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Civil War Newspapers
Jefferson County, New York

OUR LOCAL COLUMN.
Thanksgiving day in Watertown.
Last Thursday our National Thanksgiving day was observed in Watertown, by the closing of stores and places of business generally.
Most of the churches held service during the day or evening, and many thankful hearts therein gathered, to express their love and gratitude to the supreme Ruler for deliverance from the threatening destroyers of our noble country.
The streets were very quiet and had it not been for the hundreds that came in from abroad to listen to the address of Hon. MERRIT SMITH, we should almost have thought that the Sabbath had stolen prematurely upon us.
People walked about in pensive silence as if inwardly rejoicing, at the bright prospects and flattering promises, held out in our recent victories.
Every one appeared thankful that we had a country, that he with pride, could call his own. Thankful, that we had sent our noble sons to the battlefield; thankful that hundreds in our midst are now preparing to go, and apply the finishing stroke to the backs of our rebellious subjects. Thankful that our nation had the strength and courage to prosecute this struggle to so hopeful a consummation.
We give below the proceedings at the different churches of the village:

AT THE BAPTIST CHURCH.
Services were conducted by the Pastor of the Church, S. J. MATTISON, and the sermon preached which we give in a condensed form, from the following text:—
Samuel 7: 12. "And Samuel took a stone and set it up between Mizpeh and Shen and called the name of it Ebenezer saying, hitherto hath the Lord helped us."
Isreal [sic] was in sorrow. The nation had suffered from invasions and defeats. The ark had been carried away. Samuel knew how to remedy the matter. He appointed a day of fasting and prayer. Israel asked God to help them. And He did help them. They were victorious. In the flush of success Samuel stops to acknowledge God's agency. He erects a triumphal stone, saying, "Hitherto hath the Lord helped us."
Israel's experience has, in part been ours. We were defeated, humiliated and wounded. We fasted and prayed. We asked God to help us, and He has helped us. Let us stop and say so. Let us erect our monument of gratitude, saying "hitherto hath the Lord helped us." To this place of victory and triumph He hath brought us.
Do we owe our successes to God? Bad as the world is, it is not God-forsaken. The Almighty shapes both individual and national destinies. The proud king of Babylon doubted it; but God sent him forth to eat grass with the oxen "until he should "know that the Most High ruleth in the kingdoms of men." He claims to "do his will among the inhabitants of the earth and none can stay his hand." The history of the Israelites and the surrounding nations teaches us that He does rule the nations. Our national senate unanimously declared at their last session that they distinctly recognize the just government of God in all the affairs of men and nations. Enough! It is a thing made out. God reigns. We are not drifting over this stormy sea with none but human wisdom at the helm. God is there. Were He not we should perish.
1. All our reasons for rejoicing are from God. He gave us the moral triumph we have gained over the slave power. How completely were we all in its bondage. It made our Presidents, shaped our National Legislation, domineered our commercial interests, cracked its whips over our Northern cities, and scouted free speech and a free press in its borders. For a time it paralyzed our arms. No General would have Negro soldiers. Even New England volunteers would not serve with them. McClellan, when on the Chickahominy, sent back fugitive slaves who were whipped to death in Richmond. This is no proof. Yes, men who were ready to die for us and our country, were sent back to be whipped to death by masters who were slaying your sons and mothers, your husbands and fathers. Oh my God! are these things so? Did we ever live in such times? Behold the change! No slaves are sent back now. No General but would be glad of brigades of such tawdy heroes as fought at Helena, Port Hudson and Wagner. No white soldier lifts his voice against them. Scarcely a hiss is heard from those venomous Northern creatures with Southern hearts which crawl about our streets or lurk in their dens of sin and shame. Our Capital is free!! Missouri is following the Capitol. And the conquered States are following in their train. The last election in Kentucky was a victory for freedom. Who is it that thus changed the minds of our soldiers, our Generals and our slave States? Oh, it is God! His be the honor.
2. The cause of the war is to be removed. This calls for the profoundest gratitude. It was slavery that estranged us. But for it there would have been no war. Thank God then that He is removing it! Pray Him that He will burn it from our land as with lightning glance, so that not even the smell of it shall be left on our garments. "But if you touch slavery you destroy the Constitution." By no means. My constitution as a man entitles me to a right arm. But to save the rest of my body it may be necessary to cut off my arm. So to save the National life and the rest of the Constitution it may be necessary to cut off slavery, which till recently has been the right arm of the Nation. It will be better to enter into National life and peace with one arm, than having both arms to enter into the hellfire of attempting to live again with slavery. "If thy right hand offend thee cut it off and cast it into the fire." And God is cutting it off. It's only little more than a year since he put the knife to it, and He has cut from Washington clear around to New Orleans. Let our prayers to God be, that as to this half severed arm of slavery, "He will finish the work, and cut it short in righteousness." And he will finish it. Don't attempt to prevent him. Don't rush upon the thick bosses of Jehovah's buckler.
3. Our victories on the field are from God. Here is great cause for thanksgiving. A few months ago Rosecrans was sitting, incapable of advance. Grant was digging at that famous ditch. Our army at New
Orleans was reduced and fearful of attack. Our iron-clads, shattered and peeled, had just come forth from that inferno of fire at Sumpter [sic]. And Hooker's army broken and bleeding had again sought the inglorious entrenchments of the North Rappahannock. Now behold the change. Rosecrans has driven the foe. Grant and Banks have severed the main artery (as Davis called it) of the Confederacy. The Mississippi is open, and our armies are striking right and left into the two halves of rebellion. Gilmore is gathering a storm of "leaden rain and iron hail" over devoted Charleston—Lee is defeated, and within 40 days 100,000 soldiers have been lost to the Confederacy.
We besought God with strong crying for these successes. He has given them to us. He helped us. To this place of victory and triumph He brought us.
Other causes for thankfulness exist. What if our President, like Taylor, had died! What if Grant, like Mitchell, had fallen! What if yellow fever had broken but in our camps! What if Lee had reached New York! What if France and England had interfered! It makes one shudder to think what "might have been." From all these things God hath preserved us.
It is evident that whatever we have had that is good we must thank God for, or He will withhold His favors in the future. Therefore be profoundly grateful. Whatever we have had that is afflictive, is from the Almighty. We must be submissive to His visitations, and walk softly, or He will humble us with greater sorrows. We must "weep with those that weep."
It is manifest that though God can get along without us we cannot get along without Him. It will not do to trust to our vast armies—to our brave generals—to our mighty gleets, or to our vast resources. We must trust in God; we must have his favor continued to us or we shall never succeed. Whether God will help us or not depends upon how we demean ourselves in these days of triumph. If grateful and humble we may expect future and greater victories, and a day near at hand when "my yoke shall be broken" and "this whole nation will be in perfect enjoyment of union and fraternal peace."

