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114th Regiment
New York Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

CHENANGO AMERICAN.
Greene, Thursday, July 2, 1863.
The 114th in Battle.
Our own brave 114th has at last had the opportunity they so long and ardently coveted to cover themselves with glory upon the battle field. Kept back by force of circumstances they have not had a chance to exhibit their valor until recently. In company with several other regiments forming WEIZEL'S brigade, five companies of our regiment joined in a desperate attack upon the works at Port Hudson, and bravely and gallantly did they bear themselves. Charging up to the very cannon's mouth, with a storm of leaden hail dealing death and carnage through and through their ranks, not a man faltered, but with cheers and shouts they dashed on where duty led them, leaving behind a record of fame and glory which will outlive them all.
We have not many of the particulars. Col. SMITH, who was wounded, has since died. Nearly every line officer, was either killed or wounded. Among the killed is Capt. TUCKER, of Hamilton. Letters have been received here by the friends of those engaged in the attack, which give interesting accounts of the gallant affair. Capt. DEDERER, of Co E, went with his company to Port Hudson, but was obliged to return to New Orleans to Hospital, in consequence of a severe attack of jaundice. Letters from others in the same hospital say that the Captain chafes under the galling necessity which compels him to lie upon a sick bed while his brave boys are winning laurels upon the battle field. We await with anxiety a fuller account of the doings of our boys, and an accurate statement of the casualties.
This news brings the horrors of the war home to us more clearly than any previous engagements have done. The blood of the best and bravest of Chenango's sons waters the soil around Port Hudson. Many tears will flow and many lamentations go up from around our hearthstones, but we have the  satisfaction of knowing that with our mourning for the dead we can mingle congratulations that they died nobly, fighting bravely for their country's salvation.
We publish in another column a letter received from an Irish lad, named Wm. CORBETT, who enlisted in this village, addressed to his guardian, R. P. BARNARD, Esq. CORBETT was in the whole of the fight, and his statement will be found interesting. He gives a list of the killed and wounded from this vicinity which is doubtless as accurate as could be gathered the day after the battle, though other letters do not corroborate all of his account of the list of wounded.

Letter from Port Hudson, from a Member of Co, E. 114th Regiment.
REAR OF PORT HUDSON, LA.,
June 15, 1863.
DEAR SIR: It is with pain I have to relate the proceedings of yesterday, which day will ever be remembered by the 114th Regiment. On the evening of the 13th we were all served out with sixty rounds of catridge [sic] at twelve o'clock at night, our cooks made their appearance with rations of which we supplied ourselves. We were soon ordered to fall in and in a few minutes were ready to march. Accordingly five Companies of our Regiment started with Col. SMITH and Major MORSE as our leaders. Soon were joined by the 15th and 160th New York Regiments, 8th Vermont and 12th Connecticut, which Regiments constitute WIETZEL'S Brigade. We marched along silently through the woods, except some remarks about what we were going to do, every one forming his own opinion; but it being Sunday, a day so remarkable for the battles of the American army, every one was satisfied that we were going to charge the enemy's works. As we went along from one ravine to another we found troops under arms, and after a little while we came up with a group of officers, among whom was Gen. WIETZEL. The sight of our General seemed to give us new courage. Gen. WIETZEL is highly esteemed by his command and their confidence in him is such that whenever he is near we anticipate no danger.
Soon our artillery opened fire and as we turned in a ravine we halted and fixed bayonets. We soon heard a cheer on our left which told us that PAYNE'S Brigade charged the enemy's works, and the roar of artillery and musketry told the bloody work had commenced. We started ahead but soon had to halt on account of the 91st New York Regiment, which was in the ravine before us. Soon the General's Aids run by us to see what was the matter. As soon as the way was clear for our Regiment we proceeded in the best of spirits expecting to cover ourselves with honor by entering the enemy's works. About six o'clock we got to the scene of action, and soon the command was given to charge on a double quick. With a yell we darted forward under a raking fire from the enemy from behind their works, until our colors got shot. At this time we poured a volley into their works and lay down until reloaded. Our gallant Major stepped in front and asked us if we were ready, to which we responded yes. He then told us to give three cheers and follow him. This time a number of us got into a ditch under the enemy’s works where our boys were slain like sheep. Our Major, like the Colonel, got wounded in this charge. Most all of our officers were either killed or wounded. Once more our shattered companies tried a charge led by Lieut. SEARLES, of Co. G. He also got wounded at this time—nearly half our men lay wounded on the field. It was a most thrilling scene to witness the groans of our brave men in their agony of pain—all our color guards were wounded, and the color bearer killed, but a Lieut. of the 160th New York picked up our colors, and one of our boys stepped forward and demanded them, so we had the honor of bringing them off the field.
After laying two hours under fire and making three charges, we fell to the rear to form again. Never did five Companies of men go into a charge more willingly or with better courage, than did the officers and men of the 114th; but there was no such thing as entering the works, for we had to charge over fallen timber and brush, and there was a ditch at least six feet wide and six feet deep on our side of their works, the breast work or parapet being eight or ten feet high so it was impossible for any man to scale them without use of ladders or plank. If we had any fair kind of a chance we would enter the works, for never was there a more determined lot of men as the num­ber of killed and wounded will show. There were several other charges made but without effect. There was a Regi­ment sent in ahead with bags of cotton to fill the ditch for us to charge over, but they could not be made to go there. Out of the officers of our five Compan­ies there were only three came out whole. I don't intend to give only a feint idea of what it was, for if I tried to I could not. Those who lived or was not wounded remained under fire until after dark. To look round the little place our Company occupied in the woods, and to see so many missing made us very sad.
The following is a list of causalities in Co. E. Lieut. Longwell, of Co. D., who took command of our Company, was wounded in the hand while leading us into action. Much praise is due him, as he is the only man who ever led Co. E. into action yet. Indeed he is a brave officer.
Sergts. Uri Rorapaugh, acting Lieut. Wm. J. Rogers, Seymour C. Horton, wounded. Corpl. John C. Stoughton, missing. Privates, Jack Chidester, David McBirney, Chas. R. Hayward, Rob't. Wedge, Benjamin Pittsley, Chas. B. Davis, Sophronus Henmon, Joseph J. Smith Freeman S. Wedge, Edw'd Post, Lewis Handy,* Preston R. Peck, all slightly wounded, excepting Preston and Handy who were mortally wounded and left on the field, probably dead. Col. Smith is living. Capt. Tucker, and Lieut. Corben, of Co. G., are killed.
I remain truly yours,
WM. B. CORBETT.
*Since heard from, likely to recover.

A SOLDIER'S ADVICE.—The New Orleans Era publishes a bit of poetry entitled "A Wounded Soldier to a Copperhead Relative." The writer, a member of the 114th New York regiment, gives this advice to Copperheads:—

"What right have you, a traitor
To your nation and your God,
To malign the glorious country
That our ancestors have trod?
If you think 'the cause is righteous,'
And the Rebels surely right,
Shoulder gun, and strap on knapsack,
And come out with them and fight."

For the 114th Regiment.
Lieut. E. P. Pellet will leave for the 114th Regiment on Monday, August l7th. All persons wishing to send small parcels to their friends in the Regiment must leave the same at the Eagle Hotel in Norwich, on Friday or Saturday, August 14th or 15th. No package will be received after Saturday noon. No large boxes or bundles can be taken—owing to the numerous parcels—which of themselves will fill a large box. Lieut. Pellet will not be responsible for the delivery of packages to those absent from the regiment.

RETURNED.—Dennison D. Palmer, (of Co. D. 114th Reg't) son of Mr. N. T. Palmer of this village, reached home last week from New Orleans, where he has been quite sick for several weeks. He is yet confined to the house by illness.

The 114th Regiment.
It may he gratifying to those who have friends in the 114th Reg't, to know that this Reg't was not in the battle at Fort Hudson on the 27th. The Regiment had been temporarily detached from its division for guard duty, and did not reach Fort Hudson until the 30th.

Obituary.
News has been received of the death of JAMES LOOMIS, of Capt. LAKE'S company, in hospital at Donaldsonville, La., on the 23d of July, after a very short illness.

—A funeral discourse on the death of THERON L. VINCENT, of Co. K, 114th, was preached at De Ruyter, on Sunday last, by Rev. WM. CLARKE, of this village. There was a very large congregation. Several from  this village were present.

RETURNED—Lieut. JOHN C REYNOLDS, of Co. E, 114th Regiment, N. Y. S. V. has returned home. He tendered his resignation upon the Surgeon's certificate of disability, which was accepted. He reports much sickness among the boys of the regiment. Corporal JOHN C. STOUGHTON, who was reported missing is believed to be dead. Previous to REYNOLDS' return an order was issued for all the officers of the 114th to report for duty or tender their resignation. In consequence of this order Capt. DEDERER who was too ill to join his company, tendered his resignation. If it was accepted he may be expected home soon. HORATIO MOSHER and James Ireland, of this village, privates, and Corporal GEORGE PALMER, of the same regiment, have returned, discharges on account of sickness. They look as if the land of alligators did not agree with their constitutions. They are however improving rapidly.

From the 114th.—We publish an interesting letter from our regular correspondent with the 114th Regiment, now at Port Hudson.

Promoted.—Lieut. Col. S. R. Per Lee has been promoted to be Colonel of the 114th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers, vice Col. E. B. Smith, killed in our assault before Port Hudson, Louisiana.

Personal.—Among the citizens of Oxford present at the funeral of Col. Smith, we were gratified to observe Lt. Gov. Tracy, now a venerable Octagenarian. The Governor retains the brilliancy of intellect which characterized his younger days and we are glad to see the hand of time lies so lightly upon him. Hon. Henry E. Mygatt, also of Oxford was present, and was one of the pall bearers upon the occasion.

From the 114th—An Adventure on the River—The Surrender of Port Hudson—Captured Men of the 114th Paroled and Sent to Ship Island, &c., &c.
The following private letter from "Q. M. S." is handed to us for publication, and fills what ...

OUR THANKS—Are due Capt. W. H. SHAW, of the 114th, and Mr. E. N. SPENCER, Esq., (bye the bye, we should have mentioned last week, that this gentleman has become a Washingtonian, by residence, we mean,) for copies of interesting papers. The former sends us, from Beaufort, a copy of the Free South; the latter a copy of the Washington Daily Chronicle—both awful abolition papers. Shades of Calhoun, think of it! An abolition paper published in South Carolina, and by Massachusetts Yankees at that!

—The body of the lamented Col. Smith which passed through here last Friday, met an appropriate reception. Both Fire Companies were out, accompanied by the Band; cannons were fired and the defferent [sic] church bells were tolled. The streets were filled with people, and there were but few who could suppress the tears.

Lieut. G. G. Donnelly.—The friends of this brave man have received news of this brave man have received news of his death. When he enlisted into the 114th Regiment he was pastor of the Baptist Church in Afton, Chenango county, and he left his charge and proceeded with his regiment as Lieutenant of one of the companies to New Orleans, in Gen. Banks' expedition; where he saw considerable hard service. Just before his death he had been quite sick, but had so far recovered as to be doing duty when by accident he fell through a draw bridge, while out on picket, at Brashear City, La., April 26th. He had been in the ministry but about three years, and was beloved by his Church at Afton, and the community at large. He left a pleasant home, and kind friends, and associated himself with those who went forth to fight for the old flag, the Stars and Stripes, and has fallen a victim to this wicked Rebellion, at the age of 39. His widow will have the sympathy of all her neighbors and friends.— Oneonta Herald.

Those having articles to send for our sick soldiers in the 114th Reg., will please bring them to Lewis' Hall on Wednesday, Aug. 12th. The Army Relief will meet to put things in proper shape for sending by Express, at 2 P . M. We have a loud call from the Surgeon for assistance.

DAVIS—At the Marine Hospital New Orleans, July 8, 1863, of consumption and chronic diarrhoea, Mr. Ira A. Davis, of Company B, 114th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., aged 26, years.
This young man, surrounded by friends and home attractions, felt nevertheless a strong attraction for country and its welfare. When the call was made for volunteers in 1862 he responded and went, hoping to be of service in checking the fratricidal hosts which were gathering for the purpose of destroying the government which had so long nourished them. His hopes were, however, blighted by sickness. He was taken sick while his Regiment was at Fortress Monroe from which he never fully recovered, but lingered in feebleness more or less till he died. His letters to his wife and friends breathed the spirit of the christian patriot. He sleeps with the brave who have fallen victims and martyrs for their country He leaves a wife and numerous friends to mourn his early departure.

FORD--In Mt. Upton, August 11, 1863, Russell Ford, Esq., in the 65th year of his age.
The deceased was born in Delaware County, in this State, and came to this County when a boy. He held many important positions in his town. He was elected a Justice of the Peace of the town of Guilford in 1830, and held the office until a few years previous to his death. He was admitted to practice in all the Courts of this State on motion of his old friend, Hon. Daniel S. Dickinson, at the General Term of the Supreme Court, at Binghamton, in the year 1857, and continued the practice of law until his failing health compelled him to withdraw from the active and exciting pursuits of his profession. At the time of his decease he was a member of the Baptist Church and had been for 20 years. Ability, integrity and purity were his characteristics in all the relations of life. He was a consistent christian, a kind husband, and an affectionate father, and was beloved by all who knew him. As his earthly pilgrimage drew near its close he looked back upon a life well spent, and died without regret, regretted by all. His funeral was attended by a large concourse of his fellow citizens, and he has left a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn his loss.

The Late Col. Elisha B. Smith.
FUNERAL OBSEQUIES—MANIFESTATION OF
PUBLIC SYMPATHY AND RESPECT.
The remains of Col. Elisha B. Smith, fell at Port Hudson, were brought to Chenango county on Friday last. As they passed through the villages they were received with every demonstration of respect by the multitude.
At Greene, the Masons, members of ... Fire Company, and citizens generally, turned out in procession, and to the tolling of ... and the firing of minute guns, escorted the remains through the village. Bouquets of flowers were also presented by ladies to be placed ... the coffin. At Oxford nearly the same manifestations of public sympathy and sorrow were exhibited as at Greene. The firemen and citizens turned out in procession to escort the remains through the village, and bells were tolled and minute guns fired.
The funeral services at Norwich were impressive. The hearse was accompanied to the Court House Square, where the various Companies and Societies were drawn up in order together with an immense concourse of citizens and strangers, and where the Rev. Sam'l S... ville rendered an eloquent tribute to the character of the deceased; and afterwards the remains, in pursuance of the last request of the deceased, were passed over to the Masonic Order. The procession was thereupon formed in the same order as before, and while minute guns were fired, marched to the sound of appropriate music to the grave, where the exercises were according to the Masonic ritual.
The deceased was 47 years of age. He was a member of the Convention of 1846, which framed the Constitution; and was subsequently Democratic candidate for Canal Commission and for various other offices.

Funeral of Col. Smith.
The funeral obsequies of Col. Smith of the 114th Reg't N. Y. Vols., took place at Norwich last Sunday, and were attended by a very large concourse of people from every place within a distance of many miles. His body was committed to Mother Earth according to the beautiful and impressive rites of the Masonic Order, witnessed by at least five thousand spectators. The funeral service at the Grave was read by Bro. R. K. Bourne, Master of Norwich Lodge, in an impressive manner.

The 114th.—Surgeon Beecher of the 114th Regt. writing to the New Orleans Era in regard to the killed and wounded in that Regiment in the battle of the Teche, after giving the list as we have heretofore published it, says in relation to some of our well known boys—
"Upon the authority of the commanding officer, Col. Elisha B. Smith, I would add that the names of Sergt. Ballou, private Weston, and Corporal Fish have been recommended for promotion, for bravery and meritorious conduct upon the field. Sergeant Ballou is an old soldier—was in the famous "Burnside Expedition," and is in every sense an efficient, competent and well disciplined officer.
The recommendations are well deserved and eminently fitting.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. H. BEECHER.
Ass't Surgeon 114th Reg. N. Y. V."

From the 114th.—We have been permitted to peruse a private letter from Capt. W. M. Rexford, of the 114th, to his friends in this village. The Atlantic, upon which his company was had a boisterous passage to the Gulf, but not so much so as the Thames. The four companies landed on Ship Island, December 15th, where the Expedition was to rendezvous. All the ships but the Atlantic and Baltic had gone up to New Orleans, the final destination of the Expedition. The troops on board these two vessels had landed on Ship Island, to remain there until smaller boats come in to take them to New Orleans.
The Captain describes the Island as being a "great pile of sand," which is quite uninviting, even to the storm-tossed soldiers, and they were quite impatiently waiting the time when they should be ordered away from the "Desert."
Col. Smith and the remaining six companies of the regiment had not arrived on the 19th the last date of the letter. The boys were mainly well, some were slightly sick from colds and fever attacks. One man in Capt. Rexford's company, from Madison County, had died upon the Island. Name not given. Nothing further of general interest is given. We hope to hear from the Captain often.
Masonic.—At a special meeting of Norwich Lodge, No. 302 F. and A. M., held at their Lodge room, July 12th, 1863, the following preamble and resolutions were adopted:
Whereas, It has pleased the all wise Grand Master of the Universe to remove from this earth the soul of our beloved brother, Col. Elisha B. Smith, and while sorrowing with humble submission to the fiat of His will, "who doeth all things well," we deem it proper to offer this last tribute to the memory of our departed friend and brother.
Resolved, That in the departure of Brother Smith, this Lodge has lost a true and faithful brother, his family a kind and affectionate husband, son and father, society a genial, noble man, and his country a brave and accomplished officer.
Resolved, That while the members of this Lodge, in common with this whole community deplore the calamity which has suddenly removed from our midst a useful and honored citizen, in the very strength and vigor of his manhood, yet we have the melancholy satisfaction of knowing that he died a brave man, nobly defending his country, and while we duly honor the names of the thousand patriots who have fallen in this fearful struggle, his memory like the emblem of immortality we have just deposited in his grave will be ever green in our hearts.
Resolved, That while called to mourn the loss of our esteemed brother, and to offer up to his memory this last tribute of affection, we safely trust his spirit to "Him who rules in that house not made with hands eternal in the heavens."
Resolved, That we extend to the bereaved Widow and relatives the hand of sympathy and voice of consolation in this their dark hour of trial and affliction, and commend them to the care and protection of "Him who, holding the destinies of nations in his hand, notes the fall of a sparrow."
Resolved, That the Lodge be clothed with the customary badge of mourning for thirty days,
Resolved, That the Resolutions be placed upon the records of this Lodge, and that the Secretary present a copy to the widow and mother of the deceased, and that they be published in the papers of this county.

