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19th Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

Banks' Division.
SANDY HOOK, Md., August 12.
The New York 19th volunteers are now commanded by Major James H. Ledlie, (formerly of Utica) Col. Clark still being under arrest, and Lieutenant Colonel Seward having obtained leave of absence on account of sickness.
This regiment keeps watch on both sides of the Potomac, from Sandy Hook to Berlin.
Last Sunday news reached Major Ledlie that a force of upwards of one hundred cavalry was at Lorrettsville, Loudon county, where they were pressing and oppressing the Union inhabitants.
A detachment from different companies, amounting to one hundred men, under command of Captain Kennedy, company D, accompanied Captain Stevens, company F, and Surgeon F. Kenyon, crossed the river at the Rock Ferry, at one o'clock on Thursday morning, and after a march through a difficult and rocky pass of seven miles, reached Lorrettsville about daylight.
Ascertaining the rebels had left, they retraced their route two miles towards the river, in hopes the rebels would follow as soon as the latter learned Capt. Kennedy's weakness. Here the Union men formed an ambuscade, where they lay concealed until 2 P.M., when ascertaining the rebels had not returned, they continued on their way. When about three miles from the river, they were overtaken by a boy with the information that about 130 of Stewart's rebel cavalry had re-occupied the town. Tired and worn out, almost shoeless and hungry, the brave fellows, with a shout, at once voted unanimously to return and attack the rebels. Starting at a double quick, they gained sight of the town, and under cover of a corn field, gained sight of the cavalry about three rods distant. Resting for a few moments, they heard the rebel Captain give orders to mount, and believing they had been discovered and were about to be charged upon, Capt. Kennedy charged upon the town at a double quick, firing two vollies [sic] as they ran.
The enemy, after firing a few harmless shots, made their way concealed by houses out of the opposite side of the town, but not until they had one lieutenant killed and five men wounded, as ascertained from a person who came into the town soon afterwards. The inhabitants of Loudon county are generally Unionists, and were greatly rejoiced to be freed from the oppressions of the rebels.
Capt. Bowman, of the 28th New York Regiment, stationed between Berlin and the Point of Rocks, heard the firing at Lorrettsville, and started with his company and ran three miles towards Capt, Kennedy, but was too late to participate in the rout.
A defection has broken out in the l9th (Cayuga) regiment, which is now attached to Gen. Banks' division, and is under command of Major James H. Ledlie, formerly of Utica. On the 22d inst., the men claimed that their time had expired, and refused to do duty. A line was formed, and the orders of the Governor of New York, the determination of the Government, and the articles of war, were read to the regiment. Major Ledlie addressed the regiment, and finally ordered all who chose to remain to advance three paces. About 200 declined, and were immediately taken in charge by the 2d cavalry; and subsequently disrobed of their equipments and placed in charge of the 1st Pennsylvania regiment. Twenty-four hours were allowed for them to re-consider, and it is believed half of the disaffected will return. All the commissioned officers remain. Only two Orderly Sergeants were among the recusants.

Advertiser and Union.
AUBURN, N. Y.,
Wednesday Evening, May 27, 1863.
The old 19th Regiment of Infantry, now the 3d Seward Artillery, met with a very favorable and hearty reception on their arrival in this city yesterday. The time for getting up a demonstration was necessarily very brief. The announcement that the Regiment would arrive yesterday reached here by telegraph about 8 o'clock yesterday morning, and the Regiment came in about 4 P. M. It will be seen that the reception must have been altogether an impromptu affair.
But as we have said, the demonstration was very creditable to our citizens, and highly complimentary to the gallant men in whose honor it was gotten up. The arrival of the train conveying the heroes was signalled [sic] by the firing of cannon and the merry ringing of all the church bells in the city. The throng in the streets was immense, and the feeling manifested on all sides must have proved to the returning soldiers that they are held in high estimation by the loyal masses for the sacrifices they have made for their imperiled country.
An extended notice of the demonstration will be found in another column.—We only wish to refer to a marked and significant incident which occurred during the ceremonies in front of the Western Exchange, and which must have grated harshly upon the ears of certain men who were probably within hearing of what was going on. After the eloquent reception speech of Marshal KNAPP, and the reply by the gallant Colonel of the Regiment, enthusiastic cheers were given for the officers of the Regiment. After these were given, the volunteers, in order to give expression to their views regarding the Copperheads gave three horrid groans for them. The groans were so emphatic that no one could mistake their meaning.
We would ask the "peace on any terms" men of the city what they think of the sentiments entertained by the 600 men who have been absent from their homes two years fighting in defence of their country. The Copperheads have been loud mouthed in their denunciations of Loyal citizens, applying every epithet to them known to the Billingsgate vocabulary. The question is whether the returning soldiers who so emphatically expressed their sentiments yesterday in favor of a vigorous prosecution of the war are now to come in for their share of the ribald abuse which has been heaped upon their friends at home. Whatever abuse is heaped upon other Loyal citizens in the North we think the soldiers should be spared. The services they have rendered and the sacrifices they have made should shield them from Copperhead maledictions here and elsewhere.

