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127th Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

PRESENTATION TO COLONEL GURNEY'S REGIMENT.
The Monitor, commanded by Colonel Gurney, arrived in this city from their encampment at 6 o'clock yesterday morning, and marched up Broadway to No. 180 East Twelfth street, where they were presented with a beautiful flag; a gift of Mrs. Charles L. Stickney. The presentation speech was made by United Stated District Attorney Delafield Smith, and was responded to by Colonel Gurney. The regiment then marched down Broadway en route to their encampment, their excellent marching and fine, soldierly appearance being the remark of all. Colonel Gurney has every reason to be proud of the men he is about to lead into active service. On passing our office the Monitors gave three rousing cheers for the Herald.
The 127th Regiment were at last reports, at Fortress Monroe awaiting transports for Morris Island, S. C. They have recently been paid off.
We learn that a report has been circulated here that five of the Huntington boys in the 127th Reg. (Monitor) had deserted; that they had been arrested, one of them shot, and the other four to be; A number of letters have been received here since this report has been circulated, but no mention was made of any such occurrence, and we have reason to believe it is false in every respect, and only gotten up for effect in these times of excitement.
The only possible foundation for the story is from the fact that a deserter was shot in the presence of the Division of which the 127th forms a part, on the 1st inst., at Greenwich, Va. His name was Bradford Butler, and he was not only not a Huntington boy, but did not belong to the 127th Reg.

MONITORS.
HEAD-QUARTERS, 127TH REGT., N. Y. S. V.,
CAMP GURNEY, CLOUD'S MILLS, VA., March 21, 1863.
At a meeting of the members of Company C, 127th New York Volunteers, on the morning of March 2lst, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, God, in his infinite wisdom, has taken from us our late brother in arms, JOHN W. GARRISON; therefore, be it
Resolved, That the Company has lost a good friend and soldier; one who, while with us, we had ever found honorable and straightforward in all his dealings.
Resolved, That while we bow in humble submission to the Almighty's Will, we would offer our sincere condolence and sympathy to his parents and friends.
Resolved, That a copy of these proceedings be transmitted to his parents, and published in the New YORK SUNDAY MERCURY.
ALONZO W. FISK, Captain
A. S. WASHBURNE, Orderly.

WOUNDED AT GETTYSBURG.—Rev. J. B. Davis, who went to war as Chaplain of the Black Horse cavalry, which was organized in this city and mustered out of the service at Washington, afterwards raised a company of volunteers, and led them as Captain. From Captain he was chosen Major of the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh New York regiment. He has been in nearly all the Potomac and Rappahannock battles, but at Gettysburg was so disabled as to be obliged to go home to Baldwinsville, N. Y., to recover from his wounds. He was first shot in the arm at Gettysburg at the head of his troops, but he bravely went on without minding it, transferring his sword to his left hand, when a ball passed through his jaw, cutting off one of the small arteries in his neck. He has proved himself a brave soldier, and we hope he will speedily recover. He was a graduate of Williams College, and as a Baptist clergyman has officiated many times in the churches of Rev. Dr. Baldwin and Rev. Dr. Sheldon, in this city.