From the 114th Regiment.
We are permitted to make the following extract from a private letter written by a member of the Chenango regiment. It breathes the pure spirit of patriotism, and indicates the sentiments of "our boys" on the prosecution of the war. The letter was written during the siege of Port Hudson, and shows the estimation in which Copperheads are held by patriotic soldiers:
"I am not ashamed to belong to the 114th; they are true as steel; bur regiment has 480 men fit for duty. I have just been relieved at the rifle pits; we have a breastwork clear round the Rebs and cannon planted. The negroes have made several charges. They are terrible to fight; they charged seven times in succession. The Rebs hang every one they catch of them, and the negroes don't wait for the gallows, but put the bayonet into them. They are just the boys to fight the Rebs, they will not have any paroled prisoners to fight over the second time. We have been attacked in the rear by a Guerrilla band. Our boys have been chasing them, but without success; they are like the bands of Copperheads north who are continually attacking us in the rear, they are hated worse than the enemy in front. I hope the time will soon come when they will be hunted like the bands of the South and shot down at sight. You wished to know what the soldiers' feelings was about this. They are in favor of military law over the north that will make them loyal by force as Jeff. Davis does in order to control his minions in rebeldom. We hope there will be a draft and they will bring some of the Copperheads down here with us. We understand they are to fill up the old regiments. There is more men needed, and we feel that our breasts have been a bulwark for such men about long enough. Had it not been for the brave volunteers our homes would have seen such sights as we see here. We are ready to endure the hardships to sustain the Union, for without this we are ruined forever. We desire peace on no other terms than an unconditional submission to the United States. The Chenango Union is taken by three of the Company. They swear and curse the editor and say he ought to be hung. The brave boys that are facing death and bearing wounds under a scorching sun to ward off the blows aimed at their homes hate such men worse than the armed foe in front. C. C.

From Port Hudson.
The following extract from a private letter from C. E. Thompson to his parents, will not be without interest to those who have friends in the 114th Regiment. The letter is dated at Port Hudson, June 19:
Last Sunday morning about 7 o'clock,  five companies of our Regiment, B, D, E, F and G, were ordered up, and with the rest of Weitzel's brigade began moving around to the left, leaving the other five companies for picket on our lines. About daylight we arrived at the mouth of a deep ravine which our men had been clearing out for the purpose of making a charge on some earthworks ruining parallel with it. They wanted these works to plant some artillery on. Our artillery began to roar about this time, throwing shot and shell over our heads into the rebel lines, and soon we heard the yells of our boys charging on the works, and then how the mus­kets popped. We pushed along through the ravine as fast as we could, and soon it came our turn to charge. We had to file right, out of the ravine and go up a hill, over logs and brush about ten rods, to the rebel breastworks. From the time we filed out of the ravine until we got within a rod of the works, it was a continual whiz of bullets sounding more like bees swarming than anything else. Capt. Tucker was at the head of the company until we filed out of the ravine, he stopped on the corner saying, "I don't know about going in there." As the rear of the company pass­ed by he rushed toward the head, and was within two feet of me when a bullet enter­ed his breast and he fell over a log exclaim­ing, "Oh, my God! I am shot," and died within fifteen minutes. The last words he said were to tell his friends that he died for his country. I had just seen Capt. Tuck­er fall when four men came down with Col. Smith, who was shot at the head of the Regiment, the ball passing near his spine. He died last night and his body is now on the way home. Capt. Tucker was burried [sic] at Baton Rouge. We rushed on over every conceivable obstacle, the bullets flying thicker than hailstones all the time, and finally reached the foot of a little hill, about a rod from their works, which partly covered us from their fire. Major Morse was shot through the ankle, and there was no one to lead the regiment. They called for the Captain of Co. B, but he was no where to be found. Capt. Fitch of Co. F, had been wounded, and there were but two officers of our regiment to be found, Lieuts. Searles and Corbin of our company. The 160th N. Y. were supporting us. Their cowardly old Colonel kept bellowing for an officer of the 114th. Finally, as he was the senior officer on the field, he got orders to take command of the brigade and charge again. Instead of taking the lead as Col. Smith had done, he lay down in a ditch and roared out for the 114th to go on, say­ing he would support us. Lieuts. Searles and Corbin made a dash and the boys af­ter them. Corbin was going into the ditch in front of the works when he was shot in the head, killed instantly and fell into the ditch. Searles received two balls in his leg and one through his body, but they think he will recover. Andrew Sawdy was shot just over the heart, the ball passing down and out at his side. We were afraid he would die at first, but he is better now and has gone to Baton Rouge—Leroy Woods was wounded in the leg, rather serious but not dangerous. Alberto Fish, of Cole Hill, was laying by my side when a bullet from the left struck him in the leg and passing down on the bone. I believe that was all that were wounded from our way. There were 13 wounded in our company besides Capt. Tucker and Lieut. Corbin. We rallied twice after making the first charge, but it was impossible for men to go over the bank as fast as the rebels would mow them down. Our regiment was then ordered to the rear and finally got out, or part of it did. There were 86 killed and wounded in the 114th.
C. E. T.

OXFORD TIMES.
OXFORD, WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 1863.
Honors to Col. Smith.
The remains of the lamented Col. E. B. SMITH, of the 114th Regiment, who fell at Port Hudson, arrived at Chenango Forks on Friday last, and were brought to Norwich, his late residence the same day. On their passage from the Forks to Norwich, the remains of the honored dead were attended with marked and distinguished tokens of respect. On their passage through Greene the citizens of that place turned out in large numbers and joined the funeral train. On their arrival here, they were met by the fire companies and a concourse of citizens, escorted by the Oxford band, whose funeral dirge the firing of minute guns and the tolling bells furnished a scene at once solemn and imposing. There was no delay and nothing to interrupt the funeral train in the journey to the final resting place of the departed soldier. We have seldom if ever seen more heartfelt sympathy displayed on a similar occasion, and that too in a manner so entirely honorable to the dead, and creditable to the living. It was the spontaneous tribute of respect for one who had nobly fallen at his post, by those who but lately sent him to the perilous field of honor, commissioned to lead their sons and brothers in the stern conflict for a restored Union, and re-established Government, and who had given the most unimpeachable evidence of his fidelity to the trust.
The funeral of the deceased was attended at Norwich on Sunday, by a large concourse of citizens of his own and adjoining counties, the services being conducted from the steps of the Court House, where he so recently received and returned the parting salutations of his neighbors and friends upon leaving for the seat of war. The body was committed to the grave with Masonic honors, a large number of the order being present, and forming a marked and distinguished feature in the solemn services of the day.

HOME MATTERS.
Col. Smith is Dead.
As the traveller [sic] stands in the "Seven Hilled City," and dreams of the greatness of the once proud mistress, he looks around with awe for the evidences of that greatness. The winds sigh amid the crumbling ruins like the footsteps of the past, and he finds himself alone in the silence of desolation. He sits upon the "broken columns, which silently, yet eloquent speak of the Greek's skill; but that classic land is only remembered in history, and perpetuated in her exquisitely chiselled marble.— The proudest structures of earth pass away; even the pyramids, should time continue, will waste away under the beating storm and mingle with the sands of the desert. But there are monuments that never crumble—structures which lift up proudly amid the surging of ages, and bid defiance to time and storm. "On valor's side the odds of combat lie, The brave live glorious, or lamented die."
The brave contending on the field of carnage and death, for the life of their country, shall live as long as her mountains stand—live in their noble deeds and work of patriotism. When ten thousand storms have passed over the mountain tops; when the lightning of Heaven shall no longer play on the highest pinacles of earth; when the stars shall melt and disappear; when the universe shall be moved as a cottage, and all material things shall pass away, the names of those who nobly met the tide of rebellion, and gave their life for that of their country, will continue to shine, gathering new lustre forever. A worthy place, a niche in our country's temple shall be given Col. Smith, and the children of other generations shall gather around it and bless his name.
Sad and desolate are our hearts under this affliction, and mercy's cherishing, call for a tear for the fallen leader of the soldiers who left us one short year ago. May the God of the widow and orphan be very near his heart-broken wife and children, and may their consolation be "When duty called he went,
And did that duty well."
NORWICH, July 19, 1863.

At a public meeting, held at the Court House in Norwich, Wednesday, July 8, 1863, to make suitable arrangements in regard to the reception of the remains of the late Col. Elisha B. Smith, and for the funeral, Gen. O. G.
Rundell was appointed Chairman, and J. F. Hubbard, Jr., Secretary.
On motion, D. E. S. Bedford, Ralph Johnson and Daniel M. Holmes were appointed a Committee to request places of business to be closed on the arrival of the remains, and while the same are passing through the village, and also to request persons having flags to display them at half-mast.
Lewis A. Rhodes, J. E. Wheeler, Jr., and David H. Knapp were appointed a Committee to arrange for the firing of minute guns on the arrival of the remains, and to invite returned soldiers, and the military in general, to appear at the funeral. W. N. Mason, Philander B. Prindle, Walter M. Conkey, Levi Harris, E. T. Hayes, Rawson Close, Ezra Hewitt. James H. Smith and Lewis Kingsley were appointed a Committee to act in conjunction with a similar Committee of Masons, and to make arrangements generally in regard to the funeral obsequies.
Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, James H. Sinclair, Foreman of Deluge Companp [sic], Charles H. Fish, Foreman of Hose Company, Charles B. Brooks, Foreman of Rescue Hook and Ladder Company, King Hovey, were appointed a Committee to invite the Firemen of this and neighboring towns to appear in the funeral procession, and to make all necessary arrangements in regard to the same.
Abram Thomas, Jonathan Wells and George W. Gibson were appointed a Committee to so fix the liberty pole on the public square so as to admit the display from the same of a flag at half-mast. Adjourned.
J. F. HUBBARD. JR., O. G. RUNDELL,
Secretary. Chairman.

[From the Chenango Telegraph.
DEATH OF COL. SMITH.
The Funeral Obsequies.
By a dispatch from Lieut. E. P. Pellet, received on Wednesday, our citizens were informed that the body of Col. Smith had reached New York, and that it would be brought to Chenango Forks on Friday morning. Preparations were made for meeting it there, and on Thursday a number of gentlemen went down to act as an escort to accompany the remains to Norwich. The body reached the Forks at about 2 P. M., on Friday, and was taken in charge by the committee from here.
On the way up the valley demonstrations of respect and sorrow were made at Greene and Oxford, by a general turn out of the people. At Greene the procession was met at the south bounds of the village by the Masonic Fraternity and by the Fire Department, as well as by a large number of other citizens, and these, with a military band, accompanied the remains as far north as the bridge ever the canal. As the procession moved through the village, the church bells were tolled and the heavy sound of cannon awoke the mournful echoes of the hills which surround the early home of the lamented Colonel. It is due to the citizens of Greene to say that they twice turned out in this manner to do honor to the remains. It was first expected that the body would be brought up the valley on Thursday morning, and they then assembled to escort it through their village.
At Oxford the people were found gathered together when the procession
came up, and, accompanied by these, the remains were borne slowly and solemnly through the town, its coming and going marked by the tolling of bells and the firing of cannon.
The approach of the procession to Norwich was announced by the firing of one gun, at about six o'clock, and immediately the people began to move towards the south to meet it. Carriages and foot passengers thronged the streets all the way down to the Cemetery, and when the remains passed the creek bridge they were followed by at least one hundred carriages and by hundreds of people on foot. The body was taken to the Court House, and it lay in the large hall, in state, until the hour appointed, on Sunday, for conveying it to its last resting place.
While the coffin lay in the Court House it and the hall were decorated in a very tasteful manner by the ladies of the village.
The fact that the funeral ceremonies would take place on Sunday at one o'clock had been announced to the people of all parts of the adjoining country, and at an early hour on that day the village began to be filled. Emblems of mourning were displayed on many buildings, and flags draped in black were hung out by all who possessed them. At a quarter to one o'clock the body was taken from the Court House to the hearse, and conveyed to the residence of the widow of the lamented soldier, accompanied by a vast con­course of people. Immediately after it followed the firemen to the number of at least five hundred. Companies were present from Oxford, Sherburne, Smyr­na, and these, with the two Norwich Companies, made up the number. Af­ter these came members of the Masonic Fraternity from Greene, Oxford, Bain-bridge, Sherburne, Hamilton, New Ber­lin, Unadilla and Norwich, in all num­bering something over four hundred.  The coffin was not taken from the hearse at Mrs. Smith's residence. Rev. Samuel Scoville read a portion of the scriptures and made a short but very impressive prayer, when the procession returned to the front of the Court House. There an eloquent prayer was offered up by Rev. Mr. Benedict, followed by remarks by Mr. Scoville. During the ceremonies the immense audience was deeply affected, and the voice of lamentation and sorrow was heard on every hand.
At the close of the Ceremonies in front of the Court House the remains were given into the charge of the Masons, to be by them borne to the grave and deposited therein according to the rites and ceremonies of the Order. The number of people that followed the body to the cemetery could not have been less than five thousand.
Those who have been present during the burial exercises of the Masonic Fraternity know how beautiful and impressive they are, and how eloquent
each word is of the sorrow that finds its way to utterance from the wrung heart of each bereaved brother as he says his last farewell over the grave of one with whom he had close fellowship in life, and these can appreciate the feelings of the multitude who gathered around the spot where the earthly part of Col. Elisha B. Smith was laid—a spot that will be forever sacred to those who love their country and the memory of its defenders.
At the close of the Masonic Ceremonies a prayer full of feeling and earnest supplication, was offered by Rev. Mr. Searles, and then the people slowly separated.

COL. SMITH'S EFFECTS.—It is stated that the horse and the military clothing and equipments of the late Col. Smith which he had not with him at Port Hudson, were kept at Brashear City, and that they fell into the hands of the rebels when they captured the place. There is, of course, no probability that they will be recovered.—Chenango Union.

DEATH OF COL. SMITH.
THE FUNERAL OBSEQUIES.
By a dispatch from Lieut. E. P. Pellet, received on Wednesday, our citizens were informed that the body of Col. Smith had reached New York, and that it would he brought to Chenango Forks on Friday morning. Preparations were made for meeting it there, and on Thursday a number of gentlemen went down to act as an escort to accompany the remains to Norwich. The body reached the Forks at about two p. m., on Friday, and was taken in charge by the committee from here.
On the way up the valley demonstrations of respect and sorrow were made at Greene and Oxford, by a general turn out of the people. At Greene the procession was met at the south bounds of the village by the Masonic Fraternity and by the Fire Department, as well as by a large number of other citizens, and these, with a military band, accompanied the remains as far north as the bridge over the canal. As the procession moved through the village, the church bells were tolled and the heavy sound of cannon awoke the mournful echoes of the hills which surround the early home of the lamented Colonel. It is due to the citizens of Greene to say that they twice turned out in this manner to do honor to the remains. It was at first expected that the body would be brought up the Valley on Thursday morning, and they then assembled to escort it through their village.
At Oxford the people were found gathered together when the procession came up, and, accompanied by these, the remains were borne slowly and solemnly through the town, its coming and going marked by the toiling of bells and the firing of cannon.
The approach of the procession to Norwich was announced by the firing of one gun, at about six o'clock, and immediately the people began to move towards the south to meet it. Carriages and foot passengers thronged the street all the way down to the Cemetery, and when the remains passed the creek bridge they were followed by at least one hundred carriages and by hundreds of people on foot. The body was taken to the Court House, and it lay in the large hall, in state, until the hour appointed, on Sunday, for conveying it to its last resting place.
While the coffin lay in the Court House it and the hall were decorated in a very tasteful manner by the ladies of the village.
The fact that the funeral ceremonies would take place on Sunday at one o'clock had been announced to the people of all parts of the adjoining country, and at an early hour on that day the village began to be rilled [sic]. Emblems of mourning were displayed on many buildings, and flags draped in black were hung out by all who possessed them. At a quarter to one o'clock the body was taken from the Court House to the hearse, and conveyed to the residence of the widow of the lamented soldier, accompanied by a vast concourse of people. Immediately after it followed the firemen to the number of at least five hundred. Companies were present from Oxford, Sherburne, Smyrna, and these, with the two Norwich Companies, made up the number. After these came members of the Masonic Fraternity from Green, Oxford, Bainbridge, Sherburne, Hamilton, New Berlin, Unadilla and Norwich, in all numbering something over four hundred. The coffin was not taken from the hearse at Mrs. SMITH'S residence. Rev. SAMUEL SCOVILLE read a portion of the scriptures and made a short but very impressive prayer, when the procession returned to the front of the Court House. There an eloquent prayer was offerred [sic] up by Rev. Mr. Benedict, followed by remarks by Mr. Scoville. During the ceremonies the immense audience was deeply affected, and the voice of lamentation and sorrow was heard on every hand.        
At the close of the Ceremonies in front of the Court House the remains were given into the charge of the Masons, to be by them borne to the grave and deposited therein according ... and ceremonies of the Order. The number of people that followed the body to the cemetery could not have been less than five thousand.
Those who have been present during the burial exercises of the Masonic Fraternity know how beautiful and impressive they are, and how eloquent each word is of the sorrow that finds its way to utterance from the wrung heart of each bereaved brother as he says his last farewell over the grave of one with whom he had close fellowship in life, and these can appreciate the feelings of the multitude who gathered around the spot where the earthly part of Col. ELISHA B. SMITH was laid—a spot that will be forever sacred to those who love their country and the memory of its defenders.
At the close of the Masonic Ceremonies a prayer, full of feeling and earnest supplication, was offered by Rev. Mr. SEARLES, and then the people slowly separated.