Advertiser and Union.
Local, Literary, Miscellaneous.
Auburn, July 14, 1863.
The Old 19th Called For.
Our afternoon dispatches from New York come via Poughkeepsie to Albany, whence they were re-sent west. A call is expected for our Old Nineteenth boys to rally again and proceed to New York for a few days, for the protection of the city.
P. S.—A dispatch from Brig. Gen. Ledlie calls for the Old Nineteenth to come on, and officers are now awaiting volunteers in this city. Expenses paid by Gov. Seymour.
Volunteers may report to Maj. Giles, and Capt's Wall and Gavigan.
— The 19th New York Volunteers were received at Auburn on Tuesday last, with great demonstrations of welcome. There was a grand procession, and the affair wound up with speeches and three unearthly groans for the Copperheads.

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—The Auburn Advertiser has advices that Col. Clark, of the Cayuga Regiment has been charged with incompetency, [sic] deprived of his command, and is awaiting the decision of a court martial. Lieut. Col. Seward being absent, Major Ledlie, (formerly of Utica,) is in command. Col. Butterfield, of the Twelfth, was elected Brigadier General on Saturday last. The Cayuga Regiment were to march on Monday, with two days' cooked rations and two days' raw, to Winchester, Va. This news cannot be very reliable, for the Confederate General, Johnston, is at Winchester, and Col. Butterfield has been appointed a Lieutenant Colonel in the regular army instead of a Brigadier General of volunteers.

The Returned Soldiers.
On Tuesday last the soldiers belonging to this place and from the "old 19th" returned home. The boys were looking first rate and in excellent health. They all seemed glad to get back home once more and see old familiar face; judging from their talk, they seem to be as patriotic as ever--their experience in the Army does not seem to abate their love for the old flag. We heard a few say they intended to return to the Army after a short sojourn here. They speak very favorably of the war--feel confident that we will eventually "clean out" the south, but not without a severe struggle for the mastery of right and living principals. As regards a public dinner, for the soldiers, which has been talked of we can not say when it will take place, but we understand preperations [sic] are being made to give them a sumptious [sic] repast.

AUBURN, April 29.
Four fall companies of volunteers left this city at 2:15 this P. M., for Elmira. They were escorted to the depot by the Old Guard and Willard Guard. An immense concourse of our citizens turned out to see them take their departure. They left amid the roar of cannon.

Advertiser and Union.
Local, Literary, Miscellaneous.
" THE -OLD NINETEENTH."--This name, as a regimental appellation, is now known no more save in the memory of its former members and their many friends. The old Nineteenth was disbanded on Saturday last by the action of the paymaster in completing what was begun by the mustering-out officer, and, our streets for the time were filled with good natured faces of soldiers become citizens, with pockets full of greenbacks.

ALBANY EVENING JOURNAL.
TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 26, 1863.
Return of the 3d New York Artillery, Organized as the 10th Infantry.
Word was received last night that 550 of the 3d Artillery, Col. STEWART, would reach the city this morning at 5 o'clock, on the Vanderbilt, and promptly at the hour, the boat reached the clock, and the men were marched to the Delevan House, where a sumptuous breakfast was prepared for them, of which they partook with a relish.
The Regiment was recruited in Cayuga county, by Col. CLARK, now Chief of Gen. BANKS' Staff. It was mustered into service at Elmira, 734 strong, and reached Washington on the 1st of June. Soon afterwards, it was attached to Gen. PATTERSON'S Corps, and was with him through all his marches and skirmishes in Virginia.
When PATTERSON was superseded by BANKS, the Regiment continued with him. Col. CLARK was placed upon BANKS' Staff, and Lieut. Col.
LEDLIE was promoted to the command. They continued with BANKS through the entire of his Virginia campaign, did their duty in every emergency, and was subsequently organized into an Artillery Regiment, and, for a time, occupied Fort Corcoran and several other neighboring Forts.
When BURNSIDE'S Expedition was organized, the Regiment, recruited up to 1800 men, went with him to Newbern, and have participated in the following Battles—which are inscribed upon their tattered Banner, now with the 550 of the original two years men who are returning home, viz:—

Fort Macon Washington
South East Creek Kinston
White Hall Goldsboro
Newbern Washington (siege.)

In these several battles, the Regiment acted as Light Artillery, and lost 187 men.
For his gallantry at Goldsboro, Col. LEDLIE was promoted to Brigadier, and Lieut. Col. C. H. STEWART was made Colonel.
The Regiment (1100 strong) is still in the field. Both Gen. LEDLIE and Col. STEWART are with the men now on their way home, but will return in a few days to new fields of glory.
The Regiment has, from the first, been one of the most efficient, in every good quality, of any in the service; and the men going home are in excellent condition. They were accompanied by their Band, which has been with them from the first.
The expiration of the term of these two years' men, rendered the following officers supernumerary, and they will be mustered out, viz:—
Captains.—Owen Savagin, John Wall, Chas. White.
Lieutenants.—Wm. Boyle, James Deming, Charles B. Randolph, Charles Tomlinson, Luke Brannick, John E. Potter, Patrick Dwyer, Charles D. Thompsen, Charles W. Havens.
On leaving the field, Gen. FOSTER issued a special order, highly complimenting the Regiment for its gallantry and efficiency.
At 8 o'clock, they took a special train for Auburn, where they will meet with a cordial reception from their friends and fellow-citizens.

