "commanders in chief." It was a great success to all but those who got it up by two years' clamor against Government usurpation, and apology for rebellion—denouncing everything as unconstitutional except Jeff. Davis' rebellion and Copperhead politics. It was the Carnival of thieves. A hungry loafer in Neal's Charcoal Sketches is made to long for the time to come when roast pigs would run about with knives and forks stuck in their backs, waiting for some one to eat them, and when Governors and Judges attend such mob gatherings, and proclaim, at the top of their voices, their friendship, and tender promises of what they will do officially, the season for running, living roast pigs, with knives and forks in their backs, ought not to be far off. Governor Seymour seems to have made a postponement of the draft an issue with the General Government, and is said to have predicted, that it was not postponed all the Irish chamber and kitchen maids would turn incendiaries, and burn the city. I do not believe the public either fear the chamber maids or favor the postponement. But, whatever these gentle maids may do to others, as we cannot spare our worthy Governor in such times as these, I implore them, as my friends, not to lay violent hands on the Commander-in-Chief, or burn his lodgings, for, according to high authority, it is better to marry than to burn. Gov. Seymour has not unfrequently reminded the public that he had taken an oath of rare solemnity to "execute the laws." That oath he has now fulfilled, if not before. He has certainly "executed the laws" upon this occasion, for he has literally crucified them between thieves.

THE CORPS AT BINGHAMTON.--The Binghamton Republican pays a high compliment to the Citizens' Corps for the part taken by this excellent company in the celebration of the Fourth in that village. It is mentioned that at the dinner the Corps sang their spirited "Marching Along" chorus in fine style. The toast in honor of the Corps was proposed by Hon. D. S. Dickinson, who was President of the day.

MILITARY.—The military display here on Friday and Saturday last which excited considerable attention, was made by a portion (eight companies, comprising about 500 men) of the 51st Regiment from Syracuse. They left Syracuse for New York, to aid in putting down the riot there, but on reaching this place were notified by telegraph that their services were not needed. They accordingly proceeded no farther, but after speeding the day in this village returned to Syracuse Saturday evening. They made a good impression on our citizens by their gentlemanly and soldierly conduct. Their marching was excellent. In the afternoon they bad a dress parade in front of the court house, after which they broke ranks, stacked arms, and had a good time on the green and about town. They were accompanied by an excellent band of music—Samsel's of Syracuse.

DIED.—In the Hospital at Aquia Creek, Va., May 16th 1863, Stephen S. Benedict aged 36 years. Mr. Benedict was a resident of this village, and as such has long been known for his strict integrity and moral worth.
At a meeting of Independent Steam Engine Co. No. 5, the following resolutions were adopted and ordered printed:
WHEREAS, It has pleased the giver of all good, that our brother should die among strangers, and find a grave far from the bosom of his afflicted family, therefore
Resolved, That we, the members of Independent Steam Engine Co. No. 5, cannot but express our unfeigned sorrow at this dispensation which has deprived us of a useful and earnest member, one to whom this tribute of respect is due personally for his many noble qualifications which made him beloved and honored by us all.
Resolved, That in him we have lost a true friend, a brother who never forgot his obligation, a man of elevated and generous impulses.
Resolved, That we extend to his afflicted family in this painful bereavement, our deepest sympathy, and pledge anew our fidelity to each other, that we will kindly remember the families of our sick, and our deceased brothers, and in cases of necessity will afford them a generous and timely assistance.

The number of Volunteers raised in this Congressional District is as follows:
Broome County, ..........................2,262
Schuyler    “ .................................. 946
Tioga,        “ ............................... 1,525
Tompkins   “(since July l, 1862,)..  941
Total raised in District.................5,674

 

25 Joseph Owen            71 James Comfort
26 Nathan ____             72 Joseph Johnson
27 W___ Osterhout       73 Arthur Vosbury
     Wallace Dickinson   74 Abner B. Dayton
28 Jas Sweeney             75 Oliver G. Morse
29 Fred'k H. Fox           76 Nathaniel S. Weyant
30 Jas Morgan               77 Robert Farrell
31 Wilder M. Freeman  78 John Buckley
32 Friends McCarry      79 John Phealen
33 Daniel Boardman     80 Joshua U. Williams
34 Elias McCannon       81 Michael Gannon
35 John K. Seymour      82 B. F. Stoughtenburg
36 J Jas Babcock           83 James Mangin
37 Thos Pounds             84 James O'Day
38 Wm J Sweet              85 Ernest F Towner
39 Wm H Belcher          86 Hull S Barber
40 Simeon Fox               87 W Fankfurthen
41 John O'Donahue        88 Timothy Haggarty
4 Michael Loyd              89 William E Hunt
43 Willard T Harris        90 John Gaffney
44 Patrick Fernan           91 Jeremiah Gray
45 John N Austin           92 John Metygar
46 Geo W Andrus          93 Darwin A Robinson
47 Stephen Northrup

Town Of Maine.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 18.
No. No.
1 Dennis Morgan       30 Stephen Ellis
2 Lester Briggs           31 George Phipps
3 Philip Pitcher           32 John Harvey
4 David F Clark          33 Jno B Brockham
5 Albert Freeman        34 Smith Fairfield
6 Wm Oliver               35 John Hardy
7 Philander Fuller       36 Nathan Gates
8 George Loomis        37 Henry Budd
9 Seth Hull                  38 Moses N Harmon
10 Abner Willis          39 Abm D W Decker
11 Silvener Zimmer    40 Barlow Wilson
12 Watson Curtis        41 John Allen
13 Horace Hathaway  42 Henry Slosson
14 Selah Kelsey         43 Alvin F Moors
15 David Brown        44 Horace Washburn
16 Samuel Butler       45 Henry Harper
17 Daniel Maples       46 Mahlon Wheat
18 Jerome Pope          47 Levi Webb
19 Orin D Gray          48 George Riley
20 Joseph Brockham  49 Warren Andrews
21 Nelson Budd          50 Horace Walters
22 Frances Phipps       51 Lorenzo Barden
23 Harry Wright         52 Norman Young
24 Jamin Howard       53 Jerome Bliss
25 Levi Phipps           54 Robert Taylor
26 Nelson Brooks      55 Seth G Marcy
27 Silas Billings         56 Henry Soper
28 Ira Lewis                57 Alexander Ross
29 Robert Wilson

Town of Lisle.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 19—East Election District.
NO.                             NO.
1 Thos S Boughton     17 James Naylor
2 F R Sheperd             18 John Johnson
3 Wm Atwood            19 Richard Sullivan
4 Chas Schemerhorn   20 Chas Marks
5 Harvey Edminster    21 Jefferson Sparrow
6 John G Lewis           22 Edward Adams
7 Geo. H Lewis           23 Frederick Thomas
8 Thos Randall            24 Joseph Pike
9 Ranson A Pierce      25 Edgar Manwaring
10 Leonard Keelore   26 Edmund Swony
11 Bradley Mix          27Chas H Davis
13 John Wheaton       28 Jasper Wheaton
13 Franklin Pierce      29 Joseph Burn
14 Orin Carley jr        30 Hiram Tholeman
15 E M Richardson    31 John Sullivan
15 Geo W Todd         32 Alexander Phelps

SUB-DISTRICT NO. 20.
NO.                            NO.
1 Bennet Pollard        15 Chas R Franklin
1 Ira S Dickinson       16 Wm Howland
3 Angus Griffin          17 Frank Burghart
4 George M Briggs    18 Albert Harvey
5 Horam Brown jr      19 J W Livermore
6 George N Couch     20 Patrick McNary
7 George Manning     21 John C Gleesen
8 Lewis Williams      22 Norman Burghardt
9 Horace P Willis      23 H N Howland
10 Bayette Beebe      24 D R Jennings
11 Miles Pollard        25 Wm B Cook
12 Myron Pollard      26 Dwight D Dyle
13 Horatio McNeil    27 Nathan Benedict
14 C M Lusk             28 S A Houghtaling

