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104th Regiment
New York Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

The 104th Regiment.
This regiment suffered severely in the bat­tle of Wednesday of last week. Being in the first army corps they were the first to be engaged, and this one corps had to fight Hill and Longstreet's divisions, numbering 50,000 or
60,000, for several hours, without any assist­ance. But they nobly, heroically performed their full duty. Gen. Reynolds, their brigade commander, was killed at about the first fire. We are without advices as to the strength of the 104th at the time it went into battle. About two months ago it numbered about three hundred and fifty effective men. In all probability this number had been somewhat reduced since that time. On Thursday, the 2nd inst., all that could be mustered of the regiment were the Colonel, the Major, Quartermaster, one line officer, and about 40 privates. Col. Prey's horse was shot under him while com­manding the brigade. Lt. Col. Tuthill was shot in the bowels, and is reported dead. The Adjutant is missing. We give below the list of casualties as reported in the N. Y. Times:—
WOUNDED.
Capt. Wiley, Springwater,
Capt.          Fisher,
Lieut. Greggs,
   "     Rose,
   "     Richardson,
   "     Dow,
   "     Kane.
MISSING.
Capt. Starr, Rochester,
Lieut. Weed,
   "     Lamson, Geneseo,
   "     Snyder, Springwater,
   "     Starks,
   "     Tulhill, Nunda,
   "     Dixon. Livonia,
   "     Stevens,
   "     Dailey,
   "     Steele.
We hope before going to press to receive more definite intelligence as to the part the 104th had in the battle, and also as to the killed, wounded and missing.

ANOTHER BRAVE SOLDIER GONE.—Again we are called to record the death of another true and brave soldier. John Runyan, of Co. D, 104th Regiment, died in Hospital at Gettysburg, on the 18th inst., of wounds received on the 1st inst. His remains were brought home for interment by his brother, who is an Orderly in the same Co. In the first day's battle at Gettysburg the deceased was wounded by a minnie ball striking him near the left shoulder blade, and passing through both lungs came out on the right side. For over two weeks he appeared to be improving, and strong hopes were entertained of his recovery, when a cough set in and he rapidly failed. The de­ceased early enlisted with the Regiment, and had been with his Co. all the time, except for a brief period that he was a paroled prisoner, having been captured by the enemy at the second Bull Run battle.  He was a true soldier, and fell when nobly performing his duty.       
* * Lt. Col. Tuthill, (of Nunda, formerly of Corning,) of the 104th Regiment, was danger­ously wounded in the hip, at the battle of Gettysburgh [sic] and was taken prisoner, and for two days was in the hands of the rebels without medical aid. When the rebels fled he was found by our men and cared for. His wife went to Gettysburgh [sic] on hearing of his being wounded, and is now taking care of him. He lost part of a hand at the battle of Antietam.

The 104th Regiment fought in the First Army Corps last week, and the 136th probably in the Eleventh. On Friday morning last, only Colonel Prey, Major Strang and 40 men comprised the 104th Regiment, who answered to their names at roll call.

CASUALTIES IN THE 104TH.
Lost, Capt. Wiley, Capt. Fisher, Lieut. Greggs, Lieut. Rose, Lieut. Richardson, Lieut. Dow, Lieut. Kane. All wounded. Capt. Starr, Lieut. Weed, Lieut. Lamson, Lieut. Snider, Lieut. Starks, Lieut. Tuthill, Lieut. Dickson, Lieut. Stevens, Lieut. Daily, Lieut. Steele, missing. Sergeant C. C. Burns, leg. Lieut. W. J. Starks, side. Sergt. Hugh St. Jermain, leg.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTH REGIMENT.—
The following is an extract from a letter written by the Chaplain of the 104 regiment, a few days since:
As to the 104th, we are is usual good health, our encampment taking the lead of all others in the corps for its wide streets, embowed walks and neat tents, the officers daily disciplining the men in marching and the use of arms—while the privates are ready to be faithful to each position and trust placed in their charge. At the late battles they were "in the front" exposed at each moment to destruction or capture, but escaping in a manner well nigh miraculous. We are now on the qui vive —all things ready to strike tents and march at a moment's notice—where and for what no one surmises. The baloon [sic] is often up to survey the opposide  [sic] side of the river that we may not be surprised by a raid and that we may again cross if there is apparent hope of success. The weather four days since was extremely warm, but a chance for the better has just occurred. We dread the coming heat, and "eight days rations," and sixty rounds of ammunition, with etceteras too abundant and weighty for an American volunteer. But "sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof." We may remain as now for a month to come, accomplishing the important object of defending the Potomac and thus Washington. Though apparently doing nothing, we are as watchdogs at the door, ready to spring at the throat, if an intrusive step is made.

*** Lt. Col. TUTHILL of the 104th N. Y. Reg., who was dangerously wounded in the hip at Gettysburg, is slowly recovering. He arrived in this village last week Thursday. On the morning of that battle the Regiment mustered about 250 men. The next day but 45 men and one line officer could be mustered for service. The rest were killed, wounded or prisoners.

ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTH NEW YORK.
Lost—Capt. Wiley, Capt. Fisher, Lieut, Greggs, Lieut. Rose, Lieut, Richardson, Lieut. Dow, Lieut. Kane. All wounded. Missing Capt. Starr, Lieut. Weed, Lieut. Lamson, Lieut. Snider, Lieut. Starks, Lieut. Tuthill, Lieut. Dickson, Lieut. Stevens, Lieut. Daily, Lieut. Steele.

From the 104th Regiment.
Battle Field, Gettysburg, Pa.,
July 2, 1863.
Dear Herald:—I improve the earliest opportunity to inform you that we have just engaged the enemy at Gettysburg. The engagement commenced yesterday noon, and lasted until darkness compelled us to subside. Our Regiment, the Wadsworth Guards, were in the thickest of the fight, and are badly cut up. I am again a prisoner, with numerous others. I write this on the ground, at day-break. The fight has been resumed, and heavy musket fighting ... firing and cannonading is going on. We shall have an awful battle to-day. I have not time to write at length, but will append a list of the casualties in our Regiment:—
    Our Brigade General Paul, killed;
    Lieut. Col. Tuthill seriously wounded in the side, and taken prisoner;
    Capt. Wilson, prisoner;
    Capt. Wiley, wounded in the hand;
Lieuts. Snyder and Rose, Adjutant Stull and Adam Dickinson, prisoners.
Killed—Peter F. Fuller, Alonzo A. Meix, John Lodwick, Truman Herrington.
Wounded—Wesley Lewis, slight in the arm, Jasper Jackman, twice in left shoulder blade, Albert Piat, slight in leg, Corp. Ludbury, and probably others that I have not learned.
Prisoners—Jasper G. Jackman, Jerome B. Fisher, David C. Spears, Charles Willis.
Our colors fell twice, but the boys rallied and prevented their falling into the hands of the enemy.          Yours in haste,
J. B. Fisher.

OUR ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
Letter from the 104th Regiment.
PICKET LINE, NEAR EDWARD'S FERRY.
WEST BANK, POTOMAC, June 24, 1863.
DEAR SIR:—While sitting beneath an oaken copse enjoying the salubrious zephyrs of a sylvan frescade trans-Potomac on picket post, the thought occurred to my mind that I would contribute a few lines of information to your patrons. The 104th is engaged in the hazardous task of picketing in front of the enemy, though there is not an armed Reb. within ten miles as anybody "knows on." Still our belligerent obligations are as promptly "did up" as though they were demanded in proximity to the enemy. We have been doing up some pretty huge marching for the past two weeks.
We are nearly one hundred miles from our old camp near Fredericksburg, in the angle of northwest from the city of Washington. We have performed many forced marches, but never one that taxed the physical energies of the "Wadsworth Guards" "muscle," as did the one last performed. Voluntary dismissals, such as "French Leaves," obits and gutta percha furloughs, have reduced our Regiment down to the back bone and sinews of the remaining members. We have concluded to take the thing by the smooth handle, ( i.e.) those of the same grade with me, viz: privates in the rear rank, though the official quorum demands a word in the .... of eulogy. I am happy to say they are tougher than tripe and rougher than a grater, and temperance is one of the marked features of character which grace their department. There is an old maxim, which says there is never a cause without an effect, and, vice versa, the scarcity of stimula may be the proper cause of this distinctive con of virtue, not in toto.
The 11th Massachusetts has just arrived for the purpose of relieving the 104th. We are now to return into camp. We march on the morrow, en route to Edward's Ferry for Maryland. "Old fighting Joe" has evidently changed his base of operations, and since "Johnny Reb." has dug out from Fredericksburg and gone for the South Mountain and Pennsylvania corn cribs, pork barrels, &c., we thought it expedient for us to cover their retreat, and thereby secure the safety of their exodus from Fredericksburg.
Well, I now resume my pen, and for fear you may not readily perceive the cause of my inserting the above symbol of punctuation, I will manifest it. It denotes a sudden stop or change of subject, (i.e.) I was obliged to defer writing and fall into line with my "Remington" and knapsack on my back.
We have been marching for three days. We are now in Maryland; in Middletown, Frederick county, Maryland. We have witnessed very fine representations of vegetation. Everything appears promising.
Well, our old bugle has blown again, and we must be off towards Pennsylvania. I must defer, and strike tents. The Regiment is in a flourishing [sic] condition. I will write again at Leisure. Yours in haste,
JEROME B. FISHER,
Co. B, 104th N. Y. S. V.

OUR ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
Letter from the 104th Regiment.
PICKET LINE, NEAR EDWARD'S FERRY,
WEST BANK, POTOMAC, June 24, 1863.
DEAR SIR:—While sitting beneath an oaken copse enjoying the salubrious zephyrs of a sylvan frescade trans-Potomac on picket post, the thought occurred to my mind that I would contribute a few lines of information to your patrons. The 104th is engaged in the hazardous task of picketing in front of the enemy. though there is not an armed Reb. within ten miles as anybody "knows on." Still our belligerent obligations are as promptly "did up" as though they were demanded in proximity to the enemy. We have been doing up some pretty huge marching for the past two weeks.
We are nearly one hundred miles from our old camp near Fredericksburg, in the angle of northwest from the city of Washington. We have performed many forced marches, but never one that taxed the physical energies of the "Wadsworth Guards" "muscle," as did the one last performed. Voluntary dismissals, such as ''French Leaves," obits and gutta-percha furloughs, have reduced our Regiment down to the back bone and sinews of the remaining members. We have concluded to take the thing by the smooth handle, (i.e.) those of the same grade with me, viz: privates in the rear rank, though the official quorum demands a word in the way of eulogy. I am happy to say they are tougher than tripe and rougher than a grater, and temperance is one of the marked features of character which grace their deportment. There is an old maxim, which says there is never a cause without an effect, and, vice versa, the scarcity of stimula may be the proper cause of this distinctive con of virtue, not in toto.
The 11th Massachusetts has just arrived for the purpose of relieving the 104th. We are now to return into camp. We march on the morrow, en route to Edward's Ferry for Maryland. "Old fighting Joe" has evidently changed his base of operations, and since "Johnny Reb." has dug out from Fredericksburg and gone for the South Mountain and Pennsylvania corn cribs, pork barrels, &c., we thought it expedient for us to cover their retreat, and thereby secure the safety of their exodus from Fredericksburg.
—Well, I will now resume my pen, and for fear you may not readily perceive the cause of my inserting the above symbol of punctuation, I will manifest it. It denotes a sudden stop or change of subject, (i. e.) I was obliged to defer writing and fall into line with my "Remington" and knapsack on my back.
We have been marching for three days. We are now in Maryland; in Middletown, Frederick county, Maryland. We have witnessed very fine representations of vegetation. Everything appears promising.
Well, our old bugle has blown again, and we must be off towards Pennsylvania. I must defer, and strike tents. The Regiment is in a flourishing condition. I will write again at leisure. Yours in haste,
JEROME B. FISHER,
Co. B, 104th N. Y. S. V.

