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Civil War Newspapers
Kings County, New York

***The first five pages have not be OCR'd. To see copies of these pages please see: Pages 1 - 5

U.
Unkhardt, Edw 24 Clinton.

V.
Van Wagner, Hubert 33 Perrepont.
Van Tassel, C Mansion H'se.
Vanvleet, T 79 Jeralemon.
Vandevier, R T 86 Orange.
Vernon, A 91 Henry.
Voorhies, J 89 Orange.
Walton, Jno B 58 Schermerhorn.
Weller, A 28 Clinton.
Waldron, I 23 Clinton.
Wilkie, J 23 Clinton.
Wood, W H 87 Henry.
Whitney, F A 76 Remsen.
Wheeler, A A 58 Court.
Wood, Jno 85 Montague.
Warington, W H 56 Fulton.
Walsh, J 15 Monroe place.
Waldron, H Jr 22 Clinton.
Williams, J H 89 Atlantic.
Welch, C 111 Clinton.
Willets, Jos 148 Joralemon.
Williams, J D 61 Joralemon.
Wyman, Luther B Jr __ Joralemon.
Willenstein, H 221 Atlantic.
Warren, Geo W 6 Garden.
Weed, G 26 Schermerhorn.
Walstenholm, ___ 60 State.
Whealey, J 128 Remsen.
Wall, F 74 Fulton.

Y.
Young, E 63 Pierrepont.

This closed the Third Ward and the drafting for the day. A son of Mayor Kalbfliesch, half a dozen prominent physicians, Brig.-Gen. PRATT, 15 Mansion House boarders, several enrolling officers, four pairs of brothers and one dead man were drawn.
TO-DAY
The draft will be continued in this District, commencing at the Fourth Ward at 9 o'clock in the morning.

Second Congressional District, Brooklyn.
The draft for the above District commenced, according to official announcement, at 9 o'clock yesterday morning, at the headquarters of District-Marshal Samuel T. Maddox, No. 26 Grand-street, Williamsburgh. The District comprises the Sixth, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Twelfth, Fourteenth, Sixteenth, Seventeenth and Eighteenth Wards of Brooklyn (Eastern District) and the township of Flatbush, Flatlands, Gravesend, New-Lotts and New-Utrecht, Long Island. Of these the following Sub-Districts were drawn:
First.....New-Lotts, embracing East New-York……. 72
Second..Sixth Ward.................................................. 457
Third....Eighth Ward................................................ 133
Fourth...Ninth Ward…............................................. 376
Total………………………………………………1,038
Including the 50 per cent additional draft.

The Enrolling Board consisted of District Marshal Capt. Samuel J. Maddox, Commissioner Charles W. Cheshire, Surgeon George S. Woodman, M. D., and Records Chas. B. Morton.
The Police force on hand consisted of 100 men, under the command of Cooglan, of the Forty-fifth Precinct, and Inspector Carpenter presided over their arrangements throughout the day. The military force attracted particular attention as comprising Companies A and C of the noted Eighth Ohio State Volunteers, under the command of Capt. Butterfield and Lieut. J. Wetherell.
Marshal Maddox, shortly after nine o'clock, opened the proceedings with a few well-chosen remarks, and Supervisor Gilain Schanck came forward upon the counting of the ballots, and declared that as a member of the Committee appointed or rather selected by this people to inspect the counting of the ballots, he had found everything as correct and fair as human ingenuity could make it, and the rest must be left to chance or an overruling Providence. The Committee thus alluded to who officiated conjointly for all the wards, consisted of the Speaker, Mr. Schanck, Samuel Schanck, Alsam Limmington, Paterson Rapeljae and Alderman Murphy, of the Sixth Ward, and Alderman Tiernan and Supervisors Herman and Newman and Charles W. Chesile, of the Ninth Ward.
A blind man, Francis Doyle, was placed beside the box, the ballots were tossed into the wheel, and the first turn disclosed the name of James Van Syckles, of New-Lotts.

FIRST SUB DISTRICT.
The wheel rolled on, presenting the names as follows:
NEW-LOTTS

A.
Arnbey, Jas. E New-York       Alter, Wm. E New-York.
Alterbrandt, L, E N Y.            Alocke, Lewis, E N Y.

B.
Bower, John, E New-York.     Boorman, Chris, E N Y.
Additional fifty per cent.
Brerm, Chris, Forbell's            Bennett, Jacob C, East
          Landing.                                  New-York.
C.
Coffar, Wm, E New-York.      Crane, Earnest, N Lots.
Additional fifty per cent.
Conover, Henry, E N Y.                   Cl____is, E New-York.

D.
Detsel, Jacob, E N Y.              Doremus, Franklin, E N Y.
Duffy, Michael, N Lots.                    Declune, Joseph, E N Y.
Dlave, Powell, E N Y.             Duryea, Michael, N Lots.
Additional fifty per cent.
Davis, Jno B, E N Y.               Day, Robt, N Lots.
Duryea, Jno, E N Y.

F.
Forbel, Geo, E N Y.                Felter, J, E N Y.
Finger, C, N Lots.

G.
Goldsmith, B, E New-York.

H.
Hagarth, Wm, E N York.        Hernden, M, E New-York.
Hopkins, A, E New-York.       Holt, Wm, New-Lots.
Hemmuger, S, E New-York.    Howard, J, E New-York.
Hanson, J, New-Lots.              Hilieg, M, E New-York.
Additional fifty per cent.
H_wnem, H, E New-York.      Hegeman, J, New-Lots.
Horse, H, E New-York.                    Haupt, A, E New-York.
Howard, Wm B, E N York.

J.
Jackson, Samuel, New-Lots.
Additional fifty per cent.
Johnson, Fred, New-Lots.

K.
Additional fifty per cent.
Keisehman, Chas, E N Y         Roch, Jacob, E New-York.
Roch, Wm, E New-York.

L.
Lochman, John, New-Lots.

M.
McCabe, Phis, E N York.        McCarty, Owen, E Lots.
Mick, John E New-York.

N
Additional Fifty Per Cent.
Nolan, Lawrence East New-York.

O.
Oedenslater, Charles East New-York.

P.
Preston, James East New-York.
Additional Fifty Per Cent.
Provost, Geo E New-York.     Phowler, John E New-York.

R.
Rogers, Jno N Lots.
Additional Fifty per cent.
Rynolds, Jno N Lots.              Rissiner, Fred E N Y.

S.
Strauss. Jno E N Y.                 Shilling, Geo E N Y.
Schmalberger, Adam E N Y.
Additional Fifty per cent.
Stroming, Jno E N J.               Stone, Wm E N Y.
Smith, Wm N Lots.                 Stropple, Fred'k, E N Y.
Sneider, F E N Y.

T.
Torlavin, Jno, New-Lots.

V.
Van Sicklend, J, New-Lots.     Van Sicklend, J C, N Lots.
Van Sickland, J D, N Lots.      Vanderbeck, W, E New-Y'k.

W.
Warner, J, E New-York.                   Watier, M, E New-York.
Werner, C, New-Lots.

Z.
Zu_mermann, A, East New-York.

With this the draft in the First Sub-District ended but it was discovered that Mr. Louis Alterbrand, whose house was the scene of disturbance, last  Autumn, with some Massachusetts troops stationed in the vicinity, was drawn. Three cousins out of one family connection were called. The crowd of workingmen inside and around the building preserved the best order and good humor.
[Owing to the press of advertisements [sic] upon our columns, we are unable this morning to give the names drawn in the Sixth, Eighth and Ninth Wards.
Draft in the Third District.

FOURTH, FIFTH AND SEVENTH WARDS COMPLETE.
The drafting in the Third Congressional District, Capt. Stephen B. Gregory, Provost-Marshal, was resumed yesterday morning at 9 o'clock.
The military guard of Minnesotians was under command of Capt. Heffelfinger, white Capt. Joel Smith, with the force of the Forty-first Precinct and 100 men from New-York, were on duty under direct charge of Inspector Folk, Lieut. Barger, N. Y. Vols., Aid-de-Camp to Col. Nugent, superintended the draft, as the official representative of Col. Fry.
At 9 o'clock Capt. Gregory announced that the draft would be made to fill the quota of the
FOURTH SUB-DISTRICT,
which includes the Fourth Ward. Messrs Van Brunt, Taylor and Dean were appointed a Committee to count the ballots. They announced the whole number to be 1,554, of which 369 were to be drawn as the quota for the District, with the additional fifty per cent.
Mr. Corney turned the wheel, the blind man, Mr. Wintress, drew the ballot, and Commissioner Beebe, in a clear and distinct voice, called out the name of John D. Glass, Fulton-av. and ...
Mr. Glass is probably a well-known man in his District, for the announcement of his name was greeted with loud shouts and bursts of merriment.
The following alphabetical list has been carefully compared with the official ballots and may be implicitly relied upon:

A.
Armstrong, S 105 Nassau.
Atkinson, Wm, 43 Tillary.
Allen, B 108 Jay.
Abercrombie, Chas 160 Concord.
Armstrong, E 66 High.

B.
Brush, Jas R 54 High.
Bryan, John 11 Tillary.
Box, Thos 228 Pearl.
Ball, Jno 225 Washington,
Bess, W 8 Myrtle-av.
Begh, A Jr 200 Adams.
Boick, J 200 Pearl.
Buckley, D 69 Nassau.
Brown, T R 46 Tillary.
Baty, Jas 103 High.
Burdet, C E 24 Lawrence.
Boyce, E 95 Fulton-av.
Berry, L W 127 Jay.
Barrow, Jno 138 Tillary.
Bennett, G H K 182 Adams.
Booth, Chas 123 Pearl.
Booth, Saml 33 Lawrence.
Bertram, P 94 Sands.
Bryan, Jno 302 Pearl.
Burger, J D 257 Bridge.
Bennet, Wm 65 Tillary.
Bourne, T S 25 Greene.
Barn, T A 222 Pearl.
Bank, A C 48 Sands.
Bennett, J _ Fulton.
Burgbee, Thos 309 Fulton.
Brady, A 106 Tillary.
Burns, Stephen 156 Pearl.
Bailey, G W 10 Johnson.
Bayley, Wm 70 Nassau.
Brady, Jno 160 Tillary.
Beakley, Jno 62 High.
Bradley, F 269 Pearl.
Briggs, E 4 Fulton-av.
Brown, J B 90 Lawrence.
Banker, Saml 112 Concord.
Barstow, Jacob 162 Washington.
Berbold, G 398 Pearl.

C.
Cooper, D 191 Adams.
Clay, W 206 Pearl.
Croft, Scub 62 Nassau.
Craig, Chas 68 Lawrence.
Chalie, J 114 Pearl.
Cada, Danl 64 Sands.
Clarke, P 33 Tillary.
Crookrell, R H Jay.
Chapman, J C.
Chapney, F T 125 High.
Cleveland, E A 42 Johnson.
Culling, C C 195 Bridge.
Coles, Chas H col 95 Nassau.
Cameron, Jos 176 Adams.
Cornny, Jno 156 Pearl.
Cliger, Richard 169 Jay.
Case, Thos 84 Myrtle-av.
Callahan, G A 40 Myrtle-av.
Cromie, Thos H 88 Sands.
Callan, Richard 98 High.
Conyer, Jno 187 Fulton.
Chadwick, J 208 Pearl.
Carl, L P 41 Concord.
Craft, J 140 Adams.
Cotter, Chas 15 Myrtle-av.
Crane, S 68 Lawrence.
Cassidy, W J 112 Tillary.
Cornell, C W 76 Johnson.
Colyer, J E 187 Fulton.
Clarke, W 179 Bridge.
Cuff, G col 19 High.
Garreno, J col 2 Laurence-p.
Corington, T 30 Liberty.
Coburn, E W 225 Pearl.
Connee, J 320 Pearl.
Conkwell, M 17 Nassau.
Cook, Theodore, 17 High.
Crook, Abel 130 High.
Cornell, T J 73 Myrtle-av.
Conant, R 163 Washington.

D.
Draper, T 10 Nassau.
Deuz, J 197 Bridge.
Duff, J H 203 Bridge.
Dorson, T W 51 Myrtle-av.
Dorance, G W 94 Laurence.
Dunn, P L 76 Concord.
Dyer, E 101 Tillary.
Duxon, G 50 Nassau.
Donhehey, A 212 Jay.
Duff, Francis 202 Bridge,
Dunlap, R Jay and High.
Davis, A col 101 High.
Davis, Wm 291 Fulton.
Dean, D 205 Washington.
Donegey, J 212 Jay.
Dougherty, S 140 Washin'on.
Duffy, T H 40 Myrtle-av.
Duffy, P Adams & Nassau.
Douglas, W T 81 High.
Dessendorf, C 32 Chapel.
Duprie, W 157 Adams.
Deverall, G 8 Fulton.

E.
Entwistle, Ed 230 Pearl.
Edmonston, T J 98 Sands.
Eissenan, J 105 Concord.
Ellis, Jno 187 Fulton,
Everson, Geo 267 Pearl.
Eagan, Jas 72 Concord,
Everett, Wm 96 Sands.
Emory, L 26 Lawrence.

F.
Fallen, E 49 Concord.
Fenton, Jas 21 Fulton-av.
Fulton, Chas 191 Adams.
Felton, Hy 32 Willougby.
Fisk, F B 170 Washington.
Fish, W Jr 119 Nassau.
Flaherty, Jno 203 Jane.
Flanigan, E A 37 Myrtle-av.
Fryn, Dan'l 54 Sands.
Frazer, Hugh 50 Nassau.
Falkner, H 238 Pearl.
Flack, B 134 High.
Flinn, Jas 202 Pearl.

G.
Glass, J G Fulton cor Pearl.
Glover, A F, 231 Pearl.
Glazey, J 40 Myrtle-av.
Gould, H 162 Washington.
Gaon, G C 118 Johnson.
Gillig, J 68 Myrtle-av.
Griswold, E 202 Pearl.
Granville, G B 76 Johnson.
Grant, C D cold, 26 Chapel.
Green, W 341 Fulton.
Grim, G 227 Washington.
Good, S H 100 1/2 Sands.
Gillespie, F 31 Willoughby.
Gibbin,T 108 Tillary.
Gill, F 7 Lawrence.

H.
Hegekery, H B 44 Nassau.
Henern, M 75 Concord.
Hoep, Jas 65 Fulton.
Heaver, J Washington.
Henderson, H Nassau.
Hogman, __ 105 Nassau.
Hill, Thos 105 Lawrence.
Handy, Thos 63 Lawrence.
Hall, J 185 1/2 Adams.
Hoyt, J A 47 Nassau.
Hays, J W 188 Adams.
High, P 177 Adams.
Hager, J 132 Adams.
Hopkins, C H 92 Johnson.
Harrison, C L 73 Fulton.
Hosford, F 155 Washington.
Harrington, G R 45 Concord.
Hah, J 95 High.
Humneria, Hy 313 Fulton.
Hogan, Thos 79 Johnson.
Hobat, Hy 61 Tillary.
Hucksley, J S 226 Jay.
Hicks, Wm (col) 97 High.
Hagemide, F E 210 Jay.
Hunt, E 94 Myrtle-av.
Hoffman, Jas 18 Fulton-av.

J
Jacobs, A E 183 Fulton.
Jones, A 324Pearl.
Jackson, W P 211 Pearl.
John, Chas 83 Higbie.
James, Wm 26 Fulton.
Jones, A B, 184 Nassau.
Johns, Geo W 169 Johnson.
John, B 80 Willoughby.

K.
Kuthbert, Rich W 79 Nassau.
Kohr, W 313 Fulton.
Kahn, Julius, _ Johnson,
King, J 45 Higbie.
Kirtlandt, D 173 Pearl.
Kelly, A 7 Clinton row.
Kanarus, F W 285 Greene.
Kurkell, J 549 Adams.
Kirby, Jas M 99 Lawrence.
Kearney, D _ Tillary.
Kavanagh, P 50 Lawrence-pl.
Kelly, L 181 Bridge.
Korff, J M 206 Jay.

L.
Lee, J F 101 Lawrence.
Lamb, P 115 Concord.
Leclare, Chas 144 Jay.           
Lester, Wm S 30 Lawrence.
Longsberry, H 111 Johnson.  
Lockwood, L A 21 Concord.
Lawrence, J 6 Clinton-row.
Little, W 218 Pearl.
Loughlin, W 208 Jay.
Leonard, — Fulton-st.
Lyland. F 175 Jay.
Little, Jas 214 Pearl.
Ludlow, D 206 Washington.
Lee, Hy A 111 Lawrence.
Ludlow, A B 126 Nassau.
Ludland, D 74 Lawrence.
Luggland, Chas 74 Lawre'e.
Leary, E 173 Fulton.
Lynch, O S 75 Tillary.
Lockwood, Jno 11 Lawre'e.
Lancaster, L (colored), 21_ Pearl.
Malone, C A 229 Bridge.
McMillan, R, 21 Lawrence.
Moore, R, col, 97 High.
McAuley, C 76 Concord.
Murphy, M 176 Adams.
Moore, Chas 147 Jay.
Murray, Jno 229 Bridge.
Mack, G 289 Adams.
McElboddy, J 181 Adams.
McDermott, Jas 71 Nassau.
Moore, Wm Nassau.
Matthews, Jno 80 Sands.
Morked, __ 82 Lawrence.
Markellie, T 58 Sands.
Mallovex, F 7 Chapel.
McCleck, R Revere-av c John
Moore, John 147 Adams.
Morts, G B 136 Jay.
Meker, Samuel, Pearl-st and Fulton-av.
McKee, W H 35 Myrtle-av.
McGeary, A H 355 Bridge.
Michael, 47 Myrtle-av.
Mulany, M 1 Lawrence.
Moore, A 112 Lawrence.
McDowell, S C __Liberty.
McGibbins, E Lawrence.
McGare, W 245 Adams.
Moffit, R J, __ Atlantic.
Mctuavee, Jas 261 Washing'n.
Miller, Rbt __ Fulton-av.
Morehaus, A, 137 Bridge.

N.
Nelson, B, 173 Jay.
Nongonge, Hy 71 Tillary
Nash, Chas 130 Jay.
Neig, G B 190 Adams.

O.
O'Neil, Michael, 173 Jay.
O'Neil, E 8 Fulton-av.
O'Connell, N A 12 Tillary.
O'Donough, J 193 Jay.
Oneranure, Koraora, 189 Fulton.
Olmshead, T 178 Wash'ton.

P.
Poppaw, Jas 35 Chapel col.
Parsons, W 18 Sands.
Patty, P 34 Tillary.
Pearce, Jno 141 Concord.
Patterson, R (colored) High.

Q.
Queneil, 92 Willoughby.
Queberk, Jno, 27 Johnson.

R.
Ridle, G 83 Myrtle.
Roth, G 167 Washington.
Rodey, Jno A 4 Pearl.
Ritaler, Chas A 120 Nassau.
Rogers, 33 Willoughby.
Rhodes, S 13 Willoughby.
Rushmore, 86 Johnson.
Robins, Thos 251 Fulton.
Raymond, S 25 Nassau.
Ray, Chas 210 Pearl.
Rockland, L A 86 Nassau.
Richards, E J 233 Fulton.
Rineehey, Jas 187 Fulton.
Rockwood, J G 264 Adams.
Richardson, H 58 Sands.
Rett, E W 71 Lawrence.
Rice, Sam (col'd) 164 Jay.
Richardson, Wm 57 Sands.
Russell, G W 86 Tillary.

S.
Steffers, A E, 79 Tillary.
Style, M H R 291 Jay.
Smith, J A 14 Jay.
Smith, H 45 High.
Simon, Thos _ Atlantic.
Schweger, A 287 Washingt'n.
Smith, E 114 John.
Stanley, D 35 Warren.
Smith, C 96 Lawrence.
Slater, W H, 4 Fulton-ay.
Spaulding, C 154 Adams.
Sawyer, J 84 High.
Smith, Wm 24 Tillary.
Storer, A V 54 Sands.
Sandaman, Chas 2 Harper'scourt.
Stenerwald, Valentine, 115 Tillary.
Sefert, Chas 94 Varick.
Shannon, Saml 147 1/2 Jay.
Schurial, W 41 1/2 Lawrence.
Stoner, Chas 359 Fulton.
Streman, J 13 Willoughby.
Smith, Chas 231 Pearl.
Staunton, E B 32 Willou'by.
Swain, Chas H 76 Johnson.
Schoonmaker,W 108 Conco'd.
Shaffer, J 72 Nassau.
Stewart, _, 27 Willoughby.
Smith, _ _ Tillary.
Schubmans, Hy 247 Adams.
School, _ 118 Pearl.
Stralzer, W 266 Washington.
Sniith, Henry 76 Fulton.
Shamfors, G H 270 Adams.
Scholk, Chas 200 Pearl.

T.
Tweedy, J A 151 Washington.
Trubshaw, J W 29 1/2 Lawrence.
Terry, J 175 High.
Tanner, C C 201 Bridge.
Tayy, N 175 Bridge.
Titus, J P 233 Washington.
Tomies, J E col'd 180 Jay.
Tuerney, P 203 Jay.
Thompson, J H Fulton-av and Pearl.
Theyer, J 170 Adams.
Tompkins, W B 91 Fulton.
Taylor, W S 165 Fulton.
Talmadge, T 102 Bridge.
Taylor, H 154 Nassau.

U.
Ustic, T Pillow.

V.
Vosburgh, C A 84 Lawrence.
Van Brunt, _ 269 Green.
Van Peter, W 167 Concord.
Vaughn, Wm 112 Pearl.
Valentine, J V 67 Tillary.
Van Pelt, L 235 James.
Viger, W 197 Bridge.
Valentine, A A 94 Grand.

W.
Werthington, Jno. 280 Jay.
Wescott, M W 32 Myrtle-av.
Wright, S 6 Sands.
Walcott, C N 28 Johnson.
Wood, Jno __ Pearl.
Waight, A Jr 200 Adams.
Wilcox, 182 Fulton.
Warren, C _ 169 Bridge.
Wynant, Wm C 38 Concord.
Warren, J S 22 Pearl.
Willetts, J L C 127 Pearl.
Water, R 18 Fulton-av.
Winslow, A 245 Adams.
Wylie, A A 94 Grand.
Wilson, A 118 Adams.
Walsh, Wm 260 Jay.
Wenig, Geo R 80 Grand.
Walheener, G 200 Pearl.
Whitney, H 47 Concord.
Wegner, Jno 82 Tillary.
Williiamson, 213 Adams.
Wilson, H C 247 Adams.
Wyarchet, J 10 Fulton-av.
Watt, G 206 Washington.
Warner, G 289 Adams.
Wood, J N 251 Pearl.
Williams, Peter 101 Nassau.

Y.
Young, Robt 102 High.
Young, W H 16 Myrtle-av.
York, P 267 Washington.

THE DRAFT YESTERDAY.
Continued from First Page.
At the conclusion of the drawings a brief recess was taken, during which the ballots remaining in the wheel were counted by the Committee, and found to correspond with the desired tally.
Sergeant Thomas J. Cornell, several Police officers, a brother of Hon. Moses F. Odell, and the Secretary of the Montauk Insurance Company were among the favored ones.
After the Fourth Warders had retired from the room, the Fifth Warders in full force assembled, and the atmospheric status of the room became if possible more fearfully unhealthy and disagreeable.
Capt. Gregory having called the audience to order, appointed a Committee of citizens to count the ballots, who announced the total number deposited in the wheel to be 2,416, of which 551 were to be drawn as the quota of

THE FIFTH SUB-DISTRICT,
or Fifth Ward, including the 50 per cent. additional.
The Hon, Moses F. Odell, Inspector FOLK, Lieut. Bargor, Commissioner of Police Bergen, Postmaster LINCOLN and other prominent gentlemen, occupied the platform at the side of Capt. Gregory.
All being ready, the Commissioner announced the name of Michael Maguire, No, 69 Hudson-avenue, as the first on the roll of conscripts from the Fifth Ward. The other names were then drawn, and will be found herewith alphabetically arranged.

A.
Ambla, Robt _ Fulton.
Aley, Jo 142 Hudson.
Alcorn, R 35 Geld.
Amann, S 182 Sands.
Aurback, F 30 Hudson-av.
Aplez, T 54 Hudson.
Armour, Dan'l 2 Green-pl.
Ambrose, Jno Jr 122 Gorie.
Anderson, W H 1_2 Bridge.
Arten, F 33 Carl.

B.
Boitt, Wm 25 Green lane.
Burns, M 21 1/2 Front.
Boyd, J 120 Concord.
Bomback, M 138 Bridge.
Butcher, W 169 Prospect.
Busreau, F 34 Hudson-av.
Butt, Y Hudson-av.
Broner, W B 135 Concord.
Barry, D 73 G rove.
Brooks, J 193 Grove.
Buckley, B 185 Front.
Butler, E P 191 Sands.
Burdhost, H 10 Prince.
Blane, M 290 Hudson-av.
Brennan, J 291 Gold.
Bryne, T Jr 32 Sands.
Barrow, J _ Prospect.
Bird, Chas Gold & Carl.
Butler, J 71 Hudson-av.
Burns, T 136 York.
Burns, J H 138 Grove.
Burton, J A 148 Sands.
Black, G 170 Prospect.
Brown, J (col'd) 3 Jackson.
Bernard, W 133 High.
Batta, J 112 York.
Biddle, C H 122 Prospect.
Bourke, M 235 Hudson-av.
Butler, Chas 81 Hudson.
Burke, Wm 114 Navy.
Burk, T 33 Sands.
Bush, M L 169 Front.

C.
Conroy, E 147 John.
Cavney, D 22 Bridge.
Clark, M 39 Gold.
Connel, D 26 Plymouth.
Cooley, J 125 Tillary.
Caneay, John.
Casey, J 61 Stanton.
Croney, W 82 Hudson.
Coleman, F 48 Hudson.
Cagan, D 49 Stanton.
Censel, J 2 Bridge.
Clifton, D 254 Little Water.
Conelly, T Little.
Callahan, G 138 Plymouth.
Carr, H 139 Tillary.
Cannon, J 230 Water.
Carr, _ 281 Hudson-av.
Cox, T 231 Front.
Cannin, Jno 200 Front.
Clancy, P P 143 Prospect.
Coran, D __ Bridge.
Cassidy, Jno Hudson-av c Tillary.
Carway, J _ Prince.
Cane, Jno 143 Prospect.
Crawley, __ 108 Hudson-av.
Coran, A 47 Little.
Costley, T 33 Concord.
Cornelli, J 230 Little Water.
Cornell, T _ Hudson-av.
Colwell, B 154 1/2 Nassau.
Carr, J 139 Tillary.
Canton, J C 196 Nassau.
Craig, W 174 Tillary.
Connelly, J 38 Grove.
Cahill, H 43 Hudson.
Coles, C 80 Navy.
Coleth, F 146 Hudson-av.
Collins, D 148 Hudson.
Caffey, M G n Green-lane.
Conlin, Jas 3 Bridge.
Cabill, J 240 Water.
Clyne, Wm 35 Gold.
Carter, T 21 Little.
Cruckbush, Chas.
Colligan, B36 Bridge.
Cunningham, J 232 Front.
Carr, W 178 Hudson-av.
Casey, Jno A 136 Nassau.
Cornett, John 203 Gold.

D.
Delfe, P _ Hudson-av.
Dennier, M 253 John.
Duff, Robt 105 Grove.
Davis, Geo 182 Sands.
Duck, Wm 161 York.
De Witt, W W 186 Prospect.
Dumprsey, _ 177 Tillary.
Doran, T 152 Water.
Dennison, T 226 L Water.
Donohue, D 156 Plymouth.
Daney, Jno 201 Middagh.
Duseldorf, C 125 Carl.
Domingo, D 170 York.
De Witt, Jno 258 Front.
Ditt, J F 160 Nassau.
Doran, Jas 189 Tillary.
Dougherty, P 32 Hudson-av.
Donielson, Jas 476 Sands.
Dosher, A 141 Concord.
Davis, Geo 1 Parker-av.
Donahue, P 183 York.
Doyle, Daniel 175 York.
De Young, G W 133 Sands.
Dixon, _ Greene-lane.
Donovan, B 198 Bridge.
Deifland, F 126 Hudson-av.
Dorson, Jno 58 Bridge,
Dugan, R 6 Nassau-place.
Derby, F 139 Hudson-av.
Doyle, Wm H 65 Stanton.
Dalas, W 229 Gold.
Downey, T 23 Hudson-av.
Donavon, D 83 Bridge.
D'Gury, 126 Tillary.
Devoy, W 181 Grove.

E.
Enally, _ 22 Hudson-av.
Ellis, John 122 Hudson.
English, James 165 Sands.
Euson, John 193 Prospect.

F.
Farly, J 59 Stanton.
Fitzgerald, J 38 James.
Farr, J 159 Tillary.
Forrison, H 189 Green.
Finish, P 77 Tillary.
Flannigan, __ 20 Hudson.
Foley, J 61 Hudson-av.
Flyn, J 18 James.
Frank, J 29 Hudson-av.
Furey, J J 156 Prospect.
Fernison, H 156 Prospect.
Farley, J 51 Stanton.
Fitzgerald, N 280 Hudson.
Foley, F Front.
Farrell, J W 90 Carl.
Farrell, J 153 Nassau.
Fry, D 149 Hudson.
Falden, J 226 Water.
Flynn, P 192 York.
Fenerty, T 3 Concord-place.
Fox, F 213 Gold.
Fitz, C H 208 Monroe.
Forest, M 208 Monroe.
Farrell, J 281 Plymouth.
Farley, J _ Prince.
Fitz, H 36 Bridge.

G.
Grady, John 56 Navy.
Griffith, J 180 Bridge.
Gabin, J Gold & Water.
Gallagher, Jno 224 Little.
Gorman, J Plymouth near Hudson-av.
Gannon, Jno __ Tillary.
Gardner, A 125 Plymouth.
Ganery, Jno 35 Clinton.
Gallagher, T 29 Hudson-av.
Gerrey, J 222 Front.
George, A (col.) Jackson-ct.
Grascie, E 101 Gold.
Glynn, S __ Greene-lane.
Gresard, H 282 Plymouth.
Gisney, Thos 233 Water.
Greid, L W 21 Stant
Gyetes, _ 87 Gould.
Graham, Geo 204 Gold.
Groiter, Chas 212 Grove.
Grady, M 8th-av.
Gray, Wm 2 Bridge.
Galvin, M 57 Tillary.
Grady, Jno 40 Stanton.
Golhen, Thom 157 Gold.
Giles, C H 189 Sands.
Gallagher, J 186 Sands.
Gracs, J _ Plymouth.

H.
Hodson, H 49 Stanton.
Halserty, P 10 Stanton.
Harris, __ 182 Sands.
Henry, Thos 59 Hudson.
Hagan, __ 126 Hudson av.
Herolus, B 86 Green.
Hughes, __ 12 Tillary.
Harris, H 205 Grove.
Heff, __ 200 High.
Hotchkin, O G ___
Halliway, __ 174 Nassau.
Hattock, Jno 184 Concord.
Harrold, P 95 Little.
Halgott, Jno 149 Plymouth.
Handley, E 31 Gold.
Hopkins, M 60 Hudson-av.
Hudson, Jno Hanley, S 55 John.
Hughes, H 181 Prospect.
Henley, Jno 31 Greene-lane.
Harrington, T 25 Gold.
Holey, P 85 Hudson.
Howard, Jno 133 Howard.
Hussey, D 171 Hicks.
Hughley, D A 125 Tillary.
Hornen, Wm 146 York.
Hawley, J 175 Concord.
Hurthlow, Wm 209 Front.
Hardy, S H 157 Sands.
Hegan, Jos 130 Hudson.
Henerly, J 84 Water.
Howard, Jno 105 Grove.
Heartake, Geo (cld.)
Ham, N 258 John.
Henkertof, Geo (cld.)
Henka, R 161 Hudson-av.
Hopkins, M 60 Myrtle-av.

I.
Ireland, S A 178 Sands.
Ireland, P 189 Tillary.

J.
Joice, J 21 Little.
Jefferds, W E 150 Sands.
Johnson, D B __ Pronce.
Johnson, J 113 High.
Jays, D 157 Gold.
Janes, N 71 Hudson.
Johnson, W 56 Hudson.
Johnson, J N 23 Carroll.
Jones, R 22 Stanton.
John, J B 138 Prospect.
Jahlke, Fred W Gold-st.
Johnston, J E 33 Stanton.
Johnston, Benk 127 Plym'th.
Jasmes, J Jr. 26 prospect.
Jordon, Jno 142 Concord.
John, Sam'l 31 Sands.

K.
Keenan, __ 33 Stanton.
Knee, Jas 41 Hudson.
Kelly, P 142 Griffith.
Kerrigan, M 21 Monroe.
Kelly, Patrick, 28 Grove.
Kuntz, C 122 Hudson-av.
Kans, __ col 163 Concord.
Keams, __ 207 Grove.
Kent, W H 148 Gold.
Kelly, M cor Jackson-court.
Kelly, J 5 Hudson-av.
Kip, A J 121 Sands.
Kibblar, Jno 180 Hudson.
Knockton, Jas 24 1/2 Hudson.
Kelsey, W __ Carl.
Kane, J 206 Prospect.
Kenny, E 46 Hudson.
Keegan, M 169 York.
Kelsey, __ 92 Corbin.
Kelly, J 38 Stanton.
Keltler, P 86 Sands.
Kelly, P 327 front.
Kesser, P 205 Gold.
Kenna, J 175 Tillary.
Kelly, P 193 Prospect.

L.
Longher, W 198 Tlllary.
Lynch, M Plymouth and Hudson.
Lomas, F 119 Grove.
Lawrence, Jr, J 53 Gorman.
Leary, P 92 ___
Loenspick, Hudson-av.
Leonard, J 236 Front.
Lees, P 12 Tillary.
Laird, D 47 Green.
Lafaye, T 135 York.
Lozice, _ 244 John.
Lought, N 149 Tillary.
Lough, J 147 Tillary.
Low, J 221 Hudson.
Letzpatrick, __ Concord.
Latimer, F 33 Hudson.
Lukrey, J 196 High.
Ladd, J ____
Laney, W 58 Little.
Leckett, J 137 Tillary.
Lane, W 289 Hudson.

M.
McGuire, Mich 69 Hudson.
McConnell, Jno 112 Bridge.
Muller, Jno 4 Concord.
Morrison, B 29 Monroe.
Millard, Wm 53 Navy.
Moott, J 31 1/2 Gold.
Manley, P 239 Hudson-av.
McGrath, P 14 Hudson.
McCansy, B 189 Navy.
McDonnough, W 41 Little.
Mann, __ 198 Green.
Murphy, Jas 25 John.
McCarty, J 1 Stanton.
McKiff, Thos 37 Stanton.
Mckarl, T 149 Plymouth.
McCarty, M 108 Hudson-av.
Moore, G 81 Monroe.
Mitchell, H 212 Gold.
Mulloy, M 125 Plymouth.
McGailey, T 188 Bridge.
McDonough, B __
Merell, F 286 John.
Mack, Jas 31 Hudson-av.
McCarty, Ed, 170 Gold.
McCarty, H, 49 Little.
McFarlane, Z 31 Hudson.
Manning, Thos 177 Hudson.
Morton, Wm 192 Front.
McKellon, E 185 York.
McCreany, W 47 Green-lane.
Morrison, A __ Gold.
Murdell, C W 151 Sands.
Meiny, J 187 Plymouth.
Merwin, E 161 Sand.
Mellahon, __
Miller, H 104 Bridge.
Moore, J 226 Water.
McGrath, N 160 Hudson.
Mullin, F 56 Charles.
Martin, Wm 53 Talman.
Murry, Jno 51 Little.
McCarty, A 174 Hudson.
McKenner, J 126 Navy.
Miller, Chas 187 Prospect.
McPlumb, J 216 Prospect.
Malone, Jas 145 Plymouth.
Mulcrow, P 267 Gold.
Mesin, Chas. 149 Prospect.
McTrece, J 119 Front.
McKitt, __ __ Water.
McEmdee, Jno 188 Gold.
McCormick, M 40 Stanton.
McCowen, Jas ___.
McComb, Wm 41 Stanton.
Mangee, G 2 Hudson-place.
Mertin, __ 33 Carll.
McKittrick, J 170 Prospect.
McDonough, C 286 Water.
Meleany, Chas ___
McLoughlin, R _ Hudson-av.
McCartney, M 147 Plymouth.
Minor, Mr __.
Martin, James 191 Grove.
Morrison, Wm 43 Nassau.
McGrary, 149 Plymouth.
McCann, Jas 286 Plymouth.
McCarty, Jas Green-lane.
Mott, Ed 31 1/2 Gold.
Malm, B 3_ Gold.
Murphy, Jno 138 Navy.
McNeil, N 213 Nassau.
McGann, J 7 Little.
Morrell, Thos 127 Tillary.
Mentonia, J 1 Green-lane.
McIntire, R 65 Hudson.
McCally, J 179 Liberty.
McCormick, W 83 Bridge.
McCall, Thos 26 Prospect.
McGibben, __ 49 Little.
McDonald, C 30 Navy.
McCarty, __ 29 Front.
Maloney, P 79 Gold.
Moore, Jas 4 Nassau-place.
Mellariteens, S 158 Prospect.
Mott, R 121 Sands.
Mullany, M 175 Hudson-av.
McNichols, T 26 Hudson-av.
McTamney, Wm 61 Hudson.
McCarty, T 107 Hudson-av.        
Mclaney, Jas 1 Bridge.
Mulary, Jno Bridge & Till'y.

N.
Nelson, __ 106 Clinton.              
Neegan, Jas 20 Gold.
Neason, __ 141 Sands.                
Nantz, R 52 Stanton.
Neadman, T 232 Water.              
Nays, W 201 Gold.
Nicholson, Thos 235 John.          
Nash, Thos Prospect, near Carl.
Niago, J, Prince & Tillary.                

O.
O'Rork, __, __ Gold.
Osborn, Thos 5th.
O'Connor, 92 Bridge.
O'Rorke, 107 Gold.
O'Hea, Rich'd 225 Gold.
O'Donnell, J, Water & Gold.
O'Neil, C 117 Hudson-av.
Osborn, John 7 Little.
O'Shea, T 50 Grove.
O'Neil, 287 Plymouth.
Oakes, Jas 19 Stanton.
O'Hara, M 246 Prospect.
Oakes, P 40 Hudson.
O'Conner, Jno E 185 Tillary.
O'Neil, John 120 Navy.

P.
Pry, F C 135 Sands.
Petit, P 107 Gold.
Prening, D F 120 Hudson-av.
Parorin, R 8 Gold.
Post, S 200 Bridge.
Plunkey, Oner 92 Navy.
Patens, W S 28 Hudson-av.
Pistol, G 129 Grove.
Pye, Joseph 31 Carll.
Pelham, J 53 Stanton.
Plump, Jas 252 Marshall.
Pearce, Geo T 46 Hudson-av.
Poppin, J 260 Bridge.
Peterson, C 30 Stanton.
Powers, __ 201 Grove.
Park, P 237 Charles.
Phelps, V 31 1/2 Gold.
Parr, B 127 Front.
Post, Wm N 5 Bridge.
Prebb, J 131 Tillary.

Q.
Quilling, Chas 229 Front.       
Quinn, John 243 Hudson-av.
Quigley, Daniel 180 Concord.

R.
Reichertson, E 164 Main.
Revere, Wm 103 York.
Rehan, B 114 Navy.
Roth, __ 329 Front.
Rachencker, A 145 Hudson-av.
Riley, 28 Bridge.
Ross, P Water.
Rupperstert, C 23 York.
Riley, T B 196 Front.
Rodgers, Jas 131 Prospect.
Riley, J 32 Grove.
Reid, T S 46 Plymouth.
Riley, Edward 1 Prince.
Reynolds, R F 173 Sands.
Riley, Jno 74 Grove.
Riley, F 26 Fulton.
Ragan, Rich Gold & Plymouth.
Reynolds. P 24 Hudson-av.
Reorwil, J 178 Sands.
Ryan, Geo 193 Gold.
Roscoe, D 229 Gold.

S.
Stanton, J 90 State.
Smith, J B 141 Hudson-av.
Shannon, Pat 20 Bridge.
Seulby, John 22 Hudson-av.
Sailor, J (col'd) 56 Stanton.
Sands, Wm D, 182 Nassau.
Sherman, P 52 Leonard.
Sullivan, M 165 Hudson.
Shea, G 27 Hudson.
Slack, M 4 Nassau-place.
Sebert, Jno 249 Hudson.
Stephenson, A Jr 130 Prospect st.
Steward, Alex 120 Hudson.
Stract, J 123 Hudson.
Smith, F 30 Gold.
Stark, H _ Little-st.
Strinmore, A 138 Concord.
Schnieler, — 207 Gold.
Schenck, W.
Simonson, G L 25 Sands.
Shellilia, J John nr Gold.
Sesner, W 53 Stanton.
Sylph, Jno 88 Hudson.
Segner, Hy 156 Grove.
Severn, Ed 128 Pierrepont.
Shed, Mon 175 Tiliary.
Sallows. J 196 York.
Sheal, J 234 Water.
Schultz, V 24 Bridge.
Smalley, S H 186 High,
Shurmah, W 71 Marshall.
Scott, Cbas 127 Plymouth.
Simons, P 182 York.
Schelton, T 5 Charles.
Sweeney, W 253 John.
Shiltwell, Andrew 84 Tillary.
Smith, Wm 155 Concord.
Stephenson,Wm 267 Prospect.
Sailor, E (col'd) _ Stanton.
Sughorter, Geo 27 Hudson-av.
Sceole, J 25 Gold.
Slack, A 32 John,
Slow, Hy 95 Grove.

T.
Trice, P 71 Grove.
Thoms, W 156 Hudson-av.
Teaery, Henry 205 Front.
Tupley, J 210 Navy.
Tickner, E 25 Stanton.
Turner, C F 137 Grove.
Totten, S D 280 Bridge.
Thompson, D 50 Stanton.
Tomply, J 237 Hudson.
Torrance, P 25 Green lane.
Titus, T 29 Hudson-av.
Tomford, Jno 29 Hudson.
Toney, J 55 Bridge.
Thomason, W 18 Tiliary.
Thompson, C 184 York.
Tomach, E 138 High.
Teachen, R 52 John.
Thomas, Jas A 185 Huds-av.

V.
Vary, J H 180 Tillary.
Valk, A 126 York.
Vernon, Geo H 218 Bridge.
Vorey, Wm 34 John.

W.
Watch, M 186 York.
Webb, 197 Monroe.
W_sh, E H 202 Prospect.
Webb, M 165 Sand.
Wright, W 307 Front,
Wellgood, R 217 Gold.
Wiebel, Otto 92 Gold.
Walworth, D 2 Gold.
Wayland, P 254 Prospect.
Watson, W (col'd) Green-la.
Waldon, _ 23 Hudson.
Whetherston, Jno 245 John.
Welstsad, Jos 284 Plymouth.
Ward, J J 120 Grove.
Whaling, P 260 Marshall.
Ward, Thos 171 York.
Ward, J 105 Grove.
Ward, Jas 1 Stanton.
Wistlev, J 61 Tillary.
Wilson, Wm (col) 53 Green-la.
Williams. Hy 162 Concord.
Wilton, Jas 2 Dickinson's-al.
Winslow, Senl Carlton.
White, P 138 Prospect.
Welch, J 231 Hudson-av.
Wright, Jas 130 Gold.
Wall, G 79 Gold.
Williams, Hy 2 Bridge.

Y.
York, Thos 205 Gold.
York, P 175 Tiliary.
York, E 183 Prospect.
York, Eli 83 Prospect.

At the conclusion of the revolutions, Capt. Gregory ordered the counting of the ballots remaining, which resulted in a proof, and then a recess was taken for an hour.

THE DRAFT ON LONG ISLAND.
Names Drawn in the Second District on Monday.
SIXTH WARD.
The Second Sub-District is bounded by Court street, Fourth-place, Atlantic-street, Hamilton-avenue and the East River, and lies in what is termed South Brooklyn. 3,270 names were deposited in the wheel, of which, as stated, 457 were drawn, as follows:
Arnold, W 194 Union.
Adams, F E 13 Woodhull.
Adams, Jos 109 Sackett.
Appem, Hy 109 Sackett.
Arthur, M A 279 Court.
Ales, Hy 19 Union.
Ayne, Geo 34 Atlantic.
Arnold, W 186 Court.
Additional fifty per cent.
Arley, Thos 444 Columbia.
Avila, Jos 7 Willow.
Anderson, Ch 35 Degraw.
Ashton, J 326 Columbia.

B.
Buskell, T 312 Columbia.
Balser, J B 4 Atlantic.
Barber, J 24 Warren.
Brown, J 1 Veranda-pl.
Brugers, J 11 Beach-pl.
Boyd, H 26 Tompkin's-pl.
Barden, A J 196 Court.
Brennan, Ed 27 Carroll.
Balduf, Jno. 33 Carroll.
Bauemy, E 174 Congress.
Blanchard, H S 40 Baltic.
Brack, B 15 President.
Brown, E T 140 Union.
Butcher, T 18 Woodhull.
Brady, B 7 Carroll
Bargess, J 52 Woodhull.
Bell, G 55 Carroll.
Biddleconik, A 75 Sackett.
Benson, J 25 President.
Buckley, P 295 Hicks.
Baxter, R 419 Hicks.
Burdoe, J 155 Degraw.
Biers, A 30 Woodhull.
Billings, W D 88 2d-place.
Blake, Jas 16 Amity.
Basso, Andrew 125 Union.
Beigel, Geo 412 Hicks.
Boell, Chas P 162 Congress.
Boyle, D 335 Columbia.
Bates, A P 55 President.
Additional fifty per cent.
Bryan. Frank 27 Cheever.
Brunna, W 478 Columbia.
Butler, Chas 57 Summit.
Bottrell, A 37 Hamilton-av.
Boker, Al H 87 Summit.
Blake, P Degan cor Col'bia.
Bridge, J no 89 Union.
Boyd, Thos 19 Woodhull.
Busby, Alex 46 Carroll.
Bunnam, J 33 Congress.
Brophy, K 540 Columbia.
Barnam, G W 46 President.
Brow, Wm 18 Woodhull.

C.
Carry, Michl 547 Columbia.
Curry, Robt 10 W oodhall.
Canner, Pat 301 Hicks.
Conner, Jas 296 Hicks.
Cochran, Jno 307 Hicks.
Coyt, Wm 6 Carroll-pl.
Cochran, G A 121 Congress.
Caine, Thos 203 Union.
Coles, Robt 259 Corn.
Campbell, J 74 Pacific.
Conway, F 91 Sackett.
Cannon, J 316 Hicks.
Cars, Jas 275 Hicks.
Cokely, J no 313 Hicks.
Cronly, W Congress cor Hks.
Corry, Pat 29 Amity.
Cutler, T Henry & Third-pl.
Canfired, Jno 499 Columbia.
Child, G H 165 Amity.
Clary, Pat 397 Columbia,
Cusick, J 34 Pacific.
Cahill, P 23 Woodland.
Creamer, C 30 Van Brunt,
Combs, M 158 Atlantic.
Additional fifty per cent.
Clancy, Wm 316 Hicks.
Chadwig, Arch 5 Willow.
Coem, Stephen J 103 Union.
Cushing, H K 261 Court.
Cork, M A 354 Hicks.
Corkin, Pat'k 7 Willow.
Carr, Walter 168 Degraw.
Chace, C B 2 Verandah-pl.
Crawfield, Martin 4 Carroll.
Carlyle, Jas 340 Hicks.
Connell, Pat'k 301 Hicks.
Cappe, Jos 146 Degraw.
Coen, Andrew 1 Perry-pl.
Croker, Dewey 215 Clinton.
Costello, John 2 Pacific.
Cullan, Thos 69 Pacific.
Cannis, John 92 Hicks.
Cooke, Richd 439 Columbia.

D.
Diedrick, L ___.
Doerflunger, G 37 Columbia.
Develin, Pat 8 Rapelli.
Donwood, C 57 President.
Dalton, Jas L 577 Columbia.
Dunn, Thos 2 Pacific,
Dobson, T Jr 12 Strong-pl.
Duff, C 448 Columbia.
Disginstut, Jno 121 Degraw.
Duver, J 100 Hamilton-av.
Deghuce, J 224 Henry.
Dity, Chas 137 Sackett.
Delancy, Wm 3 Carroll.
Additional fifty per cent.
Digl, John 75 Degraw.
Downing, Wm W 11 2d-pl.
Dalton, Wm 312 Hicks.
Dixson, Jos 62 Degraw.
Dunn, Daniel 13 Congress.
Demby, John 29 Sackett.
Duffy, Jas 46 Pacific.
Devine, Jas 521 Columbia.
Doyle, Thos 236 Henry.
Dixon, J J 122 Atlantic.
Dubois, Jas 144 Court.
Durant, Wm 17 Strong-pl.
Deary, Pat'k 154 Atlantic.

E.
Emory, A 36 Summit.
Eldridge, T 5 Hamilton-av.
Eli, J B 134 Union.
Emmerson, T 58 Carroll.
Everett, W 83 Hamilton-av.
Emmerson, G E 15 2d-pl.
Additional fifty per cent.
Evers, J 63 Hamilton-av.
Endeman, J 544 Columbia.
Eagan, J 293 Hicks.
Euhis, E 212 Hicks,
Evans, S 86 Hamilton-av.
Edward, J 195 Clinton.

F.
Fay, M 334 Columbia.
Fox, P 407 Columbia.
Furlong, Thomas 21 Pacific.
Frank, H 262 Henry.
Fisher, C 37 Warren.
Fullerton, Jas 82 Atlantic.
Farley, C J 116 Pacific.
Fryer, T 230 Henry.
Foster, J E 55 Union.
Farrell, D Atlantic & Will'w.
Foze, Jno 552 Columbia.
Frabison, Wm 69 Presid't.
Ferendam, A 104 Lake.
Falconer, J Vanbrunt & Prst.
Freeman, G 97 President.
Figalus, L 78 Atlantic.
Flanly, Jno Degraw & Colm.
Forbes, T 97 President.

G.
Gallagher, Wm 49 Union.
Guiran, Jas 437 Columbia.
Gruan, Lott 105 Union.
Grenleben, Fred 206 Court.
Gilbert, Ed P 102 Carroll.
Gurney, Jno 101 Union.
Gay, Jno 265 Court.
Gruman, J B 166 Atlantic
Additional fifty per cent.
Gallaher, Hugh 314 Hicks.
German, Jno 510 Columbia.
Garst, 143 Sackett.
Gasson, Chas D 105 Amity.
Graham, Jas 57 Pacific.
Gahigan, Pat 14 Union.
Gaseno, Ed First-place.
Guffins, Geo 308 Hicks.
Gibbons, Pat 9 Woodhull.
Gammins, Tim 129 Clinton.
Govel, E 103 Amity.
Graef, A 182 Clinton.

H.
Heron, Fred G 218 Degraw.
Helfeld, Henry 194 Atlantic.
Hanly, James 295 Hicks.
Hubbard, M 28 Cheever-pl.
Harmer, E L 41 Tompkins-pl.
Hudson, Geo 101 Amity.
Hazleton, Wm 63 President,
Hill, A J 18 Cheever-place.
Hemsen, Geo 100 Degraw.
Hayes, Wm. 35 Woodhull,
Heming, F K Henry-st 4th-pl.
Hudson, Fred J 252 Henry.
Hollahan, Jno 309 Hicks.
Harrison, H 19 Woodhull.
Huey, M M 534 Columbia.
Hicks, Jas P 81 Pacific.
Helm, Emit 50 Hamilton-av
Hamilton, Henry 61 Carroll.
Henderson, Robt 16 Carroll.
Hyde, Jos.W 4 Carroll-place
Hendy, H 38 Tompkins-pl.
Ham, C 97 Union.
Haight, F 122 Congress.
Hess, G 456 Columbia.
Hennings, F 100 Congress.
Hamilton, J 17 President.
Heeny, Jno 3 Warren.
Hamilton, Alex 36 Carroll.
Hogan, Thos 7 Willow.
Hedger, Geo 71 Sackett.
Harkin, David 15 1st-place.
Hessian, M Atlantic & Henry.
Additional fifty per cent.
Hart, Jas 19 President,
Henan, Pat Colum. & Baltic.
Hinton, F 104 Degraw.
Hilyar, N 83 President.

I.
Ines, Fred 99 Warren.

J.
Jacobs, Ed 106 Hamilton-av.
Join, Math 388 Hicks.
Judge, Patk 100 Amity.
Jelendin, F P 409 Henry.
Jolly, Saml 156 Degraw.
Johnson, Oli 7 Beach-pl.
Johnson, Jos 49 Cheever-pl.
Jacobs, A W 92 W Warren.

K.
Kelly, Jno W President.
Kelly, Hugh 49 Pacific.
Kendall, Jos P 234 Henry.
Karney, Arch 226 Degraw.
Kelly, Patk 303 Hicks.
Kelly, Patk 46 Pacific.
Keyton, Thos 473 Columbia.
Kennedy, Phil 6 Union.
Knapp, Fredk 93 Congress.
Additional fifty per cent.
Kenny, J 94 Degraw.
Kilberbrought, J 63 Union.
King, D 30 Congress.
Kiler, G foot Pacific.
Kleva, J 9 Summit.
Kehre, P 94 Hamilton-av.
King, P 100 Amity.
Krewler, O F 46 Ham'on-av.

L.
Lynch, F 359 Hicks.
Lawlic, J Amity cor Col'ba.
Lyons, F 98 President.
Lockwood, G W 162 Court.
Lawrence, D 136 Sackett.
Levins, T J Goodwood Mill.
Leaman, W 436 Columbia.
Lewis, T F 395 Henry.
Lane, A 338 Hicks.
Lewis, A 16 Summit.
Latham, S P 68 Ham'ton-av.
Lowden, G W 172 Atlantic.
Lawless, J 6 Union.
Additional fifty per cent.
Long, J 74 Hamilton-av.
Long, Jno 53 Union.
Lambenon, G J 18 Summit.
Lockwood, W 61 President.
Lee, Wm 298 Hicks.
Layrne, Victor 144 Degraw.
Libby, Wm 36 First-place.
Leonhoe, Fred 181 Sackett.
Leonard, J 295 Hicks.
Lynch, J 144 Hamilton-av.

M.
McCoy, J 85 Union.
McGold, C 569 Columbia.
Morgan, J 35 Union.
McLane, T 246 Degraw.
Madden, M 113 Degraw.
Morris, S 45 Tompkins-pl.
Munson, J 10 Beach.
Martin, E 98 Degraw.
Morane, J 112 Degraw.
Mager, P 13 Congress.
McKage, J 120 Atlantic.
McGanhy, M 64 Atlantic.
McGuness, J 16 Beach-place. 
McGraw, J 3 President.
Miller, J Y 13 Woodhull.
Macklin, E 338 Columbia.
Medler, J 305 Hicks.
Moran, W Columbia & Baltic.
Murggrawf, C 104 Hamilton.
McCullock, W 130 Columbia.
Mack, Jas 28 Carroll.
McCann, H 67 Columbia.
Martin, D 48 Baltic.
Murphy, T 16 Pacific
Mullins, J 96 Degraw.
Magin, J 27 Pacific.
McDonald, A 20 Van Brunt.
Murry, J 275 Columbia.
Miland, Jno 37 Willow.
Additional fifty per cent.
Makan, Geo 74 President.
McCuIlan, M 25 Amity.
Musar, Wm 17 Warren.
Muller, O 131 Congress.
McKeon, Sam 11 Court.
Murray, Wm 96 Atlantic.
McHehry, John 64 Atlantic.
Meban, Frank, 21 Union.
McGuire,T 140 Hamilton-av.
Murphy, M 32 Amity.
Muller, John 414 Columbia.
Mulligan, A 91 Hamilton-av.
McCann, Pat 27 Union.
Mason, And 31 First-place.
Mosier, Geo 398 Hicks.
Muller, O 131 Congress.
Murray, Wm 96 Atlantic.
McGrath, M 3 President,
Matins, J W 172 Atlantic
McArthur, J 5 Cheever-pl.
Meyer, Aug 92 Sackett.
McNally, Pat 96 Degraw.

N.
Nagenborn, M 516 Columbia.
Napier, Alex D 122 Pacific
Nelson, Wm 534 Columbia.
Additional fifty per cent.
Nelson, Geo 10 President.
Nickaman, W M 13 Timkins.
Nelson, John 17 Beach-pl.
Nay, Michl 448 Columbia.

O.
Orr, Alex E 25 Tompkins-pl.
Olavily, Wm 79 Hamilt'n-av.
O'Reilly, Chas A 77 Summit.
Ogden, R C 117 Congress.
Owens, W C 505 Columbia.
Old, A P 41 Cheveer-pl.
O'Kelfy, Ed 315 Hicks.
O'Connor, Mich 312 Hicks.
Olesen, Thos 7 Beach-pl.
Additional fifty per cent.
Osborn, W H H 83 Summit.
O'Neil, Jas 29 Pacific.

P.
Powers, Mich 31 Amity.
Pracunlick, G 200 Clinton.
Paine, Wm 36 Cheever-pl.
Phillips, Alfred 324 Hicks.
Additional fifty per cent.
Peter, Henry, 68 President.
Parks. Wm H 203 Clinton.
Pickett, Ed 88 President.
Porteous, Geo F 95 Sackett.
Peters, Jno 71 Woodhull.

Q.
Quinn, J 136 Hamilton-av.
Quick, Jno 142 Sackett,

R.
Robinson, J W 65 Woodhull.
Romker, P O 17 Warren.
Redman, P 32 Carroll.
Ritierberich, F 553 Columbia.
Righter, C 253 Court.
Roseman, A 5 Summit.
Redney, J 49 Willet.
Rogers, J 391 Columbia.
Read, Wm 34 W Warren.
Additional fifty per cent.
Riley, Wm 70 President. Ross, J 42 Hamilton.
Riley, J 65 Union.
Rutledge, J 412 Hicks.
Rowe, J 82 2d-place.
Rogers, S 33 President.
Reed, J 39 Tompkins-place.
Ridley, Jno 75 Sackett.
Russell, W H Jr 123 Pacific.

S.
Spain, Hy 169 Clinton.
Simmons, S 2 Carroll.
Strable, J 16 Summit.
Scott, G 112 Harrison.
Swondery, J 87 Sackett.
Shea, M 1 President.
Shanly, P 20 Hamilton-av.
Schurpzschan. F 212 Degr'w.
Sevans, T 534 Columbia.
Sewal, C C 172 Clinton.
Satersteill, E c Hy & 3d-av.
Slatterford, A S 22 Summit.
Sheridan, J 307 Hicks.
Sullivan, S 1 Carroll.
Schneat, Hy 109 Sackett.
Sipperly, H J 26 1st-pl.
Seebern, G 61 Carroll.
Smith, T 86 Hamilton-av.
Shoemacher, G 86 Sackett.
Stevenson, C C 124 Clinton.
Smith, S 261 Sackett.
Seaber, M 48 Carroll.
Slattery, T 468 Columbia.
Spark, And 420 Columbia.
Schneider, P J 460 Columbia.
Scunca, Chas 17 Beach-pl.
Schmedt, C 130 Court.
Stanlaught, Thos 370 Hicks.
Shields, Pat 145 Pacific.
Schmandt, Sol 143 Sackett.
Sparks, Wm 334 Columbia.
Solomon, Sam 84 Degraw.
Sweetzer, Saml C 82 1st-pl.
Soyer, H C 85 2d-pl.
Scuggard, Hy 58 Union.
Smith, Chas 105 Harrison.
Secor, F M Clinton & Car'll.
Savender, J 54 President.
Shoemaker, J 104 Ham'n-av.

T.
Tulley, J Jr 103 Harrison.
Tobin, Wm 246 Clinton.
Thompson, P 21 Beach-pl.
Taylor, Ed 20 Carroll.
Thompson, D 110 Court.
Tourney, Jas 317 Hicks.
Tuckering, Wm 1 Terry-pl.
Additional fifty per cent.
Thatcher, Chas 319 Henry.
Terry, R S 42 First-place.
Towlan, Thos 577 Columbia.
Toney, A 66 Second-place.
Taylor, Jas 79 W Warren.
Trose, H H 354 Hicks.
Thomas, Ed 483 Columbia.
Turner, Wm K 176 Amity.

U.
Ulsamer, Frank 106 Union.
Udley, Jno 4 Union.
Underwood, H 152 Atlantic.

V.
Valentine, R 4 Degraw-pl.
Vanostron, Jno J 295 Henry.
Additional fifty per cent.
VanHorn, John 35 Hamilton.- av.

W.
Warren, Chas 45 First-pl.
Weightman, J 36 Carroll.
Woodbrigde, Chas 102 Amity.
Wall, Thos 401 Columbia.
Wicks, Geo 102 President.
Wilson, Thos 26 Sackett.
Williams, C 18 Beach-pl.
Walker, G 72 Degraw.
Wilcox, E A 108 Harrison.
Woodward, J Third-pl cor Henry.
Wallace, C 50 President.
Wood, E T 54 Second-pl.
Walch, Mich 91 Union.
Waldrage, Jas 13 Harrison.
Wilson, Peter 377 Columbia.
Waters, Chas 98 Baltic.
Wright, T O 48 Hicks.
White, Wm 100 Degraw.
Wood, J 129 Clinton.
Wardlow, R 52 Summit.
Walsh, W 33 President.
Williamson, J 132 Atlantic.
Williams, G 82 Carroll.
Welsh, Wm. Congress cor Columbia.
Additional fifty per cent.
Wyman, J 56 Woodhull-pl.
Whaler, W 121 Pacific.
Whitmore, R 2 Woodhull.
Whilling, W H 122 Union.
Winmaker, J 334 Columbia.
Waller, F 79 Sackett.
Welsh, D 31 Congress.
Walsh, W 104 Sackett.
Wall, J 66 Hamilton-av.
Williams, J 82 Carroll. 
Wood, J 82 Pacific. 
Warrow, E 136 Sackett.

Y.
Young, T W 237 Sackett.
Yeamans, J 43 Woodhull.
Yeaton, A 121 Pacific.
Additional fifty per cent,
Yell, T A 319 Hicks.

Alderman MURPHY, of the Sixth Ward, and Mr. SECOE, one of the celebrated firm of SECOR & Co., the Monitor and iron-clad builders, were among the conscripts. About midway in the proceedings the door of the wheel flew open and let many ballots fall upon the floor. The interruption was, however, only momentary.
The Sub-Districts heretofore have corresponded numerically with the Wards; hereafter they do not.
At 2 o'clock the afternoon session was opened, and Capt. GREGORY delegated Messrs. DEANE, TAILOR and VAN BRUNT to count the ballots for
THE SIXTH SUB-DISTRICT.
or the Seventh Ward. They announced the number to be 1,500, of which 373 are to be drawn as the quota for the District, with the 60 per cent. additional.
The first name taken was that of JAMES WARD, Atlantic-avenue and Classon. The others are herewith arranged alphabetically:

A.
Asborn, Edw, Fulton-av.
Askin, W W, Washingt'n-av.
Achback, Jacob, Myrtle-av.
Abercrombie, E, Kent-av.
Aberrcombie, R Willoughby.

B.
Brown, G N (col), Hall.
Brown, Chas, Steuben-av.
Buffalo, Jno, Van Buren.
Bostwick, S, Flushing-av.
Bodger, Chas, Dekalb-av.
Burns, Henry, Franklin-av.
Boclon, Wm, Quincy.
Bogarts, N, Bedford-av.
Brooks, C H, Lefferts-av.
Bego, Wm, Fulton-av.
Butler, M, Flushing-av.
Bloom, W A, 150 Kent-av.
Baignire, W 48 Classon-av.
Barr, Stewart, Hall.
Barman, H 46 Myrtle-av.
Buchanan, Jas, Franklin-av.
Boyce, John, Franklin-av.
Bauer, Chas A, Gates-av.
Buckhoedt, A, Bedford-av.
Bogardus, D, Park-av.
Bernhard, G K, Gates-av.
Brownell, F, Franklin-av.
Boerum, W P 95 Ryerson.
Bliff, Jas, Washington-av.
Bayley, Jno, Kent-av.
Butler, Geo, Skillman.
Brady, P, Hicks.
Brady. Wm 535 Myrtle-av.
Barrett, Sam, Gilman.
Burns, John, Grand-av.
Bremen, Myrtle-av.
Brown, H 15 Graham.
Brown, W F, Ryerson & Gates.

C.
Collum, T 507 Myrtle-av.
Cox, J B, Classon-av.
Cooper, J E 72 Ryerson.
Cahill, Chas, Kent-av.
Craig, Jno, Ryerson.
Conlin, Jno, Grand-av.
Christy, O A Classon-av.
Chaulus, Geo, Skillman.
Caulker, Thos 72 Ryerson.
Cook, J T, Leffert.
Custer, W F, Leffert.
Cotton, A W, Hall.
Cotting, Pat, Myrtle-av.
Cooper, D B, Kosciusko-av.
Cornell, Jno, Kent-av.
Carpenter, J, Lafayette-av.
Carson, J, Classon-av.
Cary, Ed, Classon-av.
Colden, Ed, Classon-av.
Courtney, R, Hamilton.
Counay, J, Skillman.
Crouch, John 88 Classon-av.
Candless, J W, Skillman.
Cornwall, R, Franklin.

D.
Drelber, Ebenezer Houston.
Deane, John Classon-av.
Dempsey, Michael Kent-av.
Davidson, J G C Kent-av.
Dugan, J G Hickory.
Daughter, Jas Myrtle-av.
Durkey, Peter Lafayette.
Delapier, Wm Kent-av.
Dolan, G 556 Myrtle-av.
Douglass, W H 42 Classon.
Doherty, Wm A Park-av.
Dolan, Mike Grand-av.
Davy, J Kent-av.
Daly, Mr Grand-av.
Deming, T 80 Kent-av.
Dunn, J Flushing-av.
Dixon, Chas Bedford-av.
Dennison, M E Kent-av.
Depraud, Mr 537 Myrtle-av.
Dinker, Jas Hickory.
Dixon, J Franklin-av.
Davenport, S F Fulton-av.

E.
Evans, W H, Fulton-av.  
Erwin, J, DeKalb-av.
Eugene, M, Myrtle-av.
Eagan, This Kent-av.
Evans, Rutt, Skillman.
Evans, Henry, Kent-av.
Evans, W H, Graham-av.
Eaton, T H 8 Graham-av.
Eagan, Rich'd, Kent-av.

F.
Fink, Jno Classon-av.
Fitch, Jno Classon-av.
Fullner, J Graham-av.
Foster, R, Grand-av.
Flood, J Van Buren.
Farley, Michael Forsyth-av.
Fuller, D C Putnam-av.
Fordham, Ed WW Class-av.
Farley, M 526 Myrtle-av.
Feely, Pat Flushing-av.
Ford, Jas _ Schenck.
Fisher, G Flushing-av.
Fisley, Thos Graham-av.
Flether, R Franklin-av.
Feeherty, Ph Franklin-av.
Fiff, Richard Park alley.

G.
Gary, G A 249 Ryerson.
Gray, F 543 Myrtle-av.
Gillan, F Franklin-av.
Grant, Jno Bedford-av.
Gillan, M Van Buren-av.
Grannis, T Franklin-av.
Greenleaf, C H Washington av.
Gibson, H Classon-av.
Greene, J 521 Myrtle-av.
Gillan, D 1 Van Brunt.
Gueuden, Jas Classon-av.
Gillan, M 1 Classon-av.
Gallup, J 3 Bedford-place.
Groun, A P 8 Classon-av.
Garrety, J Van Buren-av.
Goodell, Jerekiah, Kent-av.
Green, Wm Gates-av.

H.
Hardenburg, E Ryerson-st.
Hanks, H Jackson-av.
Hardny, C Franklin-av.
Huester, W E Franklin-av.
Hust, W De Kalb-av.
Handy, Pat Grand-av.
Hopkins, This Kent-av.
Hamilton, J Steuben-av.
Hisley, Wm Skillman-st.
Hammond, A Putnam-av.
Hussel, H Myrtle-av.
Haddock, H W av.
Hughes, F J Ryerson-st.
Hugeman, H 8 Fulton-av.
Hance, M R Flushing-av.
Hanlon, I Franklin-av.
Hubert, W 51 Ryerson.
Heathcock, J Ryerson-st.
Hineson, E L Franklin-av.
Harting, O 49 Ryerson-st.
Hollister, G Washington-av.
Howhand, M Classon-av.
Heany, J Flushing-av.
Hart, F A Classon-av.
Hobday, John 520 Myrtle-av.

I.
Iganbrolare, W Hickory-st.
Ibbottson, M Fulton-av.

J.
Jeffries, John, Skillman-st.
John, Thos Franklin-av.
Jordan, Pat 12 Greene-av.
Jones, T, Paul & Gates-av.
Johnson, J M, Classon, av.
Jones, J (col), Kent-av.
Johnson, John, Franklin-av.
Jones, A C, DeKalb-av.
Johnson, W 534 Myrtle-av.
James, R 222 Myrtle-av.
Johnson, J, Gates-av.
Jost, C, Kent-av.

K.
Kean, John, Franklin-av.
Ketchum, J W, Franklin-av.
Knowle, H, Fulton-av.
Kaiser, H Y, Skillman-st.
Kethler, Chas 10 Kent-av.
Kute, T, Lafayette-av.
Kork, John, Franklin-av.
Keefel, A H, Bedford-av.
Kenney, Daniel, Classon-av.

L.
Logans, E E, Bedford-av.
Lyons, J J, Franklin-av.
Lane, P, Classon-av.
Langdon, Chas, Kent-av.
Leahey, C H, Ryerson-st.
Lonegager, M R, Franklin-av.
Lambkin, H Y, Classon-av.
Larkin, O, Flushing-av.
Little, Wm A, Myrtle-av.
Lyman, Jas, Classon-av.
Loper, C M, Franklin-av.
Layton, Jas, Hemler-st.
Leach, P, Graham-av.

M.
Munsing, J O Flushing-av.
Miller, J L 158 Ryerson.
Martin, P, 54 Classon-av.
Max, J Myrtle-av.
McClosky, J Franklin-av.
McNeif, Jose Flushing-av.
Mason, Wm Myrtle-av.
McGorgan, Pat Classon-av.
McIntire, A Franklin-av.
Mekan, Geo Franklin-av.
Millen, Jno Flushing-av.
Mullen, Jno Graham-av.
McClafin, R Franklin-av.
Maho, F Myrtle-av.
McPhullis, E 508 Myrtle-av.
Muller, Jno Classon-av.
Mcguire, Jas, Graham-av.
Murray, M, Fulton-av.
Miller, J H, Franklin-av.
McAffrey, M, Hunter.
Max, H, Downing.
McHear, F, Myrtle-av.
McDermott, M, Franklin-av.
McCaffray, M, Franklin-av.
May, Wm 617 Myrtle-av.
Mullen, J Schenck.
Mulligan, Pat Franklin-av.
Mooney, Pat Classon-av.
Miller, Henry Fulton-av.
Malay, R Kent-av.
McGillen, B Kent-av.
Mitchell, Henry Kent-av.
Marton, D J Franklin-av.
Mulligan, J Putnam-av.
Mack, S E Skillman.
Magruder, Pat Flushing-av.
Mahar, P Grand-av.
McPhail, M F Ryerson.
Milligan, Jno, Park-av.
Maxhaud, J H , Fulton-av.
McGovern, B, Kent-av.
Mullon, J, Bedford-av.
McPhillip, J 558 Myrtle-av.
Menden, T, Skillman.
McIntire, Jas, Park-av.
Maloney, Jno, Classon-av.
May, Wm 250 Myrtle-av.

N.
Nottzill, Abm, Myrtle-av.
Newber, J H, Kent & Park.
Neuman, Pat, Hunter.
Neefus, W C, Franklin-av.
Newland, M, Classon.
Neal, J, Franklin-av.

O.
Owens, D, Myrtle-av.
O'Neal, J, Gates-av.
O'Brien, Thos 45 Classon-av.
O'Neal, Pat, Schenck.
Osborn, E H, Skillman.
Oakley, W F, Washington-av.
Oliff, J H, Hall.

P.
Phalon, M Franklin-av.
Phatom, S jr Kent-av.
Parker, Jas Madison-av.
Phisley, J Myrtle-av.
Phillips, S C Myrtle-av.
Powers, Jas Capt 42d Precint, Van Buren.

Q.
Quercan, A Hall.
Quinn, Jas Grand-av.
Quinn, Pat Steuben-av.
Platt, Jessie 560 Myrtle-av.
Packard, J B Franklin-av.
Price, G Gates-av.
Porter, Ray'd Franklin-av.
Penning, H 13 Myrtle-av.
Phillips, J Orman-place.
Predley, W A Hunter.

R.
Renney, M J Franklin-av.
Roltm, J Madison-av.
Rhodes, Jno H Madison-av.
Richly, Thos Classon-av.
Rayns, Frank Hunter.
Richbardt, Pat Flushing-av.
Rayns, Jno L De Kalb-av.
Robb, R 612 Fulton-av.
Rayner, N 46 Ryerson.
Rennelt, Jas Kent-av.
Richards, Chas Graham-av.
Rooney, J Lafayette-av.
Richards, W J 142 Ryerson.
Rolut, John Lefferts.
Riley, C Kent-av.
Ricks, Saml Putnam-av.
Rayns, Chas 143 Classon-av.
Rowland, W Skillman.
Robinson, C B Classon-av.
Royus, Pat Lefferts.
Russell, Wm Little Nassau.

S.
Shay, Dan 558 Myrtle-av.
St George, C R Hall and Gates-av.
Simmes, J H Grand av.
Salire, G — Kent-av.
Selden, Jno — Kent-av.
Sears, Edw — Atlantic.
Stillwell, Jas — Donnelly.
Smith, Jas — Park-av.
Smith, Jno 9 Greene-av.
Smith, Benj. Franklin-av.
Savage, H, DeKalb-av.
Sanford, J H. Grand-av.
Switzer, N, (poI'e) Myrtle-av.
Sparkman, Jno, Kent-av.
Scrubb, Eagan, Franklin.
Stwart, D S, Kent-av.
Spencer, G, Putnam-av.
Sidell, C, Classon-av.
Shannahan, J C DeKalb-av.
Stigel, A J 537 Myrtle-av.
Sullivan, G, Myrtle-av.
Smith, D, Franklin-av.
Sultar, E, DeKalb-av.
Sunners, J 28 Franklin-av.
Solder, Tho A — Hunter.
Simpson, S S — Kent-av.
Smith, Geo, — Willoughby.
Shacker, G N Kent & Myrtle.
Swift, Jos M House.
Stephenson, J — Quincy.
Stytwason, P — Fulton-av.
Steers, T C — Fulton-av.
Slattery, D 533 Kent-av.
Smith, W, Kent-av.
Solwer, E B, Bedford-av.
Stackhaus, G, Willoughby.

T.
Tuikwater, J, Myrtle-av.
Taylor, Jas F, Skillman.
Tracy, Dwight, Grand-av.
Thomas, J C, Willoughby.
Thayer, Nathan, Grand-av.
Townsend, W H 112 Ryerson.
Tucker, C, Hickory.
Taylor, J W 543 Myrtle-av.
Tilfoil, M, Flushing-av
Titus, C A, Gates-av.

U.
Urton, John, Classon-av.
Underhill, R 154 Ryerson.

V.
Van Wagner, F, Fulton-av.
Van Benshotten, Jas 546 Myrtle-av.
Voorhies, Jud'h B Grand-av.
Van Tassel, W H 45 Ryer'n.
Van Zaandt, C, col Kent-av.
Van Sliicken, C, Franklin.

W.
Webber, W 112 Graham-av.
Wiggins, Jos, Classson-av.
Widden, Jno, Grand-av.
Ward, J, Atlantic & Classon.
Williams, Chas 89 Hunter.
Woolsey, W B,Washin'n-av.
Whitney, H, Classon-av.
Webb, F 554 Myrtle-av.
Wickes, G J, Lefferts.
Woodnith, S, Fulton-av.
Woodville, W Flushing-av.
Wood, J Willoughby-av.
Wilber, E Franklin-av.
Wilson, A 8 Classon-av.
Wilkenson, F, Fulton-av.
Whitaker, O, Jefferson-av.
Wallis, R Jr, Franklin-av.
Wright, Theo Putnam-av.
Water, Geo, Kent-av.
Wheelin, B Jr, Washi'n-av.
Wilson, W B, Washin'n-av.
Welch, Jno, Ryerson.
Wright, Jno, Classon-av.
Winslow, David, Myrtle-av.
Westhover, H, Willoughby.
Watkins, J, Classon-av.
Willing, J Classon-av.
Wade, F M Gates-av.

Y.
Yulee, H Park-av.

With this was concluded the drafting for the day.
The Third Sub-District is bounded by Flatbush-avenue, the city line of Brooklyn, Third-avenue, First-street, Gowanus Canal and the shore of the river as far as the New-Utrecht line, and the Special Committee chosen to count and examine the ballots was composed of Alderman TALLMADGE, Supervisor McGrath and Messrs. SHEBMAN and DANIELS; the arrangement being that an Alderman and Supervisor of each Ward should be present to perform such duty. 909 ballots were put in the wheel, 133 to be drawn.