Town of Triangle.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 21
NO.                           NO.
1 Dan B Gates           26 Steph R Campbell
2 Moses M Tubbs     27 Chas W Egleston
3 John Lucas             28 Chas S Hall
4 Wm Dana               29 John O McGee
5 Dan J Chittenden    30 Irving J Green
6 Henry Clary            31 Earl Brewer
7 Edwin Sharp           32 Albert C Saxton
8 Eugene B Nash       33 Micheal O'Neal
9 Cyrus Dickinson     34 John Smith
10 George Love         35 Ira D Seymour
11 Rufus A Hand       36 C Perry Ashley
12 Orin W Munroe     37 Henry W Egleston
13 Geo W Hall           38 Wm H Rose
14 Devillo Northrup   39 Milo Buel
15 Wm H Twiss         40 Lewis P Ticknor
16 I D F Meacham     41 G O Williams
17 Lewis W Potts       42 John Lines
18 Henry W Lewis     43 Edm'd S Matteson
19 Ransom D Page     44 Alanson Cady
20 Dwight E Ballard   45 Eug. W Simmons
21 Samuel Garnes       46 Chas Love
22 John H Cady          47 Osias D Page
23 George Sanford      48 Perry Bliss
24 Wm Mann              49 James Correy
25 Chas Slater

Town of Union.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 22—2d Election District.
NO.                                  NO.
1 Daniel S Bradley          25 Geo W Langdon
2 Jehial M Bryles            26 Jas H Potter
3 James Haveland           27 Barton D Harper
4 Warren S Beecher       28 John S Mersereau
5 Henry Carnochan        29 Harrison Clark
6 John Wheeler              30 Atwell Rogers
7 Hanan N Brady           31 Francis D Mersereau
8 Asa W Vandemark      32 Sidney O'Keeler
9 Chas Shores                 33 Oliver A Gibbs
10 A W B Hagadon        34 Marion Oliver
11 Wm B Brown            35 Wm O'Brien
12 Richard Johnson        36 Edgar F Horton
13 Samuel Kipp              37 Edmund Guyon
14 Elijah D Cafferty       38 Fred A Cummings
15 Lewis Kipp                39 Harvy B Bartle
16 Truman B Willis       40 Wm. Powers
17 George W Webb       41 Chas Wales
18 Alanson Cleaveland  42 Seymour Mersereau
19 Jeremiah Eastman     43 Thos Grange
20 John Russell              44 Henry D St Croix
21Orlando Cleaveland   45 Addison Wood
22 Chester Lashier         46 Martin Pearce
23 Benj. Latterrette        47 Levi Webb
24 Wm H Ross               48 Morgan R Howard

SUB-DISTRICT NO. 23—1st Election District.
NO.                              NO.
1 Dan Munroe jr          10 Benj F Tyler
2 Martin Wright           11 Wm Cortright
3 Benj Boughton          12 Ezariah J Orton
4 Wm Cash                             10 Wm Finney
5 Jerry Houghtailing      14 Henry Tompkins
6 Elias Crocker              15 Austin C Gage
7 Edgar Carnine             16 Enos Rexford
8 George Silvernail        17 Isaac Wright
9 Chas L Lewis

Town of Nanticoke.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 24.
NO.                                         NO.
1 Wm Stranger              12 Martin B Smith
2 Henry W Gould                    13 Benoni Marks
3 Richard E Smith                   14 Wm Dunlap, jr
4 Abram P Hawver        15 Chester M Smith
5 John Schism               16 Chas H Pittsly
6 Levi H Baldwin                    17 Henry Tompkins
7 Jay W Bush                18 Michael Aherne
8 Wm Richards              19 Elijah Adams
9 Andrew F Scoville      20 Lorenzo Ballard
10 Meded Ketchum        21 Peter A Hawver
11 Bishop A Hartwell    22 David D Himernan

Town of Vestal.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 25.
NO.                                NO.
1 Edward Miller             27 Chas M Keator
2 Francis Balcomb         28 Wm Pearson
3 Fred'k Newcomb         29 Simeon Westfall
4 Chester Fairbrother    30 H'y Bartholomew
5 Jas Winner                  31 Edgar H Stratton
6 Dan'l Williams            32 Horace Knight
7 H Clay Balch              33 Silas L Walker
8 Ambrose Lathrop       34 John L Rounds
9 Freeman Cory             35 Martin Flynn
10 Orin Rounds             36 Ira Lathrop
11 Otis Card                  37 Abram Winans
12 Foster F Ellas           38 Sylvester Ackla
13 Peter Hellicuse                    39 Alfred D Rounds
14 Horace Goodell         40 John Rounds
15 Ervin W Weed          41 Chas Depew
16 Samuel Morse           42 Thos Layton
17 John Grippin            43 Chas Brink
18 Isaac Cox                  44 Reuben Degues
19 Pulaski Breed            45 Edwin Taylor
20 Royal S Brown                   46 Andrew H Place
21Jas S Lagrange                    47 Wm W Mersereau
22 Jas H Post                 48 Hiram Wilson
23 Isaac S Denin            49 Calvin L Minkler
24 Adam Vosburgh       50 Addison Stevenson
25 Chas Mott                 51 Chas Fox
26 James M Brayman    52 Jonathan Card

Town of Kirkwood.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 26.
NO.                                NO.
1 Marshall Finch            21 Isaac Phillips
2 Julius Benn                 22 Michael Hagerty
3 Edward O'Neil            23 Samuel Hayes
4 Benajah B Standley    24 John Dryscal
5 Edward Hayes            25 John Cruiser
6 Chas Bound                26 David A Hoag
7 Henry Conover           27 Saml Gable
8 David Doane               28 David O'Neil
9 Edwin Benn                29 Abm C Osterhout
10 Wm Jackson             30 Theo T Hunter
11 Chas A Palmer                   31 Jas Cleary
12 Andrew J Hayes       32 Lewis Godfrey
13 Daniel Jones             33 Henry C Squires
14 Statharn Keys                    34 Byron Laughlin
15 John Hagerty            35 James Gage
16 Isaac N Ball              36 Lewis Bush
17 Dennis Cronan                   37 David Rose
18 Peter F Sheak            38 Dennis Haggerty
19 Wm Standley            39 Edward Park
20 Michael Connor        40 Julius M Finch

Town of Conklin.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 27.
1 John Whitney             15 Sandy Kingsley
2 Otis Salsbury              16 Edward Hollenbeck
3 James H Eames                    17 Daniel Bills
4 Albert B Clark            18 Stephen A Ding
5 Wm Homason             19 John Gageler
6 Wm Eames                 20 G L Falmsbury
7 Judsen Lawrence         21 John W Finch
8 George Lowe               22 Eldred H Watson
9 Church Bagley            23 Royal Bodertha
10 Geo P Waterman      24 Alpheus B Corby
11 Jacob Carlin              25 John S Fletcher
12 Oscar Burchard        26 Chas Watrous
13 Smith Layton            27 Wm R Donalson
14 Jacob Banta              28 Chas Meeker

Town of Windsor.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 28.
NO.                                NO.
1 Hirans Haines, jr.        36 Sabin M Gray
2 John Madigan             37 Wm H Simmons
3 George Puley              38 Orin Guernsey
4 Edward Garlick                    39 Henry Moat
5 Lewis J Smith             40 J Tanner
6 John Delemater                    41 Austin M Brown
7 Henderson Phillips     42 Joshua Smith
8 A G Butts                             43 H Hupman
9 Jairus Chase               44 M Egleston
10 John C Sage              45 Burton Wellmot
11 E Goodenough                   46 Geo Curtis
12 Hurd B Judd             47 A Hawkens
13 Jason Brown             48 John Delany
14 Peter O Rouk            49 L Evarts
15 Nicholas Moat                    50 Theron Foster
16 W W Crisson            51 Chas Wood
17 Delber Edson            52 J H Dusenbury
18 George Garlick                   53 Geo Phillips
19 Newton W Edson     54 M Springsteen
20 Perkins K Debble      55 Clark Wetemore
21 Zac Phillips               56 W W Watrous
22 Hiram Weeks            57 C L Frost
23 John N Simpkins      58 S L Welton
24 John Doolittle           59 B H Twichel
25 Jesse Wideman                   60 Jas S Brown
26 Wm Steeper              61 Jas Martin
27 Jos W Brown            62 Chas Dickson
28 Sipson Keys             63 Whit Dusenbury
29 Ed Breman                64 Wm Pultz
30 O Snedicer                65 James Watson
31 Erastus Andrus                  66 Miles Knowlton
32 J Certredge                67 D Winston
33 Eben Hawkins                    68 Chas Mayo
34 U Springsteene                   69 Eli Welton
35 J B Loveland

Town of Sandford.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 29—1st election distrist [sic].