Our Army Correspondence.
The Late Battle—104th N. Y. S. V.
White Church Field Hospital of 2D Div.,
First Corps, near Gettysburg, Ps.,
Wednesday, July 15th, 1863.
MR. EDITOR:—I have delayed communicating to you the results of the late battle in order to greater correctness of statement. Waiving all account of the engagement itself, I would notice briefly the position of officers and privates of the 104th. Col. Prey, Major Strang, Dr. Rugg, and Lieut. McConnely are the only officers with the Regiment, which contains but 40 privates. Quartermaster Colt is with his train. Lieut. Col. Tuthill has a serious, though we hope not dangerous wound. He is at Gettysburg and will go to his home at Corning so soon as possible. Adj. Stull is a paroled prisoner and at his home near you. His health has not been good for two months past. Dr. Chase is Brigade operative surgeon. Dr. Richmond and myself are on detached service at this Hospital and that at Gettysburg. Captains Wiley and Fisher and Lieut. Stark are wounded, though not severely; all have returned home. Captains Starr and Wilson are prisoners on route to Richmond. Lieuts. Weed, Lamson, Snyder, Tuthill, Rose, Dixon Stephens, Daily and Carn, are supposed to be prisoners of war. Lieut. Thomas Johnston of Troy, a young officer of great amiability and oft-tried valor, was killed by a ball through the lungs. Lieuts. Dow, of York, and Richardson, Stark and Greggs are wounded.—Lieut. Trembly, severely wounded at Bull Run, has but lately rejoined the Regiment, and though not in active military service, is doing much good to the wounded. Lieut. Kenny is on the staff of Gen. Paul, who is severely wounded by a ball passing through each eye.
Color Sergeants Buckingham and Shea were badly wounded—the former losing a leg; also Sergeants Lefferts, mortally in the face—having lost a leg—Wylie, Gearhart, Harris, Shea, Pierce, Foster, Culver, Cutler, Carr, Curtis, and H. Germain, with Corporals Powers, Stanton, Sudbury, Cunningham, Tiplie, and Baker, in the Hospitals at Gettysburg; and here I have seen privates A. Lewis, P. Goller, A. Satier, D. Rich, S. Austinb, J. Roberts, E. G. Washburne, J. P. Wells, F. Shea, A. H. Peabody, J. Nubfang, G. Chick, M. McGee, W. Hind, P. Garry, M. Flynn, K. Fancher, E. Whipple, S. Streeter, J. B. W. Jock, W. Wetham, J. Weedright, W. Singleton, C. Landwick, H. M. Hurlburt, A. True, P. Cannon, A. Hught, J. Sweeney, J. W. Barr, N. Wallace, P. Clark, M. Maxson, N. Penswick, and A. Pratt, with many missing, most of  them will, by God's blessing, recover, though not all.
In collecting the names of deceased soldiers, I have aimed at great correctness, knowing the painfulness of a false rumor. I have just returned from the Hospital. While there I asked the inmates to give me the names of those who, to their certain knowledge, died on the field, or subsequently, as a result of wounds. They gave me these, (many more, alas! to be added:)
Thomas L. Johnstone, Lieutenant.
S. J. Curtis, Sergeant.
Owen Kerk,     "
William Woodruff, Private.
S. W. Lewis,    "
John Lodwick, "
L. F. Mix,        "
Warren Vezie,  "
Samuel Lewis, "
H. Burgess,      "
O. J. Perry,       "
James True,     "
Charles Fisher, "
R. Galusha,       "
S. M. Pecktell, "
This catalogue will be painfully enlarged as time passes on.
It will be observed that the loss of officers is specially great. In due time there will be a thorough re-organization, if not consolidation, of the Regiment.
The Hospital here established is under the official control of Dr. Chambers, assisted by Drs. Richmond, Derby and Wheeler. Too much cannot be said in praise of their skill in many intricate operations, and of attention shown by themselves and nurses to scores of wounded soldiers. Messrs. Wilcox, Washburne, Lindsey and Hamilton are attentive as usual at all hours. About fifty Confederates have been under their charge, and received all needful service. The deaths have, of course, been many. A part of my detached duty has been to bury the dead. Yesterday I conducted the burial of five persons, (two Union and three Confederate,) at the same time, in low graves. Three are now being .... we fear, a prisoner at Richmond. He ...ick at Culpepper. Capts. Latimore and ...., with Lieuts. Runyon and Losier were discharged last week on a Surgeon's certificate, and a furlough given to Capt. Prey. Lieuts. Rudd and McCaffrey were killed at the battle of Bull Run. Capt. Kelly was killed and Capt. Tuthill badly wounded at the terrible fight of Wednesday last. Other Captains and Lieuten­ants will hardly be allowed to take their places again for various reasons. Of the privates large numbers are dead on the battle field. Scores are in the hospitals sick and wounded; so that a regiment which commanded the admiration of the citizens of Washington but eight months since is less than half officered, and has but about two hundred and fifty effective men. And what is the cause? Over marching and the irregularities and deficiency of food. Not long since the regi­ment reached the end of a march with forty men! Put upon a lad of 19 between 60 and 70 pounds weight [sic]—place him in the ranks with little or no breakfast—make him walk twenty miles with but the briefest pauses to rest, and what will soon become of him? Just what is becoming of our whole army. You are startled at the North when hearing that five or eight thousand were killed and wounded in a battle; but what is that to the thousands in the hospitals sick unto death from fevers and other ailments, the result of an over fatigue and lack of food. I speak of what I know and not with half the warmth to which the subject is entitled. The 104th is in as good condition as any regiment in the division, and yet what a mere handful of officers and men—some dead—some wounded, but far more sick and disabled through over work and over fatigue.
What there was of them did, in the main, do their duty manfully on Wednesday last, (one of the most terrible battles ever fought on this continent or any other.) A few played the coward; but not their noble leader, Major Skinner, and not that brave young officer, Lieut. Starr, who added another laurel to his well earned crown; and not Capt. Kelly, who fell dead from the bul­let of the enemy; and not Capt. Tuthill, (severely wounded,) and Capt. Wing, and Capt. Wiley, with several Lieutenants who illustrated their fitness for the position they held. I have just learned the 104th lost in the Waterloo engagement of Wednesday—killed, 9; wounded, 67; miss­ing, 16. Of the first I have obtained the name of Capt. Kelly only; among the wounded of Capt. Tuthill, and Lieuts. Dow and Wilson. Lieut. Trembly, wounded at Bull Run, is conva­lescent. Henry Lamson, of Greneseo, is at Fair­fax Seminary. I regret not to see him. He will probably recover. Some 400 wounded soldiers were brought in yesterday and are at the capitol. 200 or so are at the Patent Office. Cities and villages in this region are filled with the wounded and sick.
The enemy are across the Potomac and McClellan is after them with a large force. We look for the fall of Richmond, but not without fearful slaughter. The battle of Wednesday was not decisive. While the advantage is deemed to be on our side, it was too much of a "drawn game" to be altogether satisfactory. At least so it is viewed in this quarter. Our loss of officers is sad. We can ill afford to lose such command­ers as Gens. Manfield, Reno, Kearney and per­haps Hooker.
The end; the end; when and how will it be? God grant that it may speedily arrive in our favor.
Ex-Chaplain.
Of the 104th N. Y. S. V.

.... ready for internment. Sad scenes! I have no time, strength, nor heart to recall and narrate what I have seen during the last two weeks. Oh, what weariness and exhaustion of body and spirit! The end is not now. Another fearful battle is at hand, if not already waging. The remnant of the 104th form part of the "line of battle," now said to be facing the foe. May God protect those noble men. Ere long I will write you at more length.
CHAPLAIN.
P. S I met Geo. Hull at Gettysburg. He is attending John Parry, and in other ways rendering himself useful.

The 104th Regiment.
This regiment suffered severely in the battle of Wednesday of last week. Being in the first army corps they were the first to be engaged, and this one corps had to fight Hill and Longstreet's divisions, numbering 50,000 or 60,000, for several hours, without any assistance. But they nobly, heroically performed their full duty. Gen. Reynolds, their brigade commander, was killed at about the first fire. We are without advices as to the strength of the 104th at the time it went into battle. About two months ago it numbered about three hundred and fifty effective men. In all probability this number had been somewhat reduced since that time. On Thursday, the 2nd inst., all that could be mustered of the regiment were the Colonel, the Major, Quartermaster one line officer, and about 40 privates. Col. Prey's horse was shot under him while commanding the brigade. Lt. Col. Tuthill was shot in the bowels, and is reported dead. The Adjutant is missing. We give below the list of casualties as reported in the N. Y. Times—
WOUNDED.
Capt. Wiley, Springwater,
   "     Fisher,
Lieut. Greggs,
   “     Rose,
   "     Richardson.
   "     Dow,
   "     Kane.
MISSING.
Capt. Starr, Rochester,
Lieut. Weed,
   "     Lamson, Geneseo,
   "     Snyder, Springwater.
   "     Starks,
   "     Tuthill, Nunda,
   "     Dixon, Livonia,
   "     Stevens,
   "     Dailey,
   "     Steele.
We hope before going to press to receive more definite intelligence as to the part the 104th had in the battle, and also as to the killed, wounded and missing.