A.
Antrobus, T 14th & 7th-av.
Agnew, A 4th-av bt 9th & l0th
Additional fifty per cent.
Aimlige, Isaac 21 17th.

B.
Brown, J c Degraw & 8th-av.
Bennington, C D 15th & 6th-a.
Broer, B H c 14th and 3d-av.
Baker, Wm 16th near 3d-av.
Brown, G Jr Maryland & 4 a.
Blanmon, S 24th and 5th-av.
Brittan, G 4th bt 15th & 16th.
Briggs, S 13th and 4th-av.
Brown, J A 7th-av and 13th.
Bogart, M 13th and 6th-av.
Burns, H 17th and 5th-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Brinck, T 5th and 6th-st.
Banton, Wm 16th nr 6th-av.
Brown, J 16th c 7th-av.
Blegough, J 20th bt 3 & 4 av.
Blair, H 7th-av and 16th

C.
Coopy, Geo 27th near 4th-av.
Caspin, G 5th-av near 21st.
Cowly, W 3d-av b 26th & 27th.
Callaghan, W 3d-av b 24 & 25th.
Cook, J 19th b 5th & 6th avs.
Crews, A 23d b 6th & 6th av.
Cassidy, T 6th-av and 16th.
Additional fifty per cent.
Cornell, J 20th b 5th & 6th av.
Crawford, T 12th &5th-av.
Cummings, H 9th and 2d.
Colyers, M 20th b 4th & 5th-av.
Crough, Thos 3d-av.
Chisun, W 15th w 5th-av.
Cooper, H 5th-av and 1st

D.
Drew, Jas 40 8th.
Doyle, Jas 20th between 4th and 5th av.
Doyle, Thos 5th-av. and 22d.
Additional fifty per cent.
Dillyer, Chas 44th & 5th-av.

E.
Additional fifty per cent.
Evans, John (col) between 3d-av and river.

F.
Faulkner, W b 14th & 4th-av.
Fretor, Jos 3d-av and 17th.
Fetterby, J 21st b 8d &4th av.
Flours,W H 17th b 3d & 4th-a.
Fetdey, H 19th b 5th & 9th av.
Firth, W 13 b 4th & 5th avs.
Additional fifty per cent.
Fisher, A 16th n'r C I road.
Farrell, J 21st between 5th
Flagran, T c'r 5th-av & 23d. and 6th avs.

G.
Gisburne, J 10th and 2d av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Goodwin, S S Warren n 6-av.
Guahenn, H 92 9th.
Gisburn, T 9th-av and 10th.
Gluc, C 22d and 4th-av.

H.
Holdish, S 20th near 3d-av.
Heggman, R 2lst between 5th and 6th avs.
Hedges, M 2d-av and 8th.
Harris, H 15th and 2d-av.
Hunter, H Middle & 3d avs.
Haight, J H 11th and 3d-av.
Hart, J 15th near 6th-av.
Holton, E 16th between 3d and 4th avs.
Additional fifty per cent.
Hewett, H 11th between 5th
Hochstader, R 18th and 6th and 6th avs. av.
Hildrand, L 21st between 3d and 4th avs.  
Hornet, T betwen 2d-av and river.

J.
James, Jack, 5th-av & 12th.

K.
Kruse, P 15th near 5th-av.
Kingon, J 15th and 3d-av.
Kennington, J 17th c 9th-av.
Kane, M J 23d near 5th-av.
Knox, J W 13th between 6th and 7th avs.
Kramer, P 5th-av near 14th.

L.
Lambden, J 17th nr 4th-av.
Luren, H 12th near 5th-av.
Linderen, C P 18th between 5th and 6th avs.
Lumis, G cor 21st & 5th-av.
Leween, H 17th near 5th-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Lampus, M 22d and 5th-av.

M.
McGuire, Jas 3d-av and 21st.
Murry, P 18th between 3d and 4th avs,
Molt, Isaac Middle and 3d-av.
McCarty, Den 3d-av & 19th.
Minton, Robt 106 9th.
McGrath, Jas 20th between 4th and 5th avs.
Mooney, Jas 3d-av between 26th and 27th.
McReddy, A 21st between 5th and 6th avs.
Mauiene, T 21st and 4th-av.
McGovian, 19th, between 6th and 6th avs.
Mills, Geo 10th corner 3d-av.
McMulhn, Jno cor 20th and 3d-av.
McDermott, D 5th av S 14th.
McDonald M 14th E 6th-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Micchel, C 40th bet 5th-av & river.
May, Chas 12th and 5th-av.
Merritt, Tim 20th bet 4th & 5th avs.
Maxwell, Jas A 23d & 5th-av.

O.
O'Neil, Jno B 23d & 5th-av.
O'Brien, M 15th b 3d & 4th av.
Additional fifty per cent.
O'Connor, H 22d b 5th and 6th avs.

P.
Pierce, P L 4th-av and 13th.
Palfie, Ed corner 6th-av.

Q.
Quib, Luis 14 6th-av.

R.
Ruley, J 19th b 4th & 5th avs.
Ronandtry, O 5th-av c 16th.
Raymond, F 10th b 6th and 7th avs.
Ray, Robt 42 17th.
Ritch, Wm H 17th & 9th-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Reife, Henry 3d-av nr 28th.
Rizzi, Jos 30th and 5th-av.

S.
Scheiver, H 14th E 5th-av.
Sysed, W 24th b 4th & 5th av.
Shields, W 26th b 4th & 5th a.
Southern, E 4th-av b 17th &
Staats, E M 17th nr 6th-av. 18th.
Spinger, F 19th and 4th-av.
Spundin, J 21st and 5th av.
Sutton, W H 5th-av & Ber'n.
Silvermah, H 3d-av c 19th.
Shields, T 21st and 5th-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Shultz, V T. 13th b 1st & 2d avs.
Senet, T c 21st and 5th av.

T.
Thompson, R 18th near 4th-av.
Additional fifty per cent,
Trendale, F 18th and 6th-av.
Travers, J H 18th and 4th-av.
Taylor, John 17 14th.
Travers, D K Middah, n 0th-av.

W.
Williams, Dorsey 78 15th.
Wilson, J cor 14th & 7th-av.
Wayland, V 5th-av, between 19th and 20th.
Wilbar, D 17th and 8th-av.
Williams, D C 5th-av, b 19 & 20.
Additional fifty per cent.
Williams, W H 3d-av & Mid.
Williams, Henry 102 9th.

Y.
Yorks, Abn 18th, near 4th-av.

NINTH WARD.
The Fourth Sub-District is bounded by the city line, Flatbush-avenue, Flushing-avenue, Broadway, Nostrand-street, De Kalb-avenue, Atlantic-street and Bedford-avenue. A recess of an hour having been enjoyed, this final section of the day's draft was taken up about 3 P. M., and Alderman TIERNAN and Supervisor HERMANN proceeded to examine and count the ballots, which they announced to be 2,600 in number to be deposited in the wheel, whereof 376 were to be drawn. The drawing then proceeded.

A.
Anderson, F Troy n Atlantic.
Allen, G Bergen and Grand-av.
Armstrong, G Gates-av near Stuyvesant.
Alexander, G, Spencer and Utica-av.
Ackerty, J Wickoff near Flushing-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Allen, J F Bergen n Clasen.
Amos, J Myrtle near Lewis-av.
Archer, T J Hopkins n Car.

B.
Bournay, R Wash'n-av n Dg.
Bannor, T 6th-av between Flatbush and Atlantic.
Babcock, R Marcy nr Myrtle.
Baxter, H, 9 Delmonico-pl.
Bingel, Fred 87 Atlantic.
Brinckman, Classon-av and Pacific.
Boyle, P Underhill-av n B'n.
Brown, A Bergen & W'n-av.
Brown, L R Fulton n Bedf'd.
Blewchard, A E,586 Pacific.
Brown, J E Willoughby and Sandford.
Barnes, Thos 777 Myrtle-av.
Bealey, D S Spencer and Park-av.
Barnold, R Dean & Hunterfly.
Brogan, N Begen & Grand-av.
Bohern, F Berg'n & Carl'n av.
Billey, I W Putnam n Bedf'd.
Blanchard, H W 584 Pacific.
Brinklehoff, J Bedf'd n W'y.
Banard, J J Carlton-av and Warren.
Boyle, J W Atlantic-av.
Butler, J Marcy-av and Lafayette.
Additional fifty per cent.
Binnhardt, H Walworth & Flushing avs.
Bedell, J Myrtle, n'r Lewis.
Baer, J Bowery, n'r Plk r'd.
Bishop, T Myrtle & Yates avs.

C.
Chunt, Bergen & Concklyn.
Corruthuf, W Marcey near Wilboughby.
Carrie, J H Spencer near Park av.
Crane, U A Bedford & Marcey avs.
Cathcond, G Butler near Hudson-av.
Clark, C Bedford & Clark av.
Calvert, J Atlantic & Grand avs.
Cavanah, T Yates & Fulton avs.
Crouden, M Walworth & Myrtle av.
Bergen, W K road near Quincey.
Bavand, A 72 Bedford-av.
Brown, H DeKalb & Marcy avs.
Casey, P Curren n'r Butler.
Campbell, T A Dean & Piersall.
Costovie, M Nostram & Willoughby.
Carn, T Butler & Franklinav.
Carle, J Pacific & Grand-av.
Cole, F 773 Myrtle-av.
Curran, T Warren, near Washington-av.
Cunningham, P Lundy's lane.
Chamberlain, G H Nostram & Koskiosko.
Additional fifty per cent.
Clyner, L C, Myrtle near Clark.
Canfield, G, Walworth near Yates-av.
Cevon, S H, Wikoff near New-York-av.
Craven, W, Grand-av near Dean.
Corngen, J, Baltic n Madison.
Conn, J Vanderbilt-av and Bergen.
Clark, R, Walworth near De Kalb.
Caunthers, H, Lafayette and Bedford.
Chappell, A, Pacific near Brooklyn.
Canfied, J, Walworth and Myrtle-av.
Clark, Jas J, 397 Deane.
Campling, T, Bergen near D. Clarkson.
Degnan, P, Warren near Washington-av.
Donahue, T, Warren and Underhill.
Dahl, J, B'wac cor Hopkins.
Dunlwvy, P, Myrtle-av and Walworth.
Dugan, P, Nostrand and Willoughby.
Donnelly, A, Pacific and Grand-av.
Davis, A B, Myrtle-av and Throop.
Danm, P, McDougal and Saratoga-av.
Dickenson, H, N. Y. av.
Decker, R S, Bedford-av & Jefferson.
Downey, J, Bergen and Carlton-av.
Daly, J, Flushing-av corner Mosher.
Additional fifty per cent.
Doetler, L, Nostrand near Hart.
Davenport, G, Washington and Pacific.
Demarest, A A 524 Pacific.
Dowdall, M, Myrtle-av and Walworth.
Dugale J, DeKalb n Marcy.

E.
Eldrige, J, Lewis near Myrtle-av.
Eavers, J, Dean n Unde'l-av.
Etland, J 87 Atlantic-av.
Emilstone, G, Hancock and Sackett.
Emory, H, Buffalo near Howard.
Additional fifty per cent.
Ehlers, Henry, Lafayette and Marcy.

F.
Fagin, M, Walworth near Myrtle-av.
Falgansing, Fred, Fulton and Hanover-av.
Ferber, C, Buffalo n Sackett.
Finnegan, Andrew, Atlantic and Vanderbilt.
Foddy, H, Broadway near Fulton.
Fellin, C M 769 Myrtle-av.
Fanell, Pat, Warren and Underhill-av.
Folen, Israel 35 Atlantic-av.
Fanning, C, Myrtle and Yates avs.
Fanell,W, Baltic.
Foulton, J, Lafayette and Mersey.
Ford, Ed, Butler and Classen avs.
Figins, Jno, near bone factory.
Finck, D, Yates near Lewis avenue.
Additional fifty per cent.
Finnan, J, Grand-av and Pacific.
Fletcher, R, Myrtle n Navy.
Finnegan, J, Herk'r n Bk'lyn.
Falkwin, J J, Degraw and Flatbush avs.
Forsyth, R, Herk'r n Sch'ty.
Flachmier, C, Bedford and Myrtle avs.
French, Thos, Clove Roads.

G.
Grace, P, Bergen and Coulter avs.
Gillmore, G Putnam Tompkins.
Gable, F McDougal and Sa­ratoga.
Gillispie, M Spencer.
Goodlip, E T Bedford and Madison.
Granger, Koskiusko & Sandford.
Garretty, T Lewis near Lafayette.
Green, J, Grand-av, near Bergen.
Greenman, J B Quincy and Bedford.
Goetz, G Spencer & Maple.
Geules, L De Kalb and Lott's-lane.
Gletsch, H McD and Hop's.
Griffes, J cor Washington & Pacific.
Additional fifty per cent.
Greenland, F Thorp near DeKalb.
Gibbs, J Marcy & Hickory.
Glennon, T Myrtle & Spencer.
Golbert, W Bedford and Flushing.
Glassy, G Bergen & Deane.
Gieb, J D McDougal and Utica.
Gallagher, W Washington and Saratoga.

H.
Harvey, Daniel 745 Pacific.
Hubbels, Henry 420 Deane.
Hickcocks, T W Park-pl & Vanderbilt-av.
Halpin, L cor Fulton and Beekman.
Hernoving, L Fulton and Buffalo.
Heally, Thos 182 Flatbush.
Hoffman, Herkimer & Bedford.
Hale, H DeKalb near Nostrand-av.
Harvey, C Underhill-av. and Bergen.
Hoffman, Fred 769 Myrtle.
Hack, P Flushing & Del'co.
Hella, Wm Hopkins and car stls.
Hefner, G Sandford and Myrtle.
Harland, E Spencer and Myrtle.
Happell, J J 20 Flushing.
Howland, P Sandford and Myrtle.
Hill, F Walworth and Myrtle avs.
Harrington, T Butler near Classon-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Henderson, J Sanford and Willoughby.
Hogan, R Tompkins-av and Hickory.
Havejlcott, Ed Wyckoff and Nostrand.avs.
Hubbard, Ed Chancy near Stuyvesant.
Henenk, Jor Sumter and Hopkins.
Hesler, Andrew Haskimer.

J.
Juncker, H Spencer near Park-av. 
Jackson, D H DeKalb near Marcy-av.
Johnson, H Pacific nr Troy.
Johnson, H Pacific nr Troy.
Additional fifty per cent.
Jeefs, W Spencer and Myrtle-avs.
James, D Myrtle and Throop.

K.
Kelly, J Wash-ay n Brittan.
Kinster, C Myrtle & Del pl.
Kneble, F DeKalb and Nostrand av.
Kneble, H Myrtle-av & Wal.
Keegan, C Classon nr Frank.
Keenan, M Pacific near Grand-av.
Kelly, T Bergen & Grand-av.
Kelly, F Baltic-av.
Keenan, T Spencer and Flatbush-av.
Keenan, J Carroll and Flatbush-av.
Keenan, J F Dean n Und-av.
Kenmar, J Marion n Ralph.
Kissman, D S Atln Vand-av.
Koeler, Val on railroad.
Additional fifty per cent.
Knoll, J A Sumter & Howard.
Kenevel, C Walworth & Park.
Kniff, G T 406 Pacific.
Keller, G Sumter & Saratoga.
Kidder, J G Nostrand & Doug.
Kelly, Chas Pacific & Washtn.
Kerne, P Walworth & Park av.
Kelly, Mich Atlantic av.
Kneman, P Myrtle & Spencer.
Kelly, M Chauncey & Patchen.

L.
Limburgh, J Grand av.
Lee, D Deane & Charlton av.
Lyng, C S Bedford n M'y av.
Lyon, C B Hopkins & Del pl.
Lutz, W Spencer & Myrtle av.
Lynch, J Coriton av & Wi'koff.
Lawrence, T Myrtle & Wal'h.

M.
Meyer, J Marion n Patchen.
Merthewmem, W Lafy'te n B.
Many, Wm 247 Atlantic av.
Morton, J Fulton n Troy av.
Munson, Wm L 578 Pacific.
McCully, W L Myrtle at n M.
Meigis, Cbas H, N Y av.
Miller, W Pacific n Fr'kln av.
McLaughlin, Jas 781 Pacific.
McDonald, Jno 23 Atlantic.
Murphy, P Wyckoff n Vanerbilt.
Marshall, W Douglas near Albany.
McGuigan, P Spencer & P'k.
McLoughlin, L Dean and Underhill.
Miller, C Myrtle n Marcy av.
Moran, Thos 789 Pacific.
Matthewman, J Lafayette n B av.
McKy, S Deane & Carlton av.
McDonald, T Deane & Carlton av.
Mumby, C DeKalb & Walworth.
Motts, S Jamaica Road.
Millem, M Hopkins and Delmonico-place.
Malvy, M Park-av. and Spencer.
McGuire, J Pacific and Washington.
Murdock, E Brown & Perry.
McCarty, T Washington and Classon.
McLoughlin, T Pacific and Grand.
Mehan, C David n Vander't.
Murdock, E Croin and Perry.
Mehan, L Bergen andWashington-av.
Middleton, S Herkimer and Rochester.
Mayhew, J Pacific and Washington-av.
Murray, H Dean and Vanderbilt-av.
Mathews, W Grand and Atlantic.
McLoughlin, Thos Dean and Washington -av.
Morhman, F Fulton & Troy.
Murphy, G Vanderbilt-av.
McLoughlin, E Spencer.
Manger, P Bergen and Carlton-av.
McLaughlin, J Dean and Vanderbilt-av.
Martin, M Dean and Vanderbilt-av.
McGee, M Nortrand near Myrtle-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Murphy, W Park-av and Spencer.     
Morton, C Marion near Patchen-av.  
Merritt, E 257 Atlantic-av.
McWene, W  Madison and Nostrand avs.
McNulty, B Pacific and Grand-av.
Maherdy, E Bergen and Underhill-av.
Martin, J Washington-av and President.
McGrath, A Washington-av.
Moon, J Bergen and Grand-av.
Miller, M L'plin near Patchen-av.
McLaughlin, L 781 Pacific.
Moran, J 789 Pacific.
Mahon, T Myrtle-av.
McKeen, J Gates-av near Stuyvesant-av.
Matthews, T Green near Patchen-av.
Madden, J jr Myrtle and Washington avs.
Matthew, W Warren near Washington-av.
McLue, W Warren near Washington-av.
Martin, A Butler & Clas'n-av.
McMonegan, J Bedford-av near Flushing av.

N.
Narizso, L Halsey near Reed av.
Neiland, H Vanderbilt and Atlantic avs.
Newman, F jr Quincey and 11th avs.
Neiflat, P Bedford and Flushing avs.
Additional fifty per cent.
Nolan, P Dean and Underhill-av.
Nathem, E Marion near Reed-av.

O.
Oneil, W Grand av and Pacific.
Outer, J Hopkins near Flute-av.
Otteburgh, W Pacific near Vanderbilt.
O'Brien, R 207 Atlantic-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Osborne, G Walworth and Myrtle-av.
Owens, E 247 Atlantic-av.
Olman, J Sumter near Ralph-av.
O'Connell, J Dean and Carlton-av.
Oliver, J H Myrtle and Tompkins avs.
O'Neil, P Myrtle and Walworth avs.
Ogden, F Willoughby and Yates-av.

P.
Parks, P 11 Delmonico-pl.
Plunkett, M Class'n n Paci'c.
Palmer,W H DeK'b &Thom.
Paquet, S T Berg & Vanlt-av.
Pele, C Spencer & Myrt-av.
Peman, J (cd) Dean n Ut'a-av.
Additional fifty per cent.
Phelps, Rich DeKalb-av.
Perry, Wm Quincy.
Parmell, C Bedford n Park.

Q.
Quimmerman, Chas Myrtle-av.

R.
Rogers, J Grand-av & Paci'c.
Roach, K Hopkins n Flushing-av.
Rossnthaf, A Gates & Lewis.
Rayel, A Clove Road.
Ran, A Myrtle c Walworth.
Richardson, C G Herkimer near Brooklyn.
Rendev, M Dean & Bergen.
Robinson, J L 6 Sanford.
Rolfe, G P 382 Dean.
Reddig, J W Fulton-av.
Russell, W H My'tle & Wal'h.
Rappella, C DeKalb-av.
Reynold, M J 83 Atlantic-av.
Riley, P Grand-av & Pacific.
Roach, R Van Buren.
Riley, A 409 Dean.
Reonbueker, L Hopkins & Delaware.
Additional fifty per cent.
Remny, J Middle Warren.
Ryans, Dan Dean.
Read, R J Monroe n Patchen.
Rictzer,W Nostrand & Hart.

S.
Smith, W H Quincy nr Marcy.
Schwarz, J cor Green-av & By.
Sayers, J Tompkins nr mrtle.
Sieb, J Myrtle-av & Marcy.
Stein, Geo Yates-av nr Read.
Stancliff, E Hanck nr Rlph-av.
Schaffer, P Sumter nr Hwrd.
Southwell, G Lafayte nr Bdfd.
Spies, Jno 775 Myrtle-av.
Starl, M DeKalb nr Mrcy-av.
Slimmers, S Bdfrd-av nr Jfn.
Stockhalt, J Classon nr Sckt.
Shubart, A McDougl nr Rlph.
Southard, O Atlantic-av.
Smith, Flushing-av & Del pl.
Seib, Phil Myrtle & Marcy-av.
Spier, W J 209 Alantic.
Sheeld, Ed Myrtle-av & W't.
Smith, R K Atlantic & Vanbt.
Stumps, G Myrtle nr Marcy.
Sullivan, C Washington-av.
Sprouls, D Bedford & 1st-av.
Stearns, C Carlton & Warren.
Simpson, T Spencer & Pk-av.
Syves, G Spencer & Park-av.
Shanan, P Spencer n P'k-av.
Shinger, F Park-av & Wil'by.
Sales, J Clove rd nr Sackett.
Slaten, J E Hopkins n Steub'n.
Additional fifty per cent.
Shehan, T Western & DeKalb.
Schlay, C Myrtle & Walw'rth.
Smith, T H DeK'b & Marcy-av.
Spier, T Plank rd n Warren.
Slokam, Jos 373 Myrtle-av.
Schmidt, F DeK'b n Western.

T.
Titus, A J, Warren n Huds'n.
Tome, Ed, Kos'ko and Tomkins.
Truslo, J, Pacific c Clove R.
Tomkins, Nich, Warren and Underhill.
Toslevim, T C, Delmonico-p.
Turner, R A, Dean & B'n-a.
Teivney, Geo, B Myrtle and Tompkins.
Thrush, H, Tompkins and Koscosko.
Additional fifty per cent.
Trabold, T, car stables.
Taffy, P. Atlantic and Vanderbilt ave.
Tweble, Am, Koseosko.

U.
Underhill, Jas E, Bedford and Park avs.
Underhill, Jas E, Yates n Norstrand.
Underhill, S A, Ed & Pk avs.
Additional fifty per cent.
Ulsusted, Ed, Ellery n Marcey.

V.
Vananwert, L, 4 14th.
Vincent, T, Wal'th & Pk avs.
Additional fifty per cent.
Volkening, G, DeKalb-a & S.
Victor, C, Underhill & Ber.

W.
Wallis, Thos 771 Pacific.
Wheeler, E M Bergen near Carlton.
Wood, Wm 775 Pacific.
Waldwin, S Spencer near Myrtle.
Weeks, 1 c Pacific & Claremont-av.
Wright, J P Putnam & Bedford-av.
Winslow, S Wykoff & Franklin.
Whiteneck, W 230 Atlantic-av.
Wardell, A W Van Bourn.
Additional fifty per cent.
Wobtcken, W Myrtle-av & Walworth.
Wyllis, G Bedford n Jeff'son.
Wright, H Spencer & Flushing av.
Williams, Chas Baltic.
Walgrim, S Pacific near Greenwich-av.
Willwin, G Wykoff & Vanderbilt.

Y.
Yates and Bedford.
Additional fifty per cent.
Young, W H Willoughby-av and Yates.

The drafting was quietly and pleasantly concluded between 5 and 6 o'clock, and the throng dispersed as though nothing whatever had happened out of the usual tenor of daily life. The Marshal took occasion to congratulate all present upon this agreeable result. Lieut. BARGER, of Provost-Marshal Nugent's Staff, was present on behalf of his superior officers, all day, and has the thanks of the Press for his attention to their comfort. Several of the Metropolitan force were likewise especially obliging, and deserve mention. The draft recommenced at 9 o'clock yesterday morning.

The Second District Continued.
The conscription in the Second Congressional District was resumed yesterday morning at the office of the Provost-Marshal, No. 26 Grand street, Williamsburgh, for the drafting of the quota of 1,027 men from the Tenth, Twelfth and Fourteenth Wards of Brooklyn. The several quotas were:
Tenth Ward quota, 321, 50 per cent., 161—482
Twelfth Ward quota, 137, 50 per cent., 66—202
Fourteenth Ward quota, 228, 50 per ct., 114—342—l,027
The crowd present was not large, and seemed composed mainly of workingmen, sober and orderly in their demeanor, and in some instances evincing considerable anxiety as to the proceedings of the day. A force similar to that of the day previous, of both military and police, were near at hand to quell any disturbance which might have arisen, but a display of power was avoided by the authorities.
The Tenth Ward Fifth Sub-District stood first to be drawn. A Committee was chosen to count the ballots before placing them in the wheel, consisting of Alderman Nodyne, Supervisor HAZARD, Ex-Assemblyman THOMAS, Mr. S. FROST and Ex-Alderman Hinman. The count having proven correct, and this fact announced by Alderman Nodyne, the draft proceeded in the usual manner.
The following are the persons drafted:
A.
Ayers, Jas 25 Hoyt.
Arkens, W 195 Pacific.
Adoff, E 117 Livingston.
Avers, G 25 Hoyt.
Aligew, W 33 Butler.
Albrecht, G F 175 Smith.
Allen, J 103 Warren.
Abell, C 12 Boerum.

B.
Bennett, N H 291 State.
Birke, D 95 Powers.
Birdsall, J 385 Pacific.
Briggs, Miles 251 Dean.
Brascine, P A177 Livings'n.
Burns, R 19 Dean.
Barber, S 55 Dean.
Brojan, W 91 Douglas.
Barrett, E 134 Butler.
Baldwin, S 4th-av. & Pacific.
Bromley, S 95 2d-place.
Bolton, H D Hoyt n Douglas.
Brown, P S 64 Hoyt.
Bowman, C 153 Court.
Byers, J 66 Warren.
Ben, J 80 Dean.
Balmanus, A 33 Butler.
Burns, T 169 Smith.
Brown, G S 191 Court.
Brown, W (col) 181 Pacific.
Berbridge, T 111 Court.
Barry, F cor State & Smith.
Butcher, G Schermer'n, near Bond.
Berfield, H18 Schermer'n.
Blair, P 310 Atlantic.
Bliss, W W 325 Sackett.
Baxter, G 192 Fulton-av.
Beard, O T 228 Dean.
Blameman, L 157 Smith.
Bayre, T 121 Court.
Burke, T 88 Bond.
Briggs, E 266 Dean.
Bayer, F 121 Court.
Bright, R 335 Atlantic.
Bender, S 205 Court.
Barnakel, M 95 Wyckoff.
Bowers, J 402 Atlantic.
Bainbridge, F 220Livingston.
Brown, J E 76 Boerum.
Barnes, H 255 Smith.
Benlon, S 310 Dean.
Blakeman, S 317 Atlantic,
Birch, Wm 114 Livingston.
Berner, J M 223 Pacific.
Brophy S 143 Livingston.
Bond, J 4th-av., near Dean.
Burns, J 172 Hoyt.
Burns, John 295 Dean.
Boyinskly, B 234 Atlantic.
Bumanstock, L 116 1/2 Fulton-av.
Brown, T 269 Dean.

C.
Clark, D, 57 Butler.
Callahan, T 324 Atlantic.
Carter, U 536 Atlantic.
Candy, Hy 374 Atlantic.
Carsels, Wm 380 Atlantic.
Cavanagh, A B 253 Schermerhorn.
Colden, C 267 Livingston.
Connor, A 150 Smith.
Churnheimer, J 71 Court.
Calahan, M 106 Smith.
Cronan, M 104 Warren.
Crestline, J 310 Atlantic,
Coles, H 512 Atlantic.
Crowell, D E 29 E Baltic.
Carmiencke, G 4th-av, near Dean.
Craten, W H 234 Dean.
Conklin, H 110 Hoyt.
Corcoran, J 87 Douglas.
Cook, W 13 Dean.
Cockle, T B 114. Second-ple.
Coit, A 171 Smith.
Chase, C F 118 Livingston.
Cunningham, T Butler, near Bond.
Conday, RD 215 Dean.
Casey, J 77 Butler.
Crogan, J 145 Smith.
Cawthorn, D 59 Baltic.
Crowe, P 39 Dean.
Cary, B H 481 1/2 Pacific.
Calmady, J Nevins, near President.
Coyne, D Bond n'r Degraw.
Cockle, W 114 Second-place.
Conklin, O 151 Livingston.
Conner, H C 383 Atlantic.
Crawley, P 81 Wyckoff.
Coffin, F 85 Dean.
Conroy, P 350 Pacific.
Coffey, John 62 Pacific.
Crogan, P 224 Pacific.
Cromelin, A 312 Dean.
Cooper, A 99 First-place.
Callahan, J 325 Pacific.
Clem, W Jr 40 Bond.
Casey, A 167 Livingston.

D.
Dean, T 99 Wyckoff.
Desmond, D.120 Baltic.
Dedrith, G 118 Fulton-av.
Daly, D 131 Smith.
Davis, C 63 Warren.
Dudley, B 6 Bond.
Device, J 127 Smith.
Desbrough, B 62 Pacific.
Duval, J E 294 Pacific.
De Wolf, H J 369 State.
Dormann, A G 205 State.
Dyer, J 266 Atlantic.
Down, J 133 Butler.
Doremus, H D 13 Douglas.
Demerell, Wm 200 Pacific.
Derry, T C 273 Dean.
Dowsman, L 288 Atlantic.
Douglass, A S 116 Livingst'n.
Dominey, J 7 Fulton-av.
Derrell, E 292 Deane.
Dill, J Sackett near Bond.
Duvall, E 301 Degraw.
Davidson, P 243 Court.
Demsey, P 53 Dean.
Dempsey, T 17 Dean.
Donohue, P Douglas c Bond.
Donohue, J 116 Butler.
Dawson, R 8 Hanover-pl.
Develin, P 171 Smith.
Daly, J 239 Smith.
Duncan. W E 63 Butler.
Dodds, W B _ Pacific.
Dugan, P 105 Warren.
Duhman, E 318 Pacific.

E.
Entriken,W 253 Schermerhorn.
Edwards, H 110 Fulton.
Ewers, J 118 Fulton-av.
Elias, H A 200 Fulton-av.

F.
Fleishhauer, A 30 Douglas.
Fields, Jas 70 Hoyt.
Frederich, E 70 Livingston.
Ferry. J 135 Butler.
Flynn, J 123 Baltic.
Fox, W 27 E Baltic.
Flanagan, M 85 Powers.
Field, T W 5 Dean.
Flanagan, C 268 Atlantic.
Fitzhugh, E 43 Smith.
Flynn, T Wyckoff near Powers.
Fleming, F 63 Hoyt.
Farrel, J Nevins n Warren.
Feen, H 332 Degraw.
Ford, G 59 Douglas.
Fletcher, S C 155 Smith.
Furish, M 82 Wyckoff.
Ferning, R S 229 Dean.
Finney, D 122 Union.
Finkin, H 131 Court.
Fisk, A S 386 State.
Frederick, H 288 Atlantic.
Faust, C 137 Court.
Farley, M 121 Boerum.
Farley, P 44 Dean.

G.
Godfrey, S 347 Pacific.
Glaissin, H 86 Wyckoff.
Goff, J 205 Court.
Gannelly, J Douglas near Bond.
Groudt, L 281 Atlantic.
Guillaume, J 328 Atlantic.
Gray, J 153 Smith.
Genung, M 11 Fulton-av.
Gaynor, T 136 Dean.
Gurnan, T 44 Boerum.
Griffin, J 29 Dean.
Gallagher. P 254 Atlantic.
Grepell, J 416 Atlantic.

H.
Hilyer, T 486 Pacific.
Hovett, A 141 Court.
Horan, P Nevins nr Warren.
Hubbard, 96 Dean.
Hurran, M 4 Hamilton-pl.
Harris, J 163 Smith.
Halton, P 35 Dean.
Hodgkiss, J 70 Hoyt.
Henry, R 264 Butler.
Hearn, E 128 Butler.
Hoffman, H 209 Pacific
Hand, Jas 125 Hoyt.
Holmes, P W 106 Livingston.
Hart, E 97 Wyckoff.
Haywood, H 176 Schermerhorn.
Hogart, H C 293 Pacific.
Hay, W H 36 Douglas.
Hamilton, R 85 Dean.
Holloway, B 40 Dean.
Harwood, S R Warren near Nevins.
Hensley, C 290 Atlantic.
Hinchman, S 190 Livingston.
Hambly, D President near Powers.
Harper, T Bergen n 4th-av.
Hearn, P 128 Butler.
Memmer, L 237 Pacific.
Hawley, T 209 Pacific.
Harper, F H 137 Court.
Hart, P 81 Butler.
Heusted, Hy 73 Bergen.
Hanson, C 113 Smith.
Higarty, E 45 Dean.
Hobday ,W J 102 Atlantic.
Horan, G 91 Douglas.
Hoyle, J 131 Court.
Hewitson, J 146 Livingston.
Heiser, F 289 Atlantic.
Holden, H 278 Dean.
Heinsemah, A 209 Pacific
Hunting, E Q 39 Douglas.
Hoermington, T P 168 Livingston.

I.
Irish, L B 191 Court.
Imhoff, J 426 Allen.

J.
Joy, W A 126 Bergen.
Jaffaney, J 70 Warren.
Johnston, Wm 32 Hoyt.
Jacob, A 73 Court.
Johnston, J 43 Hoyt.
Johnson, J 84 Baltic.

K.
Kork, F 309 Atlantic.
Kaveney, P 198 Pacific.
King, Edw 160 Hoyt.
Kesil, F 354 Atlantic.
Kane, W H 57 Wyckoff.
Kelly, J 227 Court.
Kavanagh, F 42 Dean.
Kelley, J 145 Smith.
Kirwin, M 470 Atlantic.
Kenney, T 227 Pacific.
Kelly, J 33 Dean.
Kennedy, J B 39 E Baltic.
Kenney, J L 272 Livingston.
Kerry, J 18 Dean.
Kgeselback, H 102 Smith,
Kelcher, P 94 Warren.
Kane, J Bergen n Nevins.
Kiegan, Jas 111 Warren.
Kaskiff, F 58 Bergen.
Kelley, J 57 Baltic.
Kenney, E _ Baltic.

L.
Laing, J 195 Fulton-av.
Lynch, W 16 Deane.
Lincoln, J D 250 Schemerhorn.
Linck, F 41 Flatbush-av.
Ludlam, J C 20 Elm-place.
Lane, T 217 Court.
Lowry, N 90 Wyckoff.
Lovey, J 209 Pacific
Lober, H 113 Smith.
Lockett, J T 36 Dean.
Langham, H 80 Dean.
Lickenburgh, H 45 Butler.
Lamb, P 51 Butler.
Lynch, S 116 Baltic.
Ludlow, J 209 Pacific.
Latham, J, Powers near State.
Lannigan, M 115 Butler.

M.
Mark, J 66 Hoyt.
McDermott, W 381 Sackett.
Macrae, E 67 Baltic.
McCaul, W 46 Butler.
Mose, J (col'd) 125 Baltic.
Morand, E 109 Smith.
Matellini, W 11 Fulton-av.
McNamara, D 117 Baltic.
Miller, T 58 Warren.
Mahmer, C E 187 Court.
Maxwell, T 321 Atlantic.
McWilliams, J 63 Butler.
Marvin, J 31 Bergen.
Molineux, E L 135 Schermerhorn.
Meserole, A R 33 Hoyt.
Metzler, G 327 Dean.
Mills, C H 313 Degraw.
Mulligan, C H 41 Bond.
Miller, J Carroll n 3d-av.
Mills, Jno 23 Wyckoff.
Matthews, H 190 Fulton-av.
Moore, J E 9 Douglas.
Magnall, J 192 Fulton-av.
Macarty, T Butler n Bond.
MacMullen, A 110 Smith.
MacNish, W 278 Smith.
McQuade, J cor Dean & Powers.
Meldrum, W 1 Douglas.
Monderan, C 152 Dean.
Martin, J 13 Dean.
McGue, P 80 Baltic.
Moore, J W 441 Atlantic.
Maher, P Bond n Degraw.
Maloney, J Bergen n Nevins.
McKenna, M 234 Pacific.
Miller, W 253 Atlantic.
Mitchell, J Union n Hoyt.
Mick, J Smith n Atlantic.
McLaughlin, W 89 Bergen.
Masters, P 27 Douglas.
McKendry, Q 266 Bergen.
Mahan, J Degraw cor Bond.
Macalley, J 370 Pacific.
Morris, J 249 State.
McCoombs, J 87 Wyckoff.
Morgan, J Union n Hoyt.
McKeen, A 94 Dean.
Nash, Henry 89 Dean., N.
Nicholorious, _ 293 1/2 Sack't.
Night, R 17 Dean.
Nostrand, P 266 Court.
Neeson, 233 Smith.
Nichols, N H 268 Union.
Nicholson, R E Bergen near 4th-av.
Northhridge, N J 166 Livingston.
Nash, Jas 468 Atlantic.

O.
O'Donnell, J 157 Smith.
Orchard, J L 20 Bergen.
Oilsen, O C 460 Atlantic.
O'Donnell, E 76 Baltic.
O'Brien, Thos 57 Baltic.
O'Brien, J cor Douglas and Bond.
Ochs, F 309 Atlantic.
Ormond, J 54 Broad.
O'Brien, Pat 478 Atlantic.

P.
Phales, E 239 Bergen.
Poulton, L M 43 Schermrh'n.
Phillips, J 247 Court.
Pandall, D 154 Dean.
Peed, C H 91 Livingston.
Pai, J 98 Livingston.
Peters, M 206 Pacific.
Ppper, F 464 Atlantic.
Polly, W 122 Dean.
Paht, E 317 Atlantic.
Pratt, V 474 Atlantic.
Paddock, J A 218 Dean.
Poulton, M 147 Schermrh'rn.
Pitcher, Jas 47 Warren.
Porter, J 311 Dean.
Powers, J E 79 Baltic.
Paterson, J 267 Livingston.
Porter, J 222 Livingston.
Peach, T 90 Elm-place.
Pollard, W 96 Warren.
Phloger, J 462 Atlantic.

R.
Rome, C 265 Livingston.
Ripke, E 27 Butler.
Rowevell, M 37 Bond.
Regan, J 116 Baltic.
Richardson, J 295 Degraw.
Ryan, T 109 Warren.
Rodar, J 124 Hoyt.
Radley, W 153 Smith.
Rice, J 362 Atlantic.
Ripley, J 178 Fulton-av.
Ryan, T 78 Baltic.
Reynolds, R 417 Pacific.
Reynolds, T cor Bond and Union.
Russell, S 124 Smith.
Randolph, J D 26 Douglas.
Raven, J 16 1/2 Butler.
Rowley, J 39 Wyckoff.
Riley, P 137 Court.
Rains, T C 376 Atlantic.
Roberts, W 237 Pacific.
Rice, E 204 Schermerhorn.
Rulad, C M 96 Third-pl.
Ryban, W P 144 Fulton-av.
Reinhard, A 19 Dean.
Rutherford, W 81 Dean.
Richardson, C O 76 Dean.

S.
Schmidt, M 374 Atlantic.
Sherwood, F 409 Pacific.
Shortman, T S 37 Wyckoff.
Safford, D B 112 Second-pl.
Stohlman, W 107 Smith.
Schieck, A C 324 Atlantic.
Sell, H S 24 Bond.
Stewart, J 85 Baltic,
Smith, S Carroll near Nevins.
Sussmann, L 174 Fulton-av.
Smith, P 278 Atlantic.
Sinclair, C 406 State.
Smith, G 170 Warren.
Selig, A Smith near Atlan'c.
Steiner, G H 162 Dean.
Smith, Jr, C C 140 Livingston.
Straube, P 46 E Baltic.
Saunders, J 267 Atlantic.
Smith, J W 320 State.
Schmidt, A 374 Atlantic.
Segar, S T 306 State.
Shover, J 16 Bergen.
Sterup, T L 219 Carroll.
Studleigh, J 419 Pacific.
Seman, Jr. L W 345 State.
Spaer, J 10 Butler.
Sutton, J B 140 Smith.
Spitz, G 216 Atlantic.
St. Clair, J 56 Bergen.
Swain, T 313 Dean.
Shanley, J 86 Wyckoff.
Stulley, T 115 Baltic.
Smith, J 118 Smith.
Stansbury, J 310 Degraw.
Sherlow, J 279 Atlantic.
Swift, J W 113 Schermerhorn.
Scallan, P 122 Bond.
Scheinberger, G 128 Fulton.
Scully. P 115 Baltic.
Slyor, C 281 Pacific.
Shea, M 102 Smith.
Slack, J Union near Hoyt.
Shapter, J S Carroll near Smith.

T.
Tinney, D 86 Douglas.
Thompson, W S 240 Schermerhorn.
Tapp, F W 47 Butler.
Tiernan, J 130 Butler.
Thompson, R 86 Dean.
Teckrick, J 3 Dean.
Taylor, A 341 Pacific.
Townsley, J 204 Pacific.
Taylor, C C 120 Butler.
Thompson, B 5 Douglas.
Tiernan, B 328 Degraw.
Thompson, R R 34 Wyckoff.
Tinsan, C 137 Court.
Tiernay, P 75 Butler.
Taylor, W H 158 Smith.
Twill, P 115 Butler.
Trochard, C 4 Butler.
Talliny, W 166 Dean.

V.
Van Vorse, A, corner Dean and Bond.
Van Saun, J 43 Douglas.
Van Wine, B Carroll near Nevins.
Van Wart, W 93 Bond.
Van Patten E 343 Pacific.
Van Wyck, M 109 Schermerhorn.
Van Leek, R 236 Dean.

W.
Whiteman, L C 59 Bergen.
Webber, H 239 Smith.
Walsh, W W 98 3d-pl.
Wicklin, H 10 Boerum.
Wickloff, A 227 Pacific.
Watson, T B 194 Pacific.
Webber, F J 372 Atlantic.
West, R R 3 Hamilton-pl.
Westervelt, C 57 Nevins.
Weldon, J corner Dean and Powers.
Wolff, J 121 Court.
Whitney, J 29 Bond.
Walter, J H 214 Bergen.
Washburne, G W 238 Dean.
Walsh, W W 282 State.
Walters, M B 273 Livingston.
Willard, J 202 Pacific.
Whittaker, F 186 Dean.
Williamson, G 440 Atlantic.
Ward, M 196 Hoyt.
Wilson, N 86 Boerum.
Wagner, F 324 Atlantic.
Wilson, E 41 Butler.
Woodward, F S 204 Ful'n-av.
Wissell, G, corner Carroll and 3d-av.
Welsh, A 126 Smith.
Wolf, J 107 Smith.
Walker, J L 4 Bergen.
Wyland, P 167 Smith.
Wilson, S 314 Dean.
Washburne, E O 21 E Baltic.
Welch, F J 192 Smith.
Wade, P 124 Smith.
Willson, J A 259 Pacific.
Wood, E 240 Dean.
Warburton, J 123 Court.
Weeks, J L 276 Pacific.
White, G C 22 Bergen.

Y.
Young, T B __ Butler.

To-day the
EIGHTH SUB-DISTRICT
or Eleventh Ward, will be attended to with a draft of 1,050 names in all. The entire quota to be drawn from this District by sub-districts, is as follows:
Sub-districts.                 Sub-Districts.
First 180                        Seventh 1,050
Second 251                              Eighth 528
Third 310                       Ninth 285
Fourth 369                     Tenth..... 369
Fifth .... 551
Sixth . 373                     Total for Third Dist. 4,296
First Sub-District 180
Second ,……….. 251
Third ………….340
Fourth.............. .369
Fifth ..................551
Sixth …………. 373
Total .............. 2,064
Yet to be drawn......... 2,232
Total.......................... 4,296
The following names, drawn yesterday in the Second District, were accidentally omitted in their regular order, in the list published on our second page:
TWELFTH WARD.
K.
Kernan, H Luqueer.
Kennedy, Jno Court.
Ketterson, H Van Brunt n'r Ewen.
Kennedy, M cor Van Brunt and Dyckman.
Kernan, M Court bet Mill & Ch.
Kutzenmore, Partition.
Keese, P Hicksn 'r Luqueer.

L.
Legreff, Michael.
Lynch, J N E cor Concord & Sullivan.
Leonard, John Walcott near Richard.
Larkin, Thos P Hamilton-av near Nelson.
Lewis, T Walcott near River.
Lee, W Clinton cor Nelson.
Laight, H Hamilton-av near Henry.
Lafferty, J Van Brunt near Commerce.

M.
Moore, S Walcot.
Muller, H Commerce and King.
Moore, H 37 Hamilton-av.
Magraw, J Commercial near Browne.
Mills, Wm Van Brunt bet Newen and Commerce.
Mallory, P cor Ferris and King.
Murphy, H 20 Sullivan, rear.
Matthews, Owen cor Concord.
Mulqueen, T Luqueer near Hicks.
Mulvany, Jno Concord near Partition.
Myers, P Van Brunt near Dyckman, rear.
Murphy, Jno Luqueer near Hicks.
McGowen, P cor Van Brunt and Tremont.
Moore, J cor Van Brunt and King.
Marsh, R 8 Clinton.
Mulsen, K cor Van Brunt & Vandyke.
Macathry, P Gowanus.
Many, S 63 Luqueer.
Myer, L Conover near Partition.
McCausland, F Van Brunt near Commerce.
Morgan, D Hicks cor Luqueer.
Macartney, A Van Brunt and Dyckman.
Maclaughlin, H Dyckman between Van Brunt and Gowanus Bay.
McCabe, Felix Partition bet Van Brunt and River.
McAllen, Peter Partition bet Van Brunt and River.
McKenna, Jno Partition bet Van Brunt and Ewer.
Manni, Geo Van Brunt near Seabrick.
Mativon, M V Brunt n'r Wm.

N.
Newberry, Q Van Brunt n'r Commerce.
Newton, C B Partition near Gowanus.
Nalen, Jno Partition bet Van Brunt and River.
Nolting, M.
Norris, Jno Imlay bet Newen and Commerce.
Nahon, Thomas.

O.
Ortison, J Dyckman bet Van Brunt and River.
Owen, Dennis, Partition.

P.
Peterson, Jas Luqueer near Hicks.
Pelham, Wm Columbia near Luqueer.
Parker, Wm Van Brunt n'r Seabrick.

R.
Richmond, C Con nr Vandk
Rahl, Geo Grinnl nr Clinton.
Ryan, P Imlay nr Commrce.
Rapenhagen, Wm cor Congress and Elizabeth.
Rockling, F Com nr King.
Ryan, Thos Cone nr Sullivn.
Rooney, M Dyck bet V B & Gowanus Bay.
Rodan, Thos VB nr King.

S.
Sherwood, S 4 William.
Selkins, C Hanover.
Storm, J Conc bet Mill and Churech.
Selkins, C Sullivan.
Steward, W partition.
Stamford, A 47 Hamilton-av.
Schultz, C 13 William.
Steward, W Court.
Sexton, T Partition W of  Van Brunt over bakery.
Sheay, K Van Brunt.
Summick, H cor King and Richard.
Sherman, A Van Brunt bet Newen and Commerce.
Stanton, T Columbia near Hamilton-av.
Sullivan, E 55 Luqueer.
Schultz, A 191 William.
Storery, J cor Conover and Reed.
Smith, T 36 William.
Sweeny, I Imlay.
Smith, J Partition.
Steller, H Nelson.
Shaw, M Van Brunt.
Steward, W Partition near Baker.
Stewart, W Court ne'r Churh.
Sweeny, I Imlay cor Bowen.
Smith, J Partition near Van Brunt.
Schultz, C 13 William.

T.
Tully, Jas Dyckman, near Richard.
Terrence, P King near Columbia.
Turner, R Fremont between Van Buren and Richard.
Thorley, Jas (col) 16th north from Creek.
Thouvener, J Van Brunt near Commerce.
Turnbull, T Dyckman near River.

W.
Watt, Jas 44 Coles.
Walch, P Partition near Gowanus Creek.
Walsh, P Van Brunt near Commerce.
Wheeler, Jas Ferris, near Dyckman.
Weieesnell, Henry Wise-st near Court.
Winans, A Vandyke near Van Brunt.

TWELFTH WARD.
After an intermission of about an hour, the proceedings were resumed for the Sixth Sub-District or Twelfth Ward, when the ballots were counted by a Committee, consisting of Alderman O'Keefe, Supervisor Driscoll, C. H. MURPHY, M, D., and J. J. Delaney, ESQ.
The number of ballots, including the fifty per cent, was stated at 203.
Shortly before 2 o'clock the wheel began to revolve, with the following result:
A.
Anderson, F Van Brunt near William.
Ashton, J Van Brunt, near Commerce.

B.
Beet, G 31 William.
Burn, Wm Commerce.
Burns, John Columbia, near Hamilton-av.
Bradley, Jno 23 William.
Butler, W 101 Hamilton-av.
Brennan, Pat Luqueer, near Hicks.
Burke, Pat Court, n Church.
Britt, Wm Van Brunt and Van Dyke.
Bradley, J corner Van Brunt and Van Dyke.
Bates, W J 38 William.
Burns, J Van Brunt, near William.
Backlem, T 6 William.
Burke, H 37 Hamilton-av.
Badder, J corner Commerce and King.
Birdsall,G N 33 Huntington.
Barnett, J Partition, near River.
Brackett, C L 16 Huntington.
Beet, G 31 William.

C.
Condon, P 7 Nelson.
Campbell, C cor Richard and Dyckman.
Campbell, J 298 Hamilton-av.
Chamberlain, G Dyckman near river.
Costello, R cor Van Brunt and Delavan.
Cox, P Van Brunt near William.
Connor, J William near Van Brunt.
Coll_n, J Luqueer near Pitt.
Carroll, P Partition.
Caffery, D Columbia near the Creek.
Chamberlin, G Dyckman near river.
Carroll, E King near Richard.
Cooper, P Centre.
Considine, P Imlay bet Mercer and Thomas.
Clirehugh, J Nelson near Court.
Cassidy, Jas Concord bet Dyckman and Partition.
Cowley, R W William.
Cornelius, N Van Brunt bet Walcott and Sullivan.

D.
Dempsey, Wm Van Brunt near William.
Donohoe, John, cor H-av.
Dunn, M, Cole-st 31st house from Luqueer.
Dowd, Wm, Cole-st near Columbia.
Driscoll, Jos, Van Brunt bet New and Commerce.
Donlan, J, Van Brunt near Commerce.
Daubin, A, Luqueer near Columbia.
Donohue, B, Van Brunt n Boerum.
Decantitun, J Conover near Walcott.

E.
Evans, W, Commerce near Richmond.

F.
Foster, Hy, Van Brunt near Fremont.
Figgins, John, Commerce n Walcot.
Frennan, O, Luqueer-st n Hicks.
Frankenstein, F 63 H-av.
Farrell. B, Partition.
Fitzzpatrick, B, Van Brunt n William.
Fox, T, Van Brunt near Commerce.
Fawn, G 61 Hamilton-av.

G.
Grimm, J Conover.
Gilligan, P Read bet Van Brunt and Conover,
Gorman, P Con bet Walcott and Partition.
Grennan, T Luqueer nr Col.
Gardner, D S 33 William.
Gilhooley, J Elizabeth cor Van Brunt.
Goldey, J 208 Hamilton-av.
Gaynor, R Conover near Partition.
Gill,T Walcott near Richard.
Green, H Van Brunt bet Ewen and Com.
Gobert, H, Rapelye near Peckham.

H.
Hoffman, L King near Richard.
Hamilton, Alex Henry near Hamilton-av.
Hetner, Hy Partition between Van Brunt & River.
Hanneman, Chas. Conover and Partition.
Higgins, Pat 61 Hamilton-av.
Hagan, W Partition near Conover.
Hanemann, Chas Conover near Partition.
Hamilton, James Walcott near River.
Higgins, R. W Van Brunt.
Horne, M corner Van Brunt and William,
Home, J 30 William.
Hagan, W Luqueer near Court.
Hickman, F 77 Hamilton-av.

J.
Johnston, Jno Elizabeth n. Van Brunt.
Jewel, F 24 Hamilton-av.

K.
Kavanagh, M 16 North 7th.
Kelly, Pat North 7th n 5th.
Kennedy, John North 6th.
Knauffman, G 138 5th.
Kelsey, Benj 66 North 4th.
Kelly, John North 7th n 4th.
Rating. Wm 1st, c N 7th.
Kane, John 36 Grand.
Kroos, Hy North 6th c 7th.
Keager, North 7th n 5th.
Kavanagh, H 90 North 6th.
Kellington, Jas 43 N 4th.
Kelly, H 313 2d.
Kiernan, Jno N 5th n 7th.
Kensley, Jno S 90 North 1st.
Kling, John 252 Grand.

L.
Lambert, Ed 120 7th.
Lewis, Charles 308 2d.
Loper, Chas 225 North 2d.
Lay, A 215 North 2d.
Latin, Safety 6th n N 5th.
Locive, John 168 5th.
Lightle, Alfred (col'd) 227 North 6th.
Lyons, Patrick North 5th.

M
Moon, Wm 51 N 7th.
Moss, Aug __ N 2d.
McFagan, Jas 28 N 5th.
Morgan, H 78 N 4th.
McLaughlin, F 321 1st.
Murphy, T 91 N 3d.
Murphy, L 313 1st.
Martin, Pat 203 N 2d.
Milky, Chas E 168 N 4th.
McMunigle, T 128 N 2d.
McElroy, M North 4th n'r 3d.
McLaughlin, Ed 321 1st.
Moore, Jno 61 North 3d.
Mason, Wm 93 North 4th.
Madren, Jno E 9th cor Ainsle.
McKenna, John North 5th.
McGuire, Jno 290 4th.
Martin, J 8th corner Grand.
Modd, F 111 North 2d.
Monrodin, C 77 North 1st.
McKinnon, G 334 N 3d.
Maneron, D 104 North 3d.
McDonnell, M 50 Grand.
McGovern, T 96 North 6th.
McDowell, G 86 North 7th.
McCaffrey, J 77 North 4th.
Mulaney, J 225 2d.
Meade, Jos, N 7th near 4th.
McLean, W 236 Grand.
McCaffrey, Thos _ 6th.
McCarthy, M 86 Grand.
McDonald, Alex 35 N 9th.
Murphy, Jno H 216 5th.
Munday, Jno 165 5th.
McNally, Jas 7th.
Miley, Wm 62 North 2d.
McLaughlin, A J 159 North 2d.
Mellew, Henry 43 North 4th.
McDuff, Jas N 9th near 5th.
McCue, N 1st near North 8th.
Maley, J 170 North 6th.
McMurky, P 75 North 6th.
Mahey, H 266 Grand.
Madot, S H, N 4th n 6th.
McCluskey, H 113 N 4th.
McMillen, J 3 Ainsle.
Megan, T N 2d cor 5th.
McGrady, O 19 N 3d.
McGoonal, P N 7th n 6th.
McKerran, M N 1st cor 9th.

N.
Niffcorkey, Alf 225 1st.
Nicholson, J N 6th n 5th.
Nolan, Jno N 5th n 6th.
Nabb, L N 6th n 4th.

O.
O'Neill, Ed 184 N 2d.
Osborne, A 85 N 1st.
Owen, N 138 N 4th.
O'Hara, Jas 184 6th.
O'Keefe. M N 5th cor 4th,
O'Connor, Jas 36 Grand.
O'Neill, P N 8th n 6th.
O'Brien, M 6th n N 5th.
O'Brien, Thos N 9th.
Oltman, Wm N 5th.
O'Rielly, C F 138 N 4th.
O'Telling, _ 39 N 9th.

P.
Platt, Jas 67 North 4th.
Philips, M 42 Grand.
Pickard, Wm A 153 N 1st.
Porcher, Thos 11 North 7th.
Peck, T I 18 Grand.
Pilsen, Alex 42 Grand.
Paul, C 202 Grand.
Philip, M. B 169 4th.
Potter, C W 3d nr North 6th.

Q.
Quinn, Hugh 7th near N 5th.
Quinn, Chas 232 North 6th.
Quinn, P 52 North 7th.

R.
Rawlinson, T 15 Fillmore-pl.
Romnell, M 72 North 4th.
Ruck, S 221 1st.
Rath, Richd, N 7th cor 6th.
Regany, L 86 North 2d.
Rorke, John 166 North 3d.
Ring, J J, N 6th near 7th.
Riley, Jas, N 7th near 7th.
Ross, Robt, N 4th near 3d.
Ryan, Pat 166 5th.
Rafterty, Wm, N 9th nr 5th.
Rorke, E, N 9th near 5th.
Rogers, M, N 5th near 7th.
Reeves, J A 228 4th.
Ronroof, A 5th cor N 5th.
Riley, Peter 54 N 4th.
Rahls, H 223 N 6th.
Riley, Jno H 91 1/2 N 2d.

S.
Smith, W N 7th.
Stone, Geo H 303 N 6th.
Simpson, Jas N 5th nr 7th.
Stahl, Hy 369 1st.
Shields, Thos 43 N 7th.
Smith, W 117 N 7th,
Simpson, Th 4th nr N 4th.
Sternwall, Benj 180 Grand.
Sterrett, Jno 52 N 6th.
Smith, B 176 N 1st.
Seibert, J 130 N 3d.
Sherman, Jas 24 N 9th.
Sullivan, D 334 3d.
Sweeny, C N 5th nr 6th.
Schroeder, Jno L 24 Grand.
Sturneld, Ben 256 Grand.
Shelly, Wm N 6th near 5th.
Staby, N 69 N 4th.
Stein, C 161 N 2d.
Stacker, J N 6th.
Skidmore, Jno B 202 Grand.
Smith, Danl 203 2d.
Sheridan, Jas 14 N 8th.
Sullivan, Pat 222 1st.
Simons, J W 298 4th.
Starkie, John N 6th.
Shute, P 130 Grand.
Scott, Robt N 7th near 6th.
Simpson, Wm 6th.

T.
Toole, Jas 7th near N 8th.
Thomas, J W 334 3d.
Tracy, Jas 2d cor North 7th.
Tracy, Wm M 269 Grand.
Tally, A 28 North 5th.
Terrill, Thos N 5th near 6th.
Travis, Geo 2 Grand.
Timmis, F 27 North 9th.
Tise, J H 13 Fillmore-place.
Traverse, M 130 North 5th.
Tute. Jno 136 North 7th.
Toole, Thos 76 North 6th.
Thomaslee, T 65 North 1st.
Tally, Pat 273 North 7th.
Tilly, E 172 North 8th.
Thompson, Jno 70 North 3d.

V.
Vesper,C 6th cor Fillmore-pl.
Vancleef, Chas 62 North 5th.
Vansandt, Jas 68 North 5th.
Van Horn, T S 66 North 4th.
VanHonten.Wm N 6th n 5th.
Van Cott, P North 9th.
Vath, B 128 Grand.

W.
Willians, J H 139 7th.
Weiman, M 28 Grand.
Woods, John 80 4th.
Wagner, F 161 North 2d.
Waylie, B 36 North 3d.
Welsh, John 51 North 3d.
Walker, J B 203 2d.
Wolff, Wm North 6th n 3d.
Walwan, Geo 7th c N 6th.
Wall, Michael 130 North 3d.
Welsh, R 117 North 6th.
White, Robert 133 9th.
Wood, Joseph.
Wandelt, Sam 18 North 3d.
Wall, E S 4th c North 7th.
Wylie, M North 8th.
Waters, John 165 7 6th. .
Welsh, John 223 North 6th.

Y.
Yerrance, Jas 99 North 4th.

After the thanks of the District Marshal for their orderly conduct, the crowd dispersed about 4 P. M., with three hearty cheers.
The drawing will be resumed this morning at 9 o'clock.

Third District.
The drawing was resumed in this District yesterday morning.
It is to be regretted that the officers connected with the draft at this point have been so negligent in affording the Press facilities for giving the names of the conscripts to the public. On the first day the meagerness of arrangement and official inattention was attributed to a want of acquaintance with the needs of the reporters and the flurry of a commencement. The same line of conduct has, however, marked the treatment of those connected with the Press during the succeding [sic] days instead of looking upon the representatives of the various ____ as officials engaged in the work of aiding them … journ__ ... ... to diffuse among the people a knowledge of the progress of their labors, they seem to regard them as troublesome individuals, whose comfort was in no way a matter of concern, and whose business they were not called to assist. The names of those drafted were read so rapidly in this district, that it was with the greatest difficulty they could be taken down. Questions in regard to doubtful names or streets, were generally disregarded by Commissioner Beebe, who rushed ahead, leaving the Reporters to make out what he said as best they might. This want of courtesy to the Press is mentioned, not because it is pleasant to find fault, but because the public should know that inaccuracies which may occur in this district are not owing to any neglect of the Reporters, but to the lack of accommodation on the part of officials, who could not seem to appreciate the position and duties of an agent of the Press.
At 9 o'clock the Committee, consisting of Messrs. Van Brunt, Oakley, and Lee, began to count the slips containing the names of those enrolled in the Seventh Sub-District, which is the Eleventh Ward of Brooklyn. This Ward includes all that part of the city lying between Fulton, Flatbush, Atlantic, Flushing, and Washington avenues, and Navy, Johnson, and Bridge streets. At the close of the counting, the Committee announced the whole number of names to be 3,985. This tallying with the number on the Provost-Marshal's list, the slips were deposited in the wheel, and the drawing commenced for the 1,050 names which constituted the quota of the