1 Jonas Underwood jr   25 John S Wayman
2 Geo A Smith               26 Martin Fisher
3 Geo C Leonard           27 James E Brown
4 Eugene Dresser           28 John Benjamin
5 James Halleck             29 Thos Prentiss
6 Clinton Sherman         30 Peter Wayman
7 Timothy McCoy                   31 Chas Daniels
8 Aaron Vincent            32 Bouton Boothe
9 Jas B Carpenter                    33 Alvin Booth
10 Danl K Belknap        34 Wm H Botsworth
11 John Shner                35 Albert Vincent
12 Wm E Demander      36 Patrick McMahoh
13 Jacob Gardinier        37 Judson Blizzard
14 Wm R Titus              38 Geo Hewitt
15 Brookyns J Lewis     39 Chas G Mygatt
16 Chas Farnham                    40 George Portey
17 Wm Thomas             41 Jerry O'Larry
18 Martin Voigt             42 John W Walker
19 Leman Stuart            43 Joseph Allen
20 Leonard Boughton    44 Edwin Stetson
21 Geo L Gregory                   45 Harmon Breeze
22 Wm B Smith             46 Geo H Allen
23 Ephraim Molson       47 Alex Cummings
24 Geo Alexander                   48 Wallace Austin

THE DRAFT IN BROOME CO.
BINGHAMTON, July 25, 1863.
MR. VISITOR:—Although at a somewhat late hour in the day, I will tell you a few things about our draft, which, since the citizens of your county have not yet been through the "mill," may not prove uninteresting.
The Provost Marshal of this district, Hon. E. C. Kattell, makes his headquarters at Owego, the shire town of Tioga County, and there all the drafting is done. The district comprises four counties, viz.: Broome, Tioga, Tompkins and Schuyler, although the aggregate population is less than in your district, which includes only three counties, viz.: Chenango, Otsego and
Delaware. The latter district having, at the last census, a population of 133,569, while the former had but 114,899, leaving our district in a minority of 18,670. The quotas in the different districts, are, however, arranged so that the proportion to be drafted is equal throughout the state. The draft here, including the fifty per cent. additional names, took about two out of every seven persons enrolled in the first class, and, no doubt, the same figures will  apply to your place.
The drawing of the lottery for Binghamton took place at Owego, Friday morning, 17th inst., and at 12:30, p. m., we had the list of names, which also appeared in an "extra" at about four o'clock.
There had been some dark hints of resistance, mob violence, and the like, for which the loyal men had fully prepared by procuring a hundred muskets from Elmira, and securing all the available ones in town, which were put into the hands of the three military companies then organized. But the precautions were, as it proved, unnecessary, for the most violent of those who were in for resistance before the draft, were quiet after it had been made, and leading Irishmen, who were determined to "fight at home" quieted down with the remark that "it was a fair dhraft, there was no chating about it."
Among those who were "gobbled up," with very few exceptions, the utmost good feeling prevailed, and even those who could illy afford to "pay or go" were ready to crack jokes at their own expense, hailing each other as "conscripts," and having a good time generally.
Very few of the rank copperheads were taken, but then, most of those who answer to that name, are too old for the first call. Young America is, as a rule, loyal to the Union.—Eight colored men were "gobbled up;" and of these the proportion was more than an average with the Irish, who seemed to slip by. Loyal men were taken, in a great majority, and some loyal firms were almost entirely taken. From I. N. Hine & Co's., dry goods store, three partners and one clerk were taken. Hirschman Brothers, and R. H. Hall's stores each contributed three, and Preston & Sears, book store, sent four to join Uncle Sam's $300 army. Neither of the newspaper offices, of which there are three, were disturbed, the printers, for once being in luck. Our ex-Assemblyman, George Bartlett, was invited to the Union Ball, and one Theodore T. Hunter received two invitations, one in Binghamton and one in Kirkwood, in both of which places he was enrolled. Two brothers, Lucius and Allen Negus drew successive numbers. They were both in Virginia building bridges when drafted, but are now here and say they will neither procure substitutes nor pay the commutation. Two others, H. H. and J. H. Doubleday, drew with only one number between them. Two persons named Michael Conners were taken, and so on. Rev. Silas McKinney, a returned Presbyterian missionary and Rev. W. P. Abbot, a Methodist teacher were the only clergymen taken in town.
Various companies were formed to mutually insure each other, and most of these worked satisfactorily. But I am making this letter too long. On the whole, this first conscription which this generation has enjoyed passed off in good order here.
Probably one half of the conscripts will pay or get substitutes, while of the other half a great number have volunteered and got their bounty, a privilege they enjoyed up to the time of their notification, which was commenced day before yesterday. The whole number drawn in town was 288.
L.R.E.

BINGHAMTON STANDARD
WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 1863.
The Draft.
The draft for the County of Broome took place at Owego, the head-quarters of this military district, on Friday morning last. The quota for this town was 192, being one in five of the number liable to draft, in the first class, but fifty per cent was added to the quota to offset those who would probably be exempted by the examining surgeon. The whole number drafted, therefore, was 228.
A general and lively interest was shown as the time drew near for the draft, and especially on the day it took place, but these was an almost universal good nature manifested. The public sentiment was, unmistakeably [sic] , that some sacrifices are demanded on the altar of patriotism when the country calls on her sons for support; and all or nearly all, cheerfully decided, in case they were called, to comply with the requirements of the law—either to go, procure a substitute, or pay the exemption fee. Insurance clubs were formed in many instances—that is six or more individuals joined together and paid fifty dollars each; and then those of the number drafted used the fund to pay the exemption fee.
We give on the 4th page a list of those who drew the prizes. In this town we notice some queer incidents. Four persons were taken from Preston & Sears' store, namely, C. W. Sears, R. S. Darrow, his clerk, and Messrs. A. Lounsbury and J. M. Bostwick, Jewelers. Three were taken from I. N. Hine & Co.s store—I. N. Hine, C. B. Perry and R. R. Coates. The various newspaper offices escaped the draft; according to the ratio they were entitled to two conscripts, at least. The legal profession is represented by A. E.  Andrews, E. K. Clark and Geo. Bartlett. Two brothers, H. H. and J.W. Doubleday, were drawn within one number of each other.
(Mr. Cary, of the Republican, for the courtesy of allowing us to use the type of the list of names, will accept our thanks.)

THE DRAFT IN BROOME COUNTY
The draft for this County took place Friday at Owego. We give below a complete list of the drafted men.—
NO.                                NO.
1 Isaac Beers                  19 John Smith
2 Darwin Felter              20 Daniel Lyon
3 Theo carman               21 Anson Meeker
4 John H Carman          22 John Jackson
5 Matt O'Connell           23 Wm Eldridge
6 Ed F Wright                24 Cramel D Abel
7 Almon Gillett              25 Charles Pierce
8 Morgan Drake            26 Charles Cortsey
9 William Carman                   27 James Lorrigan
10 Hiram Ketchum        28 Ebenezer Gage
11 Lewis Baird              29 William Layton
12 Henry Meeker           30 John Caden
13 James Reynolds        31 John Severson
14 James Abel               32 Boyle Finch
15 Emer Wencer            33 Charles H Clark
16 Silas Krom                34 Smith Layton
17 Alpheus Meeker        35 George Reynolds
18 Cyrus S Clapp                    36 David Vanorzee

