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Civil War Newspapers
Westchester County, New York

THE DRAFT IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY.
A large meeting was held in Morrisiana, Tuesday evening, to hear the report of a committee appointed to secure a suspension of the draft. A communication was read from Moses G. Leonard, Provost Marshal of the Tenth District, from which the following is an extract:
Finding so much excitement produced in the popular mind as to prevent the proper execution of the law, I immediately suspended, for the time being, all business of the district; and, that there should be no cause to produce outbreak or disturbance, I removed the books and papers of the office and government property to a place of security out of the district.
Thus far there has been nothing from the government countermanding my action, and I have reason to believe, no desire on the part of the authorities, and certainly no inclination of mine, to vary the course thus decided upon.
If such arrangements, conveyed to me verbally to-day by you, can be carried out—namely, to provide the quota of men for this district, or any portion of  volunteers or substitutes by the authorities or individuals—I have reason to believe the government would willingly accept, and for myself, I should most gladly welcome any such consummation.
In conclusion, your fellow townsmen may be assured that nothing further will be done in reference to the draft in this district until full information is given to the public of such intention. I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, your obedient servant.
Several addresses were made. Hon. A. B. Tappan, State Prison Inspector, elected on the Republican ticket, denounced the Conscription Act as unconstitutional. He said "certain parties were endeavoring to make it appear that Democrats were disloyal, but they had done more than their share in Westchester, and were yet willing to respond voluntarily, though not by force."
Isaac T. Williams, Esq., of West Farms, and a legal adviser of the Tribune, offered the following resolutions, which were unanimously adopted:
That while we pledge ourselves to the strictest obedience to all laws, human and divine, and will, in no wise, directly or indirectly, countenance the violation of either law or morals.
Resolved, That no man shall be permitted to leave the county of Westchester for the seat of war, unless he shall go voluntarily, cheerfully, and with a heart for the work.
Resolved, That the county of Westchester, by a resort to her pecuniary resources, has abundant power and ability to achieve this end, and that it is both justice and patriotism to do so.
Hon. William Radford, M. C. elect, said that in an interview with Gov. Seymour, a federal officer was present who offered to send a regiment to every district, and patrol the Hudson with gunboats. Gov. Seymour replied that he needed no such aid, being perfectly able to maintain the peace.

New Castle.
An act to Ameliorate the Draft in New Castle
Whereas, The Town on New Castle has already sent to the field quite a number of volunteers; and
Whereas, Some eight or ten of them having got homesick, and have returned without leave of their officers to see their friends, (those that keep liquor, especially;) and 
Whereas, the Deputy Sheriff, and Zero Hoyt, constable, have greatly disturbed these visitors and taken some to the Provost Marshal, and will not allow the remainder to assist us in getting our hay and harvest without giving said visitors great fears; and
Whereas, the weather is not good for getting said hay--therefore,
Resolved, That we cannot afford to do without the help of these men; that a Committee of one be appointed by said town to beset Jeff. Davis at Richmond and represent ....

The Hon. J. B. Haskin, of Westchester county, N. Y., in a speech before the Board of Supervisors, arguing in favor of a postponement of the Conscription, concluded as follows:
"I am anxious, as I hope every citizen is, to avoid the disgrace of the enforcement of the draft, especially in the county of Westchester, surrounded, as it is, by so many revolutionary
reminiscences; and I feel assured that if the Government will but give us a reasonable time, Westchester will, without the yoking of conscripts together, yield all the men that the draft—so called—requires from this county.—This war, thank God, is drawing to a close; this war, in my opinion, does not require that there should be sent from the State of New York a single man to reinforce our armies.—But if the General Government will insist upon the enforcement of the draft, we must meet it as loyal citizens; meet it not only as men who desire to have the rebellion crushed, the Union restored as it was, the Constitution maintained as it is, but also to perpetuate a government for the Union and for the State which shall in the future, give more benefits in the way of liberal principles—in the way of beneficent legislation—in the way of everything that conduces to make men on earth happy—than any government under beaten."

Fort Schuyler.
Fort Schuyler (Throgg's Neck) is occupied at present by the regiment commanded by Senator Baker, of Oregon. Colonel Baker is taking great pains with the drill of his force, and is ambitious to bare the best disciplined regiment in the army. The men are robust, well-built, a little inexpert in the use of their weapons, but are fast learning, and becoming martial in their appearance. The officers look well on parade.

WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N. Y.
A very large meeting was held in Morrisiana, Westchester county, Tuesday night, over which Hon. John B. Haskin presided, who stated that he had seen a large number of the wealthy citizens of the county and did not find one who was not willing to have any sum voted by the supervisors necessary to prevent "dragging men away by force from their homes, their firesides and their families." Hon. A. B. Tappan expressed himself as opposed to the conscription act upon every ground, not excepting that of its unconstitutionality, Isaac T. Williams offered the following resolutions which were adopted unanimously:
That while we pledge ourselves to the strictest obedience to all laws, human and divine, and will, in no wise, directly or indirectly, countenance the violation of either law or morals,
Resolved, That no man shall be permitted to leave the county of Westchester for the seat of war unless he shall go voluntarily, cheerfully, and with a heart for the work.
Resolved, That the county of Westchester, by a resort to her pecuniary resources, has abundant power and ability to achieve this end, and that it is both justice and patriotism to do so.
Hon. Wm. Radford, M. C. elect, Hon. Pierre C. Talman, Wm. Cauldwell, Esq., editor of the Sunday Mercury and Supervisor of Morrisiana, Lewis G. Morris, Esq., and others spoke in support of the resolutions. The character of this meeting may he inferred from the following reference to the men who participated in it by the New York Express:
The above meeting deserves more than usual attention. Hon. J. B. Haskin, Hon. Wm. Radford, M. C. elect, State Prison Inspector Tappan (elected on the Republican Union ticket), Isaac T. Williams, Esq., who defended Horace Greeley in the suit brought against him by De Witt C. Littlejohn and of whose legal ability the Tribune at that time was full of praise, Wm. Cauldwell, P. C. Talman and others were the class of men who countenanced the movement.
... ... Jeff. the above grievnces, and that said Committee be instructed to inform said Jeff. that he has always been his friend and advocate, but unless he said Jeff., will grant a cessation of hostilities until after haying and harvesting, he, said Committee, will stop opposing the draft and also the advocating the secession cause.
Resolved, That ____ ____ be appointed said Committee of one, for his peculiar fitness to carry the above preamble and resolutions into effect.
A farmer offered the following:
 -Resolved, That if Jeff. Davis does not comply with the request of said Committee, that said Committee be authorized to employ a certain lawyer in the city of New York, whom it is presumed Jeff. is well acquainted with, to bring a suit for damages against said Jeff., and that ____ and ____ be a Committee to ascertain what damages the farmers in said town have sustained in said Jefferson Davis not complying with the requirement of said Committee.
Resolved, That this resolution and proceeding be published in so many of the county papers as will print gratuitously, unless said Committee think best to have them inserted in the Eastern State Journal, at White Plains.
Submitted for consideration by a few farmers in hopes more may be convinced.

The World.
THE POLITICAL CONTEST.
The Situation from a New Point of View.
Remarks of John B. Haskim at Tarrytown.
A large meeting was held on Wednesday afternoon, at Tarrytown, in ratification of the nomination of William Radford as candidate for Congress from the Tenth Senatorial district. It was characterized by an unequivocal expression in favor of carrying on the war with vigor to the suppression of rebellion, and in rebuke of all usurpations of the Constitution.
Mr. Wm. A. Hunt, of Westchester, was chosen president, and Messrs. James Ferris, O. C. Denelow, J. Odell, Charles Purdy, Frost Horton, Benjamin J. Ambler, Gouverneur Kemble, Saxton Smith, John Quackenboss, and E. Welant as vice-presidents.
The following resolutions were read and unanimously adopted:
RESOLUTIONS.
The National Democratic Union electors of the counties of Westchester, Rockland, and Putnam, in mass meeting assembled, do unanimously resolve as follows:
1. That we heartily respond to the National Democratic Union nomination for state officers, headed by Horatio Seymour (cheers) for governor, and that in Seymour and Jones, in Skinner, Clerk and Talmadge we have men fitted for the times and able to bear the banner of Democracy in the pending contest onward to victory. (Cheers.)
2. That we most cheerfully ratify the nomination of the Hon. William Radford (loud cheers) as the national Democratic Union candidate for Congress in the Tenth district--that in William Radford (cheers) we have a man who will speak for his constituents in tones of patriotism and conservatism, and disregarding all sectional issues he will be first, last, and all the time for his country, the Constitution, the nation and the laws. (Great applause and three cheers for Wm. Radford.)
3. That the County of Westchester, true to her historical renown, will again be found first and foremost in supporting the candidates of true Democratic principles. That the county of Rockland, famed for Democratic triumphs and associations, will again roll up an overwhelming vote for the entire ticket. And the county of Putnam, emulating the glorious name she bears, will .... the victory in sustaining the cause of constitutional liberty.
4. That the Republican party has not been true to the country in the councils of the nation or in the tented field. In the name of liberty it has sought to sacrifice liberty; in the name of the country it has steadily pursued a sectional and partisan policy; in the name of the Union it has falsified in this campaign that honest Union movement which characterized the state campaign of 1861; and in the name of the Constitution it has invaded the privileges of the citizen and the sacred rights of men, and of their homes and firesides.
5. That the party which sustains a Sumner and eulogises a Wendell Phillips, and erects its abolition followers and sectional disorganizers into heroes and statesmen, can never wield the destinies of the American republic and of the American nation, and we call upon all who love their country to rescue that country from the control of that party which, failing to rule, ".... would ruin."
6. That we attest and renew our devotion to the Union and the Constitution, and to the government of the United States of America; that we are now, as ever, heartily resolved that the rebellion must be crushed, and that the supremacy of the laws must be maintained.
7. That the events of the past two years have shown that the Republican party is unequal to the task of preserving the Union; that we hold the Union to be the casket of our national honor, and the source of our national strength and prosperity, and mindful of the errors in past administration of the faults  present, we will intrust the guardianship and protection of that Union to other and better hands—to denounce not only abolition agitators and fanatical demagogues, but we hold disunionists and traitors in all sections of the country to deserve the scorn and desocration of all honorable men.
8. The flowers of peace can never bloom on the grave of a buried Union, and we will strengthen the hands of the Union men in all sections by honest and constitutional legislation, and we will strengthen the forces of our army in the field that the Union may be preserved, that traitors may be punished, that an atrocious rebellion may be crushed, and that the "Union and peace" may again reign together.
We call upon the government to be true to the Constitution. We call upon all arrayed against the authority of the government to again range themselves under the folds of the old flag, and we call finally upon the Democratic Union men of the state and the district to maintain their nominations at the ballot box, and to show by the result of the election that there is a second sober thought, and that men are worthy and capable of self government. (Cheers.)
Mr. Frederick Codart, of Westchester county, was then introduced and spoke at some length.
He was followed by Hon. John B. Haskin, who was received with great applause, and delivered an able and elaborate speech of an hour's length.
He referred to the Chicago platform, to speeches of Lincoln and other Republicans, and to resolutions passed in Congress to show that the Republicans were guilty of obtaining power on false pretenses. The first mistake of Mr. Lincoln, he said, was in reinstating Fremont after his removal; his second mistake was in approving the confiscation bill; his third in preventing the reinforcement of McClellan when near Richmond by McDowell, which he judges due to Mr. Chase, the Mephistocles in the government and the radical leader in the administration; the fourth mistake was in removing McClellan from the command of the army, and his fifth and greatest mistake was the Emancipation proclamation.
He next referred to the provision of the Constitution guaranteeing freedom of conscience, of speech, of press, and to assemble and petition the government for redress of grievances. Thank God, Congress can make no law, unless they indulge in the usurption of a despot, to abridge the liberty of the press or speech. Yet the administration has assumed to do many things which in other countries would have created a revolution. They have suspended the writ of habeas corpus when they had no right to do it. It might be suspended where the government had armies to enforce it, but in the loyal State of New York they had no more right to suspend it than they had to suspend the speaker by the neck. The Democratic party should be brought into power for the purpose of preventing such acts. The administration claims the right to declare martial law, and divest the citizens of all his rights, liberty and the pursuit of happiness included. They very well know that in the 35th and 36th Congresses he opposed the administration of Mr. Buchanan. He did it boldly, because he saw that Floyd was an infamous traitor and scoundrel, and was then using Mr. Buchanan to aid the cause of secession, and others of the cabinet of the same character. He opposed the forcing of a constitution on Kansas which the people of Kansas repudiated. As he opposed that administration for its corruption and venality, so he would oppose the present administration for its extravagance, corruption, and despotism. (Applause.) They have been in power two years, and we are further off from the conclusion of the war than at the first battle of Bull Run. The spirit of party predominates at Washington, and when a Democratic general who they think may hereafter run for an office wins a victory, they are afraid he will get up farther on the ladder of fame, and so they pull him down. They are prolonging the war to put money in their purses out of the infamous contract system. (Applause.) This man Chase is issuing his paper money; and to the honor of New York be it said that she took the first fifty millions, though he believed that if they had refused to take it the war would be over now; and as long as this paper money increases and circulates—as long as money is to be made by thousands and hundreds of thousands and millions by the contractors and the favorites of Mr. Chase—he doubted if this war would come to an end. He was going to give his efforts to elect an honest Democrat who would watch and protect the treasury from the plundering thieves that now infest it. (Cheers.) Mr. Haskim said they might think he spoke strongly, and referred to the reports of the Van Wyck committee and remarks of Mr. Dawes, of Massachusetts, and Elihu E. Washburn, which all proved the full truth of what he had said. Mr. Dawes declared, up to the time of the presentation of that report, this administration had plundered more than the current expenses of Mr. Buchanan's administration. Was if not just that the people who are to settle the bills—for the tax-gatherer is almost already at our door—should condemn the party under which these frauds had been perpetuated, and which would not remove the men that perpetuated them?
A year ago a large body of Democrats joined the Union movement in this state, believing that the President intended to be conservative. At the last Union convention, however, the party had become purely abolition, presided over by Simeon Draper, Republican chairman of the state committee and provost marshal. (Hisses.) The convention was controlled by Mr. Greeley, and nominated the most radical man, and one who, to the positive knowledge of the speaker, had taken every occasion to injure McClellan— (cheers)—and to exert influence in favor of his removal. What was left of the Union party of last year had been turned by the abolition contractors into a pure abolition movement. He had left it, thank God, forever! (Great applause.) The Republican party had demonstrated their incapacity for carrying on the affairs of the government. He referred to Cassius M. Clay getting $17,500 from his Russian mission, $7,000 or so, and then going around the country calling Union men traitors and threatening to hang Mr. Seymour. He wished to say a few words in reference to congress and nominations. He referred to a paragraph from the Tribune urging the election of Haight in opposition to Mr. Radford, and speaking of its support of Mr. Haskim on a former occasion because he opposed the Lecompton and other swindles. Mr. Greeley, he said, without solicitation supported his reelection because he opposed the corruption of Buchanan's administration. Now he supports Mr. Haight because Haight voted in Congress against the resolutions censuring the Secretary of War, against the exposure of the frauds in the Western Department. He supports Haight because Haight is the mere creature of this man—Secretary Chase—and the office holders foisted him upon the people of the Tenth district in opposition to their wishes.
He voted for all the swindles and speculating schemes of the last Congress, and the Republicans owned him body and soul, and he had very little brains. (Laughter.) He was nominated here by the interference of Mr. Chase's assessors and collectors,—by the interference of federal office holders—an influence that Washington and the fathers of the republic deprecated, and that it is for the men of the plow and the anvil to rebuke. He spoke in tones of high praise of Mr. Radford, and urged that it required such men in the next House to check the corruption of the administration. The handwriting was on the wall. Had they heard from Ohio, Pennsylvania, Indiana and Iowa? Ohio was Mr. Chase's state, and he had appointed his collectors and assessors all over that as over this, but the honest .... had spurned the bribe as they would here. (Cheers.) He urged to bring the Democracy into power as a more vigorous war party than that which exists—which has been tried and found wanting. Had not the people a right to complain of their agents at Washington for not carrying on the war with more vigor and with a purer purpose toward the suppression on the rebellion? (Cheers.) He advocated the Democratic ticket because he was a war man and for keeping the Union together by putting down rebellion (great cheering), but not by issuing inoperative proclamations. If there be war made upon slavery, let it be made by the advancing column of our army. ("That's so.") Let the general, when he has the power to strike off the shackles from the slave, do as Napoleon did when he issued his proclamations—do it on top of victory. If this ought to be done—if McClellan desired to use the slaves as he advanced and to free them—in God's name let it be done as a means of putting down the rebellion, but do not undertake to do it by violating the Constitution, which hitherto has kept the Union together.
Mr. Haskin closed amid great applause and three cheers. Mr. Conrad Swackhamer and Hosea B. Perkins followed.