AT DR. BRAYTON'S CHURCH.
The Pastor, Rev. Dr. BRAYTON, conducted the opening exercises and delivered a sermon from the following words:
"We will rejoice in thy salvation, and in the name of our God we will set up our banners; the Lord fulfil [sic] all thy petitions.
Psalms 20:-5
We give an abstract below.
After alluding to the Proclamation which had called us together he said:
There are times when the Providence of God seems to call for special thanksgiving: when every one feels that thanksgiving is a tribute due to God, for the tokens of his goodness; when we should be justly chargable [sic] with forgetfulness of God, and practical atheism if we did not render sincere thanks to Him.
To those who do not believe in war under any circumstances, or to those who do not see that any thing has been accomplished, it may be a very doubtful question whether this is a proper time for thanksgiving. As to the first of the proposition, I may observe that I am a peace man. I deprecate war. It is a terrible evil. I believe that there is a better way in which national difficulties might be settled than by an appeal to the sword. It is the very last remedy to which a people should be willing resort for the purpose of settling their difficulties, or righting their wrongs. I believe it to be always unnecessary when there is a willingness to deal fairly and justly. But so long as there are so many wicked and ambitious men in the world as there are; and so long as there is so great reluctance on the part of nations to practice justice in their dealings with one another, it may be expected that there will be wars. Individuals will trample upon the right of individuals, and nations upon the right of nations in violation of the principles of justice. And I maintain that it is fit and proper to rejoice over the punishment or destruction of those who so trample upon human rights, whether they be rebels at home, or enemies abroad.
The preacher reviewed at some length the history of the rebellion, and alluded thus to the attack on Fort Sumpter [sic]:
On the 12th of April the decisive step was taken that plunged the nation into civil war. The attack was made upon Fort Sumpter [sic]. That old flag which had waved over every sea—which had been honored in every land—which guaranteed its protection to every American citizen the world over; that old flag which had been the symbol of freedom to the oppressed in other lands; that old flag, under which the nation in the course of three-quarters of a century, had grown from weekness [sic] to strength, and prosperous beyond all precedent; that old flag which never before had been dishonored, was now dragged down and trailed in the dust by paricidal, traitorous hands. Oh! Shame where was thy blush! Tell it not in Gath! Publish it not in the streets of Askalon! That was an act of treachery so base as deeply to wound the heart of every true lover of his country.
He then noticed the achievments [sic] of our army and navy, expressing the belief that we have God and right on our side.
I believe, also, that we have might on our side. That is, there is power enough on the part of the Government, with the Divine blessing, to put an effectual end to this rebellion. The nation is not near exhausted. The resources are great; only let the strength of the nation be brought out, and these resources be judiciously employed, and in a short time the rebellion which has already received such heavy blows, causing it to reel and stagger, must die. The insurgents have been terribly in earnest. Only let the friends of the Government be as much in earnest and as united; let them heartily sustain the executive in the use of all lawful and necessary means to bring the war to a successful issue, and I see no reason why peace may not return before another Spring, or before the coming in of a new year. Let the people of the loyal States be but united in this one thing, and the insurgents must see that their cause is lost. But divisions and dissentions here encourage the rebels to hope. A Southern paper said, that the riot in New York, and the divisions in the North amply compensated them for the loss of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. I do not ask, or mean, that you should approve of all the measures of the Administration; but that you should render it your cordial, hearty support in the use of those measures which you know to be lawful and necessary to bring the war to a speedy close;—that you show that you are honest and in earnest in wishing this rebellion to be put down. You know that if it be put down within the next 18 months, it must be done under the present administration. If you want it put down by that time, show it! It will be put down in less than half that time, if the people will it. Why, what sacrifices have been made by you—what deprivations or hardships have you endured for the preservation of the Union? And cannot you—people of the North—afford to make as great sacrifices for its salvation, as they can for its ruin? Shame on your patriotism, if you cannot! You are not fit to enjoy the blessings of the Government under which you live, if you cannot. I cannot but admire the heroism, the patient, cheerful endurance of privation, and want, even, which the men, and women too, of the South have shown in a bad cause. The heel of almost a military dictator is on the necks of the people, and yet they stand by the government and their cause. They are willing to suffer and fight for it still. And there are yet true, noble, whole-souled men scattered all through the South, who are unconditionally for the Union. They have suffered all but martyrdom for their love for the old Union. They stand by it still. They are determined to stand by it to the last. And will you now desert them, and by your divisions and carping censures dishearten them, and strengthen the hands of their enemies?
By all that is valuable in a free government—by the blessings, for which, under God, you are indebted to that government—by your regard for future generations—by all that is noble in true patriotism I pray you stand, shoulder to shoulder, by the Government. Be one—openly, unmistakably, heartily—in putting an end to this cruel rebellion, and we may reasonably hope that the day is not distant when we shall be permitted to meet again, as now, to unite in rendering glory to heaven and thanksgiving and praise to God for the return of peace.

SERVICES AT THE METHODIST CHURCHES.
The two Methodist Churches united in their services as follows: exercises commenced in the Arsenal Street Church at 10 1/2 A. M., with singing by the congregation. Rev. O. C. COLE State Street M. E. Church then offered an appropriate and earnest prayer. Singing by the congregation. Sermon by Rev. J. W. ARMSTRONG of Arsenal Street M. E. Church, from the text, Ps. 60. and 4th. "Thou hast given a banner to them that fear thee, that it may be displayed because of the truth." Synopsis as follows:—
We are called upon to rejoice, while we are sad; to give thanks while we mourn our losses, and repent our sins. We rejoice over our victories, over the glorious history of our successes in the month of July. We will thank him whose army endureth forever. We mourn over the brave fallen, sympathize with the widow, the fatherless, the bereaved. We renounce all fellowship with the cruel rebellion, the Godless tyranny that is pouring out the nations blood and treasure. Notice the rights which the Constitution guarantees to rebels. Appeal to the mechanic, the laborer, not to countenance a tyranny which degrades him to the level of the "poor white trash" of the south, and which drives the colored man, as fast as he can accomplish it, to leave the sunny south, which he loves, to chill and freeze in the uncongenial north. A banner has been given to us, inscribed with our political gospel. "All men are created free and equal." "All, have inalienable rights, as life, liberty, happiness." Under that banner our nation was born. All the world bows to the truth of its mottoes. Kingdoms were mad, the earth trembled. No foreign nation has dared to dishonor it. Americans had to commence the work Then Napoleon dared to express his sympathy. Then the English aristocracy might timidly, barely, hiss onward the serpents of rebellion. Appeal to Americans, mechanics, laborers, all, to save themselves from a worse degradation than drove millions of them from oppression and poverty in England, Ireland and Germany, to freedom and plenty under our gospel banner. A confession of our sins, in compromising and sympathizing with traitors to our glorious bill of political and civil rights. Pity for the poor rioters of New York; blame for the men who misled them, and indicated the occasion of the outbreak. The position the rebel sympathisers will occupy in history, a warning to them, to escape from the scorn and indignation hanging over them, and an appeal to them and to all, to rally around the banner given them, to display it because of its truth, that the United States may be saved to us and to the world.
The congregation then sang a hymn, and Rev. G. BAKER, dismissed the people with the benediction.
At the State St. M. E. Church, a union prayer meeting was held at half past seven p. m. It was conducted by the Pastor, Rev. O. C. COLE, and was of a character to inspire the heart with increased love and zeal for our Country, and the perpetuation of our civil and religious liberties, and a firm reliance on Divine Providence to so control the affairs of the Nation as to bring us safely through our present difficulties, and forever remove from the land the sole cause of this wicked rebellion; and for which the Throne of Grace was fervently addressed in behalf of our Rulers and the Commanders of our forces, as well as those associated with them.

SERVICES AT TRINITY CHURCH.
The day was observed with appropriate services, besides the customary prayers, the form of Thanksgiving and the prayer for the country authorized by the Bishop, together with a prayer for those bereaved by the calamities of war, were offered. The Rector, owing to domestic affliction, had not prepared a formal discourse for the occasion, but addressed the congregation in a few and earnest words; showing that through a great calamity had befallen us, yet there were many things to be grateful for—abundant evidences, that though having us under discipline, the Government of Providences and nations bad not deserted us—and proofs even and hopes that He would not yet suffer this people, thus far led by His merciful hand, to fail utterly of their promised mission: urging a confident and reposing trust in His goodness as our greatest comfort, and the faithful fulfillment of duty towards Him as the ground of our highest hope—and finally believing and praying with devout desire, that we might come out of this furnace, a better people not only chastened, rebuked, and made wise by this discipline, but stronger, purer and greater than ever—fulfilling the good purposes of God towards our fathers.

Loyal League Meeting at Brownville.
Pursuant to the call of CHARLES ALLEN and A. A. GIBBS, Esqs., a Committee appointed for that purpose, at the County Convention, held at Watertown, July 17, 1863, a large number of the loyal inhabitants of Brownville, met at the Hall of JAMES SMITH, in Limerick, on the 21st instant, for the purpose of forming a Town Loyal National League.
The meeting was called to order by the temporary President, CHARLES ALLEN, Esq. HENRY SPICER, Esq., was chosen temporary Secretary.
After remarks by Hon. JAMES A. BELL, the usual form of compact, used by the Loyal National League, was presented for signatures, and signed by about one hundred persons present.
The League then proceeded to form a permanent organization by the choice of F. J. HALL, President, HENRY SPICER, Vice President, and A. HARLETON, Secretary.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.—J. B. Kimball, B. F. Rounds, Beriah Allen, A. C. Moffatt.
Mr. F. J. Hall declined to serve as President, and the Hon. James A. Bell, was chosen to fill the vacancy. It was voted to form District Leagues in each Election District in town, and Committees were appointed to call such meetings.
A Committee was appointed to draft Resolutions, and they presented the following, which were adopted separately:
Resolved, That on the decided victories of our Government over rebels in arms, at Gettysburg, at Vicksburg, Helena, and at Port Hudson, we find a sure presage of the final and complete triumph of the Government over the slaveholders, conspiracy and rebellion against the people and Government of the United States.
Resolved, That the Mobocratic uprisings and riots, manifesting themselves in various parts of the country, in opposition to measures employed by the Government for the suppression of the rebellion, including the draft, and the tenderness and sympathy expressed towards those thus engaged, and indications of a wide spread conspiracy on the part of the sympathising friends of the rebellion, at the north, to forcibly revolutionize the Government, and subjugate it to a southern slaveholding confederacy.
Resolved, That in the recent riot and rebellious resistance to lawful authority, in the city of New York, its arsons, murders, and savage barbarities, we witness the sad and vicious, but legitimate effects of the teachings of those persistantly [sic] and constantly opposing, speaking, and rioting against the measures employed by the Government for the suppression of the rebellion.
Resolved, That we most earnestly intreat [sic] our fellow citizens, who through the arts and wiles of the emissaries of the rebellion are being led on, step by step, to the fatal error of open resistance to lawful authority "to pause," and ponder well the guilt and consequences of attempting to overthrow the Government of the United States, a Government founded by the people, and presided over by "Washington and Jefferson, and once and again, protected and preserved by Andrew Jackson, and still enthroned in the hearts of the American people.
Resolved, That the Loyal men of Brownville, will sustain the National Administration in all its efforts to suppress the present rebellion. That we view the conscription act as a necessary measure, as just and lenient as is compatible with the object sought, and that the execution thereof shall receive our firm support.
Resolved, That we cordially and earnestly invite all citizens of the town of Brownville, who honestly desire to sustain the Government of the United States in its efforts to suppress the present rebellion, to join our association by signing our declaration of principles.
It was voted that Hugh Smith, W. P. Massey and A. Harleton be a Committee to revise resolutions, and report of proceedings for publication. It was voted to give three cheers for the Flag, and they were given with a will, only some two or three could not quite go it, "it wasn't constitutional," suppose. The League then adjourned.