The Nineteenth Regiment.
Gen. Parmenter has received a letter from Col. Brown, giving further particulars of the recent raid through King William County, Va., in which the Nineteenth (168th N. Y. V.) National Guards, took an active part. The expedition was a complete success. A large foundry used for the manufacture of shot and shells for the enemy, four large, storehouses containing large quantities of corn and grain, a large mill containing six
thousand bushels of grain, machine shops, cotton mills, lumber yards, and a great number of barns containing stores for the rebels such as grain, corn, whiskey, cotton goods &c., were destroyed.—The loss to the enemy is estimated at $120,000. A large number of cattle and mules were taken. The papers generally have given a correct account of the expedition with the exception of giving credit to the 169th regiment N. Y. V., which rightfully belongs to the 168th or 19th regiment of this state. Col. Brown addressed the following note to the Herald, which appeared in that paper on the 15th:
To the Editor of the Herald:
HEADQUARTERS. 168TH REGIMENT
N. Y. V., CAMP BROWN,
YORKTOWN, Va., June 11, 1863.
In an article in your paper of June 9, headed "The Mattapony Expedition;"' it is stated "that the expedition was made up of detachments from the One Hundred and Sixty-ninth regiment New York Volunteers," &c., &c., which is an error.
The detachment was from the One Hundred and Sixty-eighth regiment New York Volunteers, which is the Nineteenth regiment National Guard, State of New York, from Newburgh, Orange county, and was under the command of Captain Daniel Torbush, Company B.
Hoping you will insert the above in your valuable paper, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
WM. R. BROWN,
Colonel, 168th regiment New York Volunteers, (19th regiment National Guard, State of New York.)
The detachment from the Nineteenth regiment consisted of one hundred and forty men, and was commanded by Capt. Daniel Torbush, assisted by Captains Gilbert and Terwilliger, and Lieutenants Oakley, Henderson and Chase. The whole force amounted to about four hundred men under the command of Colonel C. C. Tevis, and consisted of volunteers from four regiments. When called upon for volunteers the Nineteenth regiment was in line for parade, and the whole regiment marched forward. Selections were then made from each company, the regiment furnishing over one third of the land force employed in the expedition. The main scene of action was on the road to Richmond, five miles from the Mattapony river, nineteen miles from Richmond and only eight miles from White House, where General Wise was with a large rebel force. The detachment from the Nineteenth, was the only one that met the enemy in force.—The rebels were repulsed with loss. It is known that Wm. S. Avery, of Company A, of the 19th was killed, and Col. Brown writes that two are missing, one of them was seen to throw up his hands as if shot, and the probability is that they were both killed. Their names are Perry L. Paulding and Elias G. McChain, both of Company B. Two men were wounded both named Terwilliger. One from Company B, the other from Company D. Col. Brown reports the health of the regiment as good.

Advertiser and Union.
Local, Literary, Miscellaneous.
Auburn, May 225, 1863.
Proceedings of the Meeting for the Reception of the Old Nineteenth.
At a meeting of the citizens of Auburn, convened by invitation of the Mayor, at the Court House, on Saturday evening last, his Honor, the Mayor, was called to the Chair, and Chas. A. Caulking and Chas. L Adams were appointed Secretaries.
The objects of the meeting were stated to be the making of suitable preparations for the reception of the returning members of the 3d Artillery, (late 19th infantry,) and a committee to confer on the arrangements for that occasion, was selected, who reported the following preamble and resolutions:
Whereas, The surviving members of the original 19th Regiment of N. Y. Volunteers, (late a portion of the 3d N. Y. Artillery,) are about to return to their homes in this county, after a service of two years in the army of the United States--a service upon which they cheerfully. entered without the inducement of bounties, or any motive except to vindicate and maintain a Government the existence of which was endangered by those who had wickedly taken up arms against its authority, and who had with parricidal hands dishonored the flag which, was the inviolable emblem of our liberties and of our nationality—an emblem sacred and rich in the memories of the past—beautiful and promising of peace and happiness in the future—the pride and protection of American citizens wherever unfurled upon sea or land—protecting alike the rich and the poor—commanding the respect and admiration of every Government and idolized by the lovers of liberty throughout the world, as evidence of the ability of men for self-government.
And, whereas, The soldiers now about to return to their homes and families have endured many hardships, and have on all occasions, whether guarding the National Capitol, or defending military lines, or in the storm of battle, done honor to themselves, and to the sacred duties devolved upon them, therefore—
Resolved, That the citizens of Auburn will deem it a pleasure and a duty to evidence to the returning members of the old 19th Regiment that their services and sacrifices are appreciated, and that the arduous labors and trials which they are now to relinquish have endeared them to us, and that we will ever hold them in grateful remembrance for their many hardships and perils in defence of the best government ever known to men.
Resolved, That for the purpose of giving a suitable reception to the BRAVES of said Regiment, and making the necessary arrangements therefore, a committee of forty citizens, of which His Honor, the Mayor, shall be Chairman, be appointed by the President of this meeting.
The following gentlemen were selected as such Committee of arrangements:

