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Chemung County, New York
in the Civil War

ELMIRA ADVERTISER.
LOCAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.
SATURDAY MORNING, JULY 11, '63.
TO ADVERTISERS.
The circulation of the ELMIRA ADVERTISER is equal to that of any other paper in the Southern Tier of Counties, and double that of any other paper published in Chemung County, except the Gazette.

PRAYER MEETING every week day morning at 8 o'clock in the Session room of the First Psesbyterian [sic] Church, coner [sic] Church and Baldwin streets. All are invited to attend.

Elmira commemorated the victories recently achieved by our brave armies last evening by a grand parade and speeches in the public park, and later in the evening by a grand Firemen's torch-light procession.
About 6 1/2 o'clock the various fire companis [sic] formed in front of the Court House, and headed by Updegraff's Band proceeded up to Church-st., when, soon after, everything being pronounced in readiness, the whole took up the line of march; after the fire companies, Pier's Band, followed by the village trustees and citizens and guests from abroad, walking three and four abreast, and a squad of Sprague's Cavalry on foot, and a long line of carraiges [sic] filled with discharged sick and wounded soldiers, a large number from the hospital at this rendezvous being allowed to participate in the ceremonies. Their bleached faces, the air of suffering endured, and the maimed limbs only reminded too deeply of the sacrifices and human afflictions wrought by our unholy war. The route of march was down Church to Conongua, thence to Water, up Water to Main to the Park, the roar of cannon at frequent intervals, the shouts of the multitudes and the thronged streets adding to the joy and enthusiasm. After the Committee of Arrangements and Speakers had taken their places on the stand, some delay ensued while waiting for the Presiding Officer, the interval being enlivened by music from the Bands, after which PHILO JONES called the assembly to order and announced that Rev. Mr. HERMANS would lead in prayer. After the address to the Throne of Grace, the first speaker was called upon, Maj. A. S. DIVEN, then in order, Rev. A. C. GEORGE, Rev. T. C. LINCOLN, JOHN MURDOCH, CHARLES HULETT and GEORGE S. MELLVILLE, the Bands furnishing their usual excellent music between the speeches. Col. HOFFMAN now ascended the stand and announced the route of the torch-light procession, and invited all citizens to join in and bear a hand at carrying two hundred extra torches which the Firemen could not use.—The procession was soon under way, in the same order as it marched to the Park, and proceeding down Main, through Water to College Avenue and up to West Union, down to Main, thence to Church, down Church to High, along High to Water, over the Lake-st. Bridge, along South Water to South Main, over the Main-st. Bridge, along Water to Lake to the point of starting and then disbanded. The houses along the route were for the most part illuminated. We noticed beautiful transparencies at Rev. Mr. LINCOLN'S, Dr. J. CONKEY'S and D. T. DUNN'S, while the brilliant lights from foundation to dome rendered the display magnificent from a large number of residences. Flags also formed many beautiful and appropriate adornments. In the business part of the town, the display from the Brainard House, KELLOGG & HEVENER'S Drug Store, the Press office and THOMAS JOHNSON'S new store was very fine. The whole three stories front of the latter was illuminated, while a beautiful transparency was placed over the entrance with the motto, "Our Country forever; American, Watches and Sewing Machines."
We were pleased to notice a large number of citizens present from adjoining towns. No better indication of the spirit of the occasion could have been given than in the three hearty cheers which went up from the great audience, making the whole welkin ring, after the closing of the speeches and as the processsoin [sic] broke up. It was a magnificent fete and gala time for Elmira, while rejoicing over our National victories.

AT THE SOLDIER'S HOME.—In the list of arrivals at the Soldier's Home, Elmira, we find find the names of P. Bennett, 26th regiment, and W. Colt, 6th N. Y., both of this city, and B. S. Johnson, 141st regiment, Dansville.

ARRIVALS AT THE SOLDIERS' HOME corner of McGee and Third streets, S. G. DOOLITTLE Superintendent.
C L Scott, 154 N Y, Westfield
H C Bartlett, 2 N Y cav, Sidney
S. Frisbey, 29 O, Cromwell
L Melty, 149 N Y, Syracuse
E C Beldin, 137 N Y, Richford
F M Culer, 29 O, Morgan
D Mattison, 154 N Y, Dayton
S Fuller, 72 N Y, Westfield
P Swan, 76 N Y, Taylor
C B Warner, in charge of Swan
M Welch, 154 N Y, Humphrey
J M Wood, 141 N Y, Wayne
J O Raymond, 60 N Y, Bangor

ARRIVALS AT THE SOLDIERS' HOME corner of McGee and Third streets, S. G. DOOLITTLE Superintendent.
H A Baker. 8 N Y, Porter
D Birchard, 149 Pa, Athens
J Clark, 150, Pa, Mead
T Vanderburg, 145 N Y, Perrysburg
W Jamerson, 3 Ex, Mayville
M Jamerson, having son in charge
_ Isham, 145 N Y, Westfield
_ _be, 143 Pa _ __e, having brother in charge
_ ler, 169 Pa, Gerard
_ __mpson, 130 N Y, Perry
_ __, 6 Mich, Fenton
_ __er, 1 Minn, Minneiska
_ __, 154 N Y, Ripley

FOREIGN PRISONERS.—Yesterday morning Sheriff HALLIDAY, of Elmira, came up with a three months' convict for the Penitentiary, named Catherine Clark. Catherine was a former resident of Binghamton, and was employed in a family at Elmira as a domestic, where she stole some ladies' under clothing. She was detected of the theft and sent up. She is an attractive looking girl of seventeen.—Roch. Union.

Our citizens met at the Town Hall last evening for the purpose of deciding whether we would celebrate, and the manner of celebrating the recent brilliant victories achieved by our arms. The meeting was organized by the appointment of Hon. A. S. Diven, as Chairman, and JOHN MURDOCK, as Secretary. On motion of JOHN I NICKS a committee of fifteen was appointed by the Chair as a general finance committee and committee of arrangements as follows: John I. Nicks, Chairman; Stephen McDonald, Col. Hoffman, F. A. Devoe, S. B. Fairman, Wm. M. Thayer, Wash. Marsh, S. C. Reynolds, John Arnot, Jr., W. C. Russell, E. Bartholemew, G. Gerow, Robt. Hall, Patrick Ronan, O. A. Drury.
On motion of D. F. PICKERING, the Fire Department was invited to participate in the celebration.
WASH. MARSH, made a motion to appoint a committee of five whose special duty it should be to attend to the finance. On a vote the motion was lost.
On motion of D. F. PICKERING it was
Resolved, That we celebrate [sic], and that Friday next at five o'clock P. M., the appointed hour for such celebration.
On motion of Mr. DUDLEY,
Resolved, That all business men be requested to close their places of business at five o'clock P. M. on Friday next.
On motion of S. MCDONALD, it was
Resolved, That an invitation be extended to the residents of the County, and everybody to unite with our citizens in the celebration.
The meeting was then declared adjourned by the President.

ARRANGEMENTS FOR CELEBRATING THE UNION VICTORIES.—The Committee appointed to make arrangements for celebrating the victories of Gettysburg and Vicksburg, and which assembled at the Town Hall this A. M., concluded the business upon which they had assembled by adopting the following programme:
Marshal.—H. C. HOFFMAN.
Assistants.—W. MARSH, Capt. W. W. Dingelday,
Lieut. A. N. DEVOE.
The procession is to form in front of the Court House on Friday evening, at six o'clock in the following order:
1st—Cornet Band.
2d—Firemen.
3d—City Authorities.
4th—Officers and Speakers.
5th—Committee of Arrangements.
6th—Clergy.
7th—Pier's Band.
8th—Officers and Soldiers (Invalid Soldiers in Carriages.)
9th—Citizens.
In forming, the right will rest on Church-st and proceed down Church to Conongue; thence to Water; up Water to Main, thence to the Park at the Congregational Church, where addresses will be made by A. S. Diven, Judge Dunn, John Murdock, Revs. Geo. C. Curtis, T. K. Beecher, A. C. George; Geo. S. Melville, E. P. Hart, Archibald Robertson, Rev. T. O. Lincoln, S. McDonald, D. F. Pickering and others.
At nine P. M. the Torch Light procession will form with right on Water-st, and will proceed as follows:
Up Water-st to College Avenue; thence to West Union, down West Union and Main to Church, down Church to High; thence to Water, up Water to Lake, across Lake-st Bridge to South Water, up South Water to South Main, across Main-st Bridge to Water, down Water to Lake, thence to the Court House.
officers of the meeting.
President—John Arnot, Sen'r.
Vice Presidents—Simeon Benjamin, Col. Foster, Wm. Hoffman, Judge Gray, Judge Dunn, Judge Brooks, Tracy Beadle, Asher Tyler, Edmund Miller, Philo Jones, Wm. T. Post, Chas. Hulett, Jervis Langdon, D. H. Tuttle.
Secretaries—Charles G. Fairman, Horton Tidd, G. S. Mellville.
Finance Committee—S. McDonald, John Arnot, jr., S. B. Fairman, W. Marsh, O. A. Drury.
On Torches—Chief Engineer and Foremen of Fire Companies.
Music and Carriages—F. A. DeVoe, Col. H. C. Hoffman, W. A. Thayer.
On Gun and Bells—S. C. Reynolds, W. C. Russell, Ed. Bartholomew.
On motion, the Chairman of the Finance Committee be Treasurer, and shall disburse moneys upon orders countersigned by Chairmen of the several Committees.
The Chairman of Committee of Arrangements, together with F. A. DeVoe, S. B. Fairman and W. N. Thayer were appointed Committee on Speakers, erection of Stand and Printing.
Citizens are requested and expected to join in the procession.

MAJOR A. S. LEE AMONG THE WOUNDED.
—The Elmira Press says: "We are much pained to learn that Major Arthur S. Lee, of the 2d U. S. Infantry, and who so long and honorably filled the station of mustering and disbursing officer at this Military Depot, was wounded in the ankle during the recent battles at Gettysburg.—We sincerely hope that the Major may not be kept long out of saddle."

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—The Elmira Advertiser says that about five hundred men are now quartered at the military depot in that village. The arrival of companies and parts of companies is now quite frequent, and it will undoubtedly be but a short lime before the number of troops there will be counted by thousands.

ARRIVALS AT THE SOLDIERS' HOME corner of Magee and Third streets, S. G. Doolittle, Superindent [sic].
George Morris, 8 N Y cav, Manchester
G. T. Chase, 12 N Y, Baldwinsville
H E Andrews, 154 N Y, Cataraugus
J W Coss, 8 N Y cav, Gorham
L Swan, 8 N Y cav, Winilago
J M Swan, 154 N Y, Leon
J H Chamberlain, 67 National Guard, Aurora
Wm Chamberlin,   "       "            "           "
C Boid,                  "        "           "           "
S Elsworth,            "        "           "           "
Geo M Burnside, 89 N Y, Tomkins
H VanEttan, 107 N Y, Corning

From the Western Rendezvous.
ELMIRA, May 1.
Gen. Van Valkenburg and Assistant Quartermaster-General Walker are busily at work day and night, preparing accommodations for volunteer companies ordered to rendezvous at this military depot.
Four companies from Auburn, one from Oswego, and one from Seneca Falls are quartered here. It is thought that by Monday or Tuesday the number of troops here will be increased to 3,000.
Comfortable accommodations have been fitted up for the 74th Regiment of Buffalo, which is expected on Friday.
The extensive barracks for additional troops will be commenced to-morrow, and finished in time for the Rochester and Syracuse Regiments, expected within a few days.
Three companies have been raised here, and accepted. They will be mustered into service this week.
Ten thousand dollars have been raised for the families of volunteers.

THE WICKED FLEE WHEN NO MAN PURSUETH.—This truth was verified a few evenings since in our village. One of our citizens whose conscience perhaps convicts him, for his agency in the troubles which now afflict the country, was wending his way through Railroad street towards Water at a late hour. Walking in the middle of the street with cautious tread and suspicious manner, his mind busy in conjuring up "spooks" and imaginary robbers, his conduct excited the suspicion of the night watchmen and by them he was narrowly watched. The person alluded to, walked slowly and timidly peering into the darkness, as if to escape observation. Suddenly when near the corner of Cross-st, he was confronted in imagination by an army of hobgobblins. He turned and ran with the speed of a deer towards the Depot, and turning into one of the cross streets, pursued his way toward Baldwin-st. This last movement satisfied the watchman, that there was some dishonest project on foot, and like a faithful officer as he is, concluded it was his duty to arrest the suspicious personage. Giving immediate chase he overhauled his customer near the Post Office, and seizing him by the collar demanded the reason of his strange conduct. An explanation was given, which was so strange as to be unsatisfactory until another officer came up when a recognition took place and the frightened, timid individual was allowed to depart. His imagination had conjured up rioters and assassins in every stone and object by the wayside, until he was nearly beside himself with fright.

GEN. QUINBY AT ELMIRA.—The Elmira Advertiser announces that Gen. Quinby is in Elmira to take command of the conscript camp at this place.