ELEVENTH WARD.
Allen, J L 395 Fulton
Aldrich, Wm 72 Carleton.
Ammerman, E, 234 Myrtle-av,
Angell, A E 54 Eliot-pl.
Agate, A,380 Myrtle.
Ackerman, M, Hamilton.
Alfit, E, Raymond-st.
Andel, F A, 54 Eliot-pl.
Anderson, H, 190 Adelphi.
Ahlers, M, Raymond-st.
Augesborflor, B, 65 Flushing-av.
Anderson, J, 194 Prince.
Aiken, F, 392 Carleton-av.
Ankrun, N, Atlantic-av.
Antwerp, H, 153 Myrtle-av.
Antoy, T, 379 Myrtle.
Adribroker, J F, 276 Clinton.
Andrews, C S, 292 Carleton-av.
Ackerman, H, 183 Carleton-av.
Ayres, W W, 165 Adelphi.
Auten, H, 141 Ft Greene-pl.
Abel, E L, jr, 124 Prince.
Allen, E, 250 Ciearmont-av.
Andrews, R, Park.
Anderson, R W, 182 Thompson.
Ackerman, M, 3 Park-av.
Ackerman, J Clearmont-av.
Banyard (col), Geo, 85 Carl-st.
Berry, R, 111 Cumberland-st.
Boyce, Joseph, 101 Carleton-st.
Biddle, D, 298 Bridge-st.
Bodge, J J, 110 Willoughby-st.
Bergen, P, 7 Flushing-av.
Blond, H, 425 Hudson-av.
Braard, E, 87 Prince.
Banton, J,181 Adelphia-st.
Burns, P, 427 Fulton-av.
Burk, P C, 108 Duffield-st.
Blunt, J, 79 Willoughby.
Benedict, R D, 305 Adelphi-st.
Benson, G W, 247 Cumberland.
Bunker, E J, 326 Adelphi-st.
Burke, P, 283 Carleton.
Bumback, H, 211 Myrtle-av.
Brady, C, 730 Vanderbilt.
Brennan, P, Atlantic-st.
Buck, F C.
Beale, jr, W, 260 Cumberland.
Barker, H C, 216 Carleton.
Bush, J, Washington-av.
Benton, P, Hanson-pl.
Burts, A W, 321 Gold.
Bears, N D, 87 Oxford.
Barkan, W H, 166 Adelphi.
Baker, J S, 189 Adelphi.
Bemet, D H, Clearmont-av.
Barrett, A, 251 Hudson.
Barbey, A, 241 Washington.
Brush, A, 4 Lafayette.
Bridge, R, 75 Greene-av.
Beck, H 130 Duffield.
Benson, H, 391 Fulton.
Bous, A, 403 Augustus.
Bosworth, D E, 202 Clearmont.
Bridge, T, Flushing-av.
Beglan, E D, 370 Adelphi.
Boyd, J, 360 Myrtle.
Barsols. J, Gates-av.
Brown, A, 25 Carleton-st.
Bennett, J L, 218 Navy-st.
Boland, T F, 40 Clinton-st.
Brannan, J, 259 Hudson-av.
Buckley, D, 44 Carl-st.
Burns, M, 9 Clearmont-st.
Barnum, F, 105 Adelphi-st.
Bailey, J C, 178 Myrtle-av.
Benton, G, Raymond-st.
Bell, A W, Fulton-av.
Barlow, R D, 368 Cumberland.
Brownson, C K, 147 Willoughby.
Baldwin, C F, 52 Clearmont-av.
Britton, T, Clinton.
Burd, K H, 98 Elliott-pl.
Byrd, Geo F, 22 Clearmont.
Brockway, F A, 73 Cortland.
Bennett, W H, Clearmont-av.
Brady, J, Tillary.
Burns, R, Raymond-st. 
Buckley, C, 413 Myrtle-av.
Burnett, J, Clinton-st.
Blake, A, 284 Bridge-st.
Burger, W, 55 De Kalb-st.
Breeze, G, 192 Ft. Greene.
Burns, M, Hudson-av.                  
Bee, G, Orton-pl.
Brown, L, 156 Ft. Green-pl.            
Bohaven, J, 186 Navy.
Bossen, F, 372 Carleton-st.
Brown, M, 5 Park.
Brust, J H (colored), 153 Navy.
Black, M, 460 1/2 Myrtle-av.
Ball, T A, 112 Carleton-st.
Borter, W B, 92 Prince.
Burke, E, 98 Eliot-place.
Brown, George, 384 Hudson-av.
Bore, T, 141 Willoughby-st.
Burroughs, W, 101 Fulton-av.
Boland, P, 99 Ft Green-pl.
Bonabenntura, C, 210 Gold-st.
Bennett, S R, Oxford-st.
Bride, (col,) H, 8 Fair-st.
Betts, G H, 51 1/2 Prince-st.
Bullint, L K, Myrtle-av.
Beachen, L, 73 Clearmont-pl.
Brandige, D, 184 Vanderbilt-av.
Baiseley, T, 118 Willoughby-st.
Bennett, R, 365 Hudson-st.
Bagler, J, 125 Fulton-st.
Blank, A A, 261 Cumberland.
Belzar, C, 161 Carl-st.
Bennett, S, 6 Flushing-av.
Blanchard, W, Dekalb-av.
Banks, W E, 37 n Oxford-st.
Cassidy, T, 111Carleton.
Carman, G, 350 Carleton.
Clarey, T, Bolivar.
Cooper, A. Hospital.
Cortland, J H, 60 De Kalb.
Campbell, F, Raymond.
Carman, L, 11 Fulton-av.
Cawfer, J, 25 St. Philip.
Case, H, jr, 243 Cumberland.
Copeland,. R W, 49 St Felix.
Cunningham, P, Park.
Coulthard, J, 101 Duffield.
Callahan, P, Hospital.
Concklin, A L, Hamson-pl.
Cronon, E, 412 Fulton.
Cox, J, 43 Ft Greene-pl.
Clark, J A, 504 Fulton.
Cox, J K, 101 Willoughby.
Chapin, E, 193 Navy.
Cabona, A, 86 Park-st.
Corbet, R M, 3 Hicks-av.
Curtis, W S, 373 Hudson.
Cue, M, 236 Navy.
Cornwall, Wm, 6 Lafayette.
Cloat, C D, 81 Hamilton.
Carroll, Wm, 440 Fulton-av.
Crandall, F A, 231 Fulton-av.
Caton, W B, 321 Fulton-av.
Cully, T, 32 Prince.
Chappel, W M, Park.
Colstead, W, Vanderbilt-av.
Cosdlibe, W, 224 Gravena.
Chetwidden, J, 495 Fulton-av.
Holyoke, G E, 163 Adelphi.
Cohen, D, 399 Fulton-av.
Cole, J, Clearmont.
Cabel, E, 316 Bridge.
Coleman, H, 374 Hudson-av.
Cooley, D, 338 Carleton-st.
Curran, W, Tillary-st.
Cokeman, T J, 377 Carleton av.
Cirmmerer, N, 138 Myrtle av.
Coykendoll, C, 107 Myrtle-av.
Carman, jr, W J, 200 Cl'mont.
Cagswell, G, 425 Hudson-av.
Campbell, J, 419 Hudson-av.
Coffin, D J, 60 De Kalb.
Callaghan, Wm, 230 Navy.
Cunningham, D, 401 Adelphi.
Close, C Y, 55 Cumberland.
Curtis, B, Auburn pl.
Carshaw, G H, 80 Clearmont.
Cross, J D, Atlantic st.
Coyle, E, 207 Navy.
Cameron, D, Hampton.
Connell, J, 54 De Kalb-av.
Carrs, J, Clinton-st.
Corfee, E A, Clinton-st.
Conover, F, Stanton-st.
Cook, R, 393 Conlan-st.
Costello, P, 176 Gold-st.
Coxcoll, J, 21 Green.
Cleary, J, 94 Carl.
Chichester, F, 267 Grove.
Conckly, Wm, 367 Carleton.
Cassady, M, 140 Oliver.
Cross, W, 295 Myrtle.
Clayton, G.W, 332 Fulton-av.
Carey, P, 48 Clinton.
Connoly, P, 146 Willoughby.
Cox, J T, 350 Carleton.
Conry, J T, 1 Greene-av.
Cloggett, H T A, 75 Hamilton-st.
Concklin, J, 143 Bridge.
Chivers, C H (col'd), 182 Navy.
Chapman, W, 352 Bridge.
Copeland, G J, 198 Raymond-st.
Crowher, D, Flushing-av.
Carroll, J, 80 Clearmont.
Cowell, T, 69 Adelphi.
Chapman, J, 260 Myrtle-av.
Colmar. F, 350 Myrtle-av.
Conlon, P, Washington-st.
Clarey, J A, 160 Duffield-st.
Cummings, C E, 2 Flatbush-av.
Cox, J, Hansome-place.
Cornell, S H, 96 Carleton-av.
Carson, W, Park-st.
Camler, S, Washington-st.
Donahue, M, Myrtle.
Dillon, P, 140 Bolivar.
Dobb, J A, 6 Vanderbilt-av.
Davies, S D, 444 Myrtle-av.
Davy, H R, 96 Willoughby.
Dacy, B, 32 Vanderbilt-av.
Dunn, J, Hudson-av.
Dumf'ert, L, 385 Adelphi-st.
Doody, M., 43 Carl-st.
Duff, N, 329 Adelphi-st.
Dneisch, G., Atlantic-ay.
Dranard, J., Flushing-av.
Devine, P., 42 Oliver.
Dawson, J. L., 256 Gold.
Drauda, E. J., 1115 Osgood.
Donnally, P., 1 Clearmont.
Donohue, J, 169 Navy-st.
Doscher, J, Park.
Davies, G W, Cannon-st.
Dorman, T, Cumberland-st.
Deobels, J., 6 Vanderbilt.
Dosi, E, Clinton-av.
Dawker, J, 32 Clearmont.
Dugan, J, 79 Hamilton.
Dosi, H, Clinton-av.
Doniue, R, Atlantic-st.
Duff, T, Canton-st.
Denny, D, Clinton av.
Dennison, A, 288 Fulton av.
Deals, T, Carleton av.
Dunnergan, Matt, Hudson av.
Didner, J, 393 Raymond.
Deming, T D, Fleet-place.
Dyett, A R, 143 Lafayette.
Dey, D E, 295 Navy.
Donolly, M, 4 Bolivar.
Dee, W, 415 Fulton-av.
Doland, Ed, Park-av.
Dranton, T., Carleton-st.
Dulkly, R., 178 Adelphi.
Duer, T. (col.), Flushing-av.
,Davis,G.W., 234 Clearmont-av.
Dillon, R., 231 Park-av.
Dermagzere, H., 283 Myrtle-av.
Drisler, C, 147.Myrtle-av.
Donohue, R., Clinton.
Degraw, J., 30 Prince.
Dick, Wm., Clinton-ay.
Davis, H, 180 Park-av.
Dartona, J, 409 Myrtle-av.
Dogle, E, 435 Fulton.
Dunkley, Geo, 140 Adelphi.
Degroot, N, 147 Lafayette.
Doherty, J. Flushing-av.
Donohue, B, 290 Myrtle.
Davis, Oliver A, 300 Bridge.
Dogle, C, Flushing-av.
Dunny, C J, 39 Bridge.
Deiglar, J, 438 Fulton-st.
Desdy, S, 21 Cortlandt-st.
Duttman, A, 127 Myrtle av.
Dillon, J, 306 Fulton-st.
Doughty, J, 51 Clearmont.
Elison, C, 48 Lafayette.
Enerighim, W, 7 Lafayette.
Erishue, W, 88 Clearmont.
England, E, Washington av.
Elder, F F, 223 Fulton.
Eliot, H, 108 Eliott place.
Edgar, W, Navy.
Edner, W, Hospital.
Elkin, J, 32 Prince.      
Evans, L, 204 Navy.
Ellison. J, 77 Vanderbilt.
Ebbets, J, 403 Cumberland.
Emmis, F, 4 Lafayette.
Ereener, H, 268 Fulton.
Eagan, J, Raymond.
Everds, J, 105 Clearmont.
Fleming, H, 250 Navy.
Emmons, W H, 199 Adelphi.
English, T, Vanderbilt.
Everett, Wm, 397 Myrtle.
Eustus, S,402 Hudson.
Ellett, S J 230 Park.
Faratehy, S, Park.
Farrar, B, 407 Myrtle.
Fingle, F, 87 Atlantic.
Fitzgerald, W, Atlantac.
Fleet, T E, 128 Lafayette.
Fulcher, T B H, 82 Flatbush.
Farrell, P, Park-av.
Frankun, T H, Hamilton.
Frost, J F, 169 Oxford.
Freadwell, J, (col.) 269 Myrtle.
Finnigan, M, Navy.
Farrell, J, 32 Clearmont.
Falen, J, 105
Farley, J, 202 Navy.
Foote, J, 56 Carleton.
Fearman, R, 119 Navy.
Freed, H W, 41 Oxford.
Farach, J, Park.
Fitzpatrick, P, Carleton-av.
Fitzpatrick, T, Furman.
Ferry, B, 53 1/2 Prince.
Fisher, G W, 432 Myrtle-av.
Frisbie, J H, 92 Cartleton-av.
Fuller, H L, 313 Fulton.
Feratchy, R, Park-av.
Fisher, Wm, 81 Hamilton.
Flegel, A, 444 Myrtle.
Ford, Ed, 178 Johnson.
Flanders, S, Clinton.
Freadwell, F, 229 Fulton.
Gerald, H, 125 Eliot-pl.
Gates, E, 176 Washington.
Gordon, Geo, 182 Clearmont.
Gratz, H, 12 Oxford.
Glass, J, 308 Hudson-av.
Goodey, P, Canton.
Graves, J, 47 Ft Green-pl.
Farrand, A S, 224 Fulton-av.
Forrest. C, 126 Duffield.
Foster, H H, 183 Fulton.
Fleet, R S, Fulton and Gold.
Falkner, M, 229 Myrtle.
Flackery, J, 5 Gates-av.
Foster, A E, 59 Prince.
Green, J, 5 Devebois.
Goodrich, W S, Fulton-av.
Gelgrint, S, 49 Carleton.
Gelson, M, Raymond.
Gates, G, 103 Bridge.
Gilworth, J, 255 Gold.
Gilbert, A S, Washington.
Griffith, G W, Washington-av.
Goung, J, Park-av.
Green, E, 6 Flushing.
Greenwood. J T, 192 Adelphi.
Goldthwait, C D, 241 Cumberland.
Gordon, T. 182 Clermont-av.
Gows, J (colored), City Hospital.
Gillespie, J D, 70 Eliot-pl.
Greslin, E, Clinton.
Gleason, J, 2 Fulton-av.
Gray, J, 316 Bridge.
Gates, J, 32 Bridge-st.
Gilverson, S, Park-av.
Git, R T, 32 Clearmont.
Gaul, J, 886.Park.
Gates, G, Duffield.
Gearey, (col,) R, 85 Carl.
Getts, D C, 299 Fulton.
Goodwin, H, 120 Park.
Gauisun, G, 28 Clinton.
Grow, E. 186 Johnson.
Gray, S M, 122 Lafayette.
Groll, Adam, cor DeKalb and Fleet.
Goggins, P, 142 Bolivar.
Gibbons, F S O, 4 Fleet.
Gardner, J, 214 Raymond.
Glaney, J, 12 Clermont.
Hicks, (col) J, 236 Tillary.
Haff, R C, Vanderbilt-av.
Hayward, Ed, Fulton-st.
Herman, J, 78 Flatbush.
Hanly, B, 154 Willoughby.
Hubbenton, J, 106 Duffield.
Hoyt, J, Raymond.
Gordon, P, Raymond.
Greaves, D, 370 Fulton-av.
Grunner, J. Cumberland-av.
Goodfellow. J A, 253 Gold.
Gilder, J, 1 Fleet.
Glynn, T, Tillary.
Gafney, M, Canton.
Gelston, W, 359 Cumberland.
Gustus. S, 371 Myrtle-av.
Greer, T A, 453 Myrtle.
Gillette, J, Tillary.
Grout, P, 147 Navy.
Grant, R C, 395 Myrtle-ay.
Gustern, J. 157 Elliot-place.
Ghalier, J, 154 Navy.
Green, D E, 318 Adelphi.
Gibson, J, 74 Elliot-place.
Goodmer, B F, 45 Prince.
Gray, E, 401 Fulton-av.
Gray, C, 38 Bolivar.
Hortense, B, 187 Duffield.
Hennessey, W, 288 Bridge.
Hopkins, E, 12 Fleet.
Hubbell, W H, 153 Willoughby.
Hazeltine, W G, 2 ,Cortland-av.
Hedge, C, 57 Vanderbilt.
Hall, A F, 239 Adelphi.
Hymes, Geo, DeKalb-av.
Hamsome, N, 72 Adelphi.
Hope, C C, Washington-av.
Hand, John Oxford.
Hopkins, W H, 81 Carl.
Hay, J E, 288 Carleton-av.
Hawley, H, 158 Willoughby.
Harris, W, 267 Myrtle-av.
Harvey, A C, 405 Carleton-av.
Hinsley, J, 250 Hudson-av.
High, W T, 333 Navy.
Hoonland, W P, 399 Fulton-av.
Hambler, W H, 90 Vanderbilt.
Howard, S (col.), 157 Navy.
Hicks, R W, 162 Oxford.
Hewlett, J C, Fulton.
Hedges, D, Park-av.
Higenbotom, H, 60 Bridge.
Howard, J, 40 Flatbush.
Hinkey, Wm, 362 Bridge.
Kerry, L, 340 Carleton.
Homes, G, 84 Prince.
Hastie. W S, 94 Willoughby.
Holins, F A, Canton-st.
Hohn, J. (colored) Fair-st.
Hamilton, T, DeKalb-av.
Hantab, H, jr. 146 Navy-st.
Hand, G, 67 Cumberland-st.
Hunt, A E, 40 Oxford-st.
Henderson, J, 5 Debevoise.
Hawkins, W B, Vanderbilt.
Heil, Nich, De Kalb-av.
Haigh, J L, 333 Navy.
Houch, G, 181 Navy.
Hennessy, J F, 288 Greene.
Hunter, J H, Clinton-av.
Hoxie, W E, 87 Ft Green-pl.
Hamilton, E, Raymond.
Hart, J, Raymond-st.
Hughs, P, Cortland-av.
Hill, J, 250 Cravens-st.
Herr, C, 363 Hudson-av.
Hermes, I, 64 Cortland-av.
Hughson, K A, 104 Eliot Place.
Hubbard, B, 180 Duffield-st.
Hicks, W, Fulton-av.
Harway, G W, 24 Flushing-av.
Hedele, I, 59 Fulshing-av.
Harkness, J, 96 Prince.
Hammel, M, 5 Fleet.
Housdom, D, 118 Lafayette.
Inghams, J, 343 Adelphi.
Idol, J, 229 Navy.
Jones, A B, 413 Fulton.
Jones, S R, Gates-av.
Johnson, W B, 27 Canton.
Johnson, H, _ Hospital.
Jacob, J C, Myrtle.
Johnson, W H, 157 Duffield.
John, J, 246 Gold.
Jones,C (col), 147 Navy.
Judeson, S, 200 Clearmont-av.
John, C, 90 Bridge.
Johnson, T, 64 Cortland.
Johnson, H, 401 Fulton.
Jones, J, 174 Myrtle.
Kellogg, L, 293 Carleton.
Keenan, P, 273 Myrtle-av.
Ketcham, J. 243 Fulton-av.
Kendall, G H, 98 Willoughby.
Kelly, J, 80 Clearmont.
Keefe, J L, Vanderbilt.
Kempsall, W H, 439 Fulton-av.
Kendall, T, 229 Fulton-av.
Knight, F, 19 King.
Kimball, C H, 95 Willoughby.
Kelley, M. Atlantic-av.
Kendall, W K, 314 Myrtle-av.
Jenkins,. J. M, 252 Cravens.
Jeane, H. 175 Fulton.
Jague, Geo A, 54 Oxford.
Jabis, jr, D (col), Stanton.
Jackson, T (col), 177 Navy.
Jones, J F, 81 Carleton.
Jones, W E, 40 Oxford.
Jones, R L, 343 Fulton.
Jackson, D, 238 Cumberland.
John, J, 430 Fulton-av.
Johnson. W, T, 110 Cumberl'd.
Jacobus,' H, 370 Myrtle-av.
Jones, J, Cannon.
Jokanesman, C, Atlantic-av.
John, J W, 183 Adelphi.
Keenan, W, Cortland-st.
Keenan, P, 272 Myrtle-av.
Kennedy, J, 50 Raymond.
Kendall, E G, 133 Fulton-av.
Kingsland, J, 387 Carleton-av.
Kellan, J H, Lafayette.
Kelly, P, Fulton-av.
Konig, J, 274 Hudson-av.
Krummel, H, 128 Myrtle.
K_igan, W O, Lafayette-av.
Kortland, J H, 149 Carleton.
Kelly, L B, 230 Park-av.
Kenny, N. 68 Park.
Kent, J, 383 Hudson.
Kirby, J, Johnson.
Knox, Geo W, Myrtle-av.
Kenbocher, G, Myrtle-av.
Kethrew, A, 196 Myrtle-av.
Kit, H, 222 Clearmont.
Kyle, J, 120 Johnson.
Kinny, L, 208 Tillary.
Kahil, S, 153 Myrtle-av.
Kehoe, T, 21 Vanderbilt Kistsner, F, 162 Navy.
Kissam, J H, 186 Adelphi.
Knight, C, 410 Fulton-av.
King, S. Myrtle-av.
Kirkpatrick, J, 186 Myrtle-av.
Kummel, J F, Clinton-av.
Kennedy, R, 96 Flatbush-av.
Kurkes, H, 70 Carleton-av.
Kelley, J S, 14 Vanderbilt-av.
King, G, 210 Fulton-av.
Kock, J, 144 Johnson.
Ker, G L, 77 Adelphi.
Lannon, Wm, 2 Vanderbilt.
Ley, W A, 176 Willoughby.
Litch, L, 50 Bridge.
Lutkins, T L, 59 Fort Greene-pl.
Lane, H, Stanton.
Lee, T, 399 Fulton.
Low, J, 260 Fulton.
Litchfield, G, 205 Deerfield.
Lewis, E, 197 Ft. Greene-place.
Leonard, T, 322 Cumberland.
Lewis, C C, 188 Carleton.
Low, jr, W, 344 Carleton.
Lent, D, 104 Myrtle.
Landgon, J, Vanderbilt-av.
Lathrop. 390 Cumberland.
Leary, C, 430 Fulton-av.
Longman, W H, 88 Carleton-av.
Loblof, E (colored), 262 Gold.
Lockitt, A, 301 Hdson-av.
Louer, F, Parke.
Lodwick, P, FIatbush-av.
Lowene, C A, 20 Clinton.
Luhis, G H, 261 Myrtle.
Loselt, A, 77 Hamilton.
Lomas, J S, 263 Fulton.
Lambert, J F, 153 Eliot-pl.
Lutrell, R, 304 Hudson.
Lyne, W R, 26 Greene-av.
McPherson, J, 66 Flatbush.
McClosky, J, 240 Gold.
Mabcaboy, T, 177 Myrtle.
Lewis, R F, 395 Myrtle-av.
Lufburrow, J, 379 Hudson.
Lasier, J W, 278 Fulton.
Lewis, W H, 100 Prince.
Lake, H M, 109 Ft Greene-pl.
Letmer, Geo, 393 Hudson.
Lambert, G, 135 Ft Greene-pl.
Morgan, D, 64 De Kalk.
Merrill, A E, 93 Oxford.
Moore, J, 20 Oxford.
Maurice, E, 417 Hudson.
McCormick, T, Ridge.
Miller, J, 80 Bridge.
Moran, T, 90 Flatbush.
McKeon, J, Bolivar.
Martin, J, Clinton.
McCormick, M, 398 Adelphi.
Murphy, A, Navy.
Messonger, C S, 21 Lafayette.
Middar, C, 287 Connolly.
McVail, (col'd), C, 64 Gold.
Martin, P, 370 Hudson.
Macaulay, D, 281 Hudson.
McCue, N M, 21 Fleet.
McCarthy, D, De Rahl.
McPherson, W E, 443 Fulton.
Martense, H G, Park.
Munsell, J A, 235 Cumberland.
Morris, W H, Auburn-place.
Miller, J, 214 Duffield.
Meher, T, Fulton-av.
Murray, J, 70 Randall.
McGragne, D, 142 Park-av.
Murtagh, T, 276 Gold.
McGibbin, G, Fulton-av.
Murray, P, 269 Myrtle.
Machnandy, J, 253 Hudson.
Maguire, P, 81 Hamilton.
McCortley, B, Flatbush-av.
Mason, J, 232 Bridge.
Moore, A J, 113 Vanderbilt.
Miller, J, 33 Fort Greene.
Murphy, Y, 182 Johnson.
McMullen, A, 192 Navy.
Mullen, D, 21 Lafayette.
Moran, H, DeKalb-av.
Martin, Thos, 54 Lafayette-av.
Muller, M, 400 Hudson.
Miles, J N, 105 Park-av.
Mesmer, R, 371 Carleton.
Meyers, J, 4 Clermont-av.
Matthews, B S, 376 Hudson-av.
Morton, W, 36 Adelphi.
Maggara, M, Park-av.
Macdonald, W, 51 Carl.
Merriam, F, 146 Duffield.
McCrenchy, J, 137 Navy.
Miller, C, 292 Gold.
McCormic, J, 402 Hudson-av.
Morey, C, 266 Hudson-av.
Morgan, T M, 281 Navy.
McCrassen, H, 99 Prince.
McCue, B, 160 Navy.
Mercer, T, 271 Myrtle.
Mclean, P, 174 Park.
Magill, Sidney, 229 Park-av.
McCormack, T, 1 Clermont-av.
Murphy, T, 80 Clermont.
McDondd, C, Flushing-av.
McBride, J, 321 Fulton-av.
Morris, W, 12 Vanderbilt.
Meggeson, J, 258 Navy.
Magill, R, 338 Navy.
McMahon, B, Raymond.
Manning, W, 300 Carleton-av.
McDermott, J, 169 Navy.
Miller, G C, Atlantic-av.
Murray, jr R, Clinton.
McDonohue, T, 259 Hudson-av.
Murray, J, 18 Oxford.
McGunnigan, J, Adams.
McIntyre, J, 152 Lafayette-av.
McCartney, J, DeKalb-av.
Mins, T, 974 Gold.
Morteuse, J, 73 Myrtle-av.
McNeil, T, 273 Gold.
Mitchell, J, 52 DeKalb-av.
McGuire, J, 327 Fultron-av.
Marsh, J, H, DeKalb-av.
McKay, J, 45 Clearmont.
Milard, N, 127 Lafayette.
Margrieth, J R, 133 Willougby.
Mood, F, 248 Fulton-av.
Mackintosh, E, 94 Oxford.
McLaughlin, R, 184 Myrtle.
Mallers, P, 278 Navy.
Munsell, J, 235 Cumberland.
Morse, C, Clinton-av.
Macdonald, J, 149 Carleton-av.
Mitgel, T, 399 Adelphi.
Maccaboy, P, 493 Fulton.
McHomey, J, 13 Clearmont-av.
Murfet, A C, 21 North Oxford.
McCarthy, J. 1 Clearmont-av.
Mortner, J, 233 1/2 Myrtle-av.
Merrill, L T, 45 Oxford.
McClease, D, 7 Clearmont-av.
McCarthy, J, 254 Hudson-av.
Murray, J, Murray.
Marcus, J, 293 Hudson.
McGowan, J, Fulton-av.
McCormick, R, St Felix.
Miller, R, Park-av.
Morrissev, J, Eliot-pl.
Martin, C, 93 Lafayette.
Moody, D E, 26 Flatbush.
McMillet, C, 192 Navy.
Newcomb, G W, 149 Adelphi.
Nevins, R L, 96 Hamilton.
Newville, C M, 164Clarmont-av.
Ney, W H, Park-av.
Newall, A, 311 Carleton-av.
Nathan, C, 189 Navy.
Newman, H, Vanderbilt.
Nagel, C, 149 Myrtle.
Naddy, M, Flushing-av.
Noltoh, D, 132 Oxford.
Nash, D A, 209 Adelphi.
Newman. J, Myrtle.
Noland, T, Myrtle.
Noble, Rob't, 360 Cumberland.
Noman, H W, 130 Bridge.
Nooman, W, Canton.
Ney, E C, 28 Greene-st.
Newell, Ed, 301 Carlton.
Neidlinger, J, 240 Carlton.
O'Leary, A, Hamilton.
O'Hauthalie, D H, 109
Oxford. Osborne, J G, Clinton-av.
O'Dauk, G, 342 Carleton.
Ostrander, G, 47 Vanderbilt.
Oakley, S J, 184 Navy.
Oliver, F, 148 Park.
Ostrander, P W, 47 Atlantic-av.
O'Brien, J, 156 Johnson.
O'Conner, G, 1 Clearmont.
Olsen, T, Hospital.
Oberton, J (col), 147 Navy.
Packard, J, 239 Navy.
Peasley, L, 44 Adelphi.
Parker, J, 64. Cortland.
Pollard, N, Vanderbilt-av.
Parke, M, 3 Gulliver.
Pike, O, 123 Vanderbilt-av.
Pine, J, Navy.
Ohlson, H, 65 Cumberland.
Carr, H L, 118 Lafayette.
Owens, D, (col), 147 Navy.
Pratt, C, Clinton-av.
Peer, W W, 244 Cumberland.
Pine, J W, 6 Hampden.
Pums, G, Raymond.
Purdy, T, 238 Graven.
Parks, J. 208 Adelphi.
Prince, G J, Vanderbilt.
Prouder, L A, 73 Clearmont-av.  
Parker, W, 280 Fulton-av.
Park, J, Clearmont-av.
Pond, E, 80. Greene.
Payne, J, 96 Carleton.
Parsons, H W, 277 Gold.
Potts, G, 209 Navy.
Pine, S H, 191 Carleton.
Park, J H, 19 Greene.
Phillips, W H, 256 Myrtle.
Pierce, R, Fulton-av.
Price, E, 34 Prince.
Pearsall, Wm, 445 Myrtle.
Prince, A, 299 Fulton.
Pemy, J E, 400 Cumberland.
Powers, T F, Myrtle-av.
Philips, J B, 32Hudson.
Platt, W E, Hamilton.
Pearsall. G, Cortland.
Quinn, W, 199 Bridge.
Quickley, J, 100 Clark.
Roe, D, 58 Clinton.
Ryan, W, Washington-av.
Rackett, L, 63 Adelphi.
Rinaldi, S, Park-av.
Philips, D B, 34 Lafayette.
Peters, Wm H H, 64 Washington.
Robertson, J, .12 Oxford.
Redman, T, 258 Hudson-av.
Reenan, J, 26 Lafayette-av.
Rhodes, J D, 94 Carleton-av.
Robertson, E R, 185 Duffield.
Ricks, Y, (col'd) 236 Tillary.
Ross, G S, 241 Adelphi.
Riley, J, 20 Park-av.
Riney, G, 58 Flatbush-av.
Rowan, J R, 184 Duffield-st.
Russell, W H, 7 Oxford.
Roshese, A, 66 Clearmont.
Ryrnes, Ed, 89 Carl.
Rantols, F, 66 Adelphi.
Riley, M, 77 Cumberland.
Rossmal, N, 42 Bridge.
Riley, T S, 421 Fulton.
Rutherford, T, 210 Bridge.
Roberts, R, 409 Myrtle.
Rooney, J, Sycamore.
Roger, M, 5 Cortland.
Rockwood, J W, 149 Navy.
Rowan, D A, 331 Carleton.
Rufford, J, 247 Fulton.
Ross, S B, 241 Adelphi.
Rickfuss, E D, 22 Washington.
Robinson, J, 153 Park.
Robert, A, 273 Hudson-av.
Rippen, C, 294 Myrtle-av.
Robinson, A, (col'd) 2 Fair.
Rossell, I S, 2 Lafayette.
Ratiner, J H, 108 Clermont-av.
Robert, J, 101 Fulton-av.
Rich, J W, 137 Eliot-pl.
Redfield, H, 54 Fort Greene.
Relsa, A, 363 Carlton-av.
Rogers, C, Hampton.
Ree, J P, 17 Cortland.
Robertson, J, 63 Carleton.
Rudd, B, 282 Hudson.
Ripley, J D, 135 Lafayette.
Rogers, W H, Park-av.
Reidenberg, R F, 292 Franklin.
Richardson, G, Park.
Riley, M, 14 Clinton.
Reobana, E, Clermont.
Ribb, T B, Hanson-place.
Rogers, W, Park-av.
Ryan, T, Oxford.
Ryder, S H, 189 Fulton.
Reter, B, (col'd), Oxford.
Ross, R J, 85 Carleton.
Ranke, J, Clinton-av.
Roderick, J, 22 Greene.
Rogers, J, 273 Myrtle.
Roberts, C N, 118 Lafayette.
Raymond, H D, 70 Lafayette.
Shannon, T, 230 Myrtle-av.
Shields, W H, 54 Ft Greene-pl.
Springsteen. W, 51 Carleton-av.
Seaman, B, 75 Bridge.
Seymour M, 149 Willoughby.
St Felix, L H R, 223 Raymond.
Stevenson, J N, 85 Adelphi.
Street, C B, 230 Adelphi.
Sheridan, P, Freeman.
Stryker, J F, 108 Myrtle.
Sherer, Wm, Hamilton.
Spaulding, S B, Clinton.
Spaid, C, 837 Fulton-av.
Stafford, J, 244 Cumberland.
Smith, D C. 201 Carleton.
Shreggs, B, 64 Prince.
Sedler, J H, 62 Fleet.
Reale, D C, 69 Carleton.
Roley, T, Raymond.
Roberts, J, 147 Willoughby.
Sullow, H L, 427 Hudson.
Sitch, E, Vanderbilt-st.
Slootoff, D, 12 De Kalb.
Srynder, W, 75 Hamilton.
Stringham, D, Oxford.
Salt, L R, 128 Duffield.
Sawyer, W A, 295 Adelphi.
Street, W E, 330 Adelphi.
Smith, Geo W, 292 Gold.
Smith, M W, 443 Fulton.
Stringer, S W. 57 Carl.
Smith, S R, 78 Carl.
Smith, W H, Cortland-av.
Sharp, P, Flushing-av.
Scoffeld, C, Clinton.
Soriden, F, 231 Navy.
Steven, William, 193 Adelphi.
Smith, J A, 269 Hudson.
Sylvester, J W, Raymond.
Suylan, T H, 62 Prince.
Seymour, E C, 62 Elliot-pl.
Sweet, J, Park-av.
Schamlot, J, 4 Clermont-av.
Salliman, Geo, Myrtle.
Simonds, L, 11 Greene-av.
Schinler, C, Clinton cor Myrtle.
Saber, E, Atlantic-av.
Schoonmacher, L E, 156 Adelphi.
Smith, C, 375 Hudson-av.
Sartell, B, Clinton-av.
Stracey, H, 1 Fleet.
Strickland, G A, 105 Park-av.
Simpson, H, 320 Fulton-av.
Skiwind, J, 226 Raymond.
Stultz, P, 383 Hudson.
Stapleton, T, 156 Navy.
Steele, J H, 73 Adelphi.
Sherer, P, Raymond.
Skidmore, W, 175 Adelphi.
Sanderson, S, 343 Adelphi.
Smith, jr, T E, 65 Adelphi.
Schmidt, J, 252 Grove.
Smith, E D, 23 Lafayette.
Sanders, L, 160 Willoughby.
Smith, W, 293 Hudson.
Sheppard, T, 137 Oliver.
Smith, S L, 37 N Oxford.
Sexton, W, 30 Oxford.
Silleck, H H, 365 Cumberland.
Spaulding, A, 92 Duffield.
Swift, C, 195 Adelphi.
Settleson, A W, 129 Clearm'nt.
Simpson, A, 287 Cumberland.
Sweeney, A, 114 Willoughby.
Swanton, J E, 51 Elliott.
Shaw, (col.) F, 2 Fair.
Still, J, 204 Adolphus.
Shelley, F, 230 Park.
Spader, W P, 66 Washington.
Simmonds, G, (col), 152 Navy.
Snedecer, J S, Lafayette.
Sweetland, W, Clermont-av.
Schultz, H G, 338 Fulton.
Tappett, J, 103 Lafayette.
Taber, Albert, 224 Ravens.
Tuscher, J, Fort Green-place.
Traber, Geo, 276 Fulton-av.
Thomas, E J, 69 Cumberland.
Tupps, S W, 188 Clermont.
Tucker, S, 78 Park.
Touman, P, Cortland-av.
Tillots, D B, 266 Raymond.
Tilton, Theo, 27 York.
Trumner, P, 407 Myrtle-av.
Titus, H B, Hamilton.
Thompson, C, 7 Gates.
Taper, F W, 281 Navy.
Truss, K, Myrtle-av.
Thompson, G S, 55 Prince.
Todd, E, Clinton-av.
Tuluff, W H, 249 Navy.
Taylor, C, Carleton-av.
Tillots, J, 134 Lafayette.
Tracy, H, 35 Navy.
Thompson, J W, 39 Cumb'l'd.
Taylor, P W, 215 Duffield.
Titus, E, 295 Navy.
Tobias, G H, 238 Lafayette.
Tiblets, R, Hamilton.
Turner, S, 268 Myrtle.
Temple, T D, 113 Lafayette.
Tyson, J, 10 Hampden.
Van Kleeck, P, 48 Prince.
Varien, jr, V, 51 De Kalb.
Valentine, N, 304 Carleton-av.
Van Wagner, E, 293 Myrtle-av.
Vanger, J, 435 Myrtle.
Van Stegn, J, 232 Myrtle.
Whitmore, P H, 347 Navy.
White, W H, Flatbush.
Welsh, L, 141 Navy.
Watson, T J, 48 Carl.
William, G S, 138 Ft Green-pl.
White, A, 135 Graham.
Wortman, L O, 77 N'th Oxford.
Weeks, T R, 70 Carleton-st.
Waterman, C, 46 Lafayette.
White, W, 280 Fulton-st.
Wicks, W, 23 Lafayette.
Woolengee, E W, 401 Adelphi.
Ward, W J, 55 Oxford.
Wright, D, 35 St Felix.
Ward, P, 110 Navy.
Wicks, C, 411 Myrtle-av.
Western, H.J, Washington-av.
Wolf, M, 130 Myrtle-av.
Wesley, W H, 16 Eliot-place.
Wellbroch, J, 355 Hudson-av.
William, J (col), 432 Fult0n-av.
Webster, Wm, 293 Gold.
Wrickerd, C, 214 Fort Green-pl.
Winthrop, A, 293 Fulton-av.
Wynan, J L, 104 Hamilton-av.
Walker, J A, Vanderbilt.
Washington, T B, Lafayette.
Walker, F, 104 Cumberland.
Wiltz, C, 242 Navy.
Wallace. W H, 21 Greene.
Winfield, H B, 203 Cumberl'd.
White, N, 388 Cumberland.
Wiseman, P G, 237 Fulton.
Watson, W N, 281 Grove.
Ward, J, Auburn-place.
White, T, Atlantic-av.
Walker, C, Adelphi.
William, F W, 65 Cumberl'd.
Wake, F, 397 Adelphi.
Wardell, T, 244 Raymond.
Wykoff, R M, 236 Lafayette.
Williams, E W, 41 Greene.
Warner, D, 64 Bridge.
Weldon, P, Canton.
Willis, W, 168 Clermont.
Wilson, G, 22 Cumberland.
Woolsack, W C, 378 Hudson.
Westin, C F, 372 Myrtle.
Whitehouse, F, 24 Clermont.
Whiting, G, 170 Clermont-av.
Winan, J, Park-av.
Wilcox, T, 15 Dubois.
Ward, P, 110 Raymond.
Welsh, J, Stanton-st.
Wood, H, 2 Greene-av.
Wall, M, 271 Myrtle-av.
Whiting, G, 381 Cumberland.
Whislow, W P, 117 Eliot.
William (col), H, 403 Fulton.
Wood, F A, Clinton.
William, S, 1 Park-av.
Wamzer, W H, 160 Clearmont.
Wildman, L R, 141 Willoughby.
Wortsby, L, 383 Fulton-av.
Wetmore, R D, Navy.
Watson, J, 124 Johnson.
Whitlan, D G, 362 Bridge.
Wheeler, J, Canton.
Wood, G, 252 Clearmont.
Willerts, C D, Clearmont.
White, H G, Washington-av.
William, Dan (col.), 4 Fair.
Weeds, C, cor Park & Clearm't.
Wildrich, J, 191 Fulton-av.
Winond, G H, 466 Myrtle-av.
Williams, D L, 32 Flatbush.
Waiss, W F, 338 Carleton-av.
Ward, P, 4 Blackburn.
Worst, C, Park. 
Walter, T, 377 Hudson.
Wright, G, 173 Myrtle.
Walker, W E, Auburn-place.
Westendohl, W, Raymond.
Watkey, J, 278 Gold.
Wool, R G, 275 Grove.
Wallace, Wm, 359 Hudson.
Walter, J A, 335 Carleton-st.
Webber, A, 30 Blackwell.
Young, C, Myrtle.
Yourell, P, 149 Willoughby.
York, J, Courtland-av.
York, T, 50 Bridge.
Zeroup, J, 101 Fulton.
The Eleventh Ward was finished at a quarter to one o'clock. After a recess of an hour the committee proceeded to count the slips contained ,,,nes of those
enrolled in the Eighth sub-district ...is the Thirteenth Ward.
The Committee announced the number of slips as 2,041, which being correct, they were deposited in the wheel and the drawing began for the 528 names which constituted the quota of the

THIRTEENTH WARD.
Altmeyer, S, cor Grand and 1st.
Ackerly, A, 106 S 4th.
Ankers, J H, 85 S 2d.
Ambler, R T, 129 4th.
Adamson, R, 89 S 6th.
Alex, F, 215 Grand.
Adee, D S, 3 Washington-place.
Airzel, J, 20 S 3d.
Armstrong, W A, 274 S 3d.
Abel, Geo, 186 2d.
Arting, J, 88 S 7th. Armstrong, J, 83 Grand.
Albert, A, 105 Grand.
Bowman, T H, 101 2d.
Bonder, D H, 180 3d.
Benton, E, 127 S 8th.
Burton, E, 220 S 1st.
Blawbell, J H, 93 S 1st.
Beekman, H, 47 1/2 S 7th.
Brantigan, T, cor 2d-st & S 1st.
Burke, J, 1 3d-st.
Bradley, Ben, 62 S 4th-st.
Brown, H A, 39 S 4th-st.
Brealey, T, 76 S 3d-st.
Beaton, P, 97 Grand-st.
Byrne, J, 50 S 3d-st.
Bowinwell, G C, 212 S 2d-st.
Baust, Wm, 154 S 5th-st.
Burke, C, 267 Grand-st.
Byrne, B B, cor Grand & 2d-st.
Baugh, E, 44 S 8th-st.
Bopp, C, 176 1st-st.
Baldwin, J, 241 Grand-st.
Brown, C, 148 S 1st-st.
Brakely, J, 57 S 3d-st.
Betts, C R, 140 S 2d-st.
Basleer, J, 44 S 3d-st.
Butler, W E, 104 6th-st.
Berry, J, 46 S 7th-st.
Brody, J, 188 2d-st.
Boyle, P, 104 4th-st.
Bunseiler, A, 107 South 4th-st.
Berry, Geo C, 194 South-4t-st.
Baxter, M, 5 South 5th-st.
Bedell, D, S, 143 South 1st-st.
Brown, W A, 174 South 3d-st.
Barstow, H K, 56 South 10th-st.
Brush, Geo, 63 9th-st.
Benjamin, P, 85 2d-st.
Batterson, W P, 122 South 9th.
Burnett, H, 6 South 10th-st.
Budd, W, 129 South 8th-st.
Bowlby, R N, 192 South 3d-st.
Betts, C, 126 South 8th-st.
Bergenhoff, J, 245 Grand-st.
Brunges, A, 135 4th-st.
Baker, Geo, 18 5th-st.
Busby, L, 138 South 3d-st.
Burns, R, 103 Grand-st.
Borst, J, 203 1st-st.
Bune, G L, 174 S 9th-st.
Ballow, P J, 6 4th-st.
Bristow, J, 1 S 10th-st.
Binkham, J jr, 3 5th-st.
Brampton, B C, 114 S 1st-st.
Bowers, S, 45 S 7th-st.
Concklin, E A, 98 S 5th-st.
Coord, C W, 45 S 3d-st.
Crosby, H, 79 S 4th-st.
Cole, E, 24 S 1st-st.
Carl, C, 190 2d-st.
Cornell, W D, 184 S 3d-st.
Collius, J, 109 2d-st.
Carr, S, 75 S 3d-st.
Cox, Wm, 239 Grand-st.
Connolly, T J, 197 S 2d-st.
Cole, J J, 36 S 4th-st.
Coppertnwaite, T H, 12 S 6th.
Clay, W, 64 4th-st.
Curly, J, 116 1st-st.
Class, H, 55 S 2d-st.
Catley, L, 86 S 6th-st.
Coo, J W, 37 S 6th-st.                                 
Chattaway, G, 125 4th-st.
Coard, F, 45 S 3d-st.                                      
Caspar, F, 44 S 1st-st.
Chatterson, S, 153 2d-st.               
Cook, C, 42 S 6th-st.
Culbert, A C, 71 4th-st.                              
Curley, T, 10 S 5th-st.
Concklin, J B, 215 S 2d-st.                 
Chapman, J C, 82 S 4th-st.
Close, R, 6 S 1st-st.                    
Canfield, E, 11 S 3d-st.
Creedam, T, 160 1st-st.                
Cling, J, 130 S 2d-st.
Campbell, J J, 42 S 3d-st.                      
Cocks, J, 121 4th-st.
Corn, H, 253 Grand st.                  
Cook, G F, 62 2d-st.
Cook, W, 137 4th-st.                    
Carr, T, 1 South 6th-st.
Chambers, J, 148 3d-st.                              
Cook, W, 148 4th-st.
Chestnut, J, 259 Grand-st.                    
Chessire, C W, 95 South 2d-st.
Cornish, A, 78 South 3d-st.
Clelland, S, 212 1st-st.
Chapin, Geo, 136 South 9th-st.
Congdon, S, 177 South 5th-st.
Caldwell, J, 9 South 3d-st
Cooney, C, 99 South 8th-st.
Clarey, R, 3 South 5th-st.
Cofman, J, 211 Grand-st.
Denyce, R, 5th-st.
Davis, J, 105 South 1st-st.
Duncan, J G, 58 4th-st.
Daubert, H, 1 S 5th-.st.
Davidson, C M, 26 S 9th-st.
Downing, D E, 62 S 5th-st.
Dies, J, 203 lst-st.
Dona, T, 93 S 8th-st.
Dimes, J, 192 S 5th-st.
Davis, G H, 145 S 2d-st.
Delanoy, T, 27 4th-st.
Davidson, B, 41 S 4th-st.
Dempeny, J, 153 S lst-st.
Durrender, Wm, 81 S 4th-st.
Enderby, W A, 51 9th-st.
Ehrlich, 197 Grand-st.
Edwards, J, 93 3d-st.
Ely, J R, 120 5th-st.
Foley, C, So 4th-st.
Franklin, C, 50 So 8th-st.
Fingal, W, 88 Grand-st.
Finkle, E, 14 3d-st.
Fishbough, W, 54 So 3d-st.
Fuller, B H, 19 So 6th-st.
Fenner, E, 3 5th-st.
Fagers, E, 60 S 4th-st.
Feedan, M, 147 lst-st.
Foster, W, 9 Washington-pl.
Finch, G W, 10 S 9th-st.
Fisk, S A, 2 Washington place.
Dean, C, 109 South 6th-st.
Denzie, J, 79 South 7th-st.
Davis, C E, 3 Jefferson-pl.
Day, C S, 33 S 3d-st.
Davis, L, 32 1st-st.
Dixon, H N, 16 S 7th-st.
Delange, H K, 2 S 7th-st.
Diemer, H, 20 S 7th-st.
Duffy, T, 49 S 8th-st.
Dousey, J, 134 4th-st.
Devin, H, 189 S 2d-st.
Denby, S (col'd), 50 S 9th-st.
Dempsey, W, 104 S lst-st.
Doyle, M E, 91 S 1st-st.
Ehair, T, 301 Grand-st.
Evans, T S, Wall-house.
Eliot. J, 113 So 4th-st.
Eddy, F, 176 2d-st.
Foster, G, 142 So 2d-st..
Fursman, J, 81 So 4th-st.
Furgeson, C, 11 Lewis-place.
Fisher, G, 192 2d-st.
Figge, G, 3 cor So 3d-st.
Furnald, G W, 2 So 8th-st.
Farrell, J H, 47 S 1st-st.
Fitch, D, 176 S 3d-st.
Furgerson, G S, 113 2d-st.
Fisher, J
Fitch, E, 15 Dunham-place.
Ginkey, A, 29 4th-st.
Gleason, R W, 68 S 2d-st.
Grimm, jr., C F, 170 S 2d-st.
Gleason, F, 62 S 2d-st.
Gay, F, cor 2d and S 11th-st.
Griffith, J, 188 S 5th.
Grace, J, 31 S 2d.
Girard, W, 27 S 7th.
Grigg, C C, 189 Grand.
Gallagher, J, 151 4th.
Griswold, T, S 2d.
Gould, J, 82 8th.
Gilmore, M, 50 1/2 S 6th.
Hobby, E H, 2 S 6th.
Hunt, F, 101 S 3d.
Hoffmann, J H, 211 S 4th.
Herst, S, 153 4th.
Harper, C, 1 4th.
Holden, H S, Wall House.
Hodson, C, 2 Dunham-place.
Haggard, Wm, 35 Grand.
Harkness, J, 142 S 5th.
Hartlege, J, 78 7th.
Hanks, A T, 11 5th-st.
Huested, J, 125 S 4th-st.
Hicks, J J, 49 S lst-st.
Hocker, W F, 104 S 2d-st.
Hutchins, J, 27 S 7th-st.
Hall, S, 51 S 5th-st.
Harman, J, 198 S 6th-st.
Griffith, J W, 152 4th-st.
Gillespie, W B, 163 S 2d-st.
Gibson, W H, 151 S 3d-st.
Guire, C, 153 2d-st.
Goldey, J B, 117 S 8th-st.
Grattan, T H, 183 S 4th.
Grand, W J, 128 S 1st.
Greenway, J, 7 S 6th.
Garner, H, 155 S 5th.
Grundas, A, 96 S 2d.
Greagh, A, 7 Washington-place.
Gleason, D, 68 S 2d.
Grigg, R, 10 Lafayette-place.
Hanberry, M, 120 1st.
Hamilton, J, 197 South 6th.
Hollis, G, 108 S 9th.
Haynes, W, 102 6th.
Himer, G, 198 S 4th.
Hunter, E, 120 S 2d.
Hazen, W B, S 8th.
Hoffman, H, 31 1st.
Hall, D, 94 3d.
Harvey, J C, 105 S 2d.
Hayward, M G, 30 S 10th-st.
Haynes, T, 35 Grand-st.
Hodson, J K, 48 S 1st.
Hahn, Geo, 265 Grand-st.
Hughs, C, 112 S 4th-st.
Halliday, W, 103 S 4th-st.
Havemeyer, W, 35 S 4th-st.
Henry, H, 194 S3d-st.
Hugh, J, 190 2d-st.
Howell, D P, 80 S 5th-st.
Hupps, G, 32 S 5th-st.
Haight, D F, 78 4th-st.
Hall, G, 193 S 3d-st.
Hempstead, W H, 141 S 8th-st.
Haviland, C H, 79 2d-st.
Isham, A J, 40 South 5th.
Ironsides, W J, 120 South 8th.
Johnson, S, 187 South 6th.
Jennings, F A, 148 South 4th.
Jackson, H K, 118 South 4th.
Jackson, J, 157 2d.
Jones, M A, 160 South 9th.
Jeremias, J, 157 2d.
Jenkins, A, 6 South 4th.
Jones, E H, 10 Washington-pl.
Jones, W, 120 3d.
Jarvis, E J, Washington-place.
Johnson, W H, 84 5th.
Keller, Geo, 186 2d.
Kenkell, J, Grand.
Keg!e, T, 162 South 4th.
Kyte, Geo, 12 1/2 Grand-st.
Kenyon, R W, 78 4th-st.
Kaldenbac, C, 89 S 7th-st.
Kelly, J H, 10 Lafayette Place.
Lot, S, 184 3d-st.
Lockwood, G, 107 S 4th-st.
Lewis, R, 105 Grand-st.
Little, N, 237 Grand-st.
Lea, C W, 96 3d-st.
Lewis, O B, 49 4th-st.
Leacraft, W, 72 S 3d-st.
Lockwood, J A, 137 S 4th-st.
Levy, J, 85 S 3d-st.
Littlely, F, 120 S 6th-st.
Litch, J E, 22 S lst-st.
Lim, A, 10 3d-st.
McWay, Wm, 6th-st.
McCann, J, 62 S 7th-st.
McCloud, D, 116 1st-st.
McLeon, C E, 125 Grand-st.
Munfetow, J K, 153 S 2d-st.
McMurray, A, 38 S 2d.
Manning, H, S 1st.
McCutcheon, A, 100 S 4th.
Kendrick, jr. J, 89 Grand.
Kellinger, G A, 87 South 4th.
Kemble, Geo A, cor Grand & 2d.
Klyde, Wm, 61 8th-st.
Klein, J, 13 S 7th-st.
Kipp, A, 168 S 6th-st.
Kelly, J, 47 S lst-st.
Litch, W, 148 lst-st.
Larrimee, J, 53 S 2d-st.
Lester, C, 6 Fulton Market.
Laird, J, 117 S 6th-st.
Luckenburch, H, 129 S 3d-st.
Lord, Geo H, 192 S 5th-st.
Lane, J, 45 S 4th-st.
Leider, F, 188 2d-st.
Leak, H, 182 2d-st.
Lemonier, W A (c'd), S 4th-st.
Loyd, Wm, 6 Lafayette-pl.
Lyons, B, 49 S 7th-st.
McGuire, D, 152 2d-st.
Millet, W H, 49 S 5th-st.
McCullen, J, 126 5th-st.
Marsden, D, 97 S 8th-st.
Minch, A, 203 1st-st.
McWhinney, J, 19 S 2d.
Murphy, T, 192 S 6th.
Meger, D W, 125 5th.
Mulloney, P, 1st.
McCann, F, 44 S 9.
Myers, Geo, 131 S 7th.
Miller, J, 43 S 7th.
Murray, J, 4 S 5th.
McKenerty, J, 81 S 8th.
McCormick, W, 188 S 4th.
McLaughlin, F, 202 S 2d.
Martin, D, 24 1/2 S 6th.
Murray, C, 95 S 3d.
Murdock, A, 83 Grand.
McCaffray, M, 45 S 8th.
McKenred, W, Grand & 2d-st.
McDermott, M, 161 S 3d-st.
Mill, S, S 5th-st.
McCabe, J, S lst and 2d-st.
Mettis, T, 82 8th-st.
McConnell, E J, 91 S 8th-st.
Mushon, E, 27 S 7th-st.
Muller, G, 259 Grand-st.
Malone, T, 190 2d-st.
Merritt, W D, 72 S 8th-st.
Miller, J, cor S 1st and 1st-st.
Miller, J E, 76 S 3d-st.
McGinn, P, 120 lst-st.
Mahony, G, 116 lst-st.
McAustten, D J, 124 S 6th-st.
McMahon, J, 153 S lst-st.
McCort, Wm, cor 1st & 10th-sts.
McQuade, T, cor S 6th & 8th-sts.
Murphy, T, 86 7th-st.
Macles, J, 183 S 4th-st.
McGwill, O, S lst-st.
McNally, H, 177 S 3d-st.
Middleberry, S, 190 S 5th.
Mone, A, 200 S 4th-st.
Nichols, D M, 70 South 4th-st.
Nichols, E, 209 3d-st.
North, Wm, 84 South 5th-st.
Nevins, J H, 135 lst-st.
Nostrand, J W, 167 South 4th.
Nugent, T, 11 Grand-st.
Nevins, J H, 155 South 3d-st.
O'Neil, J, 120 1st-st.
Oliver, J, 197 South 2d-st.
Olmstead, H, 125 3d-st.
Olcott, C R, 36 5th-st.
Olcott, E, 2 Washington-place.
Oppenheim, S, 122 Grand-st.
Osborne, C, 198 South 3d-st.
O'Donohue, J M, 52 2d-st.
Pfoang, K, 162 South 6th-st.
Patterson, J, South 9th-st.
Philip, J, 173 S 3rd-st.
Potter, A H, 130 S 8th-st.
Parker, S I 5th-st.
Potter, T J, 199 S 3rd.
Puff, O M, 56 S 1st-st.
Powers, J G, 89 S 3rd-st.
Pell, J, 81 S 7th-st.
Paul, H, Grand-st.
Peters, V, 125 South 3d-st.
Parks, J, 194 S 4th-st.
Prindell, G N, cor 2 and S 11th.
Parks, P, 124 S 2nd-st.
Phelps, W, 183 S 1st-st.
Pearsall, O, 205 S 1st-st.
Pemberton, J, 178 2nd-st.
Powell, A, 237 Grand-st.
Pratt, A D, 25 S 3rd-st.
Paskett, Wm, 10 Lafayette-pl.
Robinson, W, 45 So 7th-st.
Ryan, jr H, 98 S 5th-st.
Ripley, D N, 1 So 4th-st.
Rosenban, J, 100 So 6th-st.
Reebe, E, 189 So 2d-st.
Roche, D, 130 So 6th-st.
Rees, J N, 150 4th-st.
Reed, G W, 51 So 1st-st.
Rockett, G R, 142 3d-st.
Rhode, C, 167 Grand-st.
Ripling, W, 115 So 6th-st.
Richardson, W, 20 So 1st-st.
Rothman, P, 176 1st-st.
Rockwell, E, 25 So 8th-st.
Reque, G, 55 So 6th-st.
Rolixman, G, 45 So 4th-st.
Ruttenberg, H, 94 So 7th-st.
Rockenberser, J, 204 1st-st.
Raghte, O C, 37 So 7th-st.
Roche, T C, 218 So 1st-st.
Russell, H E, 162 So 5th-st.
Riney, E, 65 So 2d-st.
Ring, L, 113 So 8th-st.
Schott, L, 130 1st-st.
Smith, W (col.), 191 S 6th-st.
Swintner, H, 194 2d-st.
Smith, W T, 62 2d-st.
Smith, G, 46 S 3d-st.
Smith, A A, 100 4th st.
Schmit, M, 52 1st-st.
Smith, G R, 138 4th-st.
Sheehan, Ed, 84 1st-st.
Sullivan, T, 11 S 5th-st.
Staenhauser, K, 135 4th-st.
Scott, D, 157 2d-st.
Seizert, C, 28 S 4th-st.
Smith, W H, 168 S 4th-st.
Samond, J, cor Grand & 2d-sts.
Schlicking, Hen, 220 S 3d-st.
Stemmerman, Geo, 158 S 6th-st.
Slepe, E, 198 S 3d-st.
Stamper, J, 43 S 7th-st.
Smith, Wm, 112 3d-st.
Schults, J, 47 South 4th-st.
Shaw, T, 201 S 1st-st.
Shaw, A, 30 S 2d-st.
Swan, J, 102 S 2d-st.
Spear, H E, 189 S 5th-st.
Sopher, J A, 16 S 3d-st.
Sweet, Wm, 78 S 9th-st.
Sheridan, J, 98 5th-st.
Silleck, J, 85 S 4th-st.
Smith, L, 77 S 2d-st.
Shroader, P N, 156 S 2d-st.
Stinson, T A, 127 Grand-st.
Strong, H M, 102 S 8th-st.
Shuffield, J J, 62 2d-st.
Schlitter, J, 204 1st-st.
Smith, J, 134 3d-st.
Seibers, W, 48 S 5th-st.
Schmidt, C, 15 1/2 Grand-st.
Shay, F, 9 S 7th-st.
Stebinger, M D, S 1st, cor 2d.
Small, J, 96 S 4th-st.
Simons, J, 3d-st, cor Grand.
Schmidt, G, 50 1/2 Grand-st.
Sull, J, 185 S 3d-st.
Smith, J J, 149 S 3d-st.
Speery, W S, 11 Dunham-pl.
Sabel, J, 197 S 2d-st.
Smith, C B, 149 S 3d-st.
Suydam, J J, 111 S 2d-st.
Seeley, R, 179 2d-st.
Smith, R, 183 3d-st.
Simonen, W, S 5th cor 3d-st.
Swanton, W, 117 8th-st.
Street, C, 184 S 6th-st.
Steinfield, C, 25 S 7th-st.
Thompson, W H, 139 3d-st.
Thomas, A R, Wall House.
Tibball, J, 180 6th-st.
Thomas, J V, WallHouse.
Trickee, A, 24 S 4th-st.
Taylor, G, 1 Washington-pl.
Trano, J, 158 2d-st.
Thurkaub, A, S 9th-st.
Tillo, P N, 67 S 3d-st.
Tucker, W R, 20 S 3d-st.
St John, H, cor B and O 3d-st.
Stschoff, H W, 101 S 3d-st.
Saddington, T B, 2 7th-st.
Straut, P F, 107 2d-st.
Smith, C, 20 S 8th-st.
Turton, J, 92 S 6th-st.
Thooker, J O, 44 S 5th-st.
Tighe, J P, 64 S 6th-st.
Teale, M E, 201 S 4th-st.
Taylor, G E, 165 S 4th-st.
Templeman, F, 204 1st-st.
Trot, Wm, 142 S 6th-st.
Thompson, R, 64 4th-st.
Thomas, J, 76 S 6th-st.
Taylor, J, 105 S 9th-st.
Ulshamer, C, 120 South 7th-st.
Vandyne, J, 102 1st-st.
Valentine, C E, 141 4th-st.
Vogell, J, 93 So 1st-st.
Welter, H, 140 4th-st.
Westervelt, N J, 132 S 9th-st.
Wall, J, 267 Grand.
Watts, Geo E, 158 4th-st.  
Wilson, S, 3 7th-st.
Wood, T, 125 S 2d-st.
Waters, J, 93 S 8th-st.
Wheeler, 146 S 2d-st.
Wall, C, 28 S 9th-st.
Whitely, J, 176 S 5th-st.
Walter, A F, 2 S 7th-st.
Wall, D E, Wall House.
Watts, J, 7 4th-st.
Westervelt, P, 18 S 7th-st.
Wall, J, 267 Grand.
Watts, Geo E, 158 4th-st.
Wilson, S, 3 7th-st.
Wood, T, 125 S 2d-st.
Waters, J, 93 S 8th-st.
Wheeler, Geo H, 67 S 5th-st.
Wood, W, 152 S 9th-st.
Weaver, T, 152 S 6th-st.
Wolf, F, 145 3d-st.
Willett, J, 158 S 3d-st.
Westfield, E, cor. 2d & S 7th-sts.
Weeks, J, 48 S 2d-st.
Weaver, A L, 196 S 4th-sts.
Weirman, J, 8 S 1st-st.
Whalan, J, 170 S lst-st.
Whitehead, J, 68 1/2 S 4th-st.
Walters, J M, cor. 1st & S 9th.
Williams, E M, 169 S 6th-st.
Wentworth, J W, 195 S 1st-st.
West, A, 16 S 3d-st.
Wall, jr Wm, 31 S 9th-st.
Waterman, H, cor 2d & S sts.
Wierman, H, 8 S 1st.
Wine, F W, 60 S 4th-st.
Young, D, 3 2d-st.
Young, Wm, 152 S 2d-st.
Young, A D, 62 7th-st.
Young, J N, 3 2d-st.
The draft for this Ward was completed at 4 o'clock. To-morrow the Fifteenth and Nineteenth Wards will take their turn, and complete the draft in the Third District.

FOURTEENTH WARD.
At 3 P. M., the ballots having been counted for the Fourteenth Ward or Seventh Sub-District, by a Committee of gentlemen comprising Supervisor J. Dolan, Alderman Murphy, Ex-Alderman Riley, and Messsrs. James Maloney and John Hobley, and declared to be correct, they were to the number of 2,385 placed in the wheel--the number to be drawn 228, which, with the additional fifty per cent, (114), made the whole draft ordered 342. Amid general quiet and attention, the drawing then went on.
A.
Aarens, Al, 1st cor N 12th.
Askin, J, 141 N 5th.
Anderson, Alex, 35 N 3d.
Ackerly, R, 22 Grand.
Austin, Wm, 12 N 8th.

B.
Brennan, G, 33 N 4th.
Babcock, Jno, 158 N 5th.
Brown, A, 116 Grand.
Bradford, Geo W, 156 Grand.
Boroughmaster, H, 6th.
Booten, Pat, N 9th near 5th.
Bouner, B, 309 4th.
Betts, E, 186 N 2d.
Benington, Hy, 80 N 6th.
Bates, Benj, N 8th near 4th.
Baker, Jno, 326 3d.
Brow, Chas, 220 1st.
Brow, W W, 31 N 2d.
Bridge, Wm, 145 N 4th.
Burton, Hy, 101 9th.
Blake, M, 313 1st.
Blaney, Thos, 28 N 9th.
Brown, Jno, N 5th near 4th.
Barr, J, 198 Grand.
Booth, Sam, 71 N 5th.
Bradford, W H, 73 N 2d.
Brale, Jno, 248 Grand.
Barts, C H, 117 North 4th.
Bohn, Hy, 63 North 6th.
Barrett, Jno, 83 North 6th.
Blohm, Thos, 5th cor N 6th.
Bradway, N 6th near 4th.
Brown, Wm, 215 North 2d.      
Bayard, E, 8th cor N 2d.
Bell, Ed, N 2d near N 7th.         
Brown, F, 391 North 1st.
Baldwin, _ _, 72 N 4th.              
Beal, Jno A, 13_ 7th.

C.
Carlise, Thos J, 135 Ninth.
Connelly, B, 143 N 5th.
Chase, N G, 72 North 2d.
Callan, P, 86 North 4th.
Calhoun, Jos, 144 Grand.
Connor, M, 27 North 9th.
Carr, Peter, 1st st near N 8th.
Cehal, Chas, 122 North 2d.
Cohen, C W, 173 North 6th.
Clohen, T, 104 North 6th.
Conklin, Chris, 391 1st street, rear.
Connelly, Pat, 8th st corner Ainslie.
Cosgrove, Wm, 138 N 2d.
Collins, Hy, 116 North 4th.
Cook, M, 17 North 8th.
Chapman, B W, 134 N 6th.
Connolly, M, North 2d cor 5th.
Coletti, F, 142 1/2 Grand.
Cullin, Jno, 2d st cor N 7th.
Conklin, Jas, 132 Grand.
Clark, Jas G, North 1st.
Clark, Jno, 7th st near 6th.
Campbell, Jno, 328 2d.
Colton, Jas, North 2d near 5th.
Crosby, Jno F, 273 1st.

D.
Doran, W, 9 North 2d.
Dorwin, T J, 230 Grand.
Delacey, W H, N 6th cor 4th.
Donovan, Dan, 96 N 6th.
Day, Fred, 6th near N 7th.
Duthie, W, N 4th cor 5th.
Denham, Jno, 88 N 6th.
Daum, P, 219 N 2d.
Donough, G T, N 6th cor 4th.
Doyle, F (blind), 2d-st near N 5th.
Donnelly, Jno, N 7th.
Doker, Wm, 15 N 2d—rear.
Diercks, J H, cor N 2d.
Dunsidh, R, 26 4th.
Dreyer, Hy, 1st cor N 7th.

E.
Erwin, Geo, cor Clinton and Hamilton-av.
Eagan, Jno, North 5th.
Euter, V, 63 N 7th.
Ebbs, Jno, 69 N 2d.
Edgar, Jno, S 111 N 4th.

F.
Freer, Pat, 1st-st.
Fielding, Jere, 78 N 7th.
Flynn, Pat, 65 N 4th.
Furling, C, 118 N 3d.
Fulton, Geo, N 6th near 4th.
Forman, Jno, N 7th near 5th.
Farrell, H, 117 N 6th.
Fagin, Pat, 223 N 4th.
Foyles, J B, 122 Grand.

G.
Grady, Phil, 98 N 2d.
Gales, F, 90 N 1st.
Gunn, Jno, 311 N 4th.
Gray, Jas, 4 Ainslie.
Graham, Walt, 164 N 6th.
Gunnigan, Jno, 184 N 2d.
Gorben, Jas, 191 N 2d.
Giles, Dan'l, North 7th.
Gallivan, Wm, 137 N 6th.
Gershinsky, Robt, N 1st.
Gallaudet, M V, 13 Fillmoreplace.
Grimes, Thos, 5th.
Gorham, H W, 162 Grand.
Gannon, C, 90 N 8th.

H.
Haberlee, P, 6 Fillmore-pl.
Hicks, L S, 168 Grand.
Hadring, John, 96 North 6th.
Hamilton, A, 3d-st cor N 6th.
Healy, D, North 5th cor 4th.
Hogan, Wm, 5th near N 6th.
Hocknell, Z, 135 5th.
Holland, John, 3 Noith 3d.
Hart, E, 85 North 5th.
Hitchcock, J, N 7th near 4th.
Holland, T, 60 North _th.
Hall, James, N lst near 8th.
Hamilton, H, 98 North 4th.
Healey, Pat, North 5th.
Harrison, T, North 9th.
Hardy, Jas, N 6th near 4th.
Hammons, G H, N 7th n N 6th.
Hendrick, Jas A, 121 N 5th.
Hatfield, Wm O, N 1st n 8th.
Heinzar, Jas, 118 North 5th.
Henkell, John, 250 Grand.
Hedder, Jac, 50 Grand.
Henry, P R, 56 N 4th.
Hines, Jas, 91 North 3d.
Hanahan, J J, 13 N 3d.
Hooley, Jno, 53 North 6th.
Hanlon, J, 67 North 6th.
Hatfield, W, N 1st near 8th.
Held, Adam, 6th near N 7th.
Heath, C D, 42 North 6th.
Hunt, Peter, North 6th.
Himmey, Chas, N 5th n 5th.

J.
Johnson, F, North 3d.
Justin, Ed, 52 North 5th.
Jchrainer, J, North 6th.
James, Hy, 87 North 6th.
Jones, M, 17 North 7th.
Johnston, W (col), 132 N 4th.
Jackson, Wm, North 7th.

Second District.
The draft which was begun on Monday, in the IId District, Brooklyn, under direction of Capt. Maddox, Provost-Marshal, and his efficient assistants, was finished yesterday. The drawing commenced yesterday with the Sixteenth Ward, in the presence of Ald. Sall, Supervisor Hanson, ex-Ald. Kichl, and Mr. Rosengarten—3,382 names being placed in the wheel, of which 323 were to be drafted, and 50 per cent, 161, making 484 in all.

SIXTEENTH WARD.
Ackerman, G, 66 Graham-av.
Adensborg, J, 201 S 5th-st.
Ackerman, G, 56 Graham-av.
Anman, J, 159 Montrose-av.
Ahoinian, H, 26 Meserole-st.
Albert, L, Smith-st.
Auerfacker, J, 192 Graham-av.
Auldenhoff, E, Union-av.
Auer, S, 111 Ewen-st.
Abrahams, C, 272 Division-av.
Argricular, J, Smith-st.
Bond, A, 10 Stagg-st.
Brasholez, H, 24 S 6th.
Bergnre, C, 127 Leonard-st.
Brown, E, 68 10th-st.
Boppe, C, 45 Meserole-st.
Butman, G, 110 Graham-av.
Brooke, T, Lorrimer-st.
Brown, J, 101 Meserole-st.
Bohanmen, A, Smith-st.
Baptist, B, 50 Ewen-av.
Borschet, A, 87 Boerum-st.
Bennerson, F, 130 Leonard-st.
Brown, R, 126 Boerum-st.
Bernscheer, C, 134 Stagg-st.
Bargett, W, 146 Ewen-st.
Belter, B, 195 Montrose-av.
Bucholse, G, Bushwick-av.
Banaman, J, 55 Johnson-st.
Boineuuer, C, 84 Meserole-st.
Buigle, J A, 156 Ewen-st.
Bahraque, G, 237 So 4th-st.
Bengloig, Smith-st.
Baker, J, 34 Boerum-st.
Burheinier, G, 176 Meserole-st.
Bauer, J, 170 Scholes-st.
Bell, A, 243 So 2d-st.
Brown, A, 140 McKibben-st.
Butler, J, 54 11th-st.
Burger, M, 5 Marshall-st.
Brown, C, 439 Lerramer-st.
Burkenmaier, W, Montrose-av.
Boermer, K, 85 Stagg-st.
Backherdt, C, Smith-st.
Bottman, H, 1 11th-st.
Butcher, J, Morrel-st.
Behrman, J, 183 Scholes-st.
Backus, J, 155 Graham-av.
Blacklott, R, 128 Leonard-st.
Batch, P, 17 Johnson-st.
Bleigh, S, 12 Stagg-st.
Baker, E, 253 South 2d-st.
Brown, L, 6 King-st.
Bain, F, Dupont.
Bramway, J, Colyer-st.
Coland, J, 273 S 5th-st.
Conner, P, Ewen-st.
Cunningham, H, 191 McGibbon.
Chisner, H, 26 Meserole-st.
Conner, W, 250 S 4th-st.
Chlogh, H, Johnson-st.
Cooper, J, 182 Graham-av.
Cull, M, 10 Graham-av.
Chaftlerne, J, 36 Meserole-st.
Cardell, E, 6 Graham-av.
Croussant, J, Graham-av.
Cummings, J, 255 S 4th-st.
Cornell, W, 297 S 3d-st.
Colgan, A, policeman, Mc Kibben.         
Cahill, J E, 232 South 5th-st.
Conser, J D, Franklin.
Dirkes, A, 277 Robinson-st.        
Dooberman, W, Smith-st.
Dumper, H, 212 Johnson-st.          
Drager, W, 230 South 6th-st.
Demler, J, 66 Johnson-st.               
Dei__tz, 196 Montrose-av.
Dewald, J, 183 Montrose-av.
Duncan, E, 30 Wyckon-st.
Dipple, A, 120 Meserole-st.
Doyle, S, cor 11th-st.
Dettmontt, C, 27 Montrose-av.
Denn, J, S Johnson-st.
Delaney, M, 28 Wykoff-st.
Ditmers, N, 62 11th-st.
Diroff, H, 31 Graham-av.
Dinkenbuhler, J, 62 Graham.
Deihl, J, 93 Stagg-st.
Duscher, J, 37 Graham-av.
Donohue, M, 158 Wykoff-st.
Dolenk, J, 58 Johnson.
Doryer, S, 91 Ewen-st.
Duenniger, G, 164 Graham-av.
Dolan, J, 58 Johnson-st.
Dayus, H, (col'd) 233 So 3d-st.
Dunn, J, Morrell-st.
Duffie, J, 5 King-st.
Ersuerle, 129 Ewen-st.
Erdman, F, 306 South-4th-st.
Ercher, J, 97 Johnson-st.
Elbyck, M, 143 Scholes-st.
Engles, J, 67 Scholes-st.
Everhard, M, 129 Meserole-st.
Ehlering, L, 162 Montrose-av.
Eberly, N, 164 Johnson-st.
French, J, 147 McGibbon-st.
Frigstan, W, 188 Johnson-st.
Frown, J, 31 10th-st.
Fink, L, 27 Meserole-st.
Frennan, G, 36 Stagg-st.
Fisher, M, 87 Montrose-av.
Figelias, G, 1 Graham-av.
Filster, R, 100 Roram.
Frankel, A, 69 Marshall-st.
Frank, Wm, 11 Stagg-st.
Follbeding, F, 309 South 3d-st.
Frost, M, 175 Meserole-st.
Frederick, F, 55 Meserole-st.
Frits, C, 127 Leonard-st.
Furgerbe, W, 20 Scholes-st.
Fransicky, J, 95 Graham-av.
Faulkil, E, South 5th-st.
Filting, J, 104 Graham-av.
Fothlick, J, 183 Graham-av.
Fredericks, A, 113 McKibbon-st.
Frank, J, Ewen-st.
Grimshaw, W, 275 S 5th-st.
Grener, H, Smith-st.
Gallagher, O, 21 Marshall-st.
Grimshaw, C, 275 S 5th-st.
Giering, C, 123 Stagg-st.
Graf, J, 114 Meserole-st.
Grinnell, J, 49 Ewen-st.
Gardiner, J, 40 Cook-st.
Gleck, C, Cook-st.
Gentler, L, 13 Stagg-st.
Gloeckner, L.
Glier, L, 4 Stagg-st.
Gakle, C, 183 Johnson st.
Gorsch, C, 130 Scholes.
Grifilen, J, Desbrosses-st.
Grain, J, 168 Johnson-st.
Gibbons, J, 18 Graham-av.
Gruschudz, H, 127 Leonard-st.
Grsemer, J, 33 Meserole-st.
Goldenfels, W, 28 Scholes-st.
Galff, G, 91 Bolivar-st.
Gaugle, J, 30 leonard-st.
Graver, J, 5 Montrose-av.
George, A, 59 Ewen-st.
Graham, R, S 4th-st.
Gallagher, M, 17 Johnson-st.
Gastz, J, 61 Johnson-st.
Grindler, G, 66 Montrose-av.
Gahart, J, 96 Meserole.
Gastz, J, 61 Johnson-st.
Gaiser, A, 91 meserole.
Gimbler, J, Barret-st.
Graeber, J, Moore-st.
Hoops, J, Stagg-st.
Hurse, H, 260 Division-sv.
Hunt, J W, Marshall-st.
Hoffman, L, 160 Meserole-st.
Harmong, J, 85 Johnson-st.
Hoyt, J C, 147 Leonard-st.
Herz, J, 261 S 4th-st.
Hunekan, A, 15 Stagg-st.
Hecker, W, 87 Stagg-st.
Hanan, W, 148 Leonard-st.
Hampel, J, Graham-av.
Hitchler, L, 102 Johnson-st.
Hunt, C, 192 Lorimer-st.
Heelig, Wm, cor Smith-st.
Hanger, J, 46 Graham-av.
Heckerold, H, 13 Johnson-st.
Herstchel, J, Latimer-st.
Hacker, Chs, 151 McKibben.
Hoffman, A, 142 Boerum-st.
Hoffman, J, 119 Stagg-st.
Hewey, J, Huron-st.
Hausman, E, 149 Ewen-st.
Hoffman, C, 157 Scholes-st.
Hunt, C, 30 Scholes-st.
Huger, A, 34 Graham-av.
Hertz, E, Cook-st.
Hanck, W, 32 Meserole-st.
Harde, H, 4 Barrate-st.
Holebrook, W, Debevoise-st.
Hoteschok, G, 124 Scholes-st.
Hotchkiss, J, Upton-av.
Hunterheimer, P, 87 Stagg-st.
Hansman, J, 167 Johnson-st.
Hoteschock, G, 124 Scholes-st.
Hind, R B, 120 S 5th-st.
Hummell, T, Moore-st.
Herter, C, 292 Boerum.
Holstein, J, 61 11th-st.
Haenberger, M, 91 Ewen-st.
Harks, S, 297 S 3d-st.
Harman, J, 117 Ewen-st.
Jobest, F, 251 South 3d-st.
Juhoff, J, 96 Dolman-st.
Jorenhaus, G, 13 Union-av.
Jonas, J, 283 South 5th-st.
Jselman, H, 150 Johnson-st.
Jung, J, 184 Scholes-st.
Jackson, R (col), 268 Division -av.
Jtzsin, T, 130 Johnson-st.
Johnson, G (col), 1 Meserole-st.
Jersberger, C, 186 Montrose-st.
Jennevrive, P, Cook-st.
Kuorn, H, 34 Scholes-st.
Kalser, F, 97 Ewen-st.
Kuntz, J, 90 Graham-av.
Kohler, E, 133 Ewen-st.
Kleiper, J, 122 McKibben-st.
Katz, M, 85 Meserole-st.
Kreutzer, S, 78 Meserole-st.
Krammer, J, 176 Scholes-st.
Kapp, M, Smith-st.
Klingel, M, 33 Stagg-st.
Kaehl, J, 297 South 4th-st.
Kwill, J, Cook-st.
Ksesheimer, M, 197 Scholes-st.
Kingly, 238 South 6th-st.
Kreidelhmeher, R, 62 McKibben-st.
Kientz, F, 184 Scholes-st.
Kohl, G, Cook-st.
Krogenhenner, J, Morrow-st.
Klenwag, K, 187 Johnson-st.
Koerper, M, 90 Meserole-st.
Klueg, V, 107 Johnson-st.
Keller, J, 136 Stagg-st
Loger, J, 147 Ewen-st.
Lotz, W, 30 Scholes-st.
Lowe, P, 97 Montrose-av.
Linzey, G H, Coral-st.
Luahat, P, 69 Union-av.
Leich, J, 302 South-3d.
Leivis, J, 303 South 5th-st.
Leifert, A, 129 Morehouse-av.
Lum, J, 62 Graham-av.
Lesseur, C, 99 Leonard-st.
Lasivald, M, Ewen-st.
Lucas, P, 8 Ewen-st.
Loskein, H, 245 South 3d-st.
Lyn, G, 307 South 32-st.
Loefler, T, 58 Johnson.
M'Cabe, P, Cook-st.
Marked, N, 202 Johnson-st.
Miller, R, 59 Wyckoff-st.
Malcom, S, 46 10-st.
Kardel, E, 6 Graham-av.
Kessler, P, Johnson-st.
Krubler, W, 31 Stagg-st.
Kappes, L, 162 Johnson-st.
King, G, 95 Scholes-st.
Lang, A, 100 Graham-av.
Larkins, P, 246 South-3d.
Leonard, R, 200 South 2d.
Lockhart, Wm, 333 South 5th.
Leugflin, F, 62 McKibben-st.
Lehman, C, 96 Stagg-st.
Lyng, W, 46 Boerum-st.
Lefinan, F, 272 South 3d-st.
Lett, J, 93 Graham-av.
Lucks, C, Cook-st.
Laudtenchruger, J, Leonard-st.
Ludwig, D, 120 Scholes-st.
Levy, G, 271 South 3d-st.
Laing, G, 155 McKibben-st,
Leivis, J, 305 South 5th-st.
Mullan, J, 240 South 2d-st.
Martin, C, 71 Johnson-st.
McDowell, A, cor 10th & 2d.
Miller, C, 4th-st near Ewen.
Malow, W, 169 Ewen-st.
Mulins, J, 286 South 5th-st.
Marshall, P, 130 Wyckoff-st.
McCullen, J, 4 Cook-st.
Miller, J, 20 Cook-st.
Miller, T, 21 Graham-av.
Madged, R, 50 Montrose-av.
McDonald, J, 309 South 3d-st.
Messenger, A, jr, 56 Boerum-st.
Michal, J, 20 Stagg-st.
Muller, N, 102 Ewen-st.
McCan, R, Meserole-av.
Muller, F, 45 Boerum-st.
Mesner, M, 174 Johnson-st.
McIvar, J, 34 Debevoise-st.
Mei, S, 123 Stagg-st.
Myer, A, Montrose-av.
Muller, K, 85 Scholes-st.
Meinhard, P, 79 Leonard-st.
Myer, C, 127 McKibben-st.
Miller, J, Barrett-st.
Mangony, J, 69 Johnson-st.
Melgan, K, Union-av.
Mesten, W H, 29 10th-st.
Muller, J, 54 Union-av.
Nickel, J, Graham & Meserole.
Newman, P, 316 Broadway.
Newton, G W, 272 S 5th-st.
Neswald, A, 199 Ewen-st.
Myers, K, 12 Stagg-st.
Myer, J, 189 Johnson-st.
Manzin, J, Broadway.
Moore, C A, 210 S 6th-st.
Milsel, C, Ewing & Marshall-sts.
Moore, Wm, 325 Division-av.
McCune, B, Freeman.
Munemecher, F, 90 Wyckoff-st.
Nail, B, Johnson-st.
Nabe, C, 49 10th-st.
O'Connell, D, 246 So 3d-st.
Ochs, H, 416 Lorramore-st.
Opman, G, 121 Lorimer-st.
Ogden, J, 3 Sanford.
Piersall, R, 204 Graham-av.
Pfahl, P, 141 Leonard-st.
Pricker, L, 91 Stagg-st.
Platt, A, 138 Meserole-st.
Nichobbacker, J, 91 Scholes-st.
Nedwell, D B, 53 Jarvis.
Oswale, J, 65 Leonard-st.
Oscarron, J, 228 So. 3d-st.
Otto, L, 68 Wyckoff-st.
Prior, C, 198 Johnson-st.
Peitis, A, 315 So. 4th-st.
Pfeffer, J, 69 Chole-st.
Palmer, G, 232 So 6th-st.
Prank, J, 85 Leonard-st.
Phillips, G, 16 Cook-st.
Pranner, J, 98 Ewen-st.
Peiffer, L, 104 Ewen-st.
Phil, L, 1334 10th-st.
Pfifer, L, 104 Ewen-st.
Pluck, J, 315 So 4th-st.
Prumpzell, W, 86 Monrtrose-av.
Powlan, J, 89 Graham-av.
Plagherty, J, 258 So. 3d-st.
Quierd, M, 86 Montrose-1v.
Roeser, H, Lorimer-st.
Rey, M, 63 Marshall-st.
Rimchler, C, Barron-st.
Racher, A, Moore-st.
Riess, F C, Cook-st.
Racher, F, 170 Montrose-av.
Reochensberger, 121 Leonard.
Rieck, C, 33 Meserole-st.
Rendell, J, 262 Division-av.
Rotharmel, J, Graham-av.
Reinhard, G, 84 Wyckoff-st.
Reid, J, Cook-st.
Rubb, C, Morrow-st.
Rop, H, Johnson-st.
Reitz, J, 90 Meserole-st.
Ruck, J, 124 Scholes-st.
Reinig, J, 19 Montrose-av.
Ritz, C O, Graham-av.
Reider, J, 31 Meserole-st.
Rand, G, De Bevois-st.
Stramberges, H, 173 Johnson-st.
Sieries, J, _ Stagg-st.
Schroeder, _, 15 Graham-av.
Speadler, J, 385 S 4th-st.
Schmidt, J, 68 Marshall-st.
Schafer, C, 185 Johnson-st.
Ritnor, R, 19 Fourth-st.
Roberts, I, Ewen and Moore-st.
Roth, F, 86 Montrose-av.
Rauh, H, 18 Meserole-st.
Rennenseh, R A, 140 Meserole.
Roth, A, 125 Reserole-st.
Ranth, V, 134 Meserole-st.
Robb, C, 112 Ewing-st.
Rothmyer, C, 25 Meserole-st.
Rauth, B, 134 Meserrole-st.
Rane, C, 4 Meserole-st.
Roder, V, Franklin.
Stumpf, 134 Boerum-st.
Scherman, H, 54 Union-av.
Schoendorf, J, 121 Stagg-st.
Schingler, J, 21 Scholes-st.
Schule, G, 101 Montrose-av.
Schoch, J, 139 Meserole-st.
Strauss, B, 111 Johnson-st.
Sober, J, 228 S 3d-st.
Strauss, B, 111 Johnson-st.
Simmerman, P J, 112 Hewett.
Schmidt, M, 100 Montrose-st.
Sehr, J, 192 Montrose-av.
Schann, G, 288 S 3d-st.
Smidt, E, 97 Meserole-st.
Schaswalder, 96 Wyckoff-st.
Schneider, E, 24 Cook-st.
Starum, F, 187 Johnson-st.
Schwahn, G, 143 Scholes-st.
Stroughberger, 208 Johnson-st.
Smithberger, J, 188 Montrose-st.
Schreiner, H, 21 Scholes-st.
Schleder, P, 271 S 4th-st.
Schmidt, P, 186 Graham-av.
Schnadt, L, 153 Montrose-av.
Simmond, A, 19 Meserole.
Sayds, J, 65 Leonard-st.
Steimuller, J, 36 Meserole-st.
Schonewald, P, 96 Ewen-st.
Schneider, E, 177 Johnson-st.
Scheldt, P, 161 Johnson-st.
Smith, P, 185 Johnson-st.
Schneider, R, 148 Scholes-st.
Schonert, J, 154 Graham-av.
Sincer, C, 156 Graham-av.
Schmesenger, A, Morrall-st.
Steiner, C, 103 Ewen-st.
Schuman, E, Cook-st.
Stark, P, 25 Moore-st.
Tene, J, 60 Johnson-st.
Stuley, A, 160 McKibben.
Schui, G, 123 Meserole.
Schaeffer, A, 137 Leonard-st.
Stackman, H, 68 Montrose-av.
Schmidt, J, 68 Marshall-st.
Schwab, B, 63 10th-st.
Stratman, A, 47 Union-av.
Schiltig, A, 195 Stagg-st.
Stinnpf, J, 97 Meserole-st.
Salter, P, 142 Leonard-st.
Schoonmaker, F, 100 Boerum.
Somerville, J, 287 S 4th-st.
Steigel, J, 86 Stagg-st.
Stackney, R, Leonard-st.
Schuligert, J, 199 Montrose-av.
Schmidtman, J, cor Wall-st.
Schlelch, R, Stagg-st.
Schoen, E, McKibben-st.
Schellop, F, Ewem & Cook-st.
Thile, L, 134 10th-st.
Teager, J, 79 Leonard-st.
Tenne, H, 188 Montrose-av.
Uhrich, A, 208 Johnson-st.
Uhl, A, 61 Scholes-st.
Understeiller, J, 253 Boerum-st.
Ultzman, C, McKibben-st.
Ubrich, J, 2 Stagg-st
Vantine, D, 61 Leonard-st.
Vondersmidt, M, Montrose-av.
Voxty, A, Cook-st.
Wasinandel (ex-Coroner), Stagg.
Weiss, C, 187 Scholes-st.
Wilkinson, F, 294 S 3d-st.
Webber, C, 139 Leonard-st.
Weisbrogt, J, 22 Graham-av.
Walter, H, 283 Boerum-st.
Wehe, Wm, 63 Union-st.
Wyman, P, 7 Smith-st.
Wigand, P, 191 Graham-av.
Wirth, J, 81 McKibben-st.
Wilson, J, 43 10th-st.
Walker, C, 216 S 6th-st.
Weller, A, Anthony-st.
Williams, R, 54 Union-av.
Wassen, J, 146 Leonard-st.
Weiss, F, 153 Johnson-st.
Walter, J A, 203 Graham-av.
Weineich, M, 197 Scholes-st.
Watt, G, 51 Montrose-av.
Wills, H, 78 Meserole-st.
Wolf, F, 148 Johnson-st.
Wehrle, J, 134 Meserole-st.
Wage, K, 39 Montrose-av.
Wahr, C, 18 Scholes-st.
Wenkelman, A, 1 Meserole-st.
Willoughby, W, 2d-st.
Weidner, J, 277 Boerum-st.
Wemker, A, 199 Scholes-st.
Wollenslager, C, 25 Scholes-st.
Wall, Valentine, 30 Meserole-st.
William, G, Graham-av.
Weissman, G, Warrea-st.
Williams, A, 220 South 4th-st.
Walker, A, 86 Meserole-st.
Whitney, J S, 5 India-st.
Yost, P, 24 Montrose-st.
Ziff, C, McKibben-st.
Ziegelberger, G, 158 Graham-av.
Zeldlinger, P, 164 Graham-av.
Zeiss, A, 63 Scholes-st.