Westchester County.
PUBLIC MEETING IN MORRISANIA--THE ENROLMENT AND DRAFT SUSPENDED.
Last Wednesday evening a public meeting of the citizens of Morrisania and West Farms was held at the Town Hall in Tremont. The Hon. John B. Haskin presided. That meeting appointed a committee to wait upon the Provost marshal of the district and see whether steps could not be taken to suspend the operation of the Conscription act; and the meeting stood adjourned till last evening, in order to receive the report of the committee.
The meeting last evening, in McGraw's Hall, Morrisdania, was largely and respectably attended. Mr. Haskin presided, assisted by the following named Vice Presidents:—Abraham B. Tappen, George Butler, Lewis G. Morris, N. P. Bailey, U. N. Camp, Adrian Jones, Charles White, Lorin Ingersoll, Jordan L. Mott, Daniel S. Penny.
Mr. Haskin, after he had called the meeting to order, stated that, in view of the excitement prevailing along the lower part of the county, he, as one of the Supervisors, had deemed it proper that the Board of Supervisors of the county should be called together; and he had obtained a majority of names of Supervisors calling a special meeting of the Board, to be held at White Plains next Thursday, for the purpose of taking immediate action as to the best means possible of removing the obnoxious features of the Conscription  act, if there should be an attempt on the part of the general government to enforce it in the district. (Cries of "Good," "Sound.") He had seen a large number of the wealthy citizens in the lower part of the county, but had not met one who was not willing that the Board of Supervisors should vote any sum, however large, for the purpose of alleviating the sufferings of the families of those who might be conscripted, or preventing, if possible, the enforcement of the draft. In his interview with the Provost Marshal he (Mr. H.) had related that, if time were given, the quota of the county could be raised by appealing to the patriotism and the pockets of the people, thus avoiding the disgrace of conscription, and without dragging men away by force from their homes, their firesides and their families. (Cheers.) The committee was now ready to report.
Mr. F. W. Gilley, from the committee to wait upon the Provost marshal, reported as follows:—
The committee to whom was entrusted the matter of waiting on Moses G. Leonard, Esq., the Provost Marshal of this district, for the purpose of requesting him to delay of postpone the draft in this district, and to urge upon him the necessity of so doing, etc., would report;—That through their chairman, P. C. Talman, they did on Thursday last endeavor to reach him by telegraph, but inasmuch as communication by that means had been cut off, it was found to be impossible; but on Friday communication having been restored, a despatch was sent, asking that time might be set when he would meet with our committee. Having no immediate response, it was resolved to proceed on Saturday morning to Tarrytown, there if possible to ... the Provost Marshal and carry out the instructions and wishes of the people.
Our committee early on Saturday morning took conveyance by carriage and by railroad, reaching Tarrytown at nine A. M. We sent to the office of the Provost Marshal, informing him of our arrival and asking an interview, which was granted, and very soon we were received very respectfully by Mr. Leonard.
The object of our visit was explained by Mr. Talman, who read the resolutions, and in suitable remarks gave the Marshal the condition of matters in the towns which we had the honor on this occasion of being the representatives.
Mr. Talman was followed by the Hon. John B. Haskin, who exhorted the Marshal to take into consideration the all-pervading excitement which paralized the community, setting forth the patriotism of our people, their desire to sustain the authorities in quelling the rebellion, and their willingness to maintain law and order. He pledged himself that he would aid the people with all his power and provide all the men which should be required as the quota for our towns, if time could be given us sufficient to raise them without any resort to drafting under the act of March 1863, which act, from its inequality, was obnoxious and objectionable on account of certain features which drew the lines of distinction strongly between the rich and the poor.
Mr. Gilley then called upon the Marshal in the name of the terrified inhabitants, who were not in fear of our own townsmen but of the lawless .... who infest our borders, and whose desire and will is rape and plunder, to hesitate and not to bring the people into a frenzy bordering upon
despair.
The other gentlemen of the committee spoke their sentiments and touches on all the various reasons why precipotency was unjust as well as inimical to the welfare of the people, hoping that sufficient delay might be made to test the validity of the law before the courts, and at the same time assuring the Marshal that our people were aroused to the necessity of maintaining their reputation as true patriots, and having no designs but the protection of the general welfare and the maintenance of peace and the restoration of confidence and quiet in the community.
Mr. Leonard then responded, saying:—Gentlemen, this visit gives me a great satisfaction. You have given me new ideas, and have opened my eyes to the considerations of the strong points which you have urged. However, I must first inform you that I have anticipated much which is the object of your mission. I have suspended all action in my office on reference to the enrolment. As yet I have had no orders in relation to the draft. I have removed my papers and the government property out of the district. I have informed the authorities at Washington of my action, but have yet received no response. I have considered the state of feeling, the anxiety and alarm which pervades the district, and am of opinion the precipitate action would be fraught with much danger. I am not disposed to bow to the fist of a lawless mob, but I am willing to hear the arguments of reasonable men. I shall not order the continuation of the enrolment or reverse my action until the public safety shall warrant. And before I will do so I will retire from my official position.
I am struck with your earnest proposition to supply the men required, and as you say, without any unnecessary delay; and I believe it would be well received at Washington.
On inquiry it was found that the whole number which would be required as the quota of men called for under the draft in this district, comprising three counties, would be not more than 1,2_0, and allowing three fifths for the proportion of Westchester county, only seven hundred and fifty would be required, and that the whole number for the two towns, West Farms and Morrisania, would not exceed two hundred--say one hundred and fifteen for Morrisania and eighty-five for West Farms.
It is a very large estimate, but shows how very small is the work to be accomplished.
Your committee bear testimony to the respect which was shown them by the Marshal and his manifest desire to do all in his power to conform to the requests of the people who appealed to him through your committee.
Mr. Haskin suggested to Mr. Leonard that it would be very desirable to receive the conclusions then and there given in a written communication, to which he unhesitatingly and cheerfully acceded.
Shortly after Mr. Talman received a note from Mr. L., to which he replied enclosing the resolutions passed by the meeting at the Town Hall, West Farms, on Wednesday last. The communication over the official signature of the Provost Marshal was received by the committee, directed to Pierre C. Talman and others, and will now be read.
Mr. Talman read the following letter from the Provost Marshal, and subsequently addressed the meeting at considerable length, and with much force.
Headquarters, Provost Marshal,
Tenth District, Tarrytown, N. Y., July 18, 1863.
Hon. Pierre C. Talman and others:—
Gentlemen—I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication enclosing for my consideration certain resolutions purporting to have been adopted by citizens of the town of West Farms and vicinity relative to the Conscription act.
From the assumption of my duties as Provost Marshal it has been my endeavor to render the operation of this law as unobjectionable as possible to our citizens. The nature of the law itself is of a character to create excitement, and from a misapprehension of certain portions it has unfortunately become obnoxious to the majority of those to whom its provisions apply.
Finding so much excitement produced in the popular mind as to prevent the proper execution of the law, I immediately suspended, for the time being, all business of the district, and, that there should be no cause to produce outbreak or disturbance, I removed the books and papers of the office and government property to a place of security out of the district.
Having gone thus far I advised the authorities that nothing further could be done in carrying out the law until such time as the labors of the office could proceed without danger to the disturbance of the public peace, and of certain protection to the lives and property of citizens within the district.
Thus far there has been nothing from the government countermanding my action, and, I have reason to believe, no desire on the part of the authorities, and certainly no inclination of mine, to vary the course thus decided upon.
If such arrangements, conveyed to me verbally to-day by you, can be carried out—namely, to provide the quota of men for this district, or any portion of it, by volunteers or substitutes by the authorities or individuals—I have reason to believe the government would willingly accept, and, as for myself, I should most gladly welcome any such consummation.
In conclusion, your fellow townsmen may be assured that nothing further will be done in reference to the draft in this district until full information is given to the public of such intention. I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, your obedient servant, MOSES G. LEONARD,
Provost Marshal, Tenth District, N. Y.

The meeting was orderly and well conducted and apparently the men who took part in it were, while opposed to the Conscription act, loyal, patriotic citizens and law abiding men.

COL. BAKER'S CALIFORNIA REGIMENT.
This regiment will leave Fort Schuyler to-day for Fortress Monroe, where Col. Baker will take command of a large brigade. The regiment will arrive in the city at four o'clock, landing at Fourteenth street, and march down Broadway to Cortlandt street to the Jersey City ferry, for Philadelphia, where, after a stop of two days, it will proceed to Fortress Monroe by steamer.