SUB-DISTRICT NO. 15--All West of Chenango and North of Susquehanna Rivers.
NO.                                NO.
1 Robert B Stone           21 Cornelius Davis
2 Thomas O'Mara                   22 Aaron Bliss
3 James Q Davis            23 Samuel Hiver
4 Richard H Hall            24 Cornelius Falihee
5 Thomas Gisher           25 Marshall Morse
6 Christy Callon            26 Hiram W Fuller
7 Henry Lockwood        27 Michael McGlinn
8 Levi R Johnson                    28 Chas W Bradley
9 George A Hawe                    29 James Johnson
10 Howard Park            30 Frank Swimmer
11 Lucius W Moody      31 John Gorman
12 Alex E Andrews       32 Jeff. Wellington
13 Frank Whitney                   33 Joseph Wilson
14 Peter Ermuse            34 Chas Gale
15 David P Jackson       35 Geo Chambers
16 Joseph Braway                   36 Wm D Cutler
17 Alexander Peer                   37 Russell C Chase
18 William Riley            38 Jas T Labaron
19 Charles Diley            39 Wm W Chase
20 Henry Weaver                    40 Andrew Settle

SUB-DISTRICT NO. 16--The Second and Fifth Wards.
NO.                                NO.
1 Jas C Reed                  60 John Fean
2 Russell E Ba__us        61 Thos Conners
3 Geo Warner                62 G. C. Hemingway
4 Peter Gleck                 63 Jas Dillon
5 Gilbert Barnes            64 Terrence Lynch
6 John R Brigham                   65 A W Parmelee
7 Thomas E Norton       66 D S Roe
8 Silas McKinney                    67 D L Brownson
9 Rans. McClarra                    68 P Wall
10 George Kerr              69 Alfred Allen
11 James Bohen             70 E O'Brien
12 Frederick Corby        71 J L Finch
13 Aug Blake                 72 J H McQuan
14 Chas B Smith           73 E B Smith
15 Dennis Sullivan        74 S Holland
16 Geo Coon                 75 J M Thayer
17 Geo F Hand              76 Wm Tucker
18 James Baker             77 E P Stephens
19 Annias B Cameron   78 P Lowe
20 Chas E Corby           79 L M Dyer
21 Ripley Lynch            80 R S Darrow
22 Seth H Wells             81 H W Green
23 A D Spaulding                   82 J Shea
24 Richard Rooney        83 J M Bostwick
25 Rev W P Abbott       84 M Conners
26 John S Hinds            85 H N Baker
27 Michael Connors      86 Wm Chandler
28 Horace Loomis                   87 C Forker
29 Allen Lounsbury       88 Ezra Murphy
30 Chas E Barrett                   89 T W Whitney
31 Chas A Jarvis           90 T C Brown
32 Geo Bartlett              91 Cordon Sears
33 Chas Bronson                    92 E H Loomis
34 Geo Van Wormer     93 T T Hunter
35 And. Hanrahan                   94 C Zimmer
36 Edward Mills            95 J Sullivan
37 Robert Gilbert                    96 C Brownson
38 Chas A Herrick         97 N W Haines
39 James Delaney                    98 J Kleek
40 Isaac N Hine             99 Pat Stack
41 Lucius R Negus         100 C Burns
42 Henry Lynch             101 John Kane
43 Joseph Bohen           102 Pat Roach
44 Chas B Perry            103 C W Gambell
45 John Harroll             104 J Barnes
46 Almarin Johnson      105 John Baker
47 J W Bartholemew     106 M McMahon
48 John H Beers            107 H Jones
49 Gregory Doyle                    108 F P Jackson
50 Henry McBride         109 Eugene Piper
51 Isaiah S Dunham      110 Philo Lee
52 Elias Ayres               111 Aaron Schloss
53 Charles Davis           112 Ed Mckenzie
54 Daniel Shehan                    113 Thomas Griffin
55 Almon Taylor           114 J Lewhey
56 Aaron Williams jr     115 R R Coates
57 Wm H Siple              116 Henry Marean
58 J W Russell               117 Peter Couley
59 Henry Sampson        118 Christy Fay, Jr
119 Geo Runyan

SUB-DISTRICT NO. 17-- All East of Chenango and North of Susquehanna Rivers, except the 2d and 5th Wards.
NO.                                NO.
1 William H Nash                    48 Geo M Ricks
2 C Hana Bohan            49 Peter Murphy
3 Patrick Manning                   50 Fr'k N Blackstone
4 Edwin Kenzie              51 Edwin Curtis
5 Chas A Whitney                   52 John Carman
6 H H Doubleday                    53 Patrick Dowiny
7 Chas Jackson              54 Ephraim Stearns
8 Jas H Doubleday        55 Geo E Palmer
9 Martin Mangin            56 Sanford Stanley
10 Wm Knapp               57 Lo'zo B Roberts
11 Geo Jaynes               58 Chas B Sawtell
12 John A Moore                    59 John Matthews
13 Jas Kane                             60 Thomas Killen
14 Hugh W McFall        61 Geo F Stratton
15 Patrick Lauraban      62 Chas Sweeny
16 Lucius R Negus         63 Michael Shea
17 Allen P Negus           64 Wm Martin
18 Robert S Hogg                    65 Clark Campbell
19 A drake                     66 Sidney Robinson
20 Daniel Sullivan         67 Edward K Clark
21 Michael McMann      68 Chas H Meade
22 Orin R Mason                    69 Chas W Sears
23 Wm D Stevens                   70 Hiram Jones

SUB-DISTRICT NO. 69—Second and Third Election Districts.
No.                                 No.
1 Wm H Thompson       12 Alexander Light
2 John Lobdell               13 Riley Merrill
3 Jacob Whitney            14 Adelbert Kneeland
4 Henry Smith               15 Nichilos Martin
5 Albert B Tompkins     16 Jas E Roberts
6 John H French            17 Barnibus F Clark
7 Edward S Gregory      18 Maddison Judd
8 George Mulford                    19 John Page
9 John N Thompson      20 Henry Waterman
10 Wm Light                  21 Henry J Howe
11 Hiram B Fuller

Town of Chenango.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 30
No.                                 No.
1 Orby O Keeler            23 John C French
2 Elihue S Hawks                    24 Nelson Holt
3 Frederick Layton        25 Patrick Dillon Jr
4 Chas R Sprague                   26 Luman Graves
5 Jesse F Gray               27 Moscow Holt
6 Wm H Cleaveland       28 Robert Smith
7 Homer F Youngs        29 Oliver C Sprague
8 Robert W Byers                   30 Chas W Bowen
9 Alfred Brooks             31 G B King
10 Hez W Ackerman      32 Wm Ockerman
11 Revilo K Parman      33 Fred'k N White
12 James A Cole            34 Patrick Smith
13 Samuel Johnson        35 Jas H Siver
14 Ira Palmer                 36 Jerome Dorman
15 Wm W Scofield         37 Fred'k M Heath
16 John Carroll              38 Thos Aitchinson
17 Barney Fagan           39 Milton Holt
18 Stephen Fiero           40 Addison Smith
19 Morris Blair              41 Aaron W Young
20 Chas Layton Jr                   42 Harlo Livermore
21 Edwin Lee                 43 Luther A Vancuron
22 John Tabor

Town of Barker.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 31.
No.                                 No.
1 Simeon D Rogers        21 Newton Newman
2 Edward F Hide           22 Daniel D Drains
3 Lewis Pease                23 Anson French
4 Thomas G Lane                    24 Thomas Murphy
5 Charles Lonsberry      25 Oliver Walton
6 William M Haines       26 Herman Bell
7 Levi W Alexander       27 Abel Beach
8 John Foote                  28 Horrice B Dickens
9 Albert B Bliss             29 Noyes B Egleston
10 Bendict Eldridge       30 Chester Eldridge
11 John B Eldridge        31 Eugene M Hayes
12 Edgar Conklin                    32 Franklin Parsons
13 John B Darius                    33 Isaac Parsons
14 Charles H Taft                    34 Seth Phelps
15 Asher Worster                    35 Charles Rogers
16 Asa Cunningham      36 Urial Strickland
17 William Terwilliger   37 Theron Hollester
18 Gilbert S Morse        38 Allen Mead
19 Russell Harrington    39 John W Occerman
20 Edward Palmer

Town of Port Crane.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 32.
No.                                 No.   
1 Alva M Scott              20 Willard Shear
2 William M Temple      21 Dewitt C Dennis
3 Isaac D Andrews        22 John F Ketchum
4 Ezekiel Cole                23 Zina Spendley
5 Emmet Porter             24 Silas June
6 Philo West                  25 Nathan B Stone
7 Adnah Winner            26 John Edson
8 Calvin Hawkins                    27 Henry D Kark
9 Marcus W Scott                   28 John Doxy
10 Norman Baldwin      29 Underhill Richards
11 Oliver A Morris        30 James Winner
12 Nelson M Beardsley 31 Thomas Ward
13 Hiram O Ingraham    32 David A Crocker
14 Ezra Richards           33 Soliman Darling
15 Edward B Burrows   34 Adison Ives
16 David W Barner       35 Lewis H Lane
17 Andrew W Ingraham          36 William H Root
18 Edgar W Campbell   37 Ira Campbell
19 Jesse Germond

Town of Colesville.
SUB-DISTRICT NO. 33—First Election District.