New-York Daily Tribune
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1862.
DEPARTURE OF THE ONE-HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT.
Col. Wm. Gurney of the 127th U. S. V. left Wednesday with his regiment for Washington. This fine regiment was first organized July 22, 1862, and in one month from that date was fully completed. The Monitors so widely and favorably known, comprising as they do young and active men of the best moral character, are well represented, having in the regiment seven companies of well drilled and efficient men. Of course the future is uncertain, but if we can trust to appearances, we should most decidedly express our confidence that Col. Wm. Gurney and his regiment of Monitors will make their mark when occasion shall demand them to stand on the battle-field to uphold their rights and their country's honor.
Capt. Wm. Howland, the gentlemanly and efficient officer of Co. A, is now recruiting at No. 308 Broadway—store of Messrs. Fowler & Wells—for the regiment. Those of our young men who are desirous of going forth to sustain their country in this her hour of peril, but who fear the demoralizing influence of camp life, need no longer stand aside from the path of right, honor and duty. We cordially invite all such to call on Capt. Howland, who will cheerfully give all necessary information regarding this splendid regiment. The following is a list of the officers:
Colonel, Wm. Gurney; Lieut.-Colonel. Stewart L. Woodford; Major, Ed. H. Little; Adjutant, John L. Little; Quartermaster, Albert M, Bradshaw; Surgeon, Geo. R. Cutter; Assistant Surgeon, Elbert Rowland; Chaplain, Rev. Eben Francis, D. D.
Company A—Capt. Wm. Howland; 1st Lieut., H. James Weston; 2d Lieut., James F. Haviland.
Company B—Capt., Geo. W. Cooper: 1st Lieut., John Bogert; 2d Lieut., John Osborne.
Company C—Capt., Cornelius D. Cooper; 1st Lieut., Alonzo W. Fisk; 2d Lieut., Horace H. Grardner,
Company D—Capt., Frank D. Smith; lst Lieut., E. W. Schauffler; 2d Lieut., C. A. Benjamin.
Company E.—Captain, Jas. W. Gunney; 1st Lieutenant, Hewlet J. Long; 2d Lieutenant, Geo. S. Sammis.
Company F.—Captain, Jos. Cook; 1st Lieutenant--Wm. L. Conant; 2d Lieutenant, Wm. B. De...
Company G.--captain, Edmund S. Huffy; 1st Lieutenant, S. A. Hull; 2d Lieutenant--John L. Gardner.
Company H.--Captain, Oliver E. Vail; 1st Lieutenant, Zebulon H. Brower.
Company I.--Captain, Richard Allison; 1st Lieutenant, Burdell Dennison; 2d Lieutenant, H. L. Cog...
Company K.--Captain, A. De Bois; 1st Lieutenant, John W. Raynor; 2d lieutenant, Chas P. ....

COLONEL CONK'S SECOND SENATORIAL DISTRICT REGIMENT.
The above regiment has been almost entirely recruited in Brooklyn, and reflect much credit upon that city w... .... upon to do active service. Great care has been exercised in recruiting, so that none but men of muscle and respectability might be attached to it. There are several cases of individual patriotism which might be mentioned in connection with the organization of this corps. Some of our most respectable and wealthy citizens have become attached to it, and thrown up position and emolument for the arduous service of active campaigning.
Mr. Charles A. Murray, a young man, whose father at present holds a high position in the United States Navy, and who formerly acted as master's mate on board the Macedonian, has volunteered in Captain Henry Dawson's company of Monitors, at present attached to the regiment. Mr. Murray, being desirous of meeting enemies of his country as rapidly as possible, has selected the army as his future field of action in preference to the navy, where he might have obtained an easier and more exalted position. Such examples of individual patriotism are worthy of emulation.