Jonas White, Jr., Ch'n. Wm Hills
Wm C Beardsley Geo J Letchworth
T M Pomeroy Wm Allen
G W Peck Thos Kirkpatrick
Sylvester Willard D M Osborne
Nelson Beardsley Eli Gallup
E P Ross W S Hawley
J N Knapp Kellogg Beach
C P Wood C S Burtis
John H Chedell Chas Standard
N T Stephens C G Briggs
C Hemingway L H Baldwin
John B Richardson L L Wilkinson
Capt. Hubbard Wm B Woodin
Christopher Morgan B B Snow,
C Eugene Barber Wm P Robinson
Theo. Case John Porter
D P Wallis M S Myers
C C Dennis George Humphreys
C H Merriman John T Baker
J Ives Parsons E T Throop Martin
Lansing Briggs A G Beardsley

The above Committee will meet at a call from the Mayor.
JONAS WHITE, Jr, CH'N.
CHAS. A. CAULKINS,
CHAS. L. ADAMS, Secretaries.

THIRD ARTILLERY.—This noble regiment (formerly the Nineteenth Infantry) passed through here at 2 ½ o’clock yesterday P. M., on the way from Albany to Auburn. It numbered over 500 men, hardy and efficient soldiers, all of whom appeared as well, as respects clothing and orderly conduct, as when they went to war. These veterans had a grand reception at Auburn.

THE PARADE OF THE NINETEENTH.
Speech of Secretary Seward.
From the Auburn Daily Advertiser, May 29th.
At 10 o'clock this morning the Old Nineteenth mustered in front of the Court House, by order of Gen. Ledlie, where they were formed in line under Col. Charles H. Stewart, commanding, presenting a gallant and martial appearance, arrayed in line at open order, and going through a partial dress parade.
Their excellent band, led by Mr. Parmalee, gave some beautiful airs, and crowds of people thronged the vicinity.
At the close of the parade, Hon. William H. Seward addressed the veterans of the Nineteenth in a few brief and touching remarks, and after marching up Genesee street, the regiment passed in review, each company paying him a salute as they passed the platform, the officers presenting arms, and the colors dipping in honor of the staunch Statesman who had just welcomed them so nobly and thanked them so deservedly in behalf of their homes and their country.
The following are Gov. Seward's remarks:—My Old Neighbors and Friends:—I esteem it fortunate for myself that my return to this place determined as to the time by accident, has come at the moment when I can meet you and welcome you back to the greetings and embraces of friends, families and homes. I looked with pride at that flag of yours when as yet it exhibited not a single wrinkle and its colors were fresh and bright. I regard it now with a thousand times more of pride and satisfaction when I see it worn, dimmed and torn, but bearing in legible inscriptions between its stripes, the names of fields, bravely contested and nobly won.
Soldiers, citizens, a nation, though composed of many individual members, is in sight of God and of mankind one aggregate, thinking, reasoning, moral, responsible person. As such aggregate persons, nations are subject to the same accidents, passions, dangers and responsibilities as individual men. Troubles, dangers, calamities, disasters and death are appointed to individuals by an All-wise Providence; and the same Providence appoints them equally for the experience of nations. As no man ever yet lived who was exempt from trouble, contention and strife, so no nation that has ever existed, or ever will exist, has escaped, or can, altogether, the evils of strife and contention abroad and at home.
Of national calamities, civil war is the worst of all, for two reasons: First, the depth of the sufferings which attend it; and second, if hopelessly protracted, it brings in anarchy, foreign intervention, usurpatien and subjugation. When an individual is assaulted with a violent hand, what is then his interest? It is to prostrate his assailant and thus save himself. Self defence thus at once becomes his chief wisdom, and courage his highest virtue.
When a nation is assailed by Treason, the interest, duty and virtue it is called to exhibit, are precisely the same. It will look back to inquire through what possible errors, faults, short comings or even crimes it has fallen into such a strife, but with the purpose of drawing from the inquiry the wisdom necessary for extrication from the calamity.
Having done this it will look forward, not straining itself to see how it shall govern itself and regulate its action at long distant periods, but to ascertain where to find the enemy and how most effectually to baffle, overthrow and bind him so that the Nation can yet safely live.
Civil war divides the community, even in those places where the Government retains its accustomed strength and authority, into two classes. One that has the courage adequate to the crisis, the other that has not. Those that have the courage, in other words the virtue, adequate to the crisis rush to the field.
This country has seen 800,000 men rush in this manner to confront the Public Enemy, and this town of 15,000 souls has sent out 4,000 such, of whom you are the first installment which has returned. Among the 800,000 as well as 4,000 there was not one coward nor one traitor. There were none whose minds were troubled about the causes of the conflict, the manner in which it is conducted, or the consequences which shall follow it. Having devoted their strength, and their lives if necessary to the cause of their country, of truth, of humanity, they leave the rest to the care of that Providence which arbitrates at last in all the issues of human strife. The other class are those who stay at home to consider. Many of these, multitudes of them, as loyal and brave as their compatriots in the field are prevented by sickness, infirmity and age from joining the ranks, and others have duties not less important than those of the field. These study only how to sustain, cheer, encourage and reinforce their country's armies. But beside these and among them, mingled with them as the tares with the wheat, are all the cowards, all the traitors that the community has, and it has such because all communities are human, and vice as well as virtue inheres in humanity. In this large assemblage which has come out to greet you, or to witness this solemn ceremony of your discharge from the public service, both these classes are found. We cannot distinguish, nor is it worth our while to attempt to distinguish the one from the other. By their actions hereafter they shall be known. Those who are wise and virtuous will be found urging you to return to the field, and persevere until the battle is won, and will spare no pains, going themselves, if possible, to recruit the ranks which death honorably met has decimated. Those who are otherwise will be found still caviling about the causes of the war, about the responsibilities of its unavoidable defeats, about the distribution of honors for the victories gloriously won; they will be found accumulating treasure with one hand and storing it away from the tax gatherer with the other, that they may enjoy it after the patriotism and heroism of better men than themselves have secured the triumph which will enable them to enjoy it in safety. To the young men who I see around me I have to say it is for you to choose to which of these two classes of the community you will attach yourselves. If you are prepared to join the former the greeting you give to these our brave neighbors returned from the field, are as honorable to you as gratifying to them. If, on the other hand, you think more of your lives, more of your fortunes, more of your personal expectations than you think of your country, your salutations are a mockery, and the sight of these war-worn veterans ought to strike you with confusion and shame.
For myself, if I were within the ages and other conditions of military service, I would not have appeared here on this occasion unless it was to take up the fire lock that one of those our honored neighbors has now come to lay down.
I love the man that will not suffer his name to be written upon the register of the Provost Marshal. It is bad enough to be balloted for as a candidate for a civil office. An honest and loyal man, however, must submit to that sometimes. On the contrary, my neighbors and countrymen should never have a chance to cast lots over me as a conscript, so long as they should leave me at liberty to volunteer. Fair play is a jewel—equality in risks and hazards as well as in profits and honors is the only true justice.
Fellow soldiers, I am desirous only that you shall know that I estimate you as you deserve. I am proud of the whole army of the United States. I bear a grateful affection to every Division and every Corps of it. I am prouder of you and cherish you for a more grateful affection than others, because equally meritorious with the best, you are my nearest, truest and most faithful friends. I .... this by opening my lips and my heart to you,—lips and a heart that I have never before opened on any occasion since the seal of official responsibility was imposed upon me, when this unhappy war first broke out.
The honor that you receive this day is but the beginning of honors which .... increasing as long you live. In my childhood I followed with love and veneration the steps of the heroes of the Revolution. I saw that love and that veneration become the universal sentiment of the American people, so far that he who had differed from them or opposed them or denied the homage of his respect was deemed unworthy to be an American citizen. Such love and veneration begin to cluster upon you to-day, and they will continue till they reach such a height that when the humblest of you finds his last resting place, here or elsewhere, under the restored and complete authority of our glorious National Union, his son will be deemed to have in his father's fame an inheritance richer than the treasure that can be transmitted to his heirs by the wealthiest among us. Our posterity will look out for the heirs of the soldier and cover them with the gratitude which the father's life-time was too brief to exhaust.
Mr. Seward's speech was received with the greatest applause and enthusiasm by the multitude, and the regiment, after parading through Genesee street, were dismissed.