1 Henry E Merril           23 Dewitt Wakeman
2 Phillip Rowlan            24 Jerome Doolittle
3 Asa ___                      25 Orville K Pike
4 Dewitt Watrous                    26 Henry Utter
5 Edgar L Bedient                   27 Charles Hare
6 Dan B Collar              28 John C Reynolds
7 Stephen Utter             29 Wm Holcomb
8 Willis O Harrington    30 Nelson Pulver
9 Silas B Scott               31 Almond Ayres
10 Oliver F King            32 Ed A Hurlburt
11 Warren Mott             33 Rueben Beman
12 Benjrmin Beadsley    34 George Fish
13 S. S. Doolittle           35 F H Frasier
14 Reubin W Lovejoy    36 Edwin R Boyce
15 E H Crandel              37 Wm Stevens
16 Sobie3ky F Munroe 38 Henry Webster
17 Simeon P Handy       39 Clark Smith
18 Joseph A Stevens     40 Wm O Bancroft
19 C W Harrington        41 Warren Martin
20 Frank Edgerton         42 N C Humphrey
21 Isaac Underwood      43 Marion Chance
22 Seldon Desanders

SUB-DISTRICT NO. 34—Second and Third Election Districts.
No.                                 No.
1 Noel Warner               20 Smith Baker, Jr.
2 Frank R Roberts                   21 Warren Parsons
3 Wilber Phillips            22 Edwin Allen
4 Norman Terwilligar    23 Neri Pine
5 Henry Atwell              24 Henry M Abbot
6 Eleazer Osborne                   25 Chas P Gause
7 Junia Doolittle            26 Matthias Osborn
8 Egbert Crofutt            27 George Blatchley
9 Edmond Baker            28 Chas N Baker
10 Ira E Austin              29 George Carl
11 Erastus Hubbard      30 George Woodsworth
12 Edwin Pearsons        31 Samuel Rowe
13 Edward C Blakeslee 32 George C Lyon
14 H. J. Davenport        33 Chester Thurber
15 Edwin Knox             34 John Cox
16 L D Poole                  35 Austin Reynolds
17 Sylvester Parsons     36 David Brainard
18 Ezra McDaniel                    37 Henry Tripp
19 Averey Edson           38 Marvin Way

THE CONSCRIPTION.
The forces enrolled for the draft comprise all able-bodied male citizens and aliens who have declared their intention to become citizens, who are between the ages of twenty and forty-five. The exemptions are as follows:
"Such as are rejected as physically or mentally unfit for the service; also, first, the Vice President of the United States, the judges of the various courts of the United States, the heads of the various executive departments of the Government, and the Governors of the several States. Second, the only son liable to military duty of a widow dependent upon his labor for support. Third, the only son of aged or infirm parent or parents dependent upon his labor for support. Fourth, where there are two or more sons of aged or infirm parents subject to draft, the father, or, if he be dead, the mother may elect which son shall be exempt. Fifth, the only brother of children not twelve years old, having neither father nor mother, dependent upon his labor for support. Sixth, the father of motherless children under twelve years of age dependent upon his labor for support. Seventh, where there are a father and sons in the family and household, and two of them are in the military service of the United States as non-commissioned officers, musicians, or privates, the residue of such family and household not exceeding two shall be exempt.—And no persons but such as are herein exempted shall be exempt: Provided, however, That no person who has been convicted of any felony shall be enrolled or permitted to serve in said forces."
The forces are subject to draft for two years from the first day of July following t he enrollment, and if drawn are liable to serve during the rebellion, not exceeding three years, having the same pay and bounty as the  volunteers for three years. They are divided into two classes—the first comprising all between the ages of twenty and thirty-five, and all unmarried persons between thirty-five and forty-five, and the second comprising all others. The second class "shall not, in any district, be called into the service of the United States until those of the first class shall have been called." The classes are enrolled separately.
Persons drawn are to be notified within ten days, and informed of the place or rendezvous, where they are to be inspected, and claims for exemption for disability are to be passed upon. The provision for commutation is as follows:
§13. And be it fusther [sic] enacted, That any person drafted and notified to appear as aforesaid, may, on or before the day fixed for his appearance, furnish an acceptable substitute to take his place in the draft, or he may pay to such person as the Secretary of War may authorize to receive it, such sum, not exceeding three hundred dollars, as the Secretary may determine, for the procuration of such substitute, which sum shall be fixed as a uniform rate by a general order made at the time of ordering a draft for any State or Territory; and thereupon such person so furnishing the substitute, or paying the money, shall be discharged from further liability under that draft.
The Secretary of War has fixed upon three hundred dollars as the rate of commutation, and has designated the Collector of Internal Revenue in each District to receive the money.
The following persons, drafted from the 14th and 15th sub-districts in this town, were exempted for the causes named.
Richard H. Hall, phthisis.
Oramel D. Abel, in service March 3d, 1863, in the 27th regiment.
Cornelius Falahee, only son of a widow dependent on him for support.
Thomas L. Fisher, weakness of knee joints in consequence of dislocation.
Abial F. Finco, in service March 3d, 1863, in the 27th Regt. N. Y. V.
Charles Cortsey, general physical debility, (sarcace and tendency to hernia.)
George Chambers, under 20 years of age, July 1st, 1863.
Henry Lockwood, general physical debility, (partial ptosis.)
James Reynolds, two sons in same family and household drafted—James exempt by election of his parents, who depend on him for support.
Russell C. Chase, hernia.
Hiram W. Fuller, hernia.
Jefferson Wellington, hernia.
Hiram Ketcham, blind in right eye.
Emihan Wenzar, over 35 years old and married.
William H. Sipple, in service March 3d, 1863, in the 27th regt. N. Y. V.
Levi R. Johnson, in service March 3d, 1863, in 27th regt. N. Y. V.
Frank Whitney, Jr., in service March 3d, 1863, in the 27th regt. N. Y. V.
William Layton, hernia.
Ebenezer Gage, resident of Pennsylvania, and enrolled there.
Henry Meeker, non-resident of the district where drafted, but resident of Vestal and enrolled there.
Charles H. Clark, disease in teeth and gums.
Samuel Hizer, hernia.
Charles Davis, general debility, (affection of lungs and heart).
Horace Loomis, partial paralysis and diminution of left side.
Rypley Lynch, felon, served two years in State Prison.

THE DRAFT IN THE 31st DISTRICT.
We have received the following communication from Provost Marshal PALMER:
PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE,
31st DISTRICT, NEW YORK.
DUNKIRK, August 10th, 1863.
The Draft in this District will take place at the Head Quarters of the Board of Enrollment, in Dunkirk, commencing Monday, August 17th, 1863, and the several sub-districts will be drafted from on the days hereinafter specified, as follows:—
Monday, August 17th, the 1st and 2d sub-districts, comprising the towns of Dunkirk and Pomfret; Tuesday, 18th, the 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th sub-districts comprising the towns of Sheridan, Hanover, Portland, Westfield. Ripley, Chautauqua and Stockton; Wednesday, 19th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, l5th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th sub-districts, comprising the towns of Arkwright, Villenova, Cherry Creek, Charlotte, Ellery, Gerry, Ellington, Poland, Ellicott, Harmony and Sherman; Thursday, 20th, the 21st, 22d, 23d, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, 30th, 31st, 32d, 33d, 34th and 35th sub districts, comprising the towns of Mina, French Creek, Clymer, Busti, Kiantone, Carroll, Perrysburgh, Dayton, Persia, Otto, East Otto, Ashford, Yorkshire, Freedom and Farmersville; Friday, 21st, the 36th, 37th, 38th, 39th, 40th, 41st, 42d, 43d, 44th, 45th, 46th, 47th, 48th and 49th sub-districts, comprising the towns of Machias, Lyndon, Franklinville, Ellicottville, Mansfield, New Albion, Leon, Conewango, Napoli, Little Valley, Great Valley, Humphrey, Ischua and Hinsdale; Saturday, 22d, the 50th, 51st, 52d, 53d, 54th, 55th, 56th and 57th sub districts, comprising the towns of Portville, Olean, Alleghany, Carrolton, Salamanca, Cold Spring, Randolph, South Valley.
You are respectfully invited to attend.
By order of the Board.
GEO. W. PALMER,
Capt. and Provost Marshal,
31st District, New York.