PROPERTY TO BE CONFISCATED.—At the next term of the United States Court in this city, an important confiscation suit will occupy the attention of the court. It appears that at the outbreak of the Rebellion, Commodore Tatnall was living at Sackett's Harbor, in this State, where he had accumulated a considerable amount of property. He left immediately
on the alarm of war being sounded, for his native State, and was lately at the head of the Rebel Mosquito fleet, which was so gloriously scattered by our Naval Expedition at Beaufort last week. The furniture of his house at Sackett's Harbor, consisting of property worth about $15,000, has been confiscated by the Government. A libel and information were filed by the District Attorney, and last week a motion for condemnation was made in the United States Court, at Buffalo. Hon. Eli Cook appeared for Commodore Tatnall as claimant of the property, and proposed to answer and defend. The District Attorney then asked leave to amend the libel, which was granted, and then three weeks were allowed Mr. Cook to answer the amended libel after it should be served. In this form it will be brought before the Court, when the District Attorney will urge its confiscation.

HON. GERRIT SMITH spoke yesterday for a full hour to one of the most compact and intelligent audiences ever assembled in Washington Hall.
Contrary to the expectations of many, the orator defined his position as holding the Union paramount to every other and all other questions of State or national policy. He declared himself ready, abolitionist as he was, and a Temperance man as he was, to fight for the preservation of the Union by the side of the rankest pro-slavery man on his right and the greatest drunkard on his left. Preserve the now imperiled Union, he said, and when that trouble is over we can settle all questions that can arise under it, temperance, slavery and all.
Mr. Smith spoke on the draft, demonstrating that it was in fact one of the most kind, considerate and humane conscription acts ever passed by any nation. He said all the objections to the act were ill-timed and malicious, and intended to aid the rebellion. He was listened to throughout with marked attention and decided interest.

—A County Convention is to be held at Washington Hall, Watertown, on the 17th at 11 A. M., for the purpose of organizing Town and County National Leagues.

—The Annual Fair of the Floral and Horticultural Society will be held at Washington Hall, Watertown, on the 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th. 11th of July, day and evening.

—A few evenings since, A. D. Remington, residing near Hanchett's tavern, about two miles from Mannsville, attempted to steal about $100 worth of wool from the barn of Mr. George Cooper. After getting started with it, he was pursued, but escaped, leaving the wool, his horse and wagon and pocket-book, containing a good endorsed note for $100.

NATIONAL LOYAL LEAGUE MEETING.—Pursuant to notice, a County Meeting was held at Washington Hall, in this village, yesterday, for the purpose of organization. The meeting was composed of substantial men, and the best feeling prevailed—a feeling of determination to save the government, and a willingness to make all needed sacrifices to accomplish that object.
Hon. JAMES A. BELL presided, E. R. Keene and Lawrence Gage officiating as Secretaries.
A Business Committee was appointed, consisting of E. S. Lansing, Henry Esselstyn, J. Main, C. A. Benjamin, Geo. Babbitt, J. E. Willis and B. Brookway, who reported a plan of organization for the County, under which Leagues were established by the delegates in attendance as follows:
Adams—G W Bond, President; A J Brown, Vice President; T C Chittenden,
2d, Secretary.
Adams Center—W C Bailey, President; H E Hale, Vice President; C D Potter, Secretary.
Antwerp—John H Conklin, President; _ S Sawens, Vice President; Alonzo Chapin, Secretary.
Brownville—Charles Allen, President; J B Kimball, Vice President; A A Gibbs, Secretary.
Clayton—Henry Esselstyn, President; A R Calvin, Vice President; Horace Hitchcock, Secretary.
Depeauville—Gaylord Enos, President; A W Peck, Vice President; James Johnson, Secretary.
Henderson—G G Whitney, President; W H Rice, Vice President; E Tyler, Secretary.
Smithville—O M Stanley, President; Geo Babbitt, Vice President; B W Dewey, Secretary.
Hounsfield—Theodore Canfield, President; Jay Dimmick, Vice President; Henry J Lane, Secretary.
Lorraine—Elisha Allen, President; Erwin Pitkins, Vice President; Henry Bailey, Secretary.
Lyme—Wm Dewey, President; Joshua Main, Vice President; A H Francis, Secretary.
LeRay—Edwin Converse, President; Isaac Howe, Vice President; Sidney Cooper, Secretary.
Orleans (Stone Mills)—Lorenzo Baldwin, President; Harvey Bailey, Vice President; H M Stevens, Secretary.
Pamelia Four Corners—Jas Jones, President; Walter Fox, Vice President; Curtis Goulding, Secretary.
Pamelia—William Usher, President; Isaac Wait, Vice President; G H Failing, Secretary.
Philadelphia—J B Ackerman, President; John Allis, Vice President; Daniel Scofield, Secretary.
Rodman—O C Wyman, President; Chas D Moffat, Vice President; Isaac Jenks, Secretary.
Rutland—L D Olney, President; J B Tamblin, Vice President; A W Hardy, Secretary.
Watertown—W V V Rosa, President; D M Bennett, Vice President; A H Hall Secretary.
Wilna (Carthage)—W A Peck, President; O H Holcomb, Vice President; R Galligher, Secretary.
North Wilna—Sanford Lewis, President; Jerome Stevens, Vice President; B F Brown, Secretary.
Worth—J H Rising, President; H B Chapin, Vice President; A S Gillett, Secretary.
A County Corresponding Committee was appointed, consisting of A. H. Hall and J. L. Hotchkins, 1st dist., Luther Barrows and Wm. Dobson, 2d dist., and Henry Esselstyn and Wm. Estes, 3d dist.
B. Brockway read the pledge of the Loyal National League, and moved that efficient measures be taken to afford every citizen in the county an opportunity of signing it and thus becoming members of the Loyal National League, whose object is solely to "bind together all Loyal Men, of all trades and professions, in a common union, to maintain the power, glory, and integrity of the nation." Modified so as to embrace all over 20 years of age and adopted.
Mr. Gregg offered the following resolution which was adopted:
Resolved, That we recommend the Loyal Leagues in the different towns to meet as often as once a week, to read loyal addresses and listen to loyal speeches, to the end that the people may be more thoroughly informed as to the priceless value of our government, and the duty they owe it in this great crisis, as well as to assist in putting down the present atrocious rebellion.
The meeting was addressed at some length by D. M. Bennett and John Clark, Esqs., in an earnest and impressive manner, and then adjourned.

For the New York Reformer.
TO THE FRIENDS OF THE SICK SOLDIERS—It is my desire to inform the public of the welfare of the sick and wounded soldiers at and around Washington. I therefore improve the earliest opportunity of doing so through the columns of the Reformer.
The very many reports that come concerning the dishonesty of the societies, formed in Washington for the benefit of the soldiers, excited my anxiety to know the truth. Consequently I went there to investigate that subject as well as I could. I have spent a few weeks there, and have just returned." I was somewhat favorably disappointed. I think that the societies there are doing a great amount of good, and are trying to eradicate the dishonest ones from among them, that the work may be more efficient, but they are, as everywhere, rather deficient in the principle of right.
I can confidentially recommend to the public, The Young Men's Christian Commission, which I think to be free from any speculative motive; Also, Mrs. Mary Hill and Mrs. J. Y. Fales. All donations sent them will be judiciously distributed.
Among the articles needed at present are socks, slippers, towels, pocket handkerchiefs, (old white cotton or calico,) Lint, (raveled) bandages, and money to purchase necessary drinks, wines, &c. This season of the year is the time that little girls and boys should remember the sick soldiers by picking berries for them. I feel confident that if donations are sent to either of those mentioned they will be rightly distributed.
Their addresses are as follows:—
For Young Men's Christian Commission,
F. E. Shearer, Agent; 343 Penn. Avenue, Washington, D. C.
Mrs. Mary Hill, 447 Penn. Avenue, Washington, D. C., in care of Mrs. Bannerman.
Mrs. J. T. Fales, No. 418 C. street, near 3d, Washington, D. C.