THE CONSCRIPTION IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY.
Important Meeting of the Board of Supervisors--Remarks of Hon. John B. Haskin--Resolutions Providing for a Suspension of the Draft.
The Board of Supervisors of Westchester county met yesterday at White Plains, in response to a call for a .... meeting to consider the Conscription act and to take measures to relieve the people from its obnoxious features.
The Board was called to order by the Secretary, J. Malcolm Smith, Esq. The following Supervisors answered to their names--Wood, of Benford; Carpenter, of New Castle; ___, of Yorktown; Odell, of Northcastle; Galsted, of Rye; Hill, of Mamaroneck; Secor, of Scarsdale; Sutherland, of White Plains; Taylor, of Greenburg; Huntington, of New Rochelle; Martin, of Eastchester; Hegeman, of Pelham; ____, of Westchester; Cauldwell, of Morrisania; and Haskin, of West Farms.
Mr. ___ Cauldwell, of Morrisania, was chosen chairman. On taking his seat he thanked the Board for the honor conferred on him, and stated the object of the meeting. Residing, as he did, in the lower section of the county, most contiguous to New York city, and most subject to the excitements which that city has gone through for the past two weeks, he, in connection with other members of the Board, had thought it their duty to call a meeting of the Board to take measures for the prevention of such scenes of violence as had disgraced some portions of the State. Mr. Cauldwell referred to the meeting held at Morrisania, at which resolutions were offered by Isaiah T. Williams and unanimously adopted, that no men should leave the county of Westchester for the seat of war unless voluntarily, cheerfully and with a heart for the work. The meeting was not called by any particular party--was not a meeting of partisans--and the resolutions were offered by a gentleman who occupies a prominent position in the republican party. Upon the basis of that meeting ir had been thought proper to call a meeting of the Board to take definite action in the matter.
In response to the inquiry of the chairman as to the pleasure of the Board, Hon. John B. Haskin spoke as follows:--

SPEECH OF JOHN B. HASKIN.
Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Board of Supervisors. Not having had the honor to be a member of this Board since 1861 I had supposed that some more recent member of the Board of Supervisors would have explained to the Board the purposes for which they have convened, and prepare some plan of action for our adoption. I have deemed it ____, as a Supervisor coming from the lower part of the county, to say that it ____ ___-
___ in the remarks which have been made by the Chairman, ___ ___m___, on behalf of the owners of property in the lower part of this county, that there is not among them a man who is opposed to any suitable amount of taxation to alleviate the sufferings of those who may be drafted, provided a draft is resorted to in this county, __ to do anything within the power of the _____ portion of the people of the lower part of the county to remove the most obnoxious features of the Conscription act, the one which is known as the $300 clause. ....

.... between the rich and the poor, enabling those who can give their $300 to avoid the draft. In my judgment it behooves every conservative man in this community to do all in his power to avoid here scenes of riot, confusion and injustice—to be liberal in taxing the property of the country for the purpose of avoiding, if possible, the enforcement of the draft therein. For myself, I can say that I am above being a party man in reference to this subject. I recognize, as we should all recognize, the position in which this country is placed at the present crisis in consequence of the existing rebellion. I recognize that the scenes of victory which have occurred within the last ninety days, in the driving of Lee from Maryland, in the successful attack on and taking of Vicksburg by General Grant, in the recent attack on Jackson city, the capital of Mississippi, in the—in my judgment—impending taking of Charleston, a considerable doubt as to whether a conscription of the citizens of New York is at all necessary. I do not believe it is, if the general government will give to us in this county and State a reasonable time to obtain by volunteering a sufficiency of men to fill up the ranks of the army at Washington. You probably have seen the action of the committee that waited upon the provost Marshal, Mr. Leonard. I was one of that committee. Mr. Leonard, upon the subject of the enforcement of the enforcement of the conscription in this district, acted like a conservative gentleman—an official desirous, perhaps, of performing his duty, yet at the same time of doing it so as to offend as few as possible, provided the general government insisted upon the enforcement of the act. (Mr. Haskin read the letter, addressed by Mr. Leonard to the committee. It has already been published.) In addition to that he stated to the committee that if the authorities at Washington insisted upon precipitate action on his part in enforcing this draft, while the public mind was so generally excited, that in preference to doing so, he would resign his position. The committee stated to him that it ___ was given them they thought the patriotism and pecuniary operations of the district would enable them, with the constituted authorities, to supply the quota for this congressional district. He informed us that the quota would amount to between one thousand two hundred and fifty to one thousand five hundred for the whole district. There are five Assembly districts within the Congressional district, and three within this county. That would give Westchester county about three-fifths, so that at the outside, Westchester would not be required, according to his estimate, to furnish more than eight hundred and fifty conscripts or volunteers. Now, sir, this is about a regiment. If the county of Westchester, through its Board of Supervisors, will pass suitable resolutions, in favor of raising a regiment here, and giving large and liberal bounties to induce volunteering, and the general government should wait until the 1st of September, I do not hesitate to say as a citizen, and as a member of this board, that eight hundred and fifty men could be raised without resorting to the enforcement of the obnoxious conscription act. The democrats who are opposed to the act, many of them, to my certain knowledge, have their opposition not grounded upon any desire not to assist the general government in putting down the rebellion, for they and their friends have contributed largely in men and money to that end; but they have felt that that act itself has divested the State authorities and themselves, as citizens of the State, of certain rights to which they are entitled under the constitution of the United States, and under the precedent which has been established by this administration in Order 99 of the War Department, issued last year for the enforcement of the draft in the United States. The constitution of the United States provides for a uniform militia. It also provides that that militia shall be obtained through the Governors of the several States and by the State authorities. It also provides that the officers of the militia shall be appointed by the Governors of the States. Now, under Order No. 99, issued last year, Governor Morgan was asked to afford the quota of the State of New York for the Conscription act. Order No. 99 provided that the assessors elected by the people in the several towns should be the enrolling officers. Order No. 99 further provided that the government of the State should appoint three commissioners to put this draft into execution. This was only last year. During the last session of the Congress of the nation, for some purpose best known to themselves—by some conceived to be a partisan purpose—they passed the existing Conscription act, which blotted out an appeal to the Governor of the State—which blotted out the assessors who were, by Order No. 99, provided as the persons to enroll, and the general administration have appointed in this county and throughout the State enrolling officers not well known to the citizens—for I did not know, as Supervisor, who was the enrolling officer in my town until about six days ago. These appointees are all made in Washington, and the democrats, many of them supposing that an intended insult was proposed by the administration in the way in which they have thought to enforce the draft here, have felt some little reluctance to have the authority of the Governor and officers of the State thus blotted out by an attempted centralization of power at Washington. Therefore, some of them have raised the question of the constitutionality of this law, and have desired that it should be passed upon by the courts. But however the courts may decide, it is the duty of each of us as Supervisors and citizens to obey the law, even though it may be onerous and unjust to the poor of this county. The object of the meeting to-day is, if possible, to pacify the poor people throughout the county who may be taken under the operation of the Conscription act. If this Board of Supervisors will pass a suitable appropriation, with the purpose of applying to the Legislature next winter to have it confirmed and enacted into a law, I do not hesitate to say we will be enabled to obtain enough men to reach a regiment, and satisfy the people more and prevent any undue excitement, and certainly to avoid any scenes of violence. I am a taxpayer and citizen, and I know that in the lower part of the county the taxpayers are anxious that this Board of Supervisors should act liberally in making an appropriation for the purpose of allowing no injustice to be done to the poor of this county, provided the general government insist on the draft. I desire, gentlemen of the Board, to call your attention to a letter that I discovered a day or two since from one of the most learned and distinguished citizens of bygone days of this county, showing that in the war of 1812 there was some opposition even then from wealthy men to the enforcement of a conscription act. I allude to the letter of John Jay to Judge Peters, dated "Bedford, Westchester county, .... 1815;" and I read it for the purpose of calling the attention of the Supervisor of that town to this high authority to justify, to a certain extent, the natural opposition which now exists to the enforcement of the existing
Conscription act:—
Bedford, Westchester Co., March 14, 1863.
To Judge Peters—
Dear Sir—On reading your interesting letter of the 19th January I observed with particular pleasure, from the manner and matter of it, that, notwithstanding the winter of life and snow falling on your head you endure like an evergreen. Your impression that "we should ere long have peace" has been verified. If I remember right, you had heretofore an impression that Spain, although her case was apparently desperate, would get safe through her danger; and so it came to pass. Events having justified both these impressions or opinions, I wish you may have another
viz:—That the peace will terminate the delusion which caused the war. Several considerations induce me expect that the peace will diminish it in particularly these: Unless discontents should arise between France and Britain French influence will not soon be very active in America, and consequently, will not administer much fuel to renew and feed the flame against England. The peace will deprive the delusion of the sustenance it derived from the patronage which the war created. The abandonment of the professed objects of the war, and that without compensation either in fact or in expectation; the manifest incapacity and profusion with which the war has been conducted; the attempts to force supplies of men and money by conscription, &c., and the immense debt incurred and to be paid without any value received, all tend to withdraw confidence and good will from our political protectors, nor can the continuance and operation of war taxes be congenial with the feelings of a people who, if Pagana would dedicate more temples to Plutus than to Minerva. These and the like facts and considerations will doubtless have the most weight with that portion of the community which have been misled, but who really mean well. They will probably have some effect also on the more considerate of the others. As to the position, that "the people always mean well," or in other words, that "They always mean to say and to do what they believe to be right and just." It may be popular, but it cannot be true. The word people, you know, applies to all the individual inhabitants of a country collectively considered. That portion of them who individually mean well never was, nor until the .... will be considerable. We have not heard of any country in which the great mass of the inhabitants individually and habitually adhere to the dictates of their consciences. We know how well demagogues and pharisaical patriots mean. Having much of the wisdom of this world, and little of that of the other, they will, like their great predecessor, Absalom, always mean and act accordingly. Besides, Providence sometime chastises nations with physical epidemics and sometimes (by un... their delusions") with moral epidemics; and after a while removes them. This encourages hope; for if we have arrived at or near the pessimum of this evil the melius cannot be far distant.
Adieu, my dear sir. Yours, affectionately,
JOH JAY

This is a letter of John Jay, the father of that gentleman (Judge Wm. Jay) whose likeness is over that bench (pointing to the portrait over the chairman's seat), and one who took as much part in forming the constitution of the State of New York as any distinguished man of the period in which he lived. I have referred to this letter because it was my misfortune or good fortune yesterday to be coupled in the Tribune with Governor Seymour. Judge Barnard and others, in an assertion on the part of that paper of an attempt to commit treason by resisting the draft. The statement is mendacious; the source from which it comes is cowardly. When I recognize the fact that I have myself done more to raise volunteers in the lower part of the county for the war—paid more money than any man of my means in the county—a statement coming from the Tribune to the effect that, because Governor Seymour and others are anxious to allay the excitement of the public upon this subject and to see the laws properly enforced and at the proper time, that we therefore commit treason, is an act of injustice towards me that could only emanate from those who want this war to continue, in my opinion for the political as well as pecuniary purposes which they will achieve from it. I hop Governor Seymour will be true to the constitution of the State, true to the people of the State, and true to the constitution of the United States, and that he will recognize, as I do, the great elements which constitute a State illustrated by the poet—

What constitutes a State?
Not high raised battlement or labor'd mound.
Thick wall and moated gate;
Not cities proud, with spires and turrets crown'd;
Not bays and broad arm'd ports.
Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride;
Not starr'd and spangled courts.
Where low born baseness wafts perfume to pride.
No! Men, high minded men,
With powers as far above dull brutes endued
In forest, brake or den,
As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude;
Men who their duties know.

If Gov. Seymour recognizes, as I do, that such men constitute the State of New York, he will not by the bravado of those who yield federal bayonets yield one iota of the rights of our citizens. I am anxious to see the laws enforced. I am anxious, as I hope every citizen is, to avoid the disgrace of the enforcement of the draft,

especially in the county of Westchester, surrounded, as it is, by so many revolutionary reminiscences; and I feel assured that if the general government will but give us a reasonable time, Westchester will, without the yoking of conscripts together. yield all the men flat the drift—so called—requires from this county. This war, thank God, is drawing to its close; this war, in my opinion, does not require that there should be sent from the State of New York a single man to reinforce our armies. But if the general government will insist upon the enforcement of
the draft, we must meet it as loyal citizens—to have the rebellion crushed, the Union restored as it was and the constitution maintained as it is, but also to perpetuate a government for the Union and for the State which shall in the future, as it has in the past, give more benefits in the way of liberal principles—in the way of beneficent legislation—in the way of everything that conduces to make men on earth happy—than any government under heaven. Mr. Haskin then offered resolutions for the purpose of carrying out his views, which after some suggestions, were adopted unanimously, as follows:—
Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed by the Chair to report upon some plan of action by this Board to relieve the citizens of this county who may be drafted—if the Conscription act is to be enforced therein—from the obnoxious features of the act of conscription and to relieve their families from ant; said committee to report to this Board at the next meeting. And that the said committee of five be requested in maturing their plan to take into consideration and report upon the subject of the payment of bounties to volunteers.
Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed to wait upon Hon. Moses G. Leonard, Provost Marshal, and request him to have the draft postponed within this county, and have a suitable period of time intervene to enable the county authorities and citizens to obtain the quota required therefrom by volunteering.
The Chairman appointed the committee of five as follows:—Messrs. Haskin, Hunt, Sutherland, Seacor and Haines. On motion the Chairman was also added to the committee.
The committee of three was appointed as follows:—Messrs. Wood, Bowne and Taylor.
The Chairman also announced a new committee on the Harlem Bridge, as follows:—Messrs. Haskin, Bowne, Martin, Hunt and Wood. This committee are expected soon to, make some startling disclosures in relation to this expensive and protracted job.
The Board then adjourned.