ACCOUNT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE CELEBRATING FUND:
Amount Received....................                              $265,10
Paid Millius for tar....................         $8,00
   "   E H Bartholomew filling lamps
        and charges                                12,00
Hall Bro's torch handles                      4,50
Ogden & Pettit keroscene [sic]
       oil and wick                                23,09
Fairman & Co printing, posting..        6,50
J H King Carriage, ......................        3,00
E King do                                             3,00
J Buckbee do                                        3,00
O McGreevy do                                    3,00
T Cook do                                             3,00
E Terry do                                             3,00
D Webster ringing bell                          1,50
W C Russel bonfires                             3,00
J D Updegraff band..                           20,00
J W Smith carting                                  3,25
Pickering & Terry stand                        2,36
Tuthill & Co., flannel                            4,94
Cook & Covell powder &c                  15,15
Thos. Leary firing cannon                     9,00
A Murphy ringing bell. .                       1,50
C M Beadle roman candles                   2,80
Pier's band .                                         15,00
W F Corey, Soldiers Home........       114,51
Total                                                              $265,10
S. MCDONALD,
Treasurer,

ARRIVALS AT THE SOLDIERS' HOME, corner of MaGee [sic] and Third streets. S. G. DOOLITTLE, Superintendent.
J Dawson, 103 N Y, Spencer
W E Richardson, 107 N Y, Bath.
J Richardson, having son in charge.
E H Cox, 8th N Y Cav, Wheatland.
G L Winters, 154 N Y, Humphrey.
W M Brown, 145 Pa, Mill Creek.
Mrs Brown.
C Brown, accompanying Mrs B and son.
T M Sabar, 14th U S, Enfield.
E D Larned, 109 N Y, Perryville.
J Pierce, 148 N Y, Potter.
H B Covell, 130 N Y, Gainesville.
G Morris, 8 N Y cav, Manchester
G F Chase, 12 N Y, Baldwinsville.
L Swan, 8 Ill cav, Winesbago
J M Childs, 154 N Y, Leon
J H Chamberlin, 67 N Guard, Aurora

From the Western Rendezvous.
ELMIRA , May 3.
The arrival of troops gives quite a military appearance to the place. Gen. Van Valkenburgh and Assistant Quartermaster Gen. Walker having all they can do to provide for the large number of trooos [sic] arriving. There are now 1,84_ troops quartered at their rendezvous, 400 of which arrived to-day. The Onondaga regiment and a company from Waterloo, arrived last night. Two companies from Utica, and one each from Damiville, Bath and Cuba, arrived to-day.
The Canesaragus, Capt. Stepton of Dansville, has just arrived. They will be temporarily quartered in the Central Baptist Church. Nine companies from Rochester are expected in the morning. The officers of the various companies unite in stating that their men, without exception, are well satisfied with their quarters and fare. The health of the troops is excellent, and the men are in the beat spirits, expressing anxiety to be ordered to the seat of war as soon as possible.

SOLDIERS AT THE ELMIRA HOME.—The following are the recent arrivals at the Soldiers' Home in Elmira:
J. M. Hamilton, 33d N. Y., Geneva; J. Sprague, do., Penn Yan; C. H. Lovett, do., Manchester; L. Hackson, do., Waterloo; M. Lee, do., Palmyra; J. Bliss, do., Victor; W. H. Hecker, do., Fayette; Sergt. Proudfit, do., Seneca Falls; E. Jarvis, do., Palmyra; E. Jones, 137th N. Y., Manchester.

ELMIRA.—The following are the arrivals at the Soldiers' Home:
D. S. Porter, 33d N. Y., Rochester; C. F. Eisentrager, 33d N. Y., Walworth; J. P. Sarvis, 33d N. Y., Palmyra; B. Sweeten, 136th N. Y., Springwater; J. Milverain, 33d N. Y., Rochester; E. Jarvis, do., Palmyra; H. ROSS, do., Rochester; W. Moran, do., Waterloo; M. Lee, do., Palmyra; M. Fox, do., Genesee; C. Hendrickson, do., Waterlco; W. Pow, do., Seneca Falls; P. Barry, do., Seneca Falls; J. VanVassel, do., Seneca Falls; W. Proudfoot, do., Seneca Falls; M. Avert, do., Palmyra; S. Adams, do., Palmyra; J. Sprague, do., Penn Yan; J. Doyle, do., Penn Yan; H. G. Sherman, do, Penn Yan; J. R. Morrison, do., Pike; C. Lovett, do., Canandaigua; M. B. Risby, do., Palmyra; B. P. Richmond, do., Geneseo.

Knocked Down.
The Democratic Era, a copperhead journal published at Belmont, says " A prominent Republican in Cuba was slightly knocked down a couple of times the other night, by a returned soldier for his abuse of McClellan."
All abusers and defamers of our military men, as well as the copperheads who slander every loyal man, whether of the military or of the Government, will do well to haul in their horns, and make themselves scarce, when returned soldiers are around. One of these returned soldiers, a stranger in this locality, a few mornings since knocked down a copperhead at the depot in this village, for his abuse of Gen. HOOKER. A day or two after, some four of the returned soldiers from this village took a ride to Almond. While there the copperheads improved the opportunity to insult the soldiers, and one of them to add to the insult, repeatedly announced himself a copperhead; whereupon one of them, (Brewer COLLIER) struck the fellow a severe blow over the head with a chair, laying him out sprawling. We do not feel disposed to encourage these summary acts of the soldiers, but if disloyal men feel disposed to make themselves conspicuous by their insults and treasonable abuses, they need not expect to escape merited consequences.

TUESDAY OCTOBER 29, 1861.
LOCAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.
GRAND REVIEW.—IMPOSING MILITARY ARRAY.—FOUR THOUSAND TROOPS IN LINE.
Pursuant to order of Brigadier General VAN VALKENBURGH, the review and parade of the Regiment at this rendezvous took place yesterday. It was propitious day. The weather cool and bracing with a clear, bright October sun—it was a fortunate day for the maneuvering of the troops—and the immense concourse of people assembled to witness the ceremonies.

THE REVIEW.
Precisely at two o'clock all the Regiments had arrived on the grounds at Barracks number three. The fence west of the Barracks had been removed, giving ample space for the marching of the troops. COL. THOMAS J. PARKER, commander of the parade, immediately on the arrival of the Regiments, formed them into line of battle, the line extending half a mile in length—presenting a magnificent appearance—and such an array of soldiers, and the "pomp and circumstance of war," as never before witnessed in Western New York. General VAN VALKENBURGH accompanied by his Staff reviewed the line, passing round in front and rear, after which the troops paraded around the General and Staff.

THE MARCH.
The line of march was then taken under command of Colonel PARKER, of the 64th Regiment, in the following order:
Brigadier General R. B, VAN VALKENBURGH.
STAFF.
Colonel H. S. Fairchild, of the 54th Regiment, N. Y. S. M.
Lieutenant Colonel Arden, of Major General Morgan's Staff.
Captain A. T. Lee, of the 8th Infantry, U. S. A.
Major G. L. Smith.
Major Wm. H. Gregg.
Captain E. P. Graves.
Captain Ira Davenport, Jr.
Adjutant Wm. Rumsey, 1st Artillery, N. Y. V.
Band.
REGIMENTS.
Col. G. D. Bailey, Artillery Regiment, on the right
Col. B. P. Bailey, "Steuben Rangers."
Col. T. J. Parker, 64th Regiment N. Y, S. M.
Col. Uriah L. Davis, Lieut. Colonel Belknap in command.
Col. John C. Robie, "Dickinson Guards."
Col. J. C. Lemon, "Porter Guard Cavalry."
The unattached companies at Barracks No. 2, on the left, under command of Capt. J. A. Reynolds.
In this order the column moved through the principal streets of the city, which were everywhere thronged with people—ladies and gentleman, children on foot and in arms, horses and wagons mixed up promiscuously. It was as lively as in State Fair days. The ladies waved handkerchiefs and the soldiers responded with hearty cheers. The troops bore themselves handsomely in their various evolutions, and exhibited much proficiency in drill considering the short time they have been under military discipline. It was the greatest military display ever witnessed in this section of the State, and the largest body of men moved in battle array here, since General SULLIVAN'S army passed through the Chemung Valley in pursuit of Indians nearly a century ago.
Col. PARKER conducted the parade in a manner reflecting much credit on him as a soldier and officer. If a trial of his abilities are ever brought to a test on the field of battle, we have faith to believe that he will prove himself equal to any emergency. Without appearing invidious we might say that the noble bearing and soldierly appearance of some of the officers excited the admiration of the people—especially of Capt. LEE, Col. ARDEN, old army officers, and Col. Bailey, of the Steuben Rangers, with his silver gray locks, and Colonel Bailey, of the Artillery, on his splendid black charger.
—Everything passed off successfully and harmoni­ously during the parade, nowithstanding [sic] the great crowd of people rushing to and fro to see every­thing going on at once.

ARRIVALS AT THE SOLDIERS' HOME IN ELMIRA.
—The following named soldiers have arrived at the home for sick and wounded soldiers in Elmira:
G. B. Dippy, Co. B, 136th N. Y., from Dansville; E. McIntel, Co. K, 1st N. Y. Battery, Albion; J, McIntyre, Co, D, 8th N.Y., Cavalry, Geneva.

IMPORTANT MILITARY ARRIVALS FROM ELMIRA.—Two detachments of military arrived in this city last evening about eight o'clock, over the New York and Erie Rail Road, from Elmira. The first was the Invalid Corps, numbering 274 men, in command of Major G. S. Jennings, and composed principally of men formerly of Gen. Rosencrans army. The following are the officers accompanying the corps:
Adjutant Frank D. Garrity, formerly of 15th Kentucky.
Co. A.—Capt. Hiram Yoho, 25th Ill.; Lieut. Bowers, 35th N. Y.
Co. B.—Capt. Henry H. Reed, 35th Ill.
Co. C—Capt. Thompson, 105th Pa.; Lieut. Rowe, 4th Mich.
Co. D.—Capt. Culver, 49th Ohio; Lieut Dart, 4th Pa. Cavalry.
The corps bore with them their arms and all their accoutrements of warfare. The other detachment was a company of cavaly [sic], under command of Capt Morgan, and numbering 90 men. They bore with them their sabres, and will be equipped with the inevitable rifle at this place. They formed in line on Exchange Street after debarking, and afterwards marched up Exchange to Main, and up Main to the front of the Provost Marshal's office where they were brought to a halt. They were then marched to Fort Porter, where they will remain as Provost Guard during the draft. Of the men constituting the force we must say that they presented all the appearance of veterans which they really are.

ARRIVALS AT THE SOLDIERS' HOME corner of MeGee and Third streets, S. G. DOOLITTLE, Superintendent.
J Mumford, 68 N Y, Pomfret.
T Hounson, 146 N Y, Benton.
H Fuller, 3 Wis. Monroe, Wis.
C. Fin, 10 N Y Cavalry, Niagara.
J Hartung, 64 N Y, Alleghany.
A Fox, 157 NY, Pitcher.
C Geer, 5 N Y Cav., Pharsalia.
H D Sanders, 16 N Y Bat., Triangle.
P Eldridde, 137 N Y,Groton.
G Jump, 56 N Y, Campbelltown.
J Bentram, 9 N Y Cav., Buffalo.
J H Gaylord, 5 N Y, New York City.
B M Carter, 154 N Y, New Albion.
W Miller, 76 N Y, Truxton.
J B Phillips, 149 Pa., Bingham.
J Risley, 68 N Y, Pomfret.
J Sack, 66 N Y, Pomfret.
S B Canfield, 141 Pa., Pike.
T H Roberts, 68 N Y, Pomfret.