THE NINETEENTH TO BE PAID OFF NEXT SATURDAY.—On Saturday morning next, June 6th, the Paymaster for the Old Nineteenth will proceed to settle with the boys for their arrears and bounty. A regimental order from Col. Stewart will be found elsewhere in our columns for the final mustering for pay and discharge.—The necessary papers have been made out for the winding up of the affairs of the regiment, and after Saturday next the glorious Old Nineteenth will exist only in the memory of its former members and its present and everlasting friends and admirers.
As a regiment, this organization has experienced about as much of exciting variety as any in the service. Supposed to have been enlisted for but Three Months, it was sent to the seat of war in June, 1861, was in Patterson's and Banks' commands during three months of hardship and privation, and on the 22d of August was "turned over," for the balance of two years, to the U.S. Although feeling disappointed, outraged and demoralized for a while, it soon rallied, and has ever since been remarkable for its correct drill and efficiency, and wherever called has nobly sustained a good and honorable reputation, beating back the enemy at all points, and holding lines captured from them with successful and victorious courage and endurance. The honored flag of the Old Nineteenth bears many a legend, a well fought field, and its tattered and battle-riven folds are evidence of the service it has seen in the hands of our brave volunteers.

Return of the Third N. Y. Artillery.
A portion of this Regiment, which was organized as the Nineteenth Infantry, reached this city at 6 o'clock yesterday morning, on their way home, having served their two years' term. They number 550 men. A substantial breakfast was set for them at the Delavan House, after partaking which they took the cars and left, at 8 o'clock, for Auburn.
The Regiment was recruited in Cayuga county by Col. Clark, now Chief of Gen. Banks' Staff. It was mustered into service at Elmira, 734 strong, and reached Washington on the1st of June. Soon afterwards, it was attached to Gen. Patterson's Corps, and was with him through all his marches and skirmishes in Virginia.
When Patterson was superseded by Banks, the Regiment continued with him. Col. Clark was placed upon Banks' Staff, and Lieut. Col. Ledlie was promoted to the command. They continued with Banks through the entire of his Virginia campaign, did their duty in every emergency, and was subsequently organized [sic] into an Artillery regiment, and, for a time occupied Fort Corcoran and several other neighboring Forts.
When Burnside's Expedition was, organized, the Regiment, recruited up to 1800 men, went with him to Newbern, and have participated in the following Battles—which are inscribed upon their tattered Banner, now with the 500 of the original two years men who are returning home, viz:

Fort Macon Washington
South East Creek Kinston
White Hall Goldsboro
Newbern Washington (siege.)