A Visit to the Pennsylvania Battle Field
Casualties among Our Volunteers.
FIRST ARMY CORPS, HOSPITAL—Camp near Gettysburg, Pa., July 9th, 1863.
EDITOR HERALD:—I arrived in Washington a week ago this morning, after three days uncertain journeying via Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and by two days more busy trying, secured a War Department Pass to reach the Army of the Potomac; but my object being not so much to reach the Army as the wounded, I found it necessary to get another pass from Gen. Schenck, at Baltimore. This took another day, and I got here Monday evening. I find our 104th Regiment like all in this corps, terribly cut up, having done the principal part of Wednesday's fighting, and been in all the later fighting on the left, which was very severe on Thursday evening, and most of the day on Friday. I have visited the 11th and 3d corps Hospitals, but do not find. them so badly destroyed as the 1st, although their losses are terrible indeed. Especially the 3d, where the wounds so far as I have visited, are more severe than those of the 11th. I think in them all, the killed in proportion to the wounded is smaller than usual. We have many of the rebel wounded among us, who are much more horribly mangled than ours. I judge this may be partly from their removing many of theirs, leaving only the worst cases, and partly from the greater supply, and more effectiveness of our ammunition. If we only have their "worst cases," and they are at all in proportion to ours, the number here tell an awful tale of their whole loss.
I have stolen as much time as I could feel like doing, from the duties that press upon every working man on all sides, to visit the field. These scenes have been so often described, I will not attempt any details of its horrors. It is enough for me to tell you that here is a line of battle extending eight miles, nearly every foot of the whole distance marked by all the usual indications of a fight desperate and sanguinary as any on record.
I give you a list of casualties in the companies of several Regiments which I have visited, that belong near Dansville. The list may be subject to some changes on further information, but I have been very particular. I have seen most of the wounded myself, and learn the rest from parties who had seen them.
104th. Reg't, Co. B.—Capt. Wiley, Springwater.
Killed—Private J. Lodwich, July 1st.
   "         S. W. Lewis, "
   "         Alonzo F. Mix, "
Wounded—Capt. H. A. Wiley, severely in right hand—left for home yesterday.
Second Lieut. W. J. Starks, slightly; gone home.
1st Sergeant, H. St. Germain, in thigh, badly.
3rd Serg't, J. Cullum,           
Corporal Mark Ludbury in thigh, ball in yet, but doing well.
Private A. H. Peabody, in calf of right leg.
Missing G. L. Snyder missed in Wed­nesday's fight; some hopes are entertained, that he was taken prisoner.
Sergeant C. C. Barnes.
Corporal J. B. Butler.
   "         J. H. Scott.
Privates L. R. Campbell.
   "         J. M. Cavener.
   "         P. F. Fuller.
   "         T. Harrington.
   "         J. G. Jackman.
   "         J. McFail, and H. W. Platt, since found wounded in groin,
Prisoners, D. C.  Speer.
   "         C. Willis.

104th Regiment, Company E.
Wounded—1st Serg't Joshua Culver, wound in thigh.
2d Serg't H. S. Foster, foot since ...
3d     "     H. N. Curtiss, head se..., doing well.

Letter from ther Chaplain of the 104th.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Sept, 20, 1862.
Mr. EDITOR: Among your many readers I am allowed to recognize not a small number of personal and esteemed friends. For their sakes I ask the indulgence of a few personalities, preliminary to matters of more general interest and importance.
About two weeks ago I very unexpectedly found myself in this city, en route to my regiment, from which I had become separated at Fairfax C. H., Va. So soon as my Colonel and his attending Surgeon saw me they insisted that I do not leave the house for the present. Time passed on. The effect of the long marches I had taken, sleeping on the ground, excitement of the battle field, appeared in a form of fever of the most obstinate and debilitating character. But an officer must be with his regiment or have a certificate from an appointed surgeon. Two had freely expressed their opinions in my case; but I was sent to the highest in authority, who told me, after the briefest conversation, that he could not give me leave to remain here, nor could he give me a furlough; for neither of them would meet my case. There was but one course for him conscientiously to pursue. He took his pen and wrote a recommendation for a discharge on account of physical disability to meet army fatigues. It received the immediate signature of Gen. Halleck. Much to my regret (so far as it is right even to have a thought or wish in opposition to the Divine will) and greatly to my surprise, I am no longer a Chaplain. My coming was an experiment. I determined that if a Chaplain, I would be one with all my might:—hence, I became one with the men; walked and talked with them; slept as they slept, and participated in all their exposures. But it was too much for me. I do not at all regret coming into the army. Delightful are the acquaintances I have formed, and I know what it is to be a soldier. I have been one myself—in the field, marching and fighting, fatigued and fainting. It was no choice of mine to leave the service; but they who had the determination of these questions, said "retire;" and I reluctantly obey. The three surgeons who passed on my case were most courteous, but very decided. My Colonel gave a written, though "reluctant opinion" in the same direction. My intercourse with the officers and men has been most intimate and agreeable. I have no higher wish for my successor than that he receive as cordial a welcome and enjoy as kind attention as fell to my favored lot.
And now to matters of more importance to the public. Great changes have taken place in the 104th (Wadsworth Guards) since I joined it, two months since. Let me notice some of them. Col. Rorbach, after a residence here as an invalid for five weeks, has gone home on furlough. His return is very questionable. Lieut. Col. Kenyon has left the service under a cloud. Adjutant ...

UNIONL PRISONERS IN RICHMOND—CAPTS. KENNEDY AND MCEWEN AND LIEUTS. O'BRIEN, MCCLEAREY, RODGERS AND REQUA AMONG THE NUMBER.—For the following interesting document we are indebted to John Daley, Capt. I Co., 104th Regiment New York Vols., who is now a prisoner at Richmond. Capt. Daley was formerly one of the Assistant Engineers of our Fire Department and is well known in this city. A large number of the noncommissioned officers and privates of his company were captured with him:—
"LIBBY PRISON, RICHMOND, VA.,
August 31, 1864.
"MR. H. J. HASTINGS—Sir: Will you inform the friends (through the KNICK) of Capt. James Kennedy and Lieuts. Darnel O'Brien and McCleary that they are wounded and prisoners, and are now in Libby Prison Hospital. I had the pleasure of a shake hands from them this morning. McCleary is walking around the hospital, and Kennedy and O'Brien, the Doctor says, will be running around in a week or two. All three are in good spirits. Lieuts. H. Rodgers and J. Requa, and Capt. J. McEwen, are here and in good health. Also the following (to be copied by the Troy Times) list of enlisted men belonging to Co. I , 104th Regiment N. Y. Vols., captured August 19th:—
"Sergts. Daniel Liddy, Patrick Casey, Michael A. Mulloy; Corps. Thomas Gregg, James Murphy; Privates P. Clifford, P. Callahan, J. Cimmers, B. Comptet, J. Cadden, J. Dwyer, N. Green, L. Herrington, J. Kirby, G. King,
M. Kelly, D. Kelly, J. Law, O. Lane, and C. H. Morey.
"They are all well. Yours, &c.,
"JOHN DALY,
"Capt. Co. I, 104th Regt. N. Y. V."

Lieut. McCleary resided in West Troy. In the battle of Cold Harbor, June 3d, he received three wounds, and it was supposed he was killed. He was captured by the enemy. This fact was not known, however, until the 4th of July, when it was ascertained that he was a prisoner. He is still at Libby Prison. Many thanks for the Union. To no one is it more welcome than to the
CHAPLAIN OF 104TH.

Democrat & American.
WEDNESDAY MORNING, JULY 22.
On the Death of Robert S. McMahon, Son of Capt. John McMahon.
For the Democrat and American.

The good Shepherd look through the lambs of His fold,
He wanted one more for His pasture above;
Another to play by the river of gold,
Another to sport in the light of His love.

He saw His flocks roam in the deserts of earth, 
And said, with a smile, from these flocks I'll choose
One shall ascend from the clouds and the dearth,
And shall live on in light, its glory begun.

So He stooped from the throne of His heavenly bliss,
And pressed to its brow its own crown of thorns;
His own cup of woe the poor lamb must kiss,   
And touch the sad cross its Savior had borne.

Oh! mother. He hears thy sad wail of woe.
He heeds thy hot tears, the lone captive's sighing,
And He rends the dark vail His mercy to show,
And points out the bliss, whose gate we call—dying.

He shows thy dear lamb crowned with lillies of glory,  
The chalice of death changed for fountains of love; 
The cross buds with palm leaves, all conflicts have ceased,
Songs of triumph resound through the glory above.

Samuel Lewis, of York, belonging to the 104th Regiment, was killed in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. We have boon furnished with the following respecting the deceased:
He fell among the rebels, and as you are aware, Gen. Meade allowed no flag of truce lest the foe should escape. And I assure you of my most sincere and fervent sympathy with you in this sad event. Samuel was a youth of great amiability of disposition—high integrity—most exemplary diligence and attention to his military duties—and unflinching fortitude. He did not seem to know what fear is. At Chancellorsville he was bravery itself. But his military life has seen an untimely close. He is an added victim at the throne of this most unrighteous rebellion—another offering upon the altar of the nation's honor.

A Paroled Prisoner from Gettsyburg.
Maj. Stull of the 104th (Geneseo) regiment reached home yesterday, having been captured and paroled on the field of Gettysburg by Gen. Lee. Maj. Stull was in the fight of the first day, Wednesday, when we suffered our only repulse and greatest comparative loss. He states that when he was taken prisoner not less than 4,000 of the feder... ... to the hands of the enemy.
He and other officers were retained during the fight of the succeeding days and then paroled. The reported recapture of prisoners by Meade doubtless referred to this 4,000. Maj. Stull represents the rebels as well dressed and in good condition every way, fighting desperately and determined to conquer or die. He says they were husbanding their supplies and living with an eye to the possibility of finding themselves short of rations.
104TH REGIMENT.
Sergeant C. C Burns, Co. B, 104th New York, leg.
Capt. H. A. Wiley, Co. B, 104th New York, shoulder.
Lieut. W. J. Starks, Co. B, 104th New York, side.
Sergeant Hugh St. Germain, Co. B, 104th New York, leg.
Capt. Fisher, Lieut. Greggs, Lieut. Rose, Lieut. Richardson, Lieut. Dow, Lieut. Kane; all wounded. Missing—Capt. Starr, Lieut. Weed, Lieut. Lamson, Lieut. Snider, Lieut. Starks, Lieut. Tuthill, Lieut. Dickson, Lieut. Stevens, Lieut. Daily, Lieut. Steele.

CASUALTIES AMONG OUR VOLUNTEERS.—
The 104th Reg't. "Wadsworth Guards," was in the front in the opening fight at Gettysburg, on Wednesday, and their loss was heavy. The Times gives the following list of casualties to officers:
Capt. Wiley, Capt. Fisher, Lieut. Greggs, Lieut. Rose, Lieut. Richardson,
Lieut. Dow, Lieut. Kane; all wounded. Capt. Starr, Lieut. Weed, Lieut. Lamson, Lieut. Snider, Lieut. Sparks, Lieut. Tuthill, Lieut. Dickson, Lieut. Stevens, Lieut. Daily, Lieut. Steele, missing.
We understand a dispatch has been received, stating that I. W. Drake, of the 136th, is a prisoner in the hands of the rebels.
Capt. John W. Shafer, of the Illinois Volunteers, (son of Mr. Jacob
Shafer, of Sparta,) was wounded in the arm. We have heard of no further casualties among the volunteers from this vicinity.

WOUNDED.—The news is confirmed that Lieut. W. J. Starks, of the One Hundred and Fourth regiment, was wounded in the side, at Gettysburg. He is a well-known and highly respected young man—a son of Rev. D. Starks.