THE DRAFT IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY.—Important Meeting of the Board of Supervisors.—A meeting of the Board of Supervisors of Westchester county was held on Wednesday evening, to take such measures as might be deemed necessary, in regard to the anticipated conscription. William Cauldwell, Esq., of the Sunday Mercury, was appointed President, after which—
Mr. Wood, the chairman of a committee appointed to confer with the Provost Marshal, Mr. Moses G. Leonard, reported that he would, by a special messenger, lay the views of the committee before the authorities at Washington—the committee being in favor of voluntary enlistments.
Hon. John B. Haskins then made a lengthy and forcible address, in which he replied to several statements made by the HON, Horace Greeley. In the
course of his remarks, he said:
Now, Mr. Greeley, what you have asserted as to two-thirds of the men who have gone to the war being Republicans is absolutely false. I will offer you a wager, not of battle, but of men and money. I will go into recruiting in the town of West Farms, where I live, to get up a company, if you will do the same in the town of Newcastle, where you reside; and unless I prove that two hundred more Democrats than Republicans have gone from this county to the war I will consent to lead your men, go to the war and fight with them. Or, I will wager you $300, the amount which would exempt you or me, that three hundred more Democrats have gone to the war from this county than Republicans. But when you charge upon the people of the lower part of Westchester that they have not done their duty in this war, you indulge in a gross misstatement of facts. Morrisania has sent about three hundred men to the war. Over one hundred and fifty went voluntarily before the draft of last year was ordered, and these are probably not included in your estimate. From the township in which I live (West Farms) two hundred and fifteen men have gone to the war; about one hundred and fifteen of them under the call that was made previous to the draft of last year. Seven tenths of the men who went from these two towns, and from East Chester, and from Port Chester, were Democrats. Seven tenths of the men who went from every Democratic town in the county were Democrats. Mr. Greeley, you have libeled the people of this county when you made this statement that the Democrats of the county have not sustained the war. Why, coming down to the question of pecuniary assistance which has been rendered by Democrats in the southern part of the county, five dollars has been given toward the support of the families of volunteers by the Democrats where one has been given by the Republicans. Bit, why do you insist, Mr. Greeley, in now having the people yoked together and carried away as conscripts, your article explains. You say that if the draft last year had been put in operation, Wadsworth would have beaten Seymour by the same majority that Lincoln had in 1860, which was about fifty thousand. Therefore, now, Mr. Greeley, you insist upon having the draft put in operation here so that these poor men—mostly Democrats—who cannot raise three hundred dollars, shall be yoked together and sent to the war to enable you and your party to triumph in the coming election in this State.

Draft Meeting in Westchester County.
THE DRAFT SUSPENDED.
Resolutions that no man shall leave for the War except Voluntarily.
A very large meeting was held in Morrisania on the 21st to hear the report of a committee appointed to secure a suspension of the draft. Hon. J. B. Haskin, (Republican member of Congress,) presided. Among other things he said he had seen a large number of the influential and wealthy citizens of the county, but had not met one who was not willing to adopt any measures for the purpose of alleviating the sufferings the families of those who might be conscripted, or preventing, if possible, the enforcement of the draft. In his interview with the Provost Marshal, he (Mr. H.) had insisted that if time were given, the quota of the county could be raised by appealing to the patriotism and the pockets of the people, thus avoiding the disgrace of conscription, and without dragging men away from their homes, their firesides and their families.
Mr. Gilley from the committee appointed to wait on the Provost marshal, reported their conversation with him, and presented a letter from him which was read by Hon. Pierre G. Talman.
[The Marshal says, "The nature of the law is to create excitement, and it has unfortunately become obnoxious to the majority of those to whom its provisions apply." "Finding so much excitement produced in the popular mind as to prevent the proper execution of the law, I immediately suspended, for the time being, all business of the district." He advised the authorities that "nothing further could be done in carrying out the law, at present, and that he had received nothing from the government countermanding his action," &c.
Hon. A. B. Tappan, State Prison Inspector, denounced the Conscription act as unconstitutional. Certain parties were endeavoring to make it appear that Democrats were disloyal, but they had done more than their share in Westchester, and were yet willing to respond voluntarily, though not by force.
Isaac T. Williams, Esq. of West Farms, and a legal adviser of the Tribune, offered the following resolutions:
That while we pledge ourselves to the strictest obedience to all laws, human and divine, and will, in no wise, directly or indirectly, countenance the violation of law or morals—
Resolved, That no man shall be permitted to leave the county of Westchester for the seat of war, unless he shall go voluntarily, cheerfully, and with a heart for the work.
Resolved, That the county of Westchester, by a resort to her pecuniary resources, has abundant power and ability to achieve this end; and that it is both justice and patriotism to do so.
Mr. William's said he was as much opposed to being drafted as any man. He did not believe that one-third of the men called for would ever be drawn. One volunteer was worth three drafted men, and Westchester county could not allow one of her citizens to be made a soldier of against his will.
The resolutions were unanimously adopted.
Hon. WM. C. Bradford, (member of Congress elect, said that in an interview with Gov. Seymour, a Federal officer was present who offered to send a regiment to every district, and patrol the Hudson with gunboats. Gov. Seymour replied that he needed no such aid, being perfectly able to maintain the peace.
Lewis G. Morris, Esq. expressed full confidence in Gov. Seymour, whose name was greeted with great cheers, and counselled [sic] law and order.
This meeting deserves more than usual attention. Hon. J. B. Haskin, ex-M. C., Hon. Wm. Radford, M. C. elect; State Prison Inspector, (elected on the Republican Union ticket,) Isaac T. Williams, Esq., who defended Greely [sic] in the suit brought against him by Col. Littlejohn, and of whose legal ability the Tribune, and others were at the time full of commendation, all actively participated in the meeting, and all opposed conscription. A demonstration like this, participated in by such men, is full of significance. At all events the people, who are oblged [sic] to bear the burthen of the draft should be entirely satisfied as to the constitutionality of the measure.

The "Draft" Excitement up the Hudson River.
Cannon Mounted at Tarrytown.
The Citizens Organizing for Mutual Protection.
The Military on Duty at Yonkers.
The Canada letter mails for the steamer China, arrived in this city this morning by steamer from Yonkers. Mr. McGillivray, the officer in charge arrived at Yonkers last evening in the regular train from Toronto, but was unable to proceed further on account of the track of the Hudson River Railroad being torn up at that point. He reports that all was quiet at Yonkers this morning when he left.
The citizens had organized for mutual protection, and two companies were on guard last night at the arsenal. At Tarrytown, also, the citizens were on the alert, and when the train passed through last night they had cannon drawn out to overawe the hostile demonstration of the rioters.

NEW ROCHELLE CADETS.
A company has been organized in New Rochelle, Westchester county, with the above title. The following are the officers:—S. Perry Ayres, Captain; John Fowler, Jr., First Lieutenant; Henry W. Clark, Second Lieutenant; Theodore Pine, Third Lieutenant; David Cherbuliez, First Sergeant; Samuel G. Welling, Second Sergeant; H. Van Etten, Third Sergeant; W. Delamater, Fourth Sergeant; Frederick Prime, Jr., Fifth Sergeant; Samuel Cowdry, Corporal; John Bloom, Corporal; E. Lamdeu, Corporal; John F. Jarvis, Corporal. (June 8, 1871)

CITY INTELLIGENCE
Singular and Fatal Accident—Carelessness of a Soldier.
A singular accident, attended with fatal results, occurred on the Hudson River Railroad, near Yonkers, last Saturday night. As the train was approaching the station the report of a musket was heard, and an instant afterwards a ball crashed the glass of one of the windows of the car, striking in the head a lady passenger, said to be Mrs. Wainor, of White Plains, N. Y. The ball entered near the temple, killing the unfortunate lady immediately.
On investigation it was found that the musket was fired by a careless soldier belonging to a camp of recruits near the village of Yonkers.

HIGHLAND ZOUAVES.
This fine corps, which is composed in part of the students of the Academy at Peekskill, are to have a dress parade and drill on their parade grounds at Peekskill. The members of this corps are said to drill nearly, if not fully, as well as the Cadets at West Point. The friends of the company desiring to see them can leave Chambers street, at eleven o'clock A.M. Returning can leave Peekskill at half-past three P. M., enabling them to be in the city before dusk.
—A new camp of instruction has been located near Scarsdale, on the Harlem Railroad, 23 miles from New York, of which Egbert L. Viele, a graduate of West Point, and a former captain of the Seventh regiment, has been appointed Brigadier General in command. The Ira Harris Guards are at present quartered there, with a number of companies and parts of regiments. The camp is intended for the purpose of training regiments, complete, if possible, but incomplete if they remain so at their rendezvous after a given time, in the camp discipline and field tactics of the brigade.
—Hon. Bayard Clark, of New York, is to be named as Brigadier General, with authority to establish a school for Cavalry instruction in Westchester county.

UNION DISTRICT CONVENTION.
FIRST ASSEMBLY DISTRICT.
All loyal citizens of the several towns comprising the First Assembly District of the County of Westchester, who are in favor of unconditionally sustaining the Administration in a vigorous prosecution of the war until the rebellion is finally suppressed, and of maintaining public order and the enforcement of the laws, are requested to appoint the number of delegates to which they are respectively entitled, to meet in convention at Valentine's Hotel, Williamsbridge, on Tuesday, the 26th inst. at 3 o'clock, p. m., for the selection of three delegates to represent this District in the Union State Convention to be held at Syracuse on the 2nd day of September.
Dated August 6, 1863.
SILAS D. GIFFORD,
HARVEY KIDD,
Union District Committee.

UNION DISTRICT CONVENTION.
SECOND ASSEMBLY DISTRICT.
Notice is hereby given that a convention for the Second Assembly District of the county of Westchester to appoint three delegates to attend the Union State Convention, to be held at Syracuse, on the second day of September, next; and also to appoint five delegates to attend the Senatorial Convention, for the Eighth Senatorial District, will be held at the hotel of Brundage Sniffin, in the town of White Plains, on the 20th day of August, 1863, at 12 o'clock, noon, of that day. Dated August 11, 1863.
JOHN J. CLAPP,
GILBERT T. DAVIS, [Committee.
STEPHEN C. GRIFFIN.

We refer our readers to the doings of the Ladies' Union Relief Association of Sing Sing in our special column. Now is the time to aid our sick and wounded soldiers. Let contributions be sent in at once.

Col. Nugent's Department Enlarged.
The Tenth district—embracing the Counties of Westchester, Rockland and Putnam—has been added to the department over which Col. Nugent, A. A. Provost Marshal, has direction.

Ladies' Union Relief Association.
At a meeting of the Ladies' Union Relief Association, of Sing Sing, held August 14th, the following Managers were chosen to fill the places of Mrs. Neff, Mrs. Black and Miss Underhill: Mrs. Dr. Provost, Mrs. Frederick Weston and Miss Carpenter. The meetings will he held as usual every Friday at 4 p. m., at the Franklin Academy. Donations of Jelly and Pickles are particularly requested.
The Managers have received an urgent call from Memphis for books and magazines, the library consisting only of a few testaments, and some old newspapers, they hope sufficient reading matter will be sent in to enable them to send off a box without delay.
By order,
MRS. VANCORTLANDT,
Secretary and Treasurer.

Articles Sent.
List of Articles sent by the Ladies' Union Relief Association of Sing Sing, to the sick and wounded volunteers, August 7th to August 17th: 5 pillows, 8 pair socks, 1 blanket, 2 pair drawers, 9 sheets, 13 pillow cases, 6 bed ticks, 3 boxes and 1 bag lint, 2 bundles old linen, 1 bundle old cotton, 3 coats, 1 vest, 9 pair slippers, 2 flannel shirts, 22 towels, 180 pocket handkerchiefs, 34 new shirts, 28 half worn shirts, 3 dressing gowns, dried plums, apples and currants, 6 papers corn starch, 6 papers farina, 1 box containing 12 bottles currant shrub.
Given to sick soldiers in this vicinity: 2 double gowns, 2 hospital shirts, and 1 pair slippers.
By order,
Mrs. VANCORTLANDT,
Secretary and Treasurer,


Donations Received.
List of donations sent to the Ladies' Union Relief Association, from August 1st to August 20th:
Mrs. Pentz...............................................$5 00
Miss Luckey............................................ 1 00
Mrs. Campbell, (6 cent subscription)......    25
" North.............................................         1 00
" Charles Smith................................        1 00
" M. W. Mason, (by Mrs. North).........    1 00
" J. Sickles.......................................         1 00
" Wickes................................................   5 00
Mrs. Gilbert, 12 bottles currant shrub; Mrs. Rennie, 6 jars jelly, 6 bottles syrup; Mrs. Bacon, 6 bottles wine; Mrs. I.uckey, 1 new suit clothes, 1 sheet; Mrs. Hartman, pocket handkerchiefs, shirts, old linen; Mrs. North, pocket handkerchiefs, shirts, old linen; Mrs. Paterson, old linen; Mrs. Isace Hunt, 7 jars pickles: Mrs. Ward, pickles; Mrs. Reed, 5 large stone pots jelly; Mrs. Wickes, 2 pillows and cases; Mrs. Kendall, 6 new towels; Mrs. E. Lane, 12 towels, 4 sheets, 4 pillow cases; Mrs. M. Smith, 20 pocket handkerchiefs,  pillow cases, towels, old linen; Miss Gertrude Wells, pocket handkerchiefs; Barlow Brothers, 13 cans; Mr. Washburn, corks; Mr. Wm. Ryder, cartage.
By order,
Mrs. VAN CORTLANDT,
Secretary and Treasurer,

COUNTY JOTTINGS.
Welcome to Rear Admiral Farragut—Hastings.
Friday last was an occasion of considerable rejoicing to our fellow citizens of Hastings, in this County, on the arrival of Rear Admiral Farragut, by steamboat Broadway, at that place, which has been his family residence for several years past. A large concourse of the villagers were assembled upon the landing dock with flags and banners, one of which, a large one, stretched from pole to pole across the dock, bore the inscription "Welcome Home the Hero of the Mississippi" and amidst vociferous cheering the iron-hearted Admiral landed and made his way smilingly through the throng that eagerly pressed to greet him, and to shake the hero's hand, and to express their sincere gladness at his return from his hazardous though glorious service. To this manifestation the Admiral made a sailor's speech, brief, yet sufficient, viz.; "I heartily thank you, my fellow citizens," then making his way to his carriage departed with his wife for their home amidst another outburst of the heartiest kind of cheering.

