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Cattaraugus County, New York
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

Advertiser and Union
AUBURN, N. Y.
Saturday Evening, July 11, 1863.
See reading matter on first page.
Relief for Indigent Families of Volunteers.
The 514th chapter of the laws of New York of 1863 provide that "the Supervisor, Town Clerk and Justice of the Peace in each of the towns, and the Common Council of the respective cities of the State, shall ex officio constitute a Board of Relief for their respective towns and cities, and as such Board shall have power, from time to time, to grant such relief to the indigent families of volunteers from this State residing in such towns, and of persons ordered into the military or naval service of the United States, as shall seem necessary and proper, and the amount of such relief shall be a town or city charge respectively as the same may be upon the respective towns and cities in which the same shall be granted, and shall be audited, collected and paid in the same manner as other town and city charges now authorized by law are audited, collected and paid."
We presume there is hardly a town in the State which does not contain one or more families which are entitled to benefits conferred by the provisions of the Law referred to. It should be the object of the authorities named in the Law to see that no family which needs relief is deprived of it through any oversight or carelessness on their part. There are families in Auburn which have sent volunteers to the war and are entitled to the benefits of the Law, but which will never make application for relief from a sense of diffidence or a disinclination to be put upon the indigent list. Such families should be searched out and the necessary relief furnished.
There is no more praiseworthy object upon which the public money may be expended in the way of charity than upon the family of a volunteer who is perilling [sic] his life in defence of the Union. He has not only sacrificed the comforts of home, and the society of relatives and friends but has taken his life in his hand and is ready to offer it up on the altar of his country. The family of such a hero and patriot should not be neglected in his absence. If indigent, their wants should be alleviated, even if the authorities named in the Law are obliged to hunt them up. Among the most worthy families, which absolutely need assistance, are those which will actually suffer for the necessaries of life before they will make application.
Supplies forwarded by the ladies of Twelve Corners, Niles, for the wounded at Gettysburg: 753 yards bandaging, 1 linen coat, 1 pair summer pants, 3 pair drawers, 50 pocket handerchiefs [sic], 42 shirts, 34 arm pillows, 36 towels, 25 sheets, 4 gowns, 9 bed quilts, 11 pillow cases, 7 arm slings, 25 pounds fruit, 17 pounds lint.
The Ladies' Union Aid Society are very desirous for more assistance in making up clothing, and beg their friends to meet with them at the basement of the 2d church. There is plenty of work cut out, enough to do with, but the interest of the workers seems to flag a little. It is still desirable to supply the Commission with clothing, and let not Auburn fail in doing her share. If any one has black raspberries dried which they are willing to contribute to the sick soldiers, they will be very acceptable, as the Surgeons pronounce them to be most excellent in some forms of disease. A cask half filled with pickles is at the residence of Mrs. George Underwood. Will any housekeeper assist in filling this cask that it may be sent speedily?
C. P. UNDERWOOD, Sec'y.

State Politics.
AUBURN, N. Y., Monday, Aug. 31.
JAMES E. TYLER, RICHARD MCNEIL and ISRAEL JAKWAY are elected delegates to the Republican Union State Convention, from the First District of Cayuga County.

LOCKPORT, N. Y., Monday, Aug, 31.
The delegates for the First Assembly District of Niagara County to the Republican Union State Convention, are CHESTER F. SHELLY, ALBERT H. PICKARD, and ALANSON T. ODELL.

WOMAN'S CENTRAL ASSOCIATION OF RELIEF, New York, Aug. 19, 1863.
MRS. C. P. UNDERWOOD—Dear Madam:— The two boxes from your Society and the box from Moravia were received on the 17th. They arrived in excellent order, which we can rarely say of much of the wine and jelly sent us. In these three boxes no note has been made of a single breakage. I have also to acknowledge $2,80 enclosed from the ladies of Moravia.
Please make our acknowledgements to them, and especially to the little children who interested themselves in preparing the lint.
Will you be kind enough in future to put a separate list, with name and address attached in each box. There were none in these last two. Letter to be sent by mail beside. Today the Commission sends a cargo of ice from Boston, with vegetables to Charleston Harbor. Also we have sent 15 bbls. of sugar and _ bbls. vinegar and ginger, which will make 400 bbls. of healthy drink for the men in the trenches on Morris Island. Anti scorbutics are needed there, as onions, pickles and potatoes.
Since Gettysburgh [sic], we have been sending to Washington, Port Royal and Newbern, N. C. Also books and pamphlets to Hospitals in Memphis.
Present needs are slippers, sheets, (last week we bought 100 of these) cotton drawers, wrappers, socks, flannel clothing always. We want dried fruit of all kinds and blackberry jam and jelly, raspberry, vinegar and wines.
Very respectfully yours,
LOUISA LEE SCHUYLER,
Manager Ex. Com.