POCKET PICKED.—David Thompson, of Green Island, was robbed of $20—a check of $12 on the Farmers' Bank, and $8 in money—while viewing the procession in Oakwood Cemetery of the occasion of Col. Willard's funeral.

THE 104TH REGIMENT.—Among the casualties of the late battle in the 104th—Livingston Co. Regiment—reported are t he following:
Sergeant C. C. Burns, Co. B, 104th New York, leg.
Captain H. A. Wiley, Co. B, 104th New York, shoulder.
Lieutenant W. J. Starks, Co. B, 104th New York, side.
Sergeant Hugh St. Jermain, Co. B, 104th New York, leg.

CAPT. GEORGE H. STARR, of the 104th New York Volunteers, and a brother of the Rev. Frederick Starr of this village, was taken prisoner by the rebels at Gettysburg.

The remains of Lieut. Thomas Johnson, of the 104th Regiment, arrived at Troy yesterday morning, and the funeral will take place Wednesday.—Gen. Duryea, (says the Troy Whig,) who, in many battles, commanded the brigade to which the regiment of Lieut. Johnson was attached, visited this city on Friday last, for the express purpose of condoling with the parents of deceased, and recounting to them the various acts of bravery which Lieut. J. performed in the service of his country. On one occasion, he stated, (at South Mountain,) a battery which had done deadly execution in the Union ranks, had to be silenced. A call was made on the 104th to perform the perilous undertaking, and Lt. Johnson, said Gen. Duryea, was the first officer that stepped forward and volunteered to charge on the enemy’s guns.

Lieut. E. E. Sill.--We are pleased to learn that this gallant and meritorious young officer was not killed, as was supposed, at the battle of Dallas. On Saturday last his father received a letter from him, from which we give an extract:
Officer's Prison, Macon, Ga.
Sunday, May 29, 1864.
Dear Father,--You will doubtless have heard that I was missing in the Dallas fight before this reaches you. I was captured on the evening of Wednesday, 25th Inst. I reached this place yesterday. My health is good. Our quarters are quite comfortable. On arriving here I met Captain Dixon, of the 104th N. Y., Lieut. Drake, of the 136th, and several other acquaintances. The weather is not excessively warm, and we have good running water for drinking and bathing purposes. The officers mentioned are all well. Address me as a prisoner of war, Macon, but write nothing about military matters.
The above intelligence will be a relief not only to the Dr. and his family, but to a host of friends throughout the County, who know Lieut. S. as a competent and fearless officer. He early enlisted in the war, and by his faithfulness to duty and courage won his way to promotion. It is to be hoped that he and the others named may not remain much longer prisoners of war. Capt. Dixon and Lieuts. Drake and Lamson were captured at Gettysburg in July, 1862.

The Wounded in Washington Hospitals.
The Washington Chronicle of Tuesday publishes the following additional names of wounded, who have arrived there and are now in Hospital.
MT. PLEASANT HOSPITAL.
Darrian A. Graham, Co. D, 4th New York Artillery.
David Canfield, D, 4th N. Y. Artillery.
Wm. H. Wirtz, F, 108th N. Y.
Chas. H. Watson, A, 104th N. Y.
John Muldon, A, 76th N. Y.
Chas. Burgess, E, 24th N, Y. Cav.
Robert Chambers, E, 76th N. Y.
P. S. Weber, I, 76th N. Y.
Patrick Tierney, B, 104th N. Y.
H. A. Griow, 8th N. Y. Artillery.
John Robinson, A, 104th N. Y.
Joseph Casner, B, 140th N. Y.
George R. Hutchinson, M, 8th Artillery.
Thalman Horton, F, 104th N. Y.
Wm. Gage, K, 104th N. Y.
Chas. Davenport, C, 140th N. Y.
Joseph Leaney, D, 104th N. Y.
John Snyder, G, 140th N. Y.
Sergt. Wm. Jauncey, G, 67th N. Y.
Henry Buck, D, 104th N. Y.
Daniel D. Mann, B, 104th N. Y.
D. E. Cornwall, B, 104th N. Y.
Alex. Martin, H, 14th N. Y. Artillery.
Corp. D. A. Beardsley, D, 14th N. Y. Art.
John Emrick, Bm 14th N. Y. Art.
Michael Bloss, C, 8th N. Y. Art.
Sergt. Peter Miller, C, 9th N. Y. Art.
Wm. Gerow, C, 9th N, Y. Art.

COLUMBIAN HOSPITAL.
C. B. Fenner, Co. L, 4th N. Y. Artillery.
Rich. Bennet, G, 14th N. Y. Art.
Theo. C. Armitage, C, 111th N. Y.
Chauncey Miller, B, 111th N. Y.
Oliver N. Helmer, B, 111th N. Y.
George W. Carpenter, K, 9th N. Y. Heavy Artillery.

Correspondence of the Union and Advertiser.
104th N. Y. S. Volunteers.
RAPPAHANNOCK, Aug. 12, 1863.
MR. EDITOR:—Editors and correspondents of the Washington Chronicle, New York Herald, &c., inform their readers that the army of the Potomac is to do no marching and fighting for the present. Glad intelligence if true. But is it so? These writers may have means of ascertaining plans and purposes which we in medias res have not. It is to be hoped they have, and that they are not deluding us with an expectation joyous but deceptive.
The weather is very warm—too warm to allow of marching with safety to life, waiving all considerations of comfort. The 1st corps has been sadly reduced in numbers by the late battles and needs to be reinforced before taking the field. We have a pleasant encampment and one of practical importance as keeping watch over the railroad bridge which has been rebuilt since our arrival. We will make our lowest and most grateful obeisance to the "powers that be" if they will allow us to rest for one month. But if they will not permit us this privilege but one thing remains, and that is to "stake our tents and march away." This we did a year since and can again, though not, alas! with the same persons.
Last Sabbath was the anniversary of the battle of Cedar Mountain—then followed an approach to the Rapidan and hasty retreat to the Rappahannock (where we now are;) thence to Thoroughfare Gap, and then Bull Run (2,) Chantilly, Antietam, South Mountain, Fredericksburg, winter quarters at Belle Plaine, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and our olden locality. Let those who talk and write of the 104th N. Y. S. V. follow its footsteps during the past twelvemonth and then charge upon it idleness. And what are the results? First, to the army itself. Gens. Pope, McDowell, McClellan, Burnside, Hooker, have had their day, with Meade now in command, from whom much is expected, and through whom much will, we trust, be realized.  Second, to the regiment. The 950 who passed through Washington sixteen months ago, are reduced to less than 90! And where are the absent ones? At Gettysburg 25 officers and privates were killed; 86 wounded; 94 prisoners and missing. Total, 205. At Bull Run, Antietam and Fredericksburg this "cruel war" found victims from among us. A letter just in from Capt. Geo. Starr, of your city, now a prisoner at Libby Prison, Richmond, informs us that nine of the 104th are confined there—the prospect of an exchange at present not being favorable.
The regiment is at present in command of Col. Prey, Captain and Acting Adjutant Van Dresser, Lieuts. McConnell, Trembley and Richardson, who, with Quartermaster Colt and Dr. Rugg and the Chaplain, constitute the entire field, staff and line force. Nor is this an isolate case. The 16th Maine and 13th Massachusetts, in our brigade, are in no better condition. If the war is to be prosecuted with any hope of success, there must be large reinforcements, and that speedily. Major Strang and other officers of our regiment are at Elmira detailed to look after our interests when the conscripts arrive. A better selection could not have been made. Lieut. Col. Tuthill is at his home  in Corning, wounded, as are Capts. Wylie and Fisher, and Lieut. D. W. Starks at theirs. My amiable friend, Lieut. Thos. Johnston, of Troy, has "slept the sleep that knows no waking." If the 104th is not entitled to the name of a hard working and patriotic regiment, I know not where such an one is to be found. That there have been instances of cowardice and desertion cannot be denied; but as a body they have ever manifested a spirit of obedience, activity and heroism.
The late "Thanksgiving Day," under Proclamation of the President, was observed by the brigade in a manner similar to the Fast Day in May. Remarks were made by Chaplains Bullen of the 16th Maine, Cook of the 94th New York, French of the 39th Massachusetts, and Ward of the 104th New York, with the timely testimony of Gen. Briggs of the 1st division (formerly Gen. Wadsworth's). The attendance was large of officers and privates, who gave most respectful attention throughout. To us in the army there is much in the "signs of the times" for which to be thankful and from which to take hope. If Charleston falls (as it will eventually), then follows Savannah, while Mobile is already being attacked by Gen. Grant. What then?—a grand attack upon Washington of all available Confederate forces: victory to us and the end of the rebellion! Oh for a righteous, honorable, permanent peace! God grant it to us, afflicted nation.
During and for two weeks after the battle of Gettysburg, I was at the White Church Hospital, where I was again called to witness scenes far more numerous and agonizing than those at Bull Run and Chancellorsville. About four hundred wounded officers and privates—Union and Confederate—were gathered in a barn and under tents, receiving surgical treatment from Drs. Chambers, Richmond, Derby and Wheeler, assisted by attendants and nurses many and faithful. To each of four Chaplains were assigned special duties, one of mine being to attend the dying and bury the dead, I committed twenty-four to their hastily dug graves (twelve Union and twelve Confederate). A plain board with name, company and regiment, marks the spot where lies buried, coffinless and shroudless, the form of a loved husband, son or brother. Better this than the condition of thousands lying in piles upon the rocks where was made what is regarded the most fearful charge ever known in our national history. I was so near as to hear the yell which attends such attacks and hear the sharp musketry. At Chancellorsville I counted seventy boomings of cannon each minute, but here they were countless. No word more perfectly describes the scene and results than Satanic. I visited the entire battle ground, and the trees look as if a sirocco has passed over them, their vitality departing through the perferations made by shot and shell and ball. And ... graves—fields covered with them.
When speaking of peace as that which the army desires, it should not be understood "peace on any terms"—very far from it; but peace consistent with the claims of truth and righteousness and the constitution. To "conquer" such a "peace" they are ready to fight while to repossess it is their hearts' longing desire. "Oh that I could see a battle," says the tarrier at home. "I have seen one and do not wish to see another," says the warrior. But it is not on the battlefield alone that the soldier suffers. It is an uninterrupted series of sacrifices from the hour he leaves home till he returns to its quiet retreat and social intercourse. We shall welcome the conscripts, but we anticipate for them many a sa..our. They must come or all is lost, but joyous will be to them the day when their services are no longer needed on the _ented and battle field.

Casualties in the Fighting at Hanover Junction, May 23d.
The Tribune publishes a list of casualties in the 2d and 5th Army Corps in the fighting on Monday afternoon, May 23d, in which we find the following names from local regiments:
49th—Sergt. F. Lendmeyer, F, chest.
86th—1st Sergt. James B. Smith, E, abdomen,
8th N. Y. Heavy Artillery—Thomas Granville, M; Sergt, McDonald, D, back; Francis Moore, F, finger.
146th—O. Jones, H, thigh; O. Cavanagh, D; _. J. Coady, K, shoulder and back; J. Buckley D, face; Chas. Jamison, C, shoulder.
140th—Sergt. J. Bardell, E, leg.