SEVENTEENTH WARD.
The drawing for the Seventeenth Ward was conducted in the presence of Ald. Perry, Supervisor Killeen, J. F. Buckmaster, and Mr. Cornelius Smith.
Number of slips placed in the wheel, 1,545; to be drafted, 148; 50 per cent, 74; total to be drafted, 222.
Apneann, H, Meserole-st.
Atwater, S T, Lorimer.
Aggers, H, Franklin.
Allen, G, 4 Jarvis-st.
Archer, T, Meserole-st.
Brucken, W, 4 Union.
Berry, F, 2 India-st.
Barclay, J, Franklin.
Brogan, F, 14 Jarvis-st.
Brinckerhoff, G, 6 India-st.
Benton, J H, 1 Franklin.
Butler, T, 10 Jarvis-st.
Barker, W L, 1 India-st.
Buckmaster, G W, 1 Leonard-st.
Brown, J, Franklin-st.
Bromway, T, Colllyer-st.
Amely, P, Freeman-st.
Anderson, D, 7 Hen-st.
Aghert, F, Noble-st.
Andall, F, Meserole-st.
Arnold, A C, Milton-st.
Benjamin, J B, Sandford-st.
Bailey, G F, 11 Jarvis-st.
Breedon, J, So. 6th & Grp't-av.
Bloom, R, Backer's Pond.
Bedell, H S, Milton-st.
Bless, F, Washington-st.
Baker, E D, Ackford.
Battcher, G, Washington-st.
Bradley, J C, 13 Kent-st.
Brown, L, 6 10th.
Cashier, A, 4 Jarvis-st.
Crosby, J, Franklin.
Connelly, P, Union.
Cross, W H, 3 Franklin.
Carr, J, Franklin.
Corwin, A H, Guernsey.
Calhine, C, Eagle-st.
Callan, P, 2 Huron-st.
Craiglin, H, Dupont.
Cusiac, T, Freeman-st.
Callan, J, Marion-st.
Cushman, J, Oakland-st.
Carpenter, G, Franklin.
Connelly, J, Franklin-st.
Cohan, T, 2 Huron-st.
Costello, J, Ash-st.
Conklin, W, 7 Franklin.
Cavanagh, M, 4 Dupont-st.
Cousser, J D, Franklin.
Dunsby, W P, Ackford.
Davis, A M, Ackford.
Dorg, G, Union-av.
Dodd, D, 3 10th-st.
Dowell, J, Union-av.
Davis, G W, Greenpoint-av.
Denman, R, Touvenir-st.
Dumyre, W, Meeker-st.
Duffin, J, 5 Kent-st.
Dean, T, Dupont, nr Union-av.
Eddy, C, Huron-st.
Emory, C, 14 Jarvis-st.           
Ennis, H, Huron-st.
Erhart, H, Henry-st.
Farrell, P, Commercial.          
Foster, W, Union-av.
Fisher, J, Van Cott.
Fitzsimmon, P, Meeker-av.
Fitzgerald, P, Messerole-st.
Fieller, J, 8 10th-st.
Freeland, J, Washington-st.
Grunter, A, Franklin.
Griffin, L M, Franklin-st.
Gardner, J A, 1 India-st.
Griffith, S M, Oakland-st.
Griffin, H H, Eagle-st.
Groden, F, Franklin-st.
Gessel, C, Huron-st.
Gilliaran, U, Freeman-st.
Giffan, C, Truman-st.
Grant, J, 3 India-st.
Greene, D, 3 Comercial-st.
Han, H, Baggett's Farm.
Healy, O, Merker-st.
Hine, M, 9 Huron-st.
Hulott, R M, Franklin-av.
Headley, J, 45 Jarvis-st.
Holdowann, H, Meeker-st.
Hygart, J, 1 Washington-st.
Hiermault, A, 16 Huron-st.
Hessell, G, Freeman-st.
Jones, E, 2 India-st.
Kerland, T, Huron-st.
Kellnorg, C, Franklin-st.
Hawkins, L, Lorimer-st.
Hultz, V, Norman-st.
Hanell, M, Union-av.
Heffernon, J, Union-av.
Holmes, L, 40 Jarvis-st.
Hewry, J, Sanford-st.
Henneson, A J, 7 Jarvis-st.
Hessler, W B, Leonard-st.
Handoy, J, Huron-st.
Jones, E, Noble-st.
Kelly, W, Huron-st.
King, T M, Washington-st.
Kelsey, W S, Huron-st.
Kennes, J, 3 Green-st.
Levitt, T H, 2 Huron-st.
Lewis, W, Huron-st.
Leach, J, 10 India-st.
Leek, G I, Meserole.
Lawrence, F, 2 India-st.
McGrath, J, Franklin.
McCarty, J, 6 Jarvis-st.
Mone, W H, 50 Noble-st.
Malvy, P, Medford-st.
Lamp, G M, Leonard-st.
Leonard, R, Freeman.
Lomes, R, Green-st.
Lane, A S, Franklin.
Lanison, J, Lorimer-st.
Melanthon, J, 11 Jarvis.
Murphy, T, Franklin.
Martine, M, Arch-st.
Mills, J, 4 Franklin-st.
Merkenghulor, F, 2 Franklin-st.
Myers, A, Collyer-st.
Merker, B, Dupont-st.
Mathews, J, Franklin-st.
Madden, J, Eagle-st.
Matthewson, G, near Jarvis.
Mellen, W, VanCott-st.
McCullen, P, Washington-st.
Morris, E, Freeman-st.
McLeod, W, Meserole-st.
McGanus, A, 6 Green Point-av.
Martin, M, Commercial.
M cGlined, D, 16 Durand-st.
McCuan, B, Freeman-st.
McGovern, P, Huron.
Meyer, J, VanGott-av.
Murray, P, 13 Huron-st.
Ostrander, P, Messerole-st.
O'Gibber, P A, Washington-st.
Ostrander, G, Messerole-st.
O'Bryan, Wm, Oakland-st.
Ogden, J, 3 Sanford-st.
Patterson, J, Leonard.
Parson, W W, Leonard.
Peter, F. Patten, E, 6 Jarvis-st.
Phillbrook, H, 4 Greenpoint-av.
Provost, J W, 8 Jarvis-st.
Power, S S, Union-av.
Reilfan, W, Oakland.                   
Read, R W, Milton-st.
Reilly, J, 11 Jarvis-st.
Reegave, J, Franklin.
Roucke, P, Huroon-st.
Randolph, J S, 8 Jarvis-st.
Russell, G, Freeman-st.
Rulland, J, 1 Jarvis-st.
Robinson, J, Eagle-st.
Reeyes, A, Washington.
Smith, F, Franklin.
Sheay, J W, Guernsey-st.
Snyder, Jas T, Jarvis-st.
Starles, L, 2 Greenpoint-av.
Sch___pton, H, Freeman.
Slater, J S, Oakland and Mese-
Sharkey, P, 5 Jarvis-st. role-st.
Shaw, J, Oakland-st.
Sown, A H, Franklin-st.
Sullivan, J, Franklin.
Sharp, H W, Lorimer-st.
Smith, C G. Greene-st.
Smith, G, Franklin-st.
Stillwagon, S, Huron-st.
Smith, J, Eckford.
Storm, P, East of Ewen.
Smith, H, Freeman-st.
Stopper, A, Franklin.
Stewart, T M, Oakland-st.
Scott, C, Eagle-st.
Schufter, S E, Huron-st.
Steers, D, Huron-st.
Simpson, W B K, 41 Huron-st.
Thomas, C H, 4 India-st.
Tracy, W, Leonard-st.
Thormas, G, Franklin.
Tibbetts, H, Clinton-st.
Thorn, B C, Sanford-st.
Thomas, G W, 4 India-st.
Tuttle, G H, Madison.
Taylor, W, 13 Jarvis-st.
Thompson, J P, Graham.
Treadwell, D B, 53 Jarvis-st.
Thoma, K, K near Washington.
Tyson, G W, Union.
Winan, J, Graham-av.
Whittemore, E, Oakland-st.
Welzan, G, Union-av.
Whitcomb, L T, 18 Noble-st.
Whitney, J S, 5 India-st.
Williamson, B F, 9 Jarvis-st.
Welp, C, Bagget's Farm.
Whittemore, R, Madison-st.
Williams, W H, 17 Huron-st.
Wavrest, A H, 24 Noble-st.
Williamson, C, 2 Franklin.
Whyben, W H, Durand.
Welsh, M, Freeman.
Whitney, A R, Clinton.
Vogst, L, Franklin.
Vanderbilt, E, Orchard.
Vancott, J W, 6 Jarvis-st.
Vanderburg, J, Manor House.
Young, S W, Drommond.

EIGHTEENTH WARD.
The drawing in the Eighteenth Ward was conducted in the presence of Ald. Kalbfleisch, Assessor Griffin, Messrs. Whitehall, Bowers and Wallace. Number of slips placed in wheel, 633; number to be drafted, 633; number to be drafted, 61; 50 per cent, 30; total, 91.
Bowman, F, Metropolitan-av.     
Bessley, G, Bushwick-av.
Bangler, W, Myrtle-av.
Branen, H, Bushwick-av.
Bohler, F, Remsen-st.
Boisheau, M S, Johnson-st.
Collard, J, De Bevois-av.
Cutter, R, Smith-st.
Clarence, H, Remsen-st.
De Bevois, A, Bushwick-av.
Devlin, T, McKibben-st.
Daren, C, Myrtle-av.
Dogherty, A, Broadway.
Denton, S E, Bushwick-av.
Edan, F, Bushwick-av.
Failey, M, Weeker-av.                 
Firman, P M, Broadway.
Fitzgerald, Jas, supr of the poor,
Freestone, W, Cooper-av. Bushwick-av.
Fitzgerald, E, Bushwick-av.
Field, W, Cook-st.
Grodrich, W, Bushwick-av.
Geary, J, Sedan-st.
Goodman, N, Graham-ave.
Geer, G, Lafayette-st.
Harder, J, Washington-st.
Her, Wm, Flushing and Bush-
Hughes, E, Remsen-st. wick.
Hoffbert, N H, Cooper-av.
Hardiman, M, Metropolitan-av.
Harrold, H, Johnson-st.
Henis, J, Bushwick-av.
Herman, H, Metropolitan-av.
Howland, Jas, Sedam-st.
Howard, Jas, Bushwick-av.
Jarad, C, Degroot-st.
Jackson, North William-st.
K irdlay, W, Broadway.
Krusher, P H, Myrtle-av.
Kartz, F, Flushing-av.
Ketcham, J, Myrtle-av.
Leach, A, Washington-st.
Lyne, H, Johnson-st.
Lent, C, Bushwick-av.
Mechowfreaught, Jefferson-st.
Menskin, C, Maspeth-av.
Martin, Jos, Cook-st.
Metcalf, C, South-st.
Mass, M, North William-st.
Meahan, M, Bushwick-av.
Merritt, E W, Bushwick-av.
Middletown, B F, Broadway.
McBuder, J, Sedam-st.
Mosley, T, Bushwick-av.
Morris, J, Flussing-av.
Mouegan, J, Cooper-av.
McKay, John, Bushwick-av.
Needer, A, Myrtle-av Plank-road.
Potts, C, Sedam-st, near M'l-av.
Parker, John, Sedam-st.
Post, Smith, Bushwick-av.
Pollion, W, Hurlbut, n. Smith.
Peter, H, Washington-st.
Plumb, J, North William-st.
Ramsey, H, Adams-st.
Rich, Wm, North 2d-st.
Reves, W E, Rose-st.
Suilier, J, Washington-st.
Sutton, Jas, Linden-st.
Strub, G, De_____-st.
S_e_it, J, 46 Monroe-st.
Smith, Jas, Meeker-av.
Seaman, V, Bushwick-av.
Straus, J, Flushing-av.
Smith, E J, Monroe-st.
Summers, Otto, Monroe-st.
Shendan, M, Metropoliran-av.
Triesdale, G, Herbert-st.
Tuttle, C, Green-av.
Trainor, J, Jefferson-st.
Townsend, G, Meeker-av N C'k.
Vandervoort, T, Flushing-av.
Van Ostrand, D, Remington.
Valentine, H, Lawrence-st.
Ward, W H, Marshall-st.
Way, M H, Graham-st.
Weaver, C, 293 Boerum-st.
Wilson, A, Devoe-st.
Ward, J H, Elm-st.
Williams, G W, Nevin-st.

THE DRAFT YESTERDAY.
Continued from First Page.
Additional fifty per cent.
CIine, Gaspar, So Greenfield.
Colwell, Aug, Sheepsh'd Bay.

E.
Additional fifty per cent.
Emmons, Abm, Sheepshead Bay.

F.
Additional per cent.
Foley, Andrew, Net Lane.

H.
Hewlett, Geo, col Sheepshead Bay.

M.
Morris, Jos, Beach Road.
Morris, G, Beach Gravesend.
Morris, Jno, Beach Road.
Moran, Thos, Coney Island.
Additional fifty per cent.
Macklin, Jno, Sheepsh'd Bay.
Maginnis, J, West meadow.

P.
Paffan, William, colored, Beach Road.

R.
Rosenberg, William, N Holland Road.

S.
Sharkey, Thos, Coney Island.
Stillwell, S J, Gravesend.
Stryker, Steph S, Gravesend.
Smith, Hy, Sheepshead Bay.
Stryker, Tunis, Gravesend.
Schenck, D, col'd, Gravesend.
Additional fifty per cent.
Stillwell, James D, Gravesend.

V.
Voorhis, Peter D, Gravesend.
Vorhis, Jas, Sheepshead Bay.
Additional fifty per cent.
Van Riper, _, Gravesend.
Van Cleef, Rich'd, Net Lane.

W.
Wyckoff, Stephen, Flatland Road.
Additional fifty per cent.
Wilson, John, Gravesend.

With this the draft for the Second General District terminated, and after some complimentary remarks from the District-Marshal Samuel T. Maddox and an expression of thanks for kind attentions received by the press, the office cloaed at 5 1/2 P. M., amid the cheers of the throng. All passed pleasantly as a summer's evening.

FLATBUSH.
The drawing for the town of Flatbush was conducted in the presence of Gen. Cook, Supervisor, and Messrs. Schoonmaker and Bennett. Number of slips placed in the wheel, 437; number to be drafted, 42; 50 per cent, 21; total, 63.
Anderson, J F.
Bull, W
Brown, M, (col).
Bates, N G
Bowen, E C
Bryan, S
Bearny, J.
Canfield, T
Corteleu, J
Cooper, Jno
Clarkson, R
Clancey, M
Clarkson, M.
Euck, C
Eneau, W H
Ellsworth, N
Foden, J
Fox, J.
Green, W
Gordon, E
Hubbard, G (colored).
Hellfinger, J.
Haywood, G.
Hamblin, N.
Hood, R.
Higgins, E.
Hobby, T.
Healey, W.
Hegeman, W.
Jackson, S (col)
Johnson, J (col.)
Kelly, T.
Lott, T V.
Lott, A, F.
Merschutt, D C
Maxwell, D
McCarty, P
Murphy, W E
Story, M B
Stoodiff, S
Lane, J.
Larkin, J.
McLaughlin, F (clergyman)
McNamara, M
Mahony, M
McEvoy, R
Pilkerton, G
Raynor, G M
Smith, J A
Sichenthentler, J
Switzer, J, (Warden)
Story, J
Schack, T
Tait, J H Tigh, J
Vater, C Vandyne
Williamson, P Ward, J
White, W, (col)
Wells, C (Clergyman)
Zeller, Chas Zabriskie, J L

FLATLANDS.
The drawing for the town of Flatlands was conducted in the presence of Mr. Myers, Mr. Rider, Mr. McGraw and Mr. Hubbard. Number of slips to be placed in the wheel, 298; number to be drafted, 29; 50 per cent, 14; total, 43.
Burke, M
Benners, Charles
Bafor, H (colored)
Brumphrey, T
Brehany, Michael
Colman, James
Gallagher, John
Hobby, F
King, J
Keilley, W
Lott, W
Lott, S B
Murphy, W
Marsh, G
Mathews, A
McCreddon, M
Nolan, J H
Burke, M
Baisley, R L
Carman, T
Cavanagh, James
Donnelly, A
Green, Patrick
Garvie, J
Holmes, S (colored)
Hubbard, A E,
Kowvenhoven, E
Kelly, P
Lane, F
Luberies, P
Ledicke, Chas
Moore, R
Morris, J J
Morrison, A
Muraay, J
Mathews, Wm
Nolan, F
O'Connor, J
Hanson, P
Schenck, S
Tyler, John
Wilson, G

GRAVESEND.
The drawing for the town at Gravesend was conducted in the presence of Messrs. J. Stillman, A. Berry, and D. Clark. Number of slips placed in wheel, 222; to be drafted, 21; fifty per cent, 11. Total, 32.
Arnnic, J, Gravesend
Burns, O, South Grandfield
Bradshaw, D, Coney Island
Connor, Jeff (col'd), C'y Island
Colwell, A, Sheep's Head Bay
Cline, C, South Greenfield.
Emmons, A S, Sheep's Head Bay.
Fooley, A, Neck Lane.
Hennet, G (col'd), S. H. Bay
Hoyle, J, Sheep's Head Bay
McGinnis, J, West Meadow
Morris, Gamson, Beach, Gravesend.
McCaim, J, Sheep's Head Bay
Morris, J, Beach Road Morris, J, Beach Road
Moron, T, Coney Island
Paflaw, T (colored), Coney Island
Rosenberg, W, North Holland Road
Stryker, S S, Gravesend
Stryker, T, Gravesend
Sharkey, T, Coney Island
Smith, H, Sheephead Bay
Sutwell, S J, Gravesend
Schenk, D (col.)
Sutwell, J D, Gravesend.
Taffer, J (col.), Gravesend.
Van Ryker, J, Gravesend
Van Cleve, R, Necklane
Vooris, D, Peter, Gravesend
Vooris, J, Sheephead Bay,
Wyckoff, S, Flatland Road
Wilson, J, Gravesend.
Throughout the three days that the Draft has been going on in the IId District, it has been conducted without the least disturbance, the citizens of the respective Wards being present in large numbers, dissscuing its policy, and good naturedly expressing themselves satisfied that it was for the best, under the present circumstances.

NEW-UTRECHT.
The drawing for New-Utretcht was conducted in the presence of Supervisor Cox and Mr. Church. Number of slips placed in wheel, 503; to be drafted, 49; fifty per cent, 24. Total 73.
Brennan, J, B Ridge
Borman, J, Ft Hamilton
Bouren, J, Ft Hamilton
Benson, W, (col'd), Bath
Bowers, J, Ft Hamilton
Brady, Jas, B Ridge
Baxter, J, Bath
Bennett, W E, Bay Ridge
Benson, T, Fort Hamilton
Connolly, E, Bath
Conners, M, Ft Hamilton
Cabley, J, Ft Hamilton
Cook, D B, Bay Ridge Wood
Cupps, R, Ft Hamilton
Conway, J, Ft Hamilton
Casey, W, Ft Hamilton
Costello, J, Bay Ridge
Campbell, F, Bath
Cunningham, J, Bay Ridge
Carey, J J, Ft Hamilton
Dempsey, S, Bay Ridge
DeGraeff, G, Bay Ridge
Dogherty, E, Fort Hamilton
Denyce, E, Bay Ridge
Dempsey, J, Fort Hamilton
Dogherty, M, Fort Hamilton
DeGraff, J, Bay Ridge
Forney, J, Fort Hamilton
Fitzpatrick, P, Bath
Francis, R (col'd), B R Woods
Gilligan, H, Fort Hamilton
Hobart, R, Bay Ridge
Herkner, A, Bath
Half, J, Fort Hamilton
Hill, Thos, Fort Hamilton
Hess, M, Bath
Kennedy, P, Bay Ridge
Kensen, M M, Fort Hamilton
Keeler, J, Bay Ridge
Kinney, W, Fort Hamilton
Langley, W H, Bay Ridge
Lee, Jas, Bav Ridge
Little, T, Bay Ridge
Letcher, N, Bay Ridge
Lane. O, Fort Hamilton
McKnight, G, Fort Hamilton
Mack, J, Bath
McCormick, J, Fort Hamilton
Mehan, J, Bath
Merrew, A, Fort Hamilton
Myers, V, B R Woods
Marin, P, Fort Hamilton
McGrath, Jno, Ft Hamilton
O'Brien, J, Fort Hamilton
Remsen, Wm, Bath
Reed, U, Bath
Rodgers, J, Bath
Smith, A, Fort Hamilton
Slodder, B W, Ft Hamilton
Sutherland, R, Bay Ridge
Studley, W H, Ft Hamilton
Tracy, F, Fort Hamilton
Vincent, O S, Bath
Vanpelt, H, Bay Ridge
Weighwright, B A, Bay Ridge
Wright, J, Fort Hamilton
Watson, C, Fort Hamilton
Williams, F (col), Fort Ham'n
Williams, R, (col) Fort Ham'n
Walsh, F, Fort Hamilton
Wilson, M K, Bay Ridge Wood  
Weeks, G F, Bay Ridge Wood

The Draft in Brooklyn.
No orders have yet been received by the Assist-ant Post-Marshals in the Second and Third Congressional, Districts. Everything is in readi­ness to proceed with the drawing in these dis-tricts, and the officers are uinder the impression that it will be commenced on Monday next.

BROOKLYN.
The firemen of Brooklyn, in both districts, who have been drafted, number (with the exception of the men of one company, No. 11, not heard from) four hundred and forty-one men. Of these, one hundred and twenty-five were drafted in Williamsburg.
—The Half Million Draft Loan is not rapidly subscribed for, though the prospects are better. $86,000 have bean subscribed for up to this morning.

Incidents of the draft in Brooklyn.
The draft was continued yesterday in the Third District. The Provost-Marshal's office in Washington-street was thronged with spectators from an early hour, and the sidewalk opposite was crowded during most of the day. The Fourth, Fifth and Seventh Wards were drawn. The Eleventh and Thirteenth will be drawn to-day, and the Fifteenth and Nineteenth on Thursday. The best of order prevailed.
Among the Police drawn were Capt Powers, of the Forty-fourth Precinct; Sergt. Cornell, of the Forty-second; Sergt. Thomas Wright, of the Forty-ninth, and five patrolmen belonging to different districts.
Supervisor Booth, of the Fourth Ward; Col. E. L. Molineux, of the One Hundred and Fifty-ninth regiment New-York Volunteers, wounded in the battle of Indian Bend, La., and still in the service; Maj. Oliver T. Beard, late of the Forty-eighth regiment New-York Volunteers; Luther B. Wyman, Esq., one of the Directors of the Academy of Music, besides a number of prominent Ward politicians, were elected,
A woman named Regina Hoobstadter, residing in the Eighth Ward, was drawn as a conscript. It appears that she keeps a small store, and when the enrolling officer called for the name of her husband, she told him he could take it from the sign much better than she could tell him. Her name being on the sign instead of that of her husband, it was placed on record and she was duly enrolled and drafted.
Mr. James Smith, a barkeeper in the Franklin House, has three sons. One has served in the Excelsior Brigade since its organization, another is in the army corps of Gen. Foster, in North Carolina, and the third was drafted on Monday.
Messrs. Husted & Carll, carpet dealers, have in their employ about 25 men. Of these, nine have thus far been drafted, including Mr. Carll, one of the proprietors.
The Second Connecticut Battery, of six rifled cannon, arrived in the City yesterday and encamped on a vacant lot in Myrtle-avenue, near Broadway,

THE BROOKLYN DRAFT LOAN.
The Controller of Brooklyn has advertised for proposals for the half million dollar loan authorized by the Common Council, to mitigate the severity of the draft. Bids are to be received for ten days, by which time it is expected that the money will be in the treasury.
A meeting of the Common Council Committee on the subject of the draft loan was to have been held yesterday, but no quorum appearing, no business could be transacted, A meeting of the Board will be held this evening for the purpose of acting upon the recommendations of the Committee in regard to regulations for distributing the money.

The Exemption Ordinance--Action Under It.
The following correspondence has passed between the Comptroller and Col. Nugent.
City of New-York, Department of Finance, Aug. 31, 1863.
Col. Robert Nugent, Assistant Provost-Marshal-General,
New-York City:
Dear Sir: I have the honor to inclose herein a copy of an ordinance adopted by the Board of Supervisors of this County, and approved by his Honor the
Mayor, on the 28th inst., by which you will see that they are desirous to aid the Government in procuring the number of men needed to finish up the work of supressing the rebellion.
In behalf of the County Substitute and Relief Committee, appointed by the Bureau of Supervisors on the 28th inst., I desire to learn from you what periof of time will be allowed to persons drafted in this City, after they have been duly inspected and found liable to serve, in which to prucure acceptable substitutes or pay the sum required to procure their exemption from the draft.
It is most respectfully suggested that the allowed for the purpose above-named be as long as may be consistent with your instructions to allow, in order that we may be enabled to obtain the men.
An early reply hereto is solicited.
Very respectfully your ob'dt servant,
MATTHEW T. BRENNAN, Comptroller.
Office of the A. A. Provost-Marshal General,
Southern Division of New-York.
New-York, Sept. 1, 1863.

Matthew T. Brennan, Esq., Comptroller City of New-
York:
Dear Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of 31st ult., in which you desire to know what period of time will be allowed to persons drafted in this City, after they have been duly inspected and found liable to serve, in which to procure acceptable substitutes or pay the sum required to pay their exemption from the draft.
In reply, I would say that orders have been issued to the Provost-Marshals to defer to the last the cases of such drafted men as are members of the Fire Department, and every reasonable indulgence will be granted to such as are accepted to enable them to avail themselves of the provisions of the ordinance adopted by the Board of Supervisors.
I am, Sir, respectfully,
Your obedient servant,
ROBERT NUGENT.
Col. 69th N. Y. Vols., and Act. Assist. Provost-Marshal General.
How Col. Nugent can order the Provost-Marshals to defer the cases, we are at a loss to know. The Provost-Marshals have no more authority than the Commissioners or Surgeons, and it is for a majority of the Board of Enrollment, as the law instructs, to decide on all cases which may come before them.
The Comptroller has issued the following notice:
No application for exemption will be received until the District Board of Enrollment have examined and accepted the person drafted into the United States service, under the act of Congress approved March 3, 1863. The certificate of acceptance by the District Board of Enrollment must be presented to this Committee.
GEO. OPDYKE, Mayor,
MATTHEW T. BRENNAN, COMPTROLLER,
ELIJAH F. PURDY,
ORISON BLUNT,
WM. M. TWEED,
WM. R. STEWART.
The Committee of the Fire Department, composed of Henry Wilson, Fire Commissioner; John G. Giles, Treasurer of the Department; A. J. Delatour, President of the Department; Zopkar Mills, Trustee, and John Decker, Chief Engineer, meet at Fireman's Hall, every night, to hear claims for exexemption [sic]. Mr. Decker has insisted on the most thorough examination of the claims, and the Board fully concur with him. Applicants have to come provided with the certificate of the officers of their companies as to their being active firemen, or exempts doing active duty, and these certificates are indorsed by the Committee only after a thorough examination of the books, comparing badges, names, etc. The plan adopted is one which will effectually prevent any imposition, and discharge from the draft only those in the Department who are entitled to discharge. The Committee do not intend to allow a single unworthy member of the Department to avail himself of the ordinance.
The Committee of Supervisors appointed under the Substitute and Relief ordinance met yesterday, and perfected all their arrangements for business. They adopted certain rules and forms of application, which are duly advertised, so that ail interested may fully understand their plans.
The Committee meet at 9 A. M. every day, in the Supreme Court Room, first floor, Nos. 71 and 73 Duane street, and will be ready for business to-day.
Among the drafted in the Eleventh Ward was Theodore Tilton, of The Independent.
A considerable number of colored people were also drawn in this Ward.
A son of ex-Mayor Wall of Williamsburgh was among the conscripts of the Thirteenth.

The District Examinations.
FOURTH DISTRICT.
The Board of the IVth District resumed operations yesterday morning at 10 o'clock. At an early hour a large crowd assembled, and during the day was greatly increased. At noon the stairs and passages leading to the Board Room were chock full. The conscripts who were waiting for their turn appeared to be very pleasant, indulging in many good-natured remarks to each other, and eagerly questioning those who had been before the Board, as they passed out, asking them "How they got off?" "What they were exempt
for?" "When they were to come again," &c. Lieut. E. Klevan, who had charge of the guard (Co. H, 3d Wis. Vols.), maintained order during the day. The examination is necessarily tedious, owing to the fact that not only the conscripts are examined, but also their witnesses. Sixty-four cases were heard during the day. Of these the following were held for duty: John Gohner, Charles Vollmer, T. F. McFreeley, Frederick Goodhand. The following substitutes were also accepted: Geo. E. Brown, J. F. Brady, Jacob Vail, Mortimer Travis, and John Volanten, making nine soldiers ready for duty out of 40 cases disposed of. Thirty-three were exempted for the following reasons: Sixteen physical disability; 2, non-residents; 1, now in the service; 12, over age; 1, under age; 1, son of a widow, dependent on his labor for support. Twenty-four cases were adjourned for further hearing.

GEO. WASHINGTON BEFORE THE BOARD.
A stout, good-looking colored man, rejoicing in the name of the Father of his Country, hailing from No. 3_ Watts street, claimed exemption on account of being 36 years of age and married. Two of his colored brethren appeared as witnesses. On being asked as to George's family, one of the witnesses swore that George had ten or twelve children (he couldn't be more particular) that he knew of, and added: "I guess, Boss, hese got a few more I haint seen." The evidence was conclusive as to his age, and George was transferred to the second class.

A LIBEL ON THE BOARD.
Certain journals allege that the proceedings of this Board are conducted in secret. This is not true. Capt. Erhardt and Commissioner McFarland conduct their business openly, and representatives of the press are always welcome to attend their deliberations. That the reporter of a certain journal was excluded, is due solely to the fact that when he applied he was not in a fit state to be admitted.

FIFTH DISTRICT.
In the Vth District Capt. Duffy has notified the drafted men of the Ninth and Tenth Wards, that he will commence hearing exemption cases to-day. Two hundred persons have been notified to appear daily, in order that the Commissioners may dispose of them in their regular order, and it will be useless for any to appear before the day indicated in their notice.

SIXTH DISTRICT.
The office of the Board of Enrollment in this District, No. 185 Sixth avenue, was thronged yesterday with applicants for exemption, each with fear and trembling being ushered in turn by the guard before the Provost-Marshal, Commissioner and Surgeon, who were to decide his fate. Upward of 97 cases were disposed of yesterday. Thus far the following has been the result of their examinations: Drafted men held for service, 82; substitutes accepted, 27; paid commutation, 9; exempted for disability, 200; exempted from other causes, about 196. Quite a large number of cases have been laid over. A colored citizen, rejoicing in the name of George Washington, claimed exemption on the ground that he was 36 years of age and the father of ten children. An Irishman, claiming exemption on the ground of alienage, was asked by Commissioner Lamont if he had ever voted, when he replied that he never voted but once and then he was drunk, and that was all he knew about it. Capt. Farr expects to send a squad of men to Riker's Island by the end of the week. Thus far everything has progressed smoothly, and no trouble whatever has been experienced.

EIGHTH DISTRICT.
Capt. Mannierre and his associates of the Board of Enrollment will commence hearing applications for exemption to-day. With proper consideration for the circumstances of the laboring community, Capt.
Mannierre will hold a morning session, commencing at 7 o'clock, to hear the cases of workmen who may claim exemption, and precedence will be given to them so that they may loose as little time as possible.

NINTH DISTRICT.
In the IXth District notices have been served in the Twenty-second Ward, and the Board of Enrollment will commence to-day to hear claims. Capt. Jenkins announces that he will give a preference to persons wishing to furnish substitutes. Some of the drafted men have expressed a willingness to furnish substitutes, if they can do so at once, and be relieved of all further annoyance. The Marshal thinks this will aid in securing additions to the army.

BROOKLYN.
Draft Exemption in Brooklyn.
Mayor Kalbfleisch sent a message to the Board of Aldermen last evening in relation to the draft-relief movement. He insisted that the action of the Common Council should be limited to the relief of those persons only who have families to support or near relatives relying upon them for their maintenance. The Major added:
"The law authorizing the Common Council to borrow the money is emphatic in its language; it distinctly provides that it can only be raised for the relief of indigent families of those drafted. How the law can be construed as giving us the privilege to include those who have no one depending upon them for support—or, if they have, are able to take care of themselves—I cannot comprehend. The law should receive a liberal construction; but this is such a stretch as seems to me entirely unwarranted.
"Many of our citizens object to the exempting militiamen and firemen as such merely, and adduce strong arguments against making any distinction between the different classes of our citizens, who will all be alike called upon to pay.
"Many of those also who would be exempted under the resolution of your honorable body, it is alleged, are abundantly able to provide a substitute or procure exemption, and therefore can not be considered as indigent, as  required to be by law. The charter also, by making the members of the Common Council trustees and personally liable as such, would in my opinion appear sufficient to restrain us from going aside from the clear intent and meaning of the statute and hazard the consequences which may result therefrom.
"As the Comptroller entertains similar views, I trust your honorable body will well consider the matter, so as not to embarrass in any way the good result which would otherwise attend your action. Let the relief be granted to all who have those who are dependent upon them for support, whether they be firemen, militiamen, bakers, butchers, or follow any other pursuit. It will not only be more in conformity with the statute, and give more universal satisfaction, but I am also authorized to say that it will cause the loan to be taken more readily by capitalists."
Alderman Strong offered the following resolution, which was adopted:
"Resolved, That in the disbursement of moneys raised hereunder, the same shall be confined to the purpose of the law, and that, in determining who shall be worthy to receive relief, there shall be associated with each alderman two well-known citizens, who shall form a committee, and no relief shall be granted except by consent of a majority of the ward committee, confirmed by a majority of all the members elected to this Board, and approved by the Mayor."
The committee so appointed is as follows:
First Ward—Thos. D. Carman, Lawrence Hanley; 2d, Francis Markey, Jos. Buckley; 3d, (not represented); 4th, Burdett Stryker,Wm. Leech; 5th, Jesse M. Folk, John Pyburn; 6th, Cornelius J, Sprague, Geo. L. Kent; 7th, Samuel H. Turner, John D. Hudson; 8th, Sup. F. McGrath, Jessica Skinner; 9th, Amos T. Hatfield, A. G. Williams; 10th, Wm. M. Thomas, William Beard; 11th, Thomas J. Taylor, Felix Campbell; 12th, Wm. McAvany, Supervisor Driscoll; 13th, W. W. Armfield, Thos. Murphy; 14th, Adolphus Baker, George B. McGrath; 15th, Norman Andrews, John Balderson; 16th, A. Vigelius, Christian Eisemann; 17th, Wm, M. Messerole, Jonathan Moore; 18th, Wm. Tuttle, Charles J. Bevoise; 19th, Jas. Gridley, Roswell C. Brainard; 20th, Robert B. Benedict, Seymour L. Husted.
Bills to the amount of $39,000 have been presented to the Board of Supervisors for the pay of the Brooklyn regiments during the draft.

A Cheerful Spot.—The first snow squall for August on that cheerful spot, the summit of Mount Washington, took place last Sunday week.

The Draft in the Third Congressional District.
The drawing for the Fifteenth ward, Brooklyn, took place this morning at 9 o'clock, under the direction of Provost Marshal S. B. Gregory.
The number of names enrolled in this ward were reported to be nine hundred and fifty-five, from which two hundred and thirty-five were drawn as the quota, including fifty per cent.
Messrs. Dean, Tomkins and Tomlinson were appointed a committee to count the ballots and reported the number to be correct. The draft then proceeded.

CONSCRIPTS
Buffert, E 304 Grand
Ryder, J 250 S 2d
Rothere, J 14 Remsen
Henderson, J Richardson
Sweeny, G 164 Leonard
Hopkins, W 388 Grand
Lodine, L C Bodine
Berckhart, H Coursly
Fitting, N Graham av
Jenkins, R do
Bishop, W 83 Powers
Adolfer, J Graham
Polhemus, J 283 Somer
Viggar, J 247 N 2d
Whitman, H 267 Grand
Mauret, A 366 Grand
Vorsset, J 22 Remsen
Waterhouse, S J 240 S 2d
Roeder, C 39 Remsen
Austin, W H 81 10th
Greerer, R 54 Devoe
Martin, J 299 S 2d
Galliman, G F 356 Grand
Miller, C 251 S 1st
May, H 273 Grand
Leonard, T Richardson
Williams, G 247 Ewing
Grea, J 121 Wycoff
Schermeron, J 260 S 2d
Hoffman, G B Ainslie
Lawrence, W 38 Power
Gordell, H 302 Grand
Colher, J 275 Grand
Boyce, J A 178 Leonard
Durham, J Bushwich av
Jenkins, J G Ainsley
Ghiniges, S 288 S 1st
Fagen, D Loremer
Robbins, A 210 S 2d
Ulbrich, P 208 Union av
Schuler, F, 181 Ewen
Tarrington, W B 442 Grand
Andrews, W H Ainsley
Bohans, A 66 Remsen
Frazsin, F 23 Wyckoff
Darringer, J 40 Ainsley
Lowe, J 188 Lorimer
Morris, B 278 S 1st
Atwere, W 260 Ewen
Mount, M S 8 Ainsley
Brackenhoff, F 303 Grand
Anthony, G Power
Emmon, F 99 Wycoff
Danby, J Power
Richard, R 46 Remsen
Pergh, G Battle Row
Lorz, P 202 Union av
Baptist, W 106 10th
Hasenstock, A 188 Ewing
Price, P 257 N 2d
Brewer, T 39 Devoe
Webster, J 8 do
McKeon, J 267 Grand
Hickey, C 335 do
Connell, T Withers
Rodgers, H 238 Ewing
Vorster, E 345 Grand
Lantenplos, J 88 1/2 10th
Dittel, G Frost
Laun, L 72 11th
Longstreet, W 269 S 1st
Height, C W Wyckoff
Couwoal, H Jr 278 S 1st
Harnum, H 87 Wyckoff
Ruddy, C Leonard
Casey, W H 369 N 2d
Jones, J 237 S 1st
John, J H 142 Union av
Bowers, C 48 Richardson
Burns, J Jackson
Gates, G 242 Ewen
Heid, G 200 Alnon av
Gager, J 401 Grand
Resch, J 110 18th st
Druse, A 408 Grand
Vincent, C 43 Devoe
Russell, B 138 Remsen
Hodgers, S H Battle Row
Gilligan, D 94 Union
Folger, J 46 Remsen
Daler, G 240 Ewing
Hall, F H 7 Ross
Bennett, J G 37 Taylor
Delany, J N 5 Olymer
Church, W P 3 Reap
Yetman, G W 3 Wilson
Treiease, F A 94 Broadway
Lawrence, J Kent av
Silick, C W Lee av
Hewson, H S 128 Broadway
Kenan, J 7 Clymer
Crowell, J 175 Taylor
Broadhead, A 400 Grand
Cutler, L 92 Remsen
Clark, J cor Power & Graham
Lyon, T 253 South 1st
Ubert, J 30 Wyckoff
Pine, M 103 Union av
Leeney, J 269 South 1st
Mitchell, M 272 South 1st
List, W Smith and Remsen
Fuzie, W 197 Swing
Brady, J 28 Conselyea
Brown, E Conselyea st
Courtney, J 85 Wyckoff
Newson, C 104 Lorimer
Hewing, M 74 10th
Frende, L 291 So 1st
Wilsey, W 81 10th
Limroux, J 363 Grand
Nova, M 247 So 1st
Wiese, C 144 Lorimer
Gill, R, 12 Devoe st
Marshal, W 333 1/2 Grand
___ok, J 520 Grand
___lan, F Withers st
Lock, G 316 Grand
Wood, D 50 Remsen
Stout, W H 141 Ainsly
Drummond, E 54 Remsen
Richardson, E R 385 Grand
Betts, W 38 Remsen
Gills, T 24 Anisly
Jenkins, D do
Roth, J 210 Union av
Lymans, M Bushwick av
Miller, W 4 Conslyeo
Williams, H 315 Grand
Broser, T 237 South 1st
Brown, D R 270 Grand
Heaflee, C Smith st
Hill, T 114 10th
Henry, J 287 North 2d
Fix, D Ainslie
Cook, A Bushwick av
Bennett, J 140 Remsen
Jordan, J 40 do
Long, L do
___lls, A H Graham av
Herschel, L 19 Remsen
McCoy, J 251 N 2d
_urchell, R 269 N 2d
_reestone, J N, 275 N 2d
Dreyer, J W Union av
Martin, J 242 S 2d
Dewitt, J S 2d
Acorn, S 29 Remsen
Haideach, J 360 Grand
Elbers, E 346 Grand
Lewis, A Powers
Gunman, O Bushwick av
Stokes, B 279 Grand
Nolan, S 136 Remsen
Stillwell, J A Conselyea st
Boster, G W 335 Grand
Peace, H 272 S 1st
Rodgers, 110 8th
Sands, J 505 Grand
Knapp, J Devoe st
Hurst, J W 75 10th
Olmstead, J 192 Remsen
Simms, H 160 Leonard
Rule, A 94 Union av
Collins, 441 Grand
Miner, B Frost st
Condit, G 159 Wyckoff
Hornblow, G 250 Power
Wrightman, J Ainsley
Wetzon, J 237 South 1st
Smith, J 156 Union av
Sebrea, A 337 Grand
Hurdly, W 318 Grand
Miller, S 152 Union av
Buntz, C 271 South 1st
Malo, J 103 Wyckoff
Dunbar, A M 224 Ewing
Cullinan, M 37 Remsen
Manger, S 428 Grand
Willkeyson, J 59 Wycoff
Concklin, J C 320 N 2d
Linhister, J 302 Grand
Wagner, F 294 S 1st
Pickard, T 393 Remsen
Evans, J B Ewins st
Lewis, W J 144 Remsen
Humphrey, T 41 Devoe
Zindle, F Withers st
Stillwell, S 235 S 1st
Guce, Rev O 94 Union av
Roberts, C J 85 Devoe
Scherg, G 110 Remsen
Donaldson, W 39 Powers
Blackwell, 242 Ewell
Mead, J Lorimer st
Heymeger, W 219 Lorimer
Coleman, J 426 Grand
_leotts, F 8 Ainsley
Kemph, J North 2d
Savage, W Smith st
Demsey, J 408 Grand
Kelsey,A O, Counselyea
Watson, W H 176 Lorimer
McKan, W 182 Lorimer
Perry, J H 12 Powers
Van Nost, A 382 1/2 Grand
Buckman, G 336 Grand
Eckle, A F 274 N 2d
Stauderman, F 312 Grand
Reynold, J L 372 Grand
Fresting, L 166 Leonard
Hoaranny, O Ewing
Brooks, G W 470 Grand
Wilson, F 64 9th
Gross, H M 372 Grand
Gayner, W 237 S 1st
Fowler, B 54 Remsen
Burr, H C 448 Grand
Horn, A 30 Skillman
_ocumb, J 17 Power
Menger, W F 7 Devoe
Kenney, W 7 Power
Young, O N 2d
Williams, J G 60 Devoe
Liefert, J 81 Union av
King, W R 242 S 2d
Roach, T 284 Grand
_pader, T A 30 Ainsley
Grop, B S 272 Grand
Helpin, S 54 Remsen
Meyers. R A 117 Wycoff
This completed the quota from the Fifteenth ward, whereupon the drawing in the Nineteenth Ward was commenced.
Six hundred and ninety-eight names were enrolled, and from that number, one hundred and sixty-nine ballots were drawn as the quota from that ward.
CONSCRIPTS.
Taylor, E Bedford av
Dumant, C 1 Climar
Bewit, J 44 do
Perry, C 380 Worth
Dune, J Flushing av
Curtis, W Climar
Petersdorf, L Wallabout can
Krey, H 142 Broadway
Wells, L 144 Broadway
Major I Wilson
Coff, J Flushing av
Reed E 24 Rush
Speight, W A Lincoln pl
Lawes, C Rodney
Sphene, G W 148 Broadway
Taylor, H 147 Broadway
Separd, J W Myrtle av
Miller, P Broadway
Ficber, H 11 Climax
Shaffer, 27 Bartlette
Peness, F Kent av
Benedict, C 13 Martan
Tucker, G E 88 Climar
Glom, S C 54 Wilson
Wearing, D 206 Ross
Huler, J Bidy
Vandersee, C Ann
Thompson, J Clymar
Bishof, P 2 Lincoln Pl
Johnston, J V Hewes
Davis, N H 3 Taylor
Bersenberg, L 149 Broadway
Taylor, H J Bedford ave
Richmond, C D 4 Ross
Morgan, W T 3 Rush
Grimes, J Worth av
Lober, D 164 Taylor
Hebbleman, J 72 Broadway
Hendrickson, J 118 do
Marringrer, A do
Marshal, W D 44 Bedford av
Comstock, C 70 Bedford
Reynold, W H 105 Bidy
Carpenter, H 32 Clymer
O'Shea, J 164 Taylor                      
Surlhoff, W 10th av
Watson, W J 84 Bidy
Cheffield, C 173 Clymar
Bradly, T 179 Taylor
Kelly, J 96 Taylor
Marshal, J J 30 Taylor
French, W B Bodney
Woodlower, J Flushing av
Graham, J 26 Worth av
Hera, J G 103 Broadway
Salt, B Flushing av
Broune, A 134 Broadway
Potter, S S Jr 76 Gross
McCready, A 37 Brush
Hudson, C 11 Wilson
Watson, J R 84 Broadway
Mayers, C Broadway and Front
Traver, F W 18 Taylor
Colwell, S 1 Wilson
Merger, F Broadway
Hunt, S 22 Rush
Browne, A, 179 Taylor
Newlan, J T 80 B'way
Kenny, L B'way
Kaynor, W 26 Rush
Driscol, F L Bedford ave
Taylor, R Lee ave
Gerow, F P 37 Rush
Watson, J Kent ave
Van Winkle, E 4 4th
Cutter, A M Bedford ave
Dunn, P River
Cleveland, C 27 Curran
Marcy, G D 33 Wilson
Hall, E 7 Rosa
Wingden, J Bartlett
Hare, T H Broadway
Robbin, W 173 Bedford ave
Hory, C do
Jefferson, P Broadway
Robolton, W 204 Ross
Seaburt, H Lee av
Kearny, J 1 Taylor
Voltman, E Kent av
Wacker, C 1 do
Hollinghead, M Lee av
Dominick, M N 24 Bedford av
Whitlock, J Geary
Huffman, L 11 Whipple
Martin, H 223 Ross
Mizell, D Barllette
Lethbridge, J D Rodney
Kizman, C 71 Rodney
Gillespie, S W 74 Ross
Wilde, J 170 Ross
Russel, T 33 Wilson
Stearns, A 173 Taylor
Dixson, S 43 do
Merril, M 12 Lincoln pl
Nixson, G 149 Broadway
Lawrence, J C 20 Worth av
Gatherie, S Broadway
Krack, W 1 Kent ave
Bishop, W Pena
Browne, J N 31 Rush
Ames, J H Taylor
Thairault, A Kent ave
Leaycraft, E S Wilson
Taylor, H Bedford ave
Cohen, D 159 Broadway
Barberg, J 140 Broadway
Taylor, J Worth ave
Seely, L A Worth ave
Dennis, A 30 Morton
Hedges, 18 Lee ave
O'Donell, P Taylor
Gardner, T 39 Morton
McGuigar, H 19 Claremont
Dunavan, A H Taylor
McMahon, R B'way
Young, E R Bedford av
Chinrock, G 62 Ross
Young, D A Lee av
Stewart, L 76 Rodney
Heins, J P 1 Taylor
Burr, A Lee av
Fisher, G H Wilson
Minter, W, 8 Walton
Wade, H 34 Clymer
Robinson, G Bedford av
Forn, J Walton
Bennett, G R Marcy av
Fisher, G Penn
Smith, J 76 Ross
Shay, J S Penn
Fergerson, D 95 Broadway
Browne, G Penn
Mowler, J 93 Broadway
Owen, A Ross
Vanderbilt, E Rass
Lawrence, B 70 Rodney
Tillen, C Worth av
Wierbee, N 231 Ross
Browne, J J 30 Chinar
Black, C Kent av
Holmes, J Mc Lee av
Conlon, G H Worth av
Smith, S B Taylor
Hungtonton, C B Marcy av
Jacobs, F 136 Broadway
Williamson, D 3 Wilson
The number required from the Nineteenth ward having been drawn, the marshal stated to those present that as the quota from the Third Congressional district, numbering four thousand and forty-six had been drafted, and as there was no other business in connection with the draft, they would adjourn, and at an early day give notice to the conscripts to appear at headquarters and subject themselves to examination. The crowd in attendance then ...

BROOKLYN.
THE DRAFT—Arrival of the U. S. Troops—A number of regiments arrived in the city last evening from N. York, and encamped in different localities. The Eighth Ohio and First Indiana pitched their tents on Fort Green Park. The Fourteenth Indiana and Seventh Michigan encamped on the Parade Ground at East New York. The One Hundred and Tenth Ohio and another regiment is encamped on the Base Ball Ground, bounded by Union, Sackett, Smith and Foyt streets. The Fourth Ohio proceeded to Jamaica.

MEETING OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON THE DRAFT
The Special Committee of the Board of Aldermen for making arrangements for distribution of the fund appropriated by the Board to relieve the hardships of the draft, met this morning in the Common Council Chamber. Ald. Ternan in the chair. The resolutions passed at a previous meeting of the committee, exempting the militia and firemen, it was stated gave general satisfaction, and the committee have no doubt but the $500,000 can be easily obtained. On motion of Ald. Kalbfleisch, it was resolved to call a special meeting of the Board of Aldermen for 5 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon.
The committee then adjourned till Tuesday morning.

THE DRAFT.
The Draft in Brooklyn.
THE EXAMINING BOARD.
The Examining Board of the Third Congressional district was organized last week, and will meet daily from this date at the office of the Provost Marshal, No. 259 Washington street. The Board consists of—
Captain S. B. Gregory, Provost Marshal.
Commissioner—Abner M. Bebee.
Surgeon—Nelson L. North, M. D.
Recorder—Henry Bristow.
Persons drafted and desiring to procure substitutes are required to give notice in writing to the Board of Enrolment that on such a day they will present a substitute, giving his name, residence and age, and stating whether he is an alien or a citizen. The Board will hear propositions for substitutes and examine persons so offering every day (except Sunday), between the hours of nine and ten o'clock A. M.

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT OF THE WESTERN DISTRICT.
The secretaries of the different fire companies of the Western District of Brooklyn have made returns to Chief Engineer Cunningham, showing the number of men which have been drafted from the department. The following shows how many have been elected from each company:—
ENGINE COMPANIES.
Washington, No. 1…..12         Phenix, No. 12...........17
Neptune, No. 2……….6          Pacific, No. 14..........25
Franklin, No. 3……...15          Brooklyn, No. 17......21
Eagle, No. 4...............10           Empire, No. 19.......... 7
Union, No. 5………..12           Clinton, No. 20......... 5
Protector, No. 6...........7           Putnam, No. 21......... 8
Constitution, No. 7....12          Montauk, No. 22........ 7
Continental, No. 9.... 20
Columbus, No. 10...... 12 Total....................196

HOSE COMPANIES.
Atlantic, No. 1……... 4          Americus, No. 7..............9
Mechanics, No. 2…....6          Water Witch, No. 8........ 9
Alert. No. 3………….6           Mount Vernon, No. 10...4
Crystal, No. 4……….8           Cashow, No. 12.............. 2
Frontier, No. 5………5           Fanklin, No. 13.............. 4
Washington, No. 6….6           Eureka, No. 14 ............... 3
Total ... .......66

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANIES.
Lafayette, No. 1........6            Degraw, No. 4………… 5
Clinton, No. 2...........1            Rescue, No. 5……….....8
Empire, No. 3........... 5
Total 24
Engine Companies......................................... 196
Hose Companies............................................ 66
Hook and Ladder Companies........................ 24
Total............................................................. 286
No 11 Engine has not reported, which will increase the total number somewhat.
Two companies escaped—Hose companies Nos. 9 and 11—not a man being drafted.

THE DRAFT LOAN.
The total amount of subscriptions received by the Comptroller for the half million draft loan amounted on Saturday night last to $86,000. Bonds of $100 and upward have been prepared so as to afford an opportunity for men of limited means to subscribe.
The Seventh District.
In this district there were only sixteen cases heard and laid over during the week, which resulted as follows:
Exempted for being physically disabled....................5
Exempted for being over age......................................1
Exempted for being under age....................................1
Exempted for alienage................................................5
Exempted by furnishing substitutes............................2
Held for service...........................................................2

BROOKLYN.
MEETING OF THE COMMON COUNCIL.—The
Firemen and the Militia,—The Common Council are to hold a special meeting on Tuesday night, for the purpose of seeing what they can do for the drafted Firemen and Militia. The Firemen have threatened to disband, and the Board of Officers are to hold a meeting to-night in relation to the matter, but no action will be taken by them until after the meeting of the Common Council. The Mayor and a number of gentlemen stand ready to subscribe to a special fund to be used for the purpose of exempting all the Firemen and Militia who are not able to exempt themselves.

THE ANNUAL GATHERING of the friends and children connected with the Adelphi street Baptist Sunday School took place on Thursday afternoon and evening. The exercises consisted of singing by the children, the music being under the direction of Mr. Thompson. In the evening an appropriate address was delivered by the Rev. Mr. Troward. After the address, the scholars retired to the basement—where scups and other means of juvenile amusement were furnished—when the little folks had a merry time of it. During the evening, social converse and singing were indulged in by the friends and teachers, and at about 10 o'clock with pleasant memories of the day and evening, the anniversary exercises closed.

PROBABLE HOMICIDE.—Mr. Morris was called in last evening to see a woman named Mary Ann Campbell, who was lying in a dying condition at her residence, corner of Vine and Columbia streets. Mrs. Campbell was a very old and infirm woman and a cripple, yet her condition was not a protection from a brutal assault committed upon her by a woman named Catherine Murphy. Mrs. Campbell was so badly beaten that her recovery is considered very doubtful. The Coroner directed the arrest of Mrs. Murphy, who is held to await the result of the unfortunate woman's injuries.

BURGLARY.—The residence of Counsellor [sic] John P. Troy, No. 135 Pearl street, was feloniously entered last evening, and robbed of valuables to the amount of $114.

A Burglar Caught.—A man who gave his name as Thomas Hand, was caught last night in the act of breaking into the house of Mr. Benjamin, No. 54 Hudson avenue. He was committed to await examination.

SURROGATE'S COURT.—Before Roswell C. Brainard, Surrogate of Kings Co.—Wills admitted to probate: of Phoebe Ann Rhodes, J. Ledyard and Peter Traybold, all of Brooklyn.
Administrations were granted on the estates of Abigail Clark, Samuel C. Brower, John T. Duff, John Scheele, Hugh O'Brien and John McDonald, all of Brooklyn.

THE WEEKLY REPORT OF THE HEALTH OFFICER—shows the number of deaths during the past week to be 117. Of the deceased 19 were men, 23 women, 135 children; colored persons 6.

MAIN STREET WIDENING.—The report of the Commissioners appointed to apportion and assess the expense of widening M___ street, was presented to the County Court yesterday for confirmation. A mandamus had previously been issued directing the proper city officer (the Corporation Counsellor [sic]) to present the report. The confirmation was opposed by Mr. McCue on behalf of some of the property holders, including the City of New York.

BROOKLYN.
Relief for Drafted Men.—The Common Council met again this morning and passed resolutions appropriating $300 each for the relief of the following  drafted persons: Bartholomew Riley, Roswell D. Tompkins, Elijah Griswold, Joseph Drew, Sylvanus Hanley, Richard McLaughlin, John Leonard, Thomas McGivney, Andrew Brown, William Gaus, Peter Williams, John Richler, C. Raab, John Esquirole, Henry Roser, Charles H. Grimshaw, Charles Burton, Wm. R. Taylor, Thomas H. Kerlan. A resolution was adopted for the appointment of suitable persons to attend at the office of the Provost Marshals

The Uniformed Militia and the Draft.
Editor of Brooklyn Eagle.—
DEAR SIR—Believing that there exists in the minds of many persons a prejudice against the uniformed miltia [sic] and an exagerated [sic] idea of the vast privileges they enjoy I offer a few remarks, trusting to your willingness to see justice done to all classes of your readers for the necessary space in your columns. Some people think that the whole service is voluntary; that one can resign at any time. Like a mouse in a trap, it was very easy to get in, but very difficult to get out. Go to the captain, he refers you to the colonel; the colonel refers you to the State law, the State law says you are in for seven years. So much for the voluntary part. Persons are often deceived before joining. The service is rather expensive. Your uniform and equipments cost considerable. Members are required by company bylaws to uniform and equip themselves at their own expense. There are the dues and other expenses to pay. The "regimental fund" absorbs more than half the dues. A drummer often plays "Pop goes the Weasel" through instead of on his drum, at the expense of the company. Sometimes, on a parade, a member is accidentally killed; whence arises another assessment for his family, &c. The State agreed to furnish us with the necessary arms for drill, but owing to the delay in doing so, it was deemed necessary to buy them ourselves. Some of our wiseacres discovered a pile of damaged muskets to be sold cheap cash. An assessment was levied to purchase said muskets, but not being able to get much use from them, they were soon afterwards sold at a large discount. For neglect of duty, however onerous, the fines are very heavy. If you neglect to obey the summons of a court martial, which sits very often) you are fined by default; on neglecting to pay, it goes into the hands of the Marshal, who adds his fees thereto, and then seizes anything he can lay his hands on excepting your uniform and equipments. Glorious exemption that. But the good people will say, "you get a dollar a day for your services when called out to suppress a riot, etc. Don't see it. Look at the facts. About a year ago we were obliged to go to East New York, when the Spinola regiment was located there. We were all of us out of pocket for sundries, besides the loss of time and inconvenience. Each private is entitled to $13 for his services there. Don't expect to get it. If ever paid it will probably go to the Regimental Fund. "Cash Dr. to sundries." We have lately been on duty again at great inconvenience to us all, and some expense with many unpleasant duties to perform, and much time actually wasted. This will afford another item for the famous regimental "Cash Dr. to sundries," unless our city fathers and the Supervisors look out sharp for us. To be sure, there are some counterbalancing pleasures for all those inconveniencies above mentioned, such as leaving your business at one day's notice to rush to the rescue of those who charge you ten times the value of articles necessary to sustain life, as a reward for your services; but it is a wonderful happiness to be with gentlemen, to clean your superior officers' boots and brush the dust and fleas off his clothes. So much for being an officer! Of course all of them won't let you do this—but some did—and they rather seemed to like it too, owing to their being in the United States service and enjoying all the privileges and advantages appertaining thereto.
Many of the Militia had formed associations to assure themselves substitutes in case of being drafted—when it was rumored that the Common Council would likely pay for substitutes, most of these associations were broken up, and the members thus left out "in the cold" as well as in the draft. Briefly, the duties may be summed up as follows: Pay your fines without grumbling, expect a vote of thanks from the "officials" for your services, and pocket your pay—when you get it. Generally, take care of other people's property at your own expense, for the benefit of your darling Regimental Fund. We are like the Dutchman who having married a bad wife, remarked, "She was all worse and no better at all." He had the advantage of us in one respect. He might get a divorce; we can't, unless some benevolently disposed individual or corporation will help us.
76 Dean street, Sept. 9. C. O. Richardson.

BROOKLYN NEWS.
The Draft.— there has been very little excitement about the draft for some days past, it being generally understood that the Common Council will make a sufficient appropriation to release all such as do not wish to go by procuring substitutes. It is thought that the quota of Kings County can be raised by paying $300 bounty to each man.
Notwithstanding the disorderly scene in New-York, and apprehensions of violence in this city, the Provost-Marshals of the Second and Third Congressional Districts have been busily engaged in augmenting their lists. The navy yard and large factories have been revisited, and large numbers of names have been added, amounting in all to over one thousand. The entire number liable to draft in the Third Congressional District is something over
30,000.
The Committee of the Brooklyn Common Council, to whom the subject was referred, have resolved to recommend a course similar to that pursued by the authorities of our city, in relation to the draft. They advise an appropriation of $500,000 to commute for those drafted.

BROOKLYN NEWS.
THE DRAFT IN BROOKLYN.—Official notice has been given that the draft will commence in both Congressional Districts of Kings County on Monday next, the 31st inst.—in the Second District, under charge of Provost-Marshal Maddox, at No. 26 Grandstreet, Williamsburgh, at 9 o'clock A. M., and in the Third District, under charge of Provost-Marshal Gregory, at 259 Washington-street, Brooklyn, at 10 o'clock, A. M.
The Third District comprises the 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 7th, 11th, i3th, 15th, 19th and 20th Wards (the latter included in the 11th Ward). The quota of the first class required is as follows, by Sub-districts—the number of the Ward being placed in the parallel column:

Sub-Dist. Wards. No. Required. Sub-Dist. Wards. No. Required.
I................. l.....,..        180              VII.........11.............1,050
II................2...............251               VIII.......13..........      528
III...............3..............340                IX.........15..........       235
IV...............4.............369                  X.........19..........       169
V................5…..........551
VI...............7.............373                Total........................4,046
This includes the 50 percent additional to the quota—the number actually required being 2,697.
The drawing, it is expected, will continue three days, one-third being drawn each day.
The draft in the First Congressional District, embracing the Counties of Queens, Suffolk and Richmond, will also be commenced on Monday, at the headquarters of Capt. Edwin Rose, in the Village of Jamaica, L. I.

THE DRAFT.—We are without definate [sic] information as to the day the draft will take place in this District. It is presumed that public notice will be given a week or two before the names are drawn from the wheel. The delay is said to be occasioned by efforts to ensure the most thorough accuracy.

THE BROOKLYN MILITIA ORDERED UNDER ARMS.
—In accordance with orders received by Generals Crook and Duryea, of the 5th and 11th Brigades, from Governor Seymour, the various militia organizations assembled at their headquarters fully equipped, at 10 o'clock this morning. The object is merely to have the militia in readiness in case of any disturbance during the process of the draft in New York and Brooklyn. A portion of the militia have been kept under arms for the past two months, both at the City Armory and Arsenal. No disturbance is anticipated, though it was thought well to take these precautionary ....

WHAT GOV. SEYMOUR DID FOR BROOKLYN.—
The number of conscripts asked for from Brooklyn was 6,358. Governor Seymour's letter has had the effect of convincing the President this number was too large. The President asks, for the present, for only 4,000—the average of the Republican districts.

The Draft—The Militia Under Arms.
The militia regiments have all been ordered under arms, in compliance with an order emanating from the State Adjutant General's office. The 13th, 23d, 28th, 47th and 56th are all ordered to meet at their respective armories to-day, and to hold themselves in readiness for further directions. The exact cause is not known even to the officers, except that they are to be prepared for anything that may transpire. The object, however, doubtless is, to be prepared for eventualities in connection with the forthcoming draft, which will be commenced in the Sixth district of New York to-morrow, (Wednesday) and in the other districts as soon thereafter as convenient. The time for commencing in this city will, in all likelihood, depend upon circumstances as they may develope themselves in New York. The authorities are preparing for emergencies, and there can hardly be a doubt that law and order will be maintained. The New York Common Council having provided for cases of hardship, and the Brooklyn Board of Aldermen being about to do the same thing, we apprehend that there will be no disturbance—all real cause for on outbreak having been removed in one city, and about being removed in this community.

Brooklyn.
The Common Council Exemption Fund.
—The Banks Refuse to Advance the Money.—The reply of the Brooklyn banks to the invitation of the Mayor to take up the proposed loan of one million of dollars for paying exemptions, &c., for conscripts was received this morning. The eight banks represented at the conference on Saturday last, sent in answers, some verbal, some written, all to the same effect, declining to advance any money on the proposed law. The committee on this subject being assembled to hear these replies, then authorized the Mayor to advertise for proposals for the loan. The Mayor has accordingly issued the following notice:—
MAYOR'S OFFICE,
BROOKLYN. August 13, 1863.
Proposals will be received at the office of the undersigned, at the City Hall, until Monday, 17th inst., at 10 o'clock, A. M., for a loan of $l,000,000, or any part thereof, for which certificates will be issued, payable in one year, with interest at the rate of seven per cent per annum, in accordance with a resolution adopted by the Common Council on the 27th July.
The Common Council intend to apply to the Legislature at its next session, for an act authorizing the issue of bonds to raise the necessary funds for the redemption of said certificates. Proposals to be endorsed "Proposals for City Loan."

The Riot in Brooklyn.—In Brooklyn there was considerable disturbance. One negro house, in Columbia street was destroyed and a few other houses in Tillary street were pillaged and the negroes horribly maltreated. There was a great commotion in the Navy Yard. The walls were manned and mounted with guns.—Thirteen 18-pounders are mounted on he Flushing-avenue side, so as to sweep everything. Two 32-pounders command the main entrance, and all the vessels have been hauled into the stream, the guns
shotted, and everything ready for any emergency. Several companies of Marines with 60 rounds of cartridges, and 12 boat-howitzers, rifled cannon, with ammunition boxes loaded with percussion shells, shrapnel [sic], canister, and grapeshot, were sent to New York towards evening. The Marines were accompanied by 300 sailors, armed with cutlasses and revolvers.

Mayor Kalbfleisch and the Draft.—The Fulton Ferry organ reiterates its brazen false­hoods in relation to the action of the Mayor in the matter of "the measure to mitigate the severity of the draft," upon the principle, we suppose, that a lie well adhered to is better than the truth itself. Our readers, however, are well acquainted with the action of the Mayor, since the time he first initiated the pro­position, and know how praiseworthy it has been, and that it needs no defence, and least of all against assaults emanating from a source that stands publicly confessed as a wilful [sic] and deliberate fabricator of untruth. The action of the Aldermen this evening will fully vindi­cate the position of the Mayor, and if such a thing was possible, with assurance so unblush­ing, cover his assailants with shame.
The proprietor of the organ of the disap­pointed, we believe, assumes to be an honora­ble man, and if he desires to maintain any such position before the community he will call off his mangy cur, or close his hungry and noisy mouth with another bone, and not leave to others the task of of kicking him back to his kennel. He should rememb [sic] that though he may not be the author of them, he is never­theless responsible for the malignant effusions, the promptings of blighted ambition and mean jealousy, of the mercenary scribbler when he hires and controls.

The Bankers of Brooklyn, New York, have all refused to advance the money (one million of dollars) voted by the Common Council of that city to pay the commutation money for conscripts. The mayor, un­der authority of the Common Council, has advertised for a public loan of the amount or any portion thereof, at seven per cent., on certificate, with a promise that application shall be-made to the nest Legislature for authority to issue bonds to raise the money to pay the certificate.

The Brooklyn One-Million-Dollar Con­scription Loan.—The Tribune says: The Com­mittee of the Brooklyn Common Council appointed to make arrangements for the loan of $1,000,000, to be applied to the payment of exemptions for men of large families who should be drafted, held a meeting in the Mayor's Office Wednesday morning, for the purpose of receiv­ing the replies of the Brooklyn banks in relation to the loan. The Mayor stated that he had re­ceived replies from the banks, some verbal and some written, but all to the same effect—re­spectfully declining to take any portion of the loan. No reason was given, but the general impression is that the refusal of the banks is based upon the fact that the Common Council have no legal authority to authorize the loan; and, if au­thorized and taken, it will depend on contingen­cies whether or not the next Legislature will le­galize it.
It was finally agreed to issue proposals for a loan of $1,000,000,000 [sic] from the public, for which interest bearing certificates will be issued, the Legislature to be applied to authorize the issue of bonds to redeem the certificates.

The Draft in Brooklyn.—Preparations are being pushed forward with all possible speed; but in the Third Congressional District the officers will not be ready to commence the drawing before the latter part of the week, Thursday at the earliest, but more likely Friday or Saturday. In the Second Congressional District the business is still farther behind hand, and it will take a week or ten days before they are ready.

BROOKLYN.
Preparing for Self-Defence--A Good Example.
The residents of South Brooklyn have organized a military body for purposes of self-defence in the event of further disturbances of the peace of the city. It is entitled the "South Brooklyn Defence Guard," and is commanded by Captain Ward of the Twenty-third regiment, as experienced and capable officer, who was unanimously elected. The organization comprises young and old men, and has its headquarters in Court street, where regular drills are held. Arms have been procured, and the Guard is rapidly cementing an effective organization. Its affairs are administered by a council composed of the older members, with the following officers: President, J. Center; Vice-President, Hugh Allen; Treasurer, Mr. Blacklin.

The Peace of the City.
The undersigned, Sheriff of the county of Kings, congratulates the inhabitants of said county upon the peace and good order which have been hitherto maintained in their midst, notwithstanding the violence and excitement prevalent in the adjoining- city. He earnestly exhorts all citizens to render prompt and entire obedience to the law, and to abstain from all acts, assemblages, and words tending to any breach of the peace. And he suggests that all citizens may render essential service in the maintenance of order, by enrolling themselves in companies, and designating proper persons for the purpose of communicating with the undersigned, that, in case of violence, they may forthwith be summoned as a posse, in aid of the authorities, in maintaining good order. He suggests that the station houses of the police, in the various precincts, are convenient and proper places for such enrollment, and that the police will extend all reasonable facilities for the purpose.
Dated Brooklyn, July 15, 1863.   ANTHONY F. CAMPBELL, Sheriff, &c.

BROOKLYN.
The Draft Loan--No Bids Received.
The Common Council Committee met this morning at the Mayor's office to open the bids for the Brooklyn conscription loan. The Mayor informed the committee that there were no bids to open; none having been received. A quorum of the Joint Committee not being present no formal action could be taken, but it was understood that a special meeting of the Common Council should be called for Wednesday evening, to take action on this subject.

...DAY EVENING, ......
THE APPORTIONMENT OF CONSCRIPTS.—The principle upon which the draft has been apportioned among the Congressional Districts of the State is utterly incomprehensible except upon the supposition that it is the intention to make the draft fall heavily upon Districts strongly Democratic, and proportionately light upon Republican communities. It is not necessary to go beyond this county for a sample of the irregularities of the apportionment. The following table gives the figures necessary to an understanding of the case:
SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT.
                                                           Canvass in 1862.
                          Popu-   Total               Wads-    Sey-    Total
Wards.              lation   of Dist. Draft.  worth.   mour.    vote.
Sixth               27,710
Eighth              9,190
Ninth              17,343
Tenth              25,258
Twelfth           11,088
Fourteenth      15,475
Sixteenth        21,l81
Seventeenth    7,934
Eighteenth       4316
Towns.
Flatbush          3471
Flatlands         1652
Gravesend      1286
New Lots        3271
New Utrecht.  2781  151,951  4143   5381    10,586    15,967

THIRD (ODELL'S) CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT.
Wards.
First                 6967
Second            9817
Third           10,084
Fourth         11,766
Fifth            17,400
Seventh      12,096
Eleventh    28,851
Thirteenth 17,958
Fifteenth    10,566
Nineteenth    6697  132,242  2697   7566     8915     16,421
The enrollment in the two districts does not show sufficient disproportion to warrant the great difference in the estimated number to be drafted. In the Second District the number of names enrolled is given at 33,155. In the Third District the number is roundly stated at 30,000. In the Second District it will be noticed that while the population exceeds by nearly twenty thousand that of the Third District, the vote is between four and five hundred less. This is accounted for by the fact, that in the Second District there are a greater number of aliens residing. These aliens are not liable to serve, though counted in the population, and swelling the number of men to be drafted, the burthen must therefore fall upon such residents of the District as are citizens.

THE LIABILITY OF CITIES FOR PROPERTY DESTROYED BY MOBS.
It may be somewhat inconsistent to quote a statute of any kind, or to talk about enforcing any law, if we are ready to relinquish a single provision or line of a single statute, simply because the mob makes the demand. Nevertheless, the law defining the liability of municipalities for property destroyed by mobs, may not be without interest just at this time. We quote the provision:
"Whenever any building, or other real or personal property shall be destroyed or injured in consequence of any mob or riot, the city or county in which such property was situated, shall be liable to an action by or in behalf of the party whose property was thus injured or destroyed, for the damage sustained by reason thereof. * * * And whenever any final judgment shall be recorded against any such city or county, * * the treasurer * * shall pay the amount of such judgment, to the party or parties entitled thereto, and charge the amount thus paid to the said city or county.

THE NEXT RIOT.
If the rioters are permitted to carry a single point now, we need count on nothing else on the renewal of the bloody scenes almost by moment. If the Government concede the mob touching the draft, how can it expect to enforce the law relative to taxation ___ any city or community will have to do _- _t out of paying taxes, will be to put the mob in motion—set the "governing classes at work. Having backed down once, how can the Government expect to exert its authority after that? Having forfeited the confidence of the people in one instance, how can it hope to have that respect which confers the moral power, without which it will soon become powerless? We may not fix the hour of the day when it will show itself, or about what it will take place,—but nothing is more certain, than that if the Government yields a hair now, there will be another mob. and that too, shortly, to which everything will have to be conceded.

BROOKLYN CITY NEWS.
FRIDAY, JULY 17, 1863.
THE EXCITEMENT IN BROOKLYN.
Extortion of Money from Storekeepers by Threats—A Night Watch by the Citizens —Threats Against Citizens—No Demonstration Made—The Assault on the Colored People in Green Lane.
The city was very quiet last night and no demonstration being made in any quarter. In accordance with the recommendations of the Mayor, night patrols were organized yesterday by the citizens in the several Wards, and kept guard last night. In the neighborhoods where any colored people reside much apprehension existed, both among the white and colored inhabitants. In Chappel street, one side is tenanted by colored families, the other side by white people, and the latter were afraid the mob, if any appeared would not discriminate between them and their neighbors. Several families packed up the most valuable portion of their personal property and removed it, and some ensured their personal safety by flight.
Threats were made against several prominent citizens, generally Republicans, and there were a number of applications to the Police Inspector for a force to protect them. Threats had also been made that the mob which set fire to the grain elevators in the Atlantic Basin, would return last night and finish their work. Barber's packing warehouse in particular was threatened. A military force was stationed at the docks, and no demonstration was made, and the night passed off quietly. Everything is quiet this morning.
The 23d Regiment expected home last night has not yet arrived.
Between 7 and 8 o'clock, last evening, two shabby looking young men called at several stores in Columbia street and told the, proprietors that a mob had been organized and would that night make a demonstration. They had been deputed to collect means, and those storekeepers who contributed, would not be troubled; those who refused, would have their stores sacked or burned.—The fellows demanded twenty-five cents, which might be considered treasonable sum under the circumstances, and in view of the critical state of things, most of the storekeepers applied to, paid the money rather than risk unpleasant consequences. In some places where their demand was objected to, they made a reduction in the amount. At one place they accepted ten cents, and a dry goods dealer got rid of them by giving two ferry tickets. Finally they called at the store of Mr. John Coburn, 42 Columbia street, who gave them 25 cents, but when they left the store, he followed them, and meeting officer Oats, of the 43d Precinct, gave them in custody. The prisoners gave their names as William Harkins, aged 25, a native of Scotland, and James Wood, aged 25, an Irish laborer. They had called at about a dozen stores, and realized between two and three dollars. They are held for examination before Justice Boerum.
John Tracy, one of the crowd who assaulted the colored families in Greene Lane, was arrested and brought up before Justice Perry for examination this morning. James Henry White, (colored) whom the accused, in company with others, assaulted, appeared against, him and testified that the accused came to his residence, No. 22 Green Lane, and stoned the house. The house was also occupied by two other colored families. The complainant ran out, when Tracy struck him twice on the head. He tried to get away, but was seized and beaten. He had not done or said anything to provoke the accused before he struck him.
Judge Perry fined the accused $20 for the assault, in default of which he was sent to jail. The Police are keeping a sharp look out for other parties who were engaged in the assault.

SHALL THE GOVERNMENT OR THE MOB PREVAIL?
The issue is—Shall the Government or the organized mob prevail? There is a contest for the mastery. It is precisely this—nothing more or less. Shall the Government,—Law, Order, and all authority,—go down beneath the blows of a mob already guilty of wholesale murder, arson, theft, assassination, and ready for any extreme,—or shall the Law of the land and the regularly constituted authorities, prevail? In a contest like this—and there is no other—men must take sides. Let every one choose for himself, and show his hand.

THE PROCLAMATION OF THE MAYOR.
The recommendations as well as the con­gratulations of Mayor Kalbfleisch are both judicious and timely, and we do not doubt that the former will be very generally responded to by the citizens.
In this District they had already taken steps to preserve the peace of the community and the safety of individuals and property.
In this quarter of the city, we are happy to state, there have been no serious riotous demonstrations; and, while none are particularly to be feared, it is wise to be prepared, so that on the first manifestation of disorder it can be put down. On these preparations, on the intelligence and love of order so general in community, and on the terrible lesson taught by the riot in New York, our citizens may rely.

The Eastern District Yesterday.
The Eastern District was yesterday a scene of considerable bustle and excitement. The 47th Regiment, Col. J. V. Meserole, was announced as on its return, and the many friends of its members at once began preparations for the reception of the men. The specially righteous, of course observed their religious exercises in the morning, and these over sundry culinary utensils were put into requisition for the concoction of creature comforts which it was concluded the weary soldiers would be glad to have spread before them. At 1 o'clock the Armory at the Odeon was crowded with inquirers as to the hour when the regiment would arrive. As the transportation of troops is subject to so many interruptions, it was impossible to tell when the troops would arrive. The Ferry Company dispatched a boat to Amboy to bring the soldiers directly home, and during the afternoon a large gathering awaited its return near the foot of South Seventh street. It was not, however, until after 9 o'clock that the regiment passed through New York and crossed the ferry, landing as ordinary passengers at the accustomed place.
Falling into line with quickness and precision, the route for the Armory was taken up South 7th and through Fifth streets. Cheers and welcomes of genuine earnestness greeted the weary men as they passed along. Wives, mothers, children, and friends impatient to see husband, son or father, inquiringly penetrated the ranks until the object of search was discovered. It was thrilling, indeed, to witness the meeting of some of the parties. There were tears, words, shouts of joy, and gesticulations of delight on every side. Not one spectator could be seen who was not more or less affected. At the armory the citizen guard were on duty, as they have been, indeed, night and day for the past week. The regiment formed in the large room, and after a brief address from Col. Meserole were dismissed until this morning at 8 o'clock. In the room over the street floor large milk cans of coffee were wa__ng the attentions of the men. Edibles of various kinds were spread out with great liberality, and the assault on them at the end of half an hour gave evidence that in quality and quantity those who had provided were in no wise mistaken. It was long alter midnight before the last soldier passed the guard.
The regiment has been located at Arlington Heights for the greater portion of the time, although some of its companies have been beyond Fairfax Court House. Of the treatment received while in the service, the men do not speak in grateful terms. Many of the young members give evidence of having endured much hardship, but not a murmur escaped any of them on that account. In general appearance they were as soldierly and impressive as on the morning of their departure on the 26th of June last. They will be mustered out during to-day or to-morrow morning.