Biography.
Col. SMITH was the son of Judge ELISHA SMITH, and was a native of this village. His boyhood years were spent much upon a farm, but at his majority, he had been extensively engaged in Agencies and other business. He was elected to several Town Offices. He was Under Sheriff from 1844 to 1847. In 1846 he was chosen, with his Colleague, the venerable Ex-Lieut. Gov. TRACY, a Delegate to the Convention for the Revision of the State Constitution, and was one of the Democratic Nominees for Canal Commissioners at the first election held thereunder. In 1852 he came within a comparatively few votes of ah election to Congress from this District—the Democratic majority for him in Broome and Chenango being overborne by the heavy Whig vote in Cortland for Mr. BENNETT. He was commissioned Postmaster of Norwich in the spring of 1853, but displaced in the fall of 1854 for adherence to the Hunker Division of the Democracy which, then and since, commanded his sympathies and support.
At the first meeting of the War Committee in July, 1862, he was unanimously recommended as Regimental Commander of a Regiment of a thousand Volunteers to be raised in this Senatorial District. He accepted and discharged the trust with zeal and fidelity, though harrassed [sic] by every species of embarrassment and annoyance. The Regiment left Norwich on the 6th of September amid the subdued cheers and tearful farewells of the thousands assembled to witness it. Col SMITH followed on the 7th and joined it at Binghamton.
It was first ordered to Baltimore, and from thence, as a part of Gen. BANKS' force, to New Orleans. Soon after arriving there Col. SMITH was put in command, as acting Brigadier Gen. of all the U. S. forces, regular and volunteer, at Brashear City, and seems to have acted in that capacity, rather than as Colonel, up to the time of his fall. At the battle of Bisland, however, he commanded his own regiment in person, and for "unflinching bravery" displayed by himself and his command, received the highest commendation in a special acknowledgement from the officer whose battery it was his duty on that occasion to support. After this battle he was for a time laid up with sickness at New Orleans; but on receiving information of the intended attack on Port Hudson, hurried forward to join his command, then hardly well enough for arduous service.
The fearful assault was made within five days of his arrival, Col. Smith being assigned to the command of Gen. Weitzel's Brigade for the day. The official details of that ill-starred attack, as well as at the previous fatally unsuccessful one, have not yet been given to the public. That our men rushed on at the commanded word, and fought gallantly among pitfalls and unforeseen entanglements of the worst description, and when success or escape was impossible, sacrificed by the murderous fire of the enemy, that Col. Smith was with and amongst his soldiers encouraging them to duty, when he (with many other brave officers) fell mortally wounded, and was carried from the field to die, and that the result of the assault so unwisely conceived, was disastrous, are all that is permitted us yet to know. But when all is known, the development will furnish more and more attestations of the patriotic devotion and determined bravery of Col. Smith.
The Family of the late Col. E. B. SMITH desire us to acknowledge with profound gratitude on their part, the manifestations of respect for his memory, and of sympathy for themselves as shown by their fellow citizens of all classes, upon the late melancholy occasion; and in return to tender to them their sincerest thanks.
The Norwich correspondent of the Utica Herald writes as follows, July 16th:
The remains of Col. Elisha B. Smith, of the 114th Regiment N. Y. Volunteers, who was killed in the assault upon the works of Port Hudson on the fatal Sunday, the 14th of June ultimo, were received here on Friday last and buried on the Sabbath. Thousands of persons attended the funeral, including numbers from all the adjoining counties. The Returned Volunteers, the fine fire Companies of Oxford, Sherburne, Smyrna, and Norwich and the Freemasons of the Lodge of this and other counties, constituted the chief feature of the procession. He was buried with all the imposing ceremonies of the Order. Col Smith is sincerely mourned in this community, where his genial nature and eminently social qualities were known and appreciated of all men. His heart beat true to the cause of the country, and he fell at the head of the Gen. Weitzel Brigade, of which he had the temporary command, battling gallantly for free salvation.
The Norwich Telegraph gives the following biographical sketch of the lamented Colonel:
Col. Smith was the son of Judge Elisha Smith, and was a native of this village. His boyhood years were spent much upon a farm, but at his majority he had been extensively engaged in Agencies and other business. He was elected to several Town Offices. He was Under Sheriff from 1844 to 1847. In 1846 he was chosen, with his colleague, the venerable Ex-Lieut. Gov. Tracy, a Delegate to the Convention for the Revision of the State Constitution, and was one of the Democratic Nominees for Canal Commissioners at the first election held thereunder. In 1852 he came within a comparatively few votes of an election to Congress from this District—the Democratic majority for him in Broome and Chenango being overborne by the heavy Whig vote in Cortland for Mr. Bennett. He was commissioned Postmaster of Norwich in the spring of 1853, but displaced in the fall of 1854 for adherence to the Hunker Division of the Democracy which, then and since, commanded his sympathies and support.
At the first meeting of the War Committee in July, 1862, he was unanimously recommended as Regimental Commander of a Regiment of a thousand Volunteers to be raised in this Senatorial District. He accepted and discharged the trust with zeal and fidelity, though harrassed [sic] by every species of embarrassment and annoyance. The Regiment left Norwich on the 6th of September amid the subdued cheers and tearful farewells of the thousands assembled to witness it. Col. Smith followed on the 7th and joined it at Binghamton.
It was first ordered to Baltimore, and from thence, as a part of Gen. Banks's force, to New Orleans. Soon alter arriving there Col. Smith was put in command, as acting Brigadier Gen., of all the U. S. forces, regular and volunteer, at Brashear City, and seems to have acted in that capacity, rather than as Colonel, up to the time of his fall. At the battle of Bisland, however, he commanded his own regiment in person, and for "unflinching bravery" displayed by himself and his command, received the highest commendation in a special acknowledgement from the officer whose battery it was his duty on that occasion to support.—After this battle he was for a time laid up with sickness at New Orleans; but on receiving information of the intended attack on Port Hudson, hurried forward to join his command, though hardly well enough for arduous service.
The fearful assault was made within five days of his arrival, Col. Smith being assigned to the command of Gen. Weitzel's Brigade for the day. The official details of that attack, as well as at the previous unsuccessful one, have not yet been given to the public —That our men rushed on at the commanded word and fought gallantly among pitfalls and unforeseen entanglements of the worst description, that Col. Smith was with and amongst his soldiers encouraging them to duty when he (with many other brave officers) fell mortally wounded, and was carried from the field to die, are all that it is permitted to us yet to know. But when all is known, the development will furnish more and more attestations of the patriotic devotion and determined bravery of Col. Smith.

MORRISVILLE, MADISON
THE OBSERVER.
Excursion of the 114th Reg't N. Y. V.
TO THE "TECHE" REGION OF LOUISIANA.
(Extracts from private letters of Maj. H. B. MORSE.)
NEW ORLEANS, La., April 19, 1863.
As you have not heard from me in quite a long time, and may be feeling some anxiety, I will write you a few lines to-day. I should have written you sooner, but as I was going to make an excursoin [sic] into the country, deferred so doing until my return.
The rebels have had a force of from five to twelve thousand men at a place called "Camp Bixland," about sixteen miles above Brashear City, on the "Teche." They had strongly entrenched themselves there, and caused us a great deal of trouble, by sending out parties to attack us wherever we had a weak point. General Banks formed a plan to surround them and capture the whole party, by sending out Gen. Grover with a force of thirteen regiments above to intercept their retreat, while Gen. Weitzel's brigade and Gen.  Emery's division were to drive them from their fortifications.
Wishing to share the dangers and hardships of the expedition with the boys of our regiment, and as I promised to be with them when the day of trial came, I procured leave of absence of ten days from my duties here.
On Tuesday night I went to Brashear City and joined the regiment.
Wednesday, we were busy making preparations to leave. In the afternoon General Banks came up, and we furnished him a company from our regiment as a guard.
Thursday, we crossed the Bay; five regiments of Gen. Weitzel's brigade, with two companies of cavalry and two batteries of six guns each; also Gen. Emery's division of twelve regiments, with one or two companies of cavalry and one or two batteries.
Friday, we waited all day for Gen. Grover to get his division aboard the boats and started around the Lake. Our cavalry were engaged all day skirmishing with the enemy's pickets, who were in plain sight.
Saturday, about noon, we got in motion.—Gen. Weitzel's brigade took the advance and held it every day. We, being the second regiment in the brigade, were always among the foremost in when there was any fun. It as hard for our brigade, as we had all the skirmishing to do; but Gen. Weitzel's knowledge of the country made it necessary for him to take the lead, and as it was the post of honor, we were glad to be there. Our position as a regiment was to support one of the batteries. We marched about eleven miles this day; the enemy throwing shot and shell occasionally, to retard our progress.
Sunday our progress was slow, marching in line of battle all the way, and doing a good deal of skirmishing. We had made only about five miles at 5 o'clock p. m. We were then marching with a front of three regiments; the 75th N. Y. on our right and the 160th on our left; the battery which we supported being right behind our regiment. At this hour a shell passed over our heads, killing two of the battery horses, and then followed a perfect shower of shot and shell. We found we were right under the batteries of the enemy, who also had a gunboat in the bayou near, from which they done some capital firing. As good luck—or I should say, a kind Providence—would have it, we came to a ditch, about three feet deep, into which we plunged in double quick order.—Here we lay for an hour and a half, the shot and shell raining around us, while our own battery behind handsomely responded over our heads and so near that at every discharge the smoke blew down into our "last ditch." But presently ammunition for our batteries failed and we were forced to retire out of range of the enemy's guns, when we lay down supperless, as no fires could be allowed for coffee.
Monday morning we got our coffee and hard bread, made an early start, and by 10 o'clock had driven the enemy to their earthworks. We then secured a position in a cane-field next to a piece of woods, where our battery could work to advantage. Here we stayed all the afternoon, skirmishing with the enemy. Towards night they attacked us in strong force trying to drive us back, sending the bullets among us like hail-stones. But we lay in the rows between the cane, firing as we had opportunity, and held our own. Several of our boys were wounded here; one of them lying in the row right next to me was shot through the brain, killing him instantly. We held our position until dark, and were then ordered to retire about half a mile, and other regiments were put in advance to give us opportunity to rest. Without any supper we lay down in the cane-field and slept well.
Tuesday morning, at 4 1-2 o'clock, we were called and told we might have a few moments to make our coffee and eat our hard-tack.—Then we were to charge upon the enemy's works and carry them by storm. We had hardly started our fires, when it was discovered that the rebels had fled during the night.—We were ordered immediately to the advance to give them chase. We followed them twelve miles that day, expecting that Gen. Grover would stop them at Franklin. But they were ...

*Maj. MORSE has been for several weeks in New Orleans, acting on a Commission upon Gen. Butler's imprisonments for political offences.

... ness and the regularity with which everything runs along, hardly realize that there is a war, except when some home is made sad by the loss of a friend. But here in the South it is entirely different. War with all its horrors is carried right to the hearth-stones; in the breaking up of homes, the destruction of property, the stopping of all the wheels of civil life; which give peace, safety and prosperity. The curse falls heavily where it belongs, but the innocent must suffer in a measure also. And after these days of bloodshed are over we must have a time of financial embarrassment [sic]. But there is no country under the sun that will recuperate faster, or rise to higher honor, than our own, when we establish on a firm basis the glorious Government for which we are gladly fighting.
... too smart for him, fighting him with a part of their force on one road, while the main body escaped by another. We were very much disappointed, but it was decided to give chase and stopped for the night about a mile beyond Franklin, to arrange a new plan. We captured some four or five hundred prisoners this day, and forced the enemy to blow up their gunboat Diana. Our men were, however, so exhausted by hunger and fatigue that they stopped all along the road, and when we reached Franklin we had only about 300 men in our regiment. But the most of them came up that night, and we fed them on chickens, turkies [sic], geese, beef, mutton, &c.
Wednesday morning, we started early and marched eighteen miles that day. Emery's division falling in the rear, made a column about five miles long, as we had to march much of the time through woods, cane-fields, &c., and it was with great difficulty we could get them along. We came so close to the rebels that night, that on the plantation where we stopped, we found a dinner prepared for about fifty officers, which in their hurry they had forgotten to eat. As it was yet warm, our boys appropriated it with due appreciation.
The next day (Thursday) we made another early start, and marched about twenty miles. The rebels made a short stand at New Iberia, for the purpose of destroying property, but our cavalry charged upon them, and they left in a hurry. We found the streets lined with cotton, and cotton burning. These two days we took a good many prisoners and some guns, We were so nigh the enemy all the time as to exchange shot and shell with them every little while.
Friday the army started on again, about 6 A. M.; but as my furlough had expired, and there was no prospect of the enemy's stopping to give battle, I turned my face toward New Orleans. After a hot and dusty ride on  horse-back, of sixty good long miles, I reached Brashear City about dark that night, and had the great pleasure of finding letters from you.
I will only add that our regiment did itself credit. A good many told me that for a regiment that had never been under fire it stood splendidly.
APRIL 20.—The country on the "Teche" is  the most beautiful I have seen in the South.—The land lies above the surface of the river and bayous, so that there is no need of building levees. The soil is very rich, and all the plantations show wealth. The country reminds one of that about Rochester, N.Y.—Franklin and New Iberia—each two to three thousand inhabitants—look much like Northern villages. There are large quantities of sugar and molasses all through that country which will be taken possession of by the Government. Also mules and horses, of which we were in much need in this Department. Cattle, sheep and corn abound, but flour was worth $200 per bbl., and only rarely a few pounds to be found in a family. We found a foundry near Franklin, where the rebels had left quite a quantity of cannon ball, and another near New Iberia, where there was a large quantity of ball and shell. At the latter place there was a large slaughter-house owned by the Confederate Government, where there were large quantities of beef and pork packed ready for shipment. Here too are the rebel salt-works where is manufactured a great deal of salt. We did not visit them, but our possession of the country cuts through from ..., and gives us their ... , and our prisoners report that the rebels all fled from them at our approach.
By the way, these salt-works are quite a curiosity. They are on an island in a little bay. On digging a few feet below the surface they strike a salt rock, which they blast or quarry out, as we would stone. This rock is very saline, and resembles exactly our rock salt.
When I left the regiment last Friday it was not known how far the army would go, but it was thought they would go to the Red River, 100 miles from New Iberia. I would most gladly have gone on, but as my furlough was more than up, and there was no prospect of fighting, reluctantly returned.
The boys were very foot-sore, but traveled full as easy the last day I was with them as any before. I cannot tell how many of our boys were wounded; only two to my knowledge fatally, both in the head. One was from the Oxford company, the other William Roberts from Nelson Flats. The latter was alive the last I knew of him, but the Doctor said he could live only a short time. He was sent to one of the hospitals, but in the excitement of the fight and the hurry of the forced march afterward, my duties were such that, very much to my regret, I lost track of him. Quite a number of the boys had narrow escapes; bullet holes through their blankets, canteens, &c., for myself, I do not think any bullets or pieces of shell came within six inches of me.
I feel proud of our regiment. Almost every one showed himself a man and a soldier. There will always be some in every regiment, to fall in the rear when the hour of trial comes, and they are almost invariably the ones of whom you would least expect such conduct.
APRIL 23.—Have just received a telegram from Col. Smith, saying that he had been sent from the front with the 114th and 159th N. Y. Vols., in charge of property, &c., en route, and that he was going into camp at Brashear City
again. * * * * * * *
You in the North in the prosperity of busi- ...

From the 114th Regiment.
BEECHER'S HOSPITAL, BERWICK CITY, LA.
May 18th, 1863.
MR. EDITOR.—Since the last battle on Bayou Teche, Berwick and Brashear cities have presented quite a lively appearance. Several new hospitals have been established and most of the sick and wounded of General Banks army has been brought to these two places. Gunboats are arriving, and departing daily. Transports loaded with cotton and sugar land their precious cargoes upon the dock at Brashear city. From there it is taken by rail to New Orleans. Large droves of horses, mules, cattle, sheep, and goats, have been brought here and pastured, many of them have been butched [sic] for the troops stationed about this place. Large numbers of contrabands have also been arriving since the fight, and for a few days past our increase in population must be tremendous. Gen. Banks, has lately issued an order for raising 18 regiments of colored troops in this Department. The work has already been commenced in good earnest. Not only in this place, but at Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and other places. The negroes are enlisting rapidly, and filling up the Regiment. The regiment that is already organized, is well officered by men that have seen, from twelve to eighteen months service. I was informed by a captain, that the Colonel was a native of this place. When the war broke out he remained true to the 'old flag,' and by so doing came near losing his life. He was seized by the rebels, and a rope placed about his neck to hang him, he however, escaped, went to New York, and enlisted in a N. Y. Regiment, and was commissioned as Lieutenant, from that he was promoted to Captain, and now he is back home  as Colonel of a colored Regiment. Last Friday, a large number of recruits were brought in. They were collected about Newtown. The crowd was composed of all classes, male, and female, old, and young, such a sight, I never before wit­nessed; some were mounted upon mules, others were carrying large bundles upon their heads. Old carts were loaded down with worthless trash, mules bent beneath the combined weight of a wench, and family of children. The procession halted in the center of the place. Here friends met friends, that had come before. It was interesting to listen to their conversation; they all appeared to be feeling their best, and in high spirits. How ye do Frank? says one. Oh right smart! Ye gwine ober de Bay? Yes! hab ye seen Joe? Oh yes, Joe big man, he in de kum-pany ober dan, yah! ha! ha!
The men were soon formed in line, and with the aid of one or two colored ser­geants, the ranks were opened, and the officers who had then in charge proceeded to pick out "the halt, the lame, and the blind." These will be placed upon the plantations with the women, and children to raise sugar, and cotton. The strong able bodied men, were then taken over to Brashear, and were regularly examined by an army surgeon. Those that passed were uniformed, armed, and equipped, and placed in the camp of instruction. I was informed by an officer who was present at the medical examination, that many of their backs looked like a checkerboard, they were so cut up with scars. Yester­day, another company of some five or six hundred, arrived and went through the proceedings as the other company. They have all been taken over the Bay, old, and young. They are fed at Uncle Sam's…
… ments ready to put on at a moments notice, in case we are called upon to make or repel a charge, sleeping with one eye and both ears open, and our hands upon our gun. The last you heard from me, we, (the regiment of course,) were at Brashaer City under marching orders, but to what point it was not known, though we all supposed that Port Hudson was our destination, and so it proved, as you have before this time heard. We left Brashaer on Friday, the 29th of May, and on Sunday, the 31st, we entered the woods which surround the rebel stronghold.
Your readers have seen the letters of the New York correspondents to the Times, Tribune, and Herald, describing the fighting the troops went through when they first came here,—how they drove the rebels from point to point, out of rifle-pit's, ravines, and temporary breastworks, until they came to the inner fortifications which surround the town, where they were checked, though not driven back,—and it will not be necessary for me to enter into detail. Even if I were disposed to favor you with all "legal" news, I could  not, for there are "barriers" in the way which a "poor private" cannot overcome, and which no one but a licensed correspondent of some "great daily" are permitted to penetrate.
You have read much, probably, about the natural defences around Port Hudson and Vicksburgh [sic], but the reading does not convey the reality, especially when you add what the science of man has done to render them impregnable. It seems to me, as I look over the ground which has been gained at the point of the bayonet and in many a hand to hand struggle, that our troops must have fought like fiends incarnate to drive the rebels as far as they did. The ground is cut up into ravines and gullies, on the banks of which a handful of determined men ought to withstand a hundred, yet our troops charged up and down the precipitous sides with such resistless fury that their terror-stricken opponents sought shelter behind the last line of their defences, where they knew they could not be followed. This last line of the rebel works is upon the Port Hudson side of a deep ravine which runs nearly around the beleaguered town, and consist of earth­works thrown up, and a broad ditch up­on either side, the inside of the wall be­ing built with a terrace or platform for men to stand upon to defend against scaling. You can imagine what an amount of work the rebs must have done since last fall, when I tell you that their lines are from five to seven miles long, and since we came here they have thrown up works inside of these. Our troops have not been idle, and, save the disastrous charge of the 14th of June, in which Col. Smith lost his life, there has been no false move. I have not dared to attempt a description of what I saw on that, to many, fatal Sunday. Five companies of the 114th B, G, E, F and D, were selected to lead the storming party, the whole under command of Col. SMITH and Maj. MORSE. Col. SMITH and Maj. MORSE headed the column, and as we approached the bluff and they gave the word to charge, we rushed up the hill in the face of a deadly fire from the rebel riflemen. But no body of men could do an impossibility, and after our Colonel and Major were wounded, Capt. BOCKEE gave orders to the men to pretect [sic] themselves by every available means. Co. B, was upon a round ridge of ground, exposed to a scathing fire from front and flank, and the only means we could employ to shield ourselves was to lay flat upon our backs. Companies E, and G, charged through a ravine, and succeeded in getting into the ditch at the foot of the rebel works, from which there was no egress without fearful danger, until night lent her aid. It was between 5 and 6 o'clock in the morning when we made the charge, and from 6 A. M. till nightfall were we exposed to a constant fire from the enemy and the excessive heat of the sun.
It is an awful sight to see men maimed and shot down at your side, and an intense feeling of dread comes over the system when at each moment you expect to fall, pierced by the fatal bullet. I have heard men say that they did not dread to enter battle, but a thinking man, a man who has a father and mother, sisters, brothers, and especially one who has a wife and children to leave to the cold charities of a selfish world, cannot but fear to meet death in such a manner. Yet a good soldier does his duty, without murmuring, leaving himself in God's care, and if he goes through the struggle and comes out safe he thanks Him for it.
You have, e'er this reaches you, re­ceived a list of the killed, wounded and missing, through official sources, and I will not undertake to furnish names. I will speak of only one of the members of Co. E, Corporal John Stoughton who has been missing since the fight of Sun-day, and who, it is feared, fell upon that fatal field. The last seen of him, he was loading and firing from the cover of a stump and probably fell at that point, though no trace of him has been found. He is missed from the ranks of his company, where he was very much esteemed. When our people removed the dead from the field, the features of the fallen had so changed, and the stench was so intolerable, that a search could not be made with any success, and they were buried with all that their pockets contained that would help recognize them.