Communication.
Westchester Phalanx.
To the Editors of the N. Y. Express:
WESTCHESTER, Aug. 19th,
During the late riots the town of Westchester (Westchester county) was perambulated by a mob from the vicinity of Williams Bridge, and other places contiguous to the railroads, at mid-day, announcing that certain houses would be burned down after nightfall. The citizens of course were much alarmed, as they were entirely impotent against an armed mob, having no military organization whatever in the town. Assistance and protection were invoked from Fort Schuyler, and their purposes thwarted. Immediately after which, a number of the citizens held a meeting and formed a military association, elected Colonel W. W. Tompkins their instructor and commander, (he being a sojourner in the place at present) also elected subalterns, and non-commissioned officers, civil officers, &c., established a rigid code of bye laws, purchased arms, and commenced a regular course of elementary instruction; drill twice per week (Tuesday and Friday evenings) in the Town Hall. Six drills have been held and great progress has been made. It is to be hoped, a permanent organization under the military statutes, may result from this association—for such an organization is essential for the certain maintenance of domestic tranquility and protection of domestic rights in this populous and wealthy town, and in which, hitherto there has been a great lack of military spirit. The country ought at this day be enabled to parade four full regiments, well drilled, uniformed, armed and equipped, ready for effective service at all times, each 1,000 strong; instead of which, there are only about 6 to 8 legally organized companies in the county, and small at that and poorly disciplined, except Captain Hatch's company of Yonkers, Capt. Jay's at Rye, and Capt. Armige's at Mamaronetk; all three of these commandants are young gentlemen of education, and of practical knowledge who have quite recently organized their commands.

Republicans Opposed to the Draft.
We are glad to note the fact that the Republicans of this State are not all like the Republicans of Western New York. In another column will be found the proceedings of a meeting held in Westchester county in opposition to the draft, which was participated in by men of all parties. Hon. J. B. Haskin, Hon. Wm. Radford, M. C. elect, State Prison Inspector, Tappan (elected on the Republican Union ticket,) Isaac T. Williams, Esq., who defended Horace Greeley in the suit brought against him by De Witt C. Littlejohn and of whose legal ability the Tribune at that time was full of praise, Wm. Cauldwell, P. C. Talman and others were the class of men who countenanced the movement.—In this section a man cannot be loyal who is not in favor of riding rough-shod over the poor man's rights.

MORTALITY AT DAVID'S Island.—There are over 2,500 rebel prisoners at David's Island. They are all wounded men, from the battlefield of Gettysburg. They have received the kindest and most skillful care from U. S. surgeons, and the same food as wounded men of our own army, and have been applied with all the little delicacies which usually find the way to our hospitals from the hands of thoughtful and generous men and women. Clergymen of all denominations have visited them, conversed with them, prayed with them, supplied them with religions books and tracts and papers. For all these attentions the prisoners are grateful. The hospitals are clean, well ventilated, and considered to be admirably situated for the treatment and rapid convalescence of patients. Under these circumstances the health of this large number of wounded prisoners was all that could be desired until the hot weather set in. This was peculiarly trying to a large number of cases of unhealed and aggravated wounds; and it is, therefore, not surprising that, during the last two or three weeks, about 80 of the patients have died. They were mostly privates or non-commissioned officers, representing regiments from most of the rebel States. There is no epidemic at the island; and, with the return of cooler weather, the danger of such excessive mortality will have passed away.

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.
The Rebel Soldiers on David's Island.
Great Mortality Among Them.
Names of Eighty, Died in Hospital, Since July 19.
It will be remembered, that after the battle of Gettysburg, a large number of wounded rebels were brought to this city, and subsequently to David's Island, where they were sent to the General Hospital established there, and which is under the charge of Surgeon McDougall, Medical Director of the Department of the East.
The following shows the dates at which they have been received at said hospital:
July 17.........................................................580
  "   19.........................................................435
  "   22.........................................................974
  "   23.........................................................210
  "   25.........................................................338
Total number of rebel wounded received at
David's Island..........................................2, 537
Notwithstanding the medical care and attention which these wounded men have received on the Island, over eighty of them have died since their first arrival there, (July 17.) Below we give the names of the deceased, their regiment and company, as copied from the report book of the Decamp General Hospital, David's Island.
REBEL WOUNDED, WHO HAVE DIED ON DAVID'S ISLAND.
Date.       Name.                     Rank           Regt. & Co.
July 19.   ___ Black..................Private......38th N. C., Co. K
               J. D. Leonard............ do              S. C., Co. B
20           E. White....................Sergeant....13th S. C., Co. E
21           Wm. Gregg............... Private......38th N. N., Co. F
               John McGill.............. do ......       38th N. C., Co. K
               J. A. Wherry............. do .......      12th S. C.
July 22d—Braxton Savage,     private,       53d Ga., Co. C.
                F. M. Gardner,          private,      12th S. C., Co. E.
               Richard Miscon,        private,      51st Ga., Co. H.
              Unknown, C. S. A., died on board transport.
July 23d—C. S. Durisol,          Sergeant,     14th S. C., Co. _
July 24th—John Lumbod,        private,        53d Ga., Co. B.
                 H. J. Bandleman,     private,         28th N. C., Co. F.
                 H. T. Early,             Corporal,      11th Ga., Co. D.
                 Unknown, C. S. A.
                 S. Sweeney,             private,         7th N. C., Co. K.
                 H. C. Middleton,     private,         44th Ga., Co. G.
July 26th—James S. Darnold, private,          11th N. C. Co. K.
                 W. P. Warrick,        private,          12th S. C., Co. C.
                 W. T. Tyron,           corporal,        38th N. C., Co. K.
                  Thomas Pratt,         private,          45th N. C., Co. K.
July 25th—S. Sheeley,            private,           7th N. C., Co. K.
                 H. P. Middleton,     private,           44th Ala., Co. G.
                 J. Garrett,                corporal,         59th Ga., Co. C.
                 J. M. Parish,            sergeant,        48th Ala., Co. C.
                 J. W. Benson,          private,          45th N. C., Co. B.
                 F. J. Sprouls,           sergeant,       1st S. C., Co. A.
                 John Pease,             private, C. S. A.
                 John Birmingham,  private,            11th Miss., Co. D.
July 27th—Hy. W. Hersley,                            11th Ga., Co. G.
                 E. B. Hannah,          private,           45th Ga., Co. G.
                 E. Mathews,            private,            1st S. C., Co. H.
                 Louis Davidson,      private,            11th N. C., Co. F.
July 28th—G. H. Keisler,        private,            13th S. C., Co. K.
                 S. G. Rolader,         private,            48th Ala., Co. K.
                 W. B. Henson,        private,             52nd N. C., Co. C.
                 Wm. McDonald,     private,             6th N. C., Co. C.
July 29th—S. G. Gough,         private,             Wash. Art., 3d Co.
                 J. F. Fix,                  sergeant,           14th N. C., Co. F.
July 31—John Ellis,                 private,             4th Texas, Co. H.
                Wm. J. Hollingsworth, segt.,             15th Ga., Co. J.
                Sullivan Joyce,          private,             45th N. C., Co. K.
                David C. McDowell, private,            24th Va., Co. K.
                A. J. Bay,                   private,            24th N. C., Co. K.
                Simon O. Small,        private,            15th N. C., Co. C.
                J. P. Hundspeth,        private,             42nd Miss., Co. I.
                J. Vandegriff,            private,             10th La., Co. C.
                J. D. May,                 private,              22d N. C., Co. E.
                Henry Scott,              private,              55th N. C., Co. A.
August 1st—Jos. E. Pegram,    private,              52d N. C., K.
                 John O. Front,          corporal,            52d N. C., Co. K.
                 C. S. T. Stevens,      private,               9th La., Co. K.
August 2d—J. A. Silder,          private,               14th S. C., Co. B.
                 Harvey Chambers,  private,               14th S. C., Co. G.
                 J. H. Smith,             private,               12th South Carolina, Co. B.
                 S. C. Redman,         1st Lieutenant,   49th Va., Co. C.
                 H. S. Powell,            private,              34th North Carolina, Co. F.
August 3d.—J. N. Stowe,         Sergeant,            24th North Carolina, Co. H.
                 Samuel McRiley,     private,               55th North Carolina, Co. F.
                 J. McKethon,           private,                1st South Carolina, Co. B.
                 R. Rominger,           private,                2d North Carolina, Co. G.
                 D. W. Bullis,           private,                 52d North Carolina, Co. F.
August—A B Adams,              private,                 14th S C, co K.
                P B Hall,                  private,                  12th S C, co K.
Augt 6—A Owens,                  corp.,                     1st S C, co E.
               James Mathews,        private,                  13th N C, co E.
               W C Blemons,                                         11th La, co F.
               C M Maull,               private,                  11th La, co F.
August 3—W L Mitchell,        private,                  11th La, co D.
August 9—Wm L Tyson,        sergt.,                     9th La, co H.
                Eli Pugh,                  private,                   50th Va, co D.
                S E Shrader,             capt.,                      25th Va, co K.
                J B Bradshaw.
                H J Pyle,                   corp.,                    4th La, co B.
                J P Woods,                private,                 25th Va, co C.
                L C Robnett,             private                  32d N C, co G.

The Draft Excitement.
Important Meeting in Westchester, N. Y.
A very large meeting was held in Morrisania, Westchester county, N. Y., on Monday evening, to hear the report of a committee appointed to secure a suspension of the draft, and of which the Express publishes the following report:
Hon. John B. Haskin presided. Among other things he said that he had seen a large number of the wealthy citizens of the lower part of the county, but had not met one who was not willing that the Board of Supervisors should vote any sum, however large, for the purpose of alleviating the sufferings of the families of those who might by conscripted, or preventing, if possible, the enforcement of the draft. In his interview with the Provost Marshal he (Mr. H.) had insisted that, if time were given, the quota of the country could be raised by appealing to the patriotism and the people, thus avoiding the disgrace of conscription, and without dragging men away by force from their homes, their firesides, and their families. (Cheers.)
Mr. Gilley, from the committee appointed to wait on the Provost Marshal, reported their conversation with him, and presented a letter from him conveying the assurance that the draft should not be proceeded with until after full notice to the citizens.
Hon. A. B. Tappan, State Prison Inspector, denounced the Conscription Act as unconstitutional. Certain parties were endeavoring to make it appear that Democrats were disloyal, but they had done more than their share in Westchester, and were yet willing to respond voluntarily, though not by force.
Isaac T. Williams, Esq., of West Farms, and a legal advisor of the Tribune, offered the following resolutions:
That while we pledge ourselves to the strictest obedience to all laws, human and divine, and will, in nowise, directly or indirectly, countenance the violation of either law or morals—
Resolved, That no man shall be permitted to leave the county of Westchester for the seat of war unless he shall go voluntarily, cheerfully, and with a heart for the work.
Resolved, That the county of Westchester, by a resort to her pecuniary resources, has abundant power and ability to achieve this end, and that it is both justice and patriotism to do so.
Mr. Williams said he was as much opposed to being drafted as any man. He did not believe that one-third the men called for would ever be drawn. One volunteer was worth three drafted men, and Westchester could not allow one of her citizens to be made a soldier of against his will.
The resolutions were unanimously adopted.
Hon. Wm. Radford, M. C. elect, said that in an interview with Gov. Seymour, a Federal officer was present who offered to send a regiment to every district, and patrol the Hudson with gunboats. Gov. Seymour replied that he needed no such aid, being perfectly able to maintain the peace.
Wm. Caudwell, Esq., of the Sunday Mercury, and Supervisor of Morrisania, denied any intention on the part of workingmen to destroy property. The only danger the people now had to fear was from the thieves, who were running away from New York, and of these a dozen had already been arrested. Backed up by the resolution adopted by the meeting, he would, with the assistance of Hon. John B. Haskin, Supervisor of West Farms, use all his efforts to secure the passage by the Board of Supervisors, at the special meeting to be held at White Plains, on Thursday next, of an ordinance to provide means to alleviate the harsh features of the conscription act. [Cheers.]
Lewis G. Morris, Esq., expressed full confidence in Governor Seymour, whose name was greeted with great cheers, and counseled law and order.
Mr. Haskin concluded the proceedings with an energetic address, and at 11 o'clock the meeting adjourned.
The above meeting (says the Express,) deserves more than usual attention. Hon. J. B. Haskin, Hon. Wm. Radford, M. C. elect; State Prison Inspector Tappan, (elected on the Republican Union ticket); Isaac T. Williams, Esq., who defended Horace Greeley in the suit brought against him by De Witt C. Littlejohn, and of whose legal ability the Tribune at that time was full of praise; William Cauldwell, P. C. Talman, and others were the class of men who countenanced the movement by their presence. All opposed conscription. Mr. Williams offered resolutions that "no man should leave Westchester unless voluntarily." A demonstration, participated in by such men, is full enough evidence that the people are as much opposed to the draft as ever.