Advertiser and Union.
Local, Literary, Miscellaneous.
THANKSGIVING DAY AT SENNETT.—MESSRS. EDITORS:—By request I see some account of the observance of President Lincoln's day of thanksgiving, by the people of Sennett and vicinity, for publication in your excellent paper.
At the usual hour of morning service the assembly gathered at the Methodist chapel, filling it well; and if the cheerful, hopeful and devout countenance is an index of the heart, they came to praise and give thanks to the Ruler of the universe for all his benefits, and especially for the signal favors and successes with which He has recently crowned the union arms in their efforts to put down the unholy rebellion which is exerting all its waning strength to destroy the government of the United States.
The President's proclamation was read, with introductory prayer and reading of appropriate scriptures, by Rev. Charles Anderson, and the reading of a hymn by Rev. Mr. Eldridge. Giving thanks and supplication for continued favors by undersigned. Hymn. Discourse by Rev. Mr. Evarts, of the Baptist church.—Text, "Thanks be to God which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ." The speaker treated the subject in a national point of view, showing that God approved and blessed, or condemned and punished nations, as their works were just and righteous, or wicked and oppressive. That his instruments of national punishment are, war, pestilence and famine. That we as a nation are now suffering the fiery ordeal of the former rendered more dreadful by being a civil war.— That our national sins are, slavery, a haughty spirit, and forgetfulness of God. That their magnitude is such, that our obligations of gra­titude to the Divine King are greatly enhanced in that he has so signally vouchsafed his blessing, giving victory after victory to the various divisions of our gallant army, engaged in the ar­duous, but noble work of suppressing a wicked rebellion which threatens alike all good gov­ernment and everything dear to humanity and religion.
The discourse was listened to with deep in­terest, and is worthy of being extended and re­produced.
Rev. Mr. Anderson followed in his usually happy and vigorous style, showing that although denounced by rebel sympathizers as an aboli­tion war, and a war for the negro, it is neverthe­less a war inaugurated by Southern rebels for the express purpose of destroying the government of the United States and establishing a Hierarchy upon the base of human slavery and oppression. That God was overruling and permitting them to strike the death blow to their cherished institution.
Rev. Mr. Eldridge also made eloquent and interesting remarks. The hymns were very appropriate to the occasion and were sung by the congregation with an animation which told unmistakably of true patriotism and heartfelt gratitude.
Another evidence of the right state of feeling in the congregation was, that two liberal collections were given, one for the Christian commission, the other for the Ladies Aid Society.
Before dismissing the congregation some business matters were transacted, Mr. Eldridge in the Chair, among which was the appointing a committee to procure a new flag staff or pole; repair the old flag, appoint a time for the erection of the staff, and procure speakers for the occasion.
The committee respectfully invite all ladies and gentlemen who love the supremacy of the old red, white and blue, to be present, thus showing their patriotism true.
Committee—David Crosman, W. C. Leach, Nathan Tanner. Time for the occasion, Saturday, Aug. 15th, 2 o'clock P. M.
Speakers for the occasion—Charles M. Davis, Gen. Jesse Segoine, Revd's. Evarts and Anderson.
KEYES COBURN.
Sennett, Aug. 10, 1863.

The funeral services of the late Lieut. Luther Hutchinson, were attended by a large concourse of citizens and military yesterday. Places of business were closed in the afternoon, and our merchants and businessmen assembled at the Armory to escort the remains. The services at the grave were conducted by Rev. __.
A very large audience assembled at the Court House on Friday evening last to listen to the Rev. HIRAM EDDY, with whose long imprisonment at the South our readers are already familiar. His vivid sketches of Southern life and character, his account of the sufferings and deprivations of himself and companions, his denunciations of the system and evils of Slavery, and his eloquent vindication of the Government in its efforts to crush the Rebellion, all combined to make one of the most thrillingly interesting addresses to which we ever had the pleasure of listening. Mr. EDDY ___ant both in intellect and stature, and as ___ has but few equals in the country.

Advertiser and Union
AUBURN, N. Y.
Tuesday Evening, June 2, 1863.
Who are Copperheads?
Efforts are being made by a few Copperheads in the city to create the impression among returned soldiers that the epithet of "Copperheads" is applied to all those who remain the friends and supporters of Gen. MCCLELLAN. The soldiers, of course, cannot be fooled by any such stuff as this. There are thousands of persons who remain the friends and supporters of Gen. MCCLELLAN and who would be glad to sec him re-instated as Commander of the Army of the Potomac, who are truly loyal to the Government and sincerely desirous of seeing the Rebels utterly prostrated before the strong arm of the military power of the country.
The term "Copperhead," as the class to whom it is applied well know, refers to those who are constantly denouncing every act of the Government which has a tendency to cripple the Rebels and defeat their unholy crusade against the Constitution and Laws, They are the men who smile every time they have news of a Federal reverse, and exclaim to every loyal man they meet—"I told you so."—These same men always sneak away into their holes whenever news of a Union Victory flashes over the wires. News that causes loyal men to throw out their flags and to extend their congratulations to each other and express their hearty wishes that the Government may soon conquer an honorable peace, has a decidedly opposite effect upon the Copperheads.
They go off, growling, like a dog with a sore head. In their estimation the country is on the very brink of ruin every time a sweeping Union victory is won.
The same men are now busy in "blowing" against the contemplated draft.—They say that it cannot be enforced—that resistance will be made, and that successfully. The Government, they say, ought not to have any troops—that the difficulty ought to be settled by a compromise and that peace on any terms ought to be established. They would even let the Rebels dictate the terms rather than to have any more fighting. Not that they think it is really wicked to go to war but because they are afraid some of the Reb­els will get hurt and that they will even­tually be obliged to yield obedience to the laws. It is the men who act and talk as we have described to whom the epithet of "Copperhead" is applied and not to the friends of Gen. McClellan as the Copperheads are endeavoring to make the soldiers believe.