… table, and I suppose are under his protection.
The soldiers make a very fine appearance, in their new uniforms. They are mostly straight, large, well developed men. I think that it is mostly owing to the custom of carrying things upon the head that gives them such a straight, high headed appearance.
Gen. Banks forces are mostly at, and around Alexandria. This Department is pretty well cleared of rebels at present—Hardly one dare show his head this side of the Red River. Many of the prisoners taken in the late battle, have taken the oath or allegiance, and many others would like to stay, and enjoy protection; instead of fighting Confederate battles. They are in no hurry to get back, at leant those that I have talked with are not. Most of them seem to have quite a liking to our uniforms, the Confederate sick, and wounded, in our hospitals are nearly half dressed in our clothes. Most of them think that they done fighting enough. The main hope of the rebels now hangs on England, and Northern copperheads. The say that England will interfere, and that the North is already divided. I trust that they are mistaken. Words are inadequate to convey the disgust that the soldiers feel towards Northern copperheads. I fear some them would fare hard, if our soldiers were at home, at least I have heard them say that they would knock down the first copperhead they met. The sick, and wounded, are doing well and gaining rapidly, many of them will soon be able to rejoin their regiments. W. E.

Letter from the 114th Regiment.
BRASHAER CITY, LA, May 28, 1863.
DEAR AMERICAN:--Again the 114th have returned to their old rendezvous after a continuous march of four weeks, tired, worn and lame, yet as willing to start on a new expedition, which we have orders to be ready for, as we were two months ago, when we were first ordered into service. Since we commenced marching, on the 11th of April we have marched double the miles of any other regiment in our division, and also have almost double the number of men left in the ranks. We have made two trips to Opelousas and one trip from Opelousas to Cheneyville, 60 miles farther up the State, making an aggre­gate of about 500 miles in seven weeks during which time, we rested at intervals some eight days. The first of May we were ordered to Alexandria to join our brigade, but on arriving at Cheneyville this order was countermanded, and we were instructed to join another force which had been instructed to col­lect all negroes, big and little and take them to Brashaer. Accordingly we again took the back track, picking up all men, women and children of color that could be reached, joining the several regiments that were returning at St. Martinsville, 90 miles on our back track. We had collected, all told, somewhere in the neighborhood of 1,000 negroes, 100 mule teams and carts, besides a large number of horses, oxen, &c., and on our march must have presented a very diversified appearance.
There has been no incident worthy of note since we left, on the first of May, save perhaps, a bit of a scare we had while passing through Franklin, on the evening of the 25th inst. The facts are that the rear guard, placed behind the column to bring in stragglers, as they were passing through the above named place, were fired on by a party of guerrillas a couple of hundred strong, and came rushing in on the 114th, the rear regiment, startling us by vague stories of the strength of the enemy Lieut.-Col. PER LEE immediately formed our regiment in line of battle and awaited an attack, but the foe did not come up, and we awaited orders from our commander to advance and make the attack ourselves. Skirmishers were thrown out by the 110th and 114th, the 110th forming the first line soon coming under fire of the rebs, which they returned with so much vigor that the enemy fell back and took shelter in a sugar-mill. We now brought up a field-piece and after driving them from cover and causing a stampede of the entire party, we again turned upon our road to Brashaer. There were two men killed, three wounded, (one Lieutenant since dead) and two or three taken prisoners.
Col. MORGAN, of the 90th N. Y. V., who is senior Colonel in command, thinking that from the boldness of the attack, there might be a larger force behind, decided to march all night, which we did, arriving here yesterday at  about noon, marching about 40 miles in 20 hours, besides stoppages.
Today, we are again under light marching orders, and Port Hudson is said to be our destination, but from all accounts we will be too late to be in at the death.
P. S —Capt. TITUS, of Co. C has not been heard from since we passed thro'
Franklin, and it is feared that he is a prisoner in the hands of the guerrillas.
Respectfully, A.

Letter from the 114th Regiment.
BEFORE PORT HUDSON, LA,
MONDAY, June 29, 1863.
DEAR AMERICAN:—I have not forgotten you, but the inconveniences of a "life in the woods," besides the lack of paper, have rendered it almost impossible to write home, even. Then, again, we have to be constantly "prepared for action, our "traps" and accoutrements ...

THURSDAY, July 2d.
Yesterday I had permission to visit our lines of approach, and as I had a desire to look over our recent battlefield, I turned my steps thitherward.
I never experienced a greater surprise, for the pick-axe and spade had completely changed the surface of the ground, making fine, safe roads for the approach of troops to the very foot of the rebel parapet. If it is the design of Gen. BANKS to gain a footing at this point, he certainly will succeed, for our sharpshooters are on a level with the rebels, and if a man shows his head he is picked off without ceremony, thus protecting a storming party until they are ready to scale the parapet.
Just received instant marching orders.
Yours in haste, A.

ON BOARD STEAMER IBERVILLE,
Dear Father:
Mississippi River, July 3, 1868.
My last letter was closed just previous to taking the steamer for Port Hudson, pursuant to Col. Per Lee's order. We moved off in fine style until 2 o'clock this morning, when the rebels opened on us with a battery, about 10 miles down the river from Donaldsonville. The second shot cut off the steam pipe and one rope of the steering apparatus; but the other rope, and our nearness to the east bank, enabled the pilot to run the boat "hard on." The work of removal at once began, amid the cries of the women and children, as the shot came crashing into the ladies' cabin, and the hissing of the escaping steam. I dressed and carried my things below; I then thought I would have time to go to the levee, and so ran down the plank and went behind the bank of the river where the whizzing shot and shell passed over our heads. At once the thought came to me to help the helpless, and so I ran to the boat in the interval between the shots, and, with others, succeeded in getting the ladies and children to a place of safety. Not one was scalded, or hit, or run over, or injured, strange to say.
The "Sallie Robinson" came down the river soon after the attack, but turned back, and at 4 A. M. came down again with a gunboat. They quickly silenced the batteries and dispersed the guerillas, although we had posted the few armed men aboard, so that they could prevent a skiff coming over the river to harm us.
One shell knocked the furniture in the Captain's room into "pi," and fired the carpet, which was burning when we returned to the boat. The rebels made a dash upon Springfield landing yesterday morning (everything to and from Port Hudson is landed at this point), and the report is that the convalescents and stragglers drove them off. It is difficult to give a reliable account founded on report; almost every informant has a different story. The Captain of the boat told me last night that Gen. Banks ordered him to be at Springfield landing July 4th, without fail, and remarked they were going to have dancing going up, as they should probably have wounded soldiers down. I shall try to obey Col. Per Lee's summons if a convoy accompanies the transport. After the dancing, which closed at 1 o'clock, the ladies did not retire but continued on deck until the attack; and it was well for them that they did so, as the first shots went through and through their cabin and berths.
NEW ORLEANS. La., July 10, 1863.
To the Editor, of the Cazenovia Republican:
Long before this reaches you the telegraph will have flashed through the North the joyful news of the "surrender of both Vicksburg and Port Hudson, which perfectly thrills every loyal heart.
I started on a second attempt to reach the front last Saturday evening, per steamer "Sallie Robinson," and was enabled to get there without molestation, on the evening of the 6th.—There was constant picket firing on both sides, and occasionally the heavy sound of the mortars, which are kept playing on the enemy's works. I found the regiment the next morning, occupying a ravine under the hill, on the crest of which our breastworks are located, and only separated by a speaking distance from the enemy's line of entrenchments. They excelled our forces in the sharp-shooting constantly kept up to prevent either side making a battery; and if Vicksburg had not fallen, they would have probably held on until obliged to surrender by assault. The great trouble in the previous action was that, owing to the nature of the ground, a supporting column could not be advanced rapidly enough; but that has been all fixed by a series of mines which were arranged to explode; simultaneously, affording a wide gap through which our forces would gain the inside of the fort. Happily, however, this is now not needed.
As soon as the surrender of Vicksburg was announced by an official dispatch to General Banks, it was passed around from the left to the right of our lines that the cheering would be given by each regiment successively in the same order; and I assure you the "three times three" were given with a will. The rebs wanted to know "What's up?" Our boys replied, "Vicksburg taken" and one wrote upon a slip of paper the details of prisoners, &c., tied it to a bullet, and threw it across the ravine into their lines. Next morning Gen. Gardner sent over a flag of truce requesting to see the official dispatch, and if true the appointment of commissioners from our side to arrange terms of capitulation, &c. I left soon after for New Orleans, and did not know the result of the negotiations until I arrived at Baton Rouge. Thus, after months of patient labor and great sacrifice, the Mississippi is practically open, and a result achieved which will have, I think, more influence in deciding the contest than any other possible successes. In this connection I well remember Gen. Scott's programme for conducting the war, which was announced soon after McClellan assumed command. It was to fortify Washington, blockade the southern coast, and march an army down the Mississippi.—Eight successful battles he estimated would give us control of that highway and "break the back of the rebellion." There remains to be done a little job of cleaning out near Donaldsonville, where we were fired into on the "Iberville," and the occupation of southern and western Louisiana, and then I think our forces will be entitled to a little rest.
I saw Gault and Tickner, of Co. K, at Baton Rouge, but had no opportunity to go ashore, as I had intended, and see others of the regiment. "Tick" came to the landing, and seems nearly well. We had on board a reinforcement for Donaldsonville, which 128 convalescents so bravely defended, and, landing them there, dropped down to the anchorage of two schooners, which were lashed on either side of our boat, with the captured steamer "Corwin" attached to the left hand schooner. The ironclad "Essex" and three gunboats convoyed us down past the batteries, which are located so as to give us a raking fire from three points; but we miraculously escaped serious damage, and arrived here this morning early. The steamer "St. Mary" came down the night before, and was struck by a shell, which exploded inside of her, doing no serious injury to life or limb. It seems a little ridiculous to have the river blockaded after Vicksburg and Port Hudson have fallen, but without a co-operating land force little can be done except to drive them away, as they hide behind the levee, which affords them an excellent breastwork all the way down the river. I think I shall be excused for staying here until all danger from such causes is past. We are expecting important news from the North by to-morrow's steamer. According to accounts through rebel sources the programme of invasion has been more successful than last year and may reach further north than is desirable. I earnestly hope to hear that the rebels have been turned back ere this.
I have just seen some of our paroled prisoners from Brashear who escaped being taken to Ship Island. I cannot see why they were sent so far and for what reason. And not arriving here till this morning I was too late to see them and minister to their wants. They were very kindly treated by the rebs on their way to our lines under guard, the sick and infirm being assisted and often placed on the horses of the rebels. But everything was taken from them, and a very few only managed to get a woolen blanket or overcoat, between which the rebs gave them choice. But I must close, to be in season for the mail per Locust Point. Very truly, Q. M. S.

—In the report of proceedings of United States District Court, held at Utica last week the following paragraph appears:
J. Hunt Smith was indicted for presenting false accounts and vouchers to the Government. His trial was put over to the August term at Auburn.
We can hardly think that this refers to Capt. J. HUNT SMITH, recently of Company A, 157th regiment, and formerly editor of the Republican, at Hamilton in this county.

In Memoriam--Lieut. Henry Pettit Corbin, Class of 1863, Madison University:

O, early fallen! would our deep regret
At loss of thee, might win thee back to earth!
For we who loved thee best and knew thy worth,
Have saddest hearts to know thy sun hath set.

But vain, alas! how vain is human grief
To summon from the eternal shades thy soul,
Or from the sepulchre the rock to roll
And call the, from thy last, long dreamless sleep!

'Tis scarce a year ago since thou departed
For the dear Flag to fight, and Fatherland;
In the front rank of battle, sword in hand,
As heroes fall, to die, O noble hearted!

O, had we known, when we last looked on thee
That we should never more thy face behold,
Thy breast to ours, full warmly would we fold,
Deep-graven in our minds, thine image be!

Sleep sweetly, Brother, heeding not our tears!
Thy blood shall Freedom's cause anew baptize;
The memory of thy life and death shall rise
Like incense from our hearts through all the years.