The following are the quotas of the several towns, with the 50 per cent. added, to cover exempts:
[We omit towns in Chautauqua.--Ed. REP.]
27. Perrysburg,    42     
28. Dayton,          29
29. Persia,            44
30. Otto,               34
31. East Otto,       42
32. Ashford,                  51
33. Yorkshire.      40
34. Freedom,        35
35. Farmersville,  28              
36. Machias,                  28
37. Lyndon,                   21
38. Franklinville,  34
39. Ellicottville,    48
40. Mansfield,      27
41. New Albion,   53
42. Leon,              32
43. Conewango,   29
44. Napoli,           32
45. Little Valley,  27
46. Great Valley,  45
47. Humphrey,     23
48. Ischua,            27
49. Hinsdale,        38
50. Portville,        48
51. Olean,             78
52. Allegany,        52
53. Carrolton,      23
54. Salamanca,     65
55. Goldspring,    19
56. Randolph,      45
57. South Valley, 25
GEO. W. PALMER,     
Capt. and Provost Marshal,
31st District, New York.

NUMBER LIABLE TO DRAFT IN THE FIRST CLASS.
The following is the number of men in the first class in the several towns of this county, liable to the present draft, according to the enrollment:
Perrysburg,          154
Dayton,                100            
Persia,                  160
Otto,                     127
East Otto,             152
Ashford,               182
Yorkshire,            147
Freedom,              131
Farmersville,        106   
Machias,               106
Lyndon,                  84
Franklinville,        128
Ellicottville,                   172
Mansfield,            105
New Albion,         190   
Leon,                    121
Conewango,                   111
Napoli,                   88
Little Valley,        104
Great Valley,        164
Humphrey,             91
Ischua,                  102   
Hinsdale,              148
Portville,              171
Olean,                   274
Allegany,              184
Carrolton,              91
Salamanca,           232
Coldspring,            77
Randolph,            159
South Valley,         94   
The number enrolled in the County is 4,130; number to be drafted, 1,154.

YORKSHIRE.
151 names in the box—40 to be drawn.
Riley Weeks                   Riley Philips
David Gould, Jr.            Joseph Rice
Frank Nazen                  Fred Steffenhagen
Lewis H. Comstock       James M Hayes
James Montgomery       David Goddemote
Danl K. Bailey               Henry Smith
Orlando Perkins             Isaac O Turner
Edward M Sherman       Solomon Howe
James Smith                  Gurdon Cochran
Ira O Turner                  Perry Hodges
Alpheus Harman           Henry Buchanan
James Robinson             Joel D House
Elijah H Strong              Geo H Whiting
Wm C Pomeroy             John F Goo
Herman Nichols             Andrew J Thomas
David Lafferty               Lewis L Bump
James S Cummings        Willis B Phinney
James Bentley                Benj Philbrick
Timothy Eastwell                    Wyman Hall
Norman Everets             Royal Hancock

NEW ALBION.
191 names in box—53 to be drawn.
Culver Whitcomb                    Oscar Drew
John Gordon                  Carlton H Cottrell
Lanans H Maltby                    Artemus Fairbanks
Ephriam Smith jr                    Charles Carter
Harrison Payne jr                    Albert P Rich
Francis S Higbee            Peter Tingue
Martin Plow                   Chauncey Niles
Henry Drew                   Wm Barrell
Patrick Sheedy               David Wheller
Clarendon Day              Linus Smith
George Straight              Moses S Bishop
Joseph B Convelle         Charles Ingalls
Richard Ingersoll           Charles Brown
Henry Smarll                 John Grant
Treat B Buffun              Clarence D Oyer
Alex Yarrington             Alden Burroughs
Halrey Hitchcock           Byron Macky
Oscar O Bates                Jefferson Day
Jared Puddy                   Marcellus Adams
Wm Young                              Byron Drew
John Huntan                  Allen Kilby
Stephen Champlin                   James Brigham
Geo Thomas                  Michael McGrane
Roderick Jacobs             Birdsall Kingan
Elias Day                       Timothy Griffin
Arland Briggs                H Schoonover
Alexander Parmalee

NAPOLI.
88 names in the box—22 drawn.
George W. Cary             Wm. Miner
Alvin Nobles                  Flavill Marall
Charles Bump                Wells J, Bigelow
Abner Porter                  Levi E Fuller
John W Damon              John B F Champlin
John R. Card                 Manley D Tiffany
George A Gladden         Alphonso Boardman
James M. Boardman      Framan Leffingwell
Jonathan Milk                Wm. Rhodes
John Caston                   Edwin Davis
Horace D. Swan, jr        Orrin Whimore

LITTLE VALLEY.
105 names in the box—27 drawn.
Alphonso Ames             Douglas M. Brooks
Ezra W Earns                Richard Gardner
Wm. Cornell                  Thomas J. Green
Marens Chase                George Hilse
Asa Furnes, jr.               Charles Woodworth
Alfred Earl                     Timothy Carroll
Benj. Conklin                 Henry Couchman
Sanford Fields               Isaac Winship
Emerson Fields              Joseph Fields
Orlando Fairbrother      John Carney
Thomas Barrett             Bhrijohn Stutlet
Henry Mock                   Hamilton J. Morris
Stillman Bryant             Alvin B. Bullard
William Godding

GREAT VALLEY.
164 names in the box--45 drawn.
Stephen F. Bellows        Benjamin Hurd
Isaac P. Markham                   Hugh Morton
Erastus D. French                   Sylvester Beadn_
Michel Birmingham       Francis ___essn__
Alex F. Mudget              Boved Pe___ert__
John Palmer                   James O'Brien
Albert D. Benedict         John Hom__
Augustus Vanslyke        George Hitchcock
Orville Flint                   Jeremiah Laton
Oscar B. Seneare           C. H. Chamberlain
George B. Thorp            Joseph E Flemming
Wm Shewers                  Alonzo G. Niles
Lawrence Sullivan         Joel Gaylord
Wm Bartlett                   John F. Nelson
James Maloney             Isaac Walton
Joseph Frank                 Walter D. Phelps
Morris W. Bryant                    Allen Marsh
Dan F. Booth                 Alexander Kuehl
Sanford S Fields            Henry French
_. B. Canfield                 Samuel Duffy
Edwin Hoyt                             John Akers
Charles Green                Timothy L. Abbott
Henry Baker

LEON.
121 in box—32 drawn.
John J Greeley               John W Town
Francis Kellogg              John H Millman
Henry Coe                     John W Franklin
John W Waud                Ira L Caston
Wm N Herrick               Henry Smith
_arion Dean                   Oscar F Kellogg
Norman Williams                    Norman G Leeley
Isaac N Smith                John F Mosier
Newton Coe                   Wm R Mardock
_ber F Keller                  Luke Kellogg
_s W Caston                  Calvin Amidan
Geo Dye                         Moses McMillen
_s W Ridout                  Thos Plunket
_s F Tower                              John Hager
Warren Bump                Alonzo Thomas
Chas Filly                      Porter Snyder