SERMON BY FATHER MALONE.
It having been intimated that this distinguished priest would speak in the morning in reference to the late troubles in New York, the Cathedral on Second street was crowded at an early hour. Not Catholics alone sought admission, but the representatives of other professions were specially urgent to be provided with "a good place to hear." After the exercises at the altar, and some expressive music, for which the choir of this Cathedral is famous, be it said, the reverend gentleman said—that he did not think he should trench on political ground by calling the attention of those present to some truths which were intimately connected with the stirring and disgraceful proceedings during the last week in the Metropolis. He was aware that none of his congregration [sic] had been identified with the dark deeds there enacted, and it was a pleasure to him to know that the portion of Brooklyn in which, for over fifteen years, he had been endeavoring to give a tone to public and religious sentiment, had been so orderly and quiet. Still there was no little feeling existing, which rendered it not a little amiss that he should publicly call attention to the great Catholic truths that underlie all Governments as well as all religions. The Church taught most unmistakably that obedience to the constituted authorities is a Christian duty, in which no good Catholic should fail. St. Paul to the Romans distinctly stated this, and pronounced a damnation upon those who proved false to the teachings of such obedience. He did this, too, at a time when the country in which he lived was subject to a tyranny of Pagan oppression. In the present trouble the general and fundamental rule of the Church, which it taught all its members should not be forgotten, or neglected. Every good Catholic would now throw his influence on the side of law and order, showing himself in the hour of trial to be a man of peace, and obedient to the laws of the powers that be. There were cases which might justify revolution and rebellion, but no Irishman should forget the freedom, civil and religious, which he enjoyed in this land of liberty, and to contrast it with the limited privileges of the land of his birth would just at this time produce wholesome results. Now, more than ever, was the time for every Catholic to prove himself a good citizen and frown down the riotous conduct of those too debased to belong to any Church or care for any religious belief.
At the conclusion of the services there were general expressions of approval of the sentiments expressed in the sermon. Many for the first time had passed the threshold of the Cathedral and beheld the patriotic teacher who, for the cause of his adopted country and the welfare of his flock, would willingly expend the last mortal effort.

AMONG THE GERMANS.
There was not as much bustle in the 16th ward as usual on Sunday afternoon. The beer gardens and saloons were largely attended, however, and the subject of discussion was almost invariably, the riots. It was argued by one gentleman who has been in this country for the past twelve years, and who was a subject of political persecution at home, that the late troubles were encouraged by men whose aim it is to promote antipathy to adopted citizens. He had heard a man in the Bowery, in one of the great saloons there located, endeavoring to persuade Germans to oppose the conscription. A part of his argument was, that foreigners had become so potent a political power the natives were envious of them, and that, to reduce the number and the influence of adopted citizens, the draft would be as much as possible directed towards them. The German element, however, cannot be stimulated to popular excesses. The enjoyment of order and the blessings of equal laws and personal freedom are what it most of all things desires. The prejudices as to the place of birth have no space in the German mind, and only a great brotherhood among men is the theory which the German believes must form the fundamental portion of a successful social system. The pecuniary substitute is disapproved, as it is allowed in the act. He who can provide a substitute should be permitted that privilege, and the terms of the service should be left to be settled between the parties. Any other plan than this is obnoxious to these people, who have had more or less experience at home in the matters of conscription.—Loyal to the fullest extent, there are none who have contributed so largely and so earnestly to the support and extension of freedom throughout the world as the Germans.

The Brooklyn Daily Times.
The latest information by Telegraph, together with local incidents, will be found on the fourth page; Third Edition, issued at 4 1-2 o'clock P. M.
MONDAY EVENING, JULY 20 1863.
Negroes Thrown into the East River.—On Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of last week, gentlemen residing at Greenpoint witnessed some of the disgraceful scenes identified with the riot in New York. One gentleman who was in a small boat near the New York side, saw, on Tuesday, a band of men not a great way from the Tenth street ferry, carry something down to the end of the pier, and after some manoevers with what they carried along with them, a number of them stood aside while four or five of them threw the bodies of two black men into the river and then left. They seemed to be wild with enthusiasm. Some were dressed in red flannel shirts and blue overalls, and others were variously dressed in full suits. Our informant was not near enough to observe whether they were old or young men, but from their movements, he thought they were mostly the latter.
Other persons residing at Greenpoint intimate having seen three bodies of black men thrown over the docks on the New York side at different points.

THE PEOPLE OF GREENPOINT PREPARED.—During the whole of last week apprehensions of riot at Greenpoint were felt by the people residing there, and a number of them moved in consequence. A large body of the citizens prepared themselves for any demonstration which might be made, and kept up a patrol during the night, so that timely notice might be given to the inhabitants of any mischief which might be on the wing. The police of Greenpoint are also on the alert for any movement of an unlawful nature. They have a cannon planted in front of the station-house, which commands the Tenth and Twenty-third street ferries.

The Brooklyn Daily Times.
To LET—IN the TIMES BUILDING—a suite of rooms on the second floor, suited for a lawyer, surveyor, &c.
THURSDAY EVEN'G, JULY 16, 1863.
Proclamation by the Mayor.
MAYOR'S OFFICE,
CITY HALL, BROOKLYN, July 15, 1863.
To the Citizens of Brooklyn:
I congratulate you upon the fact that our city, thus far, has been free from the riotous proceedings which have disturbed the peace of New York, and desire to assure you that provision has been made for an armed force to be in readiness at a moment's notice, sufficiently powerful to check and suppress at once all attempts at riotous demonstrations among us. But the incendiary fire at the Atlantic Docks last evening admonishes us that there is a danger, to guard against which, especial measures should at once be adopted. To secure us against the acts of the incendiary, the services of a concentrated armed force will not suffice, and a thorough watch and guard throughout the city is necessary.
I therefore recommend to the citizens that they immediately organize in the several wards a strong force to act, during the present disturbed state of the public mind, as a night watch and patrol. Such a voluntary force, composed of the citizens in each of the wards, would, in my opinion, suffice effectually to restrain all attempts at incendiarism, and also to maintain peace and good order throughout the city.
I can assure my fellow citizens that if they determine to act on these suggestions, they may command my hearty and earnest co-operation.
MARTIN KALBFLEISCH, Mayor.

A VERY REASONABLE REQUEST.
BROOKLYN July 15th '63
Mr. Bennit
Please to use all your inftuance with your paper to prevent a draft taking place monday next there is an orgonised force of over twenty thousand man well armed to Stop it if it is attempted and One half of the citty will be Laid in ashes and your Office with it and Life will Not be wirht 10 cents you are spotted as being a Black Repugtican af the blackist kind
A FRIEND
[We have not ventured to mar the above with corrections, but print it as written.]

COMMON COUNCIL.
The Exemption Appropriation Postponed.
INTERESTING DEBATE.
WEDNESDAY, July 22, 1863.
The President, Dennis O'Keefe, Alderman of the 12th Ward, in the Chair, and a quorum being present, the reading of the minutes was, on motion, dispensed with.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE.
The Special Committee on the subject of providing means for the payment of exemption fees of such persons as may be drafted, submitted the following report:
To the Honorable the Common Council:
GENTLEMEN:—The Special Committee appointed on the message of the Mayor, of the 20th inst. to confer with the Board of Contracts, beg respectfully to Report, that they have duly considered the matter, and are of opinion that the interest of the City will be promoted by the procurement of substitutes or the payment of $300 to the General Government to purchase the exemption from draft of such persons as may be drafted under the Conscription act from this City, and under such rules and regulations as may be deemed proper under the circumstances.                                
This proposition appears to your Committee to be so manifestly a prudential as well as an econo­mical measure, that under proper safeguards it cannot fail to prove highly satisfactory to our citizens in its results. They would, therefore, respectfully submit the following, in which the Board of Contracts concur for your acceptance:
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be, and they are hereby authorized and directed to borrow, upon the faith of the city, a sum not exceeding $1,000,000, payable with interest, not exceeding 7 per cent. per annum in one year from date, and issue certificates of indebtedness therefor [sic], the avails thereof to be used for the payment of the exemption fee as required by the conscription act for such persons as may be drafted to fill the quota required from this city for the army of the United States.
Resolved, That the Joint Committee heretofore appointed upon this subject be and are hereby continued and empowered to carry the provisions of the foregoing resolution into effect, and to establish all needful rules and regulations for the purpose of guarding against any and all impositions or frauds that may be attempted to be practiced.
Brooklyn, July 22d, 1863.
RICHARD TERNAN,
JOHN A. SAAL,
LEWIS P. NEWMAN,
DENNIS O'KEEFFE.
Ald. Ternan read the following preamble and resolutions, which he intended to offer in the event of the report being adopted:
Whereas, A strong feeling exists in this city that Brooklyn has not been sufficiently credited for the troops she has seat to the field since the rebellion broke out, and great uncertainty appears to prevail about the actual number the General Government now requires from her under the Conscription Law, and
Whereas,There appears to be a very general repugnance to the enforcement by a draft, and a very general opinion (in which this Common Council concurs) that Brooklyn can, (with the sum of money just appropriated), now, as she has hitherto done, furnish her full quota of willing volunteers; be it therefore
Resolved, That a Committee of five to consist of his Honor the Mayor, the President of this Board and three other members of this Board to be appointed by its President, be now appointed whose duty shall be to confer in conjunction with other municipalities, should they so deem fit, with the State and General Governments, and particularly to urge upon the latter the wisdom and expediency of superceding [sic] the draft to allow the proper number of men required from each county to be raised by them as volunteers.
Resolved, That the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars be appropriated to defray expenses of said Committee; such sum to be expended solely under the direction of the Mayor.
Alderman Perry said he was in the minority on the Committee. He had not prepared any minority report, but he would give his reasons for being opposed to the proposition in the report, and they were simply these: he did not think that the Board would be sustained under the law in making such an appropriation, and he knew that the taxpayers were opposed to it. He believed it to be a bargain with the mob, that therefore the adoption of any such report would furnish a precedent to persons disposed to be riotous, and that in future, when appropriations were wanted from the Common Council, the city would be threatened with a mob.
Alderman Belknap offered the following as a substitute for the resolutions in the report:
Resolved, That the Mayor and Controller be authorized to borrow a sum not exceeding $500,000 at 7 per cent. interest, payable in ten years, and issue certificates of indebtedness therefor [sic], the same to be used for the following purposes, to wit:
1st. To procure substitutes for all active and exempt firemen who may be drafted. Provided however, that not more than $300 be paid to any one substitute.
2d, To pay $3 per week to the family of every drafted man who may have a wife and children or a mother depending on him for support.
Ald. Belknap said he had conversed with a great many very patriotic people in reference to that subject, and they were all opposed to appropriating $1,000,000. Such appropriations had been declared illegal in the State of Maine, and the Charter of the City of Brooklyn forbid any such action as was proposed. If anything was done, he believed that our firemen ought to be the parties exempted. They were exempt under the State law, and had served in good faith, understanding that they were exempt from any military duty. He thought the language of the Report was sufficiently definite. He should suppose that what was intended was to exempt all who might be drafted; now, the Government wanted men, not money.
Ald. Ternan said that the object of the Committee was to follow the example of other large towns. The intention of the committee was to find substitutes. Mr. Driggs had informed him during the day that public opinion was in favor not of $500,000 as at first suggested in the committee, but of $1,000,000, into which sum it had been changed during the afternoon. This step was proposed to gratify public opinion. He said they would not be two days raising 290 men in the 14th Ward. He believed there would be no difficulty in getting all the volunteers they wanted for the Government. He hoped that the members of that Board would ignore all party feeling and put that measure through at once, and thereby save the city from untold mischief, for he assured them they were standing on a volcano which might burst at any instant.
Ald. Taylor objected to the measure because he believed that if adopted, the plan would deprive the Government of 4,000 men from Brooklyn for the vindication of the Flag. He objected to it for many reasons, but most because it was unjust. Supposing two men asked to be exempted. When they came before that Committee, one would be asked if he had $300 saved up; and if he should say "yes," the Committee would reply, "we cannot help you;" while, if another man should come up, who had had tenfold the chances for saving money that the other had, but who had lived fast and probably been a pest to the community; if he should say he had not $300, then they would procure an exemption for him, thus offering a premium for idleness and thriftlessness. He was opposed to any Rochester plan. He believed, if they did anything they ought to do as the authorities were doing in Jersey City, offer bounties of $300 to men who will enlist. They had been told that if that Board did not vote to appropriate $1,000,000, they stood upon a volcano. He wanted to know if they lived in a land of Constitutional Liberty, or were they be controlled by mob law? They had been asked to ignore party; he had  ignored party night after night in the meetings of that Board, and had given his support to a Democratic
Mayor.
Ald. Ternan—Because he was a Democrat.
Ald.Taylor—There was hot a single Republican in the mob of last week.
Ald. Ternan—Plenty of them.
Ald. Taylor said that from present appearances, he should judge they were between an upper and a nether millstone—the mob, if they did not appropriate $1,000,000; and the tax-payers, if they did.
Ald. Whitney said that breaches of the law had commenced in high places. There were emancipation movements, the ignoring of the writ of habeas corpus, and other equally flagrant violations of the Constitution, and democrats were now pointed to the mob. He could say that Democrats all deplored the mob. The Democratic Party was willing to provide men for the service of the General Government. They were all willing to sustain the flag, and they intended to furnish the men too. If they appropriated the $1,000,000 they could raise 4,200 men in thirty days. There were two kinds of rights which they should respect—the rights of property and the rights of individuals.
Ald. Kimball asked if the Rochester plan was contemplated by the Committee?
Ald. Ternan—Yes, certainly.
Ald. Whitney—I don't know; my plan is to secure the exemption first.
Ald. Murphy thought 1100 volunteers had left his ward—the 14th, and he believed that 800 of them were Democrats. He knew the families of those who were now in the field, and knew what they had to suffer, and he knew those who would willingly go if a liberal bounty was offered.
Ald. O'Keeffe was surprised to see the opposition raised to this. He stood up there as an American citizen, and he was astonished that the Alderman of the 15th ward had not the moral pluck to say who was in the New York mob. He meant to say that the Irish robbers were in it.
Alderman Taylor—I call the gentleman to order, he is impunging my motives.
Alderman O'Keeffe had seen posters about the streets which said, "Sam, Organize." Well, "Sam, Organize," I have respect for Sam. Let us calmly debate this subject. I am an adopted citizen, and have sworn to sustain the laws of the State and the United States, and if the Government abrogates any section of those laws to which I have sworn, I feel myself at liberty to be independent and act against it. If you don't want to have the streets of Brooklyn running thick with blood, you will do this thing. It isn't men the Government wants, they want money with which to oppress the poor paupers of our country.
Ald. Nodine said his whole heart was with the Government of this country. He thought the debate had taken too much of a political turn. He would ask if the mob meant draft why did they sack and burn houses? Why did they hang and barn colored persons? Why did they cheer for Jeff. Davis? Why did they other things that were inconsistent with loyalty to the Government.
Ald. O'Keeffe called the speaker to order. His point was that the speaker was reading a document which he had copied from papers which that Board did not believe in.
Ald. Perry, who was in the chair, decided that Ald. O'Keeffe was out of order, as Ald. Nodine was reading his speech.
Ald. O'Keeffe wanted to ask the Alderman of the 10th if it was his own production.
Ald. Nodine—It is. I have only to say, Mr. President, that in any other place I should have answered the Alderman of the 12th, as he deserved to be answered.
Ald. O'Keeffe—I am ready to receive and reply to the gentleman's answer here or any other place.
Ald. Wallace was sorry that the debate had taken a political turn. He was in favor of sustaining the General Government, and for a vigorous prosecution of the war, until its power was vindicated and its authority respected. He proposed that the Board adjourn till next Monday evening.
Ald. Kimball never before felt so much responsibility. He was in favor of adjourning. He was in favor of considering the interests of the property owners and the rent payers. He believed that if anything was done, it ought to be on the Rochester plan—giving the money to the man drafted, his substitute, or to the General Government.
Ald. Wallace moved the following amendment to the resolutions submitted by the Committee—to take the place of all after the word "therefore” [sic] at the middle of the first resolution in the report.
Resolved, That from the  fund created from the foregoing resolutions, a bounty of $300 per man for each non commissioned officer and privates be paid for volunteers for three years or for the war, payable when mustered into the U. S. service, and that such bounty be continued until the quota of Brooklyn be filled, or the draft be made.
Resolved, That when the draft is commenced the bounty named in the foregoing resolution be discontinued, and the balance of the fund, or so much thereof as may be necessary to be appropriated to relieve cases of hardship under such regulations as this Common Council may hereafter adopt.
Resolved, that the Committee be authorized to make such arrangements as will most facilitate volunteering and to arrange with the general Government, to have such volunteers accepted so as to reduce to that extent the number of men to be drafted and to report the progress of such volunteering to the General Government, that the Government may decide on the propriety of a further postponement of the draft.
Ald. Taylor moved that the whole subject lay over till the next meeting, and that the report, with all the resolutions and papers submitted, or which may be submitted on the subject by members of the Board, be referred to the Committee with their report, and that the report of the Committee be made the special order immediately after the reading of the minutes.
Adopted—Ayes 11, nays 5.
The Board then adjourned.

BROOKLYN.
Rioters Before the Grand Jury.
James Wood and William Hartless, two rough-looking characters, were brought before Justice Boerum this morning on a charge of having extorted money by threatening storekeepers. They represented that they were among the leaders of the New York mob, and that they were instructed to levy contributions in the name of the mob, and that in case the persons upon whom they called did not pay the mob would beset them. They obtained money from all the storekeepers they visited. Justice Boerum held them for examination before the Grand Jury.

T H E COMMON COUNCIL.
THE DRAFT IN BROOKLYN.
Report of the Special Committee on the Mayor's Message.
Proposition to Raise One Million of Dollars to Purchase Exemptions.
WHO FAVORS AND WHO OPPOSES IT.
INTERESTING DEBATE.
A special meeting of the Board of Aldermen, was held last evening, pursuant to adjournment, in the Common Council Chamber. Present, Ald. Dennis O'Keeffe and a quorum of members.
On motion, the reading of the minutes of the previous meeting, was dispensed with.
The Special Committee, to whom was referred the Message of his Honor, the Mayor, on the subject of the Draft, submitted the following report:
To THE HON. THE COMMON COUNCIL:
GENTLEMEN—The Special Committee appointed on the Message of the Mayor, of the 20th instant, to confer with the Board of Contracts, beg leave respectfully to
REPORT :
That they have duly considered the matter, and are of opinion that the interests of the city will be promoted by the procurement of substitutes, or the payment of three hundred dollars to the General Government to purchase the exemption from draft of such persons as may be drafted under the conscription act from this city, and under such rules and regulations as may be deemed proper under the circumstances.
This proposition appears to your Committee to be so manifestly a prudential as well as an economical measure, that under proper safeguards, it cannot fail to prove highly satisfactory to our citizens in its results, they would, therefore respectfully submit the following, in which the Board of
Contracts concur, for your adoption:
Resolved, That the Major and Comptroller be and they are hereby authorized and directed to borrow upon the faith of the city, a sum not exceeding one million of dollars, payable with interest not exceeding seven per cent. per annum in one year from date, and issue certificates of indebtedness therefore [sic]. The avails thereof, to be used for the payment of either the procurement of substitutes, or for the payment of the exemption fee as required by the conscription act, for such persons as may be dratted to fill the quota required from this city for the Army of the United States.
Resolved, That the Joint Committee heretofore appointed upon this subject, be and are hereby continued and empowered to carry the provisions of the foregoing resolution into effect, and to establish all needful rules and regulations for the purpose of guarding against any and all imposition or frauds that may be attempted to be practised [sic] upon this city.
Brooklyn, July 22d, 1863.
RICHARD TERNAN,
JOHN A. SAAL,
LEWIS F. NEWMAN,
DENNIS O'KEEFFE,

Ald. Ternan moved that the resolutions be adopted. He had a preamble and resolutions he wished to offer, after the reading of the report which he believed, in connection, would embrace all that was necessary on the subject for proper action.
Ald. Belknap desired that there might be ample latitude given on the question, and the whole subject dealt with impartially.
Ald. Wallace suggested that the preamble and resolutions of the Alderman of the 9th be read.
Ald. Ternan withdrew them for the present.
Ald. Fisher hoped to have heard the views of the gentlemen who had not signed the report. It was naturally a subject to elicit discussion, and those not agreeing with a majority of the Committee doubtless had views which might be of interest to hear.
Ald. Perry, as a member of the Committee, explained that the report did not meet his approval although he had not prepared a minority report, nor a substitute, for the reason that the money was to be raised by the Board of Contracts, and was to be under their charge, not of the Committee. He presumed that no proposition could be carried out relative to the subject unless it met with the approval of that Body. His own views were, briefly, that the money should be applied to the relief of families, or for procuring substitutes for those unable to respond to the draft. He should vote against the resolutions in their present form.
Ald. Belknap offered the following as a substitute:
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be authorized to borrow a sum not exceeding $300,000 at 7 per cent, interest, payable in ten years, and issue certificates of indebedness therefore [sic], the same to be used for the following purposes, to wit:
First—To provide substitutes for all active and exempt firemen who may be drafted; provided, however, that not more than $300 be paid to any one substitute.
Second—To pay $3 per week to the families of all drafted men who may have a wife, children or a mother, depending on them for support.
Ald. Belknap offered the substitute for simple reasons: He had conversed with a great number of people, and had a pretty correct knowledge of public feeling. All were patriotic so far as related to providing soldiers to aid the government but on the other hand they could not see the necessity of raising a million of dollars for the purpose. Such a proceeding would be unlawful and had so been declared to be in the State of Maine and other places. It was also not in accordance with the spirit of the charter. If a proper sum were agreed upon there would be no objections; but if the amount named were adhered to then it would be stopped by some legal process. His reason for mentioning firemen was, that they were exempt from military and jury duty under the law. Many of them had served fifteen years in good faith for exemption from such a crisis as the present, and the city should now uphold them. If $3 were not enough for families he would be willing to increase the amount to $4 or $5. In some respects the report was objectionable and not clear. If it meant substitutes for all it should say so; and so it should be expressed if the money was intended for the government. But the government did not want money, which should be used as bounty to fill the regiments with men.
Ald. Ternan believed the report would be more explicit to the Board if it was again carefully read. The object in view was to follow the example of other cities. The design of the Government with the money was to obtain men; and this was the sole object of the Committee. As regards the feeling of the people, he had some opportunity to know what it was. The Collector of Taxes had conversed with many of the largest tax-payers, and there was a decided feeling among them to have this work done thoroughly. Yesterday morning the sum was fixed at $500,000, and this morning it had been increased to $1,000,000, and why! Public opinion was strong in reference to the subject, and was specially anxious to have all excitement on the question of the draft allayed. For himself, he believed there would be great trouble if the matter was not judiciously managed; and it was in obedience to public expression that the amount of the sum to be raised was changed. Collector
Driggs had told him that the quota of the 14th Ward, 214 persons, could be raised in two weeks or less, with the requisite funds. Comptroller Faron had assured him that with a million or less he could send more men to the field to support the flag of the country than the quota called for, and who would be worth in service more than double as compared to conscripts. This was the belief of the Committee, and h earnestly appealed to the members to pause and consider—to take into consideration that it is the intention to raise the quota. If there should be a conflict of authority, let none force it; for it would be but adding a match to a heap of flax. Both sides should be willing to yield some points, and he himself was ready to make a sacrifice for peaceable adjustment. A million could as legally be raised as three hundred thousand or one hundred thousand dollars. Rochester had raised an amount to redeem every man, and Westchester, with Senator Haskins presiding, at a meeting recently pledged the same thing. At West Farms, the lawyer of Horace Greeley had cooperated in like action. Such was the prevailing sentiment, and he hoped it was that of every Democrat about the Board. He conjured them to throw aside all party questions, and only act to once more have a united country.
Ald. Taylor thought the subject was like being between the upper and nether mill-stone, as it would be crushed in either case. He was prepared to be crushed. He wished to do no injustice to the resolutions of the Committee, but would anybody on perusing them suppose that it was the intention of the Common Council to contribute one man to sustain the flag of his country? It was proposed to pay the Government $300 for every man that may be drafted. Admitting that quota to be 4,200, here was a proposition to keep 4,000 men at home, away from the service the country now needs. Had the proposition been to give the $300 to men who are drafted and serve, there would not be any dilemma; as it is, we should have three millions to pay and 4,000 men less to help pay it. He had been told that men unable to pay the $300 would be helped. In the case of the man who had saved by dint of toil and great frugality some three hundred or four hundred dollars, he, if drafted, would be asked for the first question if be had sufficient to pay for his exemption. Replying in the affirmative, he would be told that having means he must help himself. In the case of another man who had lived all his life on the "live while you live" principle, and had not a dollar, he would be helped, thus offering a direct reward for prodigality. The Alderman of the 9th had referred to Rochester as an example, but Jersey City had set a better one, and it ought to be followed. There a bounty of $300 is offered to volunteers who enlist. It had been remarked that unless this measure was carried through, the volcano on which we were standing would burst. Let it burst—and burst now! He wanted to know if he lived in a land of law and order? If the rabble and murderers were to make the laws, that also he desired to know. They had declared that they would rule us again. Did he live in a land of constitutional liberty or of mob law rulers? He had asked gentlemen to ignore party, but he had not found one in the Board to do it. He had been alone, and had ignored party during his whole career. A Democratic Mayor he had supported unflinchingly, and now was asked to forget party. He would inquire if the mob was composed of party men? Who did compose it? Every gentleman present knew, and he would not insult their intelligence by pressing such a question. (Voice—"Let us know," "Out with it.") There were no Republicans found in the mob, because they are a law-abiding party; yet he would not say Democrats were not law-abiding, for he saw some around him. He insisted, however, that there were no Republicans who originated or participated in the mob, nor did the rumors circulating about town originate in Republican brains. Therefore it is a mill-stone in either case. The Alderman on the 9th had said that he had been called on by his constituents respecting the matter. The same was his own case, and to such an extent that he had hardly been able to put pen to paper during the day. His constituents wished to know if he was going to vote a million dollars to-night, and so leave the Government unprovided for. In short if he was to be ground anywhere, it should be by the law.
Ald. Whitney presumed the members would bear out his endeavor to economize money and prevent inordinate expenditures. But there were times when we must be liberal, and one of those occasions had arrived. No man condemned mob proceedings more than himself, proceedings which every Democrat disapproved. (Hear, hear.) There was, however, no denial of the fact that there existed a deep seated opposition to being drafted, and the case may as well be met intelligently as otherwise. The gentleman of the 15th said, there had been a violation of the law, and asked where it had begun? Had there been no violation of the law by the General Government? Was there not a superceeding [sic], in the fact, a nonobservance of the law in the passage of the Emancipation act? Or what might be called the shutting up of men in Fort Lafayette, and the denial of the benefit of the habeas corpus? Were these acts observing the law? Republicans had violated the law as well as the Democrats, had in fact set the example. The people had committed violence and had done wrong, and among them were as many Republicans as Democrats. Indeed the assemblage was largely made up of the various classes of plunderers and robbers, who rushed in when only a slight disturbance had been committed. The opinion that the quota would not be filled was a mistake, for the Democrats would supply all the men asked for, as it would be found they had done when the quota was first filled. It was, then, presumption to say that Democrats would not stand by the flag of the country, something which they had always done. As regards the use of the money to be raised, he believed that if it were devoted to paying voluntery [sic] enlistments [sic], men enough to fill the quota could be had in 30 days.
Ald. E. Murphy begged to say, that since the question had been put into a political aspect, that 1,100 volunteers had left his ward since the commencement of the war. Of this number 800 were Democrats. The question, however, was never asked whether they were Democrats or Republicans he well knew, for he was present on several occasions when the opportunity was given him to ascertain the facts. There were hundreds of men in his ward who could not raise $300; indeed the families of men still at the war were suffering this day for mere necessities. Still he was of the opinion that the quota in the ward could be filled if the money was paid to the substitutes or to their families.
Ald. O'Keeffe did not suppose that at any time before in his life had he felt such a lack of power to direct the requisite attention to the matter under consideration. He did not rise in his place simply to give his views, for he felt as there was not language for their expression. He was surprised to see any opposition to the measure before the Board. Individually he did not stand there as a Democrat or as a Republican, but simply as an adopted citizen. The Ald. of the 15th had made charges, and it was surprising that he would not let the Board know who were meant under the title of rabble. Had he given the information he could have but echoed the words of the Tribune and the Post—Irish robbers and Irish democrats.
Ald. Taylor called the speaker to order, as he had not made use of these terms.
Ald. O'Keeffe was only giving his opinion of what the insinuations of the Ald. of the 15th meant.   But he could not make any one believe that the   brave men who fought at Manassas, Centreville, Antietam, and during the seven days on the Pe­ninsula, would inaugurate a disturbance for the sake of subsequent plunder. If robbers and thieves take advantage of honest men who were averse to unlawful measures, was it any reason that the latter should branded in incomplicity with the for­mer? Was it a reason for exhibiting around the street certain posters, with words "Sam, organ­ize?" As for Sam, he loved him as he loved him­self, for he never without his countenance would have been elevated to the honorable position of representing a portion of the city without his as­sistance. Not, then, to have a regard for him, would be to become a renegade, and not worthy to live. In God's name let the present State of feeling be waived, and the country restored to its wonted prosperity. Let the North and the South be united once more if possible. Let there be no quibble about the tone of the resolutions, but all try and bring about the best results. He wished the Federal Government would do this; that it would put men who were competent in charge of soldiers lives, men, too, whom the soldiers love. Had this been done long ago there would have been no need of conscription now; but as it was upon us, it was our duty to raise the pecuniary re­lief. He did not mean to furnish men if he could help it. Why were there 30,000 soldiers in New York to-day? Why were they not where they were they were wanted? Why were they here to shoot down citizens? Where was General Lee? Would not these men be of any use to Gen. Meade? Would they not occupy the time of at least one Brigadier-General? They were 30,000 strong, and ready, and why should they not go back into the Army, where men were needed? The Alderman of the 15th had said that the draft reached all persons alike. Look at the poor grain shoveler! A man invariably with a large family, six or seven children. A man bountifully endowed by nature to perpetuate his race. It cost him at the very least ten shillings a day to support his children, not as any of the gentle­men present would like to have their's supported. Was he in a position to pay $300, a sum he never had and never could expect to have at his control? The members were there not to represent the rich man the tax payer, but to represent every citizen of Brooklyn that was interested either directly or indirectly. The burden would fall in one way or another on those least able to bear it, if not di­rectly, then in the way of rent or the advance of necessities. Plainly then it was but duty to take care of these men who were the first to go out and fight for us. He was not in favor of rebelling against the laws, but rather of perpetuating the institutions of the glorious country. He had taken an oath so to do, and after taking it felt that he was on an equality with those born on the soil. If, however, the government failed to observe the conditions of that oath, or abrogate any part of it, he did not consider himself bound by it nor would he hold it a perjury if he acted antagonistic to it. And this was willing to do. The Alderman of the 5th had also said that the riotous, movements came from his party, the Democrats. To that political branch he belonged true enough, and he was sorry to say that it had been misrepresented in the leaders of the newspapers. Why should they not fight against this misrepresentation? They had a right to do so. The press in doing wrong incited rebellion and mob law, and when himself or another on reading a paper discovered that the whole fault was cast upon adopted citizens, was it not natural to feel indignant? When he knew that his countrymen and other foreigners had come here at the instigation of the Government, had they not a right to feel aggrieved when fired upon by some flash officer? Thus the stigma has fallen upon a particular race. If they did not want the streets to be flooded with blood, and when they might be would not be known until the moment it should be done, some proper provision must be made to avoid such a calamity. If men alone were wanted by the Government, the $300 clause ought not to have been put in the Conscription Act. It. seemed to him to be a raid on poor citizens and a cloak to screen the rich man, behind which he might stand, while others went out to be shot. The gentleman of the 15th had averred that he had supported a Democratic Mayor. Well, if so! For himself he had been charged with being an apostate by—well, it was no matter who, for there was no truth in the charge. When the Mayor was wrong he did not and would not sustain him; if on the contrary he was right, it was his bounden duty to give him countenance. In the hands of the Mayor and of the Committee, the money would be carefully disbursed and with the strictest inquisition. The citizens might rest assured that not a cent would be disbursed to any one not worthy and deserving.
Ald. Ternan asked permission to read his preamble and resolutions which, leave being granted, he read as follows:
Whereas, A strong feeling exists in this city that Brooklyn has been sufficiently credited for the troops she has sent to the field since the Rebellion broke out, and great uncertainty appears to prevail about the actual number the General Government requires from her under the Conscription be now appointed, whose duty shall be to confer in conjunction with other municipalities should they so deem fit, with State and General Governments, and particularly to urge upon the latter the wisdom and expediency of suspending the draft to allow the proper number of men required from each county to be raised by them as volunteers.
Resolved, That the sum of $250 be appropriated to defray the expenses of said Committee such sum to be expended solely under the direction of the Mayor.
If these resolutions were adopted with those in the report of the Committee, there would be ample authority to complete the quota.
Ald. Nodyne regretted that the subject had taken a political turn, for politics did not belong here, and their introduction caused words to be said that were out of place. He would stand by the Government in its need, and do as much for the aid of the poor and helpless families as his neighbor. Indeed, he had already done more than he could afford. He did not approve of the report in all its bearings, and for reasons he was about to present. It was the most important matter which had been before the Board, and if it was discussed in an impartial manner, and without bias, it would occupy more than this meeting. He had prepared his views on the subject, and would, by permission, read them:
The Mayor, in his message, says: "In the first place, let it be fully and distinctly understood that we cannot consent even to appear in the remotest degree to concede or yield to the demands or threats of a mob, or of persons inclined to riotous demonstrations."
There must be good reasons for this. If we concede or yield—
1st. It gives recognition to violators of law.
2d. It is an admission of weakness on the part of our civil government.
3d. It will encourage a mob spirit to set the laws at defiance in this city, when any future demand, just or unjust, be denied.
4th. If the third city in the Union falters or retreats before the mob, riot and bloodshed, or submission to the mob, will be the order of things in every city, town, or village, throughout the land.
It is proposed to tax the people of Brooklyn $1,000,000, to pay the exemption of every person drafted from this city.
To understand this thing fairly, we should carefully con over the bloody record of the past ten days, and rember [sic] that it is by the light of the burning buildings of a neighboring city that we are to present to the men who made night and day fearful with their deeds, a portion, at least, of this sum. This, too, while we are threatened with a repetition of the same scenes.
Hence the Hon. Mayor observes justly:
"We cannot afford to appear, even in the remotest degree, to concede or yield."
Does the proposed action "appear, even in the remotest degree, to concede or yield"?
1st. Would the citizens consent that we should vote their money away thus, except that we would have riots else, and that this action would be a preventative?
2. Is not this consideration the animus of our action?
3. Will not the riotously-disposed portion of the people so understand it?
4. Hear the words of the Hon. Mayor:—"And there is the other consideration, which, however we may deprecate it, we are forced to take into account, and that is, should any omission to take some action on our part result in failing to prevent the enactment among us of the scenes that have recently transpired in New York, we may have a destruction of property, to say nothing of life, to reimburse which, would impose upon the taxpayers a burthen compared to which the appropriation suggested would be a mere trifle." If we act as proposed, remembering this "other consideration" presented by the Hon. Mayor, will not all the people,—riotous and law-abiding,—say 'we acted thus in fear of the mob,' and however much we wish to avoid the appearance, 'we are conceding and yielding to the demands and threats of the mob'?
5. Is the civil arm so paralyzed that we must buy up riotors [sic], as individuals in New York were recently coerced to buy off house-burners and as­sassins.
6. Nothing can be inferred from all this but an admission that the civil authorities are powerless before the mobocrats, and that, in our cowardice, we are willing to give them one million to keep quiet for a time longer.
But, before we make this humiliating admission and before we send our commissioners to rioters, let us ask if this will stay the tide of riot?
If the draft was the only cause for riot, why were houses plundered in New York? Why did the mob cheer for Jeff, Davis?
Ald. Newman called the gentleman to order, as the cheering for Jeff. Davis had nothing to do with the matter.
Ald. Ternan—Let him give us the evidence that there were cheers for Jeff. Davis.
Ald. Nodyne proceeded:
Why was Fancher's Elevator burned? Why are the neighboring woods full of homeless, starving colored men, women and children forced to flee from the mob?
Apart from all question of your right to use money for such purpose, (and I believe the Courts will decide we have no such right) I am opposed to the measure as a humiliating one, and one too that clearly will not effect its object.
For the law-abiding men, we could not pay. If drafted, they will either furnish substitutes, pay $300, or join the army.
Would it not be grossly unjust that any portion of the tax necessitated by the passage of this, should be borne by a man who, in obedience to the law, furnishes a substitute or pays his $300, or goes bravely to the battle-field?
Would, it not befoul injustice to our brave taxpayers now in the army, and who are calling loudly to us for reinforcements, to make them pay a portion of this sum which is to prevent them from being reinforced?
Why should our people who have been heavily taxed that men might be paid to join our armies, now be also heavily taxed, that men may be encouraged not to join our armies?
Ald. O'Keeffe called the gentleman to order.
The Chair—(Ald. Perry)—State the point of order.
Ald. O'Keeffe—The gentleman is reading extracts from a document published in a factious newspaper, something which is not pertinent to the question.
Ald. Nodyne—I do not wish to make any unpleasant remarks, but if the gentleman says that I am reading extracts, he says what is not true.
Ald. O'Keeffe—Is it the gentleman's own speech?
Ald. Nodyne—Yes.
Ald. O'Keeffe—(not hearing the reply distinctly)—I have asked a plain question, and expect as plain an answer.
Ald. Nodyne—I have said it was my own convictions on the subject before the Board. The Ald. of the 12th has no right to cast any reflections.
Ald. O'Keeffe—If it is his own speech, let him go on.
Ald. Nodyne—He has no right to cast reflections, and in any other place, he would be answered as he deserves.
Ald. O'Keeffe—What does the gentleman ___
The Chair directed the Alderman of the 10th to proceed.
Ald. Nodyne continued:
Is the proposed action not unjust to all the tax payers?
Is it not especially unjust to three classes of the tax payers?
1st. A., who is drafted and pays his $300 for exemption:
2d. B., who is drafted and furnishes his substitute:
3d. C., who is drafted and who shoulders his musket like a patriot.
It is urged that this money would only be used to procure substitutes for drafted men, and would not hinder the operation of the law of Congress.
This could not be;—the substitutes could not be procured.
How much could you afford to pay a substitute?
Only the $300, which you propose to vote for each.
How many men are there in the city that could be procured to go as substitutes, who have not already been in the army?
You might number them on the fingers of your two hands—especially after the draft.
If this is true, you must rely on men who have been in the service? Can you get them?
They are now offered, for re-enlistment,    $2 00
Congressional Bounty,                              100 00
From the Exemption fund,                        300 00
                                                                 $402 00
Will a man go as a substitute for $300, when he can procure $402 for the same service?
The "National Enrollment act" might undoubtedly be bettered by exempting husbands with helplessly infirm wives, and other cases that might be named of a kindred nature.
But that there are many heads of families in this condition, who now afford neither help or protection to such family, but are lazy, vagabond and thriftless, we cannot doubt.
Why should these have the benefits sought to be conferred on better men?
These men drafted, their families would be subjects of public justice and not of private charity, and in many cases that might be named would be better for the change.
Judging the present and future by the past, there can be no doubt in the mind of any man but that public-spirited individuals would step in and pay the exemption of every provident husband or other person who has helpless persons dependent on his exertions, and whose presence is at all necessary to the happiness or comfort of the helpless ones.
It is much to be preferred that this matter should be left in the hands of public-spirited individuals.
It should be fully and distinctly understood that we cannot consent even to appear in the remotest degree to oppose any constitutional law of the United States, either in letter or spirit. And while by our action here we admit the constitutionality of the "National Enrollment act" (for if the law is constitutional there is no necessity of passing this), yet are we not "consenting to appear," to say the least of it, to oppose its spirit.
The law was framed to increase the army, and it must be obvious to all, if we pass this, it will tend to prevent that increase.
Such legislation, three months ago, was unknown to the history of the world, and it is to be hoped that Brooklyn will not join those cities or towns that are willing to let it be written "We were forced to surrender to the mob."
Far better is it that we should spend or lose millions in sustaining the Government, than give farthings to conciliate a mob.
Therefore let us be firm now, and all will be well.
I will vote one or five millions, if necessary, to support the wives and families of these men while they are gone, and will vote to pledge the city to pay a just pension to their families if they should die in the service of our country.
Let our motto be, "Millions for the comfort of the wives and families of our brave defenders, but not one cent as tribute to a mob."
Ald. Wallace was sorry that the debate had partaken of a political character, inasmuch as he had attended for the purpose of discussing the matter without reference to politics. Since he had seen and conversed with returned soldiers and learned how many adopted citizens were in the army, he felt more liberal towards them in their endeavor to sustain the flag of the country. He was for sustaining the general government, and for a vigorous prosecution of the war until the authority of the government is maintained on every foot of territory belonging to it. To that end the army must be kept full, and to achieve the purpose every man must bear his part of the burden. He held that the soldier who perils his life for his country, who interposes his own body between his family and his property (Ald. W's.) and danger, should be well paid as well as taken care of. For this purpose he was willing to have his own property taxed or encumbered. If the draft was necessary, and he believed it to be, he was willing to alleviate its hardships in any manner in his power. If a man is drafted who has a family, and nothing but his own hands with which to support that family, he would be willing to have his property taxed to provide a substitute or furnish an exemption fee. Or if a man should be drafted and willing to go who has no means to provide himself shelter or food, or if he returned home wounded or sick, he would freely submit to a tax to pay that man the same bounty he would have received to go as a substitute. He desired to see some modification in the resolutions of the report, and had therefore prepared some which he would read. After the words "indebtedness therefore," in the first resolution, he would amend by adding as follows:
That from the fund created by the resolutions a bounty of $300 per man be paid for volunteers for three years, or the war, payable when mustered into the U. S. service, and that such bounty be continued until the quota of Brooklyn be filled, or the draft be made.
Resolved, That when the draft is commenced the bounty named in the foregoing resolution be discontinued, and the balance of the fund, or so much thereof as may be necessary, be appropriated to relieve cases of Hardship, under such regulations as this Common Council may hereafter adopt.
In place of the 2d resolution offered by the Committee, he would like to substitute the following:
Resolved, That the Committee be authorized to make such arrangements as will most facilitate volunteering, and to arrange with the General Government to have such Volunteers accepted, so as to reduce to that extent the number of men to be drafted—and to report the progress of such volunteering to the Government, to the end that they may decide on the propriety of further postponement of the draft.
He did not assume to have any more wisdom than other members of the Board, and indeed he did not know but what his own amendments might be improved after further reflection. In this view of the case, he proposed that the matter be laid over until next Monday evening, and the resolutions be referred back to the Committee for further consideration and report.
Ald. Kimball had not had presented to him since he had been a member of the Board, any subject which imposed so grave a responsibility as did this one. He wished to act thoughtfully and candidly, and without any partizan feeling. Sufficient time should be devoted to the question so that all might act with unanimity; and, therefore, the proposition to lay the subject over was judicious. In the meantime, opinions would be heard from the people, and various reasons expressed for and against, from which something might be learned. The people had a right of expression in the premises; and, therefore, he wished to show a proper regard, without haste, to the interests of all alike, the rich as well as the poor. He had settled upon one point, so far as he had been able to inform himself; and that was that the Rochester plan was the true one for adoption. In that city money had been raised for every man in the quota. If the drafted man went, he received $300, or if not the amount was given to his substitute; or, if neither responded, then the money was paid to the Government. Thus the burden was just on all classes of citizens, because they would all pay a just proportion of tax. He was not prepared to vote even for this plan to-night, nor did he believe there was any disposition to urge the matter through. If there was, he should vote against it. He saw many hardships about the conscription bill; and, indeed, it seemed almost impossible to frame a bill without hardships. Some believed that under the Rochester plan the Government would obtain but few recruits; but he had no fears about such a result. If a drafted man sent a substitute he was clear for three years, while if he paid $300 he was only exempt until another draft should be ordered. This, it was reported was the opinion of General Cushing. That being the case, there would be hardly a citizen who would not add a little more to the $300 and procure a substitute, so as to exempt him for three years or for the war. Such, in his opinion, would be the course pursued by the rich men, who were comparatively out of the reach of the act. He did not believe the war men were all gone. It would be remembered that for a time recruiting was dull, but that after the seven days' battle, the people made up their minds that men must be had, and soon a sufficient number came forward for a small bounty. It was not to avoid any responsibility that he urged deferring final action until Monday night, but only for the purpose of acting judiciously and safely.
Ald. Ternan had listened to the remarks of the Ald. of the 3d with great pleasure. It was an agreeable calm after a tirade of words, and he had shown himself to be a prudent merchant and a sensible man. He thought, however, in the resolutions presented by the Alderman of the 3d, that a part of his thunder had been stolen and its effect not accomplished. He could not see the effect in laying over the matter, for it was hardly possible to make any provisions that would sway the Government. If the resolutions of the report were adopted with those offered by himself, all contingencies would be provided for, the money would be raised, and the Committee would have their instructions to act.
Ald. Taylor wished only to say that the Alderman of the 12th was usually courteous in his remarks, but this evening he had misconstrued what had been said by himself. While he had charged the mob as belonging to the same party as the Ald. of the 12th, he had made no reference to any nationality. He thought it was possible to concoct a scheme so that the Board would be unanimous on the question, if the views of the opposite party were consulted. It would be observed that of the Committee of ten there were but two Republicans, and this he submitted was evidence that the Republicans had not been sufficiently consulted.
Ald. Whitney—that is the fault of the people of Brooklyn in returning so many Democrats. (Laughter and applause in the lobby.)
Ald. Taylor suggested that as the Republicans would be called on to foot as much of the bill as others, it might be in good taste to have one or two more gentlemen of his complexion as members of the Committee.
Ald. O'Keeffe explained, that as President of the Board he had appointed the Committee in accordance with the custom generally observed, giving to the dominant party of the Board a majority of the members.
Ald. Taylor moved that the report be laid over until next Monday evening, the resolutions to, be referred to the Committee, and the whole subject to be the special order, immediately after the reading of the minutes.
The motion was agreed to, on the following division:
Ayes—Ald. Whitney, Wallace, Newman,
Belknap, Nodyne, Kimball, O'Keeffe, Taylor, Perry,
Kalbfleisch, and Fisher,—11. Nays—Ald. McLaughlin,
Ennis, M. Murphy, Ternan, and E. Murphy—5.
Adjourned.

Brooklyn City News.
THURSDAY, JULY 23, 1863.
THE DRAFTBEXEMPTION---PROCEEDINGS
OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN.
Contrary to general expectation, the Board of Aldermen last evening failed to take any decisive action on the proposition of the Mayor, in reference to the purchase of exemption from the draft. There was a great deal of discussion, and many conflicting propositions offered, when finally the whole subject was referred back to the special committee for further consideration.
It is to be regretted that considerations of political partizanship should have been introduced, and thus discussions incited, and expressions indulged in under the circumstances entirely uncalled for, and out of place, and preventing candid and unprejudiced action. We give in our report of the proceedings a very full sketch of the debate. To Ald. Taylor, of the 15th ward, pertains the credit of first introducing partizan, political considerations in the discussion of the question. This gentleman has never been noted in his public course for any great liberality of sentiment or discretion of action, and his course last evening, was but in keeping with his entire career. And the retort which was provoked from Ald. O'KEEFFE was much more violent than the provocation would justify. The dispassionate, conservative and patriotic view and sentiments of Alderman WALLACE, were as especially deserving of commendation as an example to his Republican colleagues, as were those of Aid. WHITNEY to his democratic brethren on the other side of the house.
The various Committees are to meet this afternoon, further to consider the question.—Whatever may be the result of their action, we trust it will not be controlled by partizan considerations. If it shall be, the beneficial consequences anticipated to result from any such measure as has been contemplated, will be very much impaired, if not entirely destroyed. The raising of the money in the manner proposed, it must be remembered, will be an act outside of the law, and will require a very general assent on the part of the people to insure legislative endorsement. The tax-payers have ever shown themselves ready and willing to contribute liberally for the mitigation of the hardships which the events of the war have unavoidably imposed upon the people, yet it must be borne in mind that there is a limit to their liberality. And this limit will, in one view, have been exceeded, when it is proposed to tax them to pay for the exemption of every man drafted to supply the quota of Brooklyn.
The Mayor, in his suggestion that the proposed relief shall be confined only to cases where it is actually needed, and where in the event of the failure to extend it in that form, the city would certainly be called upon to supply it in some other, goes far enough, and it is that proposition, so far as we have been able to judge, which must receive the public approbation. If it shall be defeated, or the whole matter fal1 through, it will be to the extremes on both sides, that the people will be indebted—those on the side who are opposed to the draft in toto, because they desire to weaken the power of the government in the suppression of the rebellion, and those on the other, who, if their own ultra ideas are not carried into effect, would prefer that the rebellion shall be successful, and the Union dissolved. The debate in the Board of Aldermen last evening, demonstrates that much, at all events.

WHEN THE DRAFT WILL COMMENCE.—It is announced from  Washington that as soon as the necessary examination is completed, the credit given New York city for troops already furnished for the war, and the new quota required under the Conscription Act will be announced together. It is hardly thought there will be time to make out the new quotas for the resumption of the draft on Monday. Colonel NUGENT, the Provost Marshal, says that he is as ignorant of the matter as any one, and is at a loss to conjecture even what is intended to be done. The enrollment, he says, is completed, the enrollment books are in safe custody, there is a large military force in New York, and nothing appears to be wanting now but the final orders from Washington to proceed. Some of the officials are of the opinion that the matter will be delayed from time to time until the quota can be made up by volunteering.

Brooklyn City News.
THURSDAY, JULY 23, 1863.
THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

THE EXEMPTION FEES FOR THE DRAFTED.
No Decided Action Taken in the Matter
An adjourned meeting of the Board of Supervisors was held yesterday afternoon at the County Jail, Supervisor W. J. Osborne in the Chair. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.
BILLS ORDERED PAID.
Mr. E. P. Varrick, $103 75; Jeremiah Lant, $3 67; E. W. Bloom, $18 00; Jas. M. Seabury, $405 50; Wm. Birrie, $37 40; Brooklyn Gas Light Co. $229 50; Brooklyn Standard; $61 15; C. Steeres, $130 76; Kelsey & Loughlin, $1,957 64; Dayton and Carter, $31 57.

CAN'T COMPLETE THE CONTRACT.
A communication was received, from Mr. Hannigan who contracted to complete the mason work of the new Court House, stating that since he made the contract, brick, and laborers wages had largely increased. Masons were then receiving $1 50 per day, and now they receive from 16 to 17 shillings. It was therefore impossible for him to complete the contract at the price first agreed upon, as he was not a man of fortune. He therefore asked to be relieved. Referred to committee on Court House.

THE WAGES OF CONVICTS.
Penitentiary Committee to whom was referred the resolution of the Board directing the Committee to ascertain if the County could not receive more wages for the male convicts, reported that they had had a conversation with the keeper, and found that there was no demand for the prisoners services, that farmers do not appear to desire their services only in cases of absolute necessity.
The Committee did not think it advisable to raise on the ammount [sic] now paid the men. The report was adopted.
On motion the Committee was discharged.
Of the Committee on Salaries, that the Deputy Keepers of the Penitentiary be paid $2 per day.
Sup. Driscoll moved, as an amendment, they be paid $2 25. Lost.
The original resolution was adopted.

ANOTHER DRILL ROOM.
Captain Joseph T. Miller of Co. R, 70th Regiment, Duncan Light Artillary [sic], sent in a communication asking the Board to lease the large room on the second floor of Schanaderbeck & Co's Malt house on Wycoff street for the purpose of an Armory. Referred to the Committee on Armories.

THE $125,000 APPROPRIATION.
The Law Committee to whom was referred the resolution to appropriate $125,000, to be expended under the direction of the Board in procuring substitutes or in such other was as will protect and advance the interest of the citizens, reported that there was no legal, authority conferred on the Board by any existing statute empowering them to appropriate the above mentioned sum to the purpose mentioned in the resolution--That this Board appropriate during the years of 1861 and '62 large sums without any legal authority to raise money at that time, for the payment of bounties of volunteers from this county in the services of the U. S. The report was adopted and the Committee were discharged.

THE APPROPRIATION FOR THE DRAFTED.
Superintendent Burns moved that the resolution which he offered at the last meeting of the Board, to the effect that a committee be appointed to make arrangements to procure a loan not exceeding $200,000, to be used for the purpose of paying exemption fees of such persons as may be drafted under the recent Act of Congress, be taken from the table.
Superintendent Crook desired to have the resolution read the second time, that he might better understand it. After the reading, he said it was hardly worth while for the Committee to hurry over this matter, for they had a report now on the table showing that the Board had no power to borrow and appropriate money for such purposes. He should therefore oppose the resolution, and hoped the Board would not take any action in the matter at present.
Sup. Herman said there was no doubt but that the resolution was quite correct, but he would like to see the figures showing the number of volunteers which this country had furnished. He did not think our quota was as large as it had been made out and Kings county, if the facts were shown, had no deficiency to make up. He noticed that this county had been placed on an equality in the draft with other counties where the quota had not been filled. He rather thought we had been slightly imposed upon.
Sup. Talbot moved that the further consideration of the matter be postponed till the next meeting of the Board.
Sup. Barnes said he hoped the Board would take up the matter and settle it at once. There had been money raised and appropriated to encourage enlistments and although not done legally had been legalized by the Legislature.
Sup. Crooke—he knew they had raised money in this way to encourage enlistments, and he had voted in favor of it, but the Government wanted men immddiately [sic] at the time and they had no other way to obtain them. Some gentlemen came forward and contributed money out of their own private purses. He would do all he could to encourage enlistments and put men in the army but he would give no money to keep them out as this resolution proposed to do. This was not at all a patriotic purpose and was wrong. Last year their work was one of patriotism.
Sup. Canavello saw nothing wrong in the resolution of Supervisor of the 5th, and for his part would like to see the Board pass it.
Sup. Crooke said it would be entirely wrong for the Board to adopt such a resolution, and he should never lend his aid in helping to buy men out of the army.
Sup. Stilwell said he would like to see the resolution passed, not that it would particularly benefit Gravesend, for they might leave that out, but that it would be a relief to the poorer classes.
Sup. Driscoll said that where there were few poor and many rich, it made but little difference but where there were many poor and few rich, the draft would not do well. He looked upon the resolution as a protection to the county, in this matter, for it not only kept the poor man at home, but placed him at an equality with the rich man. They ought, therefore, to try and borrow the money, not only $200,000, but double that amount, if necessary. If the Common Council should appropriate the amount which the Committee proposed, the sum then would not put them on an equality with New York.
Mayor Kalbfleisch stated that the special Committee and Board of Contracts had agreed to report in favor of raising one million of dollars. He did not agree with the Supervisor from Flatbush, that this was unpatriotic, and an attempt to keep the men out of the army. The Administration had asked for a man or $300, and was it not a thousand times better for us to give them $300, and let them obtain a good man, and one who could serve in the field, than to saddle them with a man who had no courage or wish to fight?
Sup. Burns said that his Ward, (the 5th,) was mostly composed of the poorer classes, who felt this conscription most. They were unable to pay the $300 exemption fee. They had furnished their full quota of volunteers.
Sup. Crook said that the town of Flatbush, he would guarantee, had furnished more men, in proportion, than the 5th Ward had.
Sup. Booth made a few remarks, in favor of the adoption of the resolution.
Sup. Blloom [sic] said when this war first broke out, it was the opinion that it would be suppressed in a short time. Time, however, had gone on, and large armies had been put in the field and wasted. Two years and more had passed, and still we were fighting. Now we had the Conscription Act to replenish the armies, and what had been the consequence of the attempt to force it in New York? The city had been visited with riot and bloodshed.
It was the poor and industrious classes who had filled the ranks of our armies, such as Sup. Burns, of the 5th, represented. But the only question now, was whether it would be better to wait the action of the City Counsil [sic] in this matter. He favored the adoption of the resolution.
A vote was then taken on the motion of Sup. Burns to take the resolution from the table.
Sup. Kirby in explanation of his vote said he was in favor of the resolution but feared by taking action, in the mailer now, it might in some way conflict with the Committee appointed by the Common Council. He therefore voted nay.

Brooklyn.
THE DRAFT IN BROOKLYN.
The riot in New-York created an intense excitement in Brooklyn, and large numbers of persons crossed the river to see what was going on.
Captain S. B. Gregory, provost-marshal of the Third congressional district, on hearing of the proceedings in New-York, packed up all his papers and transported them to a place of safety. There is nothing now in the buildings of the least importance to any one.
The draft, which was fixed for Wednesday morning, has been suspended for the present. Further notice will he given when the drawing will take place.
The number of persons enrolled in the different wards comprising the district, and the number to be drafted, is as follows—all of the first class:
                                               No. to be
No.                     Enrolled.       Drafted.
First ward            707             180
Second ward        944             257
Third ward           1057           340
Fourth ward         1367           369
Fifth ward            1960           551
Seventh ward       1374           373
Eleventh ward      3378           1050
Thirteenth ward   1869           528
Fifteenth ward      866             235
Nineteenth ward   686             169
Of the second class about 11,000 persons are enrolled, making in all of both classes nearly 30,000.
Chief Engineer Cunningham, in view of the present exigency, ordered last night that in case of fire the bells shall ring three rounds, designating the district, and then the general alarm. This is for the purpose of assembling all the firemen so as to extinguish any fire that may occur. These orders will be in force until further directions.
The colored people are having a hard time of it. They are attacked everywhere and beaten. They crowded about the police stations last night asking for protection, being prevented from going to their homes or even walking the streets.
The police, to the number of 100, went to New-York in charge of Inspector Folk.
There was great commotion in the navy-yard. The walls were manned and mounted with guns—thirteen 18-pounders are mounted on the Flushing avenue side so as to sweep everything, two 32-pounders command the main entrance, and all the vessels have been hauled into the stream, the guns shotted, and everything ready for any emergency.
Several companies of marines, with sixty rounds of cartridges and twelve boat howitzers, rifled cannon—with ammunition boxes loaded with percussion cap shells, shrapnel, canister, and grape shot, were sent to New-York toward evening. The marines were accompanied by 300 sailors, armed with cutlasses and revolvers.
Some guns were taken from the state arsenal in
Portland avenue on Sunday night, which gave rise to the rumor that it had been attacked.
The facts are that two companies of artillery belonging to the Seventieth regiment militia have been ordered to Fort Hamilton, and the guns were taken for their use. They were placed on vessels at the foot of Little street and transported to the fort. There are no arms in the building at present.
The vote was—nays 15, ayes 9.
Sup. Bloom moved that a Committee of three be appointed to confer with the Board of Aldermen in the matter. Adopted.
The chair appointed as the Committee the following gentlemen:
Sups. Bloom, Driscoll and Talbot.
Sup. Stillwell moved that the Committee be instructed, if any money be raised they have the power to raise enough to pay the exemption of all
the men drafted. Tabled.
On motion of Sup. McGrath, the Board adjourned to meet on Tuesday the 4th of August at 4 o'clock P. M.
Public meetings are being held to-day throughout Connecticut in relation to the conscription.

The Board of Aldermen and the Draft.
To the Editor of the Brooklyn City News:
SIR:—While a silent observer of the proceedings of the Board last night, I was astonished at the manner in which members acted upon the business before them.
The "lobby" members last night were composed of men who are not in the habit of attending political clubs and ward meetings. Many of our thoughtful and substantial citizens attended to see for the first time, the representatives of their property and the guardians of their lives. Our "servants" last night stood before their sovereign for inspection. Many heard for the first time the voice of the man who had received their support at the ballot-box, and wondered at their choice.
The discussion was upon the recommendations of the Mayor with regard to exempting conscripts who would entail by their conscription a burthen upon society, and afford no substantial benefit to the national army, if conscripted.
The proposition was plain enough,—a man of ordinary conception could make up his mind upon it in five minutes,—even the Aldermen of New York city acted upon a similar matter in one night,—but it appears that the Brooklyn Fathers take more time to think,—and, being so profound, their thoughts in print may astonish their constituents.
The debate on this simple proposition of the Mayor was opened by an asthmatic-looking Alderman, (Taylor, I believe,) who considered that, inasmuch as there was a mob in New York; that there were Irishmen in that mob; that there were no Republicans in the fight; that there were only two Republicans on the Committee on the Mayor's message; that he was very patriotic; that there were men who were not patriotic; and that, in fine, his side of the house could not think,—the matter ought to be postponed!
This Solon took his seat, and was answered at some length by another of the Fathers, (a nervous and indignant gentleman,) who did not know that Republicans were ever engaged in any fight, where there was danger to life or limb. He admitted there were Irishmen in the fight at New York, as well as on the plains of Manassas, Fair Oaks, Malvern Hills. Mechanicsville, and Gettysburg. But he remembered no field where the Republicans distinguished themselves, except it was the bloodless FIELD OF CONTRACTS!
Here another father essayed to speak. Delicately constructed, mentally and physically, he attracted the commiseration of the Board and the "lobby." His name is unknown to your correspondent, (it sounded like Anodyne or Nodyne,) but he read with a weak voice an article which lately appeared, it is stated, in the Tribune, and it was an insult to that able paper to have it fathered by so puerile a parent. Being called upon by the President of the Board to acknowledge the bastardy or paternity of the thing, he indignantly denied its illegitimacy,—but a voice in the lobby called "Tribune"—and Father Nodyne was seated—looking like Jemmy Twitcher when he was charged with stealing hen's eggs and he triumphantly proved they were duck's eggs!
Finally, a gentlemanly, business-like man—(I wish I knew his name, Mr. Editor)—spoke the words of an Alderman as we should suppose an Alderman might speak. He believed that all consumers were tax-payers; practically demonstrated the injustice of the conscript bill, and declared his willingness to relieve the poor man from its onerous provisions. I allude to the Alderman of the 3d.
A school teacher from the Seventh Ward, New York, who must certainly be one of our city fathers, as he had the "liberty of speech," thought he would, then he thought he would not, and, after weighing the matter on his feet, did not know whether he would or would'nt, vote for any other than the Rochester plan, sat down, leaving us "lobby" men to consider whether opaque heads are those which should adorn the school-house and the Council Chamber?
I left, Mr. Editor, the chamber wherein these great little men do congregate, firmly resolved that when I next vote at a charter election my friends of the Taylor, Nodyne, and Teacher's school shall receive my distinguished consideration. WATCHMAN.

Brooklyn City News.
SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1863.
THE DRAFT.
The principal topic of conversation to-day, and it will be until the drawing is concluded, is the Draft. The greatest excitement prevails among the nervous and apprehensive people. Extravagant stories, so extravagant as to be ludicrous, are told of what is to be immediately done. One gentleman possessed of more than average discretion and judgment stated as a fact in the presence of several friends this morning, that an additional police force had been organized. That as soon as the name was drawn the person representing it would be taken in charge, provided with a uniform, and placed in company with others under guard. That as soon as a company should be assembled it would be forwarded to Arlington Heights put under drill for a week, and then sent away to be disposed of, in whole or in part, where most needed. Another story is told that the residents of certain districts will be notified to appear at the place of drawing, and as the names are called the individuals will separate from the assemblage, enter a room prepared for the purpose, don the uniforms, then be escorted to bid adieu to their friends, etc., and finally march forward. Still more extravagant and impossible things are related and believed by those who permit their fears to riot with their judgment. The disposition of the drafted men will be to fill up the old regiments in the several armies most depleted, without regard to location. Being placed at once among veteran and well disciplined and well drilled soldiers they will quickly become of service, and the regiments will be restored to the requisite state of efficiency.
The manner of selecting the names is some what after the fashion many years ago, adopted in drawing the numbers of a lottery, as no doubt many of our readers have seen publicly performed of an afternoon in the Park of New York. The name of each person enrolled, with his residence and color (white or black) will be inscribed upon a slip of paper about six inches in length and one in breadth. Each slip will be rolled tightly, and bound with a ring of India-rubber. The lot thus prepared will be placed in a revolving wheel on a high platform and drawn out by the Provost Marshal, or some person by him designated, one by one, at each revolution of the wheel.
The ten days' notification then follows, but meanwhile such surveillance will be exercised as to prevent desertion, for so it will be considered should any person drawn go or attempt to go away, and the same punishment as is meted to deserters will be visited upon the guilty although not mustered into the service.
A question of grave importance has suggested itself to the military authorities of this State as to the credit we are to receive for those volunteers who have joined the army since the call for three hundred thousand troops has been issued. At least ten thousand of the regular militia have volunteered, and are now under General COUCH, in addition to the volunteers who have enlisted within the last four months. Adjt. Gen. SPRAGUE has gone to Washington to ascertain whether the State is to be credited for these troops, or whether the full quota will be drafted without any reference to the troops who have volunteered to meet the invading columns in Maryland. This inquiry will be of moment to all.
The drawing of names was to have commenced this morning in New York in the Ninth Congressional District, under the direction of the Provost Marshal, and 2,521 men are required. On Monday morning the same proceeding will be begun in the Eighth District, from which 4,892 men are demanded. The uniforms and other military paraphernalia are being forwarded, and before another week shall be closed the proceeding in the metropolis will be concluded. The number to be drawn in this, the Third District, is 2,697, and embraces residents in the Fisrt [sic], Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Seventh, Thirteenth, Fifteenth and Nineteenth Wards. The total number enrolled is 27,000, of which there are 14,300 of the first class. In this proportion the number from the Second and Third Districts will be nearly 6,000.
We learn this morning that the drawing will not be later than Thursday in this city, but if possible it will be commenced at an earlier day. Already substitutes are sought for and several citizens in the Third, Fourth, Ninth and Eleventh Wards have secured the services of workmen in their employment. One gentleman liberally gives $250 in green backs, and in addition will pay to the family of the workman $10 per week, the average sum he earns. It is remarkable with what indifference these parties view the conscription, while their neighbors are tremulously consulting their physicians, and suggesting constitutional difficulties which may make their appearance in the body, should it be put to any inordinate exercise.
In some of the interior counties of the State, the conscription is completed, and the men ready for the field. The district of Newark, Jersey City, Hoboken, and Hudson, is to furnish 2,020 men, five hundred of whom will be from Jersey City. In New England the requisition is being complied with promptly, Massachusetts furnishing about 22,000. In the Providence district, Rhode Island, the drawing was completed on Tuesday last, the number from the first class being 2,971. A priest of the Catholic Church and the editor of the Journal, were among those selected. In Boston also, a priest and an editor were among the victims, and but three of the Smith family. During the ensuing week, public attention will be engrossed with this subject, and only some such event as the capture of Gen. LEE, or a scare about Washington, will prove of equal consequence.

THE CONSCRIPTION--HOW IT WILL BE
ENFORCED IN BROOKLYN.
The question of a draft has been so long before the people, that the impression had begun to prevail in the minds of many that it would not be made, but that measures less offensive and repugnant to the public would be adopted for filling the depleted ranks of our armies. This impression has been thoroughly disabused during the past two days. The authorities at Washington have ordered the immediate inforcement [sic] of the draft, and 300,000 has been fixed as the number of men to be called for under it. The enrolment is nearly or quite complete in every State, and nothing is now left but to carry out the provisions of the Conscription law passed by the last Congress. The general aversion felt by our people to raising an army by a resort to conscription, has to a large extent induced the hope a resort to the measure would be unnecessary, and any reasonable sacrifices would have been cheerfully made to have averted it. But of the necessity and justness of the measure very little doubt is entertained Of one thing we may well feel satisfied, it could not have come at a time to have met a more general concurrence than the present. We have just achieved the most important victories. The rebels have been discomfited in their futile attempt to invade the North. The army of General LEE has been routed and demoralized, and is not yet free from the chances of capture. Our victories in the Southwest have been signal, and fruitful of the most important results to the cause of the Union, and in every direction the cause of the nation is full of hope and promise. Though it is only reasonable to expect that the enemy will rally, and by every means which they can command endeavor to recussitate their wasted powers, and again present a formidable front, there is no denying that rebellion has received a staggering blow that needs but to be followed with vigorous and determined action, to insure its utter and final downfall.
These considerations, together with the absolute necessity which exists of placing in field a sufficiently powerful force to follow up successfully the recent victories which our troops have achieved, will, as a general thing, reconcile the draft, even to those who are immediately affected by it. As to the idea of any open resistance, we do not believe it is honestly entertained by one man in a hundred; on the contrary, we believe that it will be met with a much more ready acquiescence than is generally supposed. Those whom chance shall select as the ones to give themselves up first to the call of their country, will acknowledge it as one of the necessities of the times in which we live, and cheerfully obey the summons. One thing is quite certain, any attempt at resistance will be worse than useless, and recognizing this fact, men will be pretty apt to accommodate themselves to what cannot be avoided.
There are many sanguine, easy people, who imagine that with the crushing defeat of LEE, the fall of Vicksburg, and the continued flight of BRAGG, the necessity of a conscription had passed away. There are few who are willing to believe that the war is virtually at an end. In the experience of so many disappointments touching the duration of the war, we are not disposed to be so sanguine, although we think the prospect to-day is more cheering than it has ever been before. The clouds have at last dispersed, and the "peep o' day" has come; but yet we do not stand as we hope soon to stand in the glare and splendor of full noon. The horizon is flushed with the golden dawn, of victory, and the path that will lead us to honor and to peace is so brilliantly illumined, that we can no longer hesitate or be misled, or suffer ourselves to grow faint and weary by the way. But the road that lies before us may be longer than it seems, and there may even yet be pit-falls that we have not passed. Having struggled on so far, it would be a fearful thing if some unexpected obstacle should interfere to block our way, or some new danger should assail us in the rear. These things are not probable; but it should be enough for us to know that they are possible, unless we take timely means to guard against them, and the enforcement of the draft appears to be the best, if not the only means. That it will be carried out without opposition there is no good reason to doubt, and the arrangements for its enforcement in this city should, we think, meet with general acceptance.
Brooklyn is required to furnish about 5,000 men, consequently about 75,000 will be drawn. We have 27,000 names enrolled, of which from 13,000 to 14,000 are of the first class—single men, between the ages of 20 and 45, and all married men, between 20 and 35. It is scarcely possible that those of the second class will be called upon. The enrolment has been completed for some days, and the clerks, some fifty in number, are now employed in preparing the slips that are to be put in the wheel, and on Tuesday morning next, it is expected that the drawing will commence. The names will be drawn by Wards, each Ward filling its own quota, thus equally distributing the conscription over all parts of the city. The drawing will be made publicly, at No. 259 Washington street, before the Examining Board, consisting of the Provost Marshal, Mr. S. B. GREGORY, Dr. NELSON L. NORTH, Surgeon, and ABNER W. BALIE, Commissioner.
The number of exemptions for physical disability and other causes, will, no doubt, be very numerous, but it is hardly probable that it will exceed the fifty per cent. which is allowed therefor [sic].
Those drafted men who wish to take advan­tage of the $300 exemption clause, may do so by paying the money to the Collector of the Internal Revenue, from whom they will receive a discharge certificate.
The men who were in the fied [sic] at the time of the passage of the Conscription law are not liable to the draft, but whether those now in the field under the late call of Governor Seymour will be exempted is a matter to be determined in the future, their names are on the enrolment lists and may be drawn, but it is thought that a reservation in their favor will certainly be made. After the names are drawn the parties selected will be notified thereof and they will have ten days to prepare themselves for the life of a soldier. During those ten days the Examining Board will meet every day to hear all claims for exemption.
The draft, it will be seen from the foregoing, is a fixed and positive fact, soon to be realized by our citizens. The next few days will certainly be anxious ones for all classes of the community. But we feel confident that the responsibilities which they will bring will be bravely met and honorably assumed.

Brooklyn City News.
TUESDAY, JULY 21, 1863.
Meeting In Relation to the Exemption of Drafted Men.—$700,000 to be Appropriated.
The Committee appointed by the Common Council last night, for the purpose of fixing upon a sum to be appropriated to pay the exemptions of men drafted having families depending upon them, met with the Board of Contracts this morning, in the Mayor's office, to discuss the matter. They decided to recommend the appropriation of $500,000, which will secure the exemption of 1,666 men, or nearly half the quota of Brooklyn.
The Supervisors, it is understood, will appropriate the sum of $200,000, at their meeting to be held to-morrow afternoon.

Mysterious Organizations.
To the Editor of the Brooklyn City News:
Brooklyn, July 20.
Sir: You will do a favor to the curious inhabitants in the neighborhood of Gothic Hall, if you will enlighten them in regard to the mysterious organizations which met there this evening.
Between 6 and 8 o'clock the eastern door of the Hall was carefully guarded by several gentlemanly citizens behind bayonetted [sic] muskets. Every few minutes between the hours named, a citizen would make his appearance and whisper something mysterious into the ear of one of the complacent guards, and—"open sesame"—he entered. Our neighbors looked on, and wondered at this strange proceeding. Dame Rumor, with her many tongues, startled the neighborhood with reports of riotous combinations of attacking Gothic Hall—of dreadful things in store for the quiet neighborhood of the scene. At least three old ladies packed their valuables, and gave directions for an early call in the morning to leave the scareful scene.
Early this morning posters were seen on the various sidewalks, with the words "Sam, Organize," conspicuously shown. The old ladies I speak of, argued that this mysterious assemblage at Gothic Hall must be "Sam's organizers,"—and this caused "confusion worse confounded," for why should Sam organize in the dark? Sam—our old Uncle Sam—is fearless, and his actions, though once mischievously obscured by the "dark lantern," now openly gazes at the meridian Sun! I utterly repudiated the idea the old ladies entertained, that Sam organized thus strangely,—it is unworthy his dignity, derogatory to the character of all his family,—it places him on the level of the thing that conspires to beat a helpless negro simply because he is a negro.
But, Mr. Editors, it may be sufficient to simply ask you for information in regard to this romantic meeting. You—that know everything—must surely be able to satisfy the curiosity of your constant reader. ELLEN AUGUSTA.

The Mayor of Brooklyn on the Draft.—
At a meeting of the Common Council of Brooklyn, held last evening, a communication was received from Mayor Kalbfleisch, relative to the conscription law and the disturbances of last week. After stating that he deemed it proper to call the attention of the city government to the matter, he says:
That there is a deep seated and earnest repugnance felt among our people of all classes, to the conscription ordered by the Federal government, must be apparent to all. Among those of limited means, who have not the pecuniary ability to avail themselves of the right of exemption, this feeling of repugnance amounts to a sense of deep personal wrong, to avert which, in their view, justifies a resort to forcible resistance to the law. Of course in a government like ours, of the people, with the ballot box at their command for the redress of grievances, real or imaginary, there can be no possible excuse or justification for mob violence. But it is unnecessary for me to stop to discuss whether there is or is not any real ground for such a feeling as that to which I have referred. It is sufficient for the present purpose to know that it does exist, and that elsewhere in the state it has been manifested by acts of the most deplorable and objectionable character. On the other hand that it is the intention of the general government to enforce the draft at all hazard, its official announcement fully acquaints us.
It would appear that the features of the conscription law to which the strongest objection is made, is the prevision which exempts from service any drafted man who shall pay to the government the sum of $300. The operation of this provision, it is insisted upon, is virtually to limit the conscription and the probability of actual service in the army to the poorer classes, the men who do not possess, and who would find it extremely difficult if not impossible, to raise the means required to purchase exemption. This is urged by many to be partial and unjust, and in the instances of those who have families dependent upon them for support, and whom, if called into service, they would be obliged to leave to the cold and uncertain care of public or private charity, is felt to be a hardship so intolerable as, in their opinion, to warrant them in forcibly resisting its imposition. * * * * *
What I would recommend is, the appropriation of an amount of money sufficient to purchase the exemption of those having families dependent upon

them for support, who may be drafted, and who are unable to furnish or procure the means to do it themselves. * * * *
Viewing the proposition in all the phases in which it may be presented—as a measure of pecuniary economy, as a means of preserving the peace and reputation of our city, as setting an example of obedience to law and as aiding the government by a liberal contribution to its fund for the encouraging of volunteering—I feel convinced that its adoption would be certain to receive the public sanction and approval.
After the Mayor's communication was read, Ald. Ternan said that he highly approved of the Mayor's suggestions, and hoped it would be adopted in spirit. He moved its reference to a special committee of five, which was unanimously carried.