O, God, our Father! If it be thy will
That we should pay such precious coin of life
For Liberty and Right, in battle-strife,
O teach us how to suffer and be still!
R. V. W. S.
Madison University, July 10, 1863.
The above appears in the Democratic Republican, Hamilton, New York, July 16, and was read at a public meeting of the Adelphian Society, held at the Baptist Church on Friday evening July 10th, 1863.
The same paper contains an extract from a private letter by C. E. Thompson, of Company G, 114th N. Y. V., dated Port Hudson, June 19th. Last Sunday morning about seven o'clock, five companies of our regiment, B, D, E, F, and G, were ordered up, and with the rest of Weitzel's brigade, began moving around to the left, leaving the other five companies for picket on our lines. "About daylight we arrived at the mouth of a deep ravine which our men had been clearing out for the purpose of making a charge on some earthworks running parallel with it. They wanted these works to plant some artillery on. Our artillery began to roar about this time, throwing shot and shell over our heads into the rebel lines, and soon we heard the yells of our boys charging on the works, and then how the muskets popped. We pushed along through the ravine as fast as we could, and soon it came our turn to charge. We had to file right, out of the ravine and got up a hill over logs and brush about ten rods to the rebel breastworks. From the time we filed out of the ravine until we got within a rod of the works, it was a continued whiz of bullets, sounding more like bees swarming than anything else. Captain Tucker was at the head of the company until we filed out of the ravine; he stopped on the corner saying "I don’t know about going in there." As the rear of the company passed by he rushed towards the front, and was within two feet of me, when a bullet entered his breast, and he fell over a log exclaiming "Oh, my God! I am shot," and died within fifteen minutes. The last words he said were, to tell his friends that he died for his country. I had just seen Captain Tucker fall when four men came down with Colonel Smith, who was shot at the head of the regiment, the ball passing near his spine. He died last night and his body is now on the way home. Captain Tucker was buried at Baton Rouge. We marched on over every conceivable obstacle, the bullets flying thicker than hail stones all the time, and finally I reached the foot of a little hill, about a rod from the works which partly covered us from their fire. Major Morse was shot through the ankle, and there was no one to head the regiment.
They called for the Captain of Company B, but he was nowhere to be found. The Captain of Company F, was wounded, and there were but two officers of our regiment to be found, Lieutenants Searles and Corbin of one company. The 160th New York were supporting us. Their cowardly old Colonel kept bellowing for an officer of the 114th. Finally, as he was the senior officer on the field, he got orders to take command of the brigade and charge again. Instead of taking the lead as Colonel Smith had done, he lay down in a ditch and roared out for the 114th to go on, saying he would support us. Lieutenants Searles and Corbin made a dash and the boys after them. Corbin was going into the ditch in front of the works, when he was shot through the head, killed instantly and fell into the ditch. Searles received two bullets in the leg and one through his body, but they think he will recover.
Andrew Sawdey was shot just over the heart, the ball passing down, and out at his side. We were afraid he would die at first, but he is better now and is going to Baton Rouge.
Leroy Woods was wounded in the leg, rather serious but not dangerous.
Albert Fish, was lying by my side, when a bullet from the left struck him in the leg, passing down on the bone. Teere were thirteen wounded in our company besides Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Corbin. We rallied twice after making the first charge but it was impossible for men to go over the bank as the rebels would mow them down. Our regiment was then ordered to the rear and finally got out, or part of them did. There were 86 killed and wounded in the 114th.
Adjatant Underhill, of the and 114th writes to Rev. Silas Tucker, of Logansport, Indiana, on the 16th, that Searle's was mortally wounded, and the closing scene of Captain Tucker's life are as follows: "Some of his men brought me word that he was badly wounded and wished to see me, I went where he lay and found him conscious of his condition. He grasped my hand, and while I gave him every comfort in my power, he spoke to me of the purity of his desire to save his country—how strong his trust had been—of his own consciousness, he could help her no longer. He then turned his memory to the home he had left. He bid me tell you that he was conscious to the last that he had had strong hopes of seeing you all again, after peace had freed him from the obligations this condition of war had laid upon him. These hopes were now fleeing. But there were other hopes, which had been sources of comfort before, that were now brightding [sic], as only hope brightens at the latest moments of life. These strengthening hopes were becoming the body of his life. He fully realized that his time was short, and he spoke with difficulty. He said much that I could not catch, for their was a fierce battle all round. Then he seemed to engaged in prayer—the answers to which, seemed to light up his face with unusual brightness. Life was fast ebbing away. He spoke but an occasional word—these were of peace and triumph.
Thus died one of the bravest officers of our army—one of the truest of friends—a dutiful son and a triumphant christian."
J. E. PETTIT, Fabius, July 24.
From the 114th Regiment.
DONALDSONVILLE, La.
July 15th, 1863.
MR. EDITOR.—Our success at Port Hudson, so soon after the fall of Vicksburg and the still glorious news of Lee's defeat inspires the troops with new zeal. Their buoyant spirits know no bounds. We had an engagement here on the 13th with the troops of Dick Taylor. The object was to retreat and call the rebels out of their position; the battle lasted only a short time, but the loss is considerable on both sides, and we think equal, they lost the most men, and took the most prisoners. The next morning our Cavalry started out to see the position of the enemy, but returned after a scout of 15 miles, finding nothing of the enemy. Gunboats have retaken Brashear City, and the small force between here and there of the enemy is surrounded by our troops and will soon be gobbled. We see here nothing that can make us think the back bone of this rebellion is not broken, and we hope hostilities may soon cease, but it is sad to think how the rebel troops are deceived. The day before Port Hudson surrendered the paper that was printed there declared Geo. Banks to be the besieged party, stating that Johnson was in his rear, and his whole army must be taken. On the next day, the 8th, Gen. Gardner surrendered the Port, we met the enemy halfway between the breastworks, and many of them asked what the flag of truce was for, and on being told that the Port was to be surrendered they ridiculed the idea, often making the enquiry where Johnston with his forces were, and did not believe the Port was to be surrendered until we marched in and they stacked arms. One of the smart tricks of the rebels I must mention. There were many new made graves, and on opening some of them, some thousands of Springfield Rifles and several pieces of artillery were found to have been killed in action, or at least were buried with the dead. I will mention one little joke that took place before the surrender of Port Hudson. The pickets were so close together they could converse with ease, each behind a breast work, and both agreed not to fire, while each of the pickets were on the breastworks, and our men at a little distance planted a battery. After some hours one of the rebel pickets says "get down there." Gen. Gardner says "fire, its only a d——d yankee trick," and amid a shout and a burst of laughter hostilities again commenced.
One question I wish to ask is, who the copperheads are, and what they want.—They are not democrats for we have plenty of them here, and patriotic men. They are not republicans, because I claim that honorable name myself. Who are they? Are they peace men? If so, let them make peace, but not by compromise with trators [sic] in arms. The patriotism of the 114th is not gone, yet; their numbers are now only 536 men for duty when we left Port Hudson. Any man or company of men North can cry peace, but how are they going to obtain it by acknowledging the independence of the Southern Confederacy. Then the blood of the noble sons they have sent here to crush out this rebellion has flowed in vain, and been spilt for naught. The soldier is for peace, but on honorable terms. The Union we can't give up, for peace friends, nor home. Our motto is, Lay down arms, else the only argument is the cannon's mouth.—Home and friends we prize in times of peace above all things on earth. B.

Correspondence.
The letter below from a member of the gallant 114th, is sufficiently plain to be easily understood, and sufficiently positive to satisfy the most earnest and radical patriot. It is from one who has the blood of a revolutionary sire coursing through his veins, and who does not propose to relinquish without a struggle, the blessings which his patriot father fought to obtain. DONALDSONVILLE, LA., July 17th.
DEAR SON.—I am now on the bank of the Mississippi. We have got the rebels surrounded on all sides between here and Opelusas and Brashear cities, so they cannot get back into Texas again. The Union men drove them out of Texas, while Banks' army was at Port Hudson, and now Banks has got them where he wants them, he says. I suppose when the three Divisions march upon them, there will be some pretty hard fighting, probably a great many lives will be lost. I may be one of them, if it should be so, you must do the best you can for yourself. But there is one thing F. I want you should remember,—That is, the peace democrats and copperheads are traitors to the Union and their country. I want you should despise them as you would traitors. Remember this as long as you live, and tell them if I get killed that I fought for the Union like a brave soldier, and was not a traitor, like them. If it had not been for our ... the duties of a procreator, ... little prodigies; the provender which every day would require. Then I looked at the property that might be acquired, and the prosperity ensuing; the affair looked truly profitable, and really it was rather provoking to turn away and consider the 'cons;' but I was compelled to allow that the consent of the lady concerned in this conjugal arrangement was absolutely necessary. My own self conceit set this objection aside as unworthy of contemplation. I would admit of no contingency that should contradict my will in this particular. The connections might conclude that my condition was not exactly the thing; but we must expect contradiction, and I was ready to pass this by, so long as the lady did not give me a conge.
The affair seemed quite concluded; the confab was over; the consort was ready; the prodigies, being only a matter of conception, seemed not contrary to the general congratulation. All that was necessary was to regulate my conduct by conjugal rules, which might be easily done with a little constraint, though contrasting with my long-continued habits. A little concession on her side, constancy on both, concord would undoubtedly ensue and content result. Old bachelor friends would call in to condole, and find but conviviality.

From the 144th Regiment.
CAMP NEAR WEAVERVILLR STATION,
August 3d, 1863.
Mr. Mirror—Thinking that some of your many readers would like to know how the 144th was getting along, I thought I could not better employ the few leisure moments I now have than by scratching off a few lines to you.
It was on Saturday morning, the first inst., that the reveille was beat about three o'clock for the whole Division to pack up and be ready to march at five; and by that time we had pulled up stakes and were on our way to the beautiful little English village of Greenwich. We arrived there about noon and encamped in the edge of the woods. About two P. M. we were again in line. We marched about one mile, and there found the whole Division drawn up in a large field to witness the execution of Bradford Butler, a deserter from the 157th N. Y. S. V. He had not yet arrived, but before long he came under charge of Capt. Stone, Co. G, 144th N. Y. S. V., whose Company is now detailed as provost guard.—Twelve men were appointed to shoot the criminal. Henry K. Lakin, Co. F, being one of them; but I cannot give you the names of the rest. The doomed man was shot dead about three o'clock P. M. Two of the men's guns not being discharged, the men were immediately put under ar­rest. Too much praise cannot be awarded to Ma­jor C. A. Rice of the 144th, for the manner in which he conducted the affair; and especially to     Capt. Stone for his kindness to the prisoner, and the quiet by which he managed the execution.—As soon as he was dead, the whole Division was marched close by where he lay near his coffin, and also the new dug grave.
Oh! how can we imagine the feelings of the doomed man as he marched in rear of the ambu­lance containing his coffin to the fatal spot, and saw so many assembled there to witness his final end; but not one motion of dissent did he show until the black cap was adjusted, which he did not wish to be put on; but that had to be done, and then came the momentous word, "fire!" With a spring upwards, he fell back upon the ground never to rise again. Such is the fate of the deserter!
I forgot to mention the effect the sun had upon the men. We were in the field about an hour, and all that time you might see them carrying the prostrate forms of men who had been sun struck, into the woods near by. This was the hotest [sic] day we have had this summer.
We staid at Greenwich until three o'clock this morning, and left for this place, where we arrived about ten A. M. It is thought that we may stay here until the return of Capt. St. John, who was sent to Elmira to obtain conscripts to fill up the Regiment which numbers about 500 guns. We hear that Capt. St. John and his party obtained, on their arrival at Elmira, a furlough of ten days. I hope it may be true.
Yours, &c., C. CEDAR.
AUGUST 5th, 1863.
P. S. Major Austin is here paying off the regiment. They will all get their two month's pay by sundown. C. C.

LIEUT. HENRY P. CORBIN—Editor of Standard:—In addition to the very large list of names of the noble and heroic young men, who by their fall in defense of the national unity and a world's enfranchisement and liberty, have made this town sadly noted, as it has equally brought desolation and crushing sorrow to many families, and bruising to multitudes of hearts, there has been newly added one,—that of Lieut. Henry P. Corbin, an adopted son from infancy in the family of the writer. Among the many noble men killed in the assault on the rebel works at Port Hudson on Sunday, the 14th ultimo, it was his fate to be cut down by a sabre stroke.
Capt. Tucker of the same company (G), and Lieut. Searle, also fell, and their Colonel, (Smith) was mortally wounded.
The Captain was a graduate, and Lieut. Corbin was an under graduate of Madison University, with only a remaining year needed to finish his preparatory work for a ripening manhood. A noble and loving son, he gave himself cheerfully to his country.
Extract from a letter written during his first Sunday in camp at Norwich, Aug. 24th, 1862, to a sister, twined by a common cradlehood, ripened by mature fellowship and affection:—"I believe patriotism to be second only to religion, in inspiring high and noble aims, and I trust, for your sake as well as my own, that you may some time hear that I am enjoying the advantages of both. You know * * * * that in this world some must watch and some must weep, and as we are filling the places of men and women, we must not shrink from any responsibility. I am sure neither of us wish to, and we may think more of one another for it.
"I was told a new antidote for the blues, by a young lady in H---, whose brother goes with us, and that was 'to pray,' and a good deal of the advice from her and her mother I shall remember in connection with your own and mother's." J.
Fabius, N. Y., July 1, 1863.

The Attack and Repulse at Fort Hudson.
The army correspondent of the N. Y. Herald gives the following account of the attack upon the entrenchments at Port Hudson, June 14th, in which the 114th Regiment suffered so severely:
Last Saturday evening the order of attack was determined upon at headquarters and communicated to the Generals who were to command the assaulting columns. Most of the details were arranged by General Grover. The point of attack was the extreme Northeasterly angle of the enemy's breastworks. Five or six days previous to the assault several pieces of the enemy's artillery, which had been in position behind their fortifications immediately in our front, were dismounted by our guns and abandoned. Those still in position were rendered useless to the Rebels by our sharpshooters.
THE PLAN OF ASSAULT.
The plan of assault was briefly as follows:—The 75th New York, under command of Capt. Grey, and the 12th Connecticut, led by Lieutenant Colonel Peck, were detailed as skirmishers, forming a separate command under Lieutenant Colonel Babcock, of the 75th New York. The 91st New York, Colonel Van Zandt, commanding—each soldier carrying a five pound hand grenade, with his musket thrown over his shoulder—followed next in order. The skirmishers were to creep up and lie on the exterior slope of the enemy's breastworks, while the regiment carrying the grenades were to come up to the same position and throw over the grenades into the enemy's lines, with a view to rout them and drive them from behind their works. The 24th Connecticut, Colonel Mansfield, with their arms in like manner to the grenade regiment, followed, carrying sand bags filled with cotton, which were to be used to fill up the ditch in front of the enemy's breastworks, to enable the assaulting party the more easily to scale them and charge upon the Rebels.
Following these different regiments came, properly speaking, the balance of Gen. Weitzel's whole brigade, under command of Col. Smith, of the 114th New York. This command consisted of the 8th Vermont, Lieut. Col. Dillingham; the 114th Now York, Maj. Morse, and the 116th New York, Lieut. Col. Van Patten. Next came Col. Kimble's and Col. Morgan's brigades, the last of which, with another brigade, was under the general command of Col. Birge. This force was held to support the assaulting column, which was under the immediate command of Gen. Weitzel, who made the attack on the right. Gen. Emory's old division moved in conjunction with Gen. Weitzel on the left, forming a separate column. The two divisions—Gen. Weitzel's and Gen. Paine's—were under command of Gen. Grover, who, as has been before stated, planned the whole assault after  Gen. Banks' order to advance was received by him.—Gen. Weitzel's division was expected to make a lodgment inside of the enemy's works, and in that manner prepare the way for Gen. Paine's division. After the inside of the enemy's fortifications had been reached skirmishers were to push forward and clear the way while both columns were to be deployed in line of battle and move toward the town of Port Hudson, where a grand citadel, which forms the last means of Rebel defence, is situated.
THE MOVEMENT.
About daylight the 75th New York, which had been slowly advancing, approached the enemy's works sufficiently near to see his fire. Previously the columns of the main body of Gen. Grover's command were formed in the woods skirting the enemy's breastworks. The 12th Connecticut, during the night, had lost its way in the woods, and the 91st New York was ordered by General Weitzel to take the place that had been assigned to it, and follow immediately in the rear of the 75th New York. After the advance of the 75th and 91st regiments, Gen. Weitzel's entire command commenced moving forward. Several days previous our army engineers had been preparing a covered way, which extended from the woods where our troops lay up to within one hundred and fifty yards of the enemy's position. Through this covered way our troops marched in single file up to the point where the first line of battle was formed.
CAREFULLY DEVISED OBSTRUCTIONS.
After the advance had arrived at the end of the covered way they began slowly to push over the innumerable  barriers that had  been planted by     the Rebels to obstruct their march. The deep gullies, covered over by brush and creeping vines, were completely obscured from sight, and were only known to exist after our soldiers had plunged into them. Part of our skirmishers deployed to the right, while suffering severely from the enemy's fire, and a portion of the advance took up a position on the left of the point to be attacked. They were immediately followed by Gen. Weitzel's column, Gen. Paine in the meantime advancing towards the enemy's works with his command further on the left.

A MURDEROUS FIRE.
It should be stated that our troops, as soon as they had left the cover of the woods, which were scarcely three hundred yards from the enemy's breastworks, were subject to the constant fire of the Rebel infantry. A portion of artillery, which was planted some distance in the rear of our advancing forces, kept a continuous fire at the Rebel works, Capt. Terry, of the Richmond, with his battery of 8-inch Dahlgren guns, and Capt. McLaflin, with his battery, a portion of the 21st Indiana artillery, did good execution. These batterries [sic] served very much to protect our troops as they were advancing to the attack. After our skirmishers had picked their way up to within about thirty yards of the enemy's works, they sprang into  the ditch, expecting to be able to shelter themselves under cover of the Rebel fortifications, and keep the enemy down while the regiment with the hand grenades, should advance and perform their part of the work in driving the Rebels from their position.
THE SEVENTY-FIFTH N. Y. V.
The portion of the 75th which succeeded in reaching the ditch were immediately repulsed, and nearly all of them were either killed or wounded. The ditch was so enfiladed that it was impossible for men to live long under the murderous fire of the enemy.
THE PLANS FAIL.
In consequence of the repulse of the portion of the 75th regiment that succeeded in reaching the ditch, the hand grenaders could accomplish but little. In fact, although they made many desperate and gallant attempts to be of service, they rather damaged than benefitted [sic] our prospects of success; for as they threw their grenades over the Rebel breastworks the Rebels actually caught them and hurled them back among us. In the meantime, while the skirmishers were nobly endeavoring to sustain themselves in their position, Gen. Weitzel's column moved up as rapidly as possible, and made a series of desperate assaults on the enemy's works, which, for bravery and daring, the history of the war can hardly furnish a parallel.
THE FIGHT GENERAL.
At this time, the sun having fairly risen, the fight became general. A fog, which had partially obscured the contending armies, lifted and revealed their respective positions. The enemy were fully prepared for us, and they lined every part of their fortifications with heavy bodies of infantry. The battle had began [sic] in earnest, and Gen. Paine's column, as well as Gen. Wcitzel's,  was actively engaged.

FEINTS.
Before proceeding further with the details of the fight of Gen. Grover's command, it will be necessary to mention a fact that I have previously omitted—namely, that under the general plan of attack, as directed by Gen. Banks, Generals Auger and Dwight were to make on the extreme left of General Grover's position, to distract the attention of the enemy from the main assault. Accordingly, before the engagement became general between General Grover's command and the enemy, Generals Auger and Dwight had attacked the enemy, as before indicated, on Gen. Grover's extreme left. It was not the intention that the last named of these forces should storm the Rebel works, but hold the enemy in check while Gen. Grover was performing his part of the work according to the original plan, which, had he been successful, would have opened the way for the advance of our entire army on Port Hudson proper, which is surrounded, as it is understood, by a series of fortifications more impregnable than any we have yet assaulted.
A SEVERE FIGHT ON THE LEFT.
The fight on the part of Gen. Dwight's command was exceedingly severe, and scarcely less so with Gen. Grover's. Gen. Dwight's loss in killed and wounded will probably exceed two hundred, Gen. Auger's loss will fall considerable short of that number. Under Gen. Grover's command probably the most desperate fighting was done by Gen. Weitzel's old brigade. Col. Smith, leading these veterans, the heroes of many fights, fell early in the action, mortally wounded. A ball pierced his spine and passed round to the right side. The Colonel still lingers; but his death is hourly expected. The charges made on the Rebel works by our brave soldiers showed a determination to carry them at all hazards; but human bravery on this occasion was not adequate to the accomplishment of their object, The most formidable obstacle that presented itself as a barrier to our success was the Rebel glacis, which at the point attacked had been constructed in such a manner as to make every bullet tell that was fired from the Rebel breastworks while our troops were endeavoring to make the ascent. In fact the great natural advantages and engineering ability at Port Hudson have been rather under than over rated.
A GALLANT CHARGE.
Immediately upon the fall of Col. Smith, Lieut. Col. Van Patten, of the 160th New York, took command of the brigade, and gallantly led the charge until all farther hope of driving the Rebels from their position was gone. Brigade after brigade followed in rapid succession storming the Rebel works, until compelled to fall back under the terrible fire of the enemy. Conspicuous among the brigades that did the most desperate fighting were those under the command of Cols. Kimball, Morgan and Birge. They were all, however, eventually repulsed with great slaughter.
AN EFFECTUAL REPULSE.
The fighting ceased at eleven o'clock in the morning. We having been repulsed in every assault, our soldiers, under command of their officers, laid themselves down under the shelter of the gullies, trees, covered way—in fact, every thing that could afford them protection, and waited for the day to pass and darkness come on.—Many of our wounded who were accessible were carried from the field by squads detailed for that purpose. It is a shameful reflection on humanity, that a large number of our soldiers, carrying the wounded and dying from the field on stretchers, were shot down by the enemy, and in several instances the wounded were killed while being borne from the field. At nightfall, however, we commenced the burial of our dead, and succeeded before morning in carrying most of our wounded from the battle ground.
Our total loss in this last attack upon Port Hudson will probably not fall much short of one thousand.
GALLANT CONDUCT OF THE SOLDIERS.
During Sunday's fight our soldiers displayed the most extraordinary gallantry. In some instances whole companies would march up to the Rebel intrenchments [sic], when those who had preceded them had been literally annihilated before their eyes; and all of this, too, without any of the usual urging on of the officers.
A BOLD REBEL.
I noticed one Rebel officer who rode up to the angle where the general attack was made, and in the most deliberate manner possible, coolly wiped the sweat from his brow while our shells were bursting in dozens about him; and after examining the position of our forces and giving directions to his men concerning some disposition to be made of them, quietly trotted back into the woods whence he came.