MRS. E. SPENCER,
Depauville, Jeff. Co. N. Y.

SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETIES.—The following articles have been sent to the Sanitary Commission by the Watertown S. A. S.:
2 new flannel shirts, 1 pair new flannel drawers, 22 new cotton shirts, 1 dozen white woolen socks, 27 dozen colored do., 18 pairs slippers, bundles of old linen and cotton, 33 1/2 lbs dried apples, 18 lbs dried fruit and berries,
3 cans fruit and jelly, 2 bottles tomato, 1 currant syrup, 4 dozen napkins, 23 old linen pocket h'dkfs, 2 second-hand linen coats, 1 second-hand broadcloth coat, 1 pieced chair cushion, 4 bottles currant wine, 1 pair second hand linen pants, 1 do. do. vest, 1 do. comfortable, 2 volumes Rural New Yorker, 16 numbers Harper's Magazine, books and pamphlets, cash $2. MRS. ROSA.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE BROWNVILLE LOYAL LEAGUE.—Pursuant to the call of Charles Allen and A A Gibbs, Esqs., a committee appointed for that purpose, at the County Convention, held at Watertown, July 17th, 1863, a large number of the loyal inhabitants of Brownville met at the hotel of James Smith, in Limerick, on the 21st instant, for the purpose of forming a Town Loyal National League.
The meeting was called to order by the temporary President, Charles Allen, Esq. Henry Spicer, Esq., was chosen temporary Secretary.
After remarks by Hon James A Bell, the usual form of compact, used by the Loyal National League, was presented for signatures, and signed by about one hundred persons present.
The League proceeded to form a permanent organization by the choice of F J Hall, President; Henry Spicer, Vice President; A S Carleton Secretary.
J B Kimball, B F Bounds, Beriah Allen, W P Massey, and A C Moffatt, Executive Committee.
Mr F J Hall declined to serve as President, and the Hon. James A Bell was chosen to fill the vacancy.
It was voted to form District Leagues in each election district in town, and committees were appointed to call such meetings.
A committee was appointed to draft resolutions, and they presented the following, which were adopted respectively.
Resolved, That in the decisive victories of our government over rebels in arms, at Gettysburg, at Vicksburg, at Helena, and at Port Hudson, we find a sure presage of the final and complete triumph of the government over the slaveholders' conspiracy and rebellion against the people and government of the United States.
Resolved, That the mobocratic uprisings and riots, manifesting themselves in various parts of the country, in opposition to measures employed by the government for the suppression of the rebellion, including the draft, and the tenderness and sympathy expressed towards those thus engaged, are indications of a wide-spread conspiracy on the part of the sympathizing friends of the rebellion at the North, to forcibly revolutionize the government, and subjugate it to a Southern slaveholding conspiracy.
Resolved, That in the recent riot and rebellious resistance to lawful authority, in the city of New York, its arsons, murders and savage barbarities, we witness the sad and vicious, but legitimate effects of the teachings of those persistently and constantly opposing, speaking and writing against the measures employed by the government for the suppression of the rebellion.
Resolved, That we most earnestly entreat our fellow citizens, who, through the arts and wiles of the emissaries of the rebellion, are being led on, step by step, to the fatal error of open resistance to lawful authority, "to pause" and ponder well the guilt and consequences of attempting to overthrow the government of the United States—a government founded by the people, and presided over by Washington and Jefferson, and once and again protected and preserved by Andrew Jackson, and still enthroned in the hearts of the American people.
Resolved, That the loyal men of Brownville will sustain the National Administration in all its efforts to suppress the present rebellion; that we view the conscription act as a necessary measure, as just and lenient as is compatible with the object sought and that the execution thereof shall receive our firm support.
Resolved, That we cordially and earnestly invite all citizens of the town of Brownville who honestly desire to sustain the government of the United States in its efforts to suppress the present rebellion, to join our association by signing our declaration of principles.
It was voted that Hugh Smith, W P Massey and A S Carleton be a committee to revise resolutions and report of proceedings for publication.
It was voted to give three cheers for the Old Flag, and they were given with a will. Only some two or three could not quite go it; "it was n't constitutional," suppose?  The League then adjourned.

RECEIVED AN APPOINTMENT. —Dr. WALTER FAILING has received the appointment of Surgeon, under Gen. Banks, and has been ordered to report immediately, at New Orleans. He leaves for his new duties in a few days. The Doctor has been very favorably known in this village and county, and has met with a good share of patronage and public favor. We wish him abundant success in his fresh field of labor, and feel confident that his ability and skill will gain it for him.

FOLEY AGAIN.—Occasionally, we hear from FOLEY, and, according to the promise we made last Summer to keep our readers advised of all his operations so far as possible, we present the following, taken from the Carthage Republican:
"After the result of town meeting was known, Peter Foley, secessionist, copperhead fugler, finding he was beaten, picked a quarrel with Thomas Farley, and drew a dirk, and struck at Farley, threatening to kill him. William Murray, standing by, raised his arm to ward off the blow, and was badly cut by the knife, which seemed to be keenly sharpened. The affair created indignation in all decent men of both parties."

The Watertown Cadets.
If any persons have doubted whether the 60 lads who are enjoying the instruction of Capt. Potter for two evenings in the week, as a Corps of Cadets, are being benefitted [sic], our advice is just to drop into their drill-room some evening, and judge for themselves. To become convinced of the utility of the organization, the beholder will only desire to observe for a single evening the transformation which is converting our loose-jointed boys into miniature soldiers—wheeling, marching, facing, and performing the other military evolutions like veterans, and manifesting an earnestness which is creditable to them and to their gentlemanly instructor.
After a little time we understand that they are to be uniformed and equipped, when we expect to see them reviewed by Col. Browne, and "mustered into service" as defenders of the beauty and wealth of the Empire State—in which event the Black-River Corps must look to their laurels.

The Fourth Hereabouts.
There was no formal celebration in this village. The ringing of bells and the firing of a national salute reminded us of our national anniversary. In consequence of the rain the Pic-Nic of St. Mary's Congregation to Mr. Kelly's was postponed, as we are informed, to the 15th of August.
At Kingston the day was duly celebrated. There was a procession composed of the firemen of this village and Kingston headed by the Peekskill band. The declaration of Independence was read by H. W. Tibbals, esq., and a very acceptable oration was delivered by the Rev. Mr. Peck.
A noticeable feature of their celebration was the test of speed between Wiltwyck Hose Co. No. 1, and American Hose Co. No. 2 of Kingston, for a wager of $100. The distance run was 800 feet—the American Co. wining by about 4 1-2 feet. There was also another test of speed between the Rapid Hose Co. of Rondout, and the Wiltwyck and Excelsior Co.'s of Kingston. The distance run was 1000 feet. The time was as follows: Rapid 51 seconds; Wiltwyck Hose, 1 minute 13 seconds; Excelsior Hose, 1 minute 27 seconds.

For the New York Reformer.
TO THE FRIENDS OF THE SICK SOLDIERS—It is my desire to inform the public of the welfare of the sick and wounded soldiers at and around Washington. I therefore improve the earliest opportunity of doing so through the columns of the Reformer.
The very many reports that come concerning the dishonesty of the societies, formed in Washington for the benefit of the soldiers, excited my anxiety to know the truth. Consequently I went there to investigate that subject as well as I could. I have spent a few weeks there, and have just returned. I was somewhat favorably disappointed. I think that the societies there are doing a great amount of good, and are trying to eradicate the dishonest ones from among them, that the work may be more efficient, but they are, as everywhere, rather deficient in the principle of right. I can confidentially recommend to the public, The Young Men's Christian Commission, which I think to be free from any speculative motive; Also, Mrs. Mary Hill and Mrs. J. Y. Fales. All donations sent them will be judiciously distributed.
Among the articles needed at present are socks, slippers, towels, pocket handkerchiefs, (old white cotton or calico,) Lint, (raveled) bandages, and money to purchase necessary drinks, wines, &c. This season of the year is the time that little girls and boys should remember the sick soldiers by picking berries for them. I feel confident that if donations are sent to either of those mentioned they will be rightly distributed.
Their addresses are as follows:—
For Young Men's Christian Commission, F. E. Shearer, Agent; 343 Penn. Avenue, Washington, D. C.
Mrs. Mary Hill, 447 Penn. Avenue, Washington, D. C., in care of Mrs. Bannerman.
Mrs. J. T. Fales, No. 413 C. street, near 3d, Washington, D. C.