CONEWANGO.
111 names in box—29 to be drawn.
Franklin Gould              Chas D Colburn
Hyman Harris                Wm Mason
Hyman Guiles                Hiram Morris
_ A Sanders                             DeHart Grover
Wm Winshop                Reuben Towers
Oscar O Wood               Edmund Burges
_eman McElwain           Reuben M Ward
Henry Hall                     Jesse A Atwood
_Huntington                  Sam H Gardner
Emanuel Slocum            Milton Bush
John A Watson              Martin V Benson
James Darling                Robt W Scott
_ T Hammond               John Paisley
Melvin Snow                 David Stevens
_an D Beardsley

CARROLTON.
92 names in the box—23 drawn.
John B Beers                 H C Barton
Robert North                 Dan'l A Hutchinson
Henry S Waters             Walter G Brown
Charles Brown               Samuel Huntington
Ebenezer B Rice             John C Dual
George Pike                   James Kough
John A Hazzard             Dennis Keith
Cornelius King               Alonzo Seamons
James R Sweet               Michael Quillman
Thomas H B Osgood     Norris K Kellogg
Harry Barnymon           Michael Carroll
Charles Morse

HUMPHREY.
91 names in the box—23 drawn.
Erastus Barrows            Geo B Worden
Freeman Hitchcock        Robt Hogg
Benj F Stone                  Matthew O'Brien
Harlow Pierce                Michael Coffee
Sam R Fessenden                    Robt H Wilbur
Clarance Discall             Andrew Morrison
Seth Calvin                              Geo L Drake
Merrit Calvin                 David F Raub
Cornelius Reynolds       Theo Whitlock
Jacob Southwick            Henry A Chapman
David S Hull                  Franklin B Woodruff
John M Reed

ISCHUA.
104 names in the box—38 drawn.
Chas H Reed                  Jas McCrane
James Whitlock             Jas A Haynes
Henry Wagner               Adelbert Wilson
Eugene Burlingame        Jas H Barnard
Urben Wilson                Wm Morris
Reuben Reynolds                    Joel A Godfrey
Johnathan C Smith        Henry Campbell
Elbridge G Simmons      Riley L Sprague
Levi Farwell                   A J Chamberlain
Benj M Conrad              O M Merrick
Benj Bacon                              Chas L Mallory
E Chamberlain               Henry L Barber
Justus Lockwook                    Chas Drake
Barnett Boon

HINSDALE.
140 names in the box—38 drawn.
Alfred C Terrey             John Hadden
Jerry Breshnanaham      Simeon W Salsbury
George Hursh                John R Gardiner
Andrew Osman              Harvey M Brown
Henry M Smith              Howe H Gould
Charles Rice                   Elvin H Sage
Abram Miller jr              Richard A Hugenear
W Worcester                  Elias Reynolds
Morris O'Hern               H D Reynolds
Jas Cansadine                Geo M Brown
Edwin F Wood              Hervey S Wing
Henry Chapin                Eli Simons
Geo Iseman                             Henry K White
John Flannagan             W M Johnson
Rufus M Williams                   Wm McHill
Wm H Conrad               Leroy Parker
Edwin G Bullard            A McWilliams
Elisha Degraw               Michael McMahon
James Morris                 George Burton

PORTVILLE.
172 names in box—48 names drawn.
James W Page                Marian Wakefield
Henry C Scofield           Orville C Adams
Morg'n Fitzpatrick         J M Hills
Geo White                      Wm O Butts
Orrin Rider                              John S Youmans
Daniel W Howe             Amos Stay
Robt S Holcob               Jerome Hyde
Leonard Hill                   Mathew Miller
Asahel Scott                  Wm H Andrews
John Reynolds               Spencer M Barnes
Henry Strickland           Jones Johnson
Charles D Watson                   Chester Wakefield
Lewis Boyington            Aaron J Blakeslee
James Manegal              Jay Cole
Wm Woodruff               Melvirn Parish
John Meddough             O C Wakefield
C Noyes Babber            Eli G Stone
David L Parish               Laf. Strickland
Wm Slaunt                     Samuel Wheeler
Nelson P Wheeler                    A Washburn
John M Coon                 Rowland Coon
Smith Bockes                 John Cronnin
W Weston                      Leroy Pierce
Charles Bockes              John Archibald

OLEAN.
276 names in box—78 drawn.
John B Wade                 Jerry Sheehan
Geo Lawrence                Henry Johnson 2d
Wm A Comstock           Adolph Spreater
Patrick Priest                 Stephen S Fish
Argus Giers                             Wm Stratton
Pat Cahin                       Addison Judson
Chas G Barny                John Miles
Andrew J Finn               Leander Conover
Ob Patterson                  Geo Wright
Martin Stewart              John Kayes
Alonzo A Lord               Henry Korn
Reuben Johnson            Wm Black
Owen Cuffalo                John Kerr
Edwin R Shattuck                   John Coy
Morgan Merritt              Geo Shafer
James Baker                  William Wright
Jacob Klink                             Charles H Sheldon
Jerry Atwood                 Geo Chesley
James Rogers                 Jas B Beaumont
Michael O'Brien             Levi L Bouton
Martin Hines                  Wm Collopy
Chas Segler                             Martin V Moore
Paul Weise                     John Porter
John A Lang                  Lafayette Magie
Mathew Tulley               Alvrid Rockwood
John Mellia                              Edward Finn
Adam Lester                  Perry Sellen
James Maroney              Patrick Boyle
James Hall                     Geo Lucas
J C Goodwin                  Joel Farmington
James W Fuller              John W Meloy
John R Burdick              George Porter
Heman G Rugg              George Boose
Hiram C Miller              Christian Stravel
Willard Presby               Tudor Bidwell
Andrew Krieger             Wm C Squires
Henry Hyde                   Mattock Hoover
Geo Halleck                   Wm Parker
James Dillon                  J Seymour Milliken

ALLEGANY.
190 names in the box—52 drawn.
Wm John Brennan         Pat McKinny
Theodore Palen              Joseph Hartsell
Jared Phillips                 George Ehret
George Hall 2d               John Roberts
James A Freeland                    John C Stowell
John P Colgrove            Samuel Woods
Andrew Piffer                Horace Morgan
Edward S Mills              Charles Dolan
Joseph Mohr                  Stephen Crook
John Karl                       Uriah Fluent
Thomas Edgerton                    Frederick Densinger
Robert Miller                 Joel Hall
James McKenna             Pamfilo Denagliano
Jerome O'Keffe              Samuel Marsh
Danford Wiltse              Pat Dillon
John Laubendall            John Blessing
Charles Cass                  Rial Christan
John Philips                   Michael Enright
James H Battle               Evert L Bouton
John H Carles                Christian Timer
Robert Disney                Warren Russell
Sanford B McClure        Hiram A Clark
Adelbert H Marsh                   Joseph Moyer
David O'Brien                John Morris jr
Isaac E Colman              Thomas Roseck
Michael Shister              L Niccolloni

SALAMANCA.
235 names in the box—65 drawn.
A Eddy                          Jas Donohue
Wm Bule                        Geo Varris
Orrin Smith                             Edward L Carri'gton
Chas Lee                        Wm Foster
Fred'ick M Brainard      John Michael
Pat Whalan                             Robert Clover
Geo Oak Patrick            Higgins, 2d
Patrick Callahan            Levi Perego
John Fellows                  Wm Connery
Jas L Whitney                O H Millspaugh
John Medley                  Howard Carr
Thos Jones, 1st              George Wheeler
Giles Standard               Horace Bulleck
Egbert Green                  Charles Allen
Marvin Childs                Ryslet Stoddard
Alonzo Fellows              James Brady
Michael Sullivan            David Sherman
Wm Hart                        Mc Weber
Edward Kelly                 Mall Colman
Henry Cook                   Rochester Boardman
Bascoss Gault                Ira Perrigo
Albert Eastman              Geo Wandol
John Blansped               L Merrian
Martin C Willbeck         John Woodmansee
Eugene Wells                 James Dale
Delos B Clark                Mathew Hart
Lorin Eastman               Benj Allen
Joel S Otto                     Nawell Edwards
Nathaniel H Pierce         L Lomalby
Andrew Kunager           Thos Barrington
Stephen Wait                 Ansel Hinkel
Scott Whitney                John Prase