ELMIRA.—The following is the list of those drafted for the town of Elmira and Southport drawn at the Provost Marshal's office July 20, 1863:
Robt. Troup, James Simpson, John Carley, J B Up Degraff, John Diaster, Phillip Weyer, Joseph Cornell, Wm Clock, John Foster John Leary Danl O'Leary, Jas S Ewing, Orson Oakley, Holms Stoddard, Jas Marshall, Hamilton Baker, Stephen Rose Jr, Patrick Gallager, James Henry, Martin Powell, Ed Jennings, John Meade, E Ford, Bernard Curry, James Clancey, John Goldsmith, Sinclair H Losie, Seager Peter, Edward H Bartholemew, Wm C Tompkins, Melville C Wilkinson, Jacob Garrett, Edwin J Platt, Amos Linderman, Byron C Horton, Eli Kellogg, Joseph Apt, John Madegar, Dan'l Atwater, John Folsey, James McCarty, John Cavanaugh, John Butler, Wm E Knight, Ebenezer E Terry, Albert Samuels, Francis Buckhardt, Jefferson Kent, John Fitzpatrick, John Magill, Geo. W Roberts, John Fury, Halstead Simpson, Lucius A Humphry, Thomas Maloney, Henry W Beadle, Elezer C Merrill, Henry W Breese, Benj Green, Robert W Barton, Henry C Covell, George Chapman, Isaac Ellston, Robert Goldsmith, A Milliner, Isaac R Weed, William J Chapman, Thomas Stewart, (col), Oscar N Bartholomew, Burr L Hendricks, Nelson P Wildrick, George Fryer, Robt A Stewart, John McLane, Clarence Norwood, Benj V Robins, William Ward, Geo Bundy, Benj C Carpenter, H D Wells, Benj Stanard, Harrison S Busler, John Hughes, Oscar Gregory, Wm T L Mailer, Martin Lynch, Hugh McAllister, Frank J Phelps, Alex H Baldwin, Simon McMann, Anthony Allen, Nathan Dean, David Kennedy, Frederick Cook, John Lynch, Richard Ellison, Edson Wing, John W Loveess, Wm M Thayer, Simeon B. Leverich, Geo. C. White, Barzell Ridley, Horace Butts, Clark A. Campbell, Benj. Laws, John D. Spencer, Geo. Crauthers, Chas. Blademan, Sam'l Thomas, L. C. Freman, W Knapp, Wm. H Perry, Rob't Collingwood, David Jenkins, Granville D Parsons, Wm. Friday, Abm J Taylor, Henry Haupt, Mathew Dister, C Gill, Chas Delany, Dan Espy, Thad A Cowen, Wm H McElroy, John Burchill, William Bon, Henry B Jenkins, J Ed Larkin, John L Billings, James M Shoemaker, Stephen E Doolittle, Robt Jillson, Wayland M Sanders, Abbott Barbour, Benj Goldsmith, John Morris, Henry B Dick- Chas E Coon,Thos. Finnigan, John Teinson, Wm Krower, Joseph Burbage, Elihy Tuttle, Cornelius Cain, A Van Wormer, Jas Bolian, Frank Carpenter, Virgil Albertson, Humphrey J Mosier, Frank Williams, Elisha Kingsbury, Chas A Delaw, Geo G Reynolds, James Cooper, J Lovergan, Jas Colligan, Edward Elston, Patrick Gorman, Martin M'Nullty, William Boyer, John H Brown, Jacob Culp, Eugene J Williams, Anderson Murphey, Silas Shannon, John Sharp, Jefferson Fay, John M Pross, Patrick Mowery, Walter Canada, Patrick O'Brien, David Perkins, Joel Jervis, James Hammond, Jacob Oertel, Henry A Green, John Murray, Jacob Moody, Wm H Stowell, Chas C Hall, John Seeley, John McWerry, Jocob Kolb, Edward Dobell, Edwin Austin, Cristopher Slater, Jas Dunn, Wm Rhodes, John Gorman, John Dobell, Comton Learry, Hiram Becktol, Jacob Dewitt, Edwin Hammond, M Corbett, Geo Fleet, Jas J Bloomer, Wm Morterstock, Irving D Booth, Cornelius B Hanyen, Matt H Arnott, Edward Tripp, Loreu Stone, John Willer, Chas Woodhouse, Francis Weaver, Henry Miller, Patrick Cane, C Messenger, Elias Satterly, Jas Dun, Chas Mavalle, Rums King, Jas T Dudley, John McCarty, John A Peck, Alpha Kenyan, Thos Oliver, Chas Hart, Wm S Chadock, Wm C Russell, Chas Dumfree, Michael Donohue, Henry Warner.
Alonzo P Walker, Wm Hughlin, Robt S Lacy, John D Dunning, John McSroley, Wm J Moulton, John Trainor, Milton Smith, Jesse Loop, Hugh McCabe, Wm Haskell, Patrick Kough, Geo Brickwidde, Geo Kelsey, Jas Trainor, D O Elmore, D W Williams, Edward Tuton, Wm Benson, Andrew Woodard, Samuel Johnson, John Flynn, Wm Kirk, John Clark, Robt Gouldsmith, Increase Gardner, DeWitt C Brown, Henry E Millius, John Decker, No. 1, Marshal Bliven, Calvin White, Sanford Maines, Walter Dimmick, Willis S Ellis, David Bulmer, Leroy Howland, Jacob Amann, John Welch, Frank Bookmyer, James Kinney, Wm Goldsmith, Geo B Abbey, Addison M Bell, Elias H Dormaul, John Sheppard, Geo W Liasey, James W Pickering, Herman D Straus, Chancy Jordan, Hector M Seward, Morris Knox, Geo H Smith, Maxwell Haight, Chas Wheelock, Jas Greene, Wm D Abbott, John Lawrence, Patrick Brainard, John A Tyler, Michael Dister, A Lawrence, John Weaver, Henry F  Pitcher, Richard Armitage, David D Reynolds, Joshua Ross, Adolphus Dickinson, John Nurse, Robert Atkins, John Goodrich, Soloman Ossioski, John Sherridan, Wm K Greatsinger, James Croney, Wm Garrell, John Dean.

SOUTHPORT.
Myron Graves, Thos Russell, Guy Whitlock, Mich'l Hahidon, Chas Herman. Uuriah Ferguson, Robert M Watts, Jackson Terwelliger, Stephen Savey, Patrick Daily, David Casey, James Coffee, Mathew Arnot, D C Miller, Bartholmew Dempsey, Wm Piper, Chas Coffee, Wm Smith, Jas Clark, Cathan Osborne, Charles Wilcox, Humphrey O'Brien, Augustus Smith, George Mosher, Stephen Rhiensmith, John Burbage, Albert W. Georgia, John T Decker, David Congden, Oscar Strattan, Chas D Lewis, Leander Young, John Corey, John Waller, Josephus Harris, Jarvis Jenkins, Edwin Rothwell, James J Chapman, John Smith aged 34, John Spillane, Lawrence Jennings, Josiah Robbins, Samuel Shappee, M. P. Cortwright, Henry Forrand, Ed Miller Jr., John Cline, Dennis Rae, Prtrick Broell, Daniel M Mitzger, Ed E Hanger, Timothy Connolly, Gyu VanGorder, Clark Gosper, J T Ayers, John Besley, Philip G Miller, T S Murray, John B Sly, P A  Roberts, T Baldwin, Olney Brown, G R Brown, D Law, G Comfort, Ed Comfort, J H Wells, C Webster, C Denis, Richard Nichols, Patrick Stebbins, Lewis Rider, Leroy A Baker, Vergil Y Duryea, Wm Drake, John V Lewis, A J Owen, Michael Corkins, Chas Steward, Nicholas McKerrick, Geo Rider, John Mullen, Wm Brown, A Sly, Joseph Y Tooker, N C Parmenter, Wm K Sly, Geo Moshier, Geo Minier, Jas L Redfield, John Shaw, Geo A Wolcott, Abm Breese. John Baxter, Geo Miller, Theron Hollister, John Smith, Joseph Geist, Jas W Babcook, Lewis Wells, John Bane, Jas Gray, Ransford Foley, Agdrew Fitz Simmons, John Casey, John H Sly, John R Willber, Joseph C Lyons, Columbia Nichols, Alven G Barnhart, Patrick Quinn, Geo Rodgers, Anthony Barrett, Jacob Weaver jr, Michael Connelly, Thos Edward, Avah Jewell, J Barney, C S Brown, J Sharp.

The following infantry regiments are represented at this rendezvous, to take charge of the conscripts assigned to each respective regiment:
The 153d, 49th, 109th, 77th, 122d, 117th, 140th, 89th, 146th, 112th, 2d, 1st, 3d, 15th, 141st, 154th, 144th, 94th, 147th, 104th, 157th, 44th, 148th, 111th, 107th, 137th, 76th, 108th, 126th, 149th, l06th, 60th, 64th, 97th, 86th, 50th, 72d and 85th; from the 10th and 14th regular infantry, and 10th, 5th and 9th Artillery.

THE CONSCRIPTS AT ELMIRA.—A correspondent of the Evening Post, writing from Elmira under date of Aug. 14, says that there are only a few hundreds of conscripts and substitutes in camp at that place yet, but Gen. QUINBY has information indicating that the number to arrive for some time to come will be at least two thousand per week. No less than thirty New York State regiments in the field, are represented at Elmira by details of three commissioned officers and six non-commissioned officers and privates from each regiment, for the purpose of taking charge of the men assigned to their ...

Local and Miscellaneous.
Our Excess of Men.
The Republican editor is extremely solicitous on the subject of the excess of men furnished by our town previous to the draft, and is laboring hard to cast the blame upon Gov. Seymour in case we fail to obtain credit for them. If the editor will read the law he will learn that Gov. Seymour is powerless in the matter, and that the duty of assigning quotas of troops devolves upon the President. The Conscription law provides:
SEC. 12. * * * * In assigning to the districts the number of men to be furnished therefrom THE PRESIDENT SHALL take into consideration the number of volunteers and militia furnished by and from the several States in which said districts are situated, and the period of their service since the commencement of the present rebellion, and SHALL so make said assignment as TO EQUALIZE THE NUMBERS AMONG THE DISTRICTS of the several States, CONSIDERING AND ALLOWING FOR THE NUMBERS ALREADY FURNISHED as aforesaid and the time of their service.
The attempt of the Republican to cast the blame upon Gov. Seymour is futile. The Conscription act itself prescribes the manner in which excesses are to be allowed, and makes it incumbent upon the President to perform that labor. We have been promised, time and again, that Lyons should be fairly dealt by, but as the time approaches for action, the prospect of a fulfillment [sic] of those pledges grows less and less. The town of Lyons has an excess of 41 men to apply in this draft of 63 men, and these men, or at any rate 27 of them were recruited at an expense of $2700 in the shape of town bounty—hence the General Government can lastly claim 10 men only—and every man over that number is taken at the expense of justice and in violation of fair dealing. But the power is in the President, and the people will have to submit. But in doing so, it is their duty to enter their protest and characterize the authors of such injustice in befitting terms.
These remarks were predicated upon the result of the efforts of the people of Rochester to obtain justice from the authorities at Washington. Yesterday our conscripts went to Auburn to enter the ranks or pay; but as we have heard nothing of the proceedings there we of course are unable to say anything.

From Elmira.
ELMIRA, JULY 31st, 1863.
EDITORS JOURNAL:—The village of Elmira after a short interim again presents quite a martial aspect. The firm tread of military men falls upon the ear with a regularity acquired only by laborious practice, and which, to the ear of those educated in the science, bespeaks the soldier before the sight confirms it. The drafted men are coming in few at a time and at this date the officers to take charge of them are nearly as numerous as the conscripts. The Conscription act is the topic most frequently under discussion; and it is amusing in the extreme to listen to the different views advanced by different parties. There is a degree of ignorance truly lamentable existing in some communities in relation to this matter. Those persons who clamor most about the injustice and inhumanity of the present law for drafting are the ones who are profoundly ignorant of its true merits; as they are also of the defects of the old system for calling out men, and when this fact is made quite apparent to them, as it is frequently by some one who is posted, it does not occur to them as being a sufficient reason for defence. But much the larger portion of the conscripts however, are quite reconciled to their fate, and seem to recognize our country's necessities in the means employed for getting men, most of thorn would blush with shame at the thought of such a combination of several for the purpose of freeing one of their number, by paying the stipulated amount, in case he should be drafted, as you will find existing in different parts of Jefferson County. This is resistance to the draft in a very mild form; but still if it should be carried out extensively it would practically be rendering the Conscription act powerless for good by depriving the country of men. The framers of that Bill were too humane. Had they left it imperative upon every man drafted to go or produce a substitute, the main object to be secured would have been attained; and muscle would have been given the government to support our drooping banners.    R.

DRAFTED MEN AS SOLDIERS.
The officers in charge of the conscripts have a poor opinion of substitutes, but are enthusiastic in regard to the drafted men who enter the ranks. They say these men learn the drill (six hours training is performed daily) quite as rapidly as volunteers, and that in all respects they will become as good soldiers. As a body, they are much superior, both mentally and physically, to the substitutes.

DESERTERS.
PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE,
ELMIRA, Elmira, N. Y., August 17, 1863.
A Reward of Ten Dollars ($10) and the reasonable expense incurred, including transportation, &c., will be paid to any person for the  apprehension and delivery of any deserter at this office.
SAM'L M. HARMON,
Capt. and Provost Earshal [sic],
aug18              27th Dist, N. Y.

SUBSTITUTES LEAVING FOR ELMIRA.—
On Saturday evening a detachment of about twenty substitutes for drafted men, were sent to Elmira in a special car by Provost Marshal Hart. They were accompanied by a guard detailed for that purpose from the 14th Heavy Artillery. These substitutes were obtained at prices varying from $202 to $400. The demand for substitutes is exceedingly lively.—Roch. Dem.
All the above arrived here safely excepting one, who turned up non est inventus.

ARRIVALS AT THE ELMIRA HOME.—G. W. Housel, 148th N. Y., of Canandaigua; J. Arusmeyer, 140th N. Y., of this city; Sergeant S. McCall, 33d N. Y., of Palmyra, have arrived at the Soldier's Home in Elmira.

NEGRO CONSCRIPTS.
So far, only two negro conscripts have reported for duty. One of these said he was by no means displeased on account of the fact that he was drafted, and so far from running off he would say that he was not born to run "in any direction." He meant that he would stand his ground when he should meet the rebels.

FURLOUGHS.
Furloughs are given these drafted men in all cases where they are known, and there is no reason to suspect they will not return. Only a few are kept rigidly in camp.
It is to be observed that a considerable number of men here reported at the camp as ready for duty have been drafted, but not examined and mustered into the service.

The Conscript Camp at Elmira—Escape of Substitutes---Good Conduct of the Conscripts.
The Evening Post has another letter from Elmira, which states that the substitutes thus far sent to the camp there are very unreliable persons, and numerous escapes occur. One fellow was shot at five times, but got off. And other was drowned in attempting to swim the Chemung river, on the bank of which the camp is located. On the person of the latter more than $600 were found. His name was not ascertained.
Inspections of the substitute quarters and conversations with the substitutes are permitted by the guards. The men were lounging in different parts of the building without employment of any kind. They were, as a class, inferior men. Most were foreigners, but chiefly from England and Canada. The prices they obtain vary from two hundred to three hundred and fifty dollars—some individual, preferring to pay the extra fifty rather than to be unrepresented in the ranks. During the day they remain in quarters, or in some cases have the liberty of the yard, which comprises several acres in extent; but in the night they are carefully locked up and guarded. Their escape would seem to be difficult and extremely dangerous; for to run the guard in day-light involves almost certain death, in the night the chances are very small.