Tribute to the Memory of Lieut. Corbin.
At a meeting of the Senior Class of Madison University, Hamilton, N. Y., July 6th, 1863, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, It has pleased our Heavenly Father, in his inscrutable providence, to remove from us, by death on the battle-field at Port Hudson, Lieut. H. P. Corbin, 114th N. Y. S. Vols., a classmate whose nobleness of character and amiability of soul—whose genial qualities and generous nature rendered him a dearly loved member of our circle, and whose continued association with us during our college course, has only led us to esteem him more highly and mourn his loss more deeply:
Resolved, That we tender to the relatives and friends of our departed classmate, the assurances of our deep and earnest sympathy in their great bereavement, hoping that they may be sustained in this hour of sorrow by the consolations of the gospel, and by the remembrance of his noble life, and heroic death in the discharge of a soldier's duty in the maintenance of the most sacred institutions, and in defense of the most cherished rights of country and of manhood.
Resolved, That we will ever cherish in our heart of hearts the memory of our dear departed classmate—of his friendship, of his gracious character and noble death—as one of the most precious recollections of our youth.
Resolved, That we wear the usual badges of  mourning for thirty days, and also during the Commencement exercises; and that a copy of these resolutions be sent for publication to the Democratic Republican, the Utica Herald and the Examiner.
By order of the Class of 1863, of Madison University,
R. V. W. SNOW, President,
E. ARTHUR WOODS, Secretary.

ARMY CORRESP0NDENCE.
From the 114th—Letter from Capt. Bullock.
The following is an extract from a letter of Capt. D. D. BULLOCK, of the 114th, to his family, which has been kindly handed to us for publication. It will be seen that he puts our loss in the assault of the 14th ult., on Port Hudson, when Col. SMITH was wounded, at 3,000. In that portion of his letter which we are compelled to omit, for want of room, he states the Union losses in the assault of May 27th, at 1,700 wounded and 1,000 killed. They have heretofore, in official reports, been stated at 1,000 in all.
NEW ORLEANS, June 20, 1863.

* * * We come now to the general charge made last Sunday by our entire line, on the enemy's breastworks. This was more terrific than any previous fighting at Port Hudson. There were five companies from each regiment in every brigade ordered to make the charge; the remaining companies were held in reserve to defend our breastworks in case the enemy tried to make their escape, and as good luck would have it, my company was one of the reserve, and were not in the charge. We were repulsed with heavy loss, and gained nothing. Our loss in killed and wounded will not fall short of three thousand. Our regiment lost eighty in killed and wounded.
Col. SMITH died of his wounds yesterday; his body is now being embalmed, and goes home in the steamer next week. Capt. TUCKER is killed, and also Lieut. CORBIN, of the same company. I am unable to give you a list of the killed and wounded from our regiment, as they are scattered over the city in all the different hospitals. The St. Louis Hotel and all the public buildings are seized by Government for hospitals to accommodate the wounded.
Although we have been repulsed, I am confident in our ultimate success. Gen. BANKS has now called for two thousand volunteers to storm the breastworks, and offers to every private who will get inside the works, a commission. Nearly the number have already volunteered. This is what military men would call a forlorn hope.
It is possible the work may have been accomplished ere this, but I think it doubtful. It can only be accomplished by a greater loss of life than we have yet experienced. I hope, however, for the best.
Gen. SHERMAN has had his leg amputated by Dr. STONE, of this city, (a rebel Doctor,) and will probably recover. It is a fact that not one out of a hundred survives amputation.
I hope soon to be able to give a better account of the Killed and wounded of our regiment. It is a very hard matter to get any news here or on the battle-field. Our line of battle at Port Hudson is ten miles in length, and the centre of the line knows but little what the right or left is doing. But our prayer is, that I may soon be able to say to you, Port Hudson has fallen; that our arms have been victorious. But, let me tell you, it is a Sebastopol to take, and I fear our present force will not be able to accomplish the task. We have but about thirty thousand men, and many of them are fast getting sick, the climate is too much for northern men; the heat is intense, the water bad, and everything is against us. But God is on our side, and we shall succeed; therefore try to keep up good courage.

Another Letter from Capt. ...
LATER FROM PORT HUDSON—... IN DANGER—FIFTY C... ERS—SUTLER PARCE... HIS STORES CONFISCATED.
We have another letter from ... LOCK, of a late date, but have only room for the following extracts:
NEW ORLEANS, June 26.
We are not doing much at Port Hudson since the charge made on the 13th inst., in which we lost so many in killed and wounded. Our dead remained on the field four days before the enemy would allow us to bury them; and then they became so offensive to them, as they were under their breastworks, they sent to us a flag of truce, requesting us to come and bury our dead. Decomposition had taken place, and they could not be recognized by the regiments to which they belonged. It has been ascertained that our loss at that time, in killed and wounded, was over three thousand in the general charge. One more grand charge is to be made, and if we are not successful, the enterprise will he abandoned. Our army is being very fast reduced, The bombardment and picket fighting continue night and day, and the number killed and wounded daily, and becoming sick, depletes our army very much. And then we want our forces for the defense of this city. * * * *
The Teche country is now in the hands of the enemy again. They came down to Brashear City, and have taken both cities, Berwick and Brashear, captured our fort, taken all our guns, stores, and camp and garrison equipage, together with all our officers' baggage. All our forces at that place are prisoners. I am sorry to say that my trunk, with all my choice clothing, and all my military paraphernalia and company books, was captured, the value of which is over three hundred dollars of my own private property, aside from my company property. We were ordered to leave all behind when we marched to Port Hudson. I took with me a change of under-clothing, and the balance of my effects have gone up the Teche, I am not alone. A large store-house was filled with officers' trunks, valises, carpet sacks, &c. Such are the fortunes of war.
There were some fifty belonging to our regiment, who were in the convalescent camp at Brashear City, and who are supposed to be captured. Our Sutler, Mr. PARCE, of Norwich, who kept the Hotel at Brashear, is among the captured, and all his goods confiscated.
The guerillas are making their appearance below Baton Rouge, and are attacking our transports. They have already burned four steamboats, and now we convey our stores to Port Hudson guarded by gunboats. Our future looks dark. BANKS has sent dispatches for reinforcements, to what place no one knows. The rebs have made their boast that they would be in possession of New Orleans by the Fourth of July, but we don't believe it. It is certain, however, that we shall have to keep a portion of our fleet at this place and that we must have more infantry here, or we shall fall a prey to our foe.

CHENANGO COUNTY.
We received a telegraphic dispatch from Norwich, yesterday, saying that the body of Col. Elisha Smith, of the 114th New York volunteers, then in New York, would arrive at Chenango Forks Friday (this) morning, and at Norwich Friday (this) evening, where the funeral will take place on Sunday at 1 P. M. He will be buried in Masonic order.

Casualties in Co. G, 114th, N. Y. Regt.
We have been permitted to take the following list of casualties in Co. "G," 114th Regt., N. Y. Vols. from a letter of Mr. Jerome Blakeman, to his father in this town:
Killed—1st. Sergt. Chas. F. Sunny.
Privates, Edwin Thompson,
    "         Phenimore Short,
    "         James Calahan.
Wounded—Sergt. D. W. Kenney,
    "         H. Brand,
Corp. Albert Stone.
Privates—       D. T. Alderman,
                        John Barrett,
                        F. M. Beebe,
                        F. Brooks,
                        H. T. Brown,
                        ____ Crandall,
                        Geo. Gilbert,
                        G. W. Hayes,
                        *Wm. Howard,
                        M. Horrigan,
                        ____ Hardinburg,
                        D. C. Loomis,
                        O. E. Loomis,
                        ____ Parker,
                        F. Saunders,
                        E. H. Vidlaer,
                        M. Short,
                        ____ Short,
                        Jerome Blakeman.
Private Ira Powell of Co. "D" is reported wouned [sic].
*Leg amputated.

ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTEENTH NEW YORK.
Lieut. Colonel H. B. Morse, right arm.
John Hanrahan, Co. C, face.
Solomon White, Co. C, face.
Charles Adams, Co. B, groin.
Joseph S. Smith, Co. E, thigh fractured.
Lieutenant H. B. Moss.

—Appointments.
Dr. H. N. BUCKLEY of Delhi has been appointed paymaster and DYE D. BULLOCK of Bainbridge assistant quartermaster, with rank of captain in the army. The latter gentleman, it will be remembered, represented the second Assembly district of Chenango county in our State legislature last winter; he was formerly a captain in the 114th regiment N. Y. S. V.

PUTNAM—At Port Hudson, June 1863, Corporal Daniel Putnam, Co. F, 114th Regiment, aged 33 years and 6 months.
This brave soldier and true patriot was ... the gallant assault made upon Port Hudson, June 15th, where he received a wound in the abdomen and head, with which he lingered in pain until the 18th, and died. He was the only child of Mrs. Lucy Putnam, who survived him but 4 days. She died on the 22d of June, reconciled to God, well knowing that her son had just passed from the deadly conflict on the battle field, before her, into the other world. He enlisted in the fall of 1862, in the 114th Regiment and served his country faithfully, and died heroically, as will be seen by some of his last words to his comrade, E. J. Lawtell, as he parted with him for the last time in the Hospital. When asked what word he should bear to his grandfather, he said: "Tell him I died a good soldier for country, and was not shot in the back." To his wife he says: "Tell Jane to trust in God, and read the blessed promises in His word to such as trust in Him." He leaves a wife and four children, with many friends, to mourn his departure. Sherburne Items.—Lieut. John F. Buell of Company F, 114th Regt. arrived at Sherburne the 29th ult., from New Orleans—sailed 18inst. He has been quite ill for the past two months and was obliged to ask for a discharge which he obtained through the influence of the gallant Col. Smith, who you are apprised has since been killed fighting for the "Stars and Stripes."
Lieut. B. has never been in active field service though he posesses [sic] the many qualities of a brave young officer, much beloved by all in his Company, and by whom he will be greatly missed.
Lieut. B's position was a good one and had his health permitted he would have gladly retained it. Elbert E. Smith and Jacob M. Haveley are the only ones killed from Sherburne.
Chas. Sanford who has been a Clerk in the Surrogate's Office in Binghamton for some time past, returned last week. We understand he has been home for the past months quite sick. Charley is very deserving and able to do anything he starts to do. We learn that he is liked very much as a Clerk. J. S.

OXFORD TIMES.
OXFORD, WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 1863.
Death of Col. E. B. Smith.
The sad event which is announced above, was rendered more than probable by the account in our last issue of the severe wound received by Col. Smith, at Port Hudson, on the 14th inst. Assistant Surgeon Beecher, in a letter to the Chenango Union confirms the death of Col. Smith, on Thursday morning, June 18th, at 1 o'clock, "apparently unconscious of suffering, having previously expressed his willingness to depart, being fully satisfied in his own mind that he could not recover." The death of this brave man will be a shock to a very large circle of friends and acquaintance in this county, by whom Col. Smith was beloved for very many noble and excellent qualities, for although his new life was one of great exposure to manifold dangers, yet, of him as of all others whom we desire to have alive, it may be truly said, "what so unguessed as death." Col. Smith had been the recipient of honors at the hands of the people of this county, in former years, the most important of which was the election to the Convention of 1846, to revise our State Constitution, on the same ticket with Hon. John Tracy, of this village. Subsequently Mr. Smith was the unsuccessful candidate of the Democratic party for Congress and Canal Comm'r. But the crowning glory of his life was the patriotic purpose, and the high resolve which, superior to all party ties or partizan considerations, prompted him to the noble self-sacrifice in which he forgot his party and himself, and rose at once to the dignity of the true patriot. We are told that although hardly fully recovered from recent illness, he hurried forward to his command, and received the fatal wound that in a moment raised him from the living soldier to the dying hero. Col. Smith has given all that he could give to his country, and the sorrow for his loss is mellowed by the thought that his death will bring no blush to the cheek of any son of Chenango, for to his country, he has left the priceless boon of a patriot's name and a patriot's example.

Changes and Promotions in the  114th N. Y. S. V.
[Correspondence of the Chenango Union.]         
Field and Staff.—Samuel R. Per Lee, to be Colonel, vice Elisha B. Smith, died of wounds received in action. Henry B. Morse, to be Lieut. Colonel, vice Samuel R. Per Lee, promoted. Oscar H. Curtiss, to be Major, vice Henry B. Morse, promoted. Elias P. Pellet, to be Adjutant, vice Charles W. Underhill, promoted. Adrian Foote, to be Quartermaster, from 1st Lieut. Co. "F".  Charles W. Crary, to be Asst. Surgeon, appointed to fill vacancy occasioned by resignation of Dr. Beardsley.
Co. A.—2d Lieut. Daniel W. Turner, to be Captain, vice Oscar H. Curtiss, promoted.
Sergt. Lucius Crumb, to be 2d Lieut., vice Daniel W. Turner, promoted.
Co. B.—1st Sergt. Isaac Burch, to be 2d Lieut., vice Edwin O. Gibson, promoted.
Co. C.—1st Lieut. Wm. H. Longwell, to be Captain, vice Platt Titus, resigned. 2d Lieut. Norman M. Lewis, to be 1st Lieut., vice Shubael A. Brooks, resigned. 1st Sergt. John Bagg, to be 2d Lieut., vice Norman M.  Lewis, promoted.
Co. D.—2d Lieut. Edwin O. Gibson to be 1st Lieut., vice Wm. H. Longwell, promoted. 1st Sergt. Truman Smith, Jr., to be 2d Lieut.,   vice Smith Case, resigned.
Co. E.—1st Sergt. Uriah Rorapaugh to be 1st Lieut., vice Nicholas A. Dederer, promoted. 1st. Sergt. Charles L. Brown (Co. F) to be 2d Lieut., vice George G. Donnelly, deceased.
Co. F.—1st Sergt. William D. Thurber, to be 1st Lieut., vice Adrian Foote, promoted.—Cyrus J. Hardaway of Berdan's sharpshooters, to be 2d Lieut., vice John F. Buell, resigned.
Co. G.—1st Lieut. and Adjutant, Charles W. Underhill, to be Captain, vice Charles E. Tucker, killed. 1st Sergt. Jerry P. Allis, to to be 2d Lieut., vice Henry B. Corbin, killed.
Co. H.—1st Lieut. Robert P. York, to be Captain, vice Dyer D. Bullock, resigned.—Sergt. Theodore Evans, to be 1st Lieut., vice Robert P. York, promoted. Sergt. Edward E. Breed, to be 2d Lieut., vice Edwin M. Osborn, mustered out of service.
Co. I.—1st Sergt. Dennis Thompson, to be 2d Lieut., vice Elias P. Pellet, promoted.
Co. K.—Sergt. Major Elijah St. John, to be 1st Lieut., vice Erastus L. Carpenter, resigned.

Shall our Soldiers Vote?—Letter from a Volunteer Officer.
LEWISTON, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1864.
Editors Buffalo Express.—Gentlemen:—My attention has been called to a communication in the Buffalo Courier of to-day, signed "Engineer," and purporting to be the composition of "a soldier in the ranks" of Spaulding's Detachment, Engineer Brigade. The writer proceeds at some length to urge his objections to the proposed amendment to our State Constitution, providing for the extension of the elective franchise to soldiers in the field, in time of war; pleading specially that the soldiers' ballot must necessarily be cast as ordered by his commander, and that sufficient sources of information are not open to the army to procure an intelligent use of the privilege.
I do not know that I am acquainted with a single officer or man of the detachment to which this protesting member belongs. It is to be observed that he brings no accusation of undue influence in the premises against his own officers, and that he does not particularize in reference to the "agents under the eyebrows of the national government.," by whom his regiment was beset last fall. I am not prepared to say that some of his loose and rambling statements of political partiality in the matter of furloughing soldiers to come home to vote, may not be truthful. Having served with the Army of the Gulf for the past year, I have no personal knowledge of the matter. But the questions have been put to me, since my return from Louisiana on a brief leave: "Is it possible that these things can be true? Have you the power and the will to control the soldiers under you in their choice at the polls? Have you instructions from your superiors to pursue such a coarse?"
The individual who makes such charges as are contained in this article, be he in the service or out, is guilty of an unwarrantable and enormous libel upon the honesty of the volunteer officers and the intelligence of the men under their command. Can it for a moment be supposed that these latter—educated sons of the North, who have for years been accustomed to the independent exercise of the elective franchise at home, are to be made subject to the arbitrary direction of their officers in this, a purely civil duty? Be assured that such can never be the case. The right to cast their ballots according to their own pleasure has never been delegated to their officers, and will not be interfered with by the latter. If our volunteer army was composed of other material than the free and intelligent mases [sic[] of the North, the assumption might be at least plausible; as it stands, it is merely ridiculous. Further than this, I wish to enter my own protest against such wholesale charges against the volunteer officers as are contained in this communication. Can any person of sound sense believe that the relation between officers and men is one of abject and slavish submission on the one side, and of systematized terrorism and tyranny upon the other? Is it credible that men of honor, laboring in a profession which in an eminent degree calls for the exercise of honorable principles, will consent to prostitute their positions in this manner?
These questions readily suggest their answers. It is always easy for "soldiers in the ranks," under cover of anonymous signatures, to vent their spleen against their superiors in rank, through the ready medium of a partisan press. It is just as easy to put forth the extraordinary and untruthful statement, that soldiers in the field are not afforded sufficient mail facilities to acquaint themselves with the information disseminated by the press. But it is not quite as easy for any disaffected "soldier in the ranks" to convince the world and his fellow soldiers that the army is to be made the victim of a gigantic fraud through the instrumentality of its own officers.
I have no desire, in this connection, to inquire into the relative proportion of our soldiers in the field who belong to this or that political party. The question bears more directly upon the honor of volunteer officers of the State of New York; and I unhesitatingly call upon the army at large to bear mo out in the following proposi­tions: That the privilege of voting has always been most eagerly desired by the soldiers; that they have always availed themselves of it when extended; and that those upon whom it has not been conferred are anx­ious to avail themselves of it at the first moment practicable. And further: that the New York volunteers in the field are not in the least afraid that their rights in this regard, when granted, will be inter­fered with by their officers.
Only those who perfectly understand the character of the relations between the offi­cers and men of our armies, can know how indignantly the assertions put forth by "Engineer" will be scouted by the rank and file. His is the first voice of protest that I have heard from the army against enlarging the political sphere of the soldier, and may be correctly styled vox et praeterea
nihil. Good taste, if not correct discipline, might perhaps remind him that his slurs and insinuations against the administration which controls our armies and stands at their head, are unsoldierly and partizan; but these can more readily be forgiven by his comrade, than his sweeping misrepresentations of a subject which lies near the heart of every soldier.
Respectfully yours,
JAMES F. FITTS,
Captain 114th Regt., N. Y. Vols.