COMMON COUNCIL.
Monday, July 20, 1863.
President Dennis O'Keefe, Alderman of the 12th Ward, in the Chair, and a quorum being present.
The minutes of last meeting were read and approved.
COMMUNICATION FROM THE MAYOR.
Mayor's Office, Brooklyn,
July 20, 1863.
To the Honorable, the Board of Aldermen:
Gentlemen:--After conferring with many of our prominent citizens, I have thought proper to call your attention to a subject which seems to demand your earliest and most earnest consideration. While we can rejoice that our city has maintained its quiet and good order, and been permitted to escape any visitation of the terrible scenes of riot and outrage, which during the past week afflicted the city of New York, yet it must be admitted that there are causes still existing among us calculated to excite our liveliest solicitude, and apprehension for the future. The numerous notices served upon me by owners of property, that they have reason to fear its destruction by mob violence, is evidence of this fact, as conclusive as it is disagreeable. That there is a deep-seated and earnest repugnance felt among our people of all classes, to the conscription ordered by the Federal Government, must be apparent to all. Among those of limited means, who have not the pecuniary ability to avail themselves of the right of exemption, this feeling of repugnance amounts to a sense of deep personal wrong, to avert which, in their view, justifies a resort to forcible resistance to the law. Of course in a government like oars, of the people, with the ballot-box at their command for the redress of grievances, real or imaginary, there can be no possible excuse or justification for mob violence. But it is unnecessary for me to stop here to discuss whether there is or is not any real ground for such a feeling as that to which I have referred. It is sufficient for the present purpose to know that it does exist, and that elsewhere in the State it has been manifested by acts of the most deplorable and objectionable character. On the other hand that it is the intention of the General Government to enforce the draft at all hazard, its official announcements fully acquaint us. With the knowledge of these facts before us let us as representatives of the people, entrusted with the conduct of their municipal affairs, and the preservation of the public peace and order, consider, what is our duty in the premises. In the first place, let it be fully and distinctly understood that we cannot consent even to appear in the remotest degree to concede or yield to the demands or threats of a mob, or of persons inclined to riotous demonstrations. But while we should not and cannot hesitate to call into requisition all the means within our control to suppress any riot or resistence [sic] to law, is it not equally our duty when manifestations of that character are to be apprehended, to exert ourselves to the utmost of our lawful ability to guard against and prevent if possible their occurrence? For myself, I have no doubt or hesitancy upon the subject. I therefore suggest that while we relax no efforts nor withhold the slightest preparations to maintain the public peace against all attempts to disturb it, that we endeavor if possible to remove all pretest for any such disturbance.
It would appear that the features of the Conscription law to which the strongest objection is made, and which more than any other excites the popular dissatisfaction, is the provision which exempts a drafted man who shall pay to the Government the sum of $300. The operation of this provision, it is insisted upon, is virtually to limit, the conscription and the probability of actual service in the army to poorer classes, the men who do not possess, and would find it extremely difficult if not impossible, to raise the means required to purchase exemption. This is urged by many to be partial and unjust, and in the instances of those who have families dependent upon them for support, and whom, if called into service, they would be obliged to leave to the cold and uncertain care of public or private charity, is felt to be a hardship so intolerable as, in their opinion, to warrant them in forcibly resisting its imposition.
I repeat again, that I shall not be misunderstood, far be it from me to justify the entertainment of any such unlawful and improper purpose, but that it is entertained to a very considerable extent there is not the least doubt, and it is from this source that arises most of the danger that threatens the public peace.
Permit me, then, to suggest to your Hon. Body, the propriety of taking such action as will alleviate and mitigate, if it does not entirely remove this cause of grievance and complaint.
What I would recommend is, the appropriation of an amount of money sufficient to purchase the exemption of those having families dependent upon them for support, who may be drafted, and who are unable to furnish or procure the means to do it themselves. Long before there was any reason to apprehend any resistance to the draft, the subject had engaged my attention, and reflection had convinced me that the adoption of a measure of the kind I have suggested, would really be an exercise of prudent economy on the part of the city. The tax payer may object to the proposed increase of his already heavy burthen of taxation, but I think that after proper consideration and examination, he will agree with me that it is a measure of true economy. The expense of supporting the families of the drafted men who have not the means of purchasing exemption, would in the end, I am satisfied, amount to a sum far greater than the $300 paid to retain them at home, themselves to take care of those dependent upon them for support. This is a question of mere dollars and cents which any can calculate for themselves. And after all, as the Government has announced its intention of appropriating the fund which the purchases of exemption may create, to the purpose of paying bounties, such an appropriation as I have suggested would but be doing indirectly that which the city has before done directly, providing for the payment of bounties to volunteers and for the relief of their families. And there is the other consideration, which, however we may deprecate it, we are forced to take into account, and that is, should any omission to take some action on our part result in failing to prevent the enactment among us of the scenes that have recently transpired in New York, we may have a destruction of property, to say nothing of life, to reimburse which, would impose upon the taxpayers a burthen compared to which the appropriation suggested would be a mere trifle.
Viewing the proposition in all the phases in which it may be presented—as a measure of pecuniary economy, as a means of preserving the peace and reputation of our city, as setting an example of obedience to law and as aiding the government by a liberal contribution to its fund for the encouragement of volunteering, I feel convinced that its adoption would be certain to receive the public sanction and approval.
I leave to your honorable body, if the proposition I have suggested should meet with your favor, the duty of properly considering and determining the amount which shall be appropriated, and of maturing the details through which the proposition shall be carried into effect. Perhaps a reference of the subject to a joint committee composed of the Board of Contracts and the Finance, or a special committee of your honorable body, with directions to report at an early day to be set apart for the purpose, would be most proper. Very respectfully,
MARTIN KALBFLEISCH, Mayor.
Ald. Ternan had heard that communication read with a great deal of pleasure, and he was glad that the Mayor had the courage to send such a document to that Board. He moved that a special committee of five be appointed and the communication referred to them.
Ald. Belknap asked if it would not be as well to refer it to the Law Committee?
Ald. Ternan said he hoped not. He trusted that the Board would act liberally, as the Common Council of New York had done.
The motion was put, and carried unanimously.

SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON MAYOR'S COMMUNICATION.
The President of the Board appointed the following Committee of Five to whom was referred the Mayor's Message relating to providing exemption money for citizens:
Aldermen Ternan, Perry, Newman, Nodyne, and Saal.

SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON HUDSON AVENUE FERRY.
The President appointed the following Committee of Three, to whom was referred the matter.
JAMES T. BRADY charges—and justly—that the real authors and instigators of the late riot in New York kept out of the way of danger. He makes an eloquent appeal to the misguided men who participated in the outbreak, not to allow themselves to be made tools of by a lot of cowardly sneaks, who seek to further their selfish personal and political ends by exciting turmoil and bloodshed. Who these "cowardly sneaks" are it is not difficult to guess. Many of them are marked. The brand of guilt is stamped indelibly on their foreheads. They cannot escape the consequences of their crimes. The victims of their hellish plottings—the unhappy wretches whom they egged on, but had not the courage to lead—will curse them as the authors of their misfortunes. The time of their punishment is not yet; but it will soon come. The avenging Fates are on their track. They may flee from the "wrath to come," but they cannot escape.

The Brooklyn Daily Times.
To Let—in the TIMES BUILDING—a suite of rooms on the second floor, suited for a lawyer, surveyor, &c.
TUESDAY EVEN'G, JULY 21, 1863.
THE MAYOR'S PLAN TO EXEMPT MEN
FROM THE DRAFT.
The special message of Mayor Kalbfleisch to the Board of Aldermen, last evening, recommending an appropriation, which in amount Alderman Ternan hoped would be liberal, to exempt drafted men from serving, will be found in the proceedings of that body, reported in our columns this evening. If concurred in, the recommendation here made would produce two results: the city would be out of pocket at least half a million of dollars, and the Government would be minus, to a large extent at least, of the soldiers which Brooklyn should furnish to put down the Rebellion.
That the Mayor and those who are with him in this recomendation [sic] have these ends in view, we are not disposed to contend; nevertheless, that such would be the legitimate operation of the measure, is clear enough. So far as it went, it would defeat the very objects of the law, and, for our part, we find it not a little difficult to reconcile support of such a measure with an honest desire for the vigorous prosecution of the war. While we do not question the motives of those who are in favor of this system of wholesale exemption by an appropriation of the public money, we do not see in it that support of the government which it needs at the present momemt [sic]. We think, furthermore, that we perceive at the bottom of the business a concession to those who are avowedly opposed to the war, and are doing everything in their power to embarrass the government.
The injustice of such a measure in the cities to the other parts of the State, where the draft is neither resisted nor bought off, is manifest. For whoso benefit do we propose to pay this half million? While many cases would be justly relieved, the answer and the animus of the whole thing, will be found in the fact that the proposition comes on the heel of the riots.
A reasonable appropriation to support the families of drafted men, or any other plan that would facilitate the objects of the law, meet the wants of the government, and contribute to the vigorous prosecution and a speedy ending of the war, would present in itself the strongest possible claims to the support of loyal men and taxpayers,
We dissent entirely from the idea that the example of New York city is preeminently worthy of imitation, whether in the manner in which money is appropriated, or the objects to which it is generally devoted by the common council of that city. If she has millions to bestow, and if her citizens are willing to submit to endless taxation, that is no reason why we should rush ahead blindly in the same course.
We would see this war ended at the very earliest day practicable, and, if possible, without further bloodshed. In proportion as we place men in the field, we believe both of these ends will be subserved. At a moment when the leaders of the Rebellion are straining every nerve to place men in the field, and when they have actually called out every man capable of bearing arms, we would have all our acts, whether as a municipality or as citizens, go to strengthen the government, not only by giving it men, but by giving them at once.
We have neither time nor space to continue the discussion of the question to-day, and conclude by adding the following succinct presentation of the case, from one who, while liable to the draft, is neither able to pay the $300 exemption himself, nor asks the city to pay it for him.
The propositions to pay drafted men from the cities at the expense of the property of the cities, from whatever source they may emanate, are objectionable, for the following among other reasons:
1. The action is not only without precedent, but without legal authority.
2. It would be construed in troublesome quarters into a peace offering to the rioters, the object of nine-tenths of whom is plunder.
3. It is calculated to promote disaffection in all localities where no opposition is made to the draft and where there are no rioters.
4. It is establishing a precedent which never had the authority of law, and which is almost certain to be succeeded by unbearable abuses.
5. It is disparaging to aid in derogation of the authority of the Federal Government, while it is endeavoring to preserve its unity and integrity against the assaults of Southern rebels and North people who sympathise [sic] with them.

GOV. SEYMOUR AND THE $300 EXEMPTION.
To show hoe Governor Seymour is playing the demagogue, in opposing the draft, because of the $300 exemption, a single fact only need be cited. On the 5th of May last, only two months and a half ago, the Legislature passed an act to amend "an act (which is in effect a draft for a possible contingency) for the enrollment of the Militia, the organization of the National Guard of the State of New York, and for the public defence," and the 6th article of these amendments is as follows:
SEC. 6. Add at the end of section 300 of this act as follows: Any person so dratted who may be a member of any religious denomination whatever, or from scruples of conscience may be averse to bearing arms, shall be excused from said draft on payment to the Clerk of the County by whom such draft is made, the sum of Three Hundred Dollars, to be by said County Clerk paid to the Controller of the State, to be applied to the purposes mentioned in this act.
To this Governor Seymour readily appended his official sanction; and there his signature stands, to convict him of the smallest demagogueism of which a man was ever guilty.
In one thing our Irish fellow-citizens refuse to be led by their semi-traitorous organs. They are almost uniformly in favor of arming the negroes and making them fight the battles of the Union. In this they vindicate their mother wit. They cannot see why, when every white man is wanted for the work of the North, able bodied negroes should rust in idleness at the South, or be permitted to labor for the support of rebels in arms.

COMMON COUNCIL.
The regular weekly meeting of this body was held last evening, a full attendance of the members being present.

THE DRAFT.
An important communication, which will be found in the proceedings, having reference to the draft, and recommending that provision be made to pay the exemption of such drafted men as could not pay the three hundred dollars, and who for reasons could not enter the army.
Ald. Ternan had listened to the communication with great pleasure, and was glad that the Mayor had the courage to send such a document to the Board. He moved that the communication be referred to a Special Committee of five.
Ald. Belknap thought it would be just as well to refer it to the Law Committee.
Ald. Ternan was of a different opinion--.... no such reference would be made. He trusted that the Board would act liberally, as the New York Common Council had done.
The motion to refer to a Special Committee was unanimously adopted.

Brooklyn City News.
TUESDAY, JULY 21, 1863.
THE DRAFT--THE MAYOR'S MESSAGE.
At the meeting of the Board of Aldermen, last evening, a communication was received from the Mayor, recommending the appropriation of an amount of money sufficient to defray the expense of purchasing exemption from the draft of such drafted men in the city as are not able to raise the means so to do themselves, and who have families depending on them solely, for support. The proposition was most favorably received by the Aldermen, and referred to a Special Committee of five, who, together with the Board Contracts, are to confer and .... to carry the recommendation devise some plan ...... into effect. That conference was had this morning, and the Committee will doubtless be prepared to report to-morrow evening to the special meeting, which the Board has agreed to hold for its reception and consideration. It seems to be certain that the Aldermen will respond affirmatively to the recommendation of the Mayor.
The Mayor in his communication to the Board fully and clearly sets forth the argu­ments and the reasons which have induced him to make the recommendation which he has, to the Board, and we invite the attention of our readers to it, as published in our report of the proceedings. It will be seen that he most heartily and explicitly disavows any idea of yielding to mob violence, and not only deprecates any resort to it, but proclaims that to suppress and punish all attempts of the kind, no effort must be spared. He forbears any discussion as to the constitutionality of the conscription, its necessity, or the propriety of the manner of its enforcement, and bases his recommendation almost entirely upon economic considerations. His argument is, that to draft a man and send him into the army, who has a family dependent upon him for support, would entail upon the community a heavier expense than at once to purchase his exemption. His family would be left to the care of the public, and the expense of maintaining them in the end amount to a sum much greater than the $300, which the exemption will cost. It is to this class of men only that the Mayor proposes to extend relief. The able-bodied who have no such ties, and those who are able themselves or have friends to raise it for them are not proposed to be included.
The Mayor states, as we ourselves know to be the fact, that the proposition he makes, he has long favored as an economic measure, and that it is not suggested now, because of any threatened resistance to the draft. The uncertainty as to the draft being ordered at all, and the suddenness with which it was commenced, is the chief reason why it was not proposed before. Besides, the Mayor very naturally, before suggesting a step of such importance, desired to ascertain how far it would be in accordance with public sentiment. The assurances he has received from leading and prominent citizens of all shades of political opinion, who have urged him to make the recommendation to the Board of Aldermen, were sufficient to dispel all doubts he might have entertained on the subject. The press of the city, we believe without a single instance of dissent, sustain the proposition, and, indeed, months ago, when the same idea was first originated in one of the cities in Maine, the CITY NEWS urged its adoption in Brooklyn.
The only difficulty in the way of carrying the recommendation into effect, is the fact that the charter makes no provision for the raising and appropriation of the money needed to purchase exemptions. This, however, we are satisfied is an obstacle which there will be no difficulty in surmounting. Indeed, we have precedents enough in point where it has been overcome. At the commencement of the war, similar appropriations, unauthorized by the charter, were made by the Common Council, to fit out our city regiments. Subsequently, appropriations under like circumstances, were made for the relief of the families of the soldiers; and still more recently, and an instance more directly in point, when a draft was apprehended under Gov. Morgan, to avert it, the city did not hesitate to appropriate $150,000 to be distributed as bounties to volunteers, to make up the quota for Brooklyn. The money was raised by loan, upon the faith of the city, and upon the assurance that the legislature would not hesitate to legalize the action. The loan now needed to purchase the exemptions, we believe can be raised in the like manner, and the next legislature will not fail to do as did its predecessor, in the other  instances we have cited,—legalize the action of the city authorities.
There are others who may object to the proposition of the Mayor, that its adoption will operate to weaken the power of the government in suppressing the rebellion, by tending to cause the withholding of the troops it needs. The answer to this is that Congress itself, by adopting the clause permitting the purchase of exemption, invited precisely this action, and made the necessary provision to meet it. It made that provision when it authorized the money derived from such purchases to be applied to the payment of bounties to volunteers. In reality, then, the city in providing for the payment of this $300 in the cases contemplated, would be contributing most valuable aid to the government. It would be helping it most powerfully to secure the services of the returned volunteers, veteran soldiers, any one of whom in the army is worth a dozen undisciplined, inexperienced, and unwilling conscripts.
The proposition, then, may be accepted not only as a measure of real and prudent economy, but as an act of unqualified loyalty to the government. This fact, and the other and not the least important, which, as the Mayor well says we cannot avoid taking into consideration,—the effect its adoption will have in allaying public excitement and preserving the public peace,—we have not the least doubt will command for the measure almost the unanimous public approbation,

Military Affairs in Brooklyn.
THE DRAFT—MESSAGE OF THE MAYOR AND ACTION OF
THE COMMON COUNCIL.
The different militia regiments returned on Sunday reassembled at their several armories yesterday morning, and were informed that they would be required to do duty some time longer, in compliance with orders from the War Department, as requested by the authorities of this State. They were dismissed and again ordered to muster in the evening, when they were sent to guard various points in the city most liable to disturbance.
A meeting of the Board of Aldermen was held last evening, when the following communication in relation to the draft was submitted by the Mayor—

The Brooklyn Daily Times.
To Let—in the TIMES BUILDING—A suite of rooms on the second floor, suited for a lawyer, surveyor, &c,

BUYING EXEMPTIONS BY MUNICIPAL
APPROPRIATION.
Our objection to the plan of buying exemptions by municipal appropriation, conceding it to be legal, rests mainly on the belief that it does not go far enough, but falls short, if it is not in derogation of the law itself. In our judgment its limited scope will embarrass rather than afford that aid to the government on which it has counted, and which was the original purpose of the law. So far as the plan is designed to mitigate the rigors of the Conscription Act, it has our approval; wherein it falls short is, it being a substitute for the law itself, it does not produce the same results. In other words, it does not fill up the ranks of the army, but operates, practically, to hinder the accomplishment of that object. It is urged that the money proposed in lieu, will produce men. There is some show of fairness in this, but the answer by no means meets the case. The government, foreseeing its wants, has relied on this law to meet them. It proceeds to put the law in operation to get men, and it gets money instead. Now, money will do almost anything, but it will not fight battles; and though it may, in time, bring the men, they may come too late, when, through the postponement and the frustration of the plans of the government, it will be too late to fight to any purpose. The rebels are calling into the field, at this very moment, every able-bodied man between the ages of eighteen and forty-five. Judging from the past, the call will be responded to. While they are doing this, we, instead of filling up the ranks of our army, are allowing them to thin out, by expedients to avoid the draft. A month hence, perhaps, we will have got the money, the rebels the men. While we are hunting up the men with the money in our pockets, the rebels defeat us in battle; and all the consequences, which we need not enumerate, follow. The postponement and delay, incident to the substitution of something else for the law itself, will have done the business, and all your municipal appropriations will be worse than thrown away.
Now, what we would do, would be to make support of the government the prime object of all our plans; and, we would further do everything consistent with it, to alleviate the draft. If we could do both, all the better. We believe both may be done, at least to a very considerable extent. That the plan proposed, while it alleviates the draft, at the same time tends rather to embarrass the government, is the principal reason why we object to it. We believe, however, that it can be made to cover the whole ground. Let us go a  step farther; so that, while we fulfil [sic] the philanthropic purpose of mitigating the harsh features of the draft, we at the same time furnish the men contemplated under it. This we believe, we can and should do. If you say it is a great undertaking, then all the greater the reason why this unexpected and extra labor should not be thrown upon the government, and at a moment, too, when it has its hands full, and when it is expecting men instead of any substitute whatever, and when men only will save the country. If for every $300 a man can be had, then let us produce him to the government.
We believe it was never contemplated that there should be anything like this wholesale exemption. If it had been contemplated that municipalities should step in between the government and the objects contemplated by the law, then it would have read distinctly that any given locality having a certain quota of men to raise, on raising such a sum of money, would be relieved from the operation of the law. But there is a way in which municipalities can act, and that is by raising the money, and by procuring the men and handing them over to the government as the law, legitimately enforced, would. It will be all the same to the government whether the ranks are filled by the legitimate operation of the Conscription law or by the substitution of something else that makes to the same end.
Let all the cities pay money, instead of furnishing men; then let the counties do the same, as they may, if the cities may, and we conclude, our obtuse cotemporary, to whom we are striving to make things plain will be able to perceive that the country would be without an army, the rebellion left to flourish unopposed. Does any man contend that this would be the legitimate operation of the Conscription law? To most men the proposition would be tolerably plain that it had been pretty effectually nullified. A more effective method of serving the rebellion, would be difficult to devise.
We repeat, let the plan go far enough to cover the main objects dear to every truly loyal man. Let us not stop at the wrong point, just when we ought to go farther. But let us, while we appropriate money to buy exemptions, place a man in the shoes of the exempted in the ranks. This much, in reply to our cotemporary, the News, had been written before the proceedings of the Common Council and of, the Board of Supervisors came to hand. Those proceedings will be found in our columns. B__ bodies, postponed final action on this subject, in which we think they did well. While the subject should not be postponed too long, sufficient time for reflection, and conference should be taken.
We draw attention to the debates, particularly in the Common Council, and more especially to the remarks of Aldermen O'Keefe, Ternan, Nodine and Taylor.

Brooklyn.
Military Movements.—In consonance with the call of Governor Seymour for the organization of the militia regiments in New York and Brooklyn, Major-General Duryea has issued an order to the exempt officers and members of the 5th and 11th brigades, and officers and men of the several regiments not on actual duty, and represented by substitutes in the field, to attend a meeting to-morrow, Thursday evening. The members of the 5th brigade, 13th, 28th and 14th regiments, are to meet at the Governor's Room, City Hall; Col. A.M. Wood will have charge of the organization. The members of the 11th brigade, 23d, 47th, 52d and 56th regiments, will meet at the armory rooms, 363 Fulton street; Major Hubbard will take charge of the organization.

THE ENROLLMENT—ARREST OF TWO GERMANS FOR RESISTING OFFICERS.—In the main, the work of enrolling names, as required by Conscription law, is going forward with commendable promptitude, and an orderly spirit, which speaks well for the loyalty of the people, is manifest. In the 16th Ward a little disturbance occurred on Saturday, caused by the resistance of one Andrew Sauer, residing near the Cypress Hills Plank Road. When called upon by the enrolling officer, he refused to impart any of the information required, and set his dog upon the officer. The animal inflicted a severe wound, which at this season may be attended with the most serious consequences. Afterwards Sauer threatened the life of the officer, which induced the latter to make a complaint to Provost Marshal Maddox, who had the man arrested by a file of soldiers.
Provost Maddox, with a Sergeant and three files of men, on Saturday night arrested a man named John Krebbs for hindering the proper officer from taking into custody his son, also named John Krebbs. The parties reside in Montrose avenue, and the son last fall enlisted, it is charged, in the l39th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers receiving a large bounty. It is also stated that he had previously joined other regiments, and has quite recently boasted of his illegal proceedings. Last Saturday evening Provost Marshal Maddox and an officer attempted to secure the son, when the father and some German woman forcibly rescued him and made their escape. The soldiers were then called in, and the father will be tried before the United States Commissioner this morning, at 10 o'clock, on a charge of secreting a deserter. The son is still at large.

THE DRAFT IN THIS CITY,
A Conference Meeting of the Committees of
the Aldermen and Supervisors.
The Joint Committees appointed by the Board of Aldermen and Supervisors met yesterday afternoon in the Mayor's office, for the purpose of considering the proposition to appropriate money to pay the exemptions of drafted men. It was simply a conversational meeting and no decisive action whatever was taken. The Supervisors it was thought had no authority to appropriate money for the object contemplated, but with the city it was contended that the case was altogether different. It was requested that whatever action was taken should include the towns in the benefits proposed to be conferred. After a protracted conversation the Committee adjourned. In pursuance of such adjournment the committee again met this morning. The Committee from the Supervisors did not meet with them, the matter under consideration relating solely to the city, the county having agreed to take care of itself. After considerable discussion it was resolved to adopt the report of the committee presented to the Board of Aldermen at their last meeting, with the addition of the resolutions of Ald. Ternan and some other slight amendments. The report now adopted by the committee is as follows:
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be and they are hereby authorized and directed to borrow upon the faith of the city, a sum not exceeding $1,000,000, payable with interest not exceeding 7 per cent. per annum, in one year from date, and issue certificates of indebtedness therefore [sic].
The avails thereof to be used for the payment of either the procurement of substitutes, or for the payment of the exemption fee as required by the conscription act, for such persons as may be drafted to fill the quota required from this city for the Army of the United States.
Resolved, That the Joint Committee heretofore appointed upon this subject, be and are hereby continued and empowered to carry the provisions of the foregoing resolution into

effect, and to establish all needful rules and regulations for the purpose of guarding against any and all impositions or frauds that may be attempted to be practised [sic] upon the city.
And whereas, a strong feeling exists in this city that Brooklyn has not been sufficiently credited for the troops she has sent to the field since the Rebellion broke out, a great uncertainty appears to prevail about the actual number the General Government requires from her under the Conscription
Law: and
Whereas, There appears to be a very general repugnance to the enforcement of a draft, and a very general opinion (in which this Common Council concurs) that Brooklyn can (with the sum of money just appropriated) now, as she has hitherto done, furnish her full quota of willing volunteers; be it therefore
Resolved That a Committee of five to consist of His Honor, the Mayor, the President of this Board and three other members of this Board, to be named by its President, be now appointed, whose duty shall be to confer in conjunction with other municipalities should they so deem fit, with State and General Governments, and particularly to urge upon the latter the wisdom and expediency of suspending the draft to allow the proper number of men required from each county to be raised by them as volunteers; also of the question of giving full credit for all members enlisted in the army and navy from the city of Brooklyn.
Resolved, That the sum of $250 be appropriated to defray the expenses of said Committee, such sum to be expended solely under the direction of the Mayor.

THE EASTERN DISTRICT REBELLIOUS
SECESSION AT HOME.
For several years there has been a spirit of uneasiness in the Eastern District in relation to the disintegration of that part of the city, and the loss of its identity through consolidation. The onerous taxation which has fallen on the 13th Ward, where some of the largest property owners reside, has ever been a subject of discussion on all occasions when the principal taxpayers meet. At church meetings, in railroad cars, at social gatherings, the originator of consolidation has been denounced in terms of such profanity, oftentimes, as that prolonged penances would scarcely make atonement.
Last evening at half-past nine o'clock, a meeting was held by some of the principal citizens at a private residence. When all were assembled, numbering seventeen, the object of the convocation was set forth as follows:
1st.—That the system of centralization has been sufficiently tested since consolidation to convince us that its continuance will prove our ruin.
2d.—That under the present system of government the ratio of expenses is more than double that which we paid under the village or city government of Williamsburg.
3d.—That being remote from the seat of government but few have either time or opportunity to personally attend the meetings of the Common Council, and by their presence make known their wants, or act as a check on designs which have personal municipality and not general benefit in view.
4th—That being disjoined from the present union each ward may become through Legislative enactment a distinct municipality, and so conduct its internal affairs as to secure all the blessings of civilization and Christianity, at the same time reducing taxation to almost a nominal sum.
5th—That we here assembled, will urge the object of this meeting and endeavor to bring to its aid all persons inxerested [sic] in preserving what they have accumulated through years of toil and industry, and at the assembly of the next Legislature make application to be severed from the existing consolidated city of Brooklyn.
A discussion sprung up from some conversation relative to the admission of the 19th ward. It was contended by one gentleman that the taxes and assessments of the old village and city of Williamsburgh being a matter of record, it would be an impediment should new territory be included. That the three wards comprising the late municipality had been over-taxed, and that claims had been confessed and allowed through partisan influence, and which were yet in the course of initiative payment, that must be contested by the residents of the former city alone.
In answer to this, it was contended that the natural dividing line was the Wallabout creek. The Boerum and Remsen farms had been purchased and occupied by persons whose identity was in Williamsburgh; that they employed the same ferry to reach the city; that they disbursed their money in that section of the city, and were identified in every social relation with Williamsburgh people.
The discussion of the subject was brought to a close by a suggestion that the business should be transacted through a committee. The proposition was acceded to and a Committee of seven was appointed to present to the meeting at its next sitting, a detail of procedure. A Subscription paper was then passed around and liberally signed, and the meeting adjourned to meet on Friday evening, 31st instant.

CHANGE IN PUBLIC SENTIMENT.—Last week in one of the Brooklyn City cars, among the passengers was a quiet and respectably dressed colored woman. An Irishman sat opposite to her, who, after scowling at her some time, suddenly spit in her face. The outrage was no sooner committed than the Irishman got a blow from one of the passengers which sent him off his seat, and in half a minute he was tumbled headlong into the street, two other of the passengers following and assisted in bestowing a castigation that will be a caution to all scoundrels of his type. The whole was done so quickly that, although the car did not stop, the three passengers regained their seats.—[Tribune.

Brooklyn City News.
FRIDAY, JULY 4, ___
THE DRAFT.
According to the N. Y. World, it seems to be settled now that the quota of New York will be officially ascertained before the draft is continued in that city. The mission of the Committee to Washington, of which Senator Morgan was Chairman, has resulted in so much. We do not understand from this statement that Brooklyn is included in this arrangement, and if not, steps should promptly be taken to provide that it shall be. We believe that the facts, when ascertained, will demonstrate that no community in the land has contributed, either in men or money, more liberally to the support of the war, than has the City of Brooklyn, and we are entitled to and should receive the benefit of it. Leaving out of the account altogether, the thousands of her gallant sons enrolled in her citizen soldiery, she has responded with alacrity to the repeated calls of the Government in the hour of emergency. She has sent, and has now in the field, at least half-a-dozen full regiments, to say nothing of her contributions to regiments organized elsewhere, and which are credited to other localities. One of the first regiments to volunteer for the war, was the Brooklyn Fourteenth, who have won for themselves a name and a fame for glorious deeds that is as imperishable as the history of the war. And the remnant of that gallant band, sadly reduced in numbers as they are, are still there in the field, to add, if occasion shall demand, fresher hues to the laurels which the regiment has so nobly and so bravely won.
Besides her contributions to the land forces, Brooklyn has furnished men almost unstintedly to swell the strength and power of the Navy. It has not been anticipated that these would be taken into account, in the enforcement of the draft, but we notice that it is stated that men recruited for the Navy have been allowed as a part of the quota called for from Boston If this be true, of course as the Government will not prescribe different rules of action for different localities, but have a general one for all, we may expect also to receive credit for the men Brooklyn has furnished the Navy.
If this shall be done, there can be no doubt that the number of men which we shall be called upon to contribute to fill up our quota, will be so small that they can readily be raised with a little effort by volunteering, and of course, any necessity for the enforcement of the draft thus be removed. In view of these facts, we trust if it shall be found that the arrangement made by Senator MORGAN refers only to the city of New York, that no time will be lost in making provision to have Brooklyn also included. Let our authorities, upon whom properly the duty devolves, lose no time therefore, first in ascertaining whether Brooklyn is thus included, and next, if it should be found that she is not spare no effort in remedying the omission.
P. S. Since the above was written we notice that the Common Council Committee and the Board of Contracts this morning, at their joint session, have made provision as we have above suggested. See their action, as reported in another column.
"Let all the cities pay money, instead of furnishing men; then let the counties do the same, as they may, if the cities may, and we conclude that our obtuse cotemporary, to whom we are striving to make things plain, will be able to perceive that the country would be without an army, the rebellion left to flourish unopposed."—Times, (E. D.)
The Times is fighting a man of straw, of its own construction, so far as its article from which the above is an extract, is to be regarded as a reply to the argument of the CITY NEWS. In the first place, we have never contended for the purchase of a general exemption by the city, but only for those who, if drafted into the army, would leave families behind them dependent on them for support, and who cannot raise the money to purchase exemption themselves. To go further than that, we have not, nor would not advise. The Times has no words of condemnation for the man who, fortunate enough to possess the means to purchase himself free—and does not seem to consider that he is attempting to defeat "the legitimate operation of the conscript law." With what grace, then, can it contend that the poor man who is not so fortunate, so far as his own means are concerned, is in any worse category, simply because it is the public and not private money which purchases his exemption? The government loses the services of the man in both cases, and will it be pretended that it has any stronger claim on those of the poor than it has on those of the rich? We fancy not, and yet it is precisely to that extent the argument of the Times goes, if it goes for anything.
But to go further, and meet the proposition of the Times in its full length and breadth—that if the cities pay money, all the counties may—we deny that it follows as a natural sequence, as it contends, that "the country would be left without any army, and the rebellion left to flourish unopposed." The government, if it did not draft a single man in the land, would, if 400,000 men were commuted for, be put in possession of $120,000,000, to be expended solely for the purpose of paying bounties to volunteers—a sum more than sufficient to raise all the armies of brave and willing men that the nation may need. To believe otherwise, is to believe that the nation has become so dissatisfied and disgusted with the war and the manner of its prosecution, as to be ready to surrender to the rebellion. Just as are the causes of complaint on that score, we have yet to see any reasonable ground for the entertainment of any such belief.

BROOKLYN.
A Victim of the Recent Riots.
Coroner Hegeman was notified this morning to hold an inquest on the body of a colored man, which was found this morning floating in the river near Barren Island. The body was covered with cuts and bruises, and is evidently that of one of the victims of the recent riots in New York. The body was taken to the dead house for identification.
Eight Horses Burned.—A fire broke out about half-past two o'clock this morning in the wood yard and stables of D. Fohey, Nos. 16 and 17 Furman street and, owing to the combustible nature of the premises, the place was entirely destroyed before the firemen could render any assistance. There were eight horses in the stables at the time belonging to different parties, and owing to the rapidity with which the flames spread, it was impossible to get them out, and they were all burnt. The adjoining houses No. 15, occupied by O. Gilmartin as a liquor store, was damaged to the amount of about $150, and No. 17 occupied as a cooper shop by Glacken & Co., was injured to the amount of $300. The loss in the wood yard and stables amounts to about $3000, which is partially covered by insurance.

BROOKLYN.
A Colored Church Burned in Williamsburgh.—On Saturday night the colored church in Devoe street, Williamsburgh was burned. This church was threatened by a Williamsburgh mob during the week of the riots in New York. The fire was the work of incendiaries, three men having been observed leaving the church just before the fire was discovered.

BROOKLYN.
THE CONSCRIPTION FUND.—The Committee of the Board of Aldermen met yesterday morning to consider the subject of appropriating money to relieve citizens from the draft. An interchange of views showed that all were in favor of the report as presented by Alderman Ternan at the last meeting of the Common Council, except Alderman Nodyne. The report, as will be remembered, appropriates one million of dollars to the object. Alderman  Ternan moved that his resolution, offered at the last regular meeting, directing the Board to confer with the State and national authorities, with the view of securing for Brooklyn due credit for the number of men she has already furnished, be adopted. The motion was agreed to and the Committee adjourned.

ESCAPED PRISONERS FROM TROY.—Officers Frost and Jones yesterday arrested an escaped convict from Troy jail, who, with 83 others, was released by the mob last week. The name of the prisoner is Isaac Polter. He is charged with the offence of grand larceny. The accused is detained in the 41st Precinct station house, awaiting the arrival of officers from Troy.

Fires.—Between one and two o'clock yesterday morning, a fire broke out in the wood yard of Mr. D. Fahey, Nos. 17 and 19 Furman street. The flames communicated to an adjoining stable, in which there were eight horses belonging to different persons, and they were burned to death. One of the horses belonged to D. Fahey, one to Mr. Donnington, two to Mr. P. McDonough, and four to Mr. R. H. Quinn, valued at $150 each. Mr. Quinn was insured in the Home Company, of New York. The dwelling of Owen Gilligan was damaged about $200, insured in the Tradesmen's Co. The cooper shop of Loughlin & Co. was damaged to the extent of $150, insured in the Commercial Co. Mr. Fahey lost $1,400, fully insured.
A fire occurred at the comer of Fulton and Clarke street, about nine o'clock yesterday morning, caused by an explosion of some powder in a flask, which set fire to the premises, and blew out the sky-light. Some furniture in the upper story, where the accident occurred, was also damaged. The fire was extinguished without further damage.

A VICTIM OF THE NEW YORK RIOTS.—The body of a colored man was picked up near Barren Island, yesterday morning. The body was contused and greatly bruised. His clothes were torn into shreds, but half of the coat remaining. Coroner Hegeman took charge of the remains, and conveyed them to the County Hospital in Flatbush, where an inquest will be held this morning.
The 13th regiment was mustered out of the service yesterday morning, and this morning the 52d Regiment will be mustered out.
Rev. C. H. A. Bulkley, will lecture on
Abel: the type of the Martyr to truth and Right.
Two Irishmen by the name of Mike Sullivan live on Fort Hill, Brooklyn. A compatriot said to one of them: "Mike, are you drafted?" "Troth, un I spoze I am," says Mike. "An' how the divil do yon know but you're the other Mike Sullivan?"

BROOKLYN.
CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY FOR PROPERTY
DESTROYED AT THE ATLANTIC DOCK.—During the prevalence of the recent riots in New York, a body of men collected together in the vicinity of Atlantic Dock, about dusk on the evening of the 15th of July. The number increased until there were from 100 to 300. Some time after dark they proceeded in a body to the vicinity of the grain elevators in the basin, and making an assault with stones, drove off the few men who were employed to guard the property, and proceeded to set the elevators on fire; the object they had in view, and then left. A large amount of property was destroyed, all of which was insured. The insurance companies declined to pay the insurance, and the owners now apply to the City of Brooklyn for redress. Messrs. S. Fanchcr & Co. the proprietors of one of the elevators filed their claims for damages in the Comptroller's office yesterday. Their entire bill amounts to $106,309, including building, machinery, grain, &c., with interest on the whole sum. In addition to the above, the Atlantic Dock Company present a claim of $19, 500 for the destruction of the steam dredging machine Oneida, burning of the middle pier, mud scows, &c. The elevator of Mr. W. B. Baxter, which was destroyed at the same time, is valued at between $25,000 and $30,000, This claim has not as yet been presented. The whole amount of damage for which the city will be responsible will not be much less than $150,000.

THE DRAFT IN THIS CITY.
A Conference Meeting of the Committees of
the Aldermen and Supervisors.
The Joint Committees appointed by the Board of Aldermen and Supervisors met, yesterday afternoon in the Mayor's office, for the purpose of considering the proposition to appropriate money to pay the exemptions of drafted men. It was simply a conversational meeting and no decisive action whatever was taken. The Supervisors it was thought had no authority to appropriate money for the object contemplated, but with the city it was contended that the case was altogether different. It was requested that whatever action was taken should include the towns in the benefits proposed to be conferred. After a protracted conversation the Committee adjourned. In pursuance of such adjournment, the committee again met this morning. The Committee from the Supervisors did not meet with them, the matter under consideration relating solely to the city, the county having agreed to take care of itself. After considerable discussion it was resolved to adopt the report of the committee presented to the Board of Aldermen at their last meeting, with the addition of the resolutions of Ald. Ternan and some other slight amendments. The report now adopted by the committee is as follows:
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be and they are hereby authorized and directed to borrow upon the faith of the city, a sum not exceeding $1,000,000, payable with interest not exceeding 7 per cent per annum, in one year from date, and issue certificates of indebtedness therefore [sic]. The avails thereof to be used for the payment of either the procurement of substitutes, or for the payment of the exemption fee as required by the conscription act, for such persons as may be drafted to fill the quota required from this city for the Army of the United Slates.
Resolved, That the Joint Committee heretofore appointed upon this subject, be and are hereby continued and empowered to carry the provisions of the foregoing resolution into effect, and to establish all needful rules and regulations for the purpose of guarding against any and all impositions or frauds that may be attempted to be practised [sic] upon the city.
And whereas, a strong feeling exists in this city that Brooklyn has not been sufficiently credited for the troops she has sent to the field since the Rebellion broke out, a great uncertainty appears to prevail about the actual number the General Government requires from her under the Conscription law; and
Whereas, There appears to be a very general repugnance to the enforcement of a draft, and a very general opinion (in which this Common Council concurs) that Brooklyn can (with the sum of money just appropriated) now, as she has hitherto done, furnish her full quota of willing volunteers; be it therefore
Resolved That a Committee of five, to consist of His Honor, the Mayor, the President of this Board, and three other members of this Board, to be named by its President be now appointed, whose duty shall be to confer in  conjunction with other municipalities should they so deem fit, with State and General Governments, and particularly to urge upon the latter the wisdom and expediency of suspending the draft to allow the proper number of men required from each county to be raised by them as volunteers ; also of the question of giving full credit for all members enlisted in the army and navy from the city of Brooklyn.
Resolved. That the sum of money appropriated to defray the expenses of said Committee, such sum to be expended solely under the direction of the Mayor.

The Kings County War Fund Committee.
When the Administration called for 300,000 additional troops, the quota set down for this county was between 7,000 and 8,000. It was thought almost impossible by some to raise this number. The Governor, however, appointed a committee of prominent citizens in the Second and also in the Third Senatorial District--each of which committees were to endeavor to raise a regiment of volunteers to serve for three years or the war. A committee was also appointed about the same time by the Board of Supervisors to aid the authorities in all measures necessary to increase the army and navy. In prosecuting the work assigned to them the members of these respective committees became convinced that in order properly to develop the patriotism and the resources of the people of this city and county in behalf of the national cause, it was indispensable that a large central committee should be organized for that purpose. Accordingly at the special suggestion and earnest request of a delegation from each of the aforesaid committees, the "War Fund Committee of the City of Brooklyn and County of Kings" was
organized in September, 1862, with authority to ....

The Kings County War Fund Committee.
When the Administration called for 300,000 additional troops, the quota set down for this county was between 7,000 and 8,000. It was thought almost impossible by some to raise this number. The Governor, however, appointed a committee of prominent citizens in the Second and also in the Third Senatorial District—each of which committees were to endeavor to raise a regiment of volunteers to serve for three years or the war. A committee was also appointed about the same time by the Board of Supervisors to aid the authorities in all measures necessary to increase the army and navy. In prosecuting the work assigned to them the members of these respective committees became convinced that in order properly to develop the patriotism and the resources of the people of this city and county in behalf of the national cause, it was indispensable that a large central committee should be organized for that purpose. Accordingly at the special suggestion and earnest request of a delegation from each of the aforesaid committees, the "War Fund Committee of the City of Brooklyn and County of Kings" was organized in September, 1862, with authority to add to their number at discretion; and subsequently at a very large public meeting the appointment and work of the committee was unanimously approved.
The objects of the committee are to do all in their power to aid in procuring recruits; to assist the Sanitary Commission; to do what may be needful in behalf of the sick and wounded; to aid discharged soldiers, and the families of deceased soldiers and sailors in procuring the pay or pensions to which they may be entitled; to aid the United States Sanitary Commission, and to assist the Allotment Commissioners in their philanthropic work and generally to use their effort and influence in aiding the government to suppress the rebellion.
Isaac H. Frothingham, President of the Nassau Bank, is the treasurer of the committee, to whom funds may be transmitted in any way most convenient to the donor.
The committee occupy as their headquarters the rooms in the second story of the Hamilton Buildings, 15 Court street, over the Dime Savings Bank, where Dr. Strickland, one of the secretaries of the committee, may usually be found; where bulletins of the latest news from the army and navy are kept, and especially from the regiments which have been enlisted in this city and county and where any information may be obtained by the families or friends of our soldiers and sailors, which the committee may be able to impart.
The regular meetings of the committee are held on Saturday evenings of each week at the headquarters.

City News and Gossip.
Amusements this Evening.
HOOLEY'S OPERA HOUSE—Corner of Court and Remsen st.—Ethiopian Songs, Burlesques, &c.
OFFICES --30 AND 32 FULTON STREET AND
NO. 50 SOUTH SEVENTH ST., E. D.
THURSDAY EVENING, JULY 16.
THE FEELING IN THIS CITY.
Preparations of the Authorities.
COMPLETE ARRANGEMENTS MADE TO
SUPPRESS ANY CITIZENS ENROLLING.
The preparations for resisting any demonstrations of violence, disorder and incendiarism, are fast progressing towards completion. In answer to the proclamation issued by the Mayor, and published by us yesterday. Last night committees met in several of the wards and arrangements were made to enroll members. Large numbers have already signified their intention to join, and there is no doubt that from this evening forward the organizations throughout the city will be perfected and in complete working condition.
The arrangements yesterday were complete for anticipated incendiarism and riot last night. The authorities did everything that was required under the circumstances, and were amply prepared for all emergencies.
The Mayor, Police Inspector, General Duryea and Col. A. M. Wood, had the principal arrangements in hand, and had everything in complete readiness long before night. The military, numbering fully a battalion, with two howitzers, were very quietly sent to South Brooklyn, in close proximity to the Atlantic Docks, while others were so stationed that their services could be commanded in a few minutes.
Not only were the military in readiness to act, but several hundred specials were provided with formidable batons, somewhat larger than police clubs, which, under competent leaders, they were prepared to used on the craniums of those who should so far disturb the quiet of the city by actively participating in any hostile demonstration against life or property.
The police were kept in reserve the same as for some days and nights past, ready to make their appearance at any point where their services should be required. The force is deserving of great credit for their unceasing vigilance, although not in sufficient numbers to guard every man's house or place of business who thinks his property in danger, and unable to be in every place at once where sudden disturbances may arise—from whatever cause—they are still a formidable force in numbers as well as physical ability, and able to crush any general riot which might occur within the extent of their jurisdiction. They are so placed that let a difficulty of sufficient magnitude occur where it will, they will be promptly on hand as soon as a double quick can bring them to the scene.
There is no disguising the fact that since the fire on Wednesday, there has been a feverish state of feeling in the community. The families of numbers of persons were notified yesterday that their houses would be sacked and burned down. In some places anonymous letters were received and in other cases men, representing themselves as belonging to some organization called at residences and notified the occupants of what they might expect during the coming night.
It is not at all likely that these fellows meant what they threatened, or if so were brave enough to carry out their design, unless in very strong force. In the evening, when the men of families thus notified came home and were apprised by their frightened wives and children of what had occurred, they ran off post haste to the Inspector's office and informing him of the facts, invariably demanded protection, which could not be given in special cases. A gentleman residing in the 8th Ward whose family had thus been notified, expressed his decided conviction that they would have no home to go to in the morning. The night passed, however, and he remained unmolested. We know of some citizens who armed the male members of their families and volunteer friends in anticipation of an attack. We state these facts, not that we believe there is danger to be apprehended from this source, but to show what meanness reckless and unprincipled scoundrels can resort to in order to create apprehension and alarm.
The disturbers of the peace in New York are becoming more and more under control every hour, and in a brief period peace and quietness will reign as heretofore. With the subsidence of riotous proceedings in that city, apprehensions of danger will cease here; and when it is taken into consideration that our authorities are much better prepared than they were in New York at the time the riot broke out, or even for the two subsequent days, no great outbreak need be feared. If there should be any demonstration the participants would be put down with merciless severity. There is ample force and the will to do it.
We notice among other matters that on Wednesday midnight when the rioters sat fire to the grain elevators in Atlantic Dock Basin, a large number of thieves, pickpockets and incendiaries congregated at the Hamilton Ferry, foot of Whitehall street, all of whom were anxious to cross over to the opposite shore, for the purpose of having a hand in the plunder. The employees of the Union Ferry Company, seeing the condition of things, stopped the running of the boats for several hours, and thus saved South Brooklyn from the disgrace of having been invaded and plundered by the very lowest and most abandoned class of New York thieves and rowdies.

SPECULATING ON A RIOT—A SMALL BUSINESS.
Some men have a genius for making money, which is displayed in turning to account all adventitious circumstances—they possess in fact a sort of financial presence of mind. A couple of shabby looking fellows, who gave their names as Wm. Hartless and James Wood, struck a brilliant idea of making something out of the apprehensions of our citizens during the present excited state of the popular mind. They accordingly represented themselves as the financial agents of a very furious mob, which had determined to break out in Brooklyn last evening and pillaged the upper end of Columbia street. For a trifling pecuniary consideration, paid to their agents, the aforesaid mob would respect the premises of the storekeepers, and those who wished to avoid unpleasant consequences would have to come down.
Between seven and eight o'clock last evening Messrs. Wood and Heartless waited upon about a dozen storekeepers and preferred their requisitions for cash. They proved a pair of very sorry scamps, and would certainty have been repudiated by any mob having the slightest regard for its dignity. All they asked for an assurance against arson and pillage was the shabby sum of twenty-five cents; and they even came down to ten cents in some places, and a dry-goods dealer who was sharp at driving a bargain put them off with two ferry tickets. That these fellows were allowed to go from store to store, and instead of being kicked out or handed over to the police, were actually given money, is an evidence of the extraordinary feeling of apprehension of riot which pervades the community. As one of the storekeepers said this morning, in explanation why he gave the money, that he could not tell what might occur; a mob might make its appearance at any time, and as the sum asked for was trifling, he thought he had better give it than run any risk, though he had no doubt as to the character of the men he gave it to. Finally Mr. John Coburn, of 421 Columbia street, became aware of the proceedings of these self-constituted collectors of tribute, and every properly apprised Officer Oats, of the 43d, of the facts, who promptly took them into custody.
The prisoners are now held to await examination before Justice Boerum.

AN ANTI-NEGRO DEMONSTRATOR PUNISHED.
A sailor named John Tracy was brought before Justice Perry yesterday afternoon on a charge of committing an assault and battery on a colored man named James Henry White, of 22 Greene lane. Tracy was one of the parties who got up the anti-negro demonstrations in the Second ward on Wednesday afternoon. There were a dozen or more men and boys engaged in the cowardly business, but Tracy was the only person identified by the police and subsequently arrested. The complainant, White, deposed that the prisoner, with several others, came in front of his house and threw stones at the windows. He went out to get a pail of water from the pump, when Tracy assaulted him and threw stones at him. The accused made no defence. He was convicted and the Justice fined him $20, and in default of payment cimmitted [sic] him to jail for twenty-nine days.

PATROL.—It is understood that hereafter a portion of the "Odeon E. D. Home Guard" will patrol the streets nightly until further notice. This will enable the police to devote themselves in larger force to certain excited localities.

Brooklyn City News.
THURSDAY, JULY 23, 1863.
THE DRAFT EXEMPTION—PROCEEDINGS
OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN.
Contrary to general expectation, the Board of Aldermen last evening failed to take any decisive action on the proposition of the Mayor, in reference to the purchase of exemption from the draft. There was a great deal of discussion, and many conflicting propositions offered, when finally the whole subject was referred back to the special committee for further consideration.
It is to be regretted that considerations of political partisanship should have been introduced, and thus discussions incited, and expressions indulged in under the circumstances entirely uncalled for, and out of place, and preventing candid and unprejudiced action. We give in our report of the proceedings a very full sketch of the debate. To Ald. TAYLOR, of the 15th ward, pertains the credit of first introducing partizan, political considerations in the discussion of the question. This gentleman has never been noted in his public course for any great liberality of sentiment or discretion of action, and his course last evening, was but in keeping with his entire career. And the retort which was provoked from Ald. O'KEEFFE was much more violent than the provocation would justify. The dispassionate, conservative and patriotic view and sentiments of Alderman WALLACE, were as especially deserving of commendation as an example to his Republican colleagues, as were those of Ald. WHITNEY to his democratic brethren on the other side of the house.
The various Committees are to meet this afternoon, further to consider the question.—
Whatever may be the result of their action, we trust it will not be controlled by partizan considerations. If it shall be, the beneficial consequences anticipated to result from any such measure as has been contemplated, will be very much impaired, if not entirely destroyed. The raising of the money in the manner proposed, it must be remembered, will be an act outside of the law, and will require a very general assent on the part of the people to insure legislative endorsement. The tax-payers have ever shown themselves ready and willing to contribute liberally for the mitigation of the hardships which the events of the war have unavoidably imposed upon the people, yet it must be borne in mind that there is a limit to their liberality. And this limit will, in one view, have been exceeded, when it is proposed to tax them to pay for the exemption of every man drafted to supply the quota of Brooklyn.
The Mayor, in his suggestion that the proposed relief shall be confined only to cases where it is actually needed, and where in the event of the failure to extend it in that form, the city would certainly be called upon to supply it in some other, goes far enough, and it is that proposition, so far as we have been able to judge, which must receive the public approbation. If it shall be defeated, or the whole matter fall through, it will be to the extremes on both sides, that the people will be indebted—those on the side who are opposed to the draft in toto, because they desire to weaken the power of the government in the suppression of the rebellion, and those on the other, who, if their own ultra ideas are not carried into effect, would prefer that the rebellion shall be successful, and the Union dissolved. The debate in the Board of Aldermen last evening, demonstrates that much, at all events.

Brooklyn City News
THURSDAY, JULY 23, 1863.
THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS.
THE EXEMPTION FEES FOR THE DRAFTED
No Decided Action Taken in the Matter.
An adjourned meeting of the Board of Supervisors was held yesterday afternoon at the County Jail, Supervisor W. J. Osborne in the Chair.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved.

BILLS ORDERED PAID.
Mr. R. P. C. Varrick, $193 75; Jeremiah Lant, $3 67; E. W. Bloom, $18 00; Jas. M. Seabury, $405 50; Wm. Birrie, $37 40; Brooklyn Gas Light Co., $229 50; Brooklyn Standard, $61 15; C. Steers, $130 76; Kelsey & Loughlin, $1,957 64; Dayton and Carter, $31 57.

CAN'T COMPLETE THE CONTRACT.
A communication was received from Mr. Hannigan who contracted to complete the mason work of the new Court House, stating that since he made the contract, brick, and laborers wages had largely increased. Masons were then receiving $1 50 per day, and now they receive from 16 to 17 shillings. It was therefore impossible for him to complete the contract at the price first agreed upon, as he was not a man of fortune. He therefore asked to be relieved. Referred to commit

Brooklyn City News.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 1863.
THE DRAFT.
The question as to whether there will be any attempt at forcible resistance to the Draft, now it seems certain to be enforced, is being considerably discussed, and, as is natural, exciting a great deal of anxiety in the community. The belief which is generally entertained, and which the figures, as exposed by Gov. Seymour, would seem to warrant, that the enrollment has been prostituted for purposes of political advantage, has undoubtedly intensified the feeling against the Draft; but much, if not all cause of complaint on this ground, has been removed by the prompt action of the President in equalizing the quotas, as between the several Congressional Districts. The only real ground of complaint remaining, is that the measure is harsh and unnecessary, and, perhaps, unconstitutional. We say perhaps, because, as yet, no Court of competent jurisdiction has decided the Conscription law to be unconstitutional, and we know that eminent lawyers, whose devotion to the Democratic cause has never been questioned, and who are opposed to the law, do not hesitate to give it as their opinion that the law is constitutional.
Under these circumstances there is not the slightest reason for an apology, far much less a justification, of riotous resistance to the enforcement of the measure. Admit that it is a hardship, so are other incidents of the war, equally as great hardships, and yet who thinks of forcibly residing their imposition; and resort to mob law under any circumstances, can never be justifiable, and is sure to end in the disgrace and punishment of its aiders and abettors, as witness the recent mob in the city of New York and its consequences, not yet concluded. Believing this to be the overwhelming prevailing public sentiment, we have no fears that the enforcement of the draft will be resisted by any riotous demonstrations. That there are men in the community, and some of them of prominent position, whose bearing and habitual conversation is of a nature, whether intended or not, to excite their more ignorant and excitable fellow citizens by inflaming their passions to the commission of deeds of riot and outrage we have not the least doubt. We have even been informed that appeals to religious feelings have been resorted to, and the draft represented as being directed especially against those who belong to a particular religious denomination. But all such appeals, we believe, will fail to have the effect which those who indulge in them seem to have in view. The masses of the people we believe are too intelligent, too much devoted to the cause of law and order to be mislead by them.
We are no advocates, as our readers well know, for arbitrary arrests, but we must confess that the summary arrest and confinement of many of these inciters of mob violence, would be the very best disposition that for the sake of the peace of the community, could be made of them. Many are, for the most part, men who have never had any real sympathy with the cause of the Union, fellows who have gloried in the defeats of our armies, and mourned over their successes; in a word, traitors who desire the triumph of the rebellion, but who have neither the manliness nor the courage to take up arms in support of it.—These men oppose the draft and incite opposition to it, not because they care anything particularly about its hardships, but because they imagine that by such opposition they will weaken the military power of the nation, and destroy its power to suppress the armed treason. They glorify Gov. SEYMOUR, not because they fancy he can be used as an instrument for the achievement of their foul purpose; they would have crucified him a month ago for avowing himself in favor of prosecuting the war until peace was conquered and the Union was restored. They will be as much disappointed as to the present position of the Governor, as they have ever been disgusted at his patriotic devotion to his country.
We find in the World of this morning an article, on the subject of resisting the draft, from which we desire to extract. Inasmuch as the …
…tee on Court House.

THE WAGES OF CONVICTS.
Penitentiary Committee to whom was referred the resolution of the Board directing the Committee to ascertain if the County could not receive more wages for the male convicts, reported that they had had a conversation with the keeper, and found that there was no demand for the prisoners services, that farmers do not appear to desire their services only in cases of absolute necessity.
The Committee did not think it advisable to raise on the ammount [sic] now paid the men. The report was adopted.
On motion the Committee was discharged.
Of the Committee on Salaries, that the Deputy Keepers of the Penitentiary be paid $2 per day.
Sup. Driscoll moved, as an amendment, they be paid $2 25. Lost.

ANOTHER DRILL ROOM.
Captain Joseph T. Miller of Co. R, 70th Regi­ment, Duncan Light Artillary [sic], sent in a communi­cation asking the Board to lease the large room on the second floor of Schanaderbeck & Co's Malt house on Wycoff street for the purpose of an Armory. Referred to the Committee on Ar­mories.

THE $125,000 APPROPRIATION.
The Law Committee to whom was referred the resolution to appropriate $125,000, to be expended under the direction of the Board in procuring substitutes or in such other was as will protect and advance the interest of the citizens, reported that there was no legal authority conferred on the Board by any existing statute empowering them to appropriate the above mentioned sum to the purpose mentioned in the resolution—That this Board appropriate during the years of 1801 and '62 large sums without any legal authority to raise money at that time, for the payment of bounties of volunteers from this county in the services of the U. S. The report was adopted and the Committee were discharged.

THE APPROPRIATION FOR THE DRAFTED.
Superintendent Burns moved that the resolution which he offered at the last meeting of the Board, to the effect that a committee be appointed to make arrangements to procure a loan not exceding [sic] $200,000, to be used for the purpose of paying exemption fees of such persons as may be drafted under the recent Act of Congress, be taken from the table.
Superintendent Crook desired to have the resolution read the second time, that he might better understand it. After the reading, he said it was hardly worth while for the Committee to hurry over this matter, for they had a report now on the table showing that the Board had no power to borrow and appropriate money for such purposes. He should therefore oppose the resolution, and hoped the Board would not take any action in the matter at present.
Sup. Herman said there was no doubt out that the resolution was quite correct, but he would like to see the figures showing the number of volunteers which this country had furnished. He did not think our quota was as large as it had been made out and Kings county, if the facts were shown, had no deficiency to make up. He noticed that this county had been placed on an equality in the draft with other counties where the quota had not been filled. He rather thought we had been slightly imposed upon.
Sup. Talbot moved that the farther consideration of the matter be postponed till the next meeting of the Board.
Sup. Barnes said he hoped the Board would take up the matter and settle it at once. There had been money raised and appropriated to encourage enlistments and although not done legally had been legalized by the Legislature.
Sup. Crooke—he knew they had raised money in this way to encourage enlistments and he had voted in favor of it, but the Government wanted men immddiately [sic] at the time and they had no other way to obtain them. Some gentlemen came forward and contributed money out of their own private purses. He would do all he could to encourage enlistments and put men in the army but he would give no money to keep them out as this resolution proposed to do. This was not at all a patriotic purpose and was wrong. Last year their work was one of patriotism.
Sup. Canavello saw nothing wrong in the resolution of Supervisor of the 5th, and for his part would like to see the Board pass it.
Sup. Crooke said it would be entirely wrong for the Board to adopt such a resolution, and he should never lend his aid in helping to buy men out of the army.
Sup. Stilwell said he would like to see the resolution passed, not that it would particularly benefit Gravesend, for they might leave that out, but that it would be a relief to the poorer classes.
Sup. Driscoll said that where there were few poor and many rich, it made but little difference; but where there were many poor and few rich, the draft would not do well. He looked upon the resolution as a protection to the county, in this matter, for it not only kept the poor man at home, but placed him on an equality with the rich man. They ought, therefore, to try and borrow the money, not only $200,000, but double that amount, if necessary. If the Common Council should appropriate the amount which the Committee proposed, the sum then would not put them on an equality with New York.
Mayor Kalbfleisch stated that the special Committee and Board of Contracts had agreed to report in favor of raising one million of dollars. He did not agree with the Supervisor from Flatbush, that this was unpatriotic, and an attempt to keep the men out of the army. The Administration had asked for a man or $300, and was it not a thousand times better for us to give them $300, and let them obtain a good man, and one who could serve in the field, than to saddle them with a man who had no courage or wish to fight?
Sup. Burns sad that his Ward, (the 5th,) was mostly composed of the poorer classes, who felt this conscription most. They were unable to pay the $300 exemption fee. They had furnished their full quota of volunteers.
Sup. Crook said that the town of Flatbush, would guarantee, had furnished more men, in proportion, than the 5th Ward had.
Sup. Booth made a few remarks, in favor of the adoption of the resolution.
Sup. Blloom [sic] said when this war first broke out, it was the opinion that it would be suppressed in a short time. Time, however, had gone on, and large armies had been put in the field and wasted. Two years and more had passed, and still we were fighting. Now we had the Conscription Act to replenish the armies, and what had been the consequence, of the attempt to force it in New York? The city had been visited with riot and bloodshed. It was the poor and industrious classes who had filled the ranks of our armies, such as Sup. Burns, of the 5th, represented. But the only question now, was whether it would be better to wait the action of the City Counsil [sic] in this matter. He favored the adoption of the resolution.
A vote was then taken on the motion of Sup. Burns to take the resolution from the table.
Sup. Kirby in explanation of his vote said he was in favor of the resolution but feared by taking action, in the matter now, it might in some way conflict with the Committee appointed by the Common Council. He therefore voted nay.
The vote was—nays 15, ayes 9.
Sup. Bloom moved that a Committee of three be appointed to confer with the Board of Aldermen in the matter. Adopted.
The chair appointed as the Committee the following gentlemen:
Sups. Bloom, Driscoll and Talbot.
Sup. Stillwell moved that the Committee be instructed, if any money be raised they have the power to raise enough to pay the exemption of all the men drafted. Tabled.
On motion of Sup. McGrath, the Board adjourned to meet on Tuesday the 4th of August at 4 o'clock P. M.
Public meetings are being held to-day throughout Connecticut in relation to the conscription.

The Board of Aldermen and the Draft.
To the Editor of the Brooklyn City News:
SIR:—While a silent observer of the proceedings of the Board last night, I was astonished at the manner in which members acted upon the business before them.
The "lobby" members last night were composed of men who are not in the habit of attending political clubs and ward meetings. Many of our thoughtful and substantial citizens attended to see for the first time, the representatives of their property and the guardians of their lives. Our "servants" last night stood before their sovereigs [sic] for inspection. Many heard for the first time the voice of the man who had received their support at the ballot-box, and wondered at their choice.
The discussion was upon the recommendations of the Mayor with regard to exempting conscripts who would entail by their conscription a burthen upon society, and afford no substantial benefit to the national army, if conscripted.
The proposition was plain enough,—a man of ordinary conception could make up his mind upon it in five minutes—even the Aldermen of New York
World has the reputation of reflecting the Governor's sentiments, the article in question may be regarded as somewhat significant of his views on the question considered. After declaring that there is nothing in the conscription law to justify such resistance, and denouncing any such resort, and stating that "the proper course to be pursued during the enforcement of the conscription, is a wise and masterly inactivity," the articles conclude as follows:
"But with regard to the conscription, there is no ground for any other form of resistance than the prompt and fearless exposure of the unfairness and dishonesty which may accompany its execution, and testing its constitutionality in the courts. The natural effect of all the odious measures of the Administration, is to deepen the public disgust and hatred, and facilitate its final overthrow. A local disturbance in resisting the draft in New York, besides being wholly unjustifiable, would merely cause a useless effusion of blood. It would end where it began, with no other permanent consequence than the disgrace of all its abettors. It would give to the violators of the Constitution the advantage of playing the role of patrons and upholders of order, and furnish them with a plausible excuse for placing the military heel on the neck of the State. The opponents of the conscription, who are true lovers of their country, of liberty, and of law and order as well, must perpetrate no such folly."

The Brooklyn Daily Times.
The latest information by Telegraph, together with local incidents, will be found on the fourth page, Third Edition, issued at 4 1-2 o'clock P. M.
MONDAY EVEN'G, AUGUST 17, 1863.
Local Items.
The End of the Million Loan Project.
NO LOANS OFFERED.
SPECIAL MEETING OF THE COMMON COUNCIL CALLED.
The Common Council Committee met this morning at the Mayor's office to open the bids for the Conscription loan. The Mayor informed the Committee that there were no bids to open, none having been received. A quorum of the Joint Committee not being present no formal action could be taken, but it was understood that a special meeting of the Common Council should be called for Wednesday evening, to take action on this subject.

CORONER'S CASES.—On Sunday morning, between 2 and 3 o'clock, Stephen H. March, a man 54 years of age, residing at the house of Wm. Stevens, in Franklin, near Freeman street, Greenpoint, fell from a third story window and was instantly killed. Coroner Barrett held an inquest on the body, and the jury rendered a verdict in accordance with the facts in the case.
The body of Christopher McElligot, the boy who was drowned at the foot of North Second st. last week, was found in the dock at the foot of North Fourth street, on Saturday evening about 6 o'clock. It appears that deceased was thrown into the water by the breaking of a "guy" in use on the barge which was lying along side the wharf at the time; that when he rose to the surface the second time, he caught hold of the rudder of the barge with one hand, while he held his cap in the other, and shouted to fifteen men who stood on the dock "O, mister, O, mister! save me!" Although any one of the men could have saved the boy with the slightest effort, yet not one of them went an inch out of his way. The jury rendered a verdict of accidental drowning. Any one of the fifteen men referred to should have been sent to jail, or to some institution for the improvement of imbeciles.

RIOT IN THE FIFTEENTH WARD—ASSAULT UPON
A CLUB HOUSE—THE ASSAILANTS HATE A WHEELBARROW
FULL OF STONES.—At a late hour on Saturday night, some half-grown young men having resolved to make an assault upon the headquarters of the Ridgewood Base Ball Crab, No. 83 Wyckoff street, prepared themselves for the work by hauling up in front of the doomed place, a wheelbarrow filled with paving stones, when they began to pelt the ugly missiles; at the door and windows. Of course this proceeding could not be done in a corner, so there were numerous witnesses. When Capt. Mullin, and officers Voltz and Masters appeared upon the scene and dispersed the crowd before they had time to do much damage, and succeeded in arresting Edward Olive, Townsend King, and Wm. Robb, all of whom were taken before Justice Walter and charged with riotous conduct, although they were all very willing to swear that they had nothing to do with the riot. But the Justice would not permit such swearing, which circumstance was unfortunate to the extent of $10 each to Edward Olive and Townsend King. Wm. Robb was fined in $2.50. The party left court somewhat sheepish and a leetle short.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle.
TUESDAY EVENING, AUG. 18.
The Draft Here and Elsewhere.
The draft in New York commences to-morrow in this city, if nothing unforseen occurs, the wheel will be set in motion on Monday or Tuesday. The quota of Brooklyn is a little over 4,000. We assume that 6,000 names will be drawn, so as to allow for those physically unable to render military service. Brooklyn is divided into two districts, the number of men to be drawn is alike in each. Under the original apportionment twice as many men were required in one district as in the other. Thanks to Governor Seymour this has been remedied by the President directing that the average of the Republican districts should be the quota for the Democratic districts of this city and New York.
A meeting of the Common Council will be held to-morow [sic] evening to see what can be done towards raising the money to mitigate the severity of the law. It is said that the Mayor will recommend the raising of $300,000 to be used solely to pay the price of exemption in cases of peculiar hardship. It is to be regretted that a stronger effort was not made to effect an agreement between the representatives of the banks and the local authorities. The difference between the capitalists and the representatives of the city, we are inclined to believe, were on political rather than on financial grounds. The Government, as one of the bank Presidents stated, needed men; if the money is not to be used in furnishing them, we cannot, either as citizens or capitalists, see the propriety of raising it. There is no doubt but that a grave error was committed in failing to agree upon a plan of spending the money before going into the market to borrow. We have urged a plan on the local authorities, which we believe would have satisfied all parties—divested the law of all terrors, and secured for the army the willing hands it needs. It may not be too late yet to act upon the plan we have proposed, and we once more take the liberty of calling the attention of the Common Council to it. It is as
follows:—
Let the local authorities pay to every man drafted $300 if he chooses to go to the war. To him who elects to stay at home let $300 be paid to a substitute, whenever he provides one; or in the event of his not procuring a substitute, then $275 to be paid to the government, on condition that the conscript makes good the difference between this sum and the $300 which the government has fixed upon as the price of exemption. It will thus be made the interest of every man who can get a substitute to seek one, because in the event of his deciding not to go he will have to make good the difference between $275 and $300. We believe this plan will recommend itself, because—
First—It gives a bounty to every man who will go to the war, and thus secures men who are willing to go. And enables the volunteer to leave his family with the means of keeping the wolf from the door for six or eight months, by which time the war should, will, or ought to be ended.
Second—Because it makes it the interest of every man who does not desire to go, to procure a substitute, for if he fails to find one he is obliged to make good the difference between $275 and $300.
This plan will make every man who does not want to go a recruiting sergeant, and it will not bear with great severity on the poorer class, there being hardly any man so poor that he cannot raise $25 if he decide not to go. If there be any one who cannot raise by loan or otherwise $25, hardly any charge in life will be undesirable, and it cannot be a very great hardship under such circumstances to accept $300 in greenbacks and such remuneration as Uncle Sam offers. Our plan then is
$300 to those who go to the war.
$300 to those who secure substitutes.
$275 to the government for those who do not want to go, and who are willing to make good the difference between this sum and the price of exemption fixed by the government. If this plan were adopted Brooklyn could sup­ply her full quota, not of discontented conscripts, but of willing volunteers, men in most cases who have seen war; and are inured, to the hardships it imposes. If this plan be adopted we may dismiss at once all apprehension of trouble. For fear of a riot we have kept 3,000 militia under arms in this city for weeks, at a cost to the county of $3,000 or $4,000 per day. This drain on the resources of the county may continue for weeks, and the probabilities are that before the draft is completed, a sum equal to that which will at once put at rest apprehension of trouble will be eaten up. Mayor Kalbfleisch has been accustomed to carry things with a high hand about the City Hall. We assure him that in dealing with the public he cannot act "like a bull in a china shop." If he desires in good faith to relieve Brooklyn from the hardships which necessarily will attend conscription, he will listen to the voice of those who have no political purpose to subserve in the advocacy of this measure. Once more we call his attention to the necessity of devising a plan which will conciliate all parties; if necessary, the Mayor to do so, should for once yield something to the judgment of others.

The Feeling Among the People.
A day or two ago the following paragraph appeared in these columns:—
The New York News is publishing a series of articles which show that opposition to conscription is as bitter as ever, and that there is every prospect of a renewal of trouble with a renewal of the draft. From the course pursued by the journal in which those articles appear, the press and public are inclined to believe that the reporter gives what he wishes to hear rather than what he does hear. We have authority for the statement that the articles are furnished by a gentleman who in no way sympathizes with the course pursued by the News, and who is a prominent member of the party to which Mr. Lincoln owes his election. The reporter is prepared to substantiate all these articles contain, and he finds his justification in publishing them in the fact that it must be ultimately an advantage to the government to ascertain the feelings of the people.
To this the reporter of the N. Y. Daily News replies as follows:
Several papers, among them the BROOKLYN EAGLE, have seen fit to ignore the significance of the feeling among the people, which is so thoroughly proven in these articles, giving as a reason that they supposed the reporter looked only for that which he desired to find, and necessarily found a state of affairs which coincided with his own views. The EAGLE, we are pleased to note, indirectly apologises [sic] for the suspicion, and sets all things right, by quoting the tenor of the editorial "appeal" which appeared in the News on Tuesday last.
The fact is, and it may as well be stated now as at any other time, that when the writer of these articles undertook their preparation, he did so with the distinct understanding, that the truth and nothing but the truth was to be given, and that whichever way the popular mind was found to be inclining, it should be clearly and unmistakeably [sic] indicated in these columns. With the firmest belief in the general acquiescence of the laboring classes in the proceedings of the Government, and convinced that an investigation would find the vast preponderance of sentiment on the side of our rulers, we proceeded with the task.
One day's experience settled the question with us; one day's experience will convince any fair minded man as it did us, that the people as a whole, rich and poor, great and small, merchants and laborers, disapprove of the terms of the Conscription Act, do not regard it as wise or just, and would gladly have it got rid of "in some way or other." What the feeling will be now that our City Fathers have heeded the popular command, and are trying to provide a pecuniary and substantial way of escape from the draft to come, we cannot say, but presume the arrangement will be satisfactory and efficacious.
In the meantime, however, and while as yet the sore remains unhealed, the most unhealthy symptoms of trouble and disorder are apparent. The very mention of the word "Draft" suffices to darken the honest features of the laborer, and draw a scowl of displeasure over the face of the poor man's wife. They regard it as the exponent of death and poverty; as the standard of a moral foe. The draft is but a measure of the Administration, therefore they visit their indignation upon the present occupants of high places; the Administration is considered the head arid front of the Republican party, therefore they denounce in unmeasured terms every man or set of men connected with the "infernal Black Republicans." Bad blood is being engendered; trouble is brewing in the minds of a class who fly like a flash from a thought to a word, from the word to a blow. These people cannot be crushed. "Crush the mob," was the very significant and powerful heading to an able leader in the Times during the reign of terror in our midst one full moon ago; but ''Crush the mob" did not refer to the people whom we have seen—rather to the vagabonds and cutthroats from Boston and Philadelphia, who, regardless of our fair name, and anxious only to swell their purses, hit right hand and left, at once threatening Republicans and Democrats, the rich  or great, whomsoever they might be.
These people are not the "mob," they are the hardworking men who are called at mass meetings "fellow-citizens," are courteously saluted on election days, are cajoled and flattered by demagogues and politicians; they are the great substratum of power, the foundation rock on which is builded this temple, and they are determined now, as they elected years ago, that it shall be indeed the Temple of Liberty, the home of freemen and freedom.
Almost without an exception the laborers, the working people of this and the adjacent cities are Peace-men; that is they are opposed to the further prolongation of the war. Whether they are right or not in this it is not our province to discuss. The fact we relate as obtained from observation. An hour's talk with these people would not deserve verbatim reporting; twenty sentences would easily give a comprehensive summary of all that was said. We have had many such during the past week, and in nineteen cases out of twenty, before the conversation closed, the party would give it as his opinion that the war had existed long enough, that peace might now honorably be made, and that beyond a doubt the South would be only too glad of the opportunity to stop the quarrel.

Brooklyn City News.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 1863.
THE DRAFT--WHAT SHALL BE DONE?
That the draft will commence in this city some time during the ensuing week, there seems now to be no reason to doubt. The refusal of the City Banks, and other capitalists, to accept the loan of $1,000,000 authorized by the Common Council, of course puts an end to any idea of providing for a mitigation of the rigors of the draft through any such action. The Common Council, therefore, as we stated yesterday, have been called together by the Mayor to take such action in the premises as may be deemed advisable to attain the end in view.
The ordinance for raising $3,000,000, adopted by the New York Common Council, has by some been looked to as offering a precedent for the action of our Board of Aldermen, but it would seem that it has not met with the general favor which the unanimous vote it received had induced people to suppose it would. Mayor OPDYKE, up to this time, hesitates to approve of it, and it is apprehended that it will in the end receive his veto. And, under circumstances, it is considered to be exceedingly doubtful, if the Board should adopt the ordinance notwithstanding his veto, and it should become a law, whether capitalists would be willing to furnish the money.
In order to be of any avail, whatever new action our municipal authorities may decide to take, must be taken at once. There is no time for extended discussion or elaborate investigation, for the draft is upon us. The main objections to the resolutions of the Board of Aldermen are that its effect is to deprive the government of soldiers, and also that a million of dollars is too exhorbitant a sum for our tax-payers to be called upon to sustain. These facts, and the additional one that there was no legal authority for the loan, restrained the Banks and Capitalists from offering their money. The proposition which seems to have been received with most favor is that originally made by the Mayor, in his message of the 20th of July, and we believe if the Common Council should adopt it, perhaps with some modifications, having in view the offering of bounties for the encouragement of volunteering, the object desired would at once be secured.
The Mayor's proposition, it will be remembered, does not propose the raising of money sufficient to purchase the exemption of all who may be drafted, as it is contended is the effect of the Aldermen's resolutions. His idea is that in cases where a drafted man is in such pecuniary circumstances that to put him in the army, would be to leave his family dependent upon public or private charity for support, it would be an act of public economy, leaving out of view all other considerations, for the city to purchase his exemption, and thus keep him at home to take care, himself, of those dependent on him for support. All others, who do not come within that category, he proposes to leave, to go into the army if they are unable to procure substitutes, or, if they have the means, and desire so to do, to purchase their exemption. To accomplish this purpose, it is estimated the sum of $300,000 will be sufficient.
The plan of the Mayor will not satisfy all, but it seems to be about the best that can be adopted with any prospect of its meeting with success. The amount of money which it is proposed to raise, will not be deemed so great as to be felt as a serious burthen by the taxpayers, and the Banks will not be apt to regard the risk as too heavy for them to incur.

Brooklyn City News.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 1863.
THE DRAFT.--ACTION OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN.
The Board of Aldermen last evening, by a unanimous vote, resolved to authorize the raising of the sum of $500,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, to be appropriated, to use the current phrase, "for the mitigation of the hardships of the draft." The money is authorized to be borrowed in pursuance of the power and authority vested in the Common Council under the law of the last session of the Legislature, heretofore published in these columns, and is to be disbursed for the "relief of families of persons who may be drafted into the military service of the United States." It is provided also that committees shall be appointed for the Western and Eastern Districts of the city, whose duty it shall be when the drafting is commenced here, to meet daily to hear applications for relief, and to report to the Common Council what measure of relief shall be granted them. If that body, who are to meet daily, shall by the vote of a majority of all the members elected, adopt such report, then it shall take effect immediately. Parties are to be allowed, at their option, to accept a sum in gross or a weekly allowance from the relief fund. The cases of firemen are to be especially considered as entitled to favor.
The resolutions which purpose this action, and which were offered by Alderman Strong, embrace substantially the proposition suggested by him and rejected when the subject was before under consideration in the Board. They do not go as far in the extent of the relief to be afforded as many would desire, but so far as it goes, it is believed to have the sanction of law, and the resolutions are more likely, therefore, to become effective. The idea, as we understand it is, that after a man shall be drafted and he shall apply for relief to the Committees, his circumstances shall be thoroughly inquired into, and the measure of relief awarded accordingly. If he desires to purchase his exemption, or furnish a substitute, and has a portion of the money necessary, the Committee are at liberty to recommend that the city shall furnish him the balance. Or if he is unable to raise any portion of the amount, they may, if they think his case is a proper one for such relief, recommend that he be furnished with the whole amount of $300. Or if the drafted man shall elect to enter the service, and he has a family dependent solely upon him for support, then the Committee, may as he may elect, award him either $300 in gross, or a weekly allowance amounting in the aggregate to that sum, for the relief of his family.
The plan adopted, it will be seen, attempts to keep the action of the Common Council strictly within the requirements of the law of the last session of the Legislature, which only authorizes relief to be extended to the families of indigent soldiers. No provision is made for the cases of those who have the means themselves to support their families in their absence, or to purchase exemptions, or to hire substitutes, or for those single men who have no families depending on them for support. Firemen, only, are excepted from the operation of this rule. The operation of the plan promises to be, therefore, to afford every possible aid in the furnishing of men for the armies, and at the same time, to extend every possible relief for those whose pecuniary circumstances are such as to prevent them from relieving themselves.
Viewing it in this light, we do not see why it should not be received with general favor, by all parties. It is, in fact, a compromise between the two extremes—those who would exempt all, and those who would exempt none. It having, also, the sanction of law, and being in this accord with the. general popular sentiment, the Banks, we have no doubt, will promptly furnish the $500,000, or "so much thereof as may be needed." We hope, at all events, that such may be the result.