DRAFTED MEN.
The drafted men do not escape. The writer ascertained from inspection of the muster rolls, that not one of nearly one hundred of these persons who had so far arrived at this camp was absent without leave. The gathering of the conscripts has just commenced; but none of the men reported immediately after they were drafted, and have been several days in camp.
They speak of their situation generally with the utmost good feeling. Forty or fifty of the number had assembled in one end of their building, and when they were visited were engaged in the performance of ordinary games. One oi their number having brought his violin into camp, discourses excellent music. They entered freely into conversation. A considerable proportion of them had the means of procuring exemprion [sic], but they preferred, partly as a matter of duty, to take their places in the ranks.
One of them, a fine looking man, said he "would not give twenty-five cents to anybody to take his place; no man could do his fighting." Another said he would give fifty dollars for a substitute, but he would give no more. He believed he had been unfairly drafted. A third man remarked that he would be willing to go South it he could first kill off some of the copperheads here. It was not worth while to fight with a fire in the rear. He also grumbled about politicians. Then a speech was made by one of the conscripts. He said: "Now, boy's, that's all gammon. Our business is to go down and kill off the rebels, and when we have settled up their 'hash' we will come home and settle the hash here." This speech was received with cheers, in which all the conscripts joined, and the violin man recommenced his music. The feeling is excellent—not surpassed, if equaled [sic], in any of the numerous volunteer corps your correspondent has visited since the beginning of the war.

CONSCRIPTS ON GUARD.
One of the best evidences of the reliance placed upon the conscripts is found in the some-what remarkable fact that they are regularly detailed for guard duty. The excellence of the past ten days has proved the prudence of the regulation and the entire trustworthiness of these men. They are, however, kept on guard duty only in the day time, and are sent into their quarters, but not confined at night—not that they would run away, but it is not deemed best to subject them to the influence of importunate friends, or to give them a bad opinion of the service by exacting severe duty.

SUBSTITUTES ESCAPED.—We learn that nineteen of the substitutes sent from this city last week, succeeded in effecting their escape between here  and Elmira—some skedaddling from the cars when the train stopped, and others jumping off while the cars were in motion. It would seem pretty obvious that those in charge of these men must have been grossly remiss in their duty, or they could not have so easily succeeded in getting off. We may have something to add on this head hereafter. Another detachment of substitutes left for Elmira this morning. We hope they will all arrive there in safety.
The Rochester Democrat of this morning has the following: "On Friday last a detachment of the Invalid Corps started from Buffalo to take about 120 conscripts and substitutes to Elmira. Between Avon and Corning several of them attempted to escape, and four were shot by the guard. Only three succeeded in escaping."
Dr. H. S. Chubbuck, of this village, has been appointed Assistant Surgeon for the Board of enrollment, and will hereafter aid Dr. Graves in the examinations of drafted men at this depot.—Elmira Adv.

SUBSTITUES FOR ELMIRA.—Yesterday morning U. S. Detective Butler arrived from Elmira on his return from taking forward fifteen substitutes from this city. Officer Butler says that he was informed at Elmira that this was the only place from which substitutes had been received where some of them did not escape before being delivered to the authorities there.

Astounding Revelations of the Elmira Conscription Board.
The Elmira (N. Y.) Gazette in referring to the proceedings of the meeting, over which Judge Grover presided, and its revelations and denunciation of corruption in the Exemption Board, says:
The fact is notorious that the Board has been surrounded by a lot of harpies, who to all appearance enjoyed the confidence of its members, and who have made it their business to secure, for a consideration, certificates of exemption for drafted men. These men are here to-day plying their vocation. Their business is and has been well known to the Board, and yet they would have the public believe that everything is right inside the Provost Marshal's office.
The truth is, this military depot has been a sink of corruption and iniquity since the first contract was given out under the authority of Van Valkenburg. It has been a continuous system of cheating; robbing and fraud are carried on for the benefit of the peculiar friends of the poor darkey, whose patriotism must be paid for. It is but an epitome of what has been carried on since the commencement or the war, and will be carried on so long as the contractors and speculators can prolong it, commencing with members of the administration and extending through all the ramifications of its service.
The Rochester Union, commenting upon this, says:
"What are we to think of these facts, presented by the partizans of the administration and advocates of the Federal Conscription act, and referring to a Conscription Board acting at the home and under the very eyes of Ex- Congressman and Assistant Provost Marshal General of Western New York, Diven? What protection have the people generally, and Democrats particularly, in their rights under such an administration of affairs in the hands of corrupt and dishonest men and unscrupulous political opponents?
In referring generally to exposed rascalities of draft officials, we would be doing neither the officers of this district nor ourselves justice, if we omitted to say that thus far, watching as we have their proceedings carefully, everything has been conducted by them fairly and impartially, and there is no reason to suspect that they will deviate from this straightforward course in the future.

[Correspondence of the Evening Post.]
ELMIRA, N. Y., August 14, 1863.
The gathering of the men recently drafted in the interior of this State has just commenced at the great rendezvous of Central New York in Elmira. Three depots were originally appointed, namely. Riker's Island, in New York harbor; Elmira, for Central New York; and Buffalo, for Western New York. There are now but two general stations, the Buffalo depot having been abandoned, and the papers belonging to it sent to Elmira, where all the men drafted in the western part of the State will be put into camp, and thence transferred to the regiments in the field.
Elmira has, therefore, become a point of much interest. A double rendezvous, the centre of half if not more than half the area of the State, it is already crowded with soldiers, though the conscripts have, as yet, arrived in but small numbers. In addition to the rendezvous for drafted men, Elmira is also a volunteer station; large numbers of recruiting officers and their  recruits occupy the public places and hotels; and from an ordinary quiet little town of staid and innocent aspect, it has been transformed into a sort of Quartermaster's department for the subsistence of soldiers now here and to come.
The camps or barracks at Elmira number four in all. They are situated on the banks of the Chemung river, a wide though almost unnavigable stream, even for the lightest craft. The soldiers, therefore, have the benefit of uninterrupted bathing. The barracks are sufficiently numerous to accommodate nearly ten thousand soldiers; but it is likely that the arrangements for the distribution of the conscripts will prevent the presence of even half that number at the same time at the rendezvous; although the current of arrivals and departures will be large and constant until the men drafted under the present call shall have taken their places in the field.
The arrivals of drafted men here, as already stated, have but just commenced; only two of the camps are occupied by the few hundred conscripts and their substitutes who have come forward, but no less than thirty New York State regiments are represented, by details of veterans from their ranks for the purpose of conducting away the reinforcements which are to be assigned them. These veterans, including three officers and six privates from each regiment, exhibit the most laudable anxiety as to which of them shall receive the first conscripts and first be constituted maximum regiments. It is not too much to say that they hail the prospective accessions of drafted men with a certain and peculiar pleasure, and possess the utmost confidence in their ability to teach them the art of war.
Brigadier-General Isaac F. Quimby was a few days ago placed in command of the Elmira rendezvous. This officer was until June connected with General Grant's army, where he assisted in the siege of Vicksburg, in command of a division—well known as "Quimby's division"—but on account of ill-health was relieved, and came to Rochester, in this State. He was medically advised that he could not return to active service till autumn, but took command of the conscript camp. Having received orders as to which of the regiments are to be first filled and the number of men needed, the General will enter at once on the distribution of the drafted men. In the course of a day or two some of the soldiers will take their departure for New York harbor.
The draft is complete in many districts, but the time allowed to the drafted men to report for service or to present substitutes has in but a few cases expired. Meanwhile, General Quimby has information indicating that the number of conscripts to arrive for some time to come will number at least two thousand per week.
A large praportion [sic] of these men will enter the field by way of New York.                   J. M.

Advertiser and Union.
AUBURN, N. Y.,
Tuesday Evening, August 18, 1863.
See reading matter on first page.
Elmira—Arrival of Conscripts.
A correspondent of the New York Evening Post writing from Elmira states that the gathering of the men recently drafted in the interior of this state has just commenced at the great rendezvous of Central New York in Elmira. Three depots were originally appointed, namely, Riker's Island, in New York harbor; Elmira, for Central New York; and Buffalo, for Western New York. There are now but two general stations, the Buffalo depot having been abandoned, and the papers belonging to it sent to Elmira, where all the men drafted in the western part of the state will be put into camp, and thence transferred to the regiments in the field.
Elmira has, therefore, become a point of much interest. A double rendezvous, the centre of half if not more than half the area of the state, it is already crowded with soldiers, though the conscripts have, as yet, arrived in but small numbers. In addition to the rendezvous for drafted men, Elmira is also a volunteer station; large numbers of recruiting officers and their recruits occupy the public places and hotels; and from an ordinarily quiet little town of staid and innocent aspect, it has been transformed into a sort of quartermaster's department for the subsistence of soldiers now here and to come.
The camps or barracks at Elmira number four in all. They are situated on the banks of the Chemung river, a wide though almost unnavigable stream, even for the lightest craft. The soldiers, therefore, have the benefit of uninterrupted bathing. The barracks are sufficiently numerous to accommodate nearly ten thousand soldiers; but it is likely that the arrangements for the distribution of the conscripts will prevent the presence of even half that number at the same time at the rendezvous; although the current of arrivals and departures will be large and constant until the men drafted under the present call shall have taken their places in the field..
Brigadier General Isaac F. Quimby was a few days ago placed in command of the Elmira rendezvous. This officer was until June connected with General Grant's army, where he assisted in the siege of Vicksburg, in command of a division—well known as "Quimby's division"—but on account of ill health was relieved, and came to Rochester, in this State. He was medically advised that he could not return to active service till autumn, but took command of the conscript camp. Having received orders as to which of the regiments are to be first filled and the number of men needed, the General will enter at once on the distribution of the drafted men. In the course of a day or two some of the soldiers will take their departure for New York harbor.
The draft is complete in many districts, but the time allowed to the drafted men to report for service or to present substitutes has in but a few cases expired. Meanwhile General Quimby has information indicating that the number of conscripts to arrive for some time to come will number at least two thousand per week.
A large proportion of these men enter the field by way of New York.
The draft for Elmira yesterday, quite took everybody by surprise, as no public announcement had been previously made, and no one knew of the preparation until the whole machinery was in full blast, but not a long time sufficed to assemble a crowd of anxious faces, who filled up the precincts of the Provost Marshall's office, and then found room in the door-way and standing places on the walk and adjacent street. Many anxious countenances awaited the first announcment [sic] of Robert Troupe, who was properly congratulated for his priority of honors, a few names followed, but soon in fast succession were plucked out from the remorseless cylinder, an array of names well known to everyone on the street, taking, as one of the usual freaks of the draft, the names of many of our prominent young business men and clerks, for instance, the Brainard House was mulcted in its proprietor and clerk, the bar-tender, and last, but not least, the stable man; along down the street were taken, Stephan Rose, Jr., Elias Satterlee, John Decker, both from Tuthill's store, C. C. Hall, and J. T. Dudley, representing both book stores fairly, W. J. Moulton and Larkin, of Moulton's daguerrean gallery, surely a double strike, Burr Hendricks, and his companion clerk, Ed. Ford; and still it couldn't pass without giving the old bachelors a lesson in the persons of R. King, Esq., and D Dulmer, one of our esteemed merchants, and hardware had another representation in the genial person of Marry Covell, while Chemung and Chemung Canal Banks were not allowed to go scot free, in the presentation of the names of Henry Beadle and Mat. Arnot; as honored names for the draft, Lake street was not entirely forgotten in the persons of Robert Collingwood, D. D. Reynolds and Max. Haight, not to suffer invidious distinction to have Haight's Hotel entirely unrepresented.
The renowned showman, FRANK PHELPS, was also duly remembered; and emphatically among the last the worthy name of our cotemporary did not escape, WM. M. THAYER, an example in practice of the true grounded and emphatic sentiments the Press has expressed during the pending draft.—We confess we cannot offer any tears of sympathy for him, especially thus drafted into the long roll of our country's heroes and patriots. We also think he took the same view of it, for not long after, he appeared, having already donned the habiliments of war, in the garments of a Captain of our volunteer army. We are ready to back him he will fight like a good soldier of the sword, as he has already done as a brave soldier of the quill.
Captain Wilkinson was made compulsory volunteer again.
The ADVERTISER and Galette offices were singularly passed over; we suppose Uncle Sam will light upon the Advertiser in the second draft, for which we will patiently wait.
Our foreign citizens and working men were remarkably passed over; we are sure they cannot complain of unfairness in this town. The whole event was taken in good feeling and hilarity. After it was over, the drafted procured muskets and including the canes and crutches of those who appeared, as if suddenly wounded, and made quite a demonstration in the steeets [sic], deriving sport and entertainment out of the unpleasant ordeal.
The time occupied in drawing the names was about one hour. The cylinder was quickly turned, the name drawn out by Lieut. BENEDICT blindfolded, was announced by Provost Marshall HARMON, and repeated to the waiting crowd outside. One of the clerks of the Board, COON, received a momentary surprise in the calling of his own name.
Thus quietly and in good nature, the draft passed for Elmira, the drafted taking the whole matter with cheerful submission and pleasantry.

Elmira Daily Advertiser.
LOCAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS,
TUESDAY MORNING, JULY 21, '63.
PRAYER MEETING every week day morning at 8 o'clock in the Session room of the First Psesbyterian [sic] Church, coner [sic] Church and Baldwin
streets. All are invited to attend.