ANOTHER YOUNG SOLDIER GONE.
The Death of Captain Daniel C. Knowlton, of Cazenovia—A Life Given to Save the Nation's Life.
We had occasion, a day or two since, to chronicle the death of a heroic young man who, almost a lad in years, had calmly laid flown his life in the service of his country. A second instance of this patriotic devotion has just been brought to our notice. At the battle of Cedar Creek fell Captain Daniel C. Knowlton, at the early age of twenty. Captain Knowlton was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Knowlton, of Cazenovia, and nephew of Daniel P. Wood, Esq., of this city. He entered the 114th regiment of New York Volunteers as a Lieutenant, distinguished himself by bravery at the storming of Port Hudson, and was, in consequence of his heroism in that action, promoted to a Captaincy. His conduct as an officer, through his whole military career, merited and received the highest encomiums. Although he did not reach the legal age of manhood, yet his death can hardly be said to have been premature, for his brief existence was so crowded with noble deeds that they might have sufficed to fill an extended life-time with fame.
The following letter is written in connection with this subject, and is marked by such a spirit of patriotism that we venture to lay it before our readers:
CAZENOVIA, N. Y., NOV. 3, 1864.
D. P. Wood, Esq.:
DEAR SIR:—Your note of inquiry to Mr. Knowlton was received yesterday. In compliance with his request, I would reply that your fears therein expressed are a reality. Daniel laid his life on his country's altar at the battle of Cedar Creek, Va., October 19th. On the following Saturday (the 22d) the sad news was telegraphed from Utica by a friend there, who received it from New York. The next day his parents dispatched a man to recover his remains if possible.
During the following week they received a letter from Major Curtis, of the 114th New York, confirming the mournful news. He said that Daniel's company were well nigh gone, but he stood there loading and firing his musket when he fell with a musket ball in the head. While they were carrying him to the rear he died. He was buried on the field, but on Saturday the Major wrote he had been disinterred and sent to Winchester for embalming. Mr. Borden found him at Martinsburg, where he lay all packed ready to be sent home, but Mr. B. had him embalmed and his remains arrived last night.
As he lays there in the glory of his manhood that serene, composed, satisfied expression seems to rebuke the inconsolable grief of his stricken mother. The sublime grandeur of such a death, in such a cause, is glorious to me. It seems to me if my two sons who have been offered to their country had fallen, I should have been lifted into such an atmosphere of resignation as would absorb all earthly grief, leaving me a heavenly peace.
How consoling should be to his parents that they had so noble an offering for their country, and one who has done so grandly. His two years of heroic services are immeasurable when compared with ordinary life. How else could he have died to have left so imperishable a memory?
His funeral will take place on Saturday at two o'clock P. M.
Yours, with much respect,
AMELIA L. THATCHER.

Special Correspondence of Chronicle.
LETTERS FROM OUR SOLDIERS.
Letter from the 114th Regiment.
IN THE FIELD, NEAR HARRISONBURG, VA.,
September 26, 1864.
EDITORS CHENANGO CHRONICLE:—Just one week has elapsed since the great battle and victory near Winchester, of the 19th inst., and after a close pursuit of the flying enemy of more than seventy miles, Gen. Sheridan's army has halted for a brief rest. An opportunsty [sic] is now given me to furnish you with a description of the important part taken by our Regiment in this action, and to attempt to do justice to the glorious record which it has made. You will probably be furnished by others with complete lists of the killed and wounded, and with particulars of individual bravery on the field which I would gladly mention if time and space allowed. It has seemed to me that a comprehensive summary of what the 114th did in this engagement—how it fought, where, how long, and under what circumstances—must be of deep interest as well to the friends and relations of the gallant slain and wounded, as to the host of those who feel pride in the Regiment and its good name; and to a mention of these particulars you will permit me to confine myself. With the field at large I had nothing to do, but of that part of it held by the 114th, and of the action at that point, I can speak with almost entire accuracy.—Should the narrative grow lengthy under my hands, the deep interest of the subject must be my apology.
The battle of Winchester was fought in a northerly direction from the town of that name, some four miles from the turnpike road running to Berryville, and began at twelve o'clock, noon. The ground upon which it was fought was a succession of woods, clearings, and rolling intervals, with stone and rail fences crossing them. For two weeks previous to the fight, our army had lain in an intrenched [sic] camp, several miles cast of Berryville. Leaving it at three o'clock on the morning of the 19th, we moved across the turnpike and proceeded toward Winchester. Circumstances occurred to delay the 19th
Corps so that it did not reach the vicinity of the enemy until eleven o'clock; but in good time, however, for its share in the battle. Several batteries had been throwing shell from the head of the column during the march, the reports of which came back to the rear frequently and distinctly. Reaching a clearing, bordering a wood of unusual thickness, the corps was formed in order of battle under a heavy shelling from some artillery out of sight. Our Brigade moved through this wood in column by regiment, the 114th in advance. The 29th Maine had been sent farther to the right, and the 30th Massachusetts was in the rear guarding a wagon train; so that but two regiments followed ours—the 116th and 153d New York, in the order named. I mention these facts distinctly, as their bearing will presently be seen.
Our Regiment moved straight to the front, through a half-mile of dense woods and underbrush, and during the last quarter shells and bullets burst and whistled over and around it. The fire grew very annoying before we cleared the woods; several of the men were struck and disabled; Col. Per Lee's horse was wounded under him, and Maj. Curtis's instantly killed. But there was no sign of faltering or hanging back; the regiment bore itself right through the woods (which for the last three hundred yards projected in a triangle having clearings upon either side of it) and halted in the open space several rods beyond it. The order to commence firing was given, and a rapid and effective discharge of musketry was instantly opened. The men loaded and fired with the most perfect coolness, the officers animating and encouraging them, and for more than one hour their fire continued unslackened. All seemed to stand to their work with a will and determination to win.
But the sight that met our eyes barely two hundred yards across that clearing—who that was there can ever forget it? Three rebel battle-flags were tossed defiantly in the air from a line-of-battle apparently four times the length of our own, while the smoke of an incessant discharge of musketry and artillery welled away from the field. Two hundred yards is a small measure of ground, but when it is considered as the space separating two hostile lines; filled with screaming, bursting shells, and whizzing balls, and with all the demonism of a battle raging over it, it becomes fearfully narrowed. I had supposed it impossible that a more galling fire could be encountered than that which swept through our ranks before Port Hudson, but at Winchester our loss was proportionately greater by one-sixth. Not merely from our immediate front but from both flanks a murderous fire was poured upon us. It is my deliberate conviction that at this point the 114th withstood more than a whole Brigade. Of three hundred and fifty in action, one hundred and ninetywere killed and disabled, and the clothes, knapsacks and accoutrements of many of the survivors were found to be cut and torn by balls. The statistics of the war may well be challenged to produce so fright­ful a record of casualties as this.
For more than an hour this slaughter was endured with firmness, and then, to save his command from utter decimation or destruction, Maj. Curtis (Col. Per Lee having left the field, seriously wounded) gave the order to retire. The two other regiments in the meantime had formed one line some hundreds of yards in our rear, and were lying down in the cover of the woods when our crippled regiment came back, bearing its wounded, and facing about from time to time to send a volley back to the enemy. A poor remnant was rallied, on the colors and moved by the flank to the right of the 116th, ready to prolong the contest. The order was given, and the three regiments moved out of the woods and crossed the clearing on the double-quick with a yell of defiance to the rebel line, from which a furious fire burst out anew. A rail fence crossed this clearing, to the left of which, and much in advance, was the line of woods which the 114th had been compelled to abandon. Halting at this fence, the brigade lay down and opened fire For three hours this position was maintained unflinchingly, under a terrific rain of shells and bullets, with dead and dying lying thickly around. The brigade behaved nobly, gallantly; and, in spite of the severe ordeal to which it had been subjected for the last hour, the 114th did its full part in the work. I had intended, in writing this account, to avoid all mention of individuals, because all behaved well; but in speaking of this fight upon this second line, I cannot refrain from alluding to the noble death of 1st Lieut. Edward E. Breed, of Co. H. The color-bearer had been wounded on the first line, and Lieut. Breed carried the flag when the brigade moved forward to the fence. He was wounded mortally, in the breast, not a yard from me and carried to the rear.—Many, very many, had been stricken down beside me in death, or with painful wounds, but to him my attention had been particularly drawn. His conduct was gallant from first to last, and a brave, true heart grew still when he died. Peace to his ashes, and lasting honor to his memory!
After a lapse of two hours, it was plainly to be seen that the rebel fire was slackening. Their line had not advanced a foot from the first, from which fact I infer it was much cut up. But just at this time the cartridge-boxes were completely emptied, and it became necessary to fall back across the clearing into the edge of the wood, in order that the men might not be unnecessarily exposed while out of ammunition. The brigade retired in the very best order, took up a new position, re­ceived a fresh supply of cartridges, and again renewed its fire. For another hour it contin­ued the fight, while our men fell fast around us—one stern, terrible hour more of effort and exposure, and then Gen. Emory rode up to the line. I fancied that the veteran looked sadly at our shattered and wasted ranks, as he was told that this little handful represent­ed the 114th New York. "I will relieve you," he said, and we were at once withdrawn with the Brigade into the cover of the wood. The 8th Corps, which had not yet been in the action, was moved up past us; a stirring cheer burst from their long line, and the charge which ended the day's work followed. Our Brigade joined in the pursuit which was instantly commenced, and passed over the field. It was completely strewn with the dead and wounded of both sides, with arms, accoutrements, knapsacks, and all the horrible debris and wreck of the battle-field. A few shells from the retreating rebel batteries exploded in front of us, but the work had been done which sent the rebel army flying panic stricken through the streets of Winchester, and a cavalry charge near the town completed the rout. One hundred and twenty men were all of the 114th that were with its colors the following morning, and to-day there are less than one hundred and seventy available men present.
I will state here what I omitted to say in its proper place—that a portion of the 2d Division of our Corps had been repulsed in front of the first position of the 114th, and that a disorganized mass of stragglers fell back upon us. Many of these were rallied to our colors, and acted with us during the remainder of the day. The official report of Maj. Curtis, which I have been permitted to read, will, I think, corroborate every essential statement which I have made. When it is considered that the regiment fought for over an hour in an advanced position, without supports on either flank, and with a vastly superior force of the enemy, losing more than one half of its numbers—that it fell back only at the last moment, in the last extremity, and then carried all its wounded from the field—that it afterward renewed the fight with the Brigade, and continued to fight for four hours, on a footing with two regiments which had not before been seriously exposed—that through all this fiery ordeal it kept up its organization, carried its colors, and when the day was gained, joined in the pursuit—when these facts are remembered, I  think the judgment of our people at home upon the 114th must be, "It has done well."
I should apologize for occupying so much of your space, at the same time that I omit the services of the Regiment during the pursuit of the enemy up to this day. Some oth­er hand, I hope, will describe the stirring scenes of the 24th inst., when our regiment was on the advanced skirmish line, and again measured arms with the enemy; the thousand and one moving incidents of the battle-field, with its accumulation of horrors, its dead, its dying, it groans of pain and writhings of distress, and its appearance after the fight, with its burden of ghastly slain—these I have no heart to particularize. They are the in-separable attendants of every battle, but never have I been so deeply impressed with their painful aspects as in this, the greatest battle of the Shenandoah Valley.
The praises of the Regiment should perhaps be sounded by some other than one of its number, but in this statement I have merely repeated facts which are well known thro'out the entire Corps, and talked of by every camp fire. A copy of Gen. Dwight's congratulatory circular accompanies this letter, which please publish. Well as I have known the bravery of this Regiment, I know it now still better. Its reputation for unflinching courage under fire has been established beyond all cavil, and it has gained for itself a name of which we are all justly proud. Ours is the only Regiment in the Division complimented by the General for its work on the 19th.
A ragged sleeve, a twinge of the arm, and the remonstrances of the Doctor, remind me that I am not entirely whole from the fight, and that my pen must be laid aside. Allow me to remain,
Very truly yours, J. F. F.

CHENANGO AMERICAN.
Greene, Thursday, July 6, 1865.
Company E, 114th.
We give below the roster of Company E, 114th N. Y. V., as it existed at the time of its departure for the war in September, 1862. We also note names of men promoted by commission, (with the remarks of the registry thereto) and warrant, and give a list of names transferred, discharged, and deaths, adding such remarks as appear upon the Company Register in regard to those killed in battle.
Captain—Ransom Mcdonald.
1st Lieutenant—Nicholas A. Dederer.
2d Lieutenant—George G. Donnelly.
Sergeants—John C. Reynolds, Uriah Rorapaugh, John W. Toombs, Ephriam
Betts, William J. Rogers.
Corporals—Seymour C. Horton, Wm. W. Johnston, George N. Palmer, Austin D. Cable, Edwin C. Read, John C. Stoughton, George Williams, Daniel A. Tremain.
Privates—Ezra C. Adams, Henry Andrews, Andrew P. Aylesworth, Geo. W. Bodurtha, William A. Bolt, Otis G. Banks, Charles E. Bump, Smith Barnes, Wm. E. Corbett, Jack Chidester, Theodore Cable, Edmund L. Carter, George N. Chappel, John Campbell, Moses Delamater, Henry Davis, Sidney A. Delamater, James Dennis, Charles B. Davis, George O. Fitch, William A. Fuller, Christopher Grant, James W. Gilmore, Sophronus Hinman, Lewis Handy, Charles E. Hayward. William M, Horton, James S. Ireland, Isaac B. Jones, Russel A. Johnson, George W. Jones, C. Alfred Johnson, Andy Kinnier, Jeduthan Kendall, James H. Knickerbocker, William L. Lamon, William T. Marvin, Richard Marvin, David McBirney, Duncan McKellar, Francis McNeil, Horatio K. Mosher, Francis M. Mead, William Marvin, William W. Newby, Andrew H. Nichols, Henry W. Nutter, Wilberforce L. Pike, Charles M. Pittsley, Benjamin W. Pittsley, Charles E. Potter, Edward Post, Carroll Post, Preston E. Peck, David W. Pettis, Deloss Rowe, Jesse Rockwell, Peter Rogers, Lewis O. Robbins, Handford D. Rowe, Benjamin E. Rudolph, Chauncey Simmons, Edwin E. Salisbury, Frank M. Skillman, J. H. Skillman, Martin H. Skillman, John Starkweather, Jos. S. Smith, Aaron H. Seward, John W. Sutliff, Andrew Sawyer, Chester P. Tryon, Zenas H. Tarbell, Wm. H. Truax, Albert H. Teachout, Moses Tuttle, Hector S. Vanderburg, Wm. H. White, Horace J. Wood, Artemas J. Webb, Emery A. Williams, Calvin B. Weld, Freeman S. Wedge, Robert Wedge, Reed Yale,
William Rogers, Gilbert Rogers, Albert Rogers, Lewis G. Mosher, Henry Keach, Wm. H. Spencer, Albert Salisbury, Wm. McNeil.
Transferred—Moses Tuttle, Deloss Rowe, George Williams, Preston E. Peck, Joseph H. Skillman, James H. Knickerbocker, H. J. Wood, B. E. Rudolph, Henry Keach, Gilbert Rogers, Wm. Rogers.
Discharged—Wilberforce L. Pike, James S. Ireland, Horatio K. Mosher, Geo. N. Palmer, Chester P. Tryon, Wm. H. Truax, Russell A. Johnson, Aaron H. Seward, Charles E. Potter, Seymour C. Horton, John C. Reynolds, Freeman S. Wedge, Benjamin F. Pittsley, Chauncey Simmons, Uriah Rorapaugh, Ephriam Betts, Charles A. Johnson, Andy Kinnier, Jack Chidester, William J. Rogers, Carroll Post, Lewis G. Mosher, Daniel A. Tremain, William Marvin, John C. Stoughton, Edward Post, Sidney A. Delamater, Wm. H. Spencer, Wm. W. Newby, Charles E. Hayward, Emery O. Williams, Edmund L. Carter.
Deserters.—Smith Barnes, from Bal­timore. Not heard from.
William Marvin, Dec. 16, 1862, at Hilton Head, S. C. Charges removed by command of Maj. General Augur.
James W. Gilmore, July 26, 1864, from Washington, D. C. Charges re­moved by command of Maj. General Augur.
Missing—Albert Rogers, since 1864, at Grand Ecore, La. Supposed to have died on the march.