THE CONSCRIPTION.
Additional Preparations for its Enforcement in this City.
THE EXEMPTION APPROPRIATION.
Protest Against the Draft in Westchester County.
No Man to Leave the County Against his Will.
THE RIOT ON STATEN ISLAND.
Probable Appropriation by the Brooklyn Common Council.
Hostility to the Draft in New Jersey.
There is little in the way of city items relating to the draft to chronicle to-day. The draft has not recommenced, and no one seems to know when it will, except that it will be "soon;" perhaps before the close of the week. Troops continue to arrive. The Sixty-ninth New-York State Militia were to arrive last night, and probably will be in the city by the time this paper reaches its suburban readers.
In Jersey City there is quite a good deal of talk about the draft, and the municipal authorities are expected to take some such action as has been taken by the New-York Common Council. Some prominent Republicans prepared and distributed circulars stating that the $300 clause wan for the benefit of the poor man, and not of the wealthy. A large number of these papers were burned in the streets yesterday.

APPROPRIATION BY THE COMMON COUNCIL.
Yesterday morning the committee appointed by the Common Council of this city to fix upon a sum to be APPROPRIATED TO PAY THE EXEMPTION OF MEN DRAFTED WHO have dependent families, after conferring with the Board of Contracts, decided to recommend the appropriation of $500,600, which will secure the exemption of 1,666 men, or nearly half the quota of Brooklyn.
The Supervisors, it is understood, will appropriate the sum of $200,000 at their meeting to be held to-day.

IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY.
A very large and respectable meeting of the most influential citizens of Morrisania and West Farms was held at McGraw's Hall on Wednesday evening. Hon. John B. Haskin presided, and the following vice
presidents were elected: Abraham B. Tappan, George B. Butler, Lewis G. Morris, N. P. Bailey, U. N. Camp, Adrian Janes, Charles White, Lorin Ingersoll, Jordan L. Mott, and Daniel S. Denny.
Mr. Haskin stated that he, as one of the supervisors, had deemed it proper that the Board of Supervisors of the county should be called together, and he had obtained a majority of names of supervisors calling a special meeting of the Board, to be held at White Plains next Thursday, for the purpose of taking immediate action as to the best means possible of removing the obnoxious features of the Conscription act, if there should be an attempt on the part of the general government to enforce it in the district. (Cries of "good.") He had seen a large number of the wealthy citizens in the lower part of the county, but he had not met one who was not willing that the Board of Supervisors should vote any sum, however large, for the purpose of alleviating the sufferings of the families of those who might be conscripted, or preventing, if possible, the enforcement of the draft. In his interview with the provost-marshal he (Mr. H.) had insisted that, if time were given, the quota of the county could be raised by appealing to the patriotism and the pockets of the people, thus avoiding the disgrace of conscription, and without dragging men away by force from their homes, their firesides and their families. (Cheers.) The committee was now ready to report.
Mr. Gilley, from the committee appointed to wait on the provost-marshal, reported their conversation with him, and presented the following answer, which was read by Hon. Pierre C. Talman:

HEADQUARTERS PROVOST-MARSHAL
TENTH DISTRICT, TARRYTOWN, N. Y., JULY 18.
To Hon. Pierre C. Talman and others:
Gentlemen: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication inclosing for my consideration certain resolutions purporting to have been adopted by citizens of the town of West Farms and vicinity relative to the Conscription act.
From the assumption of my duties as provost-marshal it has been my endeavor to render the operation of this law as unobjectionable as possible to our citizens. The nature of the law itself is of a character to create excitement, and from a misapprehension of certain portions it has unfortunately become obnoxious to the majority of those to whom its provisions apply.
Finding so much excitement produced in the popular mind as to prevent the proper execution of the law, I immediately suspended, for the time being, all business of the district; and, that there should be no cause to produce outbreak or disturbance, I removed the books and papers of the office and government property to a place of security out of the district.
Having gone thus far, I advised the authorities that nothing further could be done in carrying out the law until such time as the labors of the office could proceed without danger to the disturbance of the public peace, and of certain protection to the lives and property of citizens within the district.
Thus far there has been nothing from the government countermanding my action, and I have reason to believe, no desire on the part of the authorities, and certainly no inclination of mine, to vary the course thus decided upon.
If such arrangements, conveyed to me verbally today by you, can be carried out--namely, to provide the quota of men for this district, or any portion of it, by volunteers or substitutes by the authorities or individuals, I have reason to believe the government would willingly accept, and, for myself, I should most gladly welcome any such consummation.
In conclusion, your fellow-townsmen may be assured that nothing further will be done in reference to the draft in this district until full information is given to the public of such intention. I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
MOSES G, Leonard,
Provost-Marshal Tenth district, N. Y.

Hon. A. B. Tappen, State Prison Inspector, denounced the Conscription act as unconstitutional. Certain parties were endeavoring to make it appear that Democrats were disloyal, but they had done more than their share in Westchester, and were yet willing to respond voluntarily, though not by force.
ISAAC T. WILLIAMS, ESQ., of West Farms, and legal adviser of the Tribune, offered the following resolutions:
That while we pledge ourselves to the strictest obedience to all laws, human and divine, and will, in nowise, directly or indirectly, countenance the violation of either law or morals:
Resolved, That no man shall be permitted to leave the county of Westchester for the seat of war, unless he shall go voluntarily, cheerfully, and with a heart for the work.
Resolved, That the county of Westchester, by a resort to her pecuniary resources, has abundant power and ability to achieve this end, and that it is both justice and patriotism to do so.
Mr. Williams said he was as much opposed to being drafted as any man. He did not believe that one-third the men called for would ever be drawn. One volunteer was worth three drafted men, and Westchester could not allow one of her citizens to be made a soldier of against his will.
The resolutions were unanimously adopted.
Hon. Wm. Radford, M. C. elect, said that in an interview with Governor Seymour a federal officer was present who offered to send a regiment to every district and patrol the Hudson with gunboats. Governor Seymour replied that he needed no such aid, being perfectly able to maintain the peace.
Wm. Cauldwell, Esq., of the Sunday Mercury, and supervisor of Morrisania, denied any intention on the part of workingmen to destroy property. The only danger the people now had to fear was from the thieves, who were running away from New York, and of these a dozen has already been arrested. Backed up by the resolution adopted by the meeting, he would, with the assistance of Hon. John B. Haskin, supervisor of West Farms, use all his efforts to secure the passage by the Board of Supervisors, at the special meeting to be held at White Plains on Thursday next, of an ordnance to provide means to alleviate the harsh features of the Conscription act.
(Cheers.)
Lewis G. Morris, Esq., expressed full confidence in Governor Seymour, whose name was greeted with great cheers, and counseled law and order.
Mr. Haskin concluded the proceedings with a stirring address.
The meeting was quiet and orderly throughout, and, as will be observed, was composed of men of character and high position in society. Mr. Tappen was elected on the Republican Union ticket. It was not in any sense a party meeting, but a union of effort to promote volunteering and demonstrate the needlessness of a forced conscription.

FURTHER ARRESTS OF ALLEGED RIOTERS – RECOVERY OF STOLEN PROPERTY.
Patrick Marry was arrested yesterday by Officer Jenks, of the Twenty-ninth precinct, charged with arson and burglary. Witnesses were present to testify that Marry was seen to break in the door of Provost-Marshal Manntere's office in Broadway, and afterward apply the torch to the building. Marry was brought to police headquarters, where he was thoroughly identified by several parties. He is locked up for examination.
Officer Gilbert Bane, of the Broadway squad, saw an Irish woman going down Broadway with a piece of cape lining under her arm. He questioned her regarding it, but as she gave no satisfactory account of its ownership he took her into custody. Upon being brought to police headquarters, she said her name was Ann Farrell; that she was sixty years of age, and that the goods came from a store in or near Eighteenth street. She said: "I didn't buy it, it coom to me." She was committed for examination.
Daniel Brown, an Irish lad of fifteen years of age, was arrested by Officer Swainson, of the Twenty-ninth, charged with stealing about $100 worth of property from the clothing store of Samuel Sulkey, No. 299 Third avenue, after it had been broken open by the mob. Brown had some of the goods in his possession, and offered them for sale at a merely nominal sum to other parties. He was taken before Justice Quackenbush and committed in default of $500 bail.
Thomas Mackey, alias Trainor, a boy eleven years of age, a native of New-York, and Michael Eyars, twelve years of age, a native of Pennsylvania, were arrested by Officer Lucas, of the Twentieth precinct, on a charge of having been in the liquor store of Barney Murtha, 259 Tenth avenue, after it had been broken open by the mob, and with having stolen from there some liquors. Mackey pleaded guilty, but Eyars denied the charge. They were both committed in default of $500 each by Justice Quackenbush.


THE RIOT ON STATEN ISLAND.
The following are the particulars of the riot which occurred on Staten Island on Monday afternoon, and which was briefly mentioned in THE WORLD of yesterday:
At 4 o'clock Monday afternoon a company of soldiers belonging to the Eleventh Regiment (Fire Zouaves) left this city for Staten Island. This company had been performing special duty during the riot here. Arriving at Vanderbilt's landing, they stacked arms and visited the several drinking places in the vicinity, where their demonstrations were most boisterous and passionate. They partook of the ardent bountifully; the officers, it is stated advising the men to drink, and in several instances compelling them to pay for "the crowd." One private, it is alleged, was forced to spend four dollars, which was all the money in his possession. After getting well saturated with liquor, they visited stores and private dwellings, invariable making unreasonable demands. It soon became apparent that a serious disturbance was to be the result of their excessive drinking. In the meantime three of the soldiers (William Walsh, John Cook, and one whose name we could not learn) started to see some acquaintances in the vicinity of the Wood road, intending to join their company before the cars left for the encampment. While absent, the soldiers were met by persons returning from work. Harsh words ensued. Firearms, daggers, and knives were freely used. During the melee Cook and Walsh were fatally wounded. Walsh was stabbed in several places, and, with his intestines protruding, he ran a short distance and fell. He was also shot. The other soldier ran away and has not been heard of since. Meanwhile the soldiers, who had taken seats in the cars, heard of the affair, and at once ran to the scene of the trouble. They rushed upon the crowd and commenced firing at the laborers and spectators. One or two citizens were slightly wounded, and thirteen were arrested and taken to Camp Sprague, New Dorp. A large number were also taken as witnesses. The firing lasted but a few minutes.
Charles Murphy, aged 50 years, was shot through the heart while witnessing the sad affair. He resided in Wood row, and had the reputation of being an inoffensive and law abiding citizen.
Walsh and Cook were taken to the Seamen's Retreat. Walsh died yesterday morning. In the afternoon an inquest was held upon his body. The verdict was that the death of the deceased was caused by persons unknown to the jury. It was the opinion of the jury that the assault by the soldiers was entirely unprovoked and uncalled for.
The arrested citizens were released yesterday morning
Colonel Lansing, commander of the troops at New Dorp, ordered a council of Inquiry as soon as the mat­ter became known to him. The court decided that the citizens were blameless in the matter, and that the soldiers were the guilty parties. The officers in command of the soldiers were ordered to New-York, and will probably be dismissed the service.