A GREAT TIME I N ELMIRA.
The Drafted Men on a Bender.
They Respond to the Call with Processions and Speeches.
The draft for three hundred men from the town of Elmira, was made at the office of the Provost Marshal in this village yesterday forenoon. The first name was drawn from the wheel at fifteen minutes before eleven o'clock, and the entire draft was finished at fifteen minutes before twelve. A large number of people was congregated in and about the office of the Provost Marshal, and the announcement of the names was received with marked demonstrations of applause. As soon as the draft was concluded, the fortunate holders of tickets prepared a programme for a grand celebration of their success. CHRISTOPHER SLATER, of the Brainard House, was chosen chief Marshal, and WM. M. THAYER, of the Daily Press, was appointed Captain. At five o'clock in the afternoon the prize holders collected in front of the Brainard House, to the number of at least a hundred, deked out in all manner of gay and striking costumes.—They looked like an old fashioned general training. Wisner's Band, and the Elmira Cornet Band led the procession, which marched up Water street to Main, up Main to Church, and down Church to the Public Square, where they halted for the speeches. In the procession were a number of banners and placards, with humorous inscriptions. One read, "The Union and the Constitution—God and Victory." Another, "What we kill, we eat." Another, "We are coming Father Abraham, three hundred dollars strong." Another "Prize Tickets $300, U. S. Lottery."
In the square a large number of people were collected to hear the speeches. Rufus KING, a member of the bar, and a drafted man, was the first speaker, and he made a speech which honored him as a man and a patriot. The spirit which he evinced will carry our country through the deepest trials which can befall it. His remarks were received with enthusiasm and applause. We should be glad to publish it in full but our limits will not permit it.
T. C. COWEN was next called upon. He appeared he said as a substitute for his son who was drafted, but absent from town. He was too old to be drafted himself. If he had been younger no doubt he should have been one of them, as he was one of the luckiest men in the world. Cowen then proceeded in a humorous and enthusiastic strain to excite the patriotism of his hearers. His remarks were responded to with the greatest enthusiasm.
S. H. LOSIE, a drafted man, next spoke. His remarks were pointed and patriotic. He was born in a foreign land, but he was ready and willing to stand by the stars and stripes of his adopted country.
CHRISTOPHER SLATER, of the Brainard House, was then called upon. He said he had only to say that though an Englishman by birth, he was proud to say he was an American citizen, and he urged the people to stand by the Constitution, the Laws and the Administration.
An old man; sixty-five years of age, then mounted the stand, and proceeded to address the people. His broken accent showed that he was a German. He said he had been sixteen years in the service in the old country, and wished he was young enough to fight now for liberty in America. He knew the difference between a monarchy and a free government, and he exhorted the people in eloquent language to stand up and fight for order and law. In conclusion he said it was the best he could do now, but when they came back he would give them something better. His speech was a novel and excising feature of the occasion [sic]. His name is Charles Simons. And we say bully for Simons.
James T. Dudley, a drafted man, then came forward and read a series of resolutions which we publish below. They were adopted with a tremenduous [sic] and unanimous shout of applause:
Whereas, The Government of the United States for the purpose of assisting in preserving itself against the destroying efforts of an organized do­mestic foe, has seen fit to institute a draft, and
Whereas, We, through the favor of kind For­tune, have been each awarded a prize in this great lottery, therefore, be it
RESOLVED, That we, the drafted men of Elmira, loving our Union, our Constitution and our Flag, hereby declare that in our opinion this action of the Government is necessary and just.
RESOLVED, That, claiming to be loyal men, we will not, by word or deed, by thought or action, offer resistance to this draft, but will respond in a manner that shall be proper and satisfactory to this call of patriotic duty.
RESOLVED, That if at any time unlawful resistance be offered to this legal conscription, we will, if called upon, spring to the defence of the Government, and will use every means placed at our disposal to put down all who so far forget themselves as to win the title of traitors and rioters.
RESOLVED, That we earnestly believe, from its baptism of blood and fire, the country shall come forth purified and with new greatness, and that through the blessing of God, again and forever, undiminished in luster—

"The star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave,
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave,

The procession then formed in line and marched through Church to Lake, down Lake to Water, and up Water to the Brainard House where it was dismissed.
The whole affair was conducted with marked success, and was received by the people with unbounded satisfaction. It proved that the people are true to the government, and ready to make any sacrifices to maintain it. The drafted men of Elmira will he honored and remembered for their humorous and patriotic demonstration. May they live long and enjoy the fruits of their sacrifices.—They are bully boys, and deserve well of their country.

DRAFTING IN THE INTERIOR OF THE STATE—FUN, NOT RIOTS.
Our correspondent at Elmira, N. Y., under date of the 20th, sends us a rather amusing description of the state of things in that village, and of the operation of the draft which took place that day. We quote from his letter:
As each name was passed out to the crowd that surrounded the Provost Marshal's office, cheer after cheer was given, and the unfortunates saluted with, "How are you, Conscript?" No armed militia guarded the office, but three saucy navy revolvers in each drawer of our "worthy's" desk told of an intention to proceed quietly if he could, "forcibly if he must." It is now some two hours since the last name was drawn out, and no outbreak has occurred; on the contrary, the "lucky" ones who drew prizes are duly celebrating the event pursuant to the following call:

"Turn out Prize Men."
"Unfortunates stand back."

All men who were fortunate enough to draw a prize in the splendid scheme which came off this A. M., will meet in front of the Brainard House this afternoon, at five o'clock, when a procession will be formed, march to the Park, speeches made by drafted men only, after which march to Brainard House where repast will be served up.
(Signed) C. SLATER,
W. M. THAYER, Capt. Grand Marshal.

Mr. Slater is the worthy proprietor of Brainard House, who as soon as he drew the prize instantly hoisted his colors, and gave his fellow soldiers a grand repast, with a full supply of "Soda" to wash it down.
The procession boasted of about one hundred conscripts dressed in parts of uniforms—headed by the Elmira Cornet Band. On the banners were many devices, some of which I name: "Our Constitution and our Union," "What we kill, we Eat," "We are coming, Father Abraham, $300 strong," "Behold the lucky drawers of the $300 prize in the U. S. Lottery," &c. Among the number I find the name of your friend, George C. Smith, son of George W. Smith, of Williamsburgh [sic], who has resided here some five years. Your correspondent was not so fortunate and drew a blank, thereby depriving you of a report of many camp scenes from the army of the drafted.
Whole number drafted 330, which is one to every four coming within the required age.

Care of Drafted Men at Elmira.
From the Elmira Advertiser.
The arrangements for the care of drafted men at this rendezvous are now perfected. The War Department has assigned squads of men and officers to take charge of the men who have drawn Uncle Sam's prizes. There are six men and three officers selected for this work from the following regiments:—5th New York Artillery, 10th New York Artillery, 153d New York Volunteers, 49th New York Volunteers, 109th New York Volunteers, 141st and 43d New York Volunteers and 13 commissioned officers placed over these. Similar detachments are to come from each other New York regiments in the field.
Lieut. Geo. W. Johnson has been appointed to the charge of the barracks by Capt, Livingston. The present barracks occupied are those near the old Fair Ground. The various companies of cavalry being raised here are occupying the same quarters.

THE DRAFT.—At Elmira, on Friday, the Enrolling Board began to draw the names of those who are to serve their country as "drafted men" unless exempted. The drawing proceeds from day to day. Allegany was first taken up. Steuben was reached yesterday.

The Daily Advertiser.
S. B. FAIRMAN—C. G. FAIRMAN.
EDITORS.
OFFICIAL PAPER.
ELMIRA, N. Y.
WEDNSDAY MORNING, JULY 22, '63.
THE CONSCRIPTION LAW.
There is no nation but has carried on war by Conscription. It is the almost universal practice of all nations, the United States excepted, to conscript their soldiers. During the last war with England, the State militia were drafted in large numbers, and the armies of the revolution were kept up by drafted men. It is a principle as old as civil government, that they who enjoy the blessings of a government are bound to sustain that government in time of war. The humblest citizen has a claim upon the government for protection to the extent of its ability and the government has a right, in emergency, to demand support from every subject thus enjoying protection, to the extent of his ability. The obligations are mutually binding upon the subject and the government. In the time of war it is not only the right but the imperative duty of government to raise armies, guided by patriotic, economic and human principles.
No government has a right to surrender its existence so long as it has power to maintain it. If a hostile foe threaten the national life, every resource, every power must be laid under contribution to preserve it. Never may it yield until from sheer exhaustion, it is compelled to do so. In the performance of this sacred and imperative duty, if men do not come voluntarily in sufficient numbers to its support, the government must, of necessity have recourse to conscription; and however much they may regret this necessity, if there be any sense of obligation left, one remaining spark of patriotism in the people, they will stand by the government, and cheerfully submit to its requirements, whatever may be its errors. The man who, at such a time, refuses to submit to the authority of the government and the laws of the land, is a more than ordinary criminal, and is utterly unworthy the least protection or benefit of civalized [sic] government. Mark it well. He is either the basest of cowards or the vilest of traitors, or a man steeped in vice and lost to all sense of honor, or else he combines the whole, and is next thing to totally depraved. And the man who pretending to patriotism, loyalty and courage, will stir up such a spirit of revolt, is the meanest and worst man of whom it is possible to conceive. We have no patience with such wickedness. The foundation of all security is obedience to the law, and when men array themselves in opposition to the regularly constituted authorities or stir up a spirit of opposition thereto, they assume all the responsibilities of such scenes as have lately been enacted in New York City, and of every species of horrible crime that is possible to be committed.
The Conscription law which is now being enforced, and which is being attacked with so much violence by the opposition party, as to incite resistance among the "baser sort," though it may not be perfect, is, we are satisfied, on the whole, a good law, and its en­forcement at the present, timely. It recog­nizes the supremacy of the general govern­ment, and happy had it been for this land, had it been adhered to; it bears first upon that class best able to endure the hardships of the camp and field, and it allows of exemptions only on such conditions as will supply the exempted man's place with a substitute, either provided by himself or by the govern­ment with the money he shall furnish. This three hundred dollar clause, which is excepted to by some, will, in the main, work admirably. It permits those who have large business interests to detain them and whose presence, therefore, at home is of more consequence to the government than it would be in the army, to remain by paying what is a fair price foe a substitute; and even a poor man, if he is worthy and there are special reasons why he should not go, can in most instances manage to obtain the amount, and be exempt.
The probability is that as large a number of the wealthy will go to the field now as would have gone had they been absolutely re­quired to furnish a substitute in order to be exempt, while the amount which exempts a man is in all cases the same. But the point we insist upon is this, that had the law been positively exceptionable, had it been faulty at every point, there would be no adequate reason for resistance. It is the law, and until repealed it must he obeyed. This is the spirit that every true man will manifest towards this conscription business.

THE DRAFT IN ELMIRA.—One of our citizens who left Elmira late yesterday afternoon, informs us that drafting was completed in that place yesterday. The draft for the towns in the county (Chemung) was first made, and Elmira was left to wind up with. There was no disorder, or opposition to the draft manifested, either in the village or towns. When our informant left, the conscripted men were marching in procession, banners flying and drums beating, and were making themselves jolly generally.—[Roch. Express.

The Draft for the 27th Congressional District Completed.
Below we give a full list of all those drafted in this County which completes the draft for this Congressional District:
ELMIRA.
Robt Troup, James Simpson, John Carlev, J B Up Degraff, John Diaster, Phillip Weyer, Joseph Cornell, Wm Clock, John Foster John Leary Danl O'Leary, Jas S Ewing, Orson Oakley, Holms Stoddard, Ja_ Marshall, Hamilton Baker, Stephen Rose Jr., Patrick Gallager, James Henry, Martin Powell, E_ Jennings, John Meade, E Ford, Bernard Curry, James Clancey, John Goldsmith, Sinclair H Losie, Seager Peter, Edward H Bartholemew, Wm C Tompkins, Melville C Wilkinson, Jacob Garrett, Edwin J Platt, Amos Linderman, Byron C Horton, Eli Kellogg, Joseph Apt, John Madegar, Dan'l Atwater, John Folsey, James McCarty, John Cavanaugh, John Butler, Wm E Knight, Ebenezer E Terry, Albert Samuels, Francis Buckhardt, Jefferson Kent, John Fitzpatrick, John Magill, Geo W Roberts, John Fury, Halstead Simpson, Lucius A Humphry, Thomas Maloney, Henry W Beadle, Ele_er C Merrill, Henry W Breese, Benj Green, Robert W _arton, Henry C Covell, George Chapman, Isaac Ell__ton, Robert Goldsmith, A Milliner, Isaac R Weed, William J Chapman, Thomas Stewart, (col), Oscar _ Bartholomew, Burr L Hendricks, Nelson P Wildrick, George Pryer, Robt A Stewart, John McLane, Clarence Norwood, Benj V Robins, William Ward, Geo Bundy, Benj C Carpenter, H D Wells, Benj Stanard, Harrison S Busler, John Hughes, Oscar Gregory, Wm T Muller, Martin Lynch, Hugh McAllister, Frank J Phelps, Alex H Baldwin, Simon McMann, Anthony Allen, Nathan Dean, David Kennedy, Frederick Cook, John Lynch, Richard Ellison, Edson Wing, John W Love_ess, Wm M Thayer, Simeon B. Leverich, Geo. C. White, Barzell Ridley, Horace Butts, Clark A. Campbell, Benj. Laws, John D. Spencer, Geo. Crauthers, Chas. Blademan, Sam'l Thomas, L. C. Freman, W Knapp, Wm. H Perry, Rob't Collingwood, David Jenkins, Granville D Parsons, Wm. Friday, Abm J Taylor, Henry Haupt, Mathew Dister, C Gill, Chas Delany, Dan Espy, Thad A Cowen, Wm H McElroy, John Burchill, William Bon, Henry B Jenkins, J Ed Larkin, John L Billings, James M Shoemaker, Stephen B Doolittle, Robt Jillson, Wayland M Sanders, Abbott Barbour, Benj Goldsmith, John Morris, Henry B Dick, Chas E Coon, Thos. Finnigan, John Teinson,Wm Krower, Joseph Burbage, Elihy Tuttle, Cornelius Cain, _ Van Wormer, Jas Bolian, Frank Carpenter, Virgil Albertson, Humphrey J Mosier, Frank Williams, Elisha Kingsbury, Chas A Delaw, Geo G Reynolds, James Cooper, J Lovergan, Jas Colligan, Edward Elston, Patrick Gorman, Martin M'Nullty, William Boyer, John H Brown, Jacob Culp, Eugene J Williams, Anderson Murphey, Silas Shannon, John Sharp, Jefferson Fa__,   John M Pross, Patrick Mowery, Walter Canada, Patrick O'Brien, David Perkins, Joel Jervis, James Hammond, Jacob Oertel, Henry A Green, John Murry, Jacob Moody, Wm H Stowell, Chas C Hall, John Seeley, John McWerry, Jocob Kolb, Edward Dobell, Edwin Austin, Cristopher Slater, Jas Dunn, Wm Rhodes, John Gorman, John Dobell, Comton Learry, Hiram Becktol, Jacob Dewitt, Edwin Hammond, M Corbett, Geo Fleet, Jas J Bloomer, Wm Morterstock, Irving D Booth, Cornelius B Hanyen, Matt H Arnott, Edward Tripp, Loreu Stone, John Wilier, Chas Woodhouse, Francis Weaver, Henry Miller, Patrick Cane, C Messenger, Elias Satterly, Jas Dun, Chas Mavalle, Rufus King, Jas T Dudley, John McCarty, John A Peck, Alpha, Kenyan, Thos Oliver, Chas Hart, Wm S Chadock, Wm C Russell, Chas Dumfree, Michael Donohue, Henry
Warner, Alonzo P Walker, Wm Hughlin, Robt S Lacy, John D Dunning, John McSroley, Wm J Moulton, John Trainor, Milton Smith, Jesse Loop, Hugh McCabe, Wm Haskell, Patrick Kough, Geo Brickwidde, Geo Kelsey, Jas Trainor, D O Elmore, D W Williams, Edward Tuton, Wm Benson, Andrew Woodard, Samuel Johnson, John Flynn, Wm Kirk, John Clark, Robt Gouldsmith, Increase Gardner, DeWitt C Brown, Henry S Millius, John Decker, No. 1, Marshal Bliven, Calvin White, Sanford Haines, Walter Dimmick, Willis S Ellis, David Bulmer, Leroy Howland, Jacob Amann, John Welch, Frank Bookmyer, James Kinney, Wm Goldsmith, Geo B Abbey, Addison M Bell, Elias H Dormaul, John Sheppard, Geo W Liasey, James W Pickering, Herman D Straus, Chancy Jordan, Hector M Seward, Morris Knox, Geo H Smith, Maxwell Haight, Chas Wheelock, Jas Greene, Wm D Abbott, John Lawrence, Patrick Brainard, John A Tyler, Michael Dister, A Lawrence, John Weaver, Henry F Pitcher, Richard Armitage, David D Reynolds, Joshua Ross, Adolphus Dickinson, John Nurse, Robert Atkins, John Goodrich, Soloman Ossioski, John Sherridan, Wm K Greatsinger, James Croney, Wm Garrell, John Dean.