MRS. E. SPENCER,
Depauville, Jeff. Co. N. Y.

The Secessionist, Foley.
Testimony Before the Justice.
EXTRACTS FROM O'LEARY'S SPEECH.
From the Carthage Republican.
DR. H. S. HENDEE, testified to hearing Foley say he was a secessionist, and that they some times talked of hanging him. The Dr. then said, "I would not use any rope on you, but put you in the river." Foley then turned to Parsons and commenced conversation again. Parsons said, "I want no further conversation with you, except to ask you one question:—Do I understand you to say, and do you wish to be understood by me and by the crowd, that you are a secessionist—an avowed enemy of the Government, and wish to see the Government defeated or overthrown and, on the other hand, do you desire the success of the Confederate Government?" Foley replied, "I do; help yourself —" adding a curse. Parsons then got into the buggy, and said, "I will take care of you sir," and ordered him to get into his buggy. On being cross examined, the witness testified that Foley said he was an avowed enemy of the Government, and hoped for its defeat, and the success of the Confederate Government.
Wm. Winch testified that he heard Foley say to Parsons, "Those buttons you wear, we pay for. Those slippers you wear, we pay for. You are a hireling." Parsons said, "I think you are a secessionist. You had better go South." After some further conversation, Parsons said to Foley, "There is one question I want you to answer me; are you a secessionist or not?" Foley replied, "I am a secessionist." Parsons said, "I will take care of you."—Foley said he was a secessionist, and favored the Southern Confederacy.
Mr. O'Leary, counsel for Lieut. Par­sons said:
"* * * What! redress for the wretch who has prayed to high Heaven for the defeat of our arms, and that no Irishman, now fighting for our country, would return alive! The report is, that this man, Foley, is an Irishman.—But I have learned that it is not so.—No. He is one of the native reptiles of this country. I knew that the Emerald Isle never could bring forth a serpent or venomous reptile whose poisonous fangs would sting the flag of Washington! [applause.]
So, your honor, the swamps of Florida and Virginia are more congenial to his feelings. There he can sit in sunshine, and sing glory to the Southern Confederacy, [Applause.] Your honor can see with what anxiety the result of this examination is watched, by the brothers and fathers of those who are now maimed and crippled, or in the agonies of death, fighting for our country. Public opinion is on the alert.—Its eagle eye is open to see if you will hold this prisoner to trial for doing a duty which is applauded by our enlightened community. You can convict him for an assault on an enemy of our Government. You can send him to prison, but mind you, he has the cheers and prayers and blessings of a law-abiding and enlightened community of American citizens!" [Applause]
Last Saturday, Justice Gilbert received the following telegram from the
War Department:
WASHINGTON, July 3, 1862.
To George Gilbert, Justice of the Peace:
Information has reached this Department that you have committed to custody, on a charge of false imprisonment, Lieut. Wm. R. Parsons, on duty as a Military Officer in your County.—Advise this Department at once of the party alleged to have been falsely imprisoned, and of the circumstances which led to such alleged action on the part of Lieut. Parsons.
By order of the Sectary of War.
C. P. WOLCOTT,
Assist. Sect.

NORTHERN AND CENTRAL COUNTIES.
JEFFERSON COUNTY.
—The officers chosen and commissioned at the Home Guard election at Watertown, ordered by Col. Jas. A. Pearse, are T. C. Crittenden, Jr., Captain; John D. Moore, 1st Lieutenant; Geo. D. Babcock, 2d Lieutenant.

—Rev. E. H. Chapin will lecture in Washington Hall, at Watertown, on Tuesday evening next, 18th. Subject: "Our National Affairs.

—Great enthusiasm was manifested by the people at Sanford's Corners, last Saturday, on the occasion of raising a pole 60 feet high, and hoisting the Star-Spangled Banner. The Home Guard, numbering about forty, were out, good music was in attendance, and speeches were made by Messrs. Octave Blank, B. B. Taggart, and J. M. Fairbanks.

BUSINESS.—The Pennsylvania War Loan of $3,000,000 has all been taken at p__.

JEFFERSON COUNTY.
—Joseph Hooker, who has just been made one of the new Brigadier Generals of the army, is a brother-in-law of O. V. Brainard, Esq., President of the Jefferson County Bank, of Watertown, and is personally known to many of the villagers. His brigade consists of four regiments, one of which is from New Hampshire, and two from Massachusetts; the remaining one is the Jefferson County Regiment, the New York 35th.

JEFFERSON COUNTY.
SACKETT'S HARBOR, Sept. 13.
By Telegraph to the Utica Morning Herald: Collector Inglehart to-day seized twenty-four boxes containing articles of curiosity and art, &c, the property  of Commodore Tattnall, late of the U. S. Navy. There is great activity at this Navy Yard to-day.

JEFFERSON COUNTY.
Union Mass Meeting. —A Union Mass Meet­ing of all citizens of the county who are in favor of preserving the Union and of sustaining and upholding the government, will be held at Watertown, to-morrow (Wednesday), at 1 o'clock p. m. It is earnestly hoped that every town in the county may be represented,
—A volunteer company is being formed at Watertown, the roll having been called last Sat­urday.

JEFFERSON   COUNTY.
Mannsville, April 30, 1861.
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:—
We had a glorious meeting at our village last evening. The Methodist Church was filled to overflowing, and hundreds were unable to gain admittance. Cannon were fired continually, the band played the national airs, and as the audience vowed to defend the Star Spangled Banner they seemed delirious with enthusiasm. Patriotic speeches were made by E. J. Marsh, Esq., Prof. Buckley, Revs. Cleghorn and Paret, Capts. Barney and Mendell, and Messrs. Hawes, Emerson and Hackley. Twenty volunteers enrolled their names, and about five hundred dollars was subscribed for the families of the volunteers.— Capt. S. J. Mendell leaves Adams with his company for Albany, next Friday evening.

JEFERSON COUNTY.
Alva Wilson, Esq., formerly of Carthage, and one of the editors of the Black River Budget, has been promoted to the rank of Captain in the 25th Iowa regiment. He was at the capture of Arkansas Post, and his company sustained a gallant part in that achievement.
—Col. Clark is quite seriously ill in Washington.
——Messrs. Hoard & Son, proprietors of the Watertown Amory, were the recipients of a complimentary supper last Saturday evening, given them by the employees of their establishment at the Woodruff House. Toasts and good speeches were a part of the programme.
—Lieutenant Morey of the 35th, now a prisoner at Richmond, writes that he and his companions are sometimes obliged to go twenty-four hours without food, and that they have not had since they went there but two or three messes of meat that did not stink so bad that no one could eat it, however hungry. He says they are in danger of being shot if they look out of the window, by day or night.
Robert Hitchcock announces through the Watertown Journal that the controversy between him and Mr. Hoard is at length definitely settled. He has received a new patent, which, with the one previously issued, covers all that he had invented. On some future occasion he proposes to furnish to those who care to know it, a history of the controversy.

OUR LOCAL COLUMN.
The Celebration.
Though Watertown is unwilling to spend money in the celebration and commemoration of the Fourth of July, she is willing to show her patriotism in celebrating the victories which may accrue to the Union arms. This fact she amply demonstrated on last Thursday evening.
It was an impromptu concern, yet it reflected great credit on the village and the Committee of arrangements, whoever they were. What with the ringing of bells, the firing of cannon, and the noises always attendant on such occasions, an incessant din was kept up for about an hour, from 7 until 8 o'clock in the evening. By that time a large crowd had collected on the Public Square, and all the roofs and windows of buildings looking that way were crowded. They had come to see the fireworks. Nor were they disappointed. How so good a display could have been got together in so short a time is a mystery to us; but certain it is that Mr. BRAGGAR produced a very pleasing show in that line. There was an endless variety of small pieces, rockets, Roman candles, fire wheels, Bengal lights, &c, but the last piece was a triumph in the pyrotechnical art. It consisted of the letters which constitute the words "Union Victories," and when they all sprang into a living place of light, the people broke into rapturous applause, signifying thereby their approbation of the piece itself, and the sentiments and feelings it conveyed to every loyal heart.
A huge bonfire was lighted, just as the last of the letters ceased to burn, which gave light to all, as well pleased with the effort, and the cause in which it was made, they sought their homes.
Let us not forget the excellent music discoursed by the Watertown Cornet Band, before and after the firework display. It will be sufficient to say that they were there, to convince any one that they did well. They paraded a company of 25 or 30 recruits bearing torches in their march around town. These men were enlisted by Capt. PAINE, for the 13th N. Y. Cavalry. They were apparently a hardy set of boys, and were nearly all members of the old 35th. We trust they will commit many gallant deeds when opportunity offers itself.
Thus has Watertown vindicated herself, and proven that she is not so much racked by party bickerings and discord that her people cannot join in one hearty national jubilee.