Brooklyn City News.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 1863.
The Draft—Meeting in the Eastern District.
A meeting of the Eastern District Aldermanic Committee on the draft, held last evening for the purpose of considering the manner in which relief should be extended, the following resolutions were offered:
Resolved, that in the distribution of the relief fund, the prime object to the draft in view should be the furnishing of men to the Government—that in every instance of an application for relief a full, and personal examination and inquiry should be made into all the circumstances thereof—that an the performance of this duty the Committee would call to its aid an associate Committee of well known citizens, and no recommendation of relief should be reported to the Common Council without the concurrence of such associate Committee;—and further that in no case whatever should any relief be granted unless the drafted man or his substitute be accepted by the United States and actually mustered into the service, and at the same time be in need of and worthy of such relief.
It was also resolved that due care should be had to secure the dispensation of such relief as might be granted in such manner as would be most beneficial to the families themselves.
Another meeting of the Committee is to be held as soon as the Mayor shall have approved of the appropriation when the associate Committee shall be selected and the arrangements completed.

Affairs at the Navy Yard.
DEPARTURE OF THE FLEET FOR CHARLESTON.
Since the attack on Charleston commenced, the number of vessels dispatched from our Navy Yard with ammunition, stores and provisions, has been almost as great as that sent to all the other squadrons together during the same time. In addition to the ships reported as having left within the last week, three more left yesterday, at 1 o'clock, the U. S. steamer Aries filled with stores, provisions and necessaries for a cruise on active service; the Adams Express Company steamer Mary Sanford and the schooner Alethea; the two last named were loaded with ice, lemons, potatoes and other delicacies for the sailors of the fleet. The Mary Sanford had no less than 250 tons of ice, and the schooner about 50 tons more. Beside, another vessel left a few days ago with another large cargo of the same valuable commodity; and in a few days more still another is to depart similarly loaded. The care of the Navy Department for the crews of the ships now engaged in the attack is so ample that even the scuttle buts in which water for ordinary drinking is kept, are provided with a fair share of ice—a circumstance unparalleled in the history of the Navy of the United States.

THE HOME IN COMMISSION.
Yesterday at noon the United States steamer Home was put formally in commission and received her officers and crew. Lieut. Commander Fillebronne, in turning over the ship to her officers, made a brief but eloquent speech on the benevolence of the Navy in thus providing so great a luxury as a "maritime boudoir" for its public service. As soon as the officers and crew were mustered, orders were given to get up steam and prepare the vessel immediately for her departure, as she is very much needed at Charleston. We described the Home minutely on Tuesday when she was purchased. She will sail to-day at three o'clock for the nearest rendezvous to the attacking squadron. The following is a list of the officers:
Acting Master Commanding, W. H. Garfield; Acting Assistant Paymaster, T. W. Burger; Acting Engigns [sic], A. E. Barnett, J. E. Stickney and W. Shackford; Acting Masters Mates, J. H. Gould, F. K. S. Nye and E. H. Monroe; Engineers, Acting First Assistant, B. S. Danton; Acting Second Assistant, C. Drandreau; Acting Third Assistants, P. Dandreau, C. K. Roelker and T. W. Dee.

UNPRECEDENTED RUSH OF BUSINESS AT THE NAVY YARD.
At no time since the war began, or ever before were the authorities of the Brooklyn Navy Yard so hard pressed with work as just now.
The mechanics in all the departments are kept constantly busy both day and night.
At night time the Yard is almost as noisy as in the day. The echoes of hammering, sawing, testing engines, &c., keep people in the vicinity of the Yard continually awake. The attack on Charleston has added, in a very great measure, to this extreme hurry. Almost every day, besides the ordinary business of discharging schooners and other small vessels, laden with provisions, ammunition, &c., and besides attending to the six or seven new men-of-war in course of construction, vessels have to be equipped at the shortest possible notice and dispatched to sea in perfect trim, although the time sometimes given for the execution of the work renders it perfectly impossible to do it as it should be done.
There were until yesterday the iron-clad Lehigh, the steamer Home, the Mary Sandford, the schooner Alethea, the steamship Relife, the steamer Ariel, and the new steamtug Ajax—all at the very same time, employing a large number of hands, and requiring incessant and unremitting toil. The U. S. steamer Mackinaw was also fitted out and dispatched within the last three days, and sailed yesterday in tow of the steamtug Governor to receive her machinery. The clerical department is worked to a great extent beyond the usual business, although no additional hands have been given by the Government. The copying, registering, and issuing of general orders daily, copying of requisitions for every ship at the station, as the case may be, and a variety of other writing to be done, is so heavy that the clerks have sometimes within the past week become exhausted with work. Colonel Willett, Secretary of the Admiral, Mr. Chas. Morse, and Mr. Willett, Jr., are the only employees provided for the execution of the arduous duties in the Commandant's office.

THE U. S. STEAMER ALABAMA.
Orders have been received from the Secretary of the Navy to discharge such of the crew of this vessel, which is now lying in Quarantine with the yellow fever on board, as are convalescent, and who have not more than four months to serve.—The remaining part of the crew is to be allowed on shore for such period of liberty as their commanding officer may see fit to give. At the expiration of their liberty they are to be transferred to the receiving-ship North Carolina. Several deaths have occurred since her arrival here, but the number is daily diminishing. The U. S. steamer Magnolia is still tending the Alabama.

The Trades.
MEETING OF THE CARPENTERS.
A meeting of the Society known as the Carpenters of Brooklyn, was held on Thursday last at their meeting rooms No. 22 Court street, the President, Mr. Malvana, in the chair, Mr. Brophy, Secretary. The minutes of the previous meeting were then read and approved, and several new members were elected, when Mr. Walsh, from the committee on printing, read his report, which was approved and the bills ordered paid.
Some applications for men were then made by several of the members who were directed to do so by their employers,
The president then read the following resolutions, and urged their adoption as being conducive to the general welfare of the society, and to enable him to conduct the business in a more parlimentary [sic] manner:
Resolved, That no brother shall be allowed to occupy the floor more than ten minutes at a time, nor shall he be allowed to speak twice on the same question until every other brother who wishes to speak shall have done so.
Resolved, That on and after this date, after the meeting is called to order, no brother be allowed to approach the chair to hold verbal intercourse with the President, unless the Sergeant-at-Arms. Brothers having questions to ask must do it in writing, and receive an answer in the same way.
The resolutions were adopted.
Quite a debate then sprung up on the propriety of making a secret society of the organization, it being considered necessary to have some sign by which the members may know each other. Nothing more than a pass word is contemplated, which it was decided to have. After some other business the meeting adjourned to meet again on Thursday evening.
Mr. Murphy moved the getting up of books for the purpose of taking down the lists of such members as might be out of employment; but Mr. Buxton amended it by substituting the putting up of a bulletin in the place of meeting, so as to induce the young men to attend the meetings more regularly. After a short debate, in which Messrs. Fromme and Murphy participated, Mr. Hazard moved to lay the matter over for a week, which was carried.
The meeting then adjourned.

Brooklyn City News.
MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 1863.  
A NEW EXPEDITION.
It is stated, and on pretty good authority, that the concentration of troops now being made in and about the city of New York, at the rate of half-dozen regiments a day, though ostensibly intended to overawe any idea of a resort to mob violence to resist the draft, is in reality intended for another purpose. They are intended for an expedition to Texas, and are to embark in transports from this harbor directly for the coast of that State, in sufficient force to occupy all of its sea ports, and destroy or drive out from its broad territory the rebel forces under MAGRUDER, supposed to be not more than some 12,000 strong. Gen. HOOKER, it is rumored, is to have command of this new expedition, which is to sail in twenty or thirty days at furthest. It is for this reason, probably, that the draft is being hurried up with the rapidity with which it is, so that the matter may have been got through with ere the time shall arrive for the departure of the expedition.
This new movement has been prompted, it is said, by the apprehensions of the Government of an intended demonstration by the French upon Texas, with a view of claiming it as a part of the new Mexican empire, and with a view of being prepared to resist it in season. The troops who are to form the expeditionary corps are all of them tried veterans, and the French, should they have the presumption to attempt to meet them will find hard customers to deal with. They will find a vast difference between an encounter with these tried soldiers, and the effeminate greasers over whom they have recently triumphed in Mexico.

THE EVENING EXPRESS.
The City and Vicinity.
Incidents of the Draft in the Towns.
The Drafting process yesterday caused some curious results. In some cases large families escaped entirely, while in others every person liable was drawn. Some of these will be cases of especial hardship.
In Clarkson the Supervisor, Post Master, and a Clergyman were drafted. While the draft was being made. The Supervisor came rushing into the office in great haste, saying that he had some interest in that draft. A moment more his name was drawn and his interest in the draft considerably increased. The cheers outside among the Clarkson men attested his popularity at home.
In Sweden, two colored men were drafted; one of them, having only one eye, will probably escape. The other will stand his chances with the remainder of the conscripted. There are probably other colored soldiers among the drafted, but we do not know their names.
John W. Starr, recently murdered in Mendon, was among the names drawn from the wheel. George A. Newcomb, who attempted suicide in Pittsford two or three weeks since, was also drawn. He is still living, but is scarcely expected to recover, as his throat was cut so that he can take little if any nourishment. Albert M. Paddock, also drafted from the same town, is also lying very sick from consumption and is not expected to live.
"Andrew Jackson," was drawn in Henrietta, and the announcement was greated [sic] with applause. He is a democrat, and we believe of the War school,—now at least, if not before.
In Churchville, Mr. Lounsbury, pastor of one of the Churches, was drawn. He is only about twenty-one years old and has just settled as pastor over the Church. The Church and society is not large and cannot afford to pay the commutation. One gentleman said that though not a member of the Church, his wife attended Mr. Lounsbury's preaching, and he would give twenty dollars to exempt him.
Among the drafted from Greece, yesterday, was Daniel T. Hunt, the Postmaster and telegraph operator. In Penfield, Castle A. Stephenson, late of the 108th Regiment, was drawn. He fought bravely at Antietam, and would be in the service now if he had not been discharged on account of ill health. He can not, probably, pass examination.
Among the drafted in Brighton is Isaac Miller, who fled to Canada last fall, a refugee from the anticipated draft. Finding that no draft was made, he returned this spring just in time to have his name enrolled, and it was drawn among the conscripted on Friday. Another brother also drafted is said to have lately taken up his residence in Canada.
In the town of Clarendon, Gustavus A. St. John, drafted next to the last one, went to Canada to avoid the draft. He has been gone about six weeks, but did not escape soon enough to avoid being enrolled.
Several clergymen are drafted to-day. Among them are reported three pastors of churches in Clarendon.
In some of the towns many of the worst "Copperheads" were drawn and their names were greeted with applause. In almost every case there was something connected with the name or circumstances of the conscript, to cause an excitement among his immediate friends and neighbors on the announcement of the name.
We learn that some of the conscripted are running away to release themselves from their new obligations to "Uncle Sam." This is not only wrong but foolish, as those thus running away will be considered deserters, and will be liable to be treated as such, in case they are ever caught. Their obligation will continue even after the war, and if at any future time they shall be taken within the United States lines, they will be tried and shot as deserters. If the Canadas should ever be annexed to the United States, it would be incumbent on the refugees from the draft to again make their escape to some other country. It is a question, aside from the disgrace of fleeing from the draft, whether any man can subject himself to such contingences in the future.
In some towns foreigners who have claimed to be citizens and have voted as such, now claim their exemption as aliens. Such persons subject themselves to the severest punishment for illegal and fraudulent voting, it they should succeed in establishing their claim.
Among all the hardships of the draft, there is one class who do not complain, and they are those whose relatives and friends are now in the service. The fathers, mothers and sisters of the volunteers are universally anxious that the draft should go on, in order that the rebellion may be speedily subdued and their sons and brothers may come home. Whatever hardships the draft may produce, there is none which is equal to the wrong of refusing to reinforce the soldiers in the field.
This morning Conductor Bromley's train on the Falls Road numbered ten cars, seven of which were Orleans county men, principally from Medina, Albion and Holley. Four of the cars were "box cars," ordinary passenger cars being scarce, but Conductor B. would not pass the Stations without taking all the passengers, and took the only available means of bringing them. They are interested in the turning of the wheel of fortune. About six hundred are entitled to a "suit of blue."

AFFAIRS IN BROOKLYN.
The city continues quiet and there is no apprehension that the peace of the community will in any way be disturbed—the draft having been suspended for the present, there can be no pretext whatever for inaugurating scenes of disorder.
The exempt members of the different regiments now absent have effected organizations, and the Arsenal and City Armory are guarded night and day.
The Mayor was requested by prominent citizens to call a public meeting, but in consequence of the present excitable state of the public mind, it was deemed advisable not to do so.
The Sheriff of Kings County has issued the following appeal to the citizens:
The undersigned, sheriff of the County of Kings, congratulates the inhabitants of said county upon the peace and good order which have been hitherto maintained in their midst, notwithstanding the violence and excitement prevalent in the adjoining city. He earnestly exhorts all citizens to render prompt and entire obedience to the law, and to abstain from all acts, assemblages and words tending to any breach of the peace; and he suggests that all citizens may render essential service in the maintenance of law and order by enrolling themselves in companies, and designating proper persons for the purpose of communicating with the undersigned, that in case of violence they may be forthwith summoned as a posse in aid of the authorities in maintaining good order. He suggests that the station houses of the police in the various precincts are convenient and proper places for such enrollment, and that the police will extend all reasonable facilities for such purpose.
ANTHONY F. CAMPBELL, Sheriff.
DATED BROOKLYN, July 15, 1863.
Several persons were brought before Justice Perry yesterday on the charge of stealing from Brooks Brothers clothing store in New York during the sacking of that establishment on Tuesday. They were arrested at Catharine Ferry, having in their possession bundles of clothing, consisting of coats pants, vests, collars, boxes of buttons, thread and trimmings, amounting in value to about $150. The accused gave their names as Ann Moore, Thomas Smith, Anthony Smith and Richard Balensburg. Mr. Brooks was sent for, and identified the goods, and the parties were committed to jail for further examination.

EXCITEMENT IN JAMAICA—A NUMBER OF STORES ROBBED.
The disorderly spirit originating in New York spread to the village of Jamaica in Queens County, and has resulted in the sacking of several stores. It appears that on Tuesday about one thousand men appeared in the streets, and after sacking the provost marshal's office, attacked the stores and helped themselves to such things as they wanted. The rioters were nearly all strangers. There was scarcely a familiar face to the old residents among them. There being no force to preserve order, the mob had it their own way. A meeting of citizens was promptly called and several companies were organized. Mr. Aaron A. Degraw was delegated to go to
New York for arms, which he succeeded in obtaining. A sufficient number of muskets to arm the law abiding citizens were sent out yesterday morning. They now deem themselves amply prepared for any emergency. The rioters impressed a number of unwilling citizens into their ranks as they marched along, but all such got out of the way as soon as they could. The citizens promise all fellows a warm reception should they again make their appearance.
Sixty cases of uniforms were in the marshal's office; of these about thirty cases were heaped into the streets and set on fire. The uniforms and accoutrements which were saved, were brought to the navy Yard last night for safe keeping.

BROOKLYN.
Brooklyn Common Council.
APPROPRIATION OF ONE MILLION OF DOLLARS TO
EXEMPT POOR MEN FROM THE DRAFT.
The Brooklyn Common Council held a regular meeting last evening, President O'Keefe in the chair.
The special business in order being the report of the Committee in favor of appropriating one million dollars to mitigate the rigors of the draft, the subject was brought up, when Ald. Ternan submitted the following additional report:
To the Honorable the Common Council:
The Special Committee of your Board to whom was referred back the report and resolutions offered by them at a previous meeting, relative to the subject matter embraced in the message of the Mayor of the 20th inst., beg leave respectfully to report, that they have carefully reconsidered their former report and the resolutions offered by them In connection therewith, and find no reason for altering the same, as in their opinion they amply provide for all contingencies that may arise in the carrying into effect the subject matter as contemplated in the message. They submit, however, the following resolutions in addition to those already submitted, believing their adoption to be for the interests of the city and a protection against supplying an undue number of conscripts under the law.
Resolved, That a committee of five, to consist of His Honor the Mayor, the President of the Board, and three other members of this Board to be named by the President, be appointed, whose duty it shall be to confer (in conjunction with other municipalities should they deem fit) with the State and General Governments, and particularly to urge upon the latter the wisdom and expediency of suspending the draft, to allow the proper number of men from each county to be raised by them as volunteers to be ascertained, and also the justice of giving full credit to the City of Brooklyn for all the men furnished in both army and navy.
Resolved, That the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars be appropriated to defray the expenses of said committee, such sum to be expended solely under the direction of the Mayor.
The following minority report on the same subject was presented and read by the Clerk:
The undersigned, a minority of the Committee to whom, on the twentieth of July, inst., was referred the message of His Honor The Mayor, upon the subject of the payment of exemptions from the draft, report, that they have given the matter careful consideration, and that they have arrived at the conclusion that the city, ought to take such action in the premises, as will tend to alleviate the hardships of the draft, but at the same time throw no impediments in the way of the speedy and successful termination of the war.
At the present auspicious moment, there is little doubt but that the prompt filling of the ranks of our depleted armies would enable the General Government to achieve such immediate success as would bring an early and honorable peace; which, on the other hand, if re-enforcements are slow and tardy, the war, with all its attendant evils, will continue to drag along for an indefinite length of time, without any decisive result. Patriotism, harmony, and self-interest, all prompt us to do everything in our power to aid the Government in now, and at once, crushing the Rebellion. We believe that, however patriotic and praiseworthy may be the intention of those who advocate that the city should pay the exemption of all who are drafted, the practical result of such a course would be to deprive the Government of what it most needs, men.
If the Army of the Potomac, for the lack of reinforcements [sic] , should be defeated, we could never forgive ourselves that we had placed obstacles in the way of filling up its decimated ranks. But while we object to a wholesale appropriation for the purpose of keeping men at home, we would be liberal and generous toward those who for any cause are unable to go but who desire to furnish substitutes to go for them. It is certainly no more than the duty of the public to see that those who fight its battles receive some reasonable compensation for their services and sacrifices, and that their families are provided for during their absence. We respectfully recommend the adoption of the following resolutions:
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be and they are hereby authorized and directed to borrow upon the faith of the city a sum not exceeding one million dollars, payable with interest not exceeding 7 per cent. per annum in one year from date and issue certificates of indebtedness therefor, and out of the avails thereof to pay the sum of $300 to each man residing in the city of Brooklyn who shall be drafted into the service of the United States under the laws thereof and who shall be actually accepted and mustered into the service or who shall procure an accepted substitued [sic] as by law empowered.
Resolved, In lieu of $300 at the option of the drafted man, to provide for his family during his absence by giving his wife a weekly allowance, and also every child under 14 years of age, a certain amount per week.
Resolved, That $300 be paid to every drafted man who is unable to pay himself, or to furnish a substitute, and whose family is entirely dependent upon him for support.
J. OAKLEY NODYNE,
TIMOTHY PERRY, }Committee.

Alderman Strong offered the following as a substitute to the original resolutions:
Resolved, That the life of our nation is of paramount importance, before which the lives and property and sufferings of individuals sink into insignificance; that to sustain our Government effectually, willingly, cheerfully, is our first our highest duty, and that duty can be best performed at, the present crisis by filling up the ranks of our armies in the field.
Resolved, That it is our duty as far as lies in our power, to mitigate the hardships that are likely to attend the enforcement of the Conscription Law, and for that purpose we hereby appropriate and agree to raise a sum not exceeding halt a million of dollars.
Resolved, That a select committee of five for each district (Eastern and Western) be appointed, whose duty it shall be, as soon as the drafting shall be commenced in this city, to meet daily in their respective districts at some convenient and proper place and time, and hear and inquire into all applications for relief by persons ordered into the military service of the United States, and report to the Common Council what relief, if any, ought to be extended, which, when approved of by a majority of all the members elected, shall take effect immediately, and for the purpose of acting on such reports the Common Council will meet daily at 9 o'clock A. M., until all necessity therefor shall have ceased.
Resolved, That the financial officers of this city, the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, be and hereby are authorized and directed to borrow, provide and raise and disburse the moneys hereinbefore mentioned and referred to, subject however, to the provisions herein contained.
There was a good deal of discussion upon the reports, and finally Alderman Strong's resolutions being put to vote separately, they were lost by the uniform vote of 7 ayes to 10 nays.
The minority report was then put to vote, and lost by 4 ayes to 13 nays.
The majority report being brought up (that appropriating one million of dollars to exempt all persons from the draft), being put, was carried by a vote of 10 to 7 as follows:
Ayes.--Alderman Whitney, McLaughlin, New, man, Saal and Kalbfleisch.
Nays.--Alderman Belknap, Nodyne, Kemball, Strong, Taylor, Perry and Fisher.
The vote is a strictly party one--the Democrats voting in the affirmative and the Republicans in the negative. Alderman Wallace (Republican) and Talmage (Democrat) were absent.
The supplementary report of the Special Committee was adopted by the same vote, 10 to 7.

WAS THERE A RIOT IN BROOKLYN?
Claims Against the City for the Property Destroyed at the Atlantic Docks.
We referred in the EAGLE A few days ago to the mischievous effects of circulating rumors that there were organizations in this city to resist the authorities and create a riot. One of the results we predicted has been realized. The owners of the property recently destroyed at the Atlantic Docks have presented claims against the city for indemnity for their losses. The fire occurred on the night of Wednesday the 15th of July, the third and last day of the riots in New York. Two grain elevators, a boat, the pier, a quantity of machinery, grain, etc., were destroyed. The fire was a deliberate act of incendiarism, but there is no evidence whatever to substantiate the assertion that there was a riot. The city is not responsible for damage done by incendiaries, whether the fire be the work of one man or fifty. Had there been no riot in the city of New York, no one would have dreamt of making the assertion that this act constituted a riot. There was no disorderly gathering, no defiance of the authorities; no act whatever that comes under the designation of riotous proceedings, and there is no reason why the city should be called upon to pay in the neighborhood of a hundred and fifty thousand dollars, to save the insurance companies. If these claims are sustained then the city may hereafter be compelled to make good all the losses by incendiarism when it can be shown that three persons were in the vicinity when the act was committed. Three persons can make a riot, but it does not follow that every unlawful act in which three persons may participate is a riot. There must be a "tumultous [sic] disturbance of the peace," a disorderly demonstration to make their proceedings come under the legal definition of the term riot. The city authorities will of course refuse to entertain these claims and defend the city in any legal action which may be brought by the claimants. We append a copy of the claims which were filed in the Comptroller's office this morning.

SMITH FANCHER AND CO.'S CLAIM.
NEW YORK, July, 1863.
THE CITY or BROOKLYN to Andrew Luke, George D. Puffer, Charles D. Puffer, Robert Murray Whiting, David Frost, William H. Rynus, Thaddeus F. Ogg, Henry Fielding, Smith Fancher, and James McChesney debtor for the following property destroyed in consequence of a mob or riot in the city of Brooklyn on the 15th day of July 1863, and the damages sustained by them by reason thereof:
A building on middle pier at the Atlantic Dock
in the city of Brooklyn $36,000
The following articles of personal property then being inside in said building, and machinery in fixtures attached thereto, namely;
Machinery                    20,000
Engine and Boiler        16,000
Iron spouting                 4,000
Millwright work          12,000
28 coil iron copper wire 3,600
110 tons of coal at       $8 830
1 ton Manilla rope           260
Hardware                      1,000
300 feet rubber belting 1,004
200 gallons oil                 250
4 tons grate bars              480
Oakland ash timber        700
Office furniture              100
Copper steam pipes     2,000
50 kegs cut nails            350
5 large tin oil cans           90
1 large force pump        420
1 cylinder and frame for engine 1,600
A quantity of tools        550
3 platform scales.          300
200 feet of hose.           210
2800 bushels wheat at $1.65     3,795
1000      "      corn     " 00.80       800
                                 $106,399     
Interest on amount
To the Comptroller of the City of Brooklyn:
Sir—You are hereby authorized to pay the amount of the above to J. W. Gilbert our attorney, and his receipt will be a voucher for the same.
For the claimants above named,
ANDREW LUKE.

CLAIM OF THE ATLANTIC DOCK COMPANY.
The Atlantic Dock Company, through its Secretary, Mr. John McCormick, presents the following bill for property destroyed by the fire on the same occasion.
Steam dredging boat Oneida                         $9,000
Mud scows attached to side of dock               2,000
Burning of Middle Pier, Atlantic Dock,         2,500
Loss through destruction of dredging machines
and pier,                                                          6,000
Total                                                            $19,500
In addition to these there will probably be a claim from Mr. Wm. B. Barber, who owned the floating elevator also destroyed by fire on this occasion. His loss was estimated at the time of the fire at $25,000, so that the total will foot up over $150,000.

BROOKLYN NEWS.
The Brooklyn Common Council.
MEETING IN RELATION TO THE DRAFT—APPROPRIATION
OF $500,000 TO RELIEVE CONSCRIPTS.
The Board held a special meeting last evening to take action in relation to the draft, with the view of perfecting measures to relieve poor men with large families.
The former action of the Board in voting one million dollars for the same purpose having proved inoperative, in consequence of the strict party vote by which it was passed, it became necessary to call a special meeting and adopt new measures which would meet the approval of all parties.
Alderman O'Keeffe, the President, occupied the Chair.
The reading of the minutes was dispensed with.
The following communication relative to the subject was then read by the Clerk:
MAYOR'S OFFICE,
BROOKYN, Aug. 19, 1863.
To the Honorable the Board of Aldermen:
GENTLEMEN: In consequence of the inability of obtaining the proposed loan of "one million" on the part of the Committee having in charge the subject matter of prodding substitutes, &c., to furnish the quota of Conscripts required under the Conscription act from this city, and the necessity for speedy action in the matter, I have called your honorable body together in order that some plan may be devised which may meet the case so as to modify the severity of the draft, and remove, if possible, the objections now urged by capitalists against subscribing for the loan.
I respectfully refer your honorable body to my message if the 20th of July last as fully embracing my views in regard to this subject, entertaining no doubt that if made the basis of your action a loan sufficient for the purpose may be negociated [sic] at once. I shall be most happy, however, as I have been heretofore, to entertain any suggestions made on the part of your honorable body differing from mine, if thereby the object sought to be obtained can be facilitated, or more satisfactorily and more readily accomplished.
MARTIN KALBFLEISCH, Mayor.
Alderman Ternan stated that he wished to have something done to ameliorate the hardships of the draft.
Alderman Strong offered the following resolutions in connection therewith:
Resolved, That pursuant to the power and authority of this Common Council, vested by chapter 514 of the laws of 1863, it is hereby determined and decided to raise a sum not exceeding five hundred thousand dollars, to be disbursed for the relief of families of persons who may be drafted into the military service of the United States.
Resolved, That the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund be and hereby are authorized and directed to borrow money and raise upon the faith, credit, and property of the City of Brooklyn, the sum of $500,000 or so much thereof as may be necessary for the purposes of the foregoing resolution—the same to be raised on such terms and conditions, and in such manner as may be most advantageous to this city.
Resolved, That a select committee of seven for the Eastern District be appointed, whose duty it shall be as soon as the drafting shall be commenced in this City, to meet daily in their respective districts at some convenient and proper place and time, and hear and inquire into all applications for relief by persons ordered into the military service of the United States, and report to this Common Council what relief, if any, ought to be estimated; which, when approved of by a majority of all the members elected, shall take effect immediately; and for the purpose of acting on such reports, this Common Council will meet daily at 9 o'clock A. M. until all necessity therefor shall
Cease.
Alderman FISHER offered the following amendment, which was adopted:
Provided, That from every person or family who shall receive any sum of money in gross from the fund so to be provided, instead of a weekly allowance as relief, a receipt be taken which shall express that the sum so paid shall be instead and in lieu of all relief to be furnished by the City or County to such person or to his family during such service.
Alderman Strong moved that the resolutions be adopted.
Alderman TAYLOR moved that it be laid over until Thursday or Friday evening. He thought there might be a nigger in the fence.
After some further discussion Alderman TAYLOR'S motion was negatived, and the resolution was adopted by the following vote:
Ayes—Whitney, McLaughlin, Ennis, M. Murphy, Talmage, Ternan, Nodyne, O'Keefe, Strong, E. Murphy, Saal, Perry, Kalbfleisch and Fisher—13.
Nays—Alderman Taylor.
Subsequently Alderman TAYLOR withdrew his objection and changed his vote. The resolutions were then passed by unanimous consent.
The following, in relation to the draft, from the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, was submitted:
CITY HALL, BROOKLYN, Aug. 19, 1863.
To the Honorable the Common Council of the City of Brooklyn:
GENTLEMEN: The undersigned would respectfully invite your attention to the fact, in connection with the proceedings now in operation for a Conscription, that the Fire Department of this city has been maintained from almost time immemorial under the assurance that the onerous duties pertaining to their calling, would under the statute, exempt the several members from the various civil duties which are especially onerous to the workingman. Having, however, been informed that an entirely opposite construction has been placed on the act, and that your honorable body is about perfecting measures whereby any injustice may be obviated, I would respectfully ask your attention in behalf of the members of this Department, and the laborious services they have rendered, in the belief that they were at once compensating for civil requirements, while giving their ....
Law; and
Whereas, There appears to be a very general repugnance to the enforcement of a draft, and a very general opinion (in which this Common Council concurs) that Brooklyn can (with the sum of money just appropriated) now, as she has hitherto done, furnish her full quota of willing volunteers; be it therefore
Resolved That a Committee of five, to consist of His Honor, the Mayor, the President of this Board, and three other members of this Board to be named by its President .... Brooklyn.

The Common Council Exemption Fund.
—The Banks Refuse to Advance the Money.—The reply of the Brooklyn banks to the invitation of the Major to take up the proposed loan of one million of dollars for paying exemptions, &c., for conscripts was received this morning. The eight banks represented at the conference on Saturday last, sent in answers, some verbal, some written, all to the same effect, declining to advance any money on the proposed law. The committee on this subject being assembled to hear these replies, then authorized the Mayor to advertise for proposals for the loan. The Mayor has accordingly issued the following notice:—
MAYOR'S OFFICE.
BROOKLYN. August 13, 1863.
Proposals will be received at the office of the undersigned, at the City Hall, until Monday, 17th inst., at 10 o'clock, A. M., for a loan of $1,000,000, or any part thereof, for which certificates will be issued, payable in one year, with interest at the rate of  seven per cent per annum, in accordance with a resolution adopted by the Common Council on the 27th July.
The Common Council intend to apply to the Legislature at its next session, for an act authorizing the issue of bonds to raise the necessary funds for the redemption of said certificates. Proposals to be endorsed "Proposals for City Loan."
By order of the committee,
MARTIN KALBFLEISCH, Mayor.

Political Movements.—The Republican General Committee held a special meeting last evening, but transacted all their business in executive (secret) session.
The National Democratic General Committee met last evening. A committee was appointed to confer with the Regular Democratic General Committee with a view of making arrangements to send a united delegation to the State Convention at Syracuse.
A series of resolutions were also adopted, endorsing Governor Seymour's remonstrance "against the unprincipled and unjust operations of an unconstitutional and odious law," as exemplified in his late correspondence with the President. The reply of the President is designated as "humiliating and alarming" to the people. The concluding resolution implores the Governor, while aiding the President in every legitimate and constitutional manner to restore to constitution and the Union, "not to suffer any innovation or usurpation of the constitutional rights of the sovereign people of the state from any pretext, come from what quarter they may, believing such innovations and usurpations would only tend to the certain destruction of our republican form of government."
The delegates were requested to organize clubs and societies in their several wards.
Affairs in this city remain quiet and orderly.
No attempt appears to have been made to create a disturbance. Those inclined to aid in disreputable scenes proceeded to New York and left us in the enjoyment of peace.

THE COLORED PEOPLE.
The colored people are beginning to show themselves again in the streets this morning. Yesterday whole families vacated their residences in some parts of the city, and went off somewhere to secure safety. Some men were chased and beaten, but nothing that could be called serious occurred. A black man going along Hudson avenue was attacked and chased some distance.
He belonged to the Navy. A number of persons placed themselves between the pursuers and the negro, and he escaped and got inside the Navy Yard gate in safety. Pink row, in Canton street, is entirely vacated. It was occupied by colored people. They have gone, no one knows where. The same is the case in some other localities abounding in colored folks; but, as we stated previously, nothing of a very serious character occurred, and the black people were much more alarmed on account of the scenes in New York than  from actual violence or threats of harm here.

THE NAVY YARD AND WAR VESSELS.
The Navy Yard looks more warlike than ever. The sailors were drilled yesterday in the use and management of howitzers, in which they showed great proficiency. Four cannon are placed at the south gate, and eight along the Flushing avenue wall, with twenty-four sailors to each gun, and a supporting guard. At the main entrance fronting York street a number of cannon are placed in position. In fact all the approaches are so guarded that it will be impossible for any mob, should they be so disposed, to make any impression whatever. The iron-clad monitor Passaic is anchored in the stream with fires going and steam up so as to be used instantly should occasion require. The gunboats Maumee, Shamrock and Quaker City are also in the stream. The latter was receiving her boilers at Webb's shipyard on the New York side and was removed on account of apprehensions that the yard would be attacked. The officers of the Navy Yard seem to have been uneasy in consequence of threats to attack the yard and take the workmen away so as to aid in their riotous demonstrations. The idea appears to have been entertained to suspend mechanical operations yesterday, but other councils prevailed and the workmen continued at their labors.

VOLUNTEERS FOR THE EMERGENCY.
A meeting of those favorable to organize for the purpose of maintaining order was held at the city armory last night, by order of Major-General Duryea. Reserves of all the regiments now at the seat of war were present, numbering over five hundred, and the spirit manifested was such that there need be no apprehension that a sufficient number can be obtained at an hour's notice to meet any emergency that may be likely to occur. The Seventeenth Regiment also met at the arsenal and took similar measures. The following official notices indicate the pervailing [sic] spirit:

VOLUNTEERS FOR THE EMERGENCY.
HEADQUARTERS CO. E, 13TH REGIMENT N. Y. S. N. G.
BROOKLYN, July 15, 1863.
All citizens desiring to resist mob violence and maintain the laws, and who are willing to volunteer for the emergency, are requested to report  immediately at the City Armory, corner of Henry and Cranberry streets.
Richard OLIVER, Lieutenant.
D. S. Lambert, Orderly.

SEVENTIETH REGIMENT N. Y. S. M.
The members of Company C are hereby notified to report for duty at the arsenal, this (Wednesday) evening, at 7 1/2 P. M., in full uniform (fatigue caps.) Punctual attendance will be required.
By order.
THOS. MCCARTY, Captain.
H. O'Lary, Orderly.

COMPANY F, 13TH REGIMENT N. G., S. N. Y., Brooklyn, July 15, 1863.
Al1 members of this Company now in the city are requested to report at the Armory this evening, at 7 1/2 o'clock.

PREPARATIONS OF THE AUTHORITIES.
The authorities have quietly made ample pre­parations to preserve the peace of the city. A reserve force of police, about 100 strong, was collected in the City Hall, under the immediate charge of Inspector Folk. Mayor Kalbfleisch renamed at the City Hall until late at night. Gen. Duryea requested the Mayor to call a public meeting in the park of citizens, to enroll themselves as a special police force for the protection of the city. Other gentlemen, however, urged that it would be dangerous to call a public meeting in the present excited state of popular feeling. Such a call would have brought thousands of men to the park, and the slightest cause might produce a collision between some of the diverse elements, and perhaps result in a serious riot. The quieter the people were kept the better. These counsels prevailed with his honor, and no public meeting was called.

REGIMENT OF EXEMPTS.
The regiment of exempts being organized under Col. A. M. Wood, is progressing favorably. They have already a fine body of disciplined men, armed and equipped, ready for any emergency.

ARTILLERY FOR NEW YORK.
About noon to-day, the First Battalion of Artillery, commanded by Capt. George Chappell, left for New York to aid in restoring order by means of grape and cannister.

RIOTERS BRINGING THEIR PLUNDER TO BROOKLYN ARE CAUGHT BY THE POLICE.
Soon after the attack on Brooks' clothing store, in Catharine street, N. Y., yesterday, a number of men, women and boys were seen crossing the Catharine Ferry to Brooklyn, with bundles of clothing. Information was given to the police of the 43d Precinct, who took steps to arrest these parties, by stationing a force at the ferry. They subsequently arrested two men, two women, and a boy, all heavily laden with plunder. They had bundles of coats, pantaloons, vests, shirt-collars, and handkerchiefs, boxes of buttons and trimmings.
The parties were taken to the station house and searched. They give their names as Thomas Smith, Anthony Smith, Jane Gordon, Ann Moore and Richard C. Ralenshay. The property they had in their possession was worth in the neighborhood of $150. The prisoners were brought before Justice Perry this morning, who committed them on a charge of grand larceny.
Two boys named John Evans, aged 17, and William Colyer, 13, were also "arrested coming over the ferry, with a quantity of carpenter's tools in their possession, which were supposed to have been stolen from some shop during the lawless proceeding of the mob. The owner of the property has not been found and the boys are held to await examination.

The Excitement in the Eastern District.
During yesterday the excitement in the Eastern District was steadily increasing on all sides and the wild rumors from New York struck terror to the more peaceably-inclined citizens. As darkness drew in reports were quietly circulated that a demonstration had been determined by some artizans from the "North side," or from Greenpoint. These stories were repeated with the customary additions until the statement was made that a mob of thousands would attack the Post-office, the residence of Dr. North, corner of Fourth and South Fifth streets, the office of the Brooklyn Daily Times, and that the life of Provost Marshol [sic] Maddox had been seriously threatened. On inquiry it was ascertained that a portion of the 45th Precinct Police were arriving as a re-serve in the Western District of the city. Post master Allen took such measures as he thought proper, and a watch was kept in the Wall House where the Post-office is situated all night. Some of the ladies of the house remained up all night, momentarily expecting an attack of the disaffected men. During the first hours of the night all sorts of rumors were received at intervals from New York, the last of which was that the clothing store of Brooks Brothers, corner of Catharine and Cherry streets, had been sacked and burned. But the hours were arriving in quiet and nothing but the fire bells of the Metropolis and the lurid glare of the sky in that direction betokaned [sic] that anything unusual was transpiring. Finally the welcome dawn, but fears temporarily, and this morning the feverish anxiety of the night was very materially allayed. It is now believed that there was no sufficient reason for expecting an attack.

MEETING OF THE 14TH WARD MECHANICS.
At about half-past eight o'clock last evening in impromptu meeting of artisans, laborers and others, mostly of the 14th ward, was held on the vacant ground between North 8th, North 9th, and 3d streets, for the purpose of arranging a plan of action. The gathering was an informal one, and was addressed by Col. Edmund Powers, residing at the corner of North 6th and 4th sts. He counselled [sic] moderation in the crisis now upon the country; the draft would not be enforced, at present, and in the meantime all citizens should organize to resist it by all lawful and proper means in their power. The proper mode of procedure was to await the lead of the Governor of the State, who was now in New York doing all he could to allay the excitement there prevailing. In a short time the courts could decide as to the constitutionality of the conscription law, and then the necessary means would be taken to prevent any injustice being done to the poor man. He hoped, therefore, that this district would not witness a, repetition of the scenes now disgracing New York; private property must be respected, and the mechanics of the Eastern District would be untrue to themselves if they aided or countenanced a reign of lawlessness and indiscriminate destruction.
There were about 600 present, and all received the remarks of the speaker with applause and cries of "Good," "You're right," etc. During the address a man in the crowd called for "three cheers for Jeff. Davis." It was received with shouts of derision and groans; so great was the disfavor manifested that the rebel sympathizer was glad to quickly leave the crowd, followed by hisses and threats. The names of Governor Seymour, and General McClellan, and the Union were greeted with prolonged cheers. At nine o'clock the meeting adjourned, and so quietly was everything conducted that residents less than a block off knew nothing of the affair. The workingmen of the North side are sound for the maintenance of law and order.

RECRUITING AT THE 47TH REGIMENT ARMORY.
The Odeon in the Eastern District was thronged last evening by a crowd of citizens, of all parties on a call privately circulated during the afternoon. It was proposed to organize at once a "Law and Order Brigade," and no sooner was the proposition announced than a roll was proposed and signed in rapid succession by over 200 names of good men and true, who will stand by for the maintenance of law if their services shall be required. Three companies were organized and the marchings and facings of the school of the soldier gone through with until a late hour. About forty of one company were armed with muskets. To-night the Armory will be open, and all who oppose mob rule are invited to identify themselves with the "Law and Order Brigade."

POSTPONEMENT OF THE DRAFT IN THE EASTERN DISTRICT.
It is understood that the draft has been indefinitely postponed in the 2d and 3d districts. Neither of the Provost Marshals have yet received any orders beyond those of enrollment. All citizens, therefore, can afford to be patient and attend to their usual avocations.

THE ICE REVOLUTION.
The ice interest to-day is quiet in the E. D., and all the carts of the "Williamsburgh," "Rockland," "Kings County," and "Independent" Companies are delivering ice to customers as usual. The prompt action of the police in arresting the two men Withers and Weber yesterday, has produced this result. These two persons gave bonds for a future appearance before Justice Colahan this morning.

OUTBREAK AT JAMAICA, L. I.
The fires of mob excitement have reached the village of Jamaica, which last night witnessed a proceeding quite as unjustifiable as any which have transpired. Shortly after dark, a body of about fifty disaffected wretches assembled in streets last evening, and broke into a house where the Provost Marshal had stored a quantity of clothing for soldiers. This they brought out piled up in the street, and after applying a torch cheered and hooted until all the garments were consumed. The value of clothing destroyed was $3,000.
No further violence was attempted.

AT GREENPOINT.
All is reported quiet among the artizans at Greenpoint this noon. Work is going on as usual, and no signs of any demonstrations are apparent. It is to be hoped this may continue, and as there is now no immediate cause for any open demonstration of disaffection, order will probably reign there.

THE CONSCRIPTION.
The Draft to Commence next Monday in the City.
The Probable Quota—How many are Required from the Different Wards
—The Uniforms Ready for the Conscripts, etc.

The Draft Elsewhere.
IT COMMENCES NEXT MONDAY IN THE CITY—THE PROBABLE QUOTA—HOW MANY ARE REQUIRED FROM THE WARDS.
The enrollment is near its completion, and in some districts of this city the draft is expected to commence on Monday next. There is a great deal of public excitement and interest in relation to it, and a great many questions are asked that nobody can or will answer. Various statements are made as to what is really the quota of this city under a supposed call for 300,000 troops, as the Provost-marshals are instructed to take that number as their basis. It has been officially stated that the quotas of this state, under previous call, have been decided completed by the authorities at Washington. Now then, if the city is called upon for her quota of men on the basis of 300,000 from the loyal states, it will be about 12,500, or subtracting the deduction the government has promised to make on account of the thirty days service of our city militia, something less than 12,000. Some papers state it at a much larger number, but there must be some mistake. Because this city has always responded with more alacrity than any other part of the Union to a call for volunteers, there is no reason that twice its quota should be taken from it when the matter comes to force. In the Eighth district the conscription will commence at 10 A. M. on Monday. There are 200,000 inhabitants and 7,500 names will be drawn. From the Sixth district, of which Captain Farr is provost marshal, the following numbers of names are to be drawn: Ninth ward, 2,452, Fifteenth ward, 1,741, Sixteenth ward, 2,655. These figures, it will be understood, cover the fifty per cent. which it is expected will exempt either by physical or other disability, or by payment of the $300. The drawing of names will, it is understood, be public. A young miss will draw the tickets from a revolving wheel and the name of the conscript will then be publicly announced. It is stated that many persons intend to apply for writs of habeas corpus to test the constitutionality of the conscription law. The uniforms for the conscripts are already supplied to the quartermaster and only wait for persons to get inside of them. Last Tuesday the draft took place in the counties of Warren, Essex, and Clinton, constituting the Sixteenth congressional district.
While there is a great deal of interest in this city about the approaching draft, there is no symptom of any armed or organized resistance to it. Some express their doubts of its constitutionality; but it will doubtless take place and be obeyed as quietly and as orderly as elsewhere.

THE CONSCRIPTION IN BROOKLYN.
The daft will take place in Brooklyn as soon as the slips for the wheel are prepared. The clerks are working at them as rapidly as possible, but it is thought they will not be ready before Wednesday of next week. The enrollment has been entirely completed for the Third Congressional district, and there will be about 14,000 of the first-class in that district out of which it is stated that 2,500 will be drafted. In the whole city the provost-marshal states that 27,000 names have been enrolled. The whole quota is estimated at 4,500. The draft will take place publicly, and will be under the supervision of the board, Captain Stephen B. Gregory, provost marshal; Nelson L. North, surgeon, and Abner M. Beebe, commissioner. The names of the members of the militia regiments which are now absent from the city have been enrolled, and they will be drafted in common with other citizens, leaving the question of their liability settled at a future day. Those volunteers who are at service in the field at the date of the passing of the act of conscription, March 3, will not be considered liable. The draft will take place by wards, and these will be subdivided into districts, and each ward will be subdivided into districts, and each ward will only be required to furnish its own quota. Arrangements are made so that persons drafted who prefer to pay three hundred dollars will immediately receive their receipt of exemption from the collector of the internal revenue. The office of the provost marshal is at 259 Washington street. About fifty clerks are employed at present in writing the slips for the wheel. The office is besieged daily by persons anxious to learn when the draft will take place and their chances of exemption.

THE CONSCRIPTION IN NEW JERSEY.
The enrollment in Jersey City is not yet completed, but the provost-marshals will finish their work in a few days so far as that is concerned. The workshops of the Erie Railroad Company, situated in the Fifth ward, contain nearly 2,000 men, and a great deal of time has been consumed in getting their names, on account of the obstacles thrown in the way of the enrolling officer. The quota of Jersey City, it is stated, will be about 500 men, being about eighty for each ward. In some of the wards the draft will be very easy. For instance in the Fifth, in which the population is about 5,000. In Newark and Hoboken the enrollment has been completed, and everything is in readiness for immediate conscription.
The instructions have been received from Washington by Acting-Assistant Provost Marshal French to make the draft in the congressional district which includes Jersey City, Newark, Hoboken, and Hudson, within ten days. The quota for this whole district is 2,620 men. It is stated that another draft will also be ordered by the state authorities, to fill up the quota for the last call, and the enrollment for this draft is in progress.

IN THE STATE.
The draft for the Sixteenth congressional district in this state, consisting of Warren, Essex, and Clinton counties, took place at Plattsburg on Tuesday of this week. It was conducted by the provost marshal of the district, under the direction of Colonel W. W. Teall, of Syracuse, special agent of the government. The draft was for 1,593 men; 2,390 names were drawn, the instructions from the War Department being to draw fifty per cent. in addition to the quota to meet exemptions, etc. This quota indicates that the call is for 400,000 troops; and in this state the draft reaches one in every three persons enrolled in the first class.
The draft at Plattsburg, Colonel Teall informs the Syracuse Journal, was conducted with the greatest good order and to the apparent satisfaction of the assemblage of citizens which crowded the court house. Every well-known name that was announced as having been drawn was received with hearty cheers. Many of the best-known citizens were drawn. Four of the clerks employed in recording the names were themselves drawn. The gentleman who drew the names, he being blindfolded, drew his own son.
The draft was ordered to take place in the Fifteenth Congressional District (Rensselaer and Washington counties), on Monday, but there being some mistake in the quota assigned the district, it was postponed till to-day. The draft will take place throughout the entire state, as fast as the preparations are completed in the respective Congressional Districts.

The Draft in Brooklyn.
HALF A MILLION DOLLARS TO BE APPROPRIATED TO
PURCHASE EXEMPTIONS FROM THIS CONSCRIPTION.
The Common Council committee appointed on Monday night to consider the mayor's communication, in which he recommends an appropriation by the city for the purpose of mitigating the severity of the Conscription act, met with the Board of Contracts yesterday morning to decide upon the amount to be raised. The mayor opened the business by asking if his proposition had met the approval of the committee, to which Alderman Ternan answered in the affirmative. A discussion as to the power of the Common Council took place, and the mayor gave it as his opinion that the money could be legally raised. He said that $30,000 only of a fund appropriated for encouraging enlistments, out of $150,0oo, voted, had been expended, and recommended that the sum remaining be used for the purpose contemplated in his message.
The question as to the number of men required came up, and it was stated that the quota of Kings county would be about 4,500 men.
After some further conversation, it was finally decided to recommend an appropriation of $500,000 for the purpose contemplated.
A special meeting of the Common Council will be held this evening for the purpose of considering the matter. As there appears to be no opposition, the recommendation of the committee will doubtless be adopted, and, from present appearances, by a unanimous vote.

THE POLICE COURTS—MUSKETS SUPPOSED TO BE STOLEN—THE ATTACKS UPON COLORED PEOPLE.
Three men named Patrick Stanton, Robert Sadler, and Michael Donnelly were brought before Justice Boerum yesterday for examination. The parties were arrested in Greenpoint on Friday last, having in their possession two breech-loading carbines and some clothing, which, it was supposed, had been stolen in New-York during the riots. The carbines had evidently come from the gun factory in Second avenue and Twenty-first street, which was pillaged and burned by the mob; but the officer who made the arrests being unable to produce any evidence implicating the parties, they were discharged.
Two small boys, named William McNally and Jas. Minor, were arraigned before Justice Boerum on the charge of destroying furniture belonging to colored families in Warren street, a few days since. A colored man named John Hicks testified that a number of persons attacked his house on the 15th instant; and destroyed his furniture, but could not identify the accused as having broken anything. Officer Gilligan swore that a large crowd smashed the windows of Hicks's house and broke all they could find inside. Saw the defendants coming out of the house at the time, but did not see them do anything. There being no evidence, in the opinion of the justice, to hold the defendants, they were discharged.

WILLIAMSBURGH.
A WORD IN SEASON.—At Saints Peter and Paul's Church, Brooklyn, E. D., located in Second street, between South 2d and South 3d, there was gathered yesterday morning a very large congregation indeed, in the expectation that Rev. Father Malone would address his people in reference to the recent troubles in New York. In this they were not disappointed. After the usual preliminary and musical exercises, his reverence said that he did not think he should tread on political ground in calling the attention of those present to some truths which were intimately connected with the stirring and disgraceful proceedings during the past week in the metropolis. He was aware that none of his congregation had been identified with the dark deeds there enacted, and it was a pleasure to him to know that the portion of Brooklyn in which, for over 15 years he had been endeavoring to give a tone to public and religious sentiment, had been so orderly and quiet. Still there was no little feeling existing which rendered it not amiss that he should publicly call attention to the great Catholic truths that underlie all governments as well as all religions. The Church taught that obedience to the constituted authorities is a Christian duty, in which no good Catholic could fail. St. Paul to the Romans distinctly stated this, and pronounced a damnation upon those who proved false to the teachings of such obedience. He did this, too, at a time when the country in which he lived was subject to a tyrrany [sic] of pagan oppression. In the present trouble the general and fundamental rule of the Church, which it taught all its members, should not be forgotten or neglected. Every good Catholic would now throw his influence on the side of law and order, showing himself in the hour of trial to be a man of peace and obedient to the laws of the powers that be. There were cases which might justify revolution and rebellion, but no Irishman should forget the freedom, civil and religious, which he enjoyed in this land of liberty; and to contrast it with the limited privileges of the land of his birth, would just at this time produce wholesome results. Now, more than ever, was the time for every Catholic to prove himself a good citizen and frown down the riotous conduct of those too base to belong to any church or care for any religious belief.

The Conscription Fund.—A conference of the officers of the Brooklyn City Banks, the Board of Contracts and Special Committee of the Common Council, was held in the City Hall on Saturday, for the purpose of consulting in relation to the raising of one million dollars by the city, to be used in mitigating the hardships of the draft. There were present, Messrs. J. J. Stadwell of the City Bank, Conklin Brush of the Mechanic's Bank, John K. Pruyn of the Central Bank, W. P. S. Herriman of the Long Island Bank, Daniel Embasy of the Atlantic Bank, George Field of the Williamsburg City Bank, I. H. Frothingham of the Nassau Bank, O. M. Beach of Farmers' and Citizens' Bank, Mayor Kalbfleisch, Aldermen Ternan, Perry and Nodyne. The Mayor stated the action of the Common Council, and the object of inviting the officers of the City Banks, to ascertain what amounts those institutions were willing to advance on the loan, and that it was desirable that the banks should act in concert. The subject was spoken of in a conversational manner. The financial gentlemen, it appeared, had no authority to make any proposition before submitting the matter to the Boards of Directors of the different banks. The principal point they wished to ascertain, however, was whether there was not such a division of public opinion as to the justice or policy of the action of the Common Council as might deter the Legislature from legalising [sic] the measure—whether, in fact, the security for the payment of the money was beyond doubt. The Mayor expressed the opinion that there was no doubt but the Legislature would legalize the act, and that he believed it met with the approval of a great majority of the people. The opinion was expressed by several gentlemen that our full quota could be raised without the draft by offering from $250 to $300 bounty for each man. Finally, it was understood that the matter would be laid before the Bank Directors, and another meeting held on Wednesdav next to receive their proposition.

AFFAIRS IN THE EASTERN DISTRICT.
Earnest Efforts of Well Disposed Citizens—How 80 Cases of Muskets were placed in safety—Arrest of a Brooker of Riot—A Policeman shoots and wounds a Night-walker—Brooklyn People wounded in New York.
Quiet still reigns in the Eastern District of the city, owing in great measure no doubt to the fact that the promptness with which all well-disposed citizens volunteered in their own behalf. At Turner's Hall in the 16th Ward the Germans drill with great perseverance and patrol the streets at night. In the 13th Ward at the Odeon the tramp of armed and determined men is heard night and day, the guard relieving each other at regular hours. The 17th Ward—formerly Greenpoint, is also awake to the impending danger and over 300 men have enrolled themselves as a guard of Minute men, and drill flight and day at the station of the 47th Precinct which has kindly been placed at their service by Captain Stilwell. The acting drill officers are Walter Holmes and Robert H. Alaire, and the temporary armory is supplied with about 250 muskets and a cannon which is already loaded and waiting for the onset.

SECURING THE MUSKETS.
For some time past there have been stored near the Atlantic Basin, South Brooklyn, a large quantity of muskets, which were captured as prize property near Key West, and the operations of Wednesday night last in that vicinity convinced the custodians of these arms that they would be safer elsewhere. Therefore they hired a lighter for the purpose of conveying them to the Navy Yard. Before they were loaded, the Captain of the lighter became intoxicated, and when he set sail was unable to manage either vessel or himself. The result was the lighter went ashore near the foot of South Eighth street, E. D., where the captain left her and went to New York. Fearing that in his drunkenness he might communicate the facts of their whereabouts to the plunderers holding sway in that city, the guardians or the property applied to Captain Woglom, of the 45th precinct police for a detail of men as a guard until this morning. The excited condition of this district would not admit of the withdrawal of any of the police; but Captain Woglom did what was much better. On his personal representations he obtained from the Roosevelt street Ferry Company the use of one of their boats, and with it drew the lighter off, and towed it to the Navy Yard, where he delivered eighty cases of muskets in charge of Admiral Paulding.

THE YEAST THAT RAISES RIOTS.
Last night, about 9 o'clock, officer Colahan of the 45th precinct, took in charge a well-grown lad, who sails at pleasure under the names of John Rogers, Roxy, and Skelly. The former is his right name, and he is known as an old offender, although he is but 17 years of age. He is already one of the alumni of the Penitentiary, and has a brother in State Prison, while his own face adds a degree of dignity to the Rogues' Gallery of the 45th precinct. When arrested, he was making North 4th street vocal with his declamations and profanity, and the excited condition of the locality was greatly increased thereby. He was drunk, and armed with a pistol, powder and ball. He resisted the officer, and appealed to the crowd to take the laws in their own hands, and give the negroes and policemen what they deserved. Danger was imminent, and his prompt arrest probably saved the district a season of violence that might have proved serious. In view of all this, the previous bad character of the lad, his being armed, and in every sense riotous, Judge Colahan, very properly, gave him 6 months at hard labor in the Penitentiary.

WOUNDED.
Among those injured in New York by the riot, and the attempts to put it down, are one or two from the Eastern District. At noon to-day the son of Dr. J. J. Acherson, of No. 89 Fourth street, was brought home from the city in an ambulance. He was acting as a member of the Seventh Regiment reserve, and during last night, white on duty near 19th street and 2d avenue, he was struck by a ball in the thigh, and of course disabled. The wound is said to be a serious one.
John Murphy, a bar tender in the upper part of New York, and a resident of South 7th street, E. D., was at work as usual yesterday, when the mob visited the place, and in attempting to escape by the rear, he was shot by a member of the 7th Regt., who mistook him for a rioter. The ball, which was from a pistol, took effect in the groin. The young man was brought to this city, and the ball was extracted by Dr. Duggan of North 6th street this morning. He will doubtless recover, although the wound is in a most unfortunate locality.
This morning about 2 o'clock as Officer Cotrell of the 47th precinct was patrolling in the vicinity of Franklin and Kent streets, he discovered a man whose movements were rather suspicious, and on asking what he was about received for an answer, "None of your G _d d__n business." He then attempted to take him when the man made a motion as if to draw a weapon Quick as lightning Officer Cotrell drew his pistol and shot him through the fleshy part of his leg. He was taken to his residence in Huron street. His name is Joseph Cozzens, and he will doubtless learn hereafter to return civil answers to civil questions.

THE COMMON COUNCIL.
THE DRAFT IN BROOKLYN.
Report of the Special Committee on the Mayor's Message.
Proposition to Raise One Million of Dollars to Purchase Exemptions.

WHO FAVORS AND WHO OPPOSES IT.
INTERESTING DEBATE,
A special meeting of the Board of Aldermen, was held last evening, pursuant to adjournment, in the Common Council Chamber. Present, Ald. Dennis O'Keeffe and a quorum of members.
On motion, the reading of the minutes of the previous meeting, was dispensed with.
The Special Committee, to whom was referred the Message of his Honor, the Mayor, on the subject of the Draft, submitted the following report:
To THE HON. THE COMMON COUNCIL:
GENTLEMEN--The Special Committee appointed on the Message of the Mayor, of the 20th instant, to confer with
the Board of Contracts, beg leave respectfully to
REPORT:
That they have duly considered the matter, and are of opinion that the interests of the city will be promoted by the procurement of substitutes or the payment of three hundred dollars to the General Government to purchase the exemption from draft of such persons as may be drafted under the conscription act from this city, and under such rules and regulations as may be deemed proper under the circumstances.
This proposition appears to your Committee to be so manifestly a prudential as well as an economical measure, that under proper safeguards, it cannot fail to prove highly satisfactory to our citizens in its results, they would, therefore, respectfully submit the following, in which the Board of Contracts concur, for your adoption:
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be and they are hereby authorized and directed to borrow upon the faith of the city, a sum not exceeding one million of dollars, payable with interest not exceeding seven per cent per annum, in one year from date, and issue certificates of indebtedness therefor. The avails thereof, to be used for the payment of either the procurement of substitutes, or for the payment of the exemption fee as required by the conscription act, for such persons as may be drafted to fill the quota required from this city for the Army of the United States.
Resolved, That the Joint Committee heretofore appointed upon this subject, be and are hereby continued and empowered to carry the provisions of the foregoing resolution into effect, and to establish all needed rules and regulations for the purpose of guarding against any and all impositions, or frauds that may be attempted to be practised upon the city.
Brooklyn, July 22d, 1863.
RICHARD TERNAN,
JOHN A. SAAL,
LEWIS F. NEWMAN.
DENNIS O'KEEFFE,
Special Committee.

Ald. Ternan moved that the resolutions be adopted. He had a preamble and resolutions he wished to offer, after the reading of the report, which he believed, in connection, would embrace all that was necessary on the subject for proper action.
Ald. Belknap desired that there might be ample latitude given on the question, and the whole subject dealt with impartially.
Ald. Wallace suggested that the preambles and resolutions of the Alderman of the 9th be read.
Ald. Ternan withdrew them for the present.
Ald. Fisher hoped to have heard the views of the gentlemen who had not signed the report. It was naturally a subject to elicit discussion, and those not agreeing with a majority of the Committee doubtless had views which might be of interest to hear.
Ald. Terry, as a member of the Committee, explained that the report did not meet his approval, although he had not prepared a minority report, nor a substitute, for the reason that the money was to be raised by the Board of Contracts, and it was to be under their charge, not of the Committee. He presumed that no proposition could be carried out relative to the subject unless it met with the approval of that Body. His own views were, briefly, that the money should be applied to the relief of families, or for procuring substitutes for those unable to respond to the draft. He should vote against the resolutions in their present form.
Ald. Belknap offered the following as a substitute:
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be authorized to borrow a sum not exceeding $300,000 at 7 per cent. interest, payable in ten years, and issue certificates of indebtedness therefor, the same to be used for the following  purposes, to wit:
First—To provide substitutes for all active and exempt firemen who may be drafted; provided, however, that not more than $300 be paid to any one substitute.
Second—To pay $3 per week to the families of all drafted men who may have a wife, children or a mother, depending on them for support.
Ald. Belknap offered the substitute for simple reasons; He had conversed with a great number of people, and had a pretty correct knowledge of public feeling. All were patriotic so far as related to providing soldiers to aid the government; but on the other hand they could not see the necessity of raising a million of dollars for the purpose. Such a proceeding would be unlawful, and had so been declared to be in the State Maine and other places. It was also not in accordance with the spirit of the charter. If a proper sum were agreed upon there would be no objections; but if the amount named were adhered to then it would be stopped by some legal process. His reason for mentioning firemen was, that they were exempt from military and jury duty under the law. Many of them had served fifteen years in good faith for exemption from such a crisis as the present, and the city should now uphold them. If $3 were not enough for families he would be willing to increase the amount to $4 or $5. In some respects the report was objectionable and not clear. If it meant substitutes for all it should say so; and so it should be expressed if the money was intended for the government. But the government did not want money, which should be used as bounty to fill the regiments with men.
Ald. Ternan believed the report would be more explicit to the Board if it was again carefully read. The object in view was to follow the example of other cities. The design of the Government with the money was, to obtain men; and this was the sole object of the Committee. As regards the feeling of the people, he had some opportunity to know what it was. The Collector of Taxes had conversed with many of the largest tax-payers, and there was a decided feeling among them to have this work done thoroughly. Yesterday morning the sum was fixed at $500,000, and this morning it had been increased to $1,000,000, and why? Public opinion was strong in reference to the subject, and was specially anxious to have all excitement on the question of the draft allayed. For himself, he believed there would be great trouble if the matter was not judiciously managed; and it was in obedience public expression that the amount of the sum to be raised was changed. Collector Driggs had told him that the quota of the 14th Ward, 214 persons, could be raised in two weeks or less, with the requisite funds. Comptroller Faron had assured him that with a million or less he could send more men to the field to support the flag of the country, than the quota called for, and who would be worth in service more than double as compared to conscripts. This was the belief of the Committee, and he earnestly appealed to the members to pause and consider—to take into consideration that it is the intention to raise the quota. If there should be a conflict of authority, let none force it; for it would be but adding a match to a heap of flax. Both sides should be willing to yield some points, and he himself was ready to make a sacrifice for peaceable adjustment. A million could as legally be raised as three hundred thousand or one hundred thousand dollars. Rochester had raised an amount to redeem every man, and Westchester, with Senator Haskins presiding, at a meeting recently pledged the same thing. At West Farms, the lawyer of Horace Greeley had cooperated in like action. Such was the prevailing sentiment, and he hoped it was that of every Democrat about the Board. He conjured them to throw aside all party questions, and only act ... ..ce more have a united country.
Ald. Taylor thought the subject was ... ..ng between the upper and nether mill-... it would be crushed in either case. He was prepared to be crushed. He wished to do no injustice to the resolutions of the Committee, but would anybody on perusing them suppose that it was the intention of the Common Council to contribute one man to sustain the flag of his country? It was proposed to pay the Government $300 for every man that may be drafted. Admitting that quota to be 4,200, here was a proposition to keep 4,000 men at home, away from the service the country how needs. Had the proposition been to give the $300 to men who are drafted and serve, there would not be any dilemma; as it is, we should have three millions to pay and 4,000 men less to help pay it. He had been told that men unable to pay the $300 would be helped. In the case of the man who had saved by dint of toil and great frugality some three hundred or four hundred dollars, he, if drafted, would be asked for the first question if he had sufficient to pay for his exemption. Replying in the affirmative, he would be told that having means he must help himself. In the case of another man who had lived all his life on the "live while you live" principle, and had not a dollar, he would be helped, thus offering a direct reward for prodigality. The Alderman of the 9th had referred to Rochester as an example, but Jersey City had set a better one, and it ought to be followed. There a bounty of $300 is offered to volunteers who enlist. It had been remarked that unless this measure was carried through, the volcano on which we were standing would burst. Let it burst—and burst now! He wanted to know if he lived in a land of law and order? If the rabble and murderers were to make the law; also he desired to know. They had declared they would rule us again. Did he live in a land of constitutional liberty or of mob law rulers? He had asked gentlemen to ignore party, but he had not found one in the Board to do it. He had been alone, and had ignored party during his whole career. A Democratic Mayor he had supported unflinchingly, and now was asked to forget party! He would inquire if the mob was composed of party men? Who did compose it? Every gentleman present knew, and he would not insult their intelligence by pressing such a question. (Voices—"Let us know," "Out with it!") There were no Republicans found in the mob, because they are a law-abiding party; yet he would not say Democrats were not law-abiding, for he saw some around him. He insisted, however, that there were no Republicans who originated or participated in the mob, nor did the rumors circulating about town originate in Republican brains. Therefore it is a mill-stone in either case. The Alderman of the 9th had said that he had been called on by his constituents respecting the matter. The same was his own case, and to such an extent that he had hardly been able to put pen to paper during the day. His constituents wished to know if he was going to vote a million dollars to-night, and so leave the Government unprovided for. In short, if he was to be ground anywhere, it should be by the law.
Ald. Whitney presumed the members would bear out his endeavor to economize money and prevent inordinate expenditures. But there were times when we must be liberal, and one of those occasions had arrived. No man condemned mob proceedings more than himself, proceedings which every Democrat disapproved. (Hear, hear.) There was, however, no denial of the fact that there existed a deep seated opposition to being drafted, and the case may as well be met intelligently as otherwise. The gentleman of the 15th said, there had been a violation of the law, and asked where it had begun? Had there been no violation of the law by the General Government? Was there not a superceding [sic], in the fact, a nonobservance of the law in the passage of the Emancipation act? Or what might be called the shutting up of men in Fort Lafayette, and the denial of the benefit of the habeas corpus? Were these facts observing the law? Republicans had violated the law as well as the Democrats, had in fact set the example. The people had committed violence and had done wrong, and among them were as many Republicans as Democrats. Indeed the assemblage was largely made up of the various classes of plunderers and robbers, who rushed in when only a slight disturbance had been committed. The opinion that the quota would not be filled was a mistake, for the Democrats would supply all the men asked for, as it would be found they had done when the quota was first filled. It was, then, presumption to say that Democrats would not stand by the flag of the country, something which they had always done. As regards the use of the money to be raised, he believed that if it were devoted to paying voluntery [sic] enlistments [sic] men enough to fill the quota could be had in 30 days.
Ald. E. Murphy begged to say, that since the question had been put into a political aspect, that 1,100 volunteers had left his ward since the commencement of the war. Of this number 800 were Democrats. The question, however, was never asked whether they were Democrats or Republicans he well knew, for he was present on several occasions when the opportunity was given him to ascertain the facts. There were hundreds of men in his ward who could not raise $300; indeed the families of men still at the war were suffering this day for mere necessities. Still he was of the opinion that the quota in the ward could be filled if the money was paid to the substitutes or to their families.
Ald. O'Keeffe did not suppose that at any time before in his life had he felt such a lack of power to direct the requisite attention to the matter under consideration. He did not rise in his place simply to give his views, for he felt as there was not language for their expression. He was surprised to see any opposition to the measure before the Board. Individually he did not stand there as a Democrat or as a Republican, but simply as an adopted citizen. The Ald. of the 15th had made charges, and it was surprising that he would not let the Board know who were meant under the title of rabble. Had he given the information he could have but echoed the words of the Tribune and the Post—Irish robbers and Irish democrats.
Ald. Taylor called the speaker to order, as he had not made use of these terms.
Ald. O'Keeffe was only giving his opinion of what the insinuations of the Ald. of the 15th meant.
But he could not make any one believe that the brave men who fought at Manassas, Centreville, Antietam, and during the seven days on the Peninsula, would inaugurate a disturbance for the sake of subsequent plunder. If robbers and thieves take advantage of honest men who were averse to unlawful measures, was it any reason that the latter should branded in incomplicity with the former?
Was it a reason for exhibiting around the street certain posters, with words "Sam, organize?" As for Sam, he loved him as he loved himself, for he never without his countenance would have been elevated to the honorable position of representing a portion of the city without his assistance. Not, then, to have a regard for him, would be to become a renegade, and not worthy to live. In God's name let the present state of feeling be waived, and the country restored to its wonted prosperity. Let the North and the south be united once more if possible. Let there be no quibble about the tone of the resolutions, but all try and bring about the best results. He wished the Federal Government would do this; that it would put men who were competent in charge of soldiers lives, men, too, whom the soldiers love. Had this been done long ago there would have been no need of conscription now; but as it was upon us, it was our duty to raise the pecuniary relief. He did not mean to furnish men if he could help it. Why were there 30,000 soldiers in New York to-day? Why were they not where they were they were wanted? Why were they here to shoot down citizens? Where was General Lee? Would not these men be of any use to Gen. Meade? Would they not occupy the time of at least one Brigadier-General? They were 30,000 strong, and ready, and why should they not go back into the Army, where men were needed? The Alderman of the 15th had said that the draft reached all persons alike. Look at the poor grain shoveler! A man invariably with a large family, six or seven children. A man bountifully endowed by nature to perpetuate his race. It cost him at the very least ten shillings a day to support his children, not as any of the gentlemen present would like to have theirs supported. Was he in a position to pay $300, a sum he never had and never could expect to have at his control? The members were there not to represent the rich man the tax payer, but to represent every citizen of Brooklyn that was interested either directly or indirectly. The burden would fall in one way or another on those least able to bear it, if not directly, then in the way of rent or the advance of necessities. Plainly then it was but duty to take care of these men who were the first to go out and fight for us. He was not in favor of rebelling against the laws, but rather of perpetuating the institutions of the glorious country. He had taken an oath so to do, and after taking it felt that he was on an equality with those born on the soil. If, however, the government failed to observe the conditions of that oath, or abrogate any part of it, he did not consider himself bound by it, nor would he hold it a perjury if he acted antagonistsc [sic] to it. And this he was willing to do. The Alderman of the 5th had also said that the riotous movements came from his party, the Democrats. To that political branch he belonged true enough, and he was sorry to say that it had been misrepresented in the leaders of the newspapers. Why should they not fight against this misrepresentation? They had a right to do so. The press in doing wrong incited rebellion and mob law, and when himself or another on reading a paper discovered that the whole fault was cast upon adopted citizens, was it not natural to feel indignant? When he knew that his countrymen and other foreigners had come here at the instigation of the Government, had they not a right to feel aggrieved when fired upon by some flash officer? Thus the stigma has fallen upon a particular race. If they did not want the streets to be flooded with blood, and when they might be would not be known until the moment it should be done, some proper provision must be made to avoid such a calamity. If men alone were wanted by the Government, the $300 clause ought not to have been put in the Conscription Act. It seemed to him to be a raid on poor citizens and a cloak to screen the rich man, behind which he might stand, while others went out to be shot. The gentleman of the 15th had averred that he had supported a Democratic Mayor. Well, if so! For himself he had been charged with being an apostate by--well, it was no matter who, for there was no truth in the charge, When the Mayor was wrong he did not and would not sustain him; if on the contrary he was right, it was his bounden duty to give him countenance. In the hands of the Mayor and of the Committee, the money would be carefully disbursed and with the strictest inquisition. The citizens might rest assured that not a cent would be disbursed to any one not worthy and deserving.
Ald. Ternan asked permission to read his preamble and resolutions which, leave being granted, he read as follows:
Whereas, A strong feeling exists in this city that Brooklyn has been sufficiently credited for the troop's she has sent to the field since the Rebellion broke out, and great uncertainty appears to prevail about the actual number the General Government requires from her under the Conscription Law; and
Whereas, There appears to be a very general repugnance to the enforcement of s draft, and a very general opinion (in which this Common Council concurs) that Brooklyn can (with the sum of money just appropriated now, as she has hitherto done, furnish her full quota of willing volunteers; be it therefore
Resolved, That a Committee of five, to consist of His Honor, the Mayor, the President of this Board, and three other members of this Board to be named by its president be now appointed, whose duty shall be to confer in conjunc­tion with other municipalities should they so deem fit, with State and General Governments, and particularly to urge upon the latter the wisdom and expediency of suspending the draft to allow the proper number of men required from each county to be raised by them as volunteers.
Resolved, That the sum of $250 be appropriated to defray the expenses of said Committee such sum to be expended solely under the direction of the Mayor.
If these resolutions were adopted with those in the report of the Committee, there would be ample authority to complete the quota.
Ald. Nodyne regretted that the subject had taken a political turn, for politics did not belong here, and their introduction caused words to be said that were out of place. He would stand by the Government in its need, and do as much for the aid of the poor and helpless families as his neighbor. Indeed, he had already done more than he could afford. He did not approve of the report in all its bearings, and for reasons he was about to present. It was the most important matter which had been before the Board, and if it was discussed in an impartial manner, and without bias, it would occupy more than this meeting. He had prepared his views on the subject, and would, by permission, read them:
The Mayor, in his message, says: "In the first place, let it be fully and distinctly understood that we cannot consent even to appear in the remotest degree to concede or yield to the demands or threats of a mob, or of persons inclined to riotous demonstrations."
There must be good reasons for this. If we concede or yield—
1st. It gives recognition to violators of law.
2d. It is an admission of weakness on the part of our civil government.
3d. It will encourage a mob spirit to set the laws at defiance in this cito, when any future demand, just or unjust, be denied.
4th. If the third city in the Union falters or retreats before the mob, riot and bloodshed, or submission to the mob, will be the order of things in every city, town, or village, throughout the land.
It is proposed to tax the people of Brooklyn $1,000,000, to pay the exemption of every person drafted from this city.
To understand this thing fairly, we should carefully con_ove_ the bloody record of the past ten days, and rember [sic] that it is by the light of the burning buildings of a neighboring city that we are to present to the men who made night and day fearful with their deeds, a portion, at least, of this sum. This, too, while we are threatened with a repetition of the same scenes.
Hence the Hon. Mayor observes justly:
"We can not afford to appear, even in the remotest degree, to concede or yield."
Does the proposed action "appear, even in the remotest degree, to concede or yield"?
1st. Would the citizens consent that we should vote their money away thus, except that we would have riots else, and that this action would be a preventative?
2. Is not this consideration the animus of our action?
3. Will not the riotously-disposed portion of the people so understand it?
4. Hear the words of the Hon. Mayor:—"And there is the other consideration, which, however we may deprecate it, we are forced to take into account, and that is, should any omission to take some action on our part result in failing to prevent the enactment among us of the scenes that have recently transpired in New York, we may have a destruction of property, to say nothing of life, to reimburse which, would impose upon the taxpayers a burthen compared to which the appropriation suggested would be a mere trifle." If we act as proposed, remembering this "other consideration" presented by the Hon. Mayor, will not all the people,—riotous and law-abiding,—say 'we acted thus in fear of the mob'; and, however much we wish to avoid the appearance, 'we are conceding and yielding to the demands and threats of the mob'?
5. Is the civil arm so paralyzed that we must buy up rioters, as individuals in New York were recently coerced to buy off house-burners and assassins.
6. Nothing can be inferred from all this but an admission that the civil authorities are powerless before the mobocrats, and that, in our cowardice, we are willing to give them one million to keep quiet for a time longer.
But, before we make this humiliating admission, and before we send our commissioners to rioters, let us ask if this will stay the tide of riot?
If the draft was the only cause for riot, why were houses plundered in New York? Why did the mob cheer for Jeff. Davis?
Ald. Newman called the gentleman to order, as the cheering for Jeff. Davis had nothing to do with the matter.
Ald. Ternan—Let him give us the evidence that there were cheers for Jeff. Davis.
Ald. Nodyne proceeded:
Why was Fancher's Elevator burned? Why are the neighboring woods full of homeless, starving colored men, women and children forced to flee from the mob?
Apart from all question of your right to use money for such purpose, (and I believe the Courts will decide we have no such right) I am opposed to the measure as a humiliating one, and one too that clearly will not effect its object.
For the law-abiding men, we could not pay. If drafted, they will either furnish substitutes, pay $300, or join the army.
Would it not be grossly unjust that any portion of the tax necessitated by the passage of this should be borne by a man who, in obedience to the law, furnishes a substitute or pays his $300, or goes bravely to the battle-field?
Would it not be foul injustice to our brave taxpayers now in the army, and who are calling loudly to us for reinforcements, to make them pay a portion of this sum which is to prevent them from being reinforced?
Why should our people who have been heavily taxed that men might be paid to join our armies, now be also heavily taxed, that men may be encouraged not to join our armies?
Ald. O'Keeffe called the gentleman to order.
The Chair—(Ald. Perry)—State the point of order.
Ald. O'Keeffe—The gentleman is reading extracts from a document published in a factious newspaper, something which is not pertinent to the question.
Ald. Nodyne—I do not wish to make any unpleasant remarks, but if the gentleman says that I am reading extracts, he says what is not true.
Ald. O'Keeffe—Is it the gentleman's own speech?
Ald. Nodyne—Yes.
Ald. O'Keeffe—(not hearing the reply distinctly)—I have asked a plain question, and expect as plain an answer.
Ald. Nodyne—I have said it was my own convictions on the subject before the Board. The Ald. of the 12th has no right to cast any reflections.
Ald. O'Keeffe—If it is his own speech, let him go on.
Ald. Nodyne—He has no right to cast reflections, and in any other place, he would be answered as he deserves.
Ald. O'Keeffe—What does the gentleman ….
The Chair directed the Alderman of the 10th to proceed.
Ald. Nodyne continued:
Is the proposed action not unjust to all the taxpayers?
Is it not especially unjust to three classes of the tax payers?
1st. A., who is drafted and pays his $300 for exemption:
2d. B., who is drafted and furnishes his substitute:
3d. C., who is drafted and who shoulders his musket like a patriot.
It is urged that this money would only be used to procure substitutes for drafted men, and would not hinder the operation of the law of Congress.
This could not be;—the substitutes could not be procured.
How much could you afford to pay a substitute? Only the $300, which you propose to vote for each.
How many men are there in the city that could be procured to go as substitutes, who have not already been in the army?
You might number them on the fingers; of your two hands—especially after the draft.
If this is true, you must rely on men who have been in the service? Can you get them?
They are now offered, for re-enlisment [sic], $2 00
Congressional Bounty                                  100 00
From the Exemption fund,                           300 00
                                                                    $402 00
Will a man go as a substitute for $300, when he can procure $402 for the same service?
The "National Enrollment act" might undoubtedly be bettered by exempting husbands with helplessly infirm wives, and other cases that might be named of a kindred nature.
But that there are many heads of families in this condition, who now afford neither help or protection to such family, but are lazy, vagabond and thriftless, we cannot doubt.
Why should these have the benefits sought to be conferred on better men?
These men drafted, their families would be subjects of public justice and not of private charity, and in many cases that might be named would be better for the change.
Judging the present and future by the past, there can be no doubt in the mind of any man but that public-spirited individuals would step in and pay the exemption of every provident husband or other person who has helpless persons dependent on his exertions, and whose presence is at all necessary to the happiness or comfort of the helpless ones.
It is much to be preferred that this matter should be left in the hands of public-spirited individuals.
"It should be fully and distinctly understood that we cannot consent even to appear in the remotest degree" to oppose any constitutional law, of the United States, either in letter or spirit. And while by our action here we admit the constitutionality of the "National Enrollment act" (for if the law is unconstitutional there is no necessity of passing this), yet are we not "consenting to appear," to say the least of it, to oppose its spirit.
The law was framed to increase the army, and it must be obvious to all, if we pass this, it will tend to prevent that increase.
Such legislation, three months ago, was unknown to the history of the world, and it is to be hoped that Brooklyn will not join those cities or towns that are willing to let it be written "We were forced to surrender to the mob."
Far better is it that we should spend or lose millions in sustaining the Government, than give farthings to conciliate a mob.
Therefore let us be firm now, and all will be well.
I will vote one or five millions, if necessary, to support the wives and families of these men while they are gone, and will vote to pledge ,the city to pay a just pension to their families if they should die in the service of our country.
Let our motto be, "Millions for the comfort of the wives and families of our brave defenders, but not one cent as tribute to a mob."
Ald. Wallace was sorry that the debate had partaken of a political character, inasmuch as he had attended for the purpose of discussing the matter without reference to politics. Since he had seen and conversed with returned soldiers and learned how many adopted citizens were in the army, he felt more liberal towards them in their endeavor to sustain the flag of the country. He was for sustaining the general government, and for a vigorous prosecution of the war until the authority of the government is maintained on every foot of territory belonging to it. To that end the army must be kept full, and to achieve the purpose every man must bear his part of the burden. He held that the soldier who perils his life for his country, who interposes his own body between his family and his property (Ald. W's.) and danger should be well paid as well as taken care of. For this purpose he was willing to have his own property taxed or encumbered. If the draft was necessary, and he believed it to be, he was willing to alleviate its hardships in any manner in his power. If a man is drafted who has a family, and nothing but his own hands with which to support the family, he would be willing to have his property taxed to provide a substitute or furnish an exemption fee. Or if a man should be drafted and willing to go who has no means to provide himself shelter or food, or if he returned home wounded or sick, he would freely submit to a tax to pay the man the same bounty he would have received to go as a substitute. He desired to see some modification in the resolutions of the report, and he therefore prepared some which he would read. After the words "indebtedness therefore in the first resolution, he would amend by adding as follows:
That from the fund created by the resolutions a bounty of $300 per man be paid for volunteers for three years, or the war, payable when mustered into the U. S. service, and that such bounty be continued until the quota of Brooklyn is filled, or the draft be made.
Resolved, That when the draft is commenced the bounty named in the foregoing resolution be discontinued, and a balance of the fund, or so much thereof as may be necessary, be appropriated to relieve cases of hardship, under such regulations as this Common Council may hereafter adopt.
In place of the 2d resolution offered by the Committee, he would like to substitute the following:
Resolved, That the Committee be authorized to make such arrangements as will most facilitate .... volunteering, and arrange with the General Government to have such Volunteers accepted, so as to reduce to that extent the number of men to be drafted—and to report the progress of such volunteering to the Government, to the end that they may decide upon the propriety of further postponement of the draft.
He did not assume to have any more wisdom than other members of the Board, and indeed he did not know but what his own amendments might be improved after further reflection. In this view of the case, he proposed that the matter be laid over until next Monday evening, and the resolutions be referred back to the Committee for further consideration and report.
Ald. Kimball had not had presented to him since he had been a member of the Board, any subject which imposed so grave a responsibility as did this one. He wished to act thoughtfully and candidly and without any partizan feeling. Sufficient time should be devoted to the question so that all might act with unanimity; and, therefore, the proposition to lay the subject over was judicious. In the meantime, opinions would be heard from the people, and various reasons expressed for and against, from which something might be learned. The people had a right of expression in the premises; and, therefore, he wished to show a proper regard, without haste, to the interests of all alike, the rich as well as the poor. He had settled upon one point, so far as he had been able to inform himself; and that was that the Rochester plan was the true one for adoption. In that city money had been raised for every man in the quota. If the drafted man went, he received $300, or if not the amount was given to his substitute; or, if neither responded, then the money was paid to the Government. Thus the burden was just on all classes of citizens, because they would all pay a just proportion of tax. He was not prepared to vote even for this plan to-night, nor did he believe there was any disposition to urge the matter through. If there was, he should vote against it. He saw many hardships about the conscription bill; and, indeed, it seemed almost impossible to frame a bill without hardships. Some believed that under the Rochester plan the Government would obtain but few recruits; but he had no fears about such a result. If a drafted man sent a substitute he was clear for three years, while if he paid $300 he was only exempt until another draft should be ordered. This, it was reported was the opinion of General Cushing. That being the case, there would be hardly a citizen who would not add a little more to the $300 and procure a substitute, so as to exempt him for three years or for the war. Such, in his opinion, would be the course pursued by the rich men, who were comparatively out of the reach of the act. He did not believe the war men were all gone. It would be remembered that for a time recruiting was dull, but that after the seven days' battle, the people made up their minds that men must be had, and soon a sufficient number came forward for a small bounty. It was not to avoid any responsibility that he urged deferring final action until Monday night, but only for the purpose of acting judiciously and safely.
Ald. Ternan had listened to the remarks of the Ald. of the 3d with great pleasure. It was an agreeable calm after a tirade of words, and he had shown himself to be a prudent merchant and a sensible man. He thought, however, in the resolutions presented by the Alderman of the 3d, that a part of his thunder had been stolen and its effect not accomplished. He could not see the effect in laying over the matter, for it was hardly possible to make any provisions that would sway the Government. If the resolutions of the report were adopted with those offered by himself, all contingencies would be provided for, the money would be raised, and the Committee would have their instructions to act.
Ald. Taylor wished only to say that the Alderman of the 12th was usually courteous in his remarks, but this evening he had misconstrued what had been said by himself. While he had charged the mob as belonging to the same party as the Ald. of the 12th, he had made no reference to any nationality. He thought it was possible to concoct a scheme so that the Board would be unanimous on the question, if the views of the opposite party were consulted. It would be observed that of the Committee of ten there were but two Republicans, and this he submitted was evidence that the Republicans had not been sufficiently consulted.
Ald. Whitney—that is the fault of the people of Brooklyn in returning so many Democrats. (Laughter and applause in the lobby.)
Ald. Taylor suggested that as the Republicans would be called on to foot as much of the bill as others, it might be in good taste to have one or two more gentlemen of his complexion as members of the Committee.
Ald. O'Keeffe explained, that as President of the Board he had appointed the Committee in accordance with the custom generally observed, giving to the dominant party of the Board a majority of the members.
Ald. Taylor moved that the report be laid over until next Monday evening, the resolutions to be referred to the Committee, and the whole subject to be the special order, immediately after the reading of the minutes.
The motion was agreed to, on the following division:
Ayes--Ald. Whitney, Wallace, Newman, Belknap, Nodyne, Kimball, O'Keeffe, Taylor, Perry, Kalbfleisch, and Fisher,--11. Nays--Ald. Mc-
Laughlin, Ennis, M. Murphy, Ternan, and E. Murphy--