In these several battles the Regiment acted as Light Artillery, and lost 187 men.
For his gallantry at Goldsboro, Col. Ledlie was promoted to Brigadier, and Lieut. Col. C. H. Stewart was made Colonel.
The Regiment (1100 strong) is still in the field. Both Gen. Ledlie and Col. Stewart are with the men now on their way home, but will return in a few days to new fields of glory.
The expiration of the term of these two years' men, rendered the following officers supernumerary, and they will be mustered out, viz:
Captains—Owen Savagin, John Wall, Chas. White.
Lieutenants—Wm. Boyle, James Deming, Charles B. Randolph, Charles Tomlinson, Luke Crannick, John F. Potter, Patrick Dwyer, Charles D. Thompson, Charles W. Havens.
On leaving the field, Gen. Foster issued a special order, highly complimenting the Regiment for its gallantry and efficiency.

RECRUITING IN THE CARS.—The Auburn Advertiser states that Capt. Kennedy, while going to Syracuse on Saturday from that city, engaged in conversation, with several fine looking young men, and as a natural result received nine splendid recruits for his artillery company. Six of them returned to Auburn with the captain, while three were sworn into the United States service in the car by the captain, and were given a furlough, to return for a few days to their home to set their "houses in order."

NEW YORK VOLUNTEES.—Twenty-nine men who mutinied in the Nineteenth Regiment, and were confined on the Rip Raps, have promised reformation, and been transferred to the Second Regiment and put on duty. Inasmuch as the officers of the Nineteenth are hard at work to fill up their thinned ranks, it seems hardly fair to give their men to another regiment.

Advertiser and Union.
Local, Literary, Miscellaneous
Auburn, May 30, 1863.
THE MUSTERING OUT OF THE 19th.—Owing to the necessary delay in the arrival of the proper officials, caused by their duties with regiments which arrived before the 10th, it may be some days before the latter regiment can be reached for muster out and payment. Due notice will be given of the arrival of the paymaster, &c., through our columns.

LATER—MUSTER ON TUESDAY NEXT.—The members of the Nineteenth are called together for muster on Tuesday next, June 2d, at 9 A.M.
By order of
CHARLES H. STEWART.

Advertiser and Union.
Local, Literary, Miscellaneous.
Auburn, May 27, 1863.
Reception of the Old Nineteenth.
A DAY OF REJOICING!
Brilliant Display of Flags and Decorations—Artillery Salutes—Speeches and Cheering—Honors to the Brave.
The gallant members of the Old Nineteenth arrived in this city at 4 p. m. yesterday, (Tuesday,) and were met at the Central Depot by an immense multitude, from all parts of the county, eager and anxious to give a suitable welcome to the brave fellows who have so nobly sustained themselves through all the trials and dangers of more than two years of service under the old flag.
Fathers, mothers, brothers and sisters, sweethearts, wives and friends were there, densely crowded together in waiting for the anxiously expected arrival.

THE MILITARY ESCORT,
Under command of Col. J. B. Richardson, comprised Co. C, Capt. P. Swift, Co. D, Capt. W. B. Rhoades; the Citizens' Military Association, in Zouave uniform, a remarkably fine appearing and well-drilled body, under command of Lt. Col. T. B. Barber, Captain Thomas acting 1st Lieut., and Co A, Capt. L. White, in continental uniform. Their escort formed a prominent and satisfactory feature of the occasion, doing honor to their drill and efficiency as citizen soldiery, and reflected credit upon the gentlemen who perfected them in tactics.

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT,
Under the direction of L. H. Baldwin, Esq., Chief Engineer, comprising Hook and Ladder No. 1, Engine Co.'s No. 1, their machine drawn by four horses, and No. 3 and No. 4, who made a fine array of stalwart and hardy fire soldiers, together with the Hose Co. of each machine, presenting a neat and graceful array, with their symmetrical hose carriages and tasteful dress, and machines decked with banners and adorned with bouquets furnished by the ladies.

FLAGS AND DECORATIONS.
Flags were flying in every part of the city, and every proprietor of the bunting displayed it. Decorations of welcoming significance were displayed at various points along the route of procession, and the firing of artillery mingled with the hearty cheers of citizens and soldiers.