FROM DAVID'S ISLAND.
We learn that there are about 3,000 Confederate prisoners upon this Island, and that they are as well eared for as circumstances will permit. They receive daily for the sick, delicacies in food and drink; also clothing and the hospital attendance of capable men and women, who are constant in their attentions.
Some of the clergymen have been permitted to visit the Island and to provide them with religious books, tracts and journals, for which the prisoners seem very grateful. Many of the officers and men are reported as religiously inclined, and very grateful for the attentions they receive.
A report that the prisoners were to be sent from the harbor to Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, has caused a good deal of distress. Clergymen who have visited these prisoners, declare themselves to be favorably impressed with their general good conduct. Their real wants, however, are many, and those who are sick and suffering ought to be supplied by the Government or others.
The rough treatment so often reported by our own prisoners who have been confined in the Southwest and at Richmond, ought to be an inducement to make the contrast for all such misconduct just as strong as possible. Notwithstanding that everything is done to improve the health of the sick and wounded prisoners, the mortality has been an average of four a day since the 19th of July. We shall give further particulars as we receive them.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY.
SPECIAL MEETING.
List of Members:
Towns.                 Supervisors.
Bedford                James Wood.
Cortlandt              Coflin S. Brown.
East Chester         Edward Martin.
Greenburgh                    Shadrach Taylor.
Harrison               Daniel W. Gray.
Lewisboro            Daniel Hunt.
Mamaroneck        Jonas D. Hill.
Morrisania           William Cauldwell.
Mount Pleasant    Isaac M. Twichings.
New Castle                    Francis M. Carpenter.
New Rochelle       Lawrence D. Huntington.
North Castle         Evander Odell.
North Salem         Joseph L. Sutton.
Ossining               Abraham B. Reynolds.
Pelham                 Benjamin Hegeman.
Poundridge                    Alsop H. Lockwood.
Rye                       James D. Halsted.
Searsdale              Francis Secor.
Somers                 William E. Teed.
West Chester        William H. Bowne.
West Farms                   John B. Haskin.
White Plains         Edmund G. Sutherland.
Yonkers               Ethan Flagg.
Yorktown             Benjamin D. Miller.

White Plains, July 29, 1863.
The Board of Supervisors met at the Court House in White Plains on Wednesday, July 29, pursuant to adjournment. Present: Mr. Cauldwell in the
Chair, and all the members of the Board except Mr. Gray, of Harrison, and Mr. Huntington, of New Rochelle.
The Clerk read the minutes of July 23, which were approved.
Mr. Wood, from the Committee appointed to wait upon the Provost-Mar­shal in reference to the postponement of the draft in this County, reported that the Committee addressed the following communication to Hon. Moses G. Leon­ard, Provost-Marshal:
White Plains, July 23, 1863.
Hon. Moses G. Leonard, Provost-Marshal Tenth District, &c.:
Dear Sir--The Board of Supervisors of Westchester County, convened in special meeting to-day to consider the state of the County, in connection with the public feeling in relation to the enforcement of the Conscription Act. The Board considered that the feeling in the County is such that the conscription cannot be enforced without great difficulty and serious disturbance of peace and good order. While the Board wish to do all in their power to aid the Government in a vigorous prosecution of the war to a speedy and successful close, they deprecate the necessity the act occasions of taking our citizens away from their families and homes against their wills, and with a disposition that will render them of little or no service to the Government. We are fully aware of the fact that the paramount want and object of the Government is men. We wish to assist it in not only obtaining men, but men who would go cheerfully, gladly, and with hearts for the work, and who would be of greater service than double their number taken involuntarily and by force. We believe that, in consequence of recent military operations, the whole number required from this County can be filled by volunteers if liberal inducements are offered. Many express themselves willing to go, and "be in at the death" of the rebellion. We are willing to offer them every inducement, and believe that thus the ends of the Government will be better served and at the same time our citizens relieved of the more pressing burdens of the conscription.
In pursuance of the above desire, the undersigned were appointed a Committee to wait upon you, as the proper Government official, and ask that you place yourself in communication with the department at Washington, and urge the expediency of postponing the draft in our County until the 1st of September, in order that the required number of volunteers may be obtained. You can give the authorities the assurance that the Board and its members, individually, will do all in their power to accomplish this end.
Respectfully yours, &c.,
JAS. WOOD,
W. H. BOWNE,
S. TAYLOR,
Committee.

To the above communication Mr. Leonard Had given to the Committee the
following reply:
Headquarters Provost Marshal,
Tenth District, Tarrytown, N. Y.
July 24, 1863.
To Messrs James Wood, W. H. Bowne, and S. Taylor, Committee, &c., Board of Supervisors,    Westchester County:
Gentlemen,--I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a communication from you, as Committee of the Board of Supervisors of Westchester County, relative to the enforcement of the Conscription Act in your County.
You desire me to place myself "in communication with the department at Washington and urge the expediency of postponing the draft in your (our) County until the 1st of September, in order that the requisite number of volunteers may be obtained."
With no authority myself in this matter other than to carry out the orders of my superiors, it has been my aim to render the performance of the duties of my position as unobjectionable as possible to the inhabitants of this district. In accordance with this aim, I have listened to suggestions, and have—when not incompatible with my own sense of duty--been guided by the advice of those whose position and influence have entitled them to confidence.
Under this line of conduct, and impelled particularly at this time by the experiment in the public mind relative to the draft, I shall communicate, at your suggestion, with the authorities at Washington, by placing in their hands a copy of your communication to me, together with a duplicate of this my response thereto.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
MOSES G. LEONARD,
Captain and Provost-Marshal Tenth District, N. Y.

Mr. Wood reported verbally that the Committee had a conversation with the Provost-Marshal, in which he informed them that he would dispatch a special messenger to Washington in reference to the matter, and that he expected the messenger would return by the time of the meeting of this Board. A member of the Committee had this morning called at the Provost-Marshal's office, out, not finding Mr. Leonard there, and not being able to obtain the desired information, the Committee were unable to make any definite report upon the matters referred to them, except the above correspondence between the Provost-Marshal and the Committee.
On motion of Mr. Haskin, the report was accepted, and the Committee continued in power.
Mr. Haskin, from the Committee appointed to report upon some plan of action by this Board to relieve the citizens of this County, who may b drafted (if the Conscription Act is enforced), from the obnoxious features of said Act, and to relieve their families from want, presented a report thereon, which was read as follows:
To the Honorable the Board of Supervisors of the County of Westchester:
The undersigned, Committee to whom, by resolution of the Board, it was referred to devise and report upon a plan of action to relieve the citizens of this County from the most obnoxious features of the Conscription Act, and the most appropriate method of raising money upon the bonds and credit of the County, to be applied to the relief of those citizens of the County who may be subject to the conscription and who may be unable to raise the necessary amount, if they should be drafted, either to provide subsidies or secure exemption, respectfully report--
That they have had under full consideration the subject referred to them. That the same subject has been a matter of serious consideration, and, to a considerable extent, of legislative action, in other parts of the State. ....

In this emergency the County must repeat its former history, and that history shows that patriotism is a plant of vigorous growth on the soil of "Old Westchester."
Actuated by these views, desirous of contributing freely and voluntarily to every just call for the defence of the nation, and to do justice to the defenders of the nation, your Committee respectfully report:
That the sum of two hundred and seventy thousand dollars should be and the same is hereby appropriated;
That the bonds of the County, bearing legal interest, should be issued therefor, but no more thereof shall be used than may be absolutely required for carrying out the provisions of this Board;
That such bonds should be issued and signed by the County Treasurer, and countersigned by the County Clerk and the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, and should in no case be negotiated for less than their par value;
That a Committee, consisting of five, to be appointed by the Chairman, should be appointed to carry out such resolutions.
With respect to the application of the money, your Committee do specially report as follows:
In case of the legal enforcement of the Conscription Act, the said Committee shall inquire into the circumstances of each person drafted, and who shall not be exempt under any of the provisions of said law, and who shall be liable to respond to the draft in one of the three ways provided by the law.
And the Committee shall use of said money the sum of three hundred dollars for the relief of such person or his family. And in case such person shall elect to enter, and shall go into the service of the United States, the sum shall be paid to such person or his family, for his or their relief.
And in case such person shall not so elect, then the said sum shall be used to procure a substitute, in all cases where a substitute can be procured thereby.
And in all cases where such person do not go into such service, and in which no substitute can be procured as aforesaid, then said sum shall be paid to the proper officer of the United States in lieu of such service or substitute.
It being intended that the money shall be used as far as practicable to procure men for the service of the United States, while at the same time drafted men and their families may be relieved.
And should the draft be postponed in this County for a stated period, with the view of giving the people time to raise the full quota of this County by volunteering, then the money appropriated shall be devoted (under the direction of the Committee appointed by this Board) to the giving of a bounty of three hundred dollars to every volunteer who shall be accredited to this County, when such volunteer shall furnish proper evidence that he has been sworn into the United States service and been duly accepted.
Resolved, That the State Senator from this District, and the members of Assembly from this County, be and they are hereby requested to secure the early passage, at the next session of the Legislature, of an act legalizing and conforming the action of this Board.
Resolved, That the moneys to be expended in carrying out the provisions and intentions of this Board shall be repaid in fifteen equal annual installments, by a general tax upon the real and personal estate of this County.
Resolved, That the moneys raised by the issue of the bonds of this County, for the purposes aforesaid, shall be distributed, for disbursement, to the Supervisors of the several towns, in proportion to the quota of men called for from each town and the assessed valuation of the several towns, in accordance with the valuations of the last corrected assessment rolls.

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and assembly, do enact as follows:
Section 1. The agent of the Clinton state prison, in this State, is hereby authorized to appropriate to the use of said prison all waters and streams of water on lot number sixty-five, in the town of Dannamora, in the tract of land known as the Gore, lying between the military township and the Canadian and ....

2 o'clock P. M.
The Board re-assembled—Mr. Cauldwell in the Chair, and a quorum present.
The business under consideration at the time of taking a recess—the report of the Committee to report a plan for the relief of citizens who may be drafted, &c.—was resumed.
Debate being had thereon—
Mr. Hunt moved that the Board adjourn for one week from this day, at 10 o'clock A. M., which motion was adopted by the following vote:
YEAS—Messrs. Bowne, Brown, Carpenter, Flagg, Hill, Hunt, Lockwood, Martin, Miller, Reynolds, Sutton, Taylor, Teed, and Wood—14.
NAYS—Messrs. Cauldwell, Halstead, Haskin, Hegeman, Odell, Secor, Sutherland, and Twitchings—8.
The Board was thereupon declared adjourned.