SOUTHPORT.
Myron Graves, Thos Russell, Guy Whitlock, Mich'l. Hallidon, Chas Herman, Unriah Ferguson, Robert M Watts, Jackson Terwelliger, Stephen Savey, Patrick Daily, David Casey, James Coffee, Mathew Arnot, D C Miller, Bartholmew Dempsey, Wm Piper, Chas Coffee, Wm Smith, Jas Clark, Cathan Osborne, Charles Wilcox, Humphrey O'Brien, Augustus Smith, George Mosher, Stephen Rhiensmith, John Burbage, Albert W. Georgia, John T Decker, David Congden, Oscar Strattan, Chas D Lewis, Leander Young, John Corey, John Waller, Josephus Harris, Jarvis Jenkins, Edwin Rothwell, James J Chapman, John Smith aged 34, John Spillane, Lawrence Jennings, Josiah Robbins, Samuel Shappee, M. P. Cortwright, Henry Forrand, Ed Miller Jr., John Cline, Dennis Rae, Patrick Broell, Daniel M Mitzger, Ed E Hauger, Timothy Connolly, Gyu VanGorder, Clark Gosper, J T Avers, John Besley, Philip G Miller, T S Murray, John B Sly, P A Roberts, T Baldwin, Olney Brown, G R Brown, D Law, G Comfort, Ed Comfort, J H Wells, C Webster, C Denis, Richard Nichols, Patrick Stebbins, Lewis Rider, Leroy A Baker, Vergil Y Duryea, Wm Drake, John Y Lewis, A  J Owen, Michael Corkins, Chas Steward, Nicholas McKerrick, Geo Rider, John Mullen, Wm Brown, A Sly, Joseph Y Tooker, N C Parmenter, Wm K Sly, Geo Moshier, Geo Minier, Jas L Redfield, John Shaw, Geo A Wolcott, Abm Breese, John Baxter, Geo Miller, Theron Hollister, John Smith, Joseph Geist, Jas W Babcock, Lewis Wells, John Bane, Jas Gray, Ransford Foley, Agdrew Fitz Simmons, John Casey, John H Sly, John R Willber, Joseph C Lyons, Columbia Nichols, Alven G Barnhart, Patrick Quinn, Geo Rodgers,
Anthony Barrett, Jacob Weaver jr, Michael Connelly,   Thos Edward, Avah Jewell, J Barney, C S Brown, J Sharp.                                                                        

BALDWIN.                               
Rosolo Hicks, Gilbert Houston, John T Bunto, John S Little, Miles  Hammond, Jessee Roberts, Aaron K Bunto, Isaac Deny, Joseph A Caywood, Charles Derby, Lewis Stedge, Hopkins E Smith, Isaac Garrabrant, Stephen B Busley, Elam Rumsey, Chas S Garrabrant, Wm Olin, Joel N Clark, Alphonse Lathrop, Caleb Launer, Chas H Decker, Daniel Green, Windson Brown.

BIG FLATT.
Chas Williams, Sylvester A Owen, Levi Rinslow, Robert Kneale, Jr., Wm Ryan, Alonzo Silsbe, Robt H Farr, Daniel Goff, David Benjamine, Anson Hungerford, Henry M Brown, Whittney Smith, Clark Yeomans, Geo Hammond, Wm B Jacobs, John Van Gorder, Patrick McMann, Morgan Pritchard, Martin Goodyear, Wm M Robinson, Amasa May, Henry Church, Geo Canfield, E Downing, Nicholas Munday, Wm Smith, Edward Rhineheart, John Brant, John Burdich, Lyman C Brown, Geo Baty, Thos Donnelly, Otis Stormes, Benj C Park, Wm S Owen, Cortright Mathews, Simpson Hughson, Erastus Rowley, Amos Manning, Saml W Hubbell, Uriah Gilbert, Henry Mosier, John L Smith, Wm McCarrick, C McMann, Daniel Foster, Ira Minier, James Goodyear, Aaron Bailey, Wm Mathews, Wm Eaker, Jas Brougham, Duncan Mills, Martin Malone, Merritt Hultz, Geo Tenbrook, Harmon G Smith, Erastus J Manning, Levi B Edminster, W E Palmer, James H Park.

CATLIN.
John Fulford, Harrison Demuna, Minor T Colegrove, Andrew Hunt, Amos Johnson, Reuben Carr, Wilson G Rickey, Jacob Smalley, Aloah Green, Sylvester Lattin, Russell Lamphen, Elias Green Jr., Lyman Tuttle, Geo W Sabins, John Atwood, Chas H Sabins, Wm Johnson, Robt R Mosher, Wm G Vandermark, Chancy N Robinson, Horace McDougal, Hiram Dean, Allen Mosher, Chark Miller, Nelson Upson, Wm Joiner, Henry T Griffiths, John Farr, Lorenzo Pike, Alvin Farr, S W Marsh, T G Tompkins, Morris Edminister, Watson Cogswill, Philip Axtell, Henry T Cole, Chas S Frost, B V Demuna, Wm S Ganning, Geo Hove_, Benj Middaugh.

HORSEHEADS.
Peter Hungerford, Danl Taylor, A C Weston, Carton J Howard, Peter W Townsend, Mike Sullivan, W Brewster, H L VanWort, Alvin Sweasy, Danl Van Auker, Alonzo Whitcomb, Chas Bennett, Walter Dailey, Austin Foster, Jesse Whittaker, John D Hemstreat, James Greek, Wm Goldsmith, John McConnell, Danl B Carpenter, Wm Hinds, John Gough, Jess_ White, Barton W Stanley, Andrew Rockwell, Wm Crandall, Simon Cahan, Sylas Taylor, H E Chamberlin, J Durland, Jas H Juddson, Chas Mandeville, Elijah Cortright, Theodore Bromage, Henry Goff, Solomon E Brees, Lewis W Young, Robt Gorman, Wm Hetfield, James Carmon, Simon C Bentley, John McCarty, Geo A Jones, John Williams, Jos Rodburn, James Rickey, Lewis Crandall, Jas H Osmer, Leroy Cross, John Hudnut, John Cahill, Geo V R Merrill, Wm A Sheppard, H Rodbourn, Farm Terwilliger, Eleza Day, John Maroney, Danl Flynn, J N Decker, Nathaniel Barbour, William Smith, Orrin Herrick, Chas D Ross, John Cornsey, Geo Wood, Lawrence Curtis, Joseph  Alexander, Jas Scott, John A Cole, John McNish, Frederick S Hooker.

CHEMUNG.
Reuben C Chapin, Jacob Hoffman, John H Hicks, John Lowman, Benj Peppard, John W Nourse, Elias Price, Stephen Cornwell, John Roberts, Jacob L Everett, Ellis Cornwell, Edmund Griswold, George W Burr, Maddison Reeve, Wm P Fitzgerald, Chas Boynton, James Warren, Isaac Vasbinder, Wm H Bosworth, Benj B Hewitt, Holly Bunce, U W Burt, Edward H Goodwin, John W Burt, George Thetgee, John Evans, Daniel Orcutt, William B Thompson, Harris Batterson, Elias B Doolittle, David A J Burt, Benj H Golden, Alex D Carey, Martin Wood, Thos Murphy, Sylvester Burt, Franklin Aikins, Thomas Simor, Henry Snell, Joseph Joslin, Wm  Drake, Lyman Smith, Oscar Wells, Michael Kelly.

ERIN.
Moses Herdick, Levi Decker, Elisha Beckwith, J Lampman, Wm Chapman, Richard Caywood, Geo F Georgia, John Hawley, James Vredenburg, David Clark, M Cooper, Sylvester Blauvelt, Abm Bowyer, Norman Rosenkrans, Lewis Dibble, Wm Bennett, Ira R Jones, David Chapman, Hosia Breese, Hamilton Hollenbeck, Andrew Chapman, Adrew Corwan, Saml Roswell, Harmon Bennett, David Vosburgh, Eugene Dunbar, Wm. Caywood, Gilbert Levayze, Jas J Park, Lyman Dykins, James Leonard, Nelson Smith, Mitchel H Harding.

VETERAN,
Alonzo Brown, Myron Phelps, Wesley Coe, Joseph H Allen, John M Stanley, Uriah Hall, John D Howell, Hiram Sawyer, Ezra Hammon, Joel C Cogswell, John M Banks, Wm C Pratt, John West, Alfred Baldwin, Chas Brown, John M Coe, Wheaton Banks, Francis Morgan, Josiah Kendle, Philip Hagen, Wm Thadgee, Wm Vanvey, Josiah W Batsford, Oliver Tanner, Carmine Lattin, Ira Van Duzen, Sandford N Fisk, George Becker, Chas M Soper, Lyman Strait, Charles Bundle, Marcus Walker, John M Coe, Geo W Sayles, Paul C Hauff, Orlando Nichols, Nathaniel D McConnell, John Campbell, Felix Holden, Sidney Lattin, Wm Kiff, Jonathan Howard, Gilbert Green, Chas Terry, Henry Lovell, John P Smith, Peter Miller, Wm Hendrick, Geo M Parsons, William Wanzer, Wm Belcher, Chas Sherwood, A McDougal, Thos Shanany, Royal J Phelps, Edwin Hoffman, John M Carr, Owin McCabe, Cuyler Whiting, Geo C Stewart, Wm H Parsons, Chas Crane, Chas Tidd, Lewis Butters. John Shulters, Isaac Egburt, Wm B Stoddard, Jonas Miller, Daniel Coe, David Turner, Amasa White, Edwin Thomas, Wm Shoemaker.

VAN ETTEN.
John Hill, Eleazer Wooden, Andrew Ramsey, Henry Maine, Levi Briden, Lucius Morey, Ira Ferine, Wm. Davi , Andrew Swartwood, Oliver Barnes, Geo. Hanson, Samuel Brink, Aaron Miller, John Neison, Ezra Woolever, Peter Getman (farmer,) Harrison W. Georgia, Geo. Wooden, Amos Linderman, Chas. Nichols, Miller Englis, Orrin Norris, Ab'm Barnes, Amariah Coon, Smith Morey, Thomas Barnes, Thadeus Rumsey, Isaac Cornish, Leonard Hess, Samuel Swartout, Sam'l D Morris, Peter Getman, (tanner,) Leroy Swartwood. Andrus Barnes, Wm. Edwards, Dan'l W. Stewart, Jas. Mills, M English.

The DRAFT IN ELMIRA.—The draft for Elmira came off on Monday. Trouble had been anticipated, but the utmost good feeling prevailed during the drawing. At five o'clock the conscripts formed a procession, with bands of music, mottoes, costumes, etc. Loud cheers were given for the Constitution and the Union. Speeches were made and the occasion of was one of rejoicing and festivity rather than disappointment.

THE DRAFT IN ELMIRA.—One of our citizens who left Elmira late yesterday afternoon, informs us that drafting was completed in that place yesterday. The draft for the towns in the county (Chemung) was first made, and Elmira was left to wind up with. There was no disorder, or opposition to the draft manifested, either in the village or towns. When our informant left, the conscripted men were marching in procession, banners flying and drums beating, and were making themselves jolly generally.