WOUNDED IN SKIRMISHING ON THE MARCH
MAY 22D.
76th—J. Ruleff, I, thigh; 1st Sergt. J. J. Reese, H, hand.
104th—F. Starr, G, leg.
We copy the above from the Tribune, which is the only paper that publishes any list of the casualties in this fighting. Other names will probably be reported in a day or two.

PRISONERS IN RICHMOND.—Captain John Daily, of company I, One Hundred and Fourth regiment, is now a prisoner of war in Richmond, together with Lieut. McCleary, and the following members of Co, I, captured Aug. 19:
Sergeants Daniel Liddy, Patrick Casey, Michael A. Malloy; Corporals Thos. Gregg, Jas. Murphy; Privates P. Clifford, P. Callahan, J. Cimmers, B. Compton, J. Cadden, J. Dwyer, N. Green, L. Harrington, J. Kirby, G. King, M. Kelly, D. Kelly, J. Law, O. Lane, and C. H. Morey.
They are all well. Lieut. McCleary resided in West Troy. At the battle of Cold Harbor, June 3d, he received three wounds, and it was supposed he was killed. He was captured by the enemy. This fact was not known, however, until the 4th of July, when it was ascertained that he was a prisoner. He is still at Libby prison.

Corporal Henry Zipkie, hit in the breast by a spent cannon ball; badly bruised, but getting along finely.
Privates, Geo. W. Parr, knee severely.
   " John P. Wells,           " regarded dangerous till to-day, doing better.
   " Nelson J. Penndock, shot in arm and not seen since, so far as known here.
Nathaniel Wallis, in finger.
The balance of the Company, 30 in all, except 3 are missing or prisoners, including Lt. A. J. Rose, known to be a prisoner.
Lieut. Trembly was taken prisoner, and having been assistant at amputation, he got a case of Surgeon Instruments in his bloody hands, and played Surgeon well enough to pass the guard when our prisoners were marched out of the town. 104th Regiment, Company B.
Killed—1st Lieut. Thos. Johnson, in Wednesday's fight.
Private S. B. Lewis,        "
Wounded, Serg't Joseph Laflath, in leg.
Corporals Wm. Everingham,           "
   "               Wm. Milliman,                 "
   "             A Sourbier,                       "
Privates H. Burgess, since died.
   "             Geo. Jack, in leg.
   "             D. C. Rich, foot.
   "             John Runyan, breast and shoulder.
   "             Geo. Nodecker, in leg.
   "             Jacob Newfang, in groin.
   "             Capt. G. H. Star.
Prisoners, 2d Lieut. E. Tuttle,
   "              Corporal Ira Waring.
   "              Private, Geo. P. Pierce.
   "              Valentine Kartz.
Missing, Ira Conrad.
   "               Joseph Montz.

104th, Company A.
Killed—1st Sergeant, T. J. Curtiss, had taken colors from the second man shot down with them. He refused to release his hold of them, till quite dead, when it took a strong force to release the staff from his dying grasp.
   "           Private Wm. Woodruff and Wm. L. Davis.
Wounded—3d Serg't N. A. Gearhart, in thigh severely.
   "               4th Serg't S. P. Havens, in arm.
   "               Corporal E. Fancher, finger shot off,
Privates, Silas Austin, shot through both thighs, badly cut, doing well.
   "               E. J. Whipple, shoulder slightly.
   "               M. Hurd, flesh wound through both thighs, doing well.
   "               W. Magee, in ankle.
   "               Hiram Passage, bruised by limb of a tree.
Prisoners—1st Serg't R. R. Weed.
   "              2d A. T. Lamson.
Corporal H. White.
   "               J. C. Hage.
Privates—W. E. Smith, Perry Hanies, Jas.
Green, James Johnson and Ed. Keen.
Missing—J. Thompson, J. Tombs, Lewis Sutton and Oliver Smith.

Our Army Correspondence.
From the 104th Regiment.
BIVOUAC OF THE 104th REG'T N. Y. V.,
On the western slope of South Mountain, at Turner's Gap, July 9th, 1863.
To the Editor of the New-Yorker:
Sitting on a rock on the western slope of South Mountain, where we fought last September, and under the shade of the small chestnuts that cover the mountain, I have spent a few moments preparing a list of the casualties which our regiment sustained in the late action at Gettysburg. I have had a list prepared for some days, but could not send it out, and marching in the rain yesterday it was spoiled. Having an opportunity to mail letters to-day through the 11th Corps, I avail myself of it to send you the list, which is all I can do at present I have no time to give you the particulars of the battle, or that portion of it in which our regiment took part, and which came under my eye. Suffice it that we lost heavily, but whipped the enemy very severely, who are making tracks for the Potomac, and the Union forces close upon their heels, skirmishing every day. I anticipated this morning another fight to-day, but they are still striving to get away. Our troops have advanced considerably to-day, but no engagement as yet. The prospect is that Lee's whole army will be taken, or so much demoralized that it will be good for nothing hereafter. General Dix, I understand, is at Culpepper with a strong force to cut off the retreat of Lee should he succeed in crossing the Potomac, which is hardly possible, as our cavalry force have destroyed their pontoons, and the river is very high, from six to ten feet above low-water mark at the fords.
Hoping that ere this reaches you the Confederate Army of the Potomac will be no more as an army, I am, sir,
Very respectfully yours,
GILBERT G. PREY.
Col. Com'dg.

LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED IN THE 104TH N. Y. V. AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, PA.
Killed—1st Lieut. Thomas Johnston, Co. D; 1st Sergt. Thomas J. Curtis, A; Pvt's Wm. L. Davis, Wm. Woodruff, Co. A; Alonzo Mix, Wesley Lewis, John Lodowick, Co B ; Edward C. Barnes, C; Samuel L. Lewis, D; John Hill, Wm. Hussong, F; Orville O. Perry, G; James Tyke, H; Charles Fisher, I; A. M. Pectell, K.
Wounded, Com'd Officers—Lt. Col. Tuthill; Capt. H. A. Wiley, Co. B; Capt. Charles W. Fisher, I; 1st Lt. Austin N. Richardson, F; 2d Lts. James H. Cain, I; Jasper M. Criggs, C; James W. Dow, H; A. J. Rose, E; Wm. J. Starks, B.
Enlisted Men—Co. A: Nathaniel Germain, Jas. Austin, Octavus Clark, _erry Haynes, Wm. McGee, Edgar J. Whipple, Edgar Fancher, Marcus Hurd.
Co. B—Albert H. Peabody, Hugh St. Germain, C. C. Barnes, Charles Delany, Mark Sudbury, Jas. Cullen.
Co. C—Col. Sergt. Maurice Buckingham, Warren Veesey, Sherman Strater, Corp. Seymour Phillips, Corp. Earl L. Gitehell, Wm. H. Rich, Newton Kerr, Orange Gardner, Banjamin Hoagg.
Co. D—Sergt. Joseph Lefflett, Corp. Warren Everingham, Albert Sauerbier, John Runyon Jacob Newfany, David C. Rich, Horace Burgess, David E. Curtis
Co. E—Sergts. John W. Culver. Horatio N. Curtis and Hiram L. Foster, Col. Corp. Andrew J. Pierce, John Wells, John W. Parr, Wm. Patrick, Nathaniel F. Wallace, Nelson J. Pennock, Henry Zipkie.
Co. F—Sergts. Alva Lard and James W. Wiley, Col. Corp. Andrew McMullen, Solomon Closser, Albert S. True, Peter Gullar, Frank Reuben. Co. G—Sergt. John E. Roberts, Martin Maxon, Michael Flynn, Timothy Lynch, Elisha Washburn.
Co. H—Corp. David Powers, Michael Staunton, Lewis C. Hazleton, John F.  Baxter, Dennis B. W. Jack.
Co. I—Corp. James Cain, John Cunningham, Thomas Shea, James Giles, Peter Cannon. Co. K—William Singleton, Peter Garny, Henry Baker, Thomas Sweeney, Anthony Hues, Gotlieb Seadrach.

Major Henry V. Colt.
It is with the highest gratification we learn that Gov. Seymour has conferred upon Lieut. Henry V. Colt the rank of Major of the 104th Regiment N. Y. S. V. Such preferment, and higher, has long been deserved and look-ed for by the many who are well acquainted with Mr. C's fitness and official claim. If long continuance in the service, tried ability, unimpeachable integrity, skill and faithfulness in meeting all the duties of any trust thus far committed to him, kindness of heart and man-nor coupled with clear and intelligent views of the issues at stake in the present natio­nal struggle, and a whole souled devotion to the Government, and the will of the people entitles their possessor to military preferment, there is not in the army a more worthy claimant than our respected townsman. These are con­siderate expressions written by one who as a staff officer was long brought into daily and most intimate acquaintance with Mr. C., and knows him well as a man and an officer. It may be safely added that no appointment could be made in more entire concurrence with the judgment and wishes of the regiment than this. With such leaders as Col. Prey, Lieut.-Col. Strang, and Major Colt, the 104th will long maintain the position which it now holds as a model for discipline and valor—so acknow­ledged by the Com. General. It is hoped that Major Colt will be allowed to visit us ere long, having been almost two years absent. When that time does come let him meet with a public reception worthy the recipient, and creditable to the community. 
W.