THE DRAFT IN THIS DISTRICT.
SPEECH OF HON. JOHN B. HASKIN IN THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS, THURSDAY, JULY 23.
MR. CHAIRMAN AND GENTLEMEN OF THE Board of Supervisors,—Not having had the honor to be a member of this Board since 1851, I had supposed that some more recent member of the Board of Supervisors would have explained to the Board the purposes for which they had convened, and prepare some plan of action for our adoption. I have deemed it necessary, as a Supervisor coming from the lower part of the County, to say that I fully concur in the remarks which have been made by the Chairman, and to assert, on behalf of the owners of property in the lower part of the County, that there is not among them one who is opposed to any suitable amount of taxation to alleviate the sufferings of those who may be drafted, provided a draft is resorted to in this County, or to do anything within the power of the wealthy portion of the people of the lower part of the County to remove the moat obnoxious feature of the Conscription Act--the one which is known as the $300 clause. It is well that I should state to the Supervisors here present, who come form the more rural parts of the County, that on Wednesday of last week a large meeting of citizens was called at the Town Hall in West Farms, without any printed notice, and superinduced by the fact that three hundred men were banded together, resolved to commit outrages, from a wild infatuation upon the subject of the injustice if the impending draft. Those citizens, in my opinion, would have burned the houses of some Republicans in the lower part of the County who were obnoxious to them, had it not been for the intervention of prominent Democrats, who allayed and pacified their feelings by representations to them that the Board of Supervisors of the county, and the people of the County, if time were given them, would resort to such measures as would prevent the enforcement, perhaps, of this odious Conscription Act. It will be well to say here for myself, that if the conscription can be avoided it is the duty, in my judgment, of every man in this County and in the State to do all in their power to accomplish this end. Conscriptions are the incidents of despotic power. They have never had them in Great Britain. The Romans resorted to them and the
French resorted to them as a result of their varied revolutions. During the war of 1812 there was a law passed upon the subject of conscription, but to the honor of the people of this State it may be said here that by appealing to the patriotism and pockets of the people at that time the conscription was very generally disregarded--it certainly was not put in offensive force. Considering the existence at the present time of a deep-seated hostility to the provisions of the Conscription Act, and especially of that feature of it which draws a distinction between the rich and the poor, enabling those who can give their $300 to avoid the draft, in my judgment it behooves every conservative man in this community to do all in his power to avoid here scenes of riot, confusion and injustice--to be liberal in taxing the property of the County for the purpose of avoiding, if possible, the enforcement of the draft therein. For myself I can say that I am above being a party man in reference to this subject. I recognize, as we all should recognize, that position in which the country is placed at the present crisis in consequence of the existing rebellion. I recognize in the scenes of victory which have occurred within the last ninety days, in the driving Lee from Maryland, in the successful attack on and taking of Vicksburg by Gen. Grant, in the recent attack on Jackson city, the capital of Mississippi, in the--in my judgment-- impending taking of Charleston, a considerable doubt as to whether a conscription of the citizens of New York is at all necessary. I do not believe it is, if the general government will give towns in this County and State a reasonable time to obtain by volunteering a sufficiency of time to fill up the ranks of the army at Washington. You probably have seen the action of the Committee that waited upon the provost-marshal, Mr. Leonard. I was one of that Committee. Mr. Leonard, upon the subject of the enforcement of the conscription in this district, acted like a conservative gentleman--an official desirous, perhaps of performing his duty, yet at the same time of doing it so as to offend as few as possible, provided the Federal Government insisted upon the enforcement of the act. [Mr. Haskin read the letter addressed by Mr. Leonard to the Committee, which was published in the Eastern State Journal of last week.] In addition to that he stated to the Committee that if the authorities at Washington insisted upon the precipitate action on his part in enforcing this draft, while the public mind was so generally excited, ... he would resign his position. The Committee stated to him that if time was given them, they thought the patriotism and ... operations of the District would enable them, with the constituted authorities, to supply the quota for this Congressional District. He informed us that the quota would amount to between one thousand two hundred and fifty to one thousand five hundred for the whole District. There are five Assembly Districts within the Congressional District, and three within this County. That would give Westchester County about three-fifths, so at the outside Westchester would not be required, according to his estimate, to furnish more than eight hundred and fifty conscripts or volunteers. Now, sir, this is about a regiment. If the County of Westchester, through its Board of Supervisors, will pass suitable resolutions in favor of raising a regiment here, and giving large and liberal bounties to induce volunteering, and the general government should wait until the 1st of September, I do not hesitate to say as a citizen, and as a member of this Board, that eight hundred and fifty men could be raised without resorting to the enforcement of the obnoxious Conscription Act. The Democrats who are opposed to the act, many of them, to my certain knowledge, have their opposition not grounded upon any desire not to assist the general government in putting down the rebellion, for they and their friends have contributed largely in men and money to that end; but they have felt that the act itself has divested the State authorities and themselves, as citizens of the State, of certain rights to which they are entitled under the Constitution of the United States, and under the precedent which has been established by this Administration in Order 99 of the War Department, issued last year for the enforcement of the draft in the United States. The Constitution of the United States provides for a uniform militia. It also provides that the militia should be obtained through the Governors of the several States and by the State authorities. It also provides that the officers of the militia shall be appointed by the Governors of the States. Now, under Order No. 99, issued last year, Gov. Morgan was asked to afford the quota of the State of New York for the Conscription Act. Order No. 99 provided that the assessors elected by the people in the several towns should be the enrolling officers. Order No. 99 further provided that the government of the State should appoint the commissioners to put the draft into execution. This was only last year. During the last session of the Congress of the Nation, for some purpose best known to themselves—by some conceived to be a partisan purpose—They passed the existing Conscription Act, which blotted out an appeal to the Governor of the State—which blotted out the assessors who were by Order No. 99 provided as the persons to enroll, and the general administration have appointed in this County and throughout the State enrolling officers not well known to the citizens—for I did not know, as Supervisor, until about six weeks ago. These appointees are all made in Washington, and the Democrats, many of them supposing that an intended insult was proposed by the administration in the way in which they have sought to enforce the draft here, have felt some little reluctance to have the authority of the Governor and officers of the State thus blotted out by an attempted centralization of power at Washington. Therefore some of them have raised the question of the constitutionality of this law, and have desired that it should be passed upon by the courts. But however the courts may decide, it is the duty of each of us, as Supervisors and citizens, to obey this law, even though it may be onerous and unjust to the poor of this County. The object of the meeting to-day is, if possible, to pacify the poor people throughout the County who may by taken under the operations of the Conscription Act. If This Board of Supervisors will raise a suitable appropriation with the purpose of applying to the Legislature next Winter to have it confirmed and enacted into a law. I do not hesitate to say we will be enabled to obtain enough men to make a regiment, and satisfy the people here and prevent any undue excitement, and certainly to avoid any scenes of violence. I am a taxpayer and citizen, and I know that in the lower part of the
County the taxpayers are anxious that this Board of Supervisors should act liberally in making an appropriation for the purpose of allowing no injustice to be done to the poor of this County, provided the general government insist on the draft. I desire, gentlemen of the Board, to call your attention to a letter that I discovered a day or two since, form one of the most learned and distinguished citizens of bygone days of this County, showing that in the war of 1812 there was some opposition even then from wealthy men to the enforcement of a conscription act. I allude to the letter of John Jay to Judge Peters, dated "Bedford, Westchester County, 14th of March, 1815," and I read it for the purpose of calling the attention of the Supervisor of that town to this high authority to justify, to a certain extent, the natural opposition which now prevails to the enforcement of the existing Conscription Act.

WESTCHESTER COUNTY.
Cortlandt.
A—J F Abrams, John F Allaire (col), Saml Acker, Jno Acker, Pat Agan, J B
Abrams.
B—Wm Boyce, L Bursdell, Moses Barmore, R Beekman, (col.) C B Bodine, C M Brown, H T Boothe, G F Barmore, Pat Brett, Ebenezer Bedell, A Boyce, J A Beal.
C —Peter Connor, J C Cox, Murthar Cane, Benj Carvy, Jr., Philip Caffrey, Benj Chase, Jas Cox, Edward Conklin, Thos Chapman, E H Clarke, J A Chase, O Chapman, Jacob Conklin, Alf Christian, Harrison Cox, John Carraty, Pat Cahil, G A Craft, Pat Cunnigan, W H Clinton, Wm Cross,  Philip Cassidy.
D —J Drennon, John Dahm, Jas Delamater, Hugh Darcy, R W Decatur, Thos Damon, Thos Durrin, Jno Duff, Ed Dyckman, J L Decker, Geo Depew, Jr., J R Denike, Sam Dalton, A J Denel.
E—Hiram Ellison, Aug Elrea, Nath Eckerd.
F—And K Freil, John Ferrey, Robt Fox, John Fox, O Frost, Chas Ferris, Jas Fowler, A T Fink, Milton Frost, Jas Ferris.
G—T H Griffin, A C Griffin, F Timpson, Gilbert Gardner, Augustus Fardner.
H—J Hagan, Wm Henry, Jr., Sam Hanna, W H Hubbell, Morris C Harrington, Jos Herne, Nich Hieney, Hen Haze, Valentine Hoffman, C B Haynes, Robt Haines, Francis Hauf, Hon House, J Haight, F Haughton, M E Hogan, S D Horton, Jno Haynes, Jno Hetherington, Thos Henderson, Jno Hurley.
I—Elias Ingersoll.
J—W Jordan, J C Jacobs, Irvin Jewell, Jno Johnson, (col).
K—J B Kimber, C C Knight, Jas Kennady, Pat Kennedy, Bartlett Kane, H  Knapp, W F Kidney, M Kensley, V Kessell, H Knoll, M Kensley.
L—Morris Lyman, Pat Lynch, Philip Loab, J Lafegre, Jacob Lent, Jno Lent, Wm Lake, Arthur Lent, H O Lent, Jacob Levy, W H Lent, Amos Lent.
M—Conrad Muller, Henry Maguire, P Murphy, M McDonald, Francis Mahon, Jno Mosher, (col.) Dan McGowan, Jno Mahon, Pat Murphy, Owen McGinnis, N R Moshar, W McMillan, M L Merritt, Jno McCaldey, Jas McCarty, J McEntee, Joseph Martin, Hugh Maguire, Tim Marage, Owen Maguire, Philip McCoy.
N—P Nickerson, Peter Nehold.
O—Jno Otis, J L Outhouse, Peter O'Donnell, Wm O'Garraty, A Oxenbyne.
P—G H Parkhurst, Geo Powell, Alonzo Pollock, S J Purdy, Benj Park, S Powell, J Purdy, H Plase, Henry S Paulding, W J Pugsley, Robert Post, E S Purdy.
Q—Chas Quinn, Clemont Quero, F Quick, E H Quimbey.
R—Ed Riley, A Robinson, John Rothaman, Geo Rodman, E Reynolds, Danl Rine.
S—Wm. Skidgel, S Strang, Henry Sehriel, Philip Smith, J W Smith. Wm Smith, Chas Schrider, J O Smith, Theo W Sutton, Jas Smith, Wm Scott, Geo
Sykes, E H Smith, J F Sutton, Henry Shaw, John Sheild, L Sarrow, Michl
Skelly, Alex Steele, Frank Stringer, Geo Sweete.
T—Forrest Tice, E Tice, Alex Turk, John Tookey, Pat Traynor, R M Tracy, Thomas J Turner, S Travis, Hiram Tice, I Van Tassal.
V—Jno Voght.
W—Chas Walker, Frank Wolfe, Chas Wessels, Jas Warren, H Williams, M Walsh, W Williams, Robt Willis, Henry Qolf, J H White.


YORKTOWN.
A—G. Anderson.
B—J. G. Bates, J. W. Bennett.
C—John Cobert, H. Crickler, M. Churchill, D. Cowalt, Robert Coday, Henry Curry, Michael Curtin, R. Clinton, W. Crawford, C. W. Crawford.
D—S. S. Dickerman, A. Dugan.
F—J. W. Fowler, M. Fitzgerald.
G—J. H. Griffin, E. W. Ganung, G. C. Green, G. Green.
H—B. F. Hyatt, E. E. Horton, S. L. Hart, J. Hyatt.
K—J. L. Knapp, S. H. Knapp.
L—H. W. Leggett, W. Loder, O. D. Lent, G. Leverich.
M—R. McKirk, P. Mullen, Thomas Madden, E. Mehaffey.
N—Wm Norman.
P—James Palmer, C. F. Peterson.
R—Jesse Ryder, A. C. Refoz, S. F. Roak.
S—S. Sniffen, E. Secor, L. Sherwood, R. Strang.
T—W. F. Tompkins, V. S. Tompkins, J. W. Travis, J. H. Tillotson, Thomas
Tobin, D. Travis.
U—W. B. Outhouse.
V—G. M. Van Cortlandt, Sam. VanTassel.
W—John Wharton, M. Ward, L. Wade, G. Weller, W. P. Wilson.
Y—I. H. Young.

NORTH SALEM AND LEWISBORO.
A—Leroy Avery, Julius Avery, C. Avery.
B—J. Birdsell, William Barker, J. F. Bailey, John W. Bradden, A. S. Bown, H. H. Betts, Benjamin Ballard, Allen Byington.
C—J. H. Clarke, H. Crosby, William Conly, J. H. Canfield, D. Crimmons.
D—P. Dowd, S. S. Denton, H. Dunn, N. C. Dickenson, Patrick Doyle, Geo. Derwoody, F. Denton, W. L. Dayton, Denis Donovan.
F—E. R. Finch, W. H. Ferris, J. Ferguson, Henry Finch, A. G. Ferris,
Stephen Fuller, Nolton Ferguson, John Faner.
G—Chas. Graham (colored), H. Gilroy, Rufus Gaudel, John Golden, J. H.
Guffin.
H—J. H. Hoyt, J. H. Henard, H. S. Hull, D. H. Howe, Thomas L. Hoyt, C. A. Hoyt, Edmund Hull, David Hanford, H. W. Horton.
K—G. R. Kable, F. Kenun, G. J. Kellogg, D. Kelly, G. E. Keeler, W.
E. Ketchum.
L—Jesse Lockwood.
M—Leander Meade, Alfred Marsh, S. O. Meade, A. B. Meade, S. McDonough, D. O. McKeel, H. S. Miller.
N—Chas. Norton, F. Nober, Patrick Noon.
O—W. Oysterbanks, Jas. O'Loughlin.
P—P. Y. Purdy, Charles Palmer, C. H. Piercet.
Q—G. C. Quick, C. W. Quick.
R—S. W. Roscoe, J. Reynolds, Jeremiah Roscoe, I. C. Reynolds, Rufus
Reed, Thomas Redegan, John Rohan.
S—J. R. Smith, Thomas Sayers, A. J. Sarles, Geo. Sherwood, John Snyder, Adam Smith, A. R. Schofield, F. Stockham.
T—E. Tilford, H. Thompson, George Todd, John Treigh.
V—H. Vale, Geo. Vail, David VanTassel.
W—A. Wallace, E. B. Wood, Geo. Williamson, Richard Walker, S. Waterbury, John Waterbury, A. D. Wheeler.

SOMERS.
B—Charles Brady, S. T. Brown, Jno. Buraddle, H. Braman, J. Burtle.
C—Martin Call, D. Cramma, Thomas Cone, John Carpenter, Joseph Conklin, L. G. Cree.
D—Benjamin Delavan, Denis Doyle.
E—W. Evans.
G—J. P. Gregory, W. Ganung, I. J. Griffin, Joseph Griffin.
H—Harrison Hunt, J. R. Holstein, D. Harrigan, W. H. Horton, James
Hyatt.
J—Samuel Jackson, George Junost.
K—Daniel Kennard.
L—Samuel Latham, John Leonard.
M—D. McKenney.
N—A. Nelson.
O—D. O'Connell.
P—H. C. Putney, E. Purdy.
R—Thomas Ryan.
S—J. Sullivan, A. Seymour, Edgar Seymour, J. H. Seymour, G. Schofield.
T—J. H. Teed.
W—John Wallis, David Walsh, M. Ward, M. Whyte, J. C. Wright.

 

 

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