THE ARRIVAL.
As the sound of the approaching train was heard in the distance, a loud murmur of congratulation filled the building, and when the cars entered the depot a deafening burst of cheers greeted the ears of their inmates with the first token of their hearty welcome.
Nearly an hour elapsed in the bustle and confusion of greeting, as the loved ones met in a fraternal embrace or rousing hand-grip, and at length the line of march was formed, through much exertion in separating the soldiers from their friends, and the regiment, escorted by our military companies and Fire Department, and led by the band of the 19th, marched to Genessee st., where the line halted in front of the Exchange Hotel and were received with a most eloquent and heart-stirring receptive address by J. N. Knapp, Esq., Provost Marshall of this District, which was a masterly effort of patriotic sentiment, embodying a welcome of which the recipients were well deserving, as follows:
GEN. LEDLIE, COL. STEWART, OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE OLD 19TH:
I am charged with the pleasing duty in behalf of the citizens of Auburn, of welcoming your safe return from the service of the country.—Nothing could be more grateful to my feelings than the performance of the duty thus assigned me. In their name, therefore, I bid you a hearty welcome to Auburn.
It is now more than two years since you left us, amidst the booming of cannon and waving of flags, the honored representatives of the righteous indignation of the people, whose feelings our flag at Sumter.
As the war progressed with varying fortunes the existence of the nation became imperiled [sic], and other regiments went out from among us to defend the nation's life. But you waited not for the approach of imminent danger. You knew only that the old flag had been fired upon by organized treason, and you promptly took your lives in your hands and went forth to avenge the insult and vindicate the national honor. Theretofore the flag had been the symbol of the power, greatness and unity of the nation, and wherever it waved on sea or land, the humblest citizen was secure under its protecting folds.
It is the course of history: all nations have honored their brave defenders; and your services, the sacrifices you have made, and the hard ships you have endured will never fail to be remembered by your grateful countrymen.
You left us two years since with blessings on our lips and good wishes in our hearts. Those blessings are still fresh on our lips—those wishes still warm in our hearts; and the citizens of Auburn hearing of your arrival in New York had convened at the Court House for the purpose of initiating the necessary proceedings to extend to you a reception worthy of the occasion. The Common Council to carry out the universal wish of our citizens, had made the necessary appropriation to ensure you the welcome you so richly deserve.
Mr. Knapp then briefly explained the various proceedings which had been made to provide for a suitable reception, read the resolutions adopted at the meeting at the Court House, and proceeded as follows:
" But you gave us no definite information in regard to the time of your arrival. Pursuing the same strategy with us that you practiced with the rebels at Whitehall, at Kingston and at Goldsboro, you were upon us before we were prepared to receive you! You will accept these good intentions in place of the pomp and display that would otherwise have greeted your return. Your regimental colors which I see before me, worn and soiled with the smoke and dust of battle, and rent with traitor bullets, bespeak more eloquently than human voice can express, the hearty welcome that you will always deserve from your grateful countrymen.
Officers and soldiers of the old Nineteenth, it is sad indeed on your return to miss the familiar faces of many of your brave comrades who have fallen in battle and by disease. I can only express for them our love while living, and mourn them dead; while to you and to all of us there remains the proud reflection that they gave their lives to the noblest cause that ever claimed a martyr. You, too, will miss the familiar faces of many of your friends and neighbors, who following your noble example, have gone out from among us to do battle in their country's cause.
Time, with his sickle, has been busy in your absence here as elsewhere, and the green mounds in our cemeteries will explain to you the vacant places you will find around your own hearth-stones. I can only offer you in this behalf, our profoundest sympathy, and the assurance of our earnest prayer that the evening may bind up, with a soft bandage, your morning of pain.
After two years of toil and hardship endured in defence of the most sacred trust ever commited [sic] to a free people, and of the best government the sun in all his course shines upon, you have returned to hear, as I know you will be glad to learn, of the unconquerable resolution, and the invincible determination of this great people never to lay down the sword until the American flag waves over every inch of American soil.
When this grand result shall have been attained by your efforts and, those of such as you, this great nation, purified by its trials and by its sacrifices, and regenerated by its baptism of blood, shall rise, nobler and grander far than statesman ever thought or poet ever dreamed.
Officers and soldiers of the Old Nineteenth: Again I bid you a hearty welcome to Auburn, to your homes, your friends, your neighbors and your kindred, whose warm grasp and kindling love will express to you more strongly than I can in words, the warm welcome that is in all our hearts.
Col. Stewart replied, in behalf of the 19th, in eloquent terms, expressing their gratitude at the warm and hearty welcome.
Cheers upon cheers were given at the close of the address, for the officers of the Regiment, winding up with three unearthly groans for the Copperheads, and the regiment were then marched to South street, under the escort of the Militia and Firemen, where they were dismissed.

THE NINETEENTH
Under command of Brig. Gen. Ledlie, and Col. Chas. H. Stewart, with the staff represented by Maj. Giles and Surgeon Dimon, presented an imposing appearance, their bronzed faces and soldierly bearing betokening their long and gallant service, as they marched through the closely packed crowds of enthusiastic welcomers.
The following list comprises the officers and number of men returned permanently:
Surgeon Theo. Dimon, Lieut. Fuller, Acting Adjutant, Lieut. Geo. Sherwood, unassigned to Company.
Co. A.—Capt. Chas. White, 73 men, Lieuts. Chas. Tomlinson, John T. Potter.
Co. C.—Lieut. Randolph, 83 men.
Co. D.—Capt. Gavigan, 55 men, Lieuts. Boyle, Brannack, and Dwyer.
Co. E.—55 men, Lieut. Fred Dennis.
Co. G.—Capt. John Wall, 80 men, Lieuts. Chas. Thompson and Mowers.
Co. I.—Lieut. Thomas, 78 men.
Co. K.—Lieuts. Mersereau and Havens.