THE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVENTH NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS—THEIR RECEPTION.
This regiment was raised under the three year call of 1862. It was recruited in about two months by General W. Gurny, formerly a Captain in the Sixty-fifth regiment New York Volunteers. A large part of the regiment is from Long Island, the remainder mostly from New York city. It was mustered into the United States service at Staten Island, on the 8th of September, 1862, and two days later left for Washington, and was assigned to the defences of Washington, under General Heintzelman, General Abercrombie commanding the division and General Gurney the brigade.
In the following April the brigade was transferred to the defences of Suffolk, Va., under General Peck. Thence, a month later, it went to West Point, Va., under General Keyes, General Gordon commanding the division. Thence to Yorktown and up the peninsula as far as White House. Returned to Yorktown and embarked July 10, 1863, for Washington. Four days later joined the Eleventh corps at Hagerstown, Md., and continued with it to Warrenton Junction. Embarked at Alexandria, August 8, and proceeded to South Carolina, landing on Folly Island, S. C., August 18. The regiment picketed opposite James Island from August to the following April, and then went to Morris Island and participated in the various movements against Charleston during the year 1864. It remained in front of Charleston till October 21, when it moved to Beaufort. On the 29th of November it joined the expedition against the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, under Generals Potter and Hatch. It took a very prominent part in the battle of Honey Hill, near Grahamsville, S. C., on the 30th of November, 1864, and in the engagements of the 6th and 9th of December, 1864, at Deveaux Neck, S. C., and also in the skirmish of the 29th of December, at the same place. The Coast division, of which it formed a part, performed very important service as a co-operating column for General Sherman, in his movement against Savannah and Charleston. Reaching Charleston a few days after its evacuation, the regiment was detailed, by order of General Sherman, for permanent city garrison, on account of its good character, and Colonel Gurny, now brevet brigadier general, was appointed permanent post commander, remaining in command of the city up to the time of the regiment coming North to be mustered out.
The regiment went out about one thousand strong, with its full complement of officers. It returns with twenty-five officers and five hundred and thirty men.
The following is a list of the commissioned officers of the regiment:—
Field and Staff—Colonel Wm. Gurny; Brevet Brigadier General; Lieutenant Colonel Edward H. Little, Major Frank K. Smith; Surgeon George R. Cutter, M. D.; Assistant Surgeon Charles B. Dayton, M. D.; Chaplain Samuel B. Willis; Adjutant, First Lieutenant Garrit F. Eaton; Quartermaster, First Lieutenant Wm. H. Dodge. Company A--Captain John L. Little, First Lieutenant George Prouly.
Company B--Captain Edward W. Schauffler, First Lieutenant Hampden Waldron.
Company C--Captain Alonzo W. Fisk, First Lieutenant Augustus S. Bodine.

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE. THE HOMEWARD MARCH.
Formal Reception of the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh New-York Regiment -- Splendid Collation — Good Speeches and Singing—Interesting News to Those Awaiting the Paymaster—Bounties—Notice to the One Hundred and Thirty-second Regiment—No Fresh Arrivals Yesterday.
The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Regiment of New-York, familiarly known as the "Monitor Regiment," and of whose arrival a brief notice appeared in THE TIMES of Saturday, was given a formal, yet hearty welcome by the friends of the regiment, at the armory of the Seventh Regiment, Saturday afternoon. Good speeches, a splendid dinner and fine singing and music comprised the interesting exercises of the day, which were as may be supposed, a perfect success.
The spacious armory or drill room, over Tompkins' Market, was neatly laid out with four long tables, lengthwise, and one placed across the room at the head of the others. These tables appeared to good advantage, with their nice white covers, glistening glasses, and shining plates and dishes. Along the walls stood the stacks of muskets carried by the members of the regiment through many a hot battle and wearisome march. The dinner, or collation, was gotten up by Mr. ISAAC HALL, No. 768 Third-avenue, at the direction of a committee appointed by the numerous friends of the regiment, and consisted of sandwiches in every known variety, bread and butter, and cold meats in all the various styles. Several barrels of delicious iced lemonade and any quantity of ice cream, with cakes and tarts in abundance. At 4 o'clock the regiment was marched in and the men took up position along the different tables, eager and well-prepared for the attack soon to commence. The Committee of Arrangements, consisting of Hon. D. S. Coddington, J. W. Farr, Geo. W. Beale, W. J. Valentine, W. H. Christie, A. L. Northrup, W. Wade, S. S. Palmer, R. S. Cole, Isaac Hall, Rufus S. King, Capt. W. Howland and D. Jacobus soon got matters in working shape, and with the help of thirty sable waiters and the kind assistance of several lady friends the tables were declared ready. Then grace having been said, the gallant "monitors" fell to with a will. During the progress of the dinner the band of the Seventh Regiment discoursed excellent music as the boys of the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh investigated the mysteries of the "spread." We need not say that they enjoyed the kind treat thus provided, as having just arrived in a government transport from Charleston, the contrast between the fare on board ship, and the groaning board before them, must have been great.
After dinner, and when the clatter of crockery and the jingling of glass-ware had ceased, the returning song written by Mrs. Lydia Baxter, expressly for the One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh Regiment was sung by Mr. ROBERTS, leader of the Thirteenth-street Church, assisted by a host of willing amateur voices. ETHAN ALLEN, Esq., then came forward and gave utterance to a few words of welcome to the regiment, in which he referred to the history of the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh, and of its varied and extensive field of duty and of service.
Rev. Mr. ARMITAGE and Dr. Burchard also addressed the gathering of veterans and home friends with good effect and amid great applause. The cheering of the brave boys in the army blue was quite a feature, and the appearance of the command was very fine. Their uniforms were all good and new, and the equipments were in the most perfect order. The proceedings at length broke up about 6 o'clock, when everybody departed more than satisfied at the great success obtained and the kindly feelings expressed.
The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Regiment was raised under the three-year call of 1862. It was recruited in about two months by Gen. W. GURNEY, formerly Captain in the Sixty-fifth Regiment New York Volunteers. A large part of the regiment is from Long Island, the remainder mostly from New-York City. It was mustered into the United States service at Staten Island, on the 8th of September, 1862, and two days later left for Washington, when it was assigned to the defences of Washington, under Gen. Heintzelman, Gen Abercrombie commanding the division and Col. Gurney the brigade.