Care of Drafted Men at Elmira.
From the Elmira Advertiser.
The arrangements for the care of drafted men at this rendezvous are now perfected. The War Department has assigned squads of men and officers to take charge of the men who have drawn Uncle Sam's prizes. There are six men and three officers selected for this work from the following regiments:—5th New York Artillery, 10th New York Artillery, 153d New York Volunteers, 49th New York Volunteers, 109th New York Volunteers, 141st and 43d New York Volunteers and 13 commissioned officers placed over these. Similar detachments are to come from each other New York regiments in the field.
Lieut. Geo. W. Johnson has been appointed to the charge of the barracks by Capt. Livingston. The present barracks occupied are those near the old Fair Ground. The various companies of cavalry being raised here are occupying the same quarters.

A GREAT TIME IN ELMIRA.
The Drafted Men on a Bender.
They Respond to the Call with
Processions and Speeches.
From the Elmira Advertiser.
The draft for three hundred men from the town of Elmira, was made at the office of the Provost Marshal in this village yesterday forenoon. The first name was drawn from the wheel at fifteen minutes before eleven o'clock and the entire draft was finished at fifteen minutes before twelve. A large number of people was congregated in and around the office of the Provost Marshal, and the announcement of the names was received with marked demonstrations of applause.
As soon as the draft was concluded, the fortunate holders of tickets prepared a programme for a grand celebration of their success. Christopher
Slater, of the Brainard House, was chosen Chief Marshal, and Wm. M. Thayer, of the Daily Press, was appointed Captain. At five o'clock in the afternoon, the prize holders collected in front of the Brainard House to the number of at least a hundred, decked out in all manner of gay and striking costumes. They looked like an old-fashioned gegeral [sic] training.
Wisner's Band and the Elmira Cornet Band led the procession, which marched up Water street to Main, up Main to Church, and down Church to the Public Square, where they halted for the speeches.
In the procession were a number of banners and placards, with humorous inscriptions. One read, "The Union and the Constitution—God and Victory." Another, "What we kill, we eat." Another, "We are coming, Father Abraham, three hundred dollars strong." Another, "Prize Tickets $300, U. S. Lottery."
In the square a large number of people were collected to hear the speeches. Rufus King, a member of the bar, and a dratted man, was the first speaker, and he made a speech which honored him as a man and a patriot. The spirit which he evinced will carry our country through the deepest trials which can befall it. His remarks were received with enthusiasm and applause. We should be glad to publish it in full, but our limits will not permit it.
T. C. Cowen was next called upon. He appeared he said as a substitute for his son who was drafted, but absent from town. He was too old to be drafted himself. If he had been younger no doubt he should have been one of them, as he was one of the luckiest men in the world. Cowen then proceeded in a humorous and enthusiastic strain to excite the patriotism of his hearers. His remarks were responded to with the greatest enthusiasm.
S. H. Losie, a dratted man, next spoke. His remarks were pointed and patriotic. He was born in a foreign land, but was ready and willing to stand by the Stars and Stripes of his adopted country.
Christopher Slater, of the Brainard House, was then called upon. He said that he had only to say that though an Englishman by birth, he was proud to say he was an American citizen, and he urged the people to stand by the Constitution, the Laws and the Administration.
An old man, sixty-five years of age, then mounted the stand, and proceeded to address the people. His broken accent showed that he was a German. He said he had been sixteen years in the service in the old country, and wished he was young enough to fight now for liberty in America. He knew the difference between a monarchy and a free government, and he exhorted the people in eloquent language to stand up and fight for order and law. In conclusion he said it was the best he could do now, but when they came back he would give them something better. His speech was a novel and exciting feature of the occasion. His name is Charles Simons. And we say bully for Simons.
James T. Dudley, a drafted man, then came forward and read a series of resolutions which we publish below. They were adopted with a tremendous and unanimous shout of applause:
Whereas, The Government of the United States for the purpose of assisting in preserving itself against the destroying efforts of an organized domestic foe, has seen fit to institute a draft, and
Whereas, We, through the favor of kind Fortune, have been each awarded a prize in this great lottery, therefore, be it
Resolved, That we, the dratted men of Elmira, loving our Union, our Constitution and our Flag, hereby declare that in our opinion this action of the Government is necessary and just.
Resolved, That, claiming to be loyal men, we will not, by word or deed, by thought or action, offer resistance to this draft, but will respond in a manner that shall be proper and satisfactory to this call of patriotic duty.
Resolved, That if at any time unlawful resistance be offered to this legal conscription, we will, if called upon, spring to the defence of the Government, and will use every means placed at our disposal to put down all who so far forget themselves as to win the title of traitors and rioters.
Resolved, That we earnestly believe, from its baptism of blood and fire, the country shall come forth purified and with new greatness, and that through the blessing of God, again and for ever, undiminished in luster—

"The star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave,
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave."

The procession then formed in line and marched through Church to Lake, down Lake to Water, and up Water to the Brainard House where it was dismissed.
The whole affair was conducted with marked success, and was received by the people with unbounded satisfaction. It proved that the people are true to the Government, and ready to make any sacrifice to maintain it. The drafted men of Elmira will be honored and remembered for their humorous and patriotic demonstration. May they live long to enjoy the fruits of their sacrifices. They are bully boys, and deserve well of their country.
The Advertiser gives the following
INCIDENTS.
Many anxious countenances awaited the first announcement of Robert Troupe, who was properly congratulated for his priority of honors; a few names followed, but soon in fast succession were plucked out from the remorseless cylinder, an array of names well known to everyone on the street, taking, as one of the freaks of the draft, the names of four of our prominent young business men and clerks; for instance, the Brainard House was muleted in its proprietor and clerk, the bar-tender, and last, but not least, the stable man; along down the street were taken, Stephen Rose, Jr., Elias Satterlee, John Decker, both from Tuthill's store, C. C. Hall and J. T. Dudley, representing both book stores fairly, W. J. Moulton and Larkin, of Moulton's daguerrean gallery, surely a double strike, Burr Hendricks, and his companion clerk, Ed. Ford; and still it couldn't pass with­out giving the old bachelors a lesson in the per­sons of R. King, Esq., and D. Dulmer, one of our esteemed merchants, and hardware had another representation in the genial person of Harry Covell, while Chemung and Chemung Canal Banks were not allowed to go scot free in the presentation of the names of Henry Beadle and Mat. Arnot; as honored names for the draft. Lake street was not entirely forgotten in the persons of Robert Collingwood, D. D. Reynolds and Max. Haight, not to suffer invidious distinction to leave Haight's Hotel entirely unrepresented.
The renowned showman, Frank Phelps, was the last, the worthy name of our cotemporary did not escape, Wm. M. Thayer, an example in practice of the true grounded and emphatic sentiments the Press has expressed during the pending draft. We confess we cannot offer any tears of sympathy for him, especially thus drafted into the long roll of our country's heroes and patriots. We also think he took the same view of it, for not long after, he appeared, having already donned the habiliments of war, in the garments of a Captain of our volunteer army. We are ready to back him; he will fight like a good soldier of the sword, as he has already done as a brave soldier of the quill.
Captain Wilkinson was made compulsory volunteer again.
The Advertiser and Gazette offices were singularly passed over; we suppose Uncle Sam will light upon the Advertiser in the second draft, for which we will patiently wait.
Our foreign citizens and workingmen were remarkably passed over; we are sure they cannot complain of unfairness in this town. The whole event was taken in good feeling and hilarity. After it was over, the drafted procured muskets and including the canes and crutches of those who appeared, as if suddenly wounded, and made quite a demonstration in the streets, deriving sport and entertainment out of the ordeal.
The time occupied in drawing the names was about one hour. The cylinder was quickly turned, the name drawn out by Lieutenant Benedict blindfolded, was announced by Provost Marshal Harmon, and repeated to the waiting crowd outside. One of the clerks of the Board, Coon, received a momentary surprise in the calling of his own name.
Thus quietly and in good nature, the draft passed for Elmira, the drafted taking the whole matter with cheerful submission and pleasantry.

THE LAW OF THE DRAFT.
Important Circular of the Provost Marshal General.
WAR DEPARTMENT.
PROVOST MARSHAL GENERAL'S OFFICE.
WASHINGTON, July 19.
Circular No. 53.
Any person claiming exemption on the ground of alienage shall file before the Board an affidavit:
1. That he is an alien, and setting forth the Government of which he claims to be a subject.
2. The time when he came into the United States, and where he has resided since that date.
3. That he has never declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States, and has not exercised the right of suffrage by voting at any election in any State.
4. That he claims to be exempt from service on the ground that he is the subject of a foreign government, and has not declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States, and has never voted in any state. The affidavit to be supported by any proof the party may offer. If the Board is satisfied that the party claiming exemption is fully entitled thereto under the act of Congress, they will discharge him from draft; but if not satisfied, they shall refer the case, with the affidavit, through the Provost Marshal, for decision by the Department of State, in the meantime suspending any action in the case until the decision of the State Department be made. The certificate of the State Department shall in such case be considered evidence of the fact whether the person is or is not subject to military duty.
JAS. B. Fry,
Provost Marshal General

CIRCULAR NO. 54.—Existing laws make a distinction in the matter of pay, bounties or other allowances, between soldiers of African descent and other soldiers in the service of the United States. Men of African descent can only be accepted as substitutes for each other under the Enrollment Act.
JAS. B. FRY,
Provost Marshal General.

The Draft in Elmira.
Elmira, Monday, July 20.
The draft for Elmira came off to day. Trouble had been anticipated, but the utmost good feeling prevailed during the drafting. At 5 o'clock the conscripts formed a procession, with hands of music, mottoes, costumes, &c.
Loud cheers were given for the Constitution and the laws, speeches were made, and the occasion was one of rejoicing and festivity, rather than disappointment,
The Empire State is loyal outside of New York, and stands by the Union to the last.
The draft in Elmira took one of the sons of John Arnot, a son of Dr. Beadle in an other Bank, the Senior Editor of the Press, Mr. Thayer, Frank Phelps the Showman, and C. Slater of the Brainard House. The proportion of foreign-born was smaller than here. The drafted men got up a celebration, paraded, had speeches and a jolly time generally.

From Elmira.
ELMIRA, JULY 31st, 1863.
EDITORS JOURNAL:—The village of Elmira after a short interim again presents quite a martial aspect. The firm tread of military men falls upon the ear with a regularity acquired only by laborious practice, and which, to the ear of those educated in the science, bespeaks the soldier before the sight confirms it. The drafted men are coming in few at a time and at this date the officers to take charge of them are nearly as numerous as the conscripts. The Conscription act is the topic most frequently under discussion; and it is amusing in the extreme to listen to the different views advanced by different parties. There is a degree of ignorance truly lamentable existing in some communities in relation to this matter. Those persons who clamor most about the injustice and inhumanity of the present law for drafting are the ones who are profoundly ignorant of its true merits; as they are also of the defects of the old system for calling out men, and when this fact is made quite apparent to them, as it is frequently by some one who is posted, it does not occur to them as being a sufficient reason for defence. But much the larger portion of the conscripts however, are quite reconciled to their fate, and seem to recognize our country's necessities in the means employed for getting men, most of them would blush with shame at the thought of such a combination of several for the purpose of freeing one of their number, by paying the stipulated amount, in case he should be drafted, as you will find existing in different parts of Jefferson County. This is resistance to the draft in a very mild form; but still if it should be carried out extensively it would practically be rendering the Conscription act powerless for good by depriving the country of men. The framers of that Bill were too humane. Had they left it imperative upon every man drafted to go or produce a substitute, the main object to be secured would have been attained; and muscle would have been given the government to support our drooping banners.
R.

CELEBRATED THE DRAFT.—The drafted men of Elmira followed the example of their brethren in Auburn in celebrating the draft.
After the devoted three hundred were announced the conscripts assembled in the public square, and having engaged two bands of music marched in procession through the streets, after which several of their number made speeches, and a series of resolutions was adopted pledging their support to the Government, and endorsing the necessity for the draft.

NOT WANTED.—The New York and Erie Railroad brought back from Elmira to their homes on Saturday last, 800 of the conscripts lately drafted from Livingston and Steuben counties, orders having been received from Washington that "when the men were wanted they would be sent for."

Dr. J. W. BABCOCK, not J. U. as the draft had it, of Webb's Mills, redeems the stain cast upon the Medical Profession by Uncle Sam in Elmira and Southport. Dr. G. R. V. MERRILL, of Horseheads, wears a like honor.

The Elmira Press says five car-loads of clothing for drafted men have been received at that Military Depot.

A CAMP OF INSTRUCTION FOR DRAFTED MEN.—A Camp of Instruction for the newly drafted regiments is about to be established half way between Baltimore and Washington, at Annapolis Junction. Gen. EGBERT L.VIELE—who has been relieved of his duties as Military Governor of Norfolk, owing to the restoration of civil government to that city—has been placed in command. An efficient staff has been ordered to report to Gen. VIELE at Annapolis, who is now on his way to assume his new and arduous duties. This camp is under the immediate superintendence of the Secretary of War, to whom Gen. YIELE reports directly.

The Draft in Elmira.
The draft in Elmira, N. Y., took place on Monday. Trouble had been anticipated, but the utmost good feeling prevailed during the drawing. At five o'clock the conscripts formed a procession, with bands of music, mottoes, costumes, etc. Loud cheers were given for the constitution and the Union. Speeches were made and the occasion was one of rejoicing and festivity rather than disappointment.

Arms for Drafted Men.
The Elmira Gazette says that a large quantity of spades have reached that Depot marked "for drafted men at Elmira." Spades are trumps.