From the 104th Regiment.
Below we give the list of casualties in the above Regiment at the battle of Gettysburg, kindly furnished us by Major Strang. The record is an honorable, yet fearful one. The Regiment previous to the battle, numbered only about two hundred and fifty men. The next day after the battle but forty-five privates and one line officer could be mustered for service. On Monday we had the pleasure of meeting Lieut. Dow who was severely wounded. He received a shot in the breast, the ball passing out through the shoulder, and another in the arm above the elbow. He is as comfortable as could be expected, and is home on a leave of absence of twenty days. It is not at all probable he will be fit for duty at the expiration of that time. Lieut. Dow after being wounded was taken prisoner, and was in the hands of the rebels for four days, when he was retaken. The small remnant of forty-five men were detailed for skirmishers the next day after the battle. The Regiment is now so reduced that the organization can hardly be preserved a great while longer. It has seen hard service, and the men have nobly performed their duty, never flinching or faltering in a single instance. The record is one that the men may with pride turn to.
Mr. NORTON—Dear Sir:—I have delayed sending a list of the casualties of our Regiment in the recent engagement at Gettysburg, partly because I wished to have it correct, and partly to await the termination of the action.
The following is the list corrected up to July sixth:—
Officers killed or died of wounds, 1—1st Lt. Thomas Johnston, Co. D.
Officer's wounded, 9—Lieut, Col. Henry G. Tuthill, abdomen; Capt. Henry A. Wiley, B., hand; Capt. Cha's W. Fisher, I., leg; 1st Lt. Austin N. Richardson, F., hand; 2d Lt. Wm. J. Starks, B., hip; 2d Lt. Jasper M. Griggs, C., leg; 2d Lt. Adoniram J. Rose, E., side; 2d Lt. James W. Dow, H., shoulder; 2d Lt. James H. Cain, L., shoulder.
Officers missing and prisoners, 10—Captain Wm. C. Wilson, K., prisoner; Capt Geo. H. Starr, D., prisoner; Adj. Homer Stull, prisoner; 1st Lt John Daily, I., prisoner; 1st. Lieut. Reuben R. Weed, A., prisoner; 1st L t Adam
Dixon; 1st Lt. George L. Snyder; 2d Lt E. A. Tuthill, prisoner; 2d Lt. Albert T. Lamson, prisoner; 2d Lt. Walter S. Stephens.
Unlisted men killed or since died of wounds: 14—1st Serg't Thomas J. Curtis, A.; private Wm. L. Davis, A.; private Wm. Woodruff, A.; private Alonzo F. Mix, B.; private J. Lodawick, B.; private Wesley Lewis, B.; private E. C. Barnes, C.; private Samuel S. Lewis, D.; private John Hill, F.; private Wm. Husson, F.; private Orville O. Perry, G.; private Jas. Tighe, H.; private Charles Fisher, F.; private A. M. Pectil, K.
Enlisted men wounded, 77—Serg. Nathaniel Gerrhart, A.; color Corp'l Edgar J. Fancher, A.; private Silas Austin, A.; private O. M. Clark, A.; private Marcus Hurd, A.; private Perry Haynes, A.; private Wm. McGee, A.; private Edgar J. Whipple, A.; 1st Serg't H. St. Germain, B.; Serg't James Cullen, B.; Ser. C. C. Barnes, B.; Corp'l Mark Sudbury, B.; private Albert H. Peabody, B.; private C. De Long, B.; color Serg't Maurice Buckingham, C.; Corp'l Earl Gitchell, C.; Corp. S. T. Phillips, C.; Corp'l Benjamin Hoag, C.; private W. Veazey, C.; private Sherman Streeter, C.; private Orange Gardner, C.; private Wm. H. Rich, C.; private Newton Kerr, C.; Serg't Jos. Leffleth, D.; Corp'l W. Everingham, D.; Corp. Albert Sourbier, D.; private John Runyan, D.; private George Chuck, D.; priv. J. Newfang, D.; private David C. Rich, D.; private Horace Burgess, D.; private David E. Curtis, D.; 1st Ser. J. W. Culver, E.; Ser. Hiram L. Foster, E.; Serg. Horatio N. Curtis, E.; color Corporal A. J. Pierce, E.; private John Wells, E.; priv. J. W. Parr, E., private Wm. Patrick, E.; priv. Nathaniel Wallace, E.; priv. N. J. Pennock, E.; private Henry Zipkie, E.; Sergeant A. Lard, F.; Ser. J. W. Wiley, F.; color Corp'l A. McMullen, F.; private Solomon Closser, F.; priv. A. S. True, F.; private Peter Goller, F.; priv. John Weidright, F.; private Wm. Husson, F.; priv. Frank Reuben, F.; priv. C. S. Cameron, F.; Serg't J. E.Roberts, G.; Corp'l M. Maxon, G.; priv. Michael Flynn, G.; private T. Lynch, G.; private E. G. Washburne, G..; Serg. O. O'Keefe, H.; Corp. David Powers, H.; Corp'l M. Stanton, H.; private L. C. Hazelton, H.; private John J. Baxter, H.; private D. B. W. Jack, H.; private Cha's Welch, H.; color Ser. W. H. Shea, I.; Corp. James Cain, I.; Corp'l John Cunningham, I.; private T. Shea, I.; priv. James Giles, I.; private Peter Cannon, I.; Ser. M. G. B. Carr, K.; Corp'l Henry Baker, K.; private Thomas Sweeney, K.; private A. Hughes, K.; private G. Leabrach, K.; priv. P. Garvey, K.; private W. Singleton, K.
Enlisted men missing or prisoners, 84—Company A—Serg't S. P. Haver; Corp'ls L. Sutton, Ja's. Toms, Ja's Thompson, John C. Hayes; privates James Green, J. Johnson, W. Smith, Oliver Smith.
Co. B—Corp'l John P. Butler; privates L. R. Campbell, Jerome B. Fisher, P. F. Fuller, Truman Harrington, Oscar Hassell, Jasper G. Jackman, Jackson McPhail, Albert Platt, C. Willis, John M. Cavanaugh.
Co. C—Serg't Francis Lincoln; privates H. Abbey, C. Strater, Wm. Briggs, R. Dunning, Erastus Gould, John P. Myers, H. Spencer.
Co. D—Corp'l Wm. B. Milliman; privates John Conrad, Henry Striven, Joseph Montz, George Nodecker, V. Kurtz, G. B. Purvis.
Co. E—Sergeants John Welch, M. Graham; privates Jackson Bush, Daniel J. Clark, H. Hoadley, Marcena Ingraham, Byron Marsh, George Hall, Moses Wallace.
Co.  F—Corp'l T. Shepard; privates Wm. Wallace, Charles W. Snider, Joseph Organ, W. Vanderbogart, John Tabe, S. G. Merrett.
Co. G—1st Sergeant John McGuire; Serg'ts E Hildom, Michael Brady; Corp'l J. Moran; privates Stephen Summers, M. McNeff, W. H. DeForest, Michael Foster, G. E. Washburne, George Stragline.
Co. H—Serg. D. McCarthy; privates John Bolton, Wm. Lee, A. P. Wilcox, E. P.Wilcox, Ja's Welch, A. Kennedy, Richard Keefe.
Co. I—Sergeants O. Crough, Dan'l Liddy, Corp'l Thomas Gregg, privates F. Murphy, N. Green, Barnard Compton, Patrick Casey, P. Walker.
Co. K—Serg. Patrick Cpnway; Corp'l R. S. Canfield; privates J. Kenney, Thomas K. Leyden, Reuben C. Galusha, H. P. Main, Thomas H. Haley.
The above list speaks for itself, making comment unnecessary, and description I will leave for those who had more time for seeing than I had. Colonel Prey and Assistant Surgeon Rugg had their horses shot under them, but escaped themselves. Lt. Col. Tuthill's wound while severe is, I am glad to say, not dangerous
Very resp'y, T. R. S.

The Casualties.
As yet we have received no full record of the casualties in the late great battles, but we must expect to find when the record is received to note the names of some from this County who have been wounded, or who have yielded up life in behalf of the Government. The 104th Regiment, "Wadsworth Guards," and the 130th—now 1st New York Dragoons, were also in the different battles, as also the 14th Heavy Artillery, were in the fight. A report on Monday stated that every commissioned and non-commissioned officer of the 104th was either killed or wounded, and that on Friday the Regiment numbered but one hundred and sixteen. This would show severe work. After the second day's battle at Gettysburg all that could be numbered was forty-seven men and two or three Regimental officers. We give a list of the wounded so far as received:
104th Regiment—John Fleming, Co. B, finger; M. Counterwright Co. C, finger; Jno. Kellogg, Co. B, finger; Corp. O. Long, Co. D; Sergeant D. E. Curtis, do., face; Sergt C. Clark, Co. F ; G. Winter, Co. D, hand; S. Streeter, Co. C, fingers; J. Darrangh, Co. D, ankle; G. Daniels, Co. F, shoulder; Corp. E. Fancher, hand; Cort. G. Puvist, Co. D, finger; Chas. Barborn, Co. A. hip; Sergt. Alva Laid, right elbow; Jno. Kelley, Co. D, finger; Geo. Pierce, do. foot; John Brennan; Henry Timbrook; Robert R. Schoonover, sick; John
Roth, sick. Most of these are in hospitals at Washington.
From the character of the wounds it is quite evident that the rebels had a large force of sharpshooters.

The 104th Regiment.
NEAR PETERSBURG, AUG. 20, 1864.
EDITOR HERALD :—I have just time as Mail is leaving to say that our veteran 104th is now in the hands of the rebels, the whole regiment, officers and men, except one Lieutenant and some fifteen or twenty men having been taken prisoners in an attempt by their Corps to hold the Weldon railroad. Some six or eight men had been wounded in the skirmishes which preceded the fight in which they were captured and are in the hospital. Only two of these, so far as I know are from our part of the State, are A. Higgius, of Co. E., from Howard, foot amputated, doing finely, and J. G. Young, of the same Co., severely wounded in the foot. I hasten the announcement of it, hoping it will reach you in time for your next week's paper, and will learn more of the particulars and give them within a day or two. Israel White, of Co. B. is the only one I recognized as from near Dansville among those left, perhaps there are more as I did not see all.
I may just say in addition, that though the losses in the Corps have been serious, there is no doubt that the enemy's loss in killed and wounded in these fights so far have been more than double ours, and that we hold all the positions gained, and with a good prospect of the complete success of the movement.
The heavy rains of the past few days have made the roads next to impassable, and may if continued compel the abandonment of the enterprise, but so far all are in fine spirits and very hopeful. In haste, T.

ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTH REGIMENT N. Y. V.
Absent Without Leave.
Capt. J. C. Thompson, K.       Step. Robinson, G.
William Webb, A.                     Christ. Rockafellow, G.
Ser. L. Sheppard, A.               T. D. Wait, G.
Corp. D. White, A.                 Geo. Andrews, H.
Edwin Bush, A.                       William Bagley, H.
C H. Carpenter, A.                  Mic. Cummings, H.
Will. Demanker, A.                 John Duncan, H.
John C. Hays, A.                     Michur Dooley, D.
Elijah White, A.                       John Dunn, H.
Theodore Magee, A.               D. Fitzpatrick, H.
Hiram B. Smith, A.                 John Flynn, H.
James Shumpshon, A,             John Fisher, H.
Frank J. Black, A.                   John H. Genore, H.
Henry Barnum, A,                   Barney Hill, H.
S. W. Farnsworth, A.              John Hayner, H.
Henry Avery, B.                     William Jordan, H.
D. W. Mann, B.                     Thomas Kelley, H.
Daniel Norton, B.                   John Lewis, H.
George Youngs, B.                 Edward Lowell, H.
Henry Robinson, B.                Pat. Mulvaine, H.       
Charles Cathin, B.                  Patrick Butler, H.
George Mosher, B.                  Moses Mason, H.
William Burchill, B.                E. H. Merwin, H.
William Eader, B.                  S. Mayhar, H.
Charles Willis, B.                   Robert Owens, H.
John Elkner, B.                      John O'Brien, H.
Reuben Thompson, B.           James Owens, H.
William Gordon, B.                James Rosseau, H.
Peter Casey, B.                     J. A. Shea, H.
A. Platt, B.                           Alex. Williams, H.
Eli Ford, B.                           Asa Button, H.
David Speers, B.                    John Craner, H.
J. White, B.                           Oscar Hilton, H.
Aruthe W. Irving, B.               T. F. Hughes, H.
C. J. Rundel, C.                      C. E. Norwood, H.
Ortillus Beardsly, C.               H. E. Callaghan, H.
H. F. Drew, C.                       Erskine Grovee, H.
John Drew, C.                        W. W. Adams, H.
Wm. Iasylin, C.                      John Carroll, H.
Newton Kerr, C.                   William Brennan, H.
John Roycraft, C.                   Joseph St. John, H.
D. S. Bush, C.                        Albert Knife, H.
Emery M. Wood, C.               Thomas Gleason, H.
William Cinchey, C.                Edward Hurley, H.
Francis P. Fuller, C.                Michael Paraten, H.
Lyman Joslyn, C.                   Michael Connolly, H.
John Coleman, C.                  George Edwards, H.
J. J. Woodward, C.                 Pat Gragley, H.
David A. Utill, C.                     J. N. Patterson, H.
Ser. M. Webster, C.                David Bowers, H.
Ser. J. E. W. Young, C.          John Way, H.
N. D. Bancroft, mus., C.        Michael Barry, H.
J. H. Armstrong, C.                 Edward Moss, H.
Gardner Brown, D.                 Francis Dillon, H.
Jas. Dolan, D.                          Serg. Chas. Mckenna,
Geo. Ellsier, D.                        Co. I.
John Gaffney, D.                     Corp. R. B. Street, I.
Mortimer Gardner, D.             James Anderson, I.
Chas. A. Hill, D.                     D. Bingham, I.
John C. Heath, D.                   J. Compton, I.
Frank Leaffied, D.                  B. Compton, I.
Winfield R. Mapes, D.            Joseph H. Clark, I.
Alex. McMulan, D.                 John Ferguson, I.
Fred. Maltztam, D.
Isaac Manbury, D.
P. McDermott, D.
Gsorge Nodecker, D.
Nodecker Ulrica, D.
Lewis Platt, D.
Charles Sherwood, D.
Geo. Strouse, D.
F. L. Streeter, D.
J. H. Akin, F.
Anderson Crowell, F.
H. C. Gifford, F.
Alfred Shaw, F.
John W. Tabor, F.
Miles Delevan, F.
William Mahanna, F.
William Carvey, F.
Zenas Bradly, F.
Charles E. Combs, F.
Elisha Howes, F.
Ser. B. C. Rapp, F.
Prince H. Potter, F.
J. J. Armstrong, G.
Charles H. Anger, G.
Warren Belton, G.
Harvey N. Bryan, G.
James Clark, G.
Peter Gavity, G.
James Howard, G.
William Jacques, G.
John Kennedy, G.
George Merrill, G.
John Meick, G.
John Mooney, G.
M. Flannigan, I.
Francis Grace, I.
H. W. Gamer, L
Stephen Ivison, I.
Alex. Kelly, I.
David Brocken, I.
Geo, Mitchell, I.
N. M. Parteli, I.
Robert Ross, I.
Michael Sullivan, I.
Frederick Troax, I.
Wm. Welsh, I.
Thomas Walters, I.
Thomas Owens, I.
Fred. Sellock, I.
Simon Dyette, H.
Thos. Linhame, H.
Andeble Leferte, H.
Wm. McCracken, H.
Peter Murphy, H.
Michael Neal, H.
Henry Ovens, H.
Henry Potter, H.
James Phillips, H.
James Quinn, H.
Thos. Reynolds, H.
Chas. Rosenberg, H.
Ira N. Sweet, H.
Edward J. Seitz, H.
Geo. Fort, H.
John W. Veile, H.
Fred. Whyland, H.
Chas. F. Wilder, H.
Cor.Wm. Singleton, H.

... present at the surrender of Lee. It has had in all on its rolls 1,600 men, and returns with 243. For more than a year the Rev. Mr. Ward, the veteran missionary to India, was its chaplain. Gilbert P. Pray was the Colonel from October, 1862, to March, 1865. The names of battles inscribed on its flag is as follows:
Bull Run second, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Bethesda Church, Petersburg and Weldon Railroad.
In all of these the regiment bore itself with conspicuous gallantry, and effectually secured the confidence and regard of commanding and general officers.
Of the officers of the regiment at its organization only three are connected with it now—Lieut. Col. J. R. Strang, who went out as 2d Lieutenant of Co. G, Major Wm. C. Willson, who went out as 2d Lieutenant of Co. K, and
Capt. James A. Gault, of Co. G. Major Henry V. Colt, who went out as Quartermaster, was afterwards promoted to Major, and was for a long time on duty here in command of the rebel prison; the duties of which laborious and delicate position he discharged with such success and justice as to win the esteem and regard of every misguided man under his command.

Letter from the 104th Regiment. 3D DIVISION HOSPITAL. 5TH CORPS,
August 22, 1864.
EDITOR REPUBLICAN—Sir—On the 18th inst. our cavalry and the 5th corps, by a well executed "flank movement," obtained possession of the Weldon railroad, about six or seven miles south of Petersburg, and though the rebels have made three desperate attempts to retake this main line of communication between Richmond and the southern portion of the Confederacy, they have been repulsed each time with fearful slaughter. But our joy is mingled with sadness in consequence of the loss in prisoners which we have sustained in holding our position.
The first battle occured [sic] on the 18th, and our losses were not heavy, having only about seventy wounded sent to our division hospital. But on the 19th a vigorous assault was made on our line, a portion of which they carried, and were thus enabled to get on the flank and rear of our division, and captured at least one third of the entire division, while they were vainly striving to hold their ground. All commissioned officers, and about one hundred of the men of the 104th N. Y. who went into the fight, are supposed to be prisoners, and only twenty-two are known to have escaped.
About twenty sick and wounded had been sent to this hospital on the 18th inst., which, with the hospital attendants, ambulance men, teamsters, musicians, &c., and the fifty-seven new men who had just been sent us (but being unarmed were not put into the fight), will make about one hundred and twenty men in the regiment. But I have not learned what disposition will be made of them.
When the fighting commenced a division of the 9th corps came promptly to our support, and enabled us to retake the ground we had lost.
On the 21st another attempt was made to drive us from the railroad, but we almost annihilated one division of rebels, and nearly all the wounded that came into our hospitals were rebels; and never before have I seen the number of wounded rebels in our hospitals so far exceed our own. Our men are jubilant over the result of the last fight, and the battle-field is in our possession, and is thickly strewn with rebel dead.
Col. Tilden, of the 16th Regiment Me., Vol., was among the prisoners, but escaped near Petersburg and has reached our lines. He says Lieut.-Col. Strang is not with the rest of the 104th, and there is rumor that he is wounded; but he may have escaped unhurt after being captured.
I herewith enclose a list of those who were in the fight, but escaped, and also a list of sick and wounded:
Name.              Rank                Co.      Remarks
Walter Steele,  Pri.,                  A,        Present for duty.
Michael Kelly,   “                    “                     “         
Wm. Brennan,   “                    B,                   “
Benjamin Kipp,             “                    “                     “
Israel White,      “                    “                     “
Horner Smith,   “                    “                     “
James Kelly,      “                    C,                    “
James Kelly,      “                    D,                    “
A. F. Bennett,   “                    E,                     “
A. J. Bush,                    “                    “                     “
D. J. Clark,                    “                    “                     “
John Gunner,     “                    F,                     “         
Theo. Springsted,          “                    G,                    “
Wm. DeForest,              “                    “                     “
John Yunt,                    “                    “                     “
A. P. Wilcox, Corp., H,                    "
Geo. Pressure,             Pri.,                   “                  “
Abram Shannon,           "                     I,                      “
Edw'd Cummings,    “                        “                     “
T. W. Cunningham, Ser’t                    K,                    “
Alex. Bigger,   Corp.              “                     “         
Chas. Chatney,            Pri.,                   “                     “
Nelson Croft, Ser't                 A,        Sick.
J. L. Toms,                  Corp.              “          “
E. White,                     Pri.                   “           “
H. McLane.              "                  "      Wounded in thumb
Geo. W. Johnson     "                  "       Sick.
Wm. Scholtz,   "                      "            "
S. P. Curtis,                 Ser't                 B,          "
S. B. Hale,                   Corp.               "          Wounded shoulder.
D. S. Allen,                 Pri.,                   "               "   head (slight)
A. J. Burns,                 "                       Sick.
Geo. Clark,                  Corp. E,           "
H. Zipke,                     "           "           "
A. Higgins,                  Pri.,      "           Woun'd leg (ampu'd)
J. S. Price,                   "           F,         Wonnded [sic] in foot.
John McGee,   Ser't     G,        Sick.
J. G. Young,    Pri.,      "           Wounded in toe.
Richard Kiefe,            "           H,        Sick.
F. Tichenor,     Mus.    "           "
Peter Dellary, Pri.,      K,        "
Geo. Vanderlive,         "           "           Wounded (slight)
ENOS G. CHASE.