In April, 1863, the brigade was transferred to the defences of Suffolk, Va., under Gen. PECK, and in July the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh joined the Eleventh Corps at Hagerstown, Md., and continued with it to Warrenton Junction, fighting with marked success at Gettysburgh. Embarked at Alexandria, August 8, and proceeded to South Carolina, landing on Folly Island, Aug. 18. It remained in front of Charleston till Oct. 21, when it moved to Beaufort On the 29th November it joined the expedition against the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, under Gens. POTTER and HATCH. The regiment took a very prominent part in the battle of Honey Hill, near Grahamsville, S. C., on the 30th of November, 1864, and in the engagements of the 6th and 9th of December, 1864, at Devaux Neck, S. C.; and also in the skirmish of the 29th of December, at the same place. The coast division, of which it formed a part, performed very important service as assaulting column for Gen. SHERMAN, in his movement against Savannah and Charleston. Reaching Charleston a few days after its evacuation, the regiment was detailed, by order of Gen. SHERMAN, for permanent city garrison, remaining in command of the city up to the time of the regiment coming North to be mustered out.
The regiment went out about one thousand strong, with its full complement of officers. It returns with twenty-five officers and five hundred and thirty men.
The following is a list of the commissioned officers of the regiment:
Field and Staff—Colonel, W. GURNEY, Brevet Brigadier General; Lieutenant-Colonel, Edward H. Little; Major, Frank K. Smith; Surgeon, George M. Cutter, M. D.; Assistant Surgeon, Charles B. Daytou, M. D.; Chaplain, Samuel B. Willis; Adjutant, First Lieut. Garrit F. Eaton; Quartermaster, First Lieut. Wm. H. Lodge.
Line Officers—
Co. A--Captain, John L. Little; First Lieutenant, George Prouly.
Co. B—Captain, Edward M. Schaunler; First Lieutenant, Hampden Waldron.
Co. C—Captain, Alonzo W. Fish; First Lieutenant Augusnts S. Bodine. Co. D—Captain, W. N. Conant.
Co. E.—First Lieutenant, Geo. S. Sammis.
Co. F—Captain, H. James Weston. Co. G—Captain, Edmund H. Henry; First Lieutenant, John J. Abercrombie, Jr.
Co. H—Captain, James F. Haviland; First Lieutenant, George J. Collins.
Co. I—Captain, Richard Allison; Second Lieutenant, John J. Reddell. Co. K—Captain, Hewlett J. Long; Second Lieutenant. Wm. B.
Eaton. N. Y. Times, July 18, 1865

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