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104th Regiment
"Another Hero Gone to His Rest"
(Obituary for 1st Lieut. Andrew Andrews
of Pike, Wyoming Co., NY).
Wyoming Mirror
,
February 25, 1863.
Transcribed and donated by Linda Schmidt

On Sunday last, at Pike, Wyoming Co., the remains of 1st Lieut. Andrew Andrews, of Co. C, of the "Wadsworth Guards," were committed to the tomb.

It gave additional solemnity to the scene, to see attending the last sad rites of this meritorious officer, ten of his comrads, including three of the once officers of his company, all of whom had been honorably discharged from public service in consequences of wounds or diseases, none the less honorable. Insatiable War! Grim, growling, ghastly monster! What thousands have gone down before thee! And yet thine anger and thine appetite is unappeased! Hardly a twelve month ago, and Lieut., then Orderly Andrews, was among us, full of health and zeal, panting for a field of usefulness.

The pride of his Company - the friend of his Regiment - respected and loved by all who knew him. The writer of this cannot remember that ever a complaint of any kind was heard against him. Early and late, sick or well, through quiet and through clamor, he was ever the same. Without an enemy in his Regiment he all times tried his powers to bring together those who were "at arms.| The last time the writer saw him was in the city of Washington while he was yet an Orderly. Having been confined in an hospital for some weeks from the effects of a violet attack of Fever, and from which he could not get an order to re-join his comrads, notwithstanding, he insisted that he was well enough so to do, he came to the writer to inquire of him what would be the consequences if he should re-join his Regiment against the Hospital Surgeon's decision. It was early seen that he was too weak and unfit to return and he was so advised. Poor fellow! he could not brook "inglorious inaction." Some of his friends were going and he must go with them. Off he went. At Fredericksburg he fought - he fell - and where he fought a hero fell. Amidst the mad crash of arms - the thunder - the shriek - the shout - the rushing in - the falling back - the going down - a shell took off his leg. He has his reward - a soldier's reward. His duty done - he lingers for a while, enduring a torture of sufferings, when death, like a kind messenger, came to his relief.

Now, mother earth,contains and shields him. Sleep, comrade ! sleep!

The years will roll and still roll on. Peace will one day spread again her bright wings over our troubled land. the dark deeds of to-day will be of history. But never while to your comrades who are left are given the years that roll, will they forget the memory of your worth deeds and patriotic death. Sleep, comrade, as a hero sleeps! Sleep! Thine honors live and shine. Humble and unpretending thou found thy part and did it well. Who can do more? May we do likewise.

R.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: October 10, 2007
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/104thInf/104thInfArtWyMirror022563.htm

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