Letter from the 104th Regiment.
HEAD QUARTERS 104TH REG. N. Y. VOLS.
Sept. 4, 1864.
FRIEND NORTON—I send you a list of our losses for the 18th and 19th of August, near the Yellow House, Va., and if you can find a place in your paper for it you will do me a great favor, and will answer a great many letters now coming to me inquiring for the men. My duties are now very laborious, being the only Line Officer on duty with the regiment, and acting in the double capacity of Adjutant and Quarter-Master; and I must necessarily neglect to answer many letters, very much in conflict with my principles and feelings.
I would further state that we have received 246 recruits from Elmira, and we now have quite a regiment again, minus officers. Our field return this morning gives 3 officers and 325 enlisted men. Capt. Wm. W. Graham, 39th Mass. Vols., is now in command of the regiment, and his fine qualities as a gentleman and officer are highly appreciated. And under his supervision you may expect to hear a good report of the regiment, and when properly drilled you may chance to hear of their fighting qualities again if they have an opportunity, Dr. Charles H. Richmond and your humble servant constitute the three officers present for duty. With a hope that we may soon see our old companions in arms again, and our cause and regiment still flourish, I close.
Col. Gilbert G. Pray,   missing in action.
Lieut.-Col. John R. Strang, "     "     "
Co. A.
1st Lieut. Corn. Timson, missing in action.
Sergt. G. Satterlee,         "         "      "
Private Henry McLane, wounded in action
   " Octavius M. Clark, missing in action
   " James Curran,             "              "
   " Thram Passage           "              “ 
   " George Pitt.                "               “
Co. B.
Capt. Henry A. Wiley,     “              “
1st Sergt. James Cullen,   "              "
Corporal Mark Sudbury,  "              "
   “          Ezekiel Wright,        "                 “
   "          Jackson McFail, "              "
   "         Samuel B. Kale, wounded  "
Private Josiah Guile,       missing    "
   "       Almond Lockwood, "          "
   "       Nelson Peabody,      "          “
   "       John F. Swartz,        "          "
   "       Charles Willis,         "           “
Co. C.
Capt. Jasper M Griggs,       "           "
1st Lieut. Francis S. Bates, "           "
1st Sergt. John Crowell,     "           "
Sergt. William Thurston,   "            "
Corporal William Joslyn,   "            "
   "          Wiley Streeter,    "             "
Private Darnel S. Allen, wounded   "
   "        Jabob Custaline, missing     "
   "        John Garrison,       "             "
   "        Robert Nesbit,       "             "
   "        Ira Parker,             "             "
   "        Lewis O. Sweetland, "         "
Co. D.
1st Lieut. Marshal J. Rogers, "         "
1st Sergt. Henry Strover,       "         "
Sergt. Warren Everingham,   "         "
Corporal Granville D. Miller, "        "
   "          Jacob Newfang,       "         "
Private James Butts,               "         "
   "       John Conrad,              "          "
   "       Herbert Jones,            "          "
   "       Valentine Kurtz,        "          "
   "        James A. Luce,         "          "
   "       Ephraim Niles,           "         "
   "       Morris Van Riper,     "          "
   "       Merritt A. Woughter, "         "
   "       Joseph Montz,            "         "
   “       Valentine Kurtz,        “          “
Co. E.
Sergt. Henry P. Woodworth, "          "
Sergt. Moses Wallis,              "         "
Private Almeron Higgings, wounded "
   "        J. G. Young,               "          "
   "        Michael Graham,   missing    "
   "        Francis Marks,            "          "
   "        James Quinline,          "          "
   "        James H. Sheridan,     "          "
   "        Henry A. Hoadly,       "          "
Co. F.
Capt. A. N. Richardson,          "          "
1st Sergt. Alva Lard,               "          "
Sergt. James W. Wiley,           "          "
Sergt. Ceylon Clark,                "          "
Corporal Daniel Swender,       "          "
   "        James A. Richardson, "          "
Private John S. Price,       wounded    "
   "       Jessie Bennett,      missing      "
   "       Charles S. Cameron,    "          "
   "       James J. Goff,              "          "
   "       Nicholas Hanna,          "          "
   "       Patrick McCue,            "          "
   "       Albert P. Potter,           "          "
   " Charles W. Root, missing since June 11, 1864, and not properly reported at head quarters.
   “        Daniel Sorter,             missing in action
   “        Eugene Sparks,           “           “
   “        Wm. H. Stewart,         “           “ 
   “        Jacob Vorhis,              “           “
   “        Isaac VanAlst,            “           “ 
   “        George W. White,      “            “
Co. G.
Capt. James A. Gault,             "            "
Sergt. Eugene Hildom,            “           "
Sergt. John A. Smith,             "              "
Corporal Lorenzo E.Thompson, "         "
Private Daniel T. Cole,           "             "
   "       Harrison Clark,            "             "
   "       Perry Clark,                 "             "
   "       Edward Crowley,         "             "
   "       Amasa Eastwood,        "              "
   "       Michael Flynn,             "             "
   "       Francis Gitchell,           "             "
   "       Henry Head,                 "             "
   "       Chester Hyde,               "             "
   "        Edgar Plympton,          "             "
   "        John Roth,                    "             "
   "        Stephen Summers,       "             "
   "        George E. Washburn,  "             "
   "        Orson Woolcott,          "             "
Co. H.
1st Lieut. Joseph C. Cary,         "            "
1st Sergt. Dennis J. McCarthy, "            "
Corporal Edwin Moss,              "            "
   "           John T. Bolton,          "            "
Private Joel W. Ayres,               "            "
   "        James A. Bennett,          "           "
   "        James Carney,                "           "
   "        Levant Wakes,               "            "
   "        Andrew Kennedy,          "            "
   "        John Loker,                    "            "
   "        John W. Patterson,         "            "
   "        John Roach,                    "           "
   "        Charles H. Trumbul,      "            "
   "         James Welch,                "            "
   "         Earle P. Wilcox,            "            "
Co. I.
Capt. John Daly,                         "            "
1st Sergeant Daniel Liddy,         "            "
Sergt. Michael A. Molloy,          "            "
Sergt. Patrick Casy,                     "            "
Corporal Thomas Gregg,            "             "
   "           Francis Murphy,          "             "
Private John Cimmer,                 “             “  
   “        Patrick Clifford,              “             “  
   “        Bernard Compton,           “             “
   “        John Cadden,                   “             “
   “        Patrick Callahan,             “             “
   “        John Duyer,                     “             “
   “        Nicholas Green,               “             “
   “        Leonard Harrington,        “             “
   “        Daniel Killey,                   “             “
   “        Martin Killey,                   “             “
   “        Job Kirby,                         “             “
   “        George King,                    “             “
   “        Oliver Lane,                     “              “
   “        John Law,                         “              “
   “        Charles Morey,                 “              “
Co. K.
1st Lieut. John R. Jarvis,               "              "
Corporal H. E. Hurlburt,          wounded       "
   "          Lynch Volger,            missing        "
Private Jas. Vanderhule,           wounded      "
   "        John Fanbert,               missing         "
   "         John Kenny,                     "              "
   "          John Killens,                   "               "
   "          Gotleib Ladorach,           "              "
   "          Thomas Leyden,             "              "
   "          Hiram P. Main,               "              "
   "          Barney Riley,                  "              "
   "          James Smith,                   "              "
   "          John Webber,                  "              "
   "          Peter Yorkerson,             "              "
The above is a correct list from the records of the regiment, and I would state that all (with the exception of two or three wounded) were captured on Friday, the 19th of August, 1864.
I am, respectfully, your obd't serv't,
SENECA WARNER. JR.,
Lieut. & Adjt. 104th Reg. N. Y. Vols.

The 104th in Elmira.
The Elmira Advertiser of yesterday announces that the 104th regiment (Wadsworth Guards) are in that city, at Barracks No. 1, awaiting payment and discharge. They arrived on Saturday evening.
The 104th was organized at Geneseo, in the Fall and Winter of 1861-2, and was named "The Wadsworth Guards," in honor of the noble and patriotic citizen whose name is a household word wherever liberty and virtue dwell, and who afterwards gave his life as a heroic and willing sacrifice upon the altar of his country. The regiment has seen as much service and hard fighting as any in the field, and has borne itself through all with unflagging zeal and undaunted bravery. The record of battles inscribed upon its flag, and the thinned and decimated condition of its once serried ranks, are the best evidences of the deeds it has done, and the honors it has won. While it has been honored in the distinguished name it bore, it has conferred honor in return, and fully justified the confidence reposed in it by the intelligent and patriotic people from whose midst it went.
The original Field and Staff officers were as follows:
Colonel—John Rorbach.
Lieutenant Colonel—Wells Kenyon.
Major—Lewis C. Skinner.
Surgeon—Enos G. Chase.
Assistant Surgeon—D. S. Landen.
Chaplain—Daniel Russell.
Adjutant—Fred T. Vance.
Quartermaster—Henry V. Colt.
The present roster is as follows:
Lieutenant Colonel (commanding)—John R. Strong.
Major—William C. Willson.
Surgeon—C. H. Richmond.
Chaplain—Alfred C. Roe.
Captains—C. Timpson, A. Dixon, J. M. Griggs, W. L. Trembly, A. N. Richardson, J. A. Gault, E. A. Tuthill.
First Lieutenants—T. W. Cookingham, Jas. Cullen (Acting Quartermaster),T. S. Bates, Alva Lord, Francis Palmer, J. A. Gary, J. K. Jarvis (Acting Adjutant).
Second Lieutenant—Charles L. Isaacs.
The Advertiser gives the following history and incidents connected with the Regiment since its organization:
The regiment, when it entered the service, reached Washington as the army, under McClellan, was about to start on the Peninsula campaign. It was attached to the 1st Corps, under McDowell, and formed a part of General Duryea's brigade, which occupied Catlett's Station during the summer of 1862. It was with Pope's army in his march to the Rapidan in August, 1862—was present at the battle of Cedar Mountain, but did not take an active part, and was engaged in all the skirmishes that occurred during the retreat to Manasses. At the second battle of Bull Run it suffered large loss; also at South Mountain and Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville.
At Gettysburg, on the first day's fight, it went into the battle with twenty-six officers and three hundred and fifty men, and came out with four officers and thirty-nine men. Its ranks were subsequently recruited, and during the summer of 1864 it was with the Army of the Potomac, sharing its fortunes, and engaged in all the battles of the Wilderness. At the Weldon railroad the regiment was captured bodily, less than twenty men escaping. Major Willson was in rebel hands for twenty months, half of which time he spent in Libby, and at last escaped from Danville, Va., making his way over three hundred and fifty miles alone to the Union lines in Tennessee. He awards to the negroes, without exception, the credit of feeding and assisting him on his long and perilous journey. His tes­timony on their behalf shows that the Govern­ment has no truer friends than the men and women of this oppressed and down-trodden race.
The regiment subsequently acted as provost guard at the 5th corps headquarters, and was ...

Military Items.—Capt. W. I. Clark, 104th Regt. was relieved from duty yesterday to return to his regiment.
The following men belonging to a detachment of the 161st Reg't. will leave soon;—First Sergeant Bastion Freeman; Quartermaster Murry Nash; Serg't D. C. Amy; Corp'l G. H. Snell; Corp'l Robert B. Murray; Provates D. A. Atwater; A. N. Brown; A. M. Harris; Sam D. Cooper; John S. Warner.
—About 53 men were sent away yesterday.
—Capt. Dumars of the detachment of the 161st is still detailed here in connection with the General Court Martial. His duties have been arduous and well performed, and it would be impossible to spare him for the field, until the business before the Court has been disposed of.
—Yesterday afternoon, Companies A and B, of the 179th were duly mustered in, and left last night, for the south. They were armed with Enfield rifles. The names of the commissioned officers of Co. A are Capt. A. A. Terrell; First Lieut. G. D. Carpenter; Second Lieut. J. F. Farr, of Co. B; Capt. R. F. Stewart; First Lieut. Geo. Cooke; Second Lieut. Bowker. Co. C will be mustered today, and sent forward soon.
—Stewart is still carefully guarded. There are three privates on duty during the day around the outside of the jail, and a corporal inside, with the prisoner and a commissioned officer who commands the whole. At night the guard pass the time within the jail near the prisoner.
One Hundred and Fourth N. Y. Infantry—Wounded—S. Streeter, Co. C, Corporal E. M. Wright, Co. B., Sergeant C. Clark, Co. F., J. Delong, Co. K., G. W. Vanderhule, company not given.

Wounded New York Soldiers.—The following names of members of the 104th Regt., wounded in the movement on the Weldon Railroad we find in the New York Tribune of yesterday: Serg't S. Curtis, Co. B; W. Schetz, A; Corp. ____ Toms, A; ____ McMaggee, A; Serg't N. Crooft, A; D. Sellar, C, head; Corp. G. Clarke, E.

Rev. F. DeW. Ward, Chaplain of the 104th Regiment, has been discharged from the service on account of physical disability, and is now at home.
On Saturday last Major Henry V. Colt, of the 104th, left for Elmira, where he is detailed for duty. He may be there for two or three months we understand. This respite from the active duties of the field is well merited. For near two years he has been in active and daily service, and this is his first furlough from the field.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: May 12, 2009
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/104thInf/104thInfCWN.htm

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