COLDSPRING.
72 names in the box—19 drawn.
Horace F Hovey             Geo Hill
John Sullivan                 John Hurley
James Hurley                 John Smith
Alfred Fuller                  Peter Berget
Luther Wait                             Henry Firman
Byron E. Darling           Aaron Bachis
Wm Egglestone              J W Campbell
W B Bowen                    Daniel Arrace
Patrick Craton               Alonzo Davis
Taylor Wood

RANDOLPH.
161 names in box—45 drawn.
F W Wadsworth            Milo Hitchcock
Walter Birch                  Geo Clyde
Joseph McCapes            Joshua Atwood
Augustus D Holt            Nicholas Bigler
Stephen Brown              Melzer R Pingrey
Reuben E Merrit            Edwin Holt
Geo Bryant                              Jehial Daniels
Enos Bush                     John F Abby
Henry Wadsworth                   Geo Hilldrum
Andrew Diken               Anthony O'Brien
Chales Goodrich            Oscar M. Sheldon
Wm Wait                       Joseph S Abbey
Jas Goodrich                  Robert E Hoard
Oliver C Gurnsey                    Wm B Bowen
E H Carpenter               Alex Wentworth
John McCapes               Henry Hildom
Walter Brown                Thomas Stone
George Stevens              Jesse Goldthwait
Jas G Johnson               Frederick Daniels
John E Rogers               Henry F Wilder
Alfred Sample                James White
Rufus Grant                   Simon Caswell
Luther Stanley

SOUTH VA____.
94 names in box—25 drawn.
Benj Reeves                   Anthony Cain
__well Mack                  Samuel Braley
Charles Barton              Marcus Bump
Da__es Congleton                   Horatio M Crooks
R___ge Norman            James Moore
L__ick McLaughlin        Madison Drum
A___ariam Palmer         John F Wyman
J___pert France             Geo Cowen
H___es Hotchkiss                   Wm Burrell
Webster Covill               Charles D Harwworth
____ __oods                  Patrick McMahon
M Barton Arthur McC____
___Stewart

MANSFIELD.
104 names in box--27 to be drawn.
Wm E Carse                  Albert T____
Allison Hollister            Ezekiel C___lson
Addison M Smith                    Larma_ Foot
David A Wheeler           James W Eddy
Nathaniel C Killborn     James M Beckwith
Patrick James                 Richard J McKay
Edward A Rhodes                   Theron M Whipple
Milton Newton              Geo Randall
Ezekiel Kelly                  Alfred Killborn
Cyrus W Bowen            Thomas T Butterfield
Oscar McKay                 Jason Rogers
Anson A Stone              Silas L Wright
Benjamin J Austin                   Edmond Stewart
George Reed

FRANKLINVILLE.
128 names in box—34 to be drawn.
Alfred Morrison             Appleton Stillman
Sylvester Deibler           Andrew Hall
Dalson Searl                  Napoleon B Deinler
Azer Curtis                              Thomas Barrell
Cyrus Salisbury             Wm Ferrice
Sylvester Adams            Wm B Sill
John E Robinson           Addison Deibler
Geo W. Stone                Jonathan Fields
Henry Donaldson                    Abram Harvey
Robert Rousburg           James Ludlow
Henry Rogers                 Jefferson Fitch
Levi Rogers                    John Kerr
Homer Bellamy              A B Matthewson
Russel Adams                Patrick Driscall
Philo J Simons               Horace Blackmon
Horace Corcans             John McClure
Artemas Burlingame      Alexander Duncan

FREEDOM.
136 names in the box—35 drawn.
John Parry                     Benjamin Leonard
Joseph Cook                  Morgan L. Davis
George Flynn                 Isaac W. Morgan
Thomas Mitchell            Walter S. Smith
Willam H. Jackson         George L. Jones
Addison J. Beebe           John C. Gulie
John H. Morain             Wm. H. Cheesman
Richard C. Wood                    Wm. P. Jones
Miles B. Lewis               Joseph Perry
Samuel Norton              Joseph W. Sawyer
Edwin R. Cornell           Wellington Bebee
Edwin J. Marble            Andrew McCarrow
E. J. Hancock                 Henry S. Crandall
Joseph Marble               Daniel Steele
Hiram B. Stone              Franklin A. Hyde
Francis D. Alden            Thomas Lewis
Hugh A. Steele               Thomas Finlay
Thomas Dorman

MACHIAS.
186 names in box—21 drawn.
Morgan Jones                Samuel Reed
John Austin                             James Adams
William Follet                Thomas J. King
Grove Armstroug                    Seth L. Root
Chester Carver               Paul Morris
Joseph Butler                 Clark Sisson
Franklin Wright             James Miller
George F. Willis             Wyman Hall
Lewis Reed                              William Davis
Norman H. Coe             Wm. L. Whitman
Harvey Button               Sylvester Austin
Edwin Baker                  Harrison Fish
Frank Folts                              Thomas J. Jones
Welcome Camp             Theodore Colby

FARMERSVILLE.
107 names in the box—28 drawn.
James H. Howard          Egbert W. Robbins
Elisha Bullock               James A. Blackmon
Wm. L. Griffith              Oscar M. Randall
Horace W. Bullock        Robert E. Roberts
Henry S. Shank             Henry H. Bellony
Peter Colerick                Gersham Rawley
Jacob Washington                   George A. Hayford
Spencer C. Bond            Jasper Parish
Ezra M Gould                Lewis Jacob
Alonzo Damon              George Love
Wm. W. Woods             Norris Cleveland
Richard Woods              Ormas Nichols
Henry Wade, jr.             Philo P. West
John Washington                    Winfield S. Hovey

ELLICOTTVILLE.
176 names in box—48 to be drawn.
Perry Williams               Marvin Root
Samuel S. Huntley         Fred C. Neilson
Owen Fitzgerald             Joseph Dolph
Barton Williams            Andrew Leach
Henry Rowland 2d        Cornelius Nye
Thos W. Litchfield         John O'Dea
Wm. McCadden             John Neilson
John Welch                              Hiram Oakes
Burr H Bentley              John King 1st
Thomas Fitzgerald         Patrick Callihan
R Joseph Pengilly                    Perry Stevens
Edward Mullaly             Royal Wright
Joseph Randall              John Slattery
Thos Brislane                Alex C Rood
John Brown                             Stephen Harrington
Seth Groat                     Clinton Hicks
Alonzo Hopkins            James J McMahon
Michael Enright             James McKinley
John Groat                     Samuel H Meloy
Patrick Lynde                John Gleason
Luke G Harmon             Alphonso Drown
James O'Brian               Luther M Blackmon
C M Beecher                  Henry Rowland 1st
Anson Smith                  Edward G Bartlett

LYNDON.
84 names in the box—21 to be drawn.
Reuben Bebee                Elijah Hoag
Myron Wilson Hicks     Daniel Ayers
Solomon R. Seeley         Charles Yaw
Leonard J Chapman      Marshal Herrick
Windham Baldwin         Mansfield Baldwin
John McKenzie              Emmet Bissell
Jacob Lockwood            George Raub
Hiram G. Hale               Alonzo D Stockwell
John Little                      Edward Harris
Darius Pattyson             Samuel J. Morris
Wm. W. Harris

Notice to Drafted Persons.
Drafted persons from the several towns in this County will report at the headquarters of the Board of Enrollment at Dunkirk, on the days specified as follows, viz:
Friday, September 18th, Perrysburg, Dayton and Persia.
Saturday, September 19th, Otto and East Otto.
Tuesday, Sept. 22, Ashford and Yorkshire, Wednesday, Sept. 23d, Farmersville, Freedom and Machias.
Thursday, Sept. 24th, Lyndon, Franklinville and Ellicottville.
Friday, Sept. 25th, Mansfield and New Albion.
Saturday, Sept. 26th, Leon, Conewango, Napoli and Little Valley.
Tuesday, Sept. 29th, Great Valley, Humphrey and Ischua.
Wednesday, Sep. 30th, Hinsdale and Olean.
Thursday, Oct, 1st, Portville and Allegany.
Friday, Oct, 2d, Carrolton, Salamanca and Coldspring.
Saturday, Oct. 3d, Randolph and South Valley.
The circular from which we quote is signed by the Provost Marshal.

 

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