THE COMMON COUNCIL.
NEW MEASURES FOR A LOAN.
$500,000 Voted for Relief of Conscripts
and Their Families.
THE BOARD UNANIMOUS FOR IT.
THE BELL-TOWER IN THE 13th WARD
MORE POLICEMEN PROPOSED
Sewerage Nuisance in the Eastern District
Pursuant to a recommendation of the Mayor, a special meeting of the Board of Aldermen was held last evening. A quorum was present, and Ald. O'Keeffe, President, in the Chair. The following communications from the Mayor were received and read:
Hon. Martin Kalbfleisch, Mayor of the City of Brooklyn:
HONORED SIR:—The undersigned taxpayers and owners of property in the Eastern District of the city of Brooklyn, beg leave to respectfully call your attention to the present state of sewerage in our district. It is within your knowledge that they have been lately subjected to an excessive tax for the sewerage of the city; this they would willingly have borne, had the benefits derived been anything like what was anticipated, but in their judgment failure must be written against the work. For some days the water and filth from the sewers have discharged into their cellars, greatly to their annoyance, and decidedly prejudicial to the health of the entire section. Cellars wherein their family stores have been kept have been turned into privies and sinks, and fevers have been engendered, whereby they have been subjected to expense and anxiety. They are advised that they have a valid claim against the city for damages done by the incapacity of said sewers, but their desire is not for damages but for relief. And though it is not strictly within your province to grant the relief, yet they pray you to cause their complaint to be certified to the Common Council, to the end that some steps may be taken to remedy the evil, and thus save the city from damages for spoliation, &c.
And as in duty they will ever pray.
CHARLES C. TALBOT, No. 12 Ainslie street.
E. P. KETCHAM, No. 18 Ainslie street.
JOHN REWL, No. 28 Ainslie street.
WM. N. LITTLE, No. 108 Grand street.
WM. CABBLE, Union avenue and Ainslie st.
HARVEY BRUNDAGE, No. 10 Ainslie street.
J. ROBINSON SMITH, North 1st, near 10th st.
The above was referred to the Committee on Sewerage.

RELIEF FOR CONSCRIPTS.
The following from the Mayor was also read:
MA YOR'S OFFICE,
BROOKLYN. August 19, 1863.
To the Hon. the Board of Aldermen:
GENTLEMEN:—In consequence of the inability of obtaining the proposed loan of "One Million" on the part of the Committee having in charge the subject matter of providing substitutes &c., to furnish the quota of Conscripts required under the Conscription Act from this city, and the necessity for speedy action in the matter, I have called your Honorable body together in order that some plan may be devised which may meet the case so as to modify the severity of the draft and remove, if possible, the objections now urged by capitalists against subscribing for the loan.
I respectfully refer your Honorable body to my message of the 20th of July last as fully embracing my views in regard to this subject, entertaining no doubt that if made the basis of your action, a loan sufficient for the purpose can be negociated [sic] at once. I shall he most happy, however, as I have been heretofore, to entertain any suggestions made on the part of your honorable body differing from mine, if thereby the object sought to be obtained can he facilitated, or more satisfactorily and more readily accomplished.
I desire also to call your attention to the enclosed communication of Mr. C. C. Talbot, and others If there is reason to apprehend that the facts stated therein are correct, it is a subject of the utmost moment, and an investigation should be had immediately, not only with a view to remedy the evil complained of at present, but to prevent its recurrence hereafter, if possible. Our system of Sewerage is a costly one, and if it should prove a failure or even prove to be faulty, it will cause great inconvenience as well as an expense, which will bear heavily upon many of our citizens; I, therefore, recommend that the matter be at once referred to a Committee for immediate investigation, and full report upon the subject.
Very respectfully,
MARTIN KABLFLEISCH, Mayor.
Ald. Strong offered the following resolutions in connection therewith:
Resolved, That pursuant to the power and authority of the Common Council, vested by chapter 514 of the laws of 1863, it is hereby determined and decided to raise a sum not exceeding five hundred thousand dollars, to be disbursed for the relief of families of persons who may be dratted into the military of the United States.
Resolved, That the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund be and hereby are authorised and directed to borrow money and raise upon the faith, credit, and property of the city of Brooklyn, the sum of $500,000 or as much thereof as may be necessary for the purposes of the foregoing resolution—the same to be raised on such terms and conditions, and in such manner as may be most advantageous to this city,
Resolved, That a select committee of seven for the Eastern District be appointed, whose duty it shall be as soon as the drafting shall be commenced in this city, to meet daily in their respective districts at some convenient and proper place and time, and hear and inquire into all applications of relief by persons ordered into the military service of the United States, and report to this Common Council what relief, if any, ought to be' extended: which, when approved off by a majority of all the members elected, shall take effect immediately; and for the purpose of acting on such reports, this Common Council will meet daily at 9 o'clock A. M. until all necessity therefore shall cease.
On motion, the Board went into Committee of the Whole for the consideration of the Mayor's message.
Ald. Strong believed that this matter was of the greatest moment to the city. The object of the resolutions which he had prepared, and offered at a former meeting, had been fully explained. In preparing them he had consulted the law, and had endeavored to comply with its requirements, expressing the object of the enactment of the Legislature at its last session. If the act were strictly interpreted, it would give relief to persons upon whom the greatest distress might fall. The power to administer this relief was in the hands of the Common Council, and unless it was applied under the act named, any proceeding to the contrary would be powerless. The Common Council, under it, were constituted a Board of Relief, and the expense accruing from it became a city charge, to be collected the same as other indebtedness. It was clearly, then, within the power of the municipal authority to give entire validity to the proposed action for relieving conscripted men. By pursuing the course he had suggested, the monied institutions would not hesitate to receive propositions for loans, and an application therefor [sic] would meet with success. He was not disposed to be captious in the mailer, nor did he feel at all annoyed by the adverse views pressed upon the Board. He desired to have the action of the Common Council such as to meet with success.
Ald. Ternan did not think it worth while to spend much time in discussing the matter, and in occupying the attention of the Board, when the subject was so generally understood. The second resolution certainly gave unqualified authority for the action of authorities, and was entirely fair in its spirit.
Ald. Strong explained the purport of the resolutions in detail, as he understood them, and as they must be construed by every person of intelligence. It was but a common duty to assist those on whom the hardships of the draft would inevitably fall, and from such as have the means it was very properly supposed that relief would be had. It would indeed, be a great mortification and a shame should the object sought for not be attained.
Ald. Fisher had prepared a series of resolutions almost identical with those offered by the Alderman of the 13th. He would, however, offer the following as an amendment:
Provided, That every person or family who shall receive any sum of money in gross from the fund so to be provided, instead of a weekly allowance as relief, a receipt be taken which shall express that the sum so paid shall be instead and in lieu of all relief to be furnished by the city or county to such person or to his family during such service.
Ald. Strong accepted the amendment.
Ald. Taylor called for the reading of the resolutions, and after being read moved to lay them on the table until the following evening, when the Board might meet and take final action. To him they appeared crude, and a deliberation of twenty-four hours would no doubt be of essential benefit to all in considering a subject of so great importance.
The question was then taken on the resolutions, and they were adopted, ayes 13, nays 1; Ald Taylor voting in the negative.
On motion of Ald. Strong the Committee then rose, and the Chairman, Ald. Whitney, reported the adoption of the resolutions to the Chair and submitted them to the action of the Board.
Ald. Strong moved that the action of the Committee be concurred in and the resolution adopted.
Ald. Taylor moved to table the resolution until Friday evening.
Ald. Whitney urged that there should be unanimity in whatever action was had. There could be no doubt about obtaining the money if the proper action was taken by the Board, and as the question was understood by all persons, the concluding action should be taken this evening. Delay was not necessary, nor could any effectiveness be given to the matter by it.
Ald. Strong again urged the adoption of the resolutions, and hoped that no captious objections would be allowed to interfere with a subject of such vital moment to all. He desired it to' be distinctly understood that for his own part he would wash his hands of anything of a political character connected, or attempted to be connected with the subject.
After some further discussion the question was taken on the resolutions, and they were adopted,
Ald. Taylor voting in the negative and objecting to the unanimous consent asked. Subsequently, however, he withdrew his objection, and desired to be recorded as voting in the affirmative.
The Special Committee to whom was referred August 3, 1863, the communication of the Bell Ringers of the 13th Ward Bell Tower, asking that repairs might be made to said Tower so as to put it in a safe condition, would respectfully

REPORT:
That they have, personally, visited and inspected said Bell Tower and find that it is in a very dilapidated condition, not a sound stick of timber being visible in the whole structure. Decay and ruin are apparent at every joint, and it seems almost a miracle of mercy that the whole structure has not, ere this, tumbled to the ground, with the loss of life of the bell ringer or passer-by. Every wind shakes it to its foundation, and during the prevalence of a storm the ringers abandon the lofty elevation, considering it altogether too dangerous to remain.
Immediate action should be taken in the premises ere the city is called upon to respond in damages for the loss of life or the destruction of private property. Your Committee are of the decided opinion that repairs are out of the question and a perfect waste of money without the shadow of a benefit, nothing less than a complete new structure being necessary. In this opinion they are seconded by numerous builders, whom they have consulted, and who suggest with your Committee that immediate action should be taken on the subject.
In the early part of the present year a communication from the bell-ringers of this tower, on this subject, was presented to this Common Council and referred to the E. D. Fire Department Committee. The Committee reported on the 8th of June "that the tower is in a dilapidated and even dangerous condition, liable at any moment to fall and beyond economical repair," recommending at the same time that an appropriation of $3,500 be made for building a new tower "in connection with the Armory about to be built in the Eastern District," and a resolution to that effect was attached to the report and adopted.
In consequence of this action on the part of the Common Council, your Committee have been somewhat embarrassed as to what action they should recommend, but from the representations made to your Committee by the Engineers, and numerous other prominent firemen, as well as from their own observation, they are satisfied that the tower ought to remain in its present location, for many reasons, some of which are that its location is the highest in the Eastern District from tide-water, and consequently a better view can be obtained from the same height of building; it is, also more central in its present position than it would be on the site of the proposed Armory, and less liable to engender strife and annoyance than if it were connected with a building devoted to another organization distinct in its character and purpose. And when it is, also, remembered that some time, perhaps a year or more must elapse before the Armory and tower could be ready for occupancy, your Committee are of opinion that the interests of the public at large, as well as the wishes and desires of the Fire Department would be best promoted by rescinding the resolution adopted June 8th, and authorizing instead, the Board of Contracts to immediately rebuild the tower on its present site, your Committee would, therefore, recommend for adoption the following resolutions, viz:
Resolved, That the resolution, adopted June 8th, 1863, to wit: "That this Common Council hereby determines and decides to build a bell-tower in the Eastern District in place of the tower in the Thirteenth Ward, and that the same be built in connection with the Armory about to be built in said district at an expense not exceeding the amount on hand to the credit thereof, to wit: three thousand five hundred dollars" be, and the same is hereby rescinded.
Resolved, That this Common Council do hereby determine and decide to rebuild the bell-tower in the Thirteenth Ward, upon its present site, at an expense not exceeding three thousand five hundred dollars, which amount is already appropriated for that purpose, and that the Board of Contracts be directed to carry the provisions of the resolution into effect. Respectfully submitted,
F. W. KALBFLEISCH,
JOHN A. SAAL.
SAMUEL TAYLOR,
Special Committee.

Ald. Strong hoped the resolutions of the Committee would not be adopted.
It was proposed to build a bell tower in connection with the new Armory, thereby saving expense, and at the same time giving a better site than that in present use. The bell tower in the 13th Ward, it was well known was considered a nuisance, and more than that, it was a great detriment to the property owned by the city adjacent to it. He believed that the general feeling was to connect the new tower with the Armory.
Ald. Kalbfleisch had been assured by the firemen and bell-ringers that the present location was in every respect the most preferable, and he had been guided somewhat in drawing the report by their experience.
Ald. Strong moved to table the resolutions.
Lost.
The question was then taken on the adoption of the report, and it was not agreed to, ayes 9, nays 3, there not being two-thirds of the members present voting in the affirmative.
The following, in relation to the draft, from the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, was submitted:
CITY HALL, BROOKLYN, Aug. 19, 1863.
To the Honorable the Common Council of the City of Brooklyn:
GENTLEMEN—The undersigned would respectfully invite your attention to the fact, in connection with the proceedings now in operation for a Conscription, that the Fire Department of this city has been maintained from almost time immemoriable [sic] under the assurance that the onerous duties pertaining to their calling, would under the statute, exempt the several members from the various civil duties which are especially onerous to the workingman. Having, however, been informed that an entirely opposite construction has been placed on the act, and that your honorable body is about perfecting measures whereby any injustice may be obviated, I would respectfully ask your attention in behalf of the members of this Department, and the laborious services they have rendered, in the belief that they were at once compensating for civil requirements, while giving their own fortunes and the prospects of their families in behalf of public protection.
I am, gentlemen, respectfully yours,
JOHN CUNNINGHAM, Chief Engineer.
In connection with the above, the following resolution was offered by Ald. McLaughlin:
Resolved, That, the members of the Fire Department of this city, in consideration of their unsolicited services in the saving of life and the preservation of property, be especially considered in the commutation to be raised by the City of Brooklyn, either in purchasing or procuring substitutes for said firemen who may be drawn in the Conscription, or for the relief of their families, as circumstances may suggest.
The resolution was adopted by unanimous consent.
CENTRAL DEPARTMENT OV THE METROPOLITAN
POLICE, 300 Mulberry street,
New York, August 17, 1863.
To the Mayor and Common Council of the City of Brooklyn.
In making an estimate for the amount required for the Police force of the City of Brooklyn last year, a balance of five thousand ($5,000) dollars

excess over expenditures was deducted from the appropriation for the current year.
A more careful estimate now shows that there will be a balance to the credit of the City of Brooklyn on the 1st day of January, 1864, of between ten and fifteen thousand dollars. This accumulation since 1857, when the Metropolitan Police law went into operation, it is unnecessary now to explain. It is sufficient to know that the balance is on the right side of the ledger.
Assuming that the amount will be $13,000, it would be sufficient to pay fifty additional men for four months of the present year, viz., from 1st September to 1st January, 1864. This would give five additional men to each precinct and sub-precinct, or such other disposition of the increased force as would best protect the public interest.
In view of the fact, of the small police force of the city—(the force remaining substantially the same as in 1857, notwithstanding the rapid spread and increase of population)—in view, too, of the times, which demand an increase of the police force, and is called for by the best interests of the city and by its citizens, and of the fact that the law has placed the power of increase entirely in your hands, I respectfully ask your honorable body to give the necessary authority for all immediate increase of fifty additional policemen to the Brooklyn force. Respectfully,
JOHN G. BERGEN.
Treasurer of Met. Police Board.
Laid on the table.
The Finance Committee to whom was refered [sic] the communication of the Mayor relative to expenditures incurred during the anticipated riot, offeeed [sic] the following:
REPORT:
That they examined into the matter, and find the following to constitute the items:—
Bill of Chas. Spaulding, for feeding policemen       $114 90
S. A. Holmes                                                              6 37
P. H. Grogan                                                          117 49
B. McKell                                                                 11 70
Hopkins & Brice                                                    157 80
E. Snedeker                                                                        29 00
H. B. Witty                                                                        24 50
Total....                                                                $462 26
That the incurring of the said indebtedness was ....

Brooklyn Voting $500,000 and Kings County $200,000 More for Relief
Under the Conscription Act.
A dispatch this morning says: "A Committee of the Common Council of Brooklyn today agreed to the appropriation of half a million to secure the exemption of drafted men having families depending on them. This will cover nearly half the quota of the city. The Board of Supervisors will, it is understood, appropriate $200,000 more." This action of the Brooklyn Council was in pursuance of an appeal from the citizens and the recommendation of Mayor Kalbfleisch, the latter of which is as follows:
MAYOR'S OFFICE, BROOKLYN, July 20.
To the Honorable the Board of Aldermen:
GENTLEMEN: After conferring with many of our prominent citizens, I have thought proper to call your attention to a subject which seems to demand your earliest and most earnest consideration. * * * * *
It would appear that the features of the Conscription law to which the strongest objection is made, and which more than any other excites the popular dissatisfaction, is the provision which exempts from service any drafted man who shall pay to the government the sum of $300. The operation of this provision, it is insisted upon, is virtually to limit the conscription and the probability of actual service in the army to the poorer classes, the men who do not possess, and who would find it extremely difficult, if not impossible, to raise the means required to purchase exemption. This is urged by many to be partial and unjust, and in the instances of those who have families dependent upon them for support, and whom, if called into service, they would be obliged to leave to the cold and uncertain care of public and private charity, is felt to be a hardship so intolerable as, in their opinion, to warrant them in forcibly resisting its imposition.
I repeat again, that I shall not be misunderstood; far be it from me to justify the entertainment of any such unlawful and improper purpose, but that it is entertained to a very considerable and alarming extent there is not the least doubt, and it is from this source that arises most of the danger that threatens the public peace.
Permit me, then, to suggest to your honorable body the propriety of taking such action as will alleviate and mitigate, if it does not entirely remove this cause of grievance and complaint.
What I would recommend is, the appropriation of an amount of money sufficient to purchase the exemption of those having families dependent upon them for support, who may be drafted, and who are unable to furnish or procure the means to do it themselves. Long before there was any reason to apprehend any resistance to the draft, this subject had engaged my attention, and reflection had convinced me that the adoption of a measure of the kind I have suggested would really be an exercise of prudent economy on the part of the city. The tax payer may object to the proposed increase of his already heavy burden of taxation; but I think that, after proper consideration and examination, he will agree with me that it is a measure of true economy.
The expense of supporting the families of the drafted men who have not the means of purchasing exemption, would in the end, I am satisfied, amount to a sum far greater than the $300 paid to retain them at home, themselves to take care of those dependent upon them for support. This is a question of mere dollars and cents which any can calculate for themselves.—And after all, as the government has announced its intention of appropriating the fund which the purposes of exemption may create, to the purpose of paying bounties, such an appropriation as I have suggested would but be doing indirectly that which the city has before done directly, providing for the payment of bounties to volunteers and for the relief of their families. And there is the other consideration, which, however, we may deprecate it, we are forced to take into account, and that is, should any omission to take some action on our part result in failing to prevent the enactment among us of the scenes that have a destruction of property to say nothing of life, to reimburse which would impose upon the taxpayers a burden compared to which the appropriation suggested would be a mere trifle.
Viewing the proposition in all the phases in which it may be presented—as a measure of pecuniary economy, as a means of preserving the peace and reputation of our city, as setting an example of obedience to law and as aiding the government by a liberal contribution to its fund for the encouragement of volunteering—I feel convinced that its adoption would be certain to receive the public sanction and approval.
I leave to your honorable body, if the proposition I have suggested should meet with your favor, the duty of properly considering and determining the amount which shall be appropriated, and of maturing the details through which the proposition shall be carried into effect. Perhaps a reference of the subject to a joint committee composed of the board of contracts and the finance, or a special committee of your honorable body, with directions to report at an early day to be set apart for the purpose, would be most proper. Very respectfully,
MARTIN KALBFLEISCH, Mayor.

The Draft in Brooklyn.
THE MILITIA UNDER ARMS.
The different militia regiments comprising the Fifth and Eleventh brigades were ordered to be in readiness for active service yesterday. The different organizations met at their respective armories during the day or evening. The Thirteenth and Twenty-eighth met at the city armory, corner of Henry and Cranberry streets; the Twenty-third and Fifty-second met at the armory corner of Fulton and Orange streets; the Fifty-sixth at the armory in .... .... methods for manufacturing cord in a ... and simple manner, and at a small expense. A machine has just been invented in Paris, called La glaciere a bascale. It is thus described:
A cylinder of metal—tin will answer—with a movable cover at one end, to be kept tightly in its place by a screw when shut; with two openings, one at each end, to receive through two funnels the materials used; and a discharge cock at one end to discharge the contents when the cylinder is to be emptied, is all the apparatus required. This cylinder, when properly charged, is placed on a pair of rockers, so that a see-saw .... enforcement of the draft has  ceased. The police are also held in readiness by order of the General Superintendent until further directions. It is not known when the draft will commence in Brooklyn, no orders having yet been received by the provost-marshals.

(From the Brooklyn Eagle, August 18.)
The draft in New York commences to-morrow; in this city, if nothing unforeseen occurs, the wheel will be set in motion on Monday or Tuesday. The quota for Brooklyn is a little over 4,000. We assume that 6,000 names will be drawn, so as to allow for those physically unable to render military service. Brooklyn is divided into two districts; the number of men to be drawn is alike in each. Under the original apportionment twice as many men were required in one district as in the other. Thanks to Governor Seymour this has been remedied by the President directing that the average of the Republican districts should be the quota for the Democratic districts of this city and New-York. A meeting of the Common Council will be held to-morrow evening to see what can be done towards raising the money to mitigate the severity of the law. It is said that the mayor will recommend the raising of $300,000 to be used solely to pay the price of exemption in cases of peculiar hardship. It is to be regretted that a stronger effort was not made to effect an agreement between the representatives of the banks and the local authorities, The difference between the capitalists and the representatives of the city, we are inclined to believe, were on political rather than on financial grounds The government, as one of the bank presidents stated, needed men; if the money is not to be used in furnishing them, we cannot, either as citizens or capitalists, see the propriety of raising it. There is no doubt but that a grave error was committed in failing to agree upon a plan of spending the money before going into the market to borrow.
For fear of a riot we have kept 3,000 militia under arms in this city for weeks, at a cost to the county of $3,000 or $4,000 per day. This drain on the resources of the county may continue for weeks, and the probabilities are that before the draft is completed, a sum equal to that which will at once put at rest apprehension of trouble will be eaten up. Mayor Kalbfleisch has been accustomed to carry things with a high hand about the City Hall. We assure him that in dealing with the public he cannot act "like a bull in a china shop." If he desires in good faith to relieve Brooklyn from the hardships which necessarily will attend conscription he will listen to the voice of those who have no political purpose to subserve in the advocacy of this measure. Once more we call his attention to the necessity of devising a plan which will conciliate all parties; if necessary, the mayor to do so, should for once yield something to the judgment of others.

BROOKLYN NEWS.
The Draft.
THE FIREMEN AND MILITIA TO BE EXEMPTED.
The Special Committee appointed by the Board of Aldermen, at their meeting on Monday evening, in regard to making arrangements for the distribution of the fund to be appropriated to mitigate the rigor of the draft, held a meeting yesterday morning in the Common Council Chamber. Alderman Tiernan, Chairman of the Committee, and Aldermen Nodyne, McLaughlin, Murphy and Kalbfleisch were present. Maj.-Gen. Duryea presented a petition from the officers of the Second division State national Guard, requesting, in view of the services which the militia have rendered the country, and the necessity which existed for keeping the organization perfect, that the Common Council should provide for the exemption of the members of the force.
The firemen made a similar claim at a former meeting of the Board of Aldermen, stating in the communication that they had risked their lives in the preservation of the property and lives of citizens. Alderman McLaughlin therefore offered the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted:
Resolved, That all members of the Fire Department of the City of Brooklyn, both exempt and active, who were legally drafted into the service of the United States under the Conscription act, shall have the commutation fee of $300 paid for them to the city. Should any member of the Department so drafted elect to serve, the sum of $300 shall be paid to him upon his being mustered into the service of the United States.
Alderman Nodyne then offered the following resolution, which was also adopted:
Resolved. That the active members of the various uniformed regiments of the City of Brooklyn, known as the National Guard, in consideration of their services heretofore rendered, and the alacrity with which they have responded to the Government in its time of peril, be placed upon the same footing, in the relief to be offered by the Common Council, as the firemen of said city, as provided in the foregoing resolution.
The Committee then adjourned, to meet this morning, when they will take into consideration some plan for distributing relief to the drafted men who do not belong to either of the above classes.

Brooklyn Common Council.
THE HALF MILLION CONSCRIPTION LOAN—THE RECENT
CALAMITY AT HAMILTON-AVENUE BRIDGE.
A special meeting of the Common Council was held Monday evening, in compliance with a call of the Mayor, to take such action in relation to the half-million dollar loan as to secure the money without unnecessary delay.
Alderman O'KEEFE, the President, occupied the Chair, and there were present Messrs. McLaughlin, Newman, Ennis, M. Murphy, Ternan, Talmage, E. Murphy, Taylor and Kalbfleisch.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved, when the following communication from the Mayor was submitted:
MAYOR'S OFFICE, BROOKLYN, Aug. 24, 1863.
To the Honorable the Board of Aldermen:
GENTLEMEN: I most sincerely regret the necessity which compels me to again call your honorable body together, and ask you to modify the resolutions adopted at your special meeting of the 19th inst., in reference to raising money to relieve the families of those who may be drafted to do military service in the army of the United States, in compliance with a law of Congress known as the Conscription act, for the reason that capitalists  express a disinclination to loan the money in their present shape.
The first resolution adopted by your honorable body provides for raising the money in pursuance of the power conferred upon the Common Councils of cities, by chapter 514 of the Laws of 1863. On consultation with Judge MORSE, the Treasurer, upon the subject, and an examination of some other statutes presumed to confer additional powers, as also to meet the wishes of parties desirous of investing some of their means in furtherance of the object in view, I have thought best the more to facilitate and expedite matters connected with the raising of the money, to submit for consideration, to your honorable body, the propriety of rescinding the first resolution, and adopt the following, which is substantially the same, and, in my opinion, will prove more effectual in its results.
Resolved, That in pursuance of the power and authority vested by law in this Common Council, it is hereby determined and decided to raise a sum not exceeding five hundred thousand dollars to be disbursed for the relief of the families of those who may be drafted for service into the armies of the United States.
The second resolution adopted by you provides for borrowing the money by the Commissioners on the Sinking Fund. This is not the usual way of borrowing money for the use of the city, and as chapter 40 of the laws of  1863 expressly provides that bonds issued for moneys expended for bounties to volunteers or for expenses of their enlistment, or for aid to their families, or to pay any liability incurred therefor, shall be in the same manner and form as other bonds heretofore issued by the city. It is considered inadvisable to depart in this instance from the mode invariably pursued on former occasions when loans have been negotiated. I therefore submit for adoption, the following in lieu thereof:
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be and are hereby, authorized and directed to borrow upon the faith and credit of the city, in such manner as may be most advantageous for the city, a sum hot exceeding five hundred thousand dollars, or as much thereof as may, from time to time, be necessary to carry into effect the foregoing resolutions. The moneys so borrowed to be paid into the city treasury, to be used for the purposes contemplated under the first resolution.
Very respectfully,
MARTIN KALBFLEISCH, Mayor.
I also beg leave to call your attention to the communi­cation of the Brooklyn City Railroad Company, in order that your honorable body may take such action in the premises as may be deemed best for the interests of the city, and to guard against the recurrence of accidents such as are mentioned therein.
Very respectfully,
MARTIN KALBFLEISCH, Mayor.
After the reading of the communication, Alderman. TERNAN moved to rescind the resolutions adopted at the last meeting, which was agreed to.
On motion of Alderman TERNAN, it was resolved to adopt the two resolutions suggested by the Mayor.
On motion it was then resolved to adorn a resolution providing a Committee of seven to disburse the fund.
The following Committee was appointed, the resolutions having been unanimously adopted: Aldermen Ternan, Nodyne, Taylor, McLaughlin, Kalbfleisch, Perry and McMurphy.
The following communication in relation to the recent calamity at the Hamilton-avenue draw bridge, was read and referred to the Law Committee:
The Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of the City of Brooklyn:
GENTLEMEN : I beg to call your attention to the lamentable accident at the bridge over Gowanus Creek on Hamilton-avenue, on the night of the 19th inst. We claim that the primary cause of this deplorable accident was the neglect of the city authorities in not furnishing proper lights and guards, and requiring more care from those having the charge of the bridge. This Company has no control, voice, or direction, in regard to the bridge, the lights, signals, or persons keeping the same. It is a part of the public highway, over which we, in common with others, have a right of transit. For this privilege we specially pay $20 per annum for every car run, and keep in repair not only seventeen feet in width of the bridge, but of the 30 miles of street occupied by us. Surely, for this consideration we have a right to, and do ask all possible care, and a full indemnity for all damages suffered by us, by reason of any neglect of the city authorities or its servants. We call your attention to the matter, not only in behalf of ourselves and those whom we transport, but in behalf of all others crossing the bridge. While the jury who examined the circumstances of this accident did not deem it within their province, or pertinent to their inquiry to take testimony as to the manner the bridge had been kept and lighted, other than on the night in question, there were those who were ready and ... to ... that the bridge had been opened at night without lights, when it was so dark it could not be seen; and that night after night no light has been there, so that those crossing had to get off or out of their vehicles and grope their way in the dark to find if the bridge was open or closed. With all respect we beg to suggest: First—That the city should forthwith add other and better lights, with signals on both sides of the bridge. Second—That gates should be so constructed as to close the street when the bridge is open. Third—That the passage of boats through the draw should be regulated by an ordinance, so that the draw should not be open but at stated intervals. Fourth—That the keeping of the bridge should be given to the Company, subject to the control of the city authorities. We acknowledge our duty to use all possible care; we mean to do so; if we do not, we must and do suffer. We hold the city subject to the same rule.
Respectfully submitted,
H. R. PIERSON,
President Brooklyn City Railroad Company.
The communication was referred to the Law Committee, and the Board adjourned.

MILITARY MATTERS IN THIS CITY.
The Regiments on Duty—The Preparations in the Navy Yard—The City Hall Garrisoned— Arrival of three Regiments United States Regulars—The Movements of Troops through the City—All Military Information prohibited by Gen. Canby.
All the Militia Regiments are on duty to-day, either at their respective Armories or in different parts of the city. One-half of each regiment is ordered to be retained at its armory, in the case of those not on duty elsewhere, while the remainder are allowed to be absent on shot leave, in the discretion of the commanding officer.
The Seventy first Regiment has two companies, C and D, on duty at High Bridge, under command of Captains Libby and Stowe. The left wing is on guard at the armory this morning.
The Thirty-seventh Regiment, except a detachment which guards the armory, is detailed at the Gas Works, foot of 18th street.
The Fourth Regiment is stationed at the White street Arsenal, in which building it has its armory.
Gen Hall is at the up town arsenal, corner of 35th street and 7th avenue, with the 8th regiment and a portion of the 55th.
The remainder of the 55th is at the gas works in East 14th street, near avenue B.
At Jefferson Market Drill Rooms, Colonel George B. Hall, formerly of the Excelsior Brigade, has his headquarters. He is raising a regiment, to be composed of ten companies, containing thirty-two men each. A meteing [sic] was held at the headquarters on Tuesday evening, at which a large number of men were enrolled. Three companies, almost full, have been already enrolled in Brooklyn for this regiment, and nearly four more in this city.
General Sandford remains on duty at the Police Headquarters.
Generals Dix and Canby are at their respective headquarters.

THE NAVY YARD.
Several vessels of the fleet lying in the stream have their guns bearing on the Navy Yard. The crews of the receiving ship North Carolina, the school-ship Savannah and several other men-of-war are at their guns ready for action, and several pieces of artillery have been hauled into the highways of the Yard ready for immediate use. The Army Quartermaster in this city sent over four tugs yesterday which Admiral Paulding armed immediately, each of them receiving several guns. The steam-tug Vanderbilt, Capt. Boggs, was also provided with a suitable battery in order to render such service as she might be ordered for in case of trouble. The marines on guard at the gate, and those left at the barracks of Flushing avenue are supplied with cartridges, and "toled off" in marching order.—The Armory, the Ordnance Department, the Navy Lyceum and other sections of the Yard are guarded; the muskets in the Lyceum are all loaded and ready to be handed out if needed. All the officers of the station have their side arms on or by them. All the approaches to the Yard on every side are strongly guarded either by the guns of the fleet in the stream or by special batteries. The employees are kept at work, however, evincing very little interest in the progress of the draft—indeed much less than was expected.

THE CITY HALL.
At 9 o'clock last evening, under orders from Brigadier General Yates, the City Hall was guarded by a detachment from Companies B, G, E, A, and K, of the 12th Regiment New York State National Guard, Col W. G. Ward commanding. The detachment was under command of Capt. L. N. Hansen, and will remain at the Hall a day or two.
The Mayor's office has a special guard over it, and the passage-ways leading to the Governor's room are also guarded. Why there should be so much military display at the City Hall no one seems to know.

ARRIVAL OF REGULARS
The steamship Empire arrived yesterday from Washington, having on board the 14th regiment of United States regulars, in command of Major McGiddings. The 12th U. S. regulars also arrived in the same vessel, numbering 450 men, in command of Capt Dunn.
The U. S. transport Daniel Webster arrived this morning from Alexandria, having on board 500 men of the second brigade of infantry regulars, in command of Col. Burbank.

THE MOVEMENTS OF TROOPS THROUGH THE CITY.
We give the following additional extract from Gen, Canby a recent order in relation to the movements of troops through the city:
Movements through the streets of the city will be made quietly and with as little delay as possible. Special care must be taken in this movement that the flanks and rear of the column are well guarded, and, if made in connection with artillery, that the supports are stronger than usual.
For the troops in the city the police alarm will be the signal for preparation, and will be communicated to the forts and vessels in the harbor. To avoid unnecessary alarm or disturbance in the city, commanders will take the necessary measures for assembling the troops without beating or sounding the usual alarm.
The police authorities have authorized the captains of precincts to put themselves in communication with the commanders of troops posted in their neighborhood for the purpose of communicating information and rendering such other assistance as may be necessary.
The publication, or furnishing of publication, by persons connected with this command, of any information in relation to the numbers of men, movements or operations of the troops, the ... and condition of the public works, or any other military information that might be used for inappropriate purposes, is prohibited.
By order of Brigadier General Canby.
C. T. CHRISTENSEN, Assistant Adjutant General.

BROOKLYN.
THE CONSCRIPTION IN BROOKLYN.—The Common Council held a special meeting last evening to take action in relation to the draft, with the view of perfecting measures to relieve poor men with large families. A communication having been read from Mayor Kalbfleisch, calling the attention of the Board to the necessity of speedy action. In consequence of the inability of obtaining the proposed loan of "one million" on the part of the Committee having in charge the subject matter of providing substitutes, Alderman Ternan offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Commissioners of the Sinking und be, and hereby are authorized and directed to borrow money and raise upon the faith, credit,  and property of the City of Brooklyn, the sum of $500,000 or so much thereof as may be necessary for the purpose of the foregoing resolution—the same to be raised on such terms and conditions, and in such manner as may be most advantageous to the city.
The resolution was passed unanimously. A resolution was adopted that members of the Fire Department be especially considered in the commutation to be raised by the City of Brooklyn.

SAD RAILROAD ACCIDENT—Three Persons Drowned.—A melancholy accident, attended by the loss of three lives, occurred on the Greenwood line of cars, at Gowanus creek, last night. The draw-bridge which cresses ihe creek at Hamilton avenue was open, it appears, for the purpose of allowing a vessel to pass through, when one of the city railroad cars; on its way to Fulton Ferry, came along, and in the darkness was driven into the water. Three passengers—two men and a boy—were on board at the time, and were all drowned before assistance could be rendered them.
The driver was precipitated into the creek off the platform, but beyond a few severe bruises he escaped uninjured. The conductor, Hunt, was carried down into the water, and had to break his way out through one of the glass windows before he could extricate himself from his perilous situation.
The dead bodies of the passengers were recovered, and removed to the station house for identification.—One of the passengers was a blind preacher, named Shannon, and the boy previously referred to was in his company at the time of the accident. The horses were drowned and the car completely demolished.

FURTHER PARTICULARS.
As soon as the accident became known, crowds flocked to the spot and the greatest excitement prevailed, the number of lives lost being greatly exaggerated by rumor. Assistance was soon obtained, and the bodies of the deceased were recovered. They were a man and a boy about 14 years of age, who were soon after identified as the blind preacher, Rev. William C. Shannon and the boy who attended him, named Thos. Stewart. Mr. Shannon had been to Fort Hamilton to preach to the soldiers and others, and was on his return home. He leaves a wife and sister who were dependent on his care to mourn his loss. They reside at 119 Degraw street.
The other passenger, Mr. Henry C. Herdjon, had a narrow escape of his life, and was very seriously injured. He was conveyed to a neighboring house, where he was attended by Dr. Buell, after which he was taken to his house in 9th street, near 3d avenue.
The conductor, Francis Hunt, was inside the car when it went over the bridge, and he escaped by breaking through one of the car windows while under water. He was severely cut with the broken glass.
The driver, John Farrell, was somewhat injured by the fall into the creek. No signal was made by the bridge tender that the draw was open. The bridge tender says the usual signal was hoisted, but this important question will probably be settled by the Coroner's inquest.
Coroner Bennett has taken charge of the bodies, and will proceed with the investigation to-day.
At the spot where the car fell in, the water is not over six or seven feet deep; the car fell on one side; both horses were drowned, and the car is badly damaged, involving a loss of about $500 to the City Railroad company.

THE POLICE FORCE OF BROOKLYN.—The following important communication from the Treasurer of the Metropolitan Police Board has been received by the Mayor and referred to the Committee on Police of the
Common Council:
CENTRAL DEPARTMENT OF THE METROPOLITAN
POLICE, 360 Mulberry street,
New York, August 17, 1863.

To the Mayor and Common Council of the City of
Brooklyn:
In making an estimate for the amount required for the Police force of the City of Brooklyn last year, a balance of five thousand ($5,000) dollars excess over expenditures was deducted from the appropriation for the current year.
A more careful estimate now shows that there will be a balance o the credit of the City of Brooklyn on the 1st day of January, 1864, of between ten and fifteen thousand dollars. This accumulation since 1857, when the Metropolitan Police law went into operation, it is unnecessary now to explain. It is sufficient to know that the balance is on the right side of the ledger.
Assuming that the amount will be $13,009, it would be sufficient to pay fifty additional men for four months of the present year, viz, from 1st September to 1st January, 1864. This would give five additional men to each precinct and sub-precinct, or such other disposition of the increased force as would best protect the public interest.
In view of the fact of the small police force of the city—(the force remaining substantially the same as in 1857, notwithstanding the rapid spread and increase of population)—in view, too, of the times, which demand an increase of the police force, and is called for by the best interests of the city and by its citizens, and of the fact that the law has placed the power of increase entirely in your hands, I respectfully ask your honorable body to give the necessary authority for an immediate increase of fifty additional policemen to the Brooklyn force.
Respectfully, JOHN G BERGEN,
Secretary of Met. Police Board.

THE BELL TOWER IN THE 13TH WARD.—The Special Committee of the Common Council, to whom was referred August 3d, 1863, the communication of the Bell Ringers, of the 13th Ward Bell Tower, asking that repairs might be made to said Tower, so as to put it in a safe condition, reported last evening that they have inspected said Bell Tower and find that it is in a very dilapidated condition, not a sound stick of timber being visible in the whole structure. They recommend that immediate action be taken in the premises ere the city is called upon to respond in damages for loss of life or the destruction of private property. The Committee proposed the following resolutions, which were laid over.
Resolved, That the Common Council do hereby determine and decide to rebuild the bell tower in the
Thirtieth Ward, upon its present site, at an expense not exceeding three thousand five hundred dollars, which amount is already appropriated for that pur­pose, and that the Board of Contracts be directed to carry the provisions of the resolution into effect.

Brooklyn City Times. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 1863.
THE ONE MILLION LOAN
THE BANKS REFUSE TO TAKE IT.
ACTION of THE COMMITTEE
Public Advertisement to be Made for Proposals.
Our readers will remember that at the last meeting of the Common Council Committee, and the Board of Contracts, at which the various Banks in the City were represented, it was agreed that the Boards of Directors thereof should consider the matter of taking the Loan of $1,000,000 authorized by the Common Council, to be raised and appropriated for the purpose of mitigating the rigors of the Draft, and report to the Mayor, to-day, what has their determination in regard thereto. Accordingly, this morning the Committee again met, when a response was received, understood to be unanimous on the part of the City Banks, declining to loan the money, or any part thereof.
The Committee, after considerable conversation, agreed to offer the loan to the public, and directed the following advertisement to be made:
MAYOR'S OFFICE, BROOKLYN, 12TH
August, 1863.—PROPOSALS will be received at the office of the undersigned, at the City Hall, until Monday, 17th instant, 10 o'clock, A. M., for a loan of ONE MILLION OF DOLLARS, or, any part thereof, for which certificates will be issued, payable in one year, with interest at the rate of seven per cent. per annum, in accordance with a resolution adopted by the Common Council on the 27th July.
The Common Council intend to apply to the Legislature at its next Session for an Act authorizing the issue of bonds to raise the necessary funds for the redemption of said certificates.
Proposals to be endorsed "Proposals for City Loan."
By order of the Committee.
                         MARTIN KALBFLEISCH, Mayor.

The Draft Reinforcements in the Army of the  Potomac—The New Recruits
Put Through Their Paces.
We are beginning to receive the advance specimens of our national defenders, whom the draft, and a lack of the three hundred dollars to substitute, added to their undoubted patriotism, have induced to enter the service, and their advent among us adds not a little to our chapter of comedies. The old soldiers seem to consider the new comers legitimate prey, and the way they enlighten the conscripts upon the matter of the appearance, size and domestic habits of the war elephant, is vastly more exciting than agreable [sic] to the victims, and considerably more entertaining to the old than to the new soldiers. The conscripts, of course, come into their new service very much as our new militia regiments used to go to the field—provided with immaculate clothing and new outfit complete, to which they have added the pin cushions, and needle-cases and innumerable etceteras which their anxious wives and sisters and sweethearts had bestowed with loving hands upon them. They do, indeed, look nice in their new toggery, when compared with the seedy-looking veterans all around and about them, and are the objects of an undoubted jealousy on the part of their newfound comrades. But some how they do not long retain their new clothes, and blankets, and haversacks, and havelock, and dear home mementoes; for, after the first two or three days' marching and drilling, hungry, because they can not crunch the "hard task," and thirsty, because their stomachs will not bear the vapid, insipid, stagnant, mud sweetened element here called water, they soundly sleep away not only the dark hours of night, but long into the morning, after their experienced tent-mates have arisen. Then they find, to their sorrow, that they are minus the beautiful blue uniforms of which they were the undoubted possessors the night previous, whose places have been supplied with tattered garments, bearing the unimpeachable marks of many a tedious march, and indubitable proofs that soap is scarce in the army. Complaint would be useless; but the expletives used by the conscripts, when they discover the fraud, betoken that the remembrance of their youthful Sabbath-school precepts has passed away with their losses, and they take their revenge in highly unchristian comments upon the morality and honesty of the Army of the Potomac.

INSPECTION OF CONSCRIPTS.
But this exchanging of clothing is only one way the old soldiers have of extracting amusement from the new-comers. After the duties of the morning are over, an enterprising observer might discover a crowd of veterans escorting a party of recruits to some secluded place near camp, where "inspection" is to take place. Now, it must not be supposed that this "inspection" is that inspection referred to in the army regulations, but it is a sort of rude ritual improvised for the occasion. The party, as they pass out of camp, are generally under the charge of a non-commissioned officer, selected for his humor and ability to create the most profound impression upon those who are to be "inspected." Arriving at a point in some field near where perhaps are ensconsed the commissioned officers of the regiment, within the thick foliage of the hazel and blackberry, (the candidates are ordered to divest themselves of their clothing and to form into line. If the day be one of those intensely hot ones, such as have afflicted us for a few days past, the denuded patriots are not kept facing the sun over half an hour at a time, when they are allowed to "about face" and go through the manual of arms until cooked upon each side alike. When this culinary process is completed, the "inspected" are allowed to don their habiliments, when they are told that such must be gone through with in order to harden them to the service. If a rain comes up during the day, some high private, who does not mind getting wet, parades the green soldiers for squad drill until the shower is over, to the no small annoyance of all concerned. Of course, none of the officers know any thing of the jocular indignities practiced by their subordinates, or, of course, none of them would allow "sich things to be carrid on," but I notice they never as yet have been able to ascertain who, if any, of their commands are the guilty party. An other thing I notice, is the fact, that after the new-comers learn the "sell," they are the first to avail themselves of the opportunity to inspect the next batch that arrives, "Every man has his turn and every dog his day," is the motto with all alike.

Mayor Kalbfleisch and the Measure to Mitigate the Severity of the Draft.
The Board of Aldermen three or four weeks ago passed a series of resolutions, prepared by Mayor Kalbfleisch, appropriating $1,000,000 to mitigate the severity of the conscription law. The Republican members of the committee, to which the prepartion [sic] of these resolutions was entrusted, desired to have the resolutions modified to meet their wishes. The modifications proposed were upon the whole unimportant. The Mayor obstinately refused to change a word in the resolutions of which he was the author. The consequence was that when the resolutions came before the Board, the Republican members refused to sustain them. Knowing how desirable it was to secure unity, the resolutions were sent back, so that they might be made to conform to the views of both political parties in the Board, while still subserving the purpose in view. The Mayor still obstinately refused to make any alterations, and the resolutions, in consequence, were carried through the Board by a strict party vote. The bank directors of this city refused to lend the money, alleging as a reason that the measure appeared to them to be a party one, and that as the action of the Aldermen had yet to be legalized by the Legislature, the question might take a party shape in that body, in which case there was a possibility that the banks would fail to obtain adequate security for their money. Thus, much to the disappointment of thousands of poor families in this city, the measure fell through. The Mayor's obstinacy and lack of consideration for the opinions of others seemed us pernicious and unjustifiable, and we so stated, admonishing him at the same time that in carrying through a project of this sort he could not expect the same humiliating subserviency to his will which the Mayor is accustomed to exact from the underlings around the City Hall. At the last meeting of the Board of Aldermen a project having the same end in view as that which the Mayor's obstinacy defeated, was introduced by a Republican Alderman. The plan proposed meets with general acceptance, and if carried out will relieve men whose absence will leave those near and dear to them dependent upon the public bounty, from their responsibility under the conscription law, besides securing a merited recognition of the services of the members of the Fire Department, who are also, under this plan, to be relieved from liability to military service, if they choose to avail themselves of the favor. We cannot see what objection the Mayor can possibly have to this measure, except that he is not the author of it, and that its execution is left to the Board of Aldermen. We understand, however, that his honor is not satisfied, and that he has called the Aldermen together on Monday to discuss a plan of his Honor's devising. Delay certainly, and in all probability total failure of a project at once economical, charitable, and just, will be the consequence, or we are no prophets if this determination on the part of Mayor Kalbfleisch to have his plan or none adopted be adhered to. Now we hold that this obstinacy is unjustifiable, and the result of it will be to bring sorrow on many a poor man's home. The Mayor, through his minions, attributes unworthy motives to us for the course we have taken. There is not a reader of this journal who will believe the Mayor, or any other man, that the course of the EAGLE is influenced by any other motive, than a desire to advance the public interest. For its principles the EAGLE has risked its very existence. There is no corporation in Brooklyn, or out of it influentual enough to escape our censure when censure is deserved; there is no public officer, no matter what party he represents, who need expect imunity [sic] from criticism when he is puzzle-headed, obstinate or corrupt. Whatever faults the EAGLE may have, friend or foe will alike concede that lack of independence is not of them. Strong in the public confidence, the EAGLE has only defiance for its foes. Our readers will bear us witness that we have missed no opportunity of commending Mayor Kalbfleisch whenever his conduct was commendable. We feel under no obligations to support him in keeping the streets dark and dirty. We cannot endorse him when by his act assessment certificates for the payment of which the city was not responsible, and which were bought by speculators at 25 and 30 cents on the dollar, were converted into seven per cent bonds, thus adding to the debt of the city $240,000. When the Mayor assured us on his honor that he was not interested a dollar in these certificates, we believed him and threw discredit on those who assured us that Mr. Kalbfleisch, Jr., could not say as much, that the Mayor was escaping under a technicality, and that it was all in the family. In the future as in

the past we will sustain the Mayor when we believe him to he right, and we shall condemn him whenever we think he is in the wrong.
We have no space nor inclination to enter into a personal altercation with Mayor Kalbfleisch or his creatures. He has men around him who have hung on to the body politic as a leech on the body natural. Men who live for office, and who cannot live without it. We have heard that the chief executive officer of this city over his cups is accustomed to tell his boon companions that the EAGLE is hostile to him because he did not give this or that office to those who control its columns. Our motives can be known only to ourselves. We now assure the Mayor that he is mistaken, and that the next time he relates the story he will be deliberately lying. To the trite and stupid billingsgate of his Honor's henchman, we have nothing to say in reply. Chesterfield himself might be excused for forgetting the courtesies of life had he been thrown into the society of bear dancers, or compelled to serve as a subordinate in the north-east corner of the City Hall.

The Common Council and the Draft.
The Aldermen of the Eastern District who constitute one of the Committees under whose direction the fund proposed to be raised for mitigating the hardships of the draft, is to be disbursed, held a meeting last evening to discuss the plan of administering the relief. The plan these gentlemen propose will probably be submitted to the full Board, before it is adopted; it emanates from Alderman Strong, the author of the resolutions adopted by the Common Council. It is expressed in the following resolutions:
Resolved, That in the distribution of the relief fund the prime object to be kept in view should be the furnishing of men to the Government. That in every instance of an application for relief a full and personal examination and inquiry should be made into all the circumstances thereof; that in the performance of this duty the committee would call to its aid an associate committee of well known citizens, and no recommendation of relief should be reported to the Common Council without the concurrence of such associate committee; and further that in no case whatever should any relief be granted unless the drafted man or his substitute be accepted by the United States and actually mustered into the service, and at the same time be in need of and worthy of such relief.
Resolved, That due care should be had to secure the dispensation of such relief as might be granted in such manner as would be most beneficial to the families themselves.
These resolutions are somewhat vague, and leave us in doubt on some points as to the intentions of the Committee. In cases where a man would leave a large family in helpless circumstances if he should enter the service, it would be better to obtain a substitute even as a matter of public economy. The Committee do not make it clear whether they would undertake to provide or pay substitutes. It is understood that the money is to be paid only to such persons as enter the U. S. service, and who may have a family in circumstances requiring such relief. If the money is to be paid to the families of the men, then the Board had better adopt the old plan of weekly payments, for the worst form of administering relief is to pay the money in a lump, for it is sure to be spent long before the time it was calculated to last, and the families would become a charge upon the county. It was undoubtedly the intention of a majority of the Common Council, and the general belief outside that the resolutions adopted by the Board had a wider scope than the mere doling out ....

The Draft in Brooklyn—The Third Congressional District.
We called this morning at the office of Provost Marshal Gregory, and were informed that everything was in readiness to proceed with the drawing. No order has yet been received, and as three days' notice is usually given, the drawing is not likely to commence on Monday or Tuesday as rumored.
The enrollment in this district has been thoroughly revised, and is now believed to be as complete and correct as it is possible to make it. In the revision and comparison of lists it was found that out of sixteen thousand names only thirty had been duplicated.
The circumstances of both these cases were inquired into, and the manner in which the duplication occurred was explained. The enrollment occupied several weeks and during that time some of the unsettled population, such as young men living in boarding houses moved from one house to another and so timed their removals as to be enrolled by the officers in different districts. In each of the thirty cases alluded to, the owner of the duplicated name was a boarder, who had changed his residence while enrollment was progressing.
A suspicion has haunted some people that their names were down twice on the enrollment books, because they were taken at their residence, and again at their place of business. Such errors were avoided by a simple plan; names taken at places of business, unless the parties slept on the premises, and made it their actual residence, were not entered on the books, but the other lists were referred to, to see if the names had been enrolled. If any name was not found on the books, the enrolling officer was sent back in each case, to make necessary inquiries, and have any omission corrected. This explanation will probably set at rest a good many persons who felt uneasy under the impression that they might have two chances instead of one, of shouldering a musket or paying $300. The Enrollment Commissioners and the employees of the office give polite attention to all inquiries and seem ready to furnish any information they can to satisfy the public as to their proceedings.

TROUBLE WITH CONSCRIPTS.—Conscripts and substitutes appear to be troublesome fellows to get along with, and require much looking after; like the countryman's horse they are hard to catch and are not worth much when caught. About the hardest duty that soldiers can be set at is, we should judge, guarding conscripts. The Boston Traveller gives an account of the transportation of two hundred Massachusetts conscripts from Boston to Alexandria, during which the following episode occurred:
"After leaving the camp everything went on well until Wednesday night about nine o'clock, when notice was given to the guard that some of the conscripts were making preparations to fire the steamer. The De Molay was in the Potomac River at the time. An alarm was instantly sounded, and the whole guard called out, the hose made ready, and upon investigation it was discovered that some of the conscripts had piled up a variety of stuff in the hold of the vessel, and contemplated having a nice fire in a few moments, but it was discovered in season to prevent their plan being carried out. The De Molay arrived at Alexandria, Va., on Thursday night. About nine o'clock, when a short distance from the wharf, about twenty-five or thirty of the conscripts made an attempt to escape by jumping overboard and striking out for the shore. An alarm was immediately given, and the whole guard turned out, but twenty of the 'skedaddling' party succeeded in getting away from the steamer. Some twenty or thirty shots were fired at those in the water by the guard, but it being dark, they had little chance of hitting any of them. The boats were at once lowered and manned by the guard, and after a short pursuit seventeen men were picked up, some in the water, and several on canal boats that were lying near, on which they had sought to conceal themselves. The prisoners were taken back to the De Molay, where they were ironed together, placed upon a settee, and kept in that position over night. A man upon one of the canal boats in the river said he saw two of the conscripts in the water go down when fired upon by the guard, and heard another one cry out: 'My God, I am hit.' All of the party were recaptured but the three alluded to above. There was no more trouble that night. The next morning the steamer went up to the wharf and landed the conscripts, who were delivered by the guard to a regiment of Pennsylvania Reserves, in waiting to receive them."

Affairs at the Navy Yard.
DEPARTURE OF THE FLEET FOR CHARLESTON.
Since the attack on Charleston commenced, the number of vessels dispatched from our Navy Yard with ammunition, stores and provisions, has been almost as great as that sent to all the other squadrons together during the same time. In addition to the ships reported as having left within the last week, three more left yesterday, at 1 o'clock, the U. S, steamer Aries filled with stores, provisions and necessaries for a cruise on active service; the Adams Express Company steamer Mary Sanford and the schooner Alethea; the two last named were loaded with ice, lemons, potatoes and other delicacies for the sailors of the fleet. The Mary Sanford had no less than 250 tons of ice, and the schooner about 50 tons more. Beside, another vessel left a few days ago with another large cargo of the same valuable commodity; and in a few days more still another is to depart similarly loaded. The care of the Navy Department for the crews of the ships now engaged in the attack is so ample that even the scuttle buts in which water for ordinary drinking is kept, are provided with a fair share of ice—a circumstance unparalleled in the history of the Navy of the United States.

THE HOME IN COMMISSION.
Yesterday at noon the United States steamer Home was put formally in commission and received her officers and crew. Lieut. Commander
Fillebronne, in turning over the ship to her officers, made a brief but eloquent speech on the benevolence of the Navy in thus providing so great a luxury as a "maritime boudoir" for its public service. As soon as the officers and crew were mustered, orders were given to get up steam and prepare the vessel immediately for her departure, as she is very much needed at Charleston. We described the Home minutely on Tuesday when she was purchased. She will sail to-day at three o'clock for the nearest rendezvous to the attacking squadron. The following is a list of the officers:
Acting Master Commanding, W. H. Garfield; Acting Assistant Paymaster, T. W. Burger; Acting Engigns [sic], A. E. Barnett, J. E. Stickney and
W. Shackford; Acting Masters Mates, J. H. Gould, F. K. S. Nye and F. H. Monroe; Engineers, Acting First Assistant, B. S. Danton; Acting Second Assistant, C. Drandreau; Acting Third Assistants, P. Dandreau, C. K. Roelker and T. W. Dee.

UNPRECEDENTED RUSH OF BUSINESS AT THE NAVY YARD.
At no time since the war began, or ever before were the authorities of the Brooklyn Navy Yard so hard pressed with work as just now.
The mechanics in all the departments are kept constantly busy both day and night.
At night time the Yard is almost as noisy as in the day. The echoes of hammering, sawing, testing engines, &c, keep people in the vicinity of the Yard continually awake. The attack on Charleston has added, in a very great measure, to this extreme hurry. Almost every day, besides the, ordinary business of discharging schooners and other small vessels, laden with provisions, ammunition, &c., and besides attending to the six or seven new men-of-war in course of construction, vessels have to be equipped at the shortest possible notice and dispatched to sea in perfect trim, although the time sometimes given for the execution of the work renders it perfectly impossible to do it as it should be done.
There were until yesterday the iron-clad Lehigh, the steamer Home, the Mary Sandford, the schooner Alethea, the steamship Relife, the steamer  Ariel, and the new steamtug Ajax—all at the very same time, employing a large number of hands and requiring incessant and unremitting toil. The U. S. steamer Mackinaw was also fitted out and dispatched within the last three days, and sailed yesterday in tow of the steamtug Governor to receive her machinery. The clerical department is worked to a great extent beyond the usual business, although no additional hands have been given by the Government. The copying, registering, and issuing of general orders daily, copying of requisitions for every ship at the station, as the case may be, and a variety of other writing to be done, is so heavy that the clerks have sometimes within the past week become exhausted with work. Colonel Willett, Secretary of the Admiral, Mr. Chas. Morse and Mr. Willett, Jr., are the only employees provided for the execution of the arduous duties in the Commandant's office.

THE U. S. STEAMER ALABAMA.
Orders have been received from the Secretary of the Navy to discharge such of the crew of this vessel, which is now lying in Quarantine with the yellow fever on board, as are convalescent, and who have not more than four months to serve.—The remaining part of the crew is to be allowed on shore for such period of liberty as their commanding officer may see fit to give. At the expiration of their liberty they are to be transferred to the receiving-ship North Carolina. Several deaths have occurred since her arrival here, but the number is daily diminishing. The U. S. steamer Magnolia is still tending the Alabama.

BROOKLYN NEWS.
REPARATIONS FOR THE DRAFT IN BROOKLYN—ARRIVAL OF UNITED STATES TROOPS.—The arrangements for commencing the draft in this city on Monday morning are completed. The Provost-Marshal of the Second District expects to complete the drawing in three days, and the Provost-Marshal of the Third District intends to finish two Wards each day, and more if possible. It is probable that the entire week will be consumed before the drawing is completed. A number of regiments arrived in the city, last evening, from New-York, and encamped in different localities. The Eighth Ohio and First Indiana pitched their tents on Fort Greene Park. The Fourteenth Indiana and Seventh Michigan encamped on the parade-ground at East New-York. The One Hundred and Tenth Ohio and another regiment is encamped on the Base Ball Ground bounded by Union, Sackett, Smith and Hoyt streets. The Fourth Ohio proceeded to Jamaica. Several of the militia regiments were ordered to Jamaica, but the orders were subsequently countermanded. The officers of the Forty-ninth Police Precinct raised their flag, and fired a national salute with a ten-pounder in their possession, in honor of the veterans who passed their Station-house on the march to East New-York.

THE FALL OF SUMTER.—The Brooklyn City Gaslight Company are making preparations to illuminate their building in Remsen-street as soon as it is officially announced that the "Old Flag" waves over Fort Sumter. They experimented with the lights this evening, and they made a brilliant appearance.

Williamsburgh.
FIREMEN'S DEMONSTRATION.—Manhattan Engine Company No. 8, of New-York, is now at the house of the Victory Engine No. 11, on Clymer-street, near Bedford-avenue, Brooklyn, (E. D.) This evening, at 8 o'clock, after a collation there, she will be paraded to the Roosevelt-street ferry, and sail to the foot of Roosevelt-street, New-York, where she will be received and escorted home by a large procession formed in her honor. No. 8 is the steam fire-apparatus sent to contest with those of English build.

KILLED BY A FALL.—Yesterday noon, CLARENCE, the son of Mr. Geo. C. Wood, liveryman, No. 70 South Sixth-street, Brooklyn, (E, D.,) fell through an aperature for passing hay and fractured his skull. He was so badly injured that he died in less than an hour. His age was six years. Coroner Barrett held an inquest.

Brooklyn City News.
MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 1863.
THE DRAFT LOAN.
The statements in the New York papers to the contrary notwithstanding, not a single bid has been received for the $1,000,000 loan advertised for by the corporate authorities. The time for receiving proposals expired this morning, and so there is, we suppose, an end to that matter.
The Common Council Committee and the Board of Contracts met this morning, and it was agreed that a special meeting of the Common Council should be called by the Mayor, to meet on Wednesday next. On that occasion it is probable that the Board will repeal their former resolutions, which have failed to secure the object in view, and adopt something like the ordinance enacted by the New York Aldermen on Saturday, and which appears to meet with general approval. The New York ordinance appropriates $3,000,000, for the purpose of paying $300 to every drafted person in indigent circumstances, whose liability to serve shall have become fixed, for the relief of his family; and to every drafted fireman, who does not wish to enter the military service, to enable him to procure a substitute; also to every person who shall volunteer as a soldier. This ordinance was voted for by all the Republican members of the Board, and, it is expected, will receive the approval of Mayor OPDYKE. The measure is believed to be legal, and it is supposed there will be no difficulty in raising the money under it.

"BEWARE OF DANGER"—"ICE THIN HERE."—Such are the notices frequently put up during the skating season, in places of public resort for that winter exercise. Just now we would put them up as a warning to the Federal authorities on the question of STATE RIGHTS. Under the excitement of National difficulties, not perhaps unmingled with the promotion of ambitious projects, there is an evident tendency on the part of the Executive and Administration to tread with incautious steps on STATE RIGHTS. It is a very dangerous spot to tread upon, and our earnest regard for the duly constituted authorities and their safety, leads us to throw out the signals of danger. The "ice" on the surface of public feeling on the matter of the inviolability of, and sacred regard due to, the rights and privileges of our Sovereign and Independent States, is very thin, and the hazard is too great, of a plunge in the troubled waters of civil commotion, for us to remain quiet, without promptly exhibiting the alarm signals of danger.

BROOKLYN.
THE MILITIA UNDER ARMS.—The different militia regiments comprising the Fifth and Eleventh Brigades were ordered to be in readiness for active service yesterday. The different organizations met at their respective armories during the day or evening. The 13th and 28th met at the City Armory, corner of Henry and Cranberry streets; the 23d and 52d met at the armory corner of Fulton and Orange streets; the 66th at the armory in Raymond street; the 70th at the arsenal in Portland avenue; and the 47th at their armory in the Eastern District.
Strong guards were detailed last night at all the armories and places where arms and military encoutrements are stored. The regiments are to report at their respective headquarters daily, and to keep themselves in readiness to act at short notice. Since the return of the militia from Pennsylvania and Maryland, one company of each .... kept on constant duty in guarding .... Now the entire force will be kept until .... all apprehension of danger from the enrollment of the draft has ceased. The police are also held in readiness by order of the General Superintendent, until further directions. It is not known when the draft will be commenced in Brooklyn, no orders having yet been received by the Provost-Marshals.

THE FIFTY-SECOND REGIMENT.—There has been much sickness among the members of this regiment, and several deaths have occurred since their return from the States of Pennsylvania and Maryland. Those of the officers who recently died are Captains Green, Walsh and Denitre, and six other officers are sick from camp fever, contracted during the campaign. Several of the privates have also died from similar causes.

THE BEST JOKE OF THE SEASON.
Says our Fulton ferry cotemporary in its last issue:—
"Whatever faults the Eagle may have, friend and foe will coincide that lack of independence is not one of them.
The writer of the foregoing sentence is really cruel in the keen irony and sharp satire with which he so covertly assails his employer. It is striking down one in "the house of his friends," in his own house, indeed, and with a vengeance. The "independence" of the Eagle! What a magnificent joke! Why, from that day, not many years ago, when the pecuniary contributions of sundry politicians rescued it from the very verge of the grave, down to the present time, when through a succession of fortuitous accidents, and the aid of the brains and talents of others, its proprietor is enabled to inscribe his name upon the roll of Brooklyn's "wealthy men," the Eagle has notoriously been the most time-serving and abjectly sycophantic sheet, where "thrift has followed fawning," that ever issued from the press. True, it has generally worn a swaggering, braggart, defiant sort of air, which some might mistake for independence, but it was merely the assurance and assumption of the confidence man and sharper, and put on to deceive and browbeat the ignorant and timid, though really quite as much to hide guilty fears of detection and exposure. The exhibition of a well filled pocket book was always sufficient to unmask the pretence and reveal the real intent. Columns of evidence we might cite to prove this fact, but a brief allusion to its course will suffice to remind our readers of what is already more or less familar [sic] to most of them.
Take the corporations of our city, the Rail Road, the Ferry, and the Gas companies, for instance, and which of them has this "independent" sheet not assailed and abused as monopolies, and violators of the rights of the public? And yet, for no one of them did it ever fail to find an apology or defence, if but patronage, in the way of advertising or job-printing, or something more tangible still, was dispensed to it. And where is the politician or public officer, no matter with what party he may have been connected, who, if derided and criticised in its columns, ever failed to silence its noisy clamor, and secure immunity from its dirty diatribes, if he desired it, by administering to it a soothing draught of public pap? Take its political course, and what a striking spectacle of "independence" does that present? It is not necessary to go back but a couple of years. During the last political campaign it was an advocate of Breckinridge and his rebellious crew, and when the treason of his partisans culminated in the firing on Fort Sumter, and the inauguration of the rebellion, it continued to be so earnest in its sympathy with its old friends, that the Administration directed it to be excluded from the mails as a disloyal publication. How did it show its immaculate "independence" then? Why, its then able editor was promptly dismissed, sacrificed to appease the wrath of the indignant powers that be, a more supple instrument substituted in his stead, and the paper immediately became a subservient tool of the Administration, having secured pardon upon the express condition and promise that it should become so. The Democratic party was then apparently under a cloud, and this "independent" sheet did not hesitate formally to proclaim its abandonment of all connection with it, and to plunge, soul and body, into the "Union," no party, movement then set on foot, it promising to be, as it proved, a popular and successful one. Since then the prospects of the Democratic party have materially improved, success has perched upon its banners, and is likely to remain there for an indefinite period, and lo! the Eagle is again a "Democratic organ," and the eulogist of the "primary Kings" who erst it so fiercely denounced. Fort Lafayette has no longer any terrors for it, and so, it shows its "independence" again. To-day it affects to adhere to Governor SEYMOUR and the conservative Democrats, and yet its managers, in private, are enthusiastic in expressing their hearty sympathy and concurrence with the FERNANDO WOOD, "peace at any price" men, and dare not publicly denounce them. This is another phase of its "independence."
If an all-absorbing, exclusive devotion to self-interest, regardless of every other consideration whatever, is "independence," the Eagle is correct in claiming that it has no lack of it. To its self-interest, everything, even the dictates of ordinary gratitude, must succumb. As an example, there is the fact that but a few days ago it most coarsely and wantonly assailed a gentleman—who was the means of saving its establishment from mob violence, and who has assumed the management of the new theatre soon to open in this city—for no other reason under Heaven, that any one can conjecture, other than that its proprietor feared the new enterprise might, in its rivalry to the Academy, depreciate the value of the stock he owned therein. When it finds that its insolent assault will fail to embarrass or retard the new enterprise, or for some other more potential reason, we may expect that it will exhibit its "independence" by becoming an enthusiastic supporter and advocate of it. And yet with all these facts, to say nothing of a host of others we might enumerate, patent before its readers and the public, to talk of the independence of the Eagle! Why it is the best joke of the season, and the whole town is in a broad grin over it.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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