OFFICIAL   REGISTER   OF   THE   COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Ransom Macdonald, Captain, Aug. 13, 1862. Resigned and Honorably Discharged, at Baltimore, Md., Nov. 6, 1862.
Nicholas A. Dederer, 1st Lieutenant, Aug. 13, 1862. Promoted to Captain vice Macdonald, resigned, Nov. 6, 1862. Resigned and honorably discharged at Natchitoches, La., March 31, 1864.
George G. Donnelly, 2d Lieutenant, Aug. 13, 1862. Commissioned as 1st Lieuienant [sic], Nov. 6, 1862, vice Dederer, promoted, but never mustered. Died from injuries received in discharge of his duty, at Brashaer City, La., April 26th, 1863.
Uriah Rorapaugh, 1st Lieutenant, July 20, 863. Promoted from 1st Sergeant, vice Dederer promoted.—Muster to date from Sept. 1, 1863. Wounded three times at Port Hudson. Participated in the engagements of Bisland, Port Hudson, Sabine Cross Roads, Pleasant Hill, Cane River, Mansura, Opequan, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek. Promoted to Captain of Co. H, March 14, 1865.
Ellas P. Pellet, Captain, May 9th, 1864. Promoted from 1st Lieutenant and Adjutant. Muster to date from July 1, 1864. Assumed command of Company E, July 26, 1864.—Participated in engagements of Fort Bisland, Sabine Cross Roads, Pleasant Hill, Cane River, Mansura, Opequan, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. March 27, 1865. Promoted from 1st Sergeant vice Rorapaugh promoted.—Muster to date from March 27, 1865.—Participated in engagements of Bisland, Port Hudson, Sabine Cross Roads, Pleasant Hill, Cane River, Mansura, Opequan, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. Captured at Port Hudson, June 14, 18633; recaptured July 9, 1863. Captured at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; escaped same day.

OFFICIAL REGISTER OF PROMOTIONS BY WARRANT.
William L. Laman, Jeduthan P. Kendall, Preston E. Peck, Christopher Grant, Calvin B. Weld, William E. Corbett, Henry Andrews, Charles M. Pittsley,
Charles B. Davis, Zenas Tarble, William McNiel, Moses E. Delamater, George O. Fitch.
[The above are names taken from the list of privates, since the original organization of the Company.]

LIST OF DEATHS.
Albert H. Teachout, at Baltimore, Sept., 1862, of typhoid fever.
Martin K. Skillman, in Gulf of Mexico, Jan. 1, 1863, of typhoid fever.
Otis G. Banks, at Quarantine, N. O., Jan., 1863, of small pox.
Chas. R. Bump, at Bayou Boeuf, March 27, 1863, of typhoid fever.
Lewis O. Bobbins, at Brashaer City, April 11, 1863, of typhoid fever.
Hector S. Vanderburgh, at Fortress Monroe, June 10, 1863, of diptheria.
Robert Wedge, at Baton Rouge, July 28, 1863, of chronic diarrhea and wounds received at Port Hudson.
Henry W. Nutter, in Barracks U. S. Hospital, N. O., Sept. 24, 1863, of chronic diarrhea.
John Campbell, at New Iberia, Oct. 26, 1863, of remittent fever.
Andrew P. Aylesworth, Nov. 3, 1863, at Marine Hospital, N. O.
Lieut. G. G. Donnelly, at Brashaer City, April 26, 1863, of injuries received while in the discharge of his duties.
John Starkweather, at New Orleans, Sept. 1863, of chronic diarrhea.
Andrew J. Sawyer, at New York, April 28, 1864, of chronic diarrhea.
Joseph S. Smith, at New Orleans, May 6, 1864, of wounds received at
Sabine Cross Roads, April 8, 1864.
David W. Pettis, at Annapolis, Sept. 13, 1864.
Corporal Wm. R. Corbett, killed while manfully discharging his duty at the battle of Opequan. As a man and comrade he was ever genial and pleasant; as a soldier, none braver ever faced the enemy.
William M. Horton, killed while manfully discharging his duty at Winchester, Sept. 19, 2864.
Francis McNeil, Calvin B. Weld, Francis M. Skillman, and Sergt. John W. Toombs were each wounded at Winchester, Sept. 19, 1894, and subsequently died from the effects of their wounds. Of each of these it is said: "Always prompt and faithful in the discharge of his duty, he died honored and respected by his Company.
William W. Johnston, killed at Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864.
William A. Fuller, wounded at Port Hudson and at Winchester, and killed at Cedar Run, Oct. 19, 1864. Always a good soldier.

COMPANY K.—This gallant Company of the 114th, received a handsome reception upon their arrival home at Cazenovia. They were met by Civic Societies and marched into town where thousands greeted them with cheers and other demonstrations of joy. Rev. A. L. Eddy in behalf of the citizens, made an eloquent and appropriate Address, and the "Girl I left behind me Society" furnished a bountiful supper. Every thing passed off pleasantly. The Cazenovia Republican gives a lengthy account of the reception.

Chenango American.
Greene, Thursday, July 6, 1865.
The 114th to the People.
NORWICH, June 19, 1865.
The scarred veterans of the One Hundred and Fourteenth New York returned from the severe conflicts of a sterner life, from the depths of overflowing hearts thank you, citizens of Chenango, for your glad welcome, for your ovations so grand and magnificent, for your greetings so completely overwhelming.
Thoughts of coming home again and meeting once more after so long and perilous an absence the dear friends, the loved ones and the little ones so long left behind, have been our support at all times, in all places and under circumstances the most trying. It has been to us too a source of consolation, beyond the power of language to express, that amid all our trials and hardships, our exposures and dangers, in order to perpetuate this glorious Union and transmit unimpaired to posterity our precious inheritance we have had the encouragement and support of the good people at home, have never been forgotten, especially by the true men, the fair women and the lovely daughters of Chenango and Madison. The heart and sympathies of the people have been with us. In their morning and evening devotions we know and have felt that their supplications have daily ascended to the Father of Mercies, to the God of battles, that we might be preserved amid the calamities and dangers incident to the soldier's life; and at length having accomplished our mission, having conquered a peace, crowned with glory and honor and blessings, we might be permitted to return to our families and homes. Your petitions have been a shield above us—a protection around about us.
Beset by temptation on every hand, and when the Syren song has allured to vice, thoughts of a mother, or a sister, or a faithful companion at home, or a letter perhaps fresh from the family fire-side, yet moistened with a tear, breathing words of confidence, fidelity and love, not unfrequently have restrained the thoughtless and the wayward and brought back the wonderer to the ways of virtue, to the path of peace.
And when enveloped in difficulties and dangers, seen and unseen, your blessings have fallen upon us like the gentle rain from Heaven upon the parched and thirsty earth—like the dew-drops of the night upon the drooping leaves and flowers—and when death stared us in the face and taken our companions from us, whether from the smoke of the stormy battle-field or from the hospital by wounds or lingering disease, your prayers have sustained them and us and accompanied the spirit of the dying soldier to the heaven of eternal rest.
There have ever been exercised toward us the same deep interest, the same anxiety for our welfare, the same devotion and tender regard, that were seen and manifested when of a Saturday afternoon in the month of early Autumn, nearly three years ago, we moved from our rendezvous with solemn step, yet with firm resolve, with determined yet with throbbing, aching hearts, and eyes like yours, suffused in tears, and launched our inexperienced bark upon the troubled waters.
Whether upon the quiet, sluggish stream or upon the heaving, surging waters; whether upon the barren shores of desolate islands, or upon the blooming verdant plain; whether in the swamps and morasses, or in the rolling, fertile valley; whether on the march, in the bivouac, or on the "tented field;" whether on the picket post, on the skirmish line, or in the battle's van, not a day nor an hour has passed that we have not shared your anxious thoughts or been objects of your hopes and fears. And, while we have kept bright the musket and scabbard, you my countryman, and especially my fair countrywoman have kept bright the golden links in the chain of social life, till they have vibrated to love like that of angels and you now can say to man and time and death, "We defy you to break them."
Prayers uttered in tears in the holy sanctuary, around the family altar and in the secret chamber, have been graciously answered. Hope, long deferred, has been realized [sic]. Faith has received its own precious reward. The joy of all hearts has culminated in the festivities and rejoicings of our "welcome home." We said the joy of all hearts; would to GOD, in truth we could say as much. This is a solemn day. It is a day of sadness as well as rejoicing; a day of mourning as well as of thanksgiving. The army of the dead it is said is greater than that of the living. We need not ask where are the missing ones—the stalwart men, the athletes, the gifted youth, the noble boys, the patriotic and the brave, who went out with us to return no more forever? They filed in long line with us from our encampment through the streets of this village, with hopes as high as ours, and received with us the benedictions of grateful, loving hearts and a parting blessing. The sorrowful faces, the tearful eyes, the evidence of grief, this day witnessed, tell the mournful and impressive story.
As we march back to expectant towns   and are welcomed with open arms, we miss you bright-eyed eager boy, full of hope and of promise; we miss you, sturdy, and battle-scarred veteran of the Union; we miss the sun-burned and care worn face, with lines deepening upon it; the eager glance of many waiting eyes at home miss the faultless form that gladdened a mother's fond heart; they miss a kind father or a loving brother, and in bitterness of spirit turn fearfully away. Alas, the anguish of such waiting, when waiting is in vain. "If he had but lived to come back with them—even scarred and wounded—if he had come back!" Many have fallen—gloriously fallen! They sleep upon the mountains and in the valley, where the tramp of armed men, the roar of canon, and the shriek of battle can awake them no more. They rest in church yards, in hospital grounds, in forest and in field. Their bones are bleaching upon burning sands in desolate places and lie beside the bank of the grand water.
When the sea shall give up its dead in response to the trumpet call, summoning all to appear and answer to the muster roll in the last great day, some will come forth. Some who went out with us to do battle for their country's liberty, have returned upon their shields. A noble struggle—in some instances brief—amid the tempest of war, closed their earthly battles.
The gallant KNOWLTON, the heroic BURCH and BREED, THURBER and LEWIS, yes, and the conscientious GILBERT who died early in the strife from disease, although they rest in home bought grounds, sleep in soldier's graves. So if others who filled less conspicuous, but no less honorable or dangerous position, among whom may be named a MORSE and WEAVER, SKINNER and SKILLMAN, a CRAMPHIN and JACKSON, a TOMPSON and a TEW. Having with others cheerfully laid down their lives that their country might live, they have gone to meet their reward, where war and rumors of war no more disturb nor alarm.
Although dead, they still live! They live in influence and example—live, fresh and green in the recollections of this fearful contest for a nation's life—in the remembrance of surviving com­rades, in the depths of sorrowing hearts. Their spirits hover over the scene of this day, whispering words of consolation and comfort to the berea­ved, of cheer and encouragement to brave companions, who fought and bled with them side by side. Long shall we miss and mourn them. When we meet, as I trust we often may, to commemorate their services and valo­rous deeds; when we gather around our fire-sides, to speak of their virtues, to bear in remembrance their goodness and sorrow for their loss, it will be with a solemn conviction that that loss is a personal one, that it enters our own households, disturbs our own family circles and our most intimate family relations. Yet is our native land dearer to our hearts, dearer because of their sacrifice and their blood. When Liberty seeks to reward her fallen heroes, now that the strife is ended, she will wreathe for their brows garlands of unfading glory. Though the flowers that shall blossom over their graves will blush for the guilt of their Destroyer, yet shall they be redolent with the perfume of their patriotic devotions.
One whose name has not been mentioned, and we regret mention cannot be made of all, has not been forgotten. Frank, generous, warm-hearted and true-hearted, with a face beaming with intelligence and open as the day, it is not surprising that he has hosts of friends and was greatly beloved by all. Col. SMITH had not, 'tis true, received a military education. Yet, with the energy of his earnest nature, after prayerfully deciding what was duty, in answer to the call of his country, he threw his soul into the world of fitting himself for his responsible position, and he early manifested those peculiar gifts which fitted him to influence and command. It is not necessary to claim for him qualities which he did not possess. It is not asserted that he was a great military man—a great strategist. Indeed, time and opportunity were not permited [sic] him to develope [sic] his capabilities, or the power and extent of his military genius. Others, we know, not more promising or conspicuous in the beginning, have acquired national renown. In the varying and changing fortunes of war, in the pulling down of one and the setting up of another we had marked out for him, had he lived, a brilliant career and great success.—That he was a good disciplinarian cannot be questioned. Prompt obedience to orders, which is one of the brightest qualities of a true soldier, whether in the rank or high in command, was regarded by him almost as a religious duty, and enforced with equal exactness upon the men of his command. When off duty, with all the tenderness of his lovng [sic] nature, with the solicitude and anxiety of a father or a brother, he went among the men, extending aid and sympathy in all their troubles and trials. When ill, as he was on several occasions in Louisiana, from the effect of a Southern climate, the deepest anxiety was ever manifested for his safety and welfare. When mangled and bleeding in the trenches of Port Hudson, almost within the gates of the citadel, we well remember how brave hearts were grieved, and when dying in the hospi­tal constructed of trees and boughs, many a returned veteran will remem­ber how the spot was thronged day and night by the men and officers of the "old Brigade" which he led in that fatal charge, extending their sympathies and giving expressions of sorrow. When the sad news of his death reached this home and this community you know better than we the deep feeling here produced. The spontaneous outpouring of every heart in a community is the highest panegyric that can be offered to departed worth. No higher econiums could be bestowed upon any man, than the sincerity of the popular manifestation of esteem over his grave. No man, probably, who has ever lived in this community died more universally beloved, or was more universally mourned. No obsequies were more impressively observed. He, too, sleeps in a soldier's grave! Here in this beautiful valley, with which his name is so inseperably associated, our first beloved commander lies sleeping. Around him the "everlasting hills" keep eternal guard and the deep and unwavering love of his stricken family, who "refuse to be comforted because he is not," watch with tender devotion his sacred dust. Cycles may roll their untiring rounds, generations may pass from the stage of action, the works of man may crumble and decay, but the name of him who led us forth to battle will still be revered and honored. And when the last trump shall sound, and the dim light of the resurrection morn shall break away the gloom that overshadows the world, Chenango, whose pure heart beats but for God and duty, will be found watching at the portals of his tomb!
From my hasty and necessarily imperfect allusions to the dead, it must not be inferred that the living, those who have withstood through long years the infections and exposures of the camp, the fatigues of the weary march, the carnage and desolation of the bat­tle-field, and the brunt of the stormy shock, are not entitled to gratitude and eternal regard. The bullet marks up­on the persons and the tortuous course of the fated missiles, which in a mirac­ulous manner have saved the destruc­tion of life-sustaining tissues and the deadly mangling of arteries, tell of the hair-breadth escape. Some come back with empty and useless sleeves and bodies maimed—and all come back he­roes; but the living are with us, the spared monuments of the amazing goodness and mercy of God; and can answer for themselves. We cannot re­hearse at length the services of this noble regiment or dwell upon its trials—its victories and triumphs. Its his­tory is an integral part of the history of the rebellion for the past three years. It forms a woof in the web, a link in the chain, which binds and grapples it to the affection and grati­tude of the country in a bright and happy future. Its battered shields and tattered banners, and pierced and raveled guidons, tell of the close contact, of the terrible struggle with the inveterate foe, of "the fierce thunder-storm and iron hail," of hotly contested battle-fields.
It was baptised [sic] at Fort Bisland. In the forty days' siege and investment of Port Hudson it rendered its name immortal! With the First Division of the Nineteenth Corps it turned the tide of an inglorious defeat at Sabine Cross Roads, and saved the army in Louisiana. At Pleasant Hill, Cane River, Mansura and Yellow Bayou it acquitted itself well—did nobly. In the severer trials of the Shenandoah it more than maintained the reputation it had previously acquired. On the 19th of September, at the battle of Opequan, for upwards of half an hour, entirely unsupported and alone, subjected to a galling front and enfilading fire, it held in check a whole rebel line, for some minutes withholding its own fire for fear of injury to friends, from the  intervening  tide of our own men retreating.
Here it was that PER LEE, TURNER, BOCKEE, LONGWELL and SEARLE were severely wounded and BREED fell. One hundred and eighty-eight men and officers in killed and wounded, being three-fifths of the number it took into action, were the glorious offering of that eventful day.
At Cedar Creek a month later it bravely resisted the surprise and night attack of the audacious EARLY, and when the broken and disorganized ranks were gathered up the enlinement rectified, and the tide of battle changed, the army being reinforced by only one man, it entered the van in hot pursuit of the flying foe.
The scars which our brave men carry upon their persons are their own enduring mementoes, more precious and honorable than the insignia of greatness, the fading wealth of Kings or the ephemeral crowns of honor. A grateful and discriminating public will do justice to the valor of her devoted sons, award the meed of praise to the living—commemorate the virtues and services of her heroic dead.
Upon the scroll of honor as with the pen of a diamond will be written in characters of living light, "Well done good and faithful servants" The work of the sword is at an end. We have an end of strategy and sieges and fortifications.
There is an end of campaigns and marches and battles, and of consequent carnage and desolation. The American Rebellion, conceived in wicked men's hearts and hatched in the nest of treason, has found a fitting finale, or soon will, in the halter. The rebellion, as an armed institution has at length found "the last ditch!" The rebellion as a military contrivance has passed into history. Our battle-fields become pilgrim-shrines, and the schemes of master minds belong to the fire-side and the romance. The war is over! Our work is done, our mission is ended, and amid the plaudits and welcome of a grateful people we return to you to-day, comparatively a "feeble remnant," to live with you, and die with you, and to go forth to war no more forever. We beat our implements of warfare into implements of husbandry. Having acquired martial renown we come back to plough and pruning hook, to our accustomed avocations and the pursuits of peace. Some have feared that we were drifting upon despotism because of the exercise of military power—some have taken alarm lest we were becoming a nation of warriors. Four or five years have demonstrated to the foes of the Republic, at home and abroad, to the enemies of free institutions everywhere, that we are a nation of warriors! We have learned the art of war as well as the arts of peace. We are a nation of warriors, who propose to spin, and weave, and plant, and sow, and reap, and hammer, and at the same time protect the "old Flag," the flag of our country and the flag of our fathers, whether upon the sea or upon the land, and keep the peace of the American Continent to the end of time. We do not come to bring you peace or the glad tidings of its near approach. We come to enjoy with you the blessed boon, the glorious fruition rendered an hundred fold more precious because of the sacrifice it has cost to procure it.
And to-day, as we set up our banners anew as in the name of our God, without hypocrisy or dissimulation, we inscribe upon them, "Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable.” It now remains for us, my countrymen, to heal as far as possible the wounds which wicked war has made; to help the helpless and the maimed, to comfort the bereaved and pour into the wounded broken heart the oil of consolation. Rejoicing ever­more in a peace enduring while time shall last, and in the hope and assurance that no deluge of secession will ever again endanger the liberties of the people or the stability of our na­tion, let us in heart and soul adopt the poet's invocation:

"Now, Father lay thy healing hand
In mercy on our stricken land;         
Oh! lead its wanderers to the fold,
And be its Shepherd as of old.

"So shall our Nation's song ascend
To Thee, our Ruler, Father, Friend,
While Heaven's wide arch resounds again
With peace on earth, good will to men."

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: December 2, 2009
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/114thInf/114thInfCWN.htm

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