Taxing Property to Pay Exemptions.
Notwithstanding the Reformer and some few moneyed Republicans who are not liable to a draft are opposing any movement by the towns to raise money to pay three hundred dollars to drafted men, we are gratified that the people generally seem disposed to take such a course in order to avoid the humiliating and heart rending spectacle of seeing men dragged away from their homes against their wishes, and placed on the battle field. In several towns steps have already been taken, in accordance with the recommendation of the Jefferson County Democratic Society, to call special town meetings to take the subject into consideration, and we presume others will move immediately, He must be a heartless man and a poor patriot who would not contribute according to his means, to pay three hundred dollars to  every drafted man, if he is compelled to go, to be used for his benifit [sic] if he chooses to accept the "call" or if he cannot accept, to procure a substitute or give it to the government for the purpose, as the act says, "for procuring a substitute." Every one must be satisfied that more and better men can be secured by this means, than will be obtained if no such action is taken by the towns. For the purpose of assisting our friends in ascertaining the views of the people on this question we suggest the following as a form of a petition for the voters of the towns to present to the town officer competent to call a special Town Meeting:
To the Town Clerk of the Town of ____ Jeff. County:
The undersigned, legal voters of said town, respectfully request, you to at once call, in due form of law, a Special Town Meeting, for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of raising, by tax upon the taxable property of said town, a sum sufficient to pay each resident thereof, who may be drafted and accepted under the present call, the sum of $300, to be by him used for his own benefit, if he chooses to go, to procure a substitute, or to pay his commutation in the event of not going.—Dated ___ 1863.
It will be good policy to get this petition signed by a number of voters (although only twelve are necessary,) so that the Town Clerk will have no hesitation in calling the meeting. We presume objections will be made that such action will not be legal—that a law of the last Legislature forbids it. The following is the clause referred to, which is found in the bill providing for paying a State bounty:
SEC.3. Neither any county, city, town or municipal corporation, or person, or recruiting officer of any other State, shall hereafter offer, raise or expend any money, or incur any liability, for the purpose of giving, or paying any bounties to promote the enlistment of volunteers, provided that the provisions of this section shall not apply to the action of any county, city, town or municipal corporation relative to bounties paid or promised prior to the passage of this act, nor shall this section be so construed as to prevent the payment of any sums to procure substitutes for persons drafted.
By the terms of this section it will be seen that it is expressly provided that this law shall not be so construed as to prevent towns paying money to procure substitutes. As the conscription act says the drafted man "shall furnish an acceptable substitute, or he may pay such sum not exceeding $300, as the Secretary of War may determine, for the procuration of a substitute," it matters not whether the conscript presents the substitute, himself, or pays the money to the government "for the procuration of a substitute."

Jeff. Co. Democratic Society.
This Society met, pursuant to adjournment, at the Democratic Head Quarters at Apollo Hall on the 23d inst. The list of towns were called and found to be well represented. The Committees appointed at the previous meeting to draft resolutions, through their Chairman Hon. John W. Tamblin, reported the following preamble and resolutions, which after discussion, were unanimously adopted:

PREAMBLE.
Whereas, Our country is involved in a distructive [sic] war, brought on by a wonton disregard of the principles of our government, and compromises of the Constitution, and the Union and our free institutions are in danger of being overthrown by rebellion and revolutionary usurpations, and, as it is evident, that the country can only be saved in a condition of freedom and prosperity, by conservative pupular [sic] action, therefore, for the purpose of consolidating a correct and enlighened [sic] public judgment, and harmonizing the views of the people, and promoting concert of discussion and action, in defending their rights and liberties, and our popular free institutions, the council of the "Jefferson County society, for the diffusion of correct political knowledge," adopt and commend to the consideration of the people, the following platform of principles and measures:
Resolved, That by virtue of the declaration of Independence [sic] , each State for itself, became free and absolutely independent [sic], the people thereof being endowed with entire and unlimited sovereignty, and entitled to unconditional loyalty and allegiance; that by the adoption of the federal constitution, the respective States each for itself, deligated [sic] certain sovereign powers to the people of the United States, to be exercised in such manner and with such limitations as provided by the constitution, which by virtue of such grant, became sovereign as to such powers and no others, and entitled to loyalty to the extent of such powers, and not to unconditional loyalty. That true loyalty and allegiance consists in obeidence [sic] to the Federal Government in the exercise of its delegated powers, and in obedience to the State government, in the exercise of all other powers, and that the States are the sole judges, as to the necessity of increasing or diminishing the powers of the Federal Government.
Resolved, That the Federal Administration by disregarding the foregoing fundamental principles of the American system of Democracy, putting itself in conflict with the sovereign powers of the country, by violations of the Constitution, by usurping and exercising unauthorized [sic] powers, and by encroachments on the reserved rights of the States, has, to a fearful extent, subverted our constitutional government, and assumed prerogatives inconsistent with the rights and sovereignty of the people, and destructive of their prosperity and happiness.
Resolved, That the present war, was brought on by a disregard of the principles and policy ever maintained by the Democratic party, and by a coillision [sic] between the doctrines and lawless efforts of Northern  Abolitionist, and faithless and corrupt politicians, and unjust exertions by the Southern people, to extend and perpetuate the institution of slavery; that these classes have the responsibility of the terrible calamities which now afflict the country; that by the enactment [sic] of unconstitutional laws subversive of Southern constitutional rights, and by the successful resistance to laws for carrying into effect the compromises of the constitution, the Southern people had just reasons to somplain [sic]; but having resorted to unjust and unconstitutional modes of redress, against the advice and warning of the Northern Democracy, the party does not sympathize with them in their struggle for independence and a disolution [sic] of the Union; but as in duty bound, will, with the utmost earnestness and perseverance, sustain the government in prosecuting the war, for defending and maintaining the supremacy of the constitution and preserving the Union, with all the dignity, equality and rights of the States unimpaired; but that the people have the right to demand that the present war be prosecuted for constitutional purposes only, according to the rules of civilized warfare, and that it should close when the supremacy of the constitution and the Union shall be restored.
Resolved, That all public officers hold their positions and powers as grants from the people, expressed in the constitution and laws of the country, and subject to the restrictions and limitations contained in the constitution, and that the exercise of all unauthorized powers, tend to a subversion of the government, and are criminal violations of a sacred trust, of which the people have a right to judge and condemn their unfaithful servants; that in the present momentous crisis, it behooves them to consider with earnestness and sobriety, the following acts and usurpations of their military servants, to wit, creating a new State of a small portion of another State, in express violation of the constitution, whereby the State of Virginia, when the Union shall be restored, with one fourth of the population of New York, will have double the representation in the U. S. Senate, and an unjust number of electors for president.
In attempting to destroy the free and constitutional representation in Congress, by thrusting in members elected under military dictation contrary to law.
Trampling on the rights of the people, by dispersing peaceful assemblages met to discuss matters essential to their rights and happiness,
Interfering with elections contrary to law, by sending over the country swarms of sallaried [sic] officers to deceive and harrass [sic] the people, and sending military forces to overcome electors and disturb them at the polls.
Arresting candidates to prevent them from canvassing their districts, and arbitrary dissmissing [sic] faithful officers from service, for voting according to the dictates of their conscience; abridging the liberty of the press and of speech.
Arbitrarily arresting citizens without process of law, who were guilty of no offense against the law, sending them out of the State to military prisons, trying citizens by illegal commissions, and inflicting cruel and unusual punishments.
Creating unnecessary officers to harrass [sic] the people and eat out their substance, for the purpose of rewarding favorites and political partaisans [sic].
Suffering and perpetuating gross acts of fraud and corruption, and appointing men to important public trusts, who were convicted of corruption.
Enacting and executing partial laws making unjust distinctions between the rich and the poor, the laboring classes and the favored few, supending [sic] the writ of Habeas Corpus, and setting up the military above the civil authority, and depriving the people of the privalige [sic] of testing their rights in the courts of law.
Paying promptly unemployed and unnecessary officers, while disabled soldiers and the widows and orphans of soldiers killed in battle, are denied their lawful bounties and back pay.
Violating the great principles of civil and political liberty, for the defense of which our fore fathers fought and bled, and which they wrung from the grasp of tyrants at the expense of much blood and treasure.
On motion of Mr. Ainsworth, Resolved, That the Town Societies be requested to forward the names of the officers of their Societies and the names of their Committees to the Recording Secretary of the County Societies.
On motion of Mr. Clark, Resolved, That this General Council recommend the Town Societies to meet as often as every other week for consultation, remarks and the reading of such speeches and articles as the officers of the Society may think proper.
On motion of Nicholas Lawyer, Resolved, That if the draft should be enforced, we reccommend [sic] that the people of the County, assemble in  their respective towns, and provide for raising by tax a sufficient amount of money to pay each man drafted the sum of $300.
The meeting then adjourned subject to the call of the Executive Committee.
STEPHEN STRONG, President.
W. H. SIGOURNEY, Recording Sect'y.