—In Auburn, Sunday, a company under command of Captain Baker, and an Irish company under the command of Captain Gavigan, were enrolled and papers forwarded to Albany. The Irish company marched from the Catholic church, after service, in a body to the armory and enrolled their names. Enlistments are still going on rapidly.

OUR MAYOR ABBOAD.—Mayor Bookstaver, notwithstanding the critical state of affairs at home, found time to attend a partizan [sic] demonstration at Binghamton on Thursday and was absent from home thirty-six hours, when his presence here might have been of great importance. The Binghamton Republican notices his mission there thus curtly:
"Mayor Bookstaver of Syracuse came a long way, exerted himself prodigiously, and took up a good deal of time to say nothing. We refer to his speech at the Democratic meeting last evening."
We are glad to observe that the Mayor has returned to his post of duty, and that he was active this forenoon in consultation with the military and police authorities.

WELL DONE, LEDYARD.—Immediately after the news was received at Aurora, of the battle at Gettysburgh [sic], Mr. David L. Parmalee, Principal of the Academy, was sent to the relief of our wounded soldiers with three trunks filled with linen and clothing, and two boxes filled with wine, fruit, &c.
In three days the citizens of Ledyard raised the sum of sixteen hundred and thirty-four dollars, and orders were given Mr. Parmalee to draw any additional amount which would contribute to the comfort of the wounded. The Hon. E. B. Morgan contributed $1000.

Advertiser and Union
Local, Literary, Miscellaneous.
Auburn, August 12, 1863.
THANKSGIVING DAY AT SENNETT.—MESSRS EDITORS:—By request I send some account of the observance of President Lincoln's day of thanksgiving, by the loyal people of Sennett and vicinity, for publication in your excellent paper.
At the usual hour of morning service the assembly gathered at the Methodist chapel, filling it well; and if the cheerful, hopeful and devout countenance is an index of the heart, they came to praise and give thanks to the Ruler of the universe for all his benefits, and especially for the signal favors and successes with which He has recently crowned the union arms in their efforts to put down the unholy rebellion which is exerting all its waning strength to destroy the government of the United States.
The President's proclamation was read, with introductory prayer and reading of appropriate Scriptures, by Rev. Charles Anderson, and the reading of a hymn by Rev. Mr. Eldridge. Giving thanks and supplication for continued ____ by undersigned. Hymn. Discourse by Rev. Mr. Evarts, of the Baptist church.—Text, "Thanks be to God which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ." The speaker treated the subject in a national point of view, showing that God approved and blessed, or condemed [sic] and punished nations, as their works were just and righteous, or wicked and oppressive. That his instruments of national punishment are, war, pestilence and famine. That we as a nation are now suffering the fiery ordeal of the former rendered more dreadful by being a civil war.—That our national sins are, slavery, a haughty spirit, and forgetfulness of God. That their magnitude is such, that our obligations of gratitude to the Divine King are greatly enhanced in that he has so signally vouchsafed his blessing, giving victory after victory to the various divisions of our gallant army, engaged in the arduous, but noble work of suppressing a wicked rebellion which threatens alike all good government and everything dear to humanity and religion.
The discourse was listened to with deep interest, and is worthy of being extended and reproduced.
Rev. Mr. Anderson followed in his usually happy and vigorous style, showing that although denounced by rebel sympathizers as an abolition war, and a war for the negro, it is nevertheless a war inaugurated by Southern rebels, for the express purpose of destroying the government of the United States and establishing a Hierarchy upon the base of human slavery and oppression. That God was overruling and permitting them to strike the death blow to their cherished institution.
Rev. Mr. Eldridge also made eloquent and interesting remarks. The hymns were very appropriate to the occasion and were sung by the congregation with an animation which told unmistakably of true patriotism and heartfelt gratitude.
Another evidence of the right state of feeling in the congregation was, that two liberal collections were given, one for the Christian commission, the other for the Ladies Aid Society.
Before dismissing the congregation some business matters were transacted, Mr. Eldridge in the Chair, among which was the appointing a committee to procure a new flag staff or pole; repair the old flag, appoint a time for the erec­tion of the staff, and procure speakers for the occasion.
The committee respectfully invite all ladies and gentlemen who love the supremacy of the old red, white and blue, to be present, thus showing their patriotism true.     
Committee—David Crosman, W. C. Leach, Nathan Tanner. Time for the occasion, Satur­day, Aug. 15th, 2 o'clock P. M.
Speakers for the occasion—Charles M. Davis, Gen. Jesse Segoine, Revd's, Evarts and Ander­son.                                   
KEYES COBURN.       
Sennett, Aug. 10, 1863.

 

 

 

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