Alleged Frauds on Drafted Men.
It has been charged that gross frauds, in the shape of favoritism and bribes, have been practiced by the Enrolling Board at Elmira. The Elmira Press makes the following references to these charges:—
We believe that infamous and outrageous frauds have been practiced upon the drafted men who come to Elmira to have their cases acted upon by the Board. Thousands of dollars have been obtained from them by swindlers—men who condescended to the basest lying and deception in order to obtain their money. We have for some time been cognizant of the manner in which these miserable sharks operated, but have avoided reference to it, hoping that the officers would make an example of some of them. Their modus operandi was this:
Two villains—one a doctor and the other a lawyer—come to Elmira, and mingle with the drafted men. They find a man who has some physical disability, and who expects to be exempted. The pretended doctor scrapes an acquaintance with him, and tells him he is a physician. The man of course asks him his opinion of his case. The doctor takes him one side, examines him, pronounces him unfit for service; but tells the poor fellow that it's no  use, Dr. Graves will make him go—when he, pretender though he may be, knows that the examining surgeon will throw him out. He will tell his victim that he has seen worse cases than his which have been sent out for three years by the Doctor; and will wind up by telling him confidentially that he knows a man who will get him clear, and cites him to his friend, the real or pretended lawyer, who will agree, for $100, or $150, to get him exempt or refund the money. The victim takes the chance, and of course is cleared, as the sharks knew he would be.
Now wasn't that a sharp game? And what do we see as the result? These men go home, and have told their friends in Allegany county, that they gave $100 or $150 to clear themselves. They think it was the money that done it. They were told by a man they supposed to be a physician that they would not be exempt from disability, and of course they think it was the money that cleared them. In several cases that are known, these men who took the money, and agreed to clear them, never saw or had any communication with the Board or the Surgeon.
There is every reason to believe that there has been many frauds by persons who claimed to be fathers of motherless children, and sons of dependent parents, but these cases are open for investigation, and Major Diven, the Assistant Provost Marshal General, will pay any amount to a person who will furnish him evidence by which to convict persons, whether in or out of office, who have been guilty of complicity in these iniquities. There are men like Mr. Diven, whose honesty and veracity no one ever doubted, who have taken every opportunity and have been furnished every facility for knowing whether or not these charges are true; and it is their belief that all this corruption has been among outsiders, of whose doings no one in the Provost Marshal's office has had any knowledge whatever. Our friends in Allegany county should think twice before they undertake to stir up the people against the officers of the Government.

A RENDEZVOUS OF DRAFTED MEN.
The Central New York Depot at Elmira—Arrival of Conscripts—The Camps, &c.
[Correspondence of the Evening Post]
ELMIRA, N. Y., August 14, 1863.
The gathering of the men recently drafted in the interior of this state has just commenced at the great rendezvous of Central New York in Elmira. Three depots were originally appointed, namely, Riker's Island, in New York harbor; Elmira, for Central New York; and Buffalo, for Western New York. There are now but two general stations, the Buffalo depot having been abandoned, and the papers belonging to it sent to Elmira, where all the men drafted in the western part of the state will be put into camp, and thence transferred to the regiments in the field.
Elmira has, therefore, become a point of much interest. A double rendezvous, the centre of half if not more than half the area of the state, it is already crowded with soldiers; though the conscripts have, as yet, arrived in but small numbers. In addition to the rendezvous for drafted men, Elmira is also a volunteer station; large numbers of recruiting officers and their recruits occupy the public places and hotels; and from an ordinarily quiet little town of staid and innocent aspect, it has been transformed into a sort of quartermaster's department for the subsistence of soldiers now here and to come.
The camps or barracks at Elmira number four in all. They are situated on the banks of the Chemung river, a wide though almost unnavigable stream, even for the lightest craft. The soldiers, therefore, have the benefit of uninterrupted bathing. The barracks are sufficiently numerous to accommodate nearly ten thousand soldiers; but it is likely that the arrangements for the distribution of the conscripts will prevent the presence of even half that number at the same time at the rendezvous; although the current of arrivals and departures will be large and constant until the men drafted under the present call shall have taken their places in the field.
The arrivals of drafted men here, as already stated, have but just commenced; only two of the camps are occupied by the few hundred conscripts and their substitutes who have come forward, but no less than thirty New York stats regiments are represented, by details of veterans from their ranks, for the purpose of conducting away the reinforcements which are to be assigned them. These veterans, including three officers and six privates from each regiment, exhibit the most laudable anxiety as to which of them shall receive the first conscripts and first be constituted maximum regiments. It is not too much to say that they hail the prospective accessions of drafted men with a certain and peculiar pleasure, and possess the utmost confidence in their ability to teach them the art of war.
Brigadier-General Isaac W. Quimby was a few days ago placed in command of the Elmira rendezvous. This officer was until Jane connected with General Grant's army, where he assisted in the siege of Vicksburg, in command of a division—well-known as "Quimby's division"—but on account of ill-health was relieved, and came to Rochester, in this state. He was medically advised that he could not return to active service till autumn, but took command of the conscript camp. Having received orders as to which of the regiments are to be first filled and the number of men needed, the General will enter at once on the distribution of the drafted men. In the course of a day or two some of the soldiers will take their departure for New York harbor.
The draft is complete in many districts, but the time allowed to the drafted men to report for service or to present substitutes has in but a few cases expired. Meanwhile, General Quimby has information indicating that the number of conscripts to arrive for some time to come will number at least two thousand per week.
A large proportion of these men will enter the field by way of New York.
J. M.

THE EVENING ...
Alleged Frauds at Elmira.
Considerable excitement has existed in Allegany County for some days past, over the alleged fraudulent exemption of drapted [sic] men by the Board of Enrollment at Elmira. A large public meeting has been held at Angelica, which was addressed by Hon. Martin Grover. Resolutions were adopted denouncing the reported corruption, and demanding a strict and thorough investigation of the facts. The Elmira papers do not credit the reports, but say that they have caused the greatest excitement in Allegany County:
Persons who have received certificates have, on their return home, boldly proclaimed that they obtained them by fraud and the payment of money. These statements, and the large number of exemptions which are known to have been made, very naturally produced the intense feeling which pervades Allegany county. With some knowledge of the transactions before the Board of Enrollment, and the circumstances under which the exemptions have been given, we are free to say we do not credit the allegations which are made. Men may have been foolishly and even wickedly fleeced of their money by lobbyists and strikers hanging around the Board. But that the Board of Enrollment or any member of it can in the slightest degree be implicated we do not believe.
Capt. Harmon, as Provost Marshal of the District, on learning of the allegations that are made, immediately addressed a letter to the Provost Marshal General demanding a Court of Enquiry, and the Board of Enrollment unanimously annulled the exemption of every individual who claimed, or in reference to whom it was claimed that fraud existed, and they have been cited to reappear before the Board and substantiate their charges. Officers guilty of fraud and corruption do not usually act in so prompt and fearless a manner. We have the utmost confidence that the most thorough investigation which can possibly be made will utterly fail to implicate a single member of the Board.
Among the conscripts of Chemung county are no less than four county officials, viz:—the County Judge, the Surrogate, the District Attorney and one of the Justices of Sessions.

PRACTICAL WORKINGS OF CONSCRIPTION. The frauds in the exemption department in the Elmira District, have been the subject of a public indignation meeting. The character of the fraud is indicated in the following passage from the Elmira Gazette:

WHO GOT THE STEERS ?—Some poor fellow in Allegany was drafted. About all his worldly possessions consisted of a pair of steers, upon which he relied to help himself and dependent family. He could not go to war and leave his family to starve, and it was almost as hard for him to part with the steers. But one or the other must be done. Finally it was arranged with one of the outside lobby-men at the Provost Marshal's office, that if the poor man would give up his steers he should have exemption papers. Now, what we want to know is who got the "steers." We know who got the "mare," but we have not been able to find out who got the steers.

A. A. PROVOST MARSHAL GENERAL'S
OFFICE, WESTERN DIVISION, STATE OF NEW
YORK, ELMIRA, Sept. 11th, 1863.—To the Editor of the Elmira Gazette—Sir:—An article in your issue of last evening, contrasting the departure of WHEELER'S Battery of volunteers with that of drafted men, contained mistatements [sic] that I cannot think you would willingly make, and which I trust you will be willing to correct.
After very properly complimenting the men of this Battery, you say:
A contrast to this picture can be seen any day when a band of conscripts are sent forward. A cordon of armed sentinels, with loaded guns and fixed bayonets surround the unhappy men who have been torn from family and friends, ready to shoot them down, should the promptings of liberty overcome the fears of personal harm, and induce any one of them to make an effort to escape. Quite often gangs are chained together like galley slaves, presenting a pitiable and melancholy sight to the beholder.
Now no drafted men have ever been brought to or taken from this depot "chained together like galley slaves," or chained or manacled in any manner. What has given rise to the allegation is probably the fact that deserters from the army are forwarded from here in chains and their desperate efforts to escape make this precaution necessary. These deserters so far as I know have in no case been from drafted men. They have been mostly from the volunteer regiments, with a few substitutes accepted under the draft.
Nor has it been found necessary to surround the drafted men with a "cordon of armed sentinels with loaded guns and fixed bayonets." Many bad men tempted by the money they could obtain as substitutes, have offered themselves and been accepted, who intended from the commencement to escape. These men are guarded on their way to and from this depot, and experience shows that they have not been too closely guarded, for with all the precautions that have been used many have escaped. Their escape might easily have been prevented by chaining them, but it has in no case been allowed to chain men not charged with crime. I have never heard of the first drafted man attempting to escape, and when this class of men are sent by themselves no guards are necessary.
You must be aware that these men who enlist as substitutes enlist voluntarily. They are either moved by a willingness to serve from patriotism, to save some friend from service, or from the money paid them. Those that volunteer through the recruiting officers are either stimulated by patriotism or the sums paid by way of bounty, and are none the less mercenary than those who receive the bounty from an individual. The higher bounties you pay or the higher price substitutes can command, the more men will be tempted by mercenary motives, and the more desertions you will have. Witness the recent conduct of the New Jersey volunteers, requiring a regiment of veterans to guard them, and then only restrained by the last resort. These men were paid by unheard of bounties paid by that State to fill her quota without a draft by men gathered from all parts of the land.
I do not say this to disparage volunteering. You know a little more than a year ago how earnest I was in encouraging this mode of replenishing the army, when many were insisting that the better way was to draft. I only desire to vindicate the quality of the troops obtained by drafting. I invite you to visit the barracks where these men are quartered, and I defy you to show me a better body of men from any volunteer corps in State or Nation.
The object of this communication, however, is to correct the error first alluded to.
Very respectfully your obd't serv't,
A. S. DIVEN,
A. A. Provost Marshal Gen.

Head Quarters Elmira Depot of Volunteers.
ELMIRA, 2d December, 1861.
GENERAL ORDERS NO. 11.
1. In obedience to the following order—
General Head Quarters, State of New York,
ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE.
ALBANY, Nov. 23d, 1861.
Special Orders, No. 510.
1. In accordance with his request Brig.-Gen'l Van Valkenburgh is relieved from duty as Commandant of the Depot of Volunteers at Elmira, from and after the 2d day of December next.
Brig.-Gen'l Van Valkenburgh will resume the command of his Brigade.
2. Col. E. F. Shepard is hereby appointed Commandant of the Depot of Volunteers at Elmira, and will enter upon the duties of the Office on the 2d day of December next.
By Order of Commander-inn-Chief.
THOS. HILLHOUSE,
Adjutant General.
—I assume command of this depot.
II. Capt. Ira Davenport, jr., of Bath, N. Y., is appointed Adjutant to the Commandant.
III. General Orders No. 5 from these Head Quarters are continued in force, except so far as they are herein modified.
Paragraphs 3 and 4 of said General Orders are hereby rescinded.
The Daily Morning Reports will be returned to these Head Quarters before 9 1/2 o'clock, a. m.
Reveille will be sounded immediately after day break.
Peas upon a Trencher, at 7 1/2 o'clock, a. m.
The Surgeon's Call       " 8            "         "
Troop                            " 8 1/2     "          "
Guard Mounting.          " 9           "          "
Squad, Company or
Battallion [sic] Drill     " 9            "          "
till 12 o'clock.
Roast Beef will be
sounded..                      " 12 1/2    "       p.m.
Squad, Company or
Battallion [sic] Drill..   " 1 1/2      "         "
till Retreat.
Expiration of all passes " 6 1/2     "         "
Tattoo                            " 9 1/2     "         "
Taps                               " 10         "         "
There will be daily at least three roll calls, viz.: at Reveille, Retreat and Tattoo. They will be made on the Company parades by the First Sergeants, superintended by a Commissioned Officer of the Company.
The Captains will report absentees without leave to the Colonel or Commanding Officer.
IV. In order to familiarize the Volunteers with the duty of the Sentinel, the army system of parole and countersign is established. The parole and countersign will be issued daily from these Head-Quarters; and no Officer or private will be allowed to pass the Guard without giving one or the other as the case may require. This paragraph will not supercede [sic] the provisions of General Orders Nos. 5 and 8, in reference to furloughs and passes.
V. The various Companies will daily by turn furnish Orderlies in fatigue, without arms, for duty at these Head Quarters.
VI. Muster-in-Rolls will be kept at these Head-Quarters, and Company Commanders will see that as fast as men are mustered their names are properly entered thereon.
VII. All are enjoined to assiduity in learning, and faithfulness in discharging, every duty. The soldier is always upon his honor.
VIII. This Order will be read at Evening Parade this day to all regiments, organized or forming, within this Command.
ELLIOTT F. SHEPARD,
Colonel Commanding Elmira Depot.
IRA DAVENPORT, JR., Adjutant.

 

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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