Volunteering—Recruiting is now going on at a rapid rate in our village. We have at least five recruiting offices, and all appear to be doing well, while some are succeeding remarkably. We hear of similar success in quite a number of the other towns. In Antwerp, we are told, the people feel confident of raising their draft quota, by volunteers. The spirit for enlisting is also good in Cape Vincent. Something is being done all around. If these volunteers are all counted, as we suppose they will be, in lieu of conscripts, the draft will fall quite lightly on the county.
It is obviously to the interest of every one liable to military duty, who would go if drafted, to volunteer and receive the bounty. There is not much to risk now in either case. The first six or eight weeks of the fall campaign, will most likely end the severe fighting. The rebels are worn out, used up and exhausted. They have only one army now worthy the name—that of Gen. Lee—and when Gen. Meade is adequately reinforced, and the extreme hot weather is over, we think he will make short work of dispersing it. That, at all events, will end the heavy business in the fighting line, though it is quite likely shat Gen. Lee will see before that time, that more fighting on his part is useless—that the Confederacy is gone up—and that even a victory by his army could not save it. If Charleston is taken at this effort, that is very likely to finish the business.

UNION LEAGUE AT CAPE VINCENT.—At a meeting of loyal citizens of the town of Cape Vincent, held Aug. 18th, 1863, at the Cape Vincent Hotel, organised [sic] by appointing William Estes Chairman, and G. W. Warren, Secretary, a Loyal National League was established and organized by appointing the following persons to office:
G. W. WARREN, President.
F. W. DEMING, Vice Dresident [sic].
W. H. WEBB, Treasurer.
W. L. HUNTINGTON, Secretary.
Executive Committee—William Estes, Perly Ainsworth, Albert D. Shaw, John H. Moore, Theodore Stedman.
If allowed to judge by the enthusiasm and patriotism exhibited at the meeting, or by the number of respectable names already attached to the pledge, law and order will continue to be respected in Cape Vincent, and our government sustained in its efforts to suppress the rebellion.

THE DRAFT.—From Surgeon E. S. WALKER, who came from Watertown yesterday we learn authoritatively that the draft has not yet been ordered in this district and that corrections are continually being sent on to the enrollment lists.

Draft.
It is expected that the draft in this district will be made next week, or as soon thereafter as possible. The Provost Marshal is ready to commence as soon as his quota is assigned. .
It will take place at the Headquarters of the Board of Enrollment, in Watertown, in as public a manner as possible, and notice will at once be given to those who may be drafted. The Board is constituted as follows: Provost Marshal, Fred. Emerson; Commissioner, Arthur Pond; Examining Surgeon, E. S. Walker.
The following extract from the law shows who besides those physically disabled, are exempt from the draft:
First, the Vice President of the United States, the judges of the various courts of the United States, the heads of the various executive departments of the government, and the governors of the various States.
Second, the only son liable to military duty of a widow dependent upon his labor for support.
Third, the only son of aged or infirm parent or parents dependent upon
his labor for support.
Fourth, where there are two or more sons of aged or infirm parents subject to draft, the father, or if he is dead, the mother may select which son shall be exempt.
Fifth, the only brother of children not twelve years old having neither father nor mother, dependent upon his labor for their support.
Sixth, the father of motherless children, under twelve years of age dependent upon his labor for support.
Seventh, where there are a father and sons in the same family and household and two of them are in the military service of the United States as noncommissioned officers, musicians or privates, the residue of such family and household, not exceeding two, shall be exempt: Provided, however, That no person who has been convicted of felony shall be enrolled or permitted to serve in said forces.

The Draft in this County.
Provost Marshal Emerson informs us that he has made returns of the enrollment in this county, and is liable to receive on order any day to commence the draft. The list can be seen at the Invalid Recruiting Rooms in the Arcade. We should publish the names of those enrolled in the first class, but the draft may take place before we could get it before the public. If any one has reason to think that names have been omitted by the enrolling officer, he can find out by examining the list, or by writing to the Provost Marshall or any friend in town to examine the list, and if a name is omitted, have it added to the list. What number is to be drafted in this county is not known, but probably, including the 50 per cent, some 1800 or 1900 provided our quota is in the same ratio as that of St Lawrence county, and that we have furnished no more volunteers than St, Lawrence has,

THE BOARD OF ENROLLMENT, for this district is composed of Fred. Emerson, Provost Marshal, and President of the Board, Doct. E. S Walker, of Herkimer Co., Surgeon, and Arthur Pond, of Lewis Co., Citizen at Large. Messrs Emerson and Pond, we are personally acquainted with, and can give our assurance that perfect fairness and equity will characterize all their acts and decisions. Of Doct. Walker, we can only speak from information, which is of the most satisfactory kind. The Board is such a one as ought to inspire the highest degree of public confidence.

The Draft in Jefferson County.
The following names have been drawn for Jefferson County, additional to those printed yesterday:

LYME.
No. Enrolled 252—No. Drawn 72.
Edwin Shelly, Orren T Johnson, Newell J Danley, Lewis Center, Alonzo Spenable, Wm S Utley, Philip Lotee, Jacob Fox, Charles Phillips, John Dingman, Wm Abbey, Greenleaf R Wilcox, Martin Getnan, Simon Wells, George W Ratney, Jerome Wells, Morgan Klock, Wm O Thomson, Sam Watrous, Peter Vandoren, Noel E Douglass, Wallace Ryder, Menzo Hayes, Jason Fay, Joseph LaPonte, George Aman, Alvah N Warner, Wm M Holbrook, Alonzo H Francis, Eleazer A Watkins, Lawrence T Weaver, Oliver B Hewitt, Alvah Dillenbeck, Orville S Flanburg, Richard C Bunce, Alonzo Lott, Elias Fredinburg, Wm Bates, John Fox, Harrison J Blodgett, Preston B Gaige, Minot J Howard, Frank Lucas, Ambrose Combs, Albert B Mayhew, Solomon Hayes, Wm H Dewey, Lewis Snell, Lyman Munson, Ross C Houghton, Chauncey D Hayes, Charles H Hamilton, Madison J McCombs, Lewis Garopee, Stewart Merrill, Clitus Shepard, Duane J Cross, Wallace Dodge, Scott Blodgett, Gains N Harmon, Minot M Ingalls, Alonzo C Nims, Brayton G Harris, Orren N Wilcox, Henry F Swin, Grove Penny, Calvin H Becker, James H Cline, Thomas Brushingham, Chauncy Clause,  Leroy S Reed, Jacob J Hunter.

ORLEANS.
No. Enrolled 331—No. Drawn 88.
Washington Laribee, Ezra H Cornwall, Geo Gardner, J V Kissel, Oliver Moore, Warren Smith, Bailey Goodrich, Andrew Baldwin, Geo Pelcher, Spencer W Payne, Malachi Fults, Chauncey Gray, Jas H Baxter, Jewett Cole, Andrew Walts, Loren Church, Rev Uriel Graves, Melvin Burton, Geo W Rasback, Geo Timmerman, Eli Sargent, Henry Rapp, Chauncey Walts, Henry Witherhorn, Richid Parker, Frank Landerson, Geo Cranker, Loraine Loicks, Lewis Sargent, Geo Church, Daniel Copeley, Valentin Meyers, Parley Foot, Alonzo Countryman, Aaron Forbes, Wm Newton, Geo Carpenter, Wm McKinly, John S Petrie, Albert Ramsdill, Jackson Dillendack, Hiram Church, Vallentine Workman, Jno Hunder, Robert Fisher, Geo Welch, Albert Sheley, Chas Weatherhorn, Philo Storring, Shadrack Newton, Edson Rood, Anthony Herbert, John Fredinburgh, Dexter Jones, Michel Hewes, Amos Ghlet, Calvin Wright, Peter Pohl, David W Howe, Henry Sloat, Belcher Brown, Jacob Pichard, Jacob Leahr, John Galey, Otis N Briton, Asa Goodrich, Nathaniel R Reed, Alonzo Snell, Daniel Moore, Geo Strough, Martin Loucks, Thos Getman, Edson Parker, Alexander Parker, Wm P Timmermon, Jacob Fults, George Eyleston, Elijah Klock, Henry Robbins, Handley Foot, Jno Weatherhorn, Linus Price, Steph Getham, Benj Wood, Duane Smith, Peter Kepler, Leonard Ford, Absolom  Price.

PAMELIA.
No Enrolled 207—No. Drawn 46.
Richard Gear, Richard Gardner, Patrick Grace, Warren H Starkweather, Hiram Shaw, John P Pitcher, Dwight S Robbins, Andrew Davenport, Harlow Rogers, Ward Nichols, Ledger Disc, Herbert Barton, Cyrenus Sripp, Cyrus Ogsbury, Joel Tkmmerman, Marcus Harth, Ambrose Carter, Harrison Mack, James Bradshaw, Albert L Gleason, Clark M Wait, Norman Countryman, William Wood, William Miller, Porter Weatheroy, William Cursie, John Mann, Chas M Bannister, Washington White, Medad Cook, Jr, B F Wood, Frank Goulding, Charles M Tripp, Charles G Niles, Martin Fuller, Andrew Weldon, Rice Gould, Ira Walrath, Edward Gear, Jasper N Dodge, David Bass, Henry J Sherman, Alexander Tingue, Heley Fuller, David Martell, Peter Farmer.

PHILADELPHIA.
No. Enrolled 166. No. Drawn 46,
V B Ayers, Sailor Child, Charles F Reed, George Clough, Farney Parker, John S Peck, Samuel Isdel, Harvey Hamblin, Oliver Child 2d, Stephen Stodard, Ed Bush, Dexter Bennett, Wm Hart, Truman Clark, Sidey Starling, Mathew Norton, H D Brown, A Y Baxter, James Sterling Jr, Martin V Hazelton, Richard Swift, John Isdale, George E Tucker, T R Langdon, Alvin Powell, S D Potter, Charlee H Cross, Samuel B Scofield, William Sharon, George Murphy, Henry M Wilson, Eli Rogers, Simeon Scoughton, George Thomas, Wm M Ross, Edwin Wilson, John Burke, Theodore Mott, William Rhuber, W H Hewett, Samuel Cooper, Charles E Gould, James Sheldon, Wm H Collins, George Powell, Francis D Wheeler.

RODMAN.
No. Enrolled 135—No. Drawn 36.
George Post, John Roseboom, Austin F Fassett, Alonzo Washburn, Nelson G Cooley, Christopher Clairy, George Flint, George L Eutterfield, Sam Blodgett, Robert B Schram, Alfred Brooks, Edward Nunn, Eri Dean, Charles E Glasier, Sterling Lewis, T Madison Burtch, Mich'l Lowry, Orrin A Edmonds, Ben F Woodward, George Smith, Thomas Petrie, Daniel Fosee, Chester Loucks, Nathan A Wright, Rosell L Grant, Orlando F Nichols, Charles Brooks, Mortimer Griffin, Wm R Dean, Robert McGear, Delos Cooley, Otis Newton, Giffard Brown, Lyman Odell, Oliver R Porter, Lucius Carter.

RUTLAND.
No. Enrolled 193—No. Drawn 55.
Frank Day, Wm H Sowles, Henry Humphrey, Hiram Allen, Belora Brainard, Wm P Coats, Thos A Herrow, David Cumins, Geo B Hazelton, Albert D Veber, Elias Ltater, Chas Hazel, Samuel Green, Solon Betrningham, Augustus Roby, Jos Allen, John Mott, Edward Wescott, J Goodrich Scott, John McLane, Orren O Jacobs, Kimball Oaks, Geo Waldo, Dewitt C Wheeler, Augustus M Jacobs, Alfred E Isham, Geo Durham, Nelson Birmingham, Harlan B Dunlap, Allen Taylor, W C Bull, Orville Woodward, Jno Calahan, Henry Demarse, Charles Glass, John Jeagle, Jas Norris, W Orlando Smith, Edwin Burlingame, Peter Bergevin, Henry L Underwood, Harrison Sisco, Laon Pridean, Chancey Durham, Archibald G Stevens, Oscar Johnson, Newton Oaks, Jno Huntington, Jno H Gross, N Clark Munro, Benj J Archer, Albert Hendricks. Timothy Kidder, Isaac McMullin, Jno D Middleton.

THERESA.
No, Enrolled 219—No. Drawn 60.
Fernando Wilson, Hiram Neville, Geo Hough, Victor Cooper, Henry Maillet, Jno Casey, Jno Sterns, Jno D T Seeber, Jno Allen, Parker A Thayer, Bethuel Allen, Jacob Sned, Christopher Gills, Chas Higgins. Pat Harris, Henry Miller, Mich Ely, Bradley B Durphy, Abram Shely, Jas Wright, Pat Farrel, Chas Mallet, S Norman Stevenson, Benj Putnam, Jno Mallet, Jas A Parker, Hiram Wheeler, Mitchel Rivers, Jason Grennell, W D Wooledge, Delos Herrick, Jos Tyler, Geo E Yost Normon Wagner, Lewis Evans, Alex H Cooper, Eph G Corbin, Geo Hough, Orsimus Cornwell, Jas Sheley, Nelson Fults, Rosel Collis, Jno Hunt, Geo Stone, Chas Fairbanks, Wm VanAmee, Luther Baldwin, Jno Jordon, Louis Klock, Merritt Cupenaugh, E D Sheley, Arva Parker, Milton Wheeler, Sylvester Maxfield, A Shertliff, Horace Parkhurst, Melvin E Cornwall, Warren Webster, Edward Waters, Henry Simons.

WILNA.
No. Enrolled 318—No Drawn 92.
Wm Dawley, Mich Tobey, Wm Cline, Owen E Foley, Egbert Flint, Gideon Hinderson, Jno J Boyle, Geo Weaver, Daniel Clearwater, Lyman J Carpenter, Henry J Kellogg, Almond Cooper, Demorris Dana, Othello A Lanfear, Hanibal Carter, Thos Cumins, Myron Owens, Thos Maloney jr, Geo Pierce, Munro Ten Eyck, Robt H Hawley, Lewis Pair, Aaron Pennington, Cornelius Smith, Thos Fitsimmons, Elbridge Sims, And Collins, Cortus B Lewis, A R Crane, Mich Smith, Sidney W Hotchkins, Geo Thomas, Sylvester Calaham, Bennett F Brown, Wm A Reynolds, Jas Galvin, Mich Kinney, Phillander Draper, Jno Ingalls, Norris M Carter, Darius H Peck, Nelson Lanfear, Stillman Mathews, Wm Jebb, Melville C Rice, Orville Hunt, Geo Mitchell, Jno Savage, Ezra Vandewacker, Warren Van Allen, G J Case, Hiram K Lanfear, Reed R Crook, Luke Burns, Luke Sherron, Fred'k Ward, Henry Ford, Wm Crossit, Henry Flint, Jno S Edwards jr, F G Connell, Asa Shafer, Alono W Sylvester, Wm Shoe, Silas Crowner, Hiram Tooley, Parish Main, Samuel Henderson, Henry Van Amberg, Theo D Warren, Tnos Larry, Thos Hickman, Peter Clark, Geo Lewis, Volney D Warren, Pat Cain, Horace Blanchard, Wm W Owens, Benj Clark, Henry Fitsimmons, Adolphus Allen, Nath Lindslaff, Mich Martin, Edward Reynolds, Geo W Stanner, Viucent Farr, Jos A Smith, Pat Shaw jr, Jos Davis, Robt Marcott, Spencer C Osborne. Jas Myer.

A Provost Marshal Arrested by Order of Judge Mullen.
We have repeatedly alluded to the action of Judge Miilan [sic] of the 5th district in maintaining the jurisdiction and dignity of his court, and enforcing respect for the writ of habeas corpus. Being of whig antecedents and a Republican of unquestioned standing, his rulings have attracted more attention than those of other judges against whom party bias has been alleged. Judge Mullin has gone a step further in enforcing the habeas corpus than any other of his colleagues on the bench. In the case of an "infant" in whose behalf a writ had been sued out Provost Marshal Eastman of the Jefferson and Lewis District made the return prescribed by War Department and stood upon it refusing to produce the prisoner. The 1atters counsel moved a writ of attachment for the arrest of the Marshal. Judge Mullen instantly granted and ordered the Sheriff to execute it. The Sheriff soon appeared with the Marshal in custody, and as the Court had not time to hear the argument that day, the offending official was remanded to the custody of the Sheriff who was ordered to produce him at an adjourned day.
—Rochester Union.

 

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: October 16, 2012
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/counties/civil/counties/jefferson.htm

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