THE COLORS OF THE 19TH.—The battle scarred flag of the 19th hangs in Prince's News Room, tattered and torn by shot and shell, with the inscriptions of the several fights through which it was so gloriously borne by its brave defenders. This banner was presented at Elmira by our ladies, just before the 19th left for the seat of war two years ago. It bears the names of Fort Macon, Washington, Kingston, Whitehall, Goldsboro, Newbern, South West Creek, Lovetsville, Rawl's Mills and Washington a second time. It is a glorious souvenir of the past, in which its supporters have done themselves a never dying honor.

IN THE EVENING
The fine Band of the 19th serenaded several of our prominent citizens and were partakers of the hospitalities of those gentlemen.
The whole affair throughout the day and evening passed off happily, and though the liberal provision of the Common Council was not given an opportunity of being expended in decorations, &c., owing to the short notice allowed by the sudden arrival of the 19th, yet the reception was a pleasant success for such an impromptu one, and all the participants were well satisfied.

SPECIAL ORDER OF GEN. FOSTER.—The following Special Order of Gen. Foster was issued just previous to the departure of the Regiment from his Department:
HEAD QUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, 18th ARMY CORPS,
NEWBERN, MAY 20th, 1863.
Special Orders,
No. 144
The term of service of many of the 3d N. Y. artillery having expired, and they being about to leave the Department, the Commanding General feels called upon to express his thanks to them for the past, and his best hopes and wishes for their future.
The Commanding General hopes that after a brief enjoyment of home, the memory of the brave deeds in which they have participated in this Department, and the memory of their friends left behind, will induce many or all of those officers and men, to re-enlist and return again to the Department of North Carolina.
There are few among the parting who cannot recall with pride the siege of Fort Macon, the affair of Rawles Mills, and the action of Kingston, Whitehall, Goldsboro and Washington.
The Commanding General sympathizes with the companions and families of those brave men who have fallen and whose memory will ever remain recorded in the annals of this Department.
By command of Maj. Gen. J. G. FOSTER.
SOUTHARD HOFFMAN, A. A. G.

CRIMINAL.—At Seneca Falls recently, Sergeant McClure, who was on recruiting service for the 19th regiment, was assaulted by three ruffians and so badly beaten that he died of his injuries. The Sergeant, who is spoken of as a Christian and a gentleman, was returning from church with a couple of ladies when he was attacked. The murderers are in jail, and the Sergeant was buried with military honors.

The Third Artillery.
Messrs. JOHN M. DEUEL, JOHN BENEDICT, and CLARK SAUNDERS, members of the Third Artillery, formerly the 19th Regt., N. Y. V., arrived home last evening. They look remarkably well, are in fine spirits. They were stationed at Newbern.
The citizens of Auburn are to give the 19th Regiment a public reception today.—A newspaper correspondent in the ranks of the 19th (Cayuga) regiment, after enumerating the men detailed for an expedition, adds:
You may notice that the numbers in each of these companies were small. This was for want of shoes—many of our men being now entirely barefoot.
— Six members of the Jordan Brass Band have joined the Cayuga regiment, (19th) to act professionally, and new instruments to the amount of about $700 are being manufactured for them in Syracuse.
— Col. Clark, formerly of the 19th (Cayuga) regiment, who has been under arrest for some months, and has finally been succeeded in command by Major J. H. Ledlie, has been appointed to a place on Gen. Banks' staff.
— Col. Ledlie, of the 19th (Cayuga) Regiment, has engaged a brass band for his regiment, at Syracuse.

MOVEMENTS OF TROOPS.
Elmira, June 5, 1861.
The Cayuga regiment leaves for Washington at nine A. M. tomorrow, via Harrisburg.

THE NEW YORK TROOPS.
ELMIRA, N. Y., June 6, 1861.
The Nineteenth, or Cayuga regiment, Colonel Clark commander, left this morning for Washington via Harrisburg. An immense concourse of people witnessed the departure. The wildest enthusiasm prevailed.

THE CHAPLAIN OF THE 19TH REGIMENT.—Rev. HENRY FOWLER, well known in this city, now pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church in Auburn, received on Saturday afternoon an official announcement of his appointment as Chaplain of the Cayuga Regiment. Mr. F. is a gentleman, a christian, and, as many occasions have demonstrated, a brave and true man.

FROM THE NINTEENTH.—Adjutant William Hathaway, writes us as follows, under date of "Headquarters of the regiment, near Middleburgh, Va. July 21st: We arrived here last night, after two days hard marching, from Berlin, Md. The health of the regiment is generally good. We are seeing hard times and soldiers' fare. The boys deserve great credit for their perseverance and cheerfulness under such forced marches and privations.—We marched over fifty miles in two days without anything to eat, except a little pork and coffee—our supply trains, with hard tack, not coming up in time, and we had only one day's rations in our haversacks when we started from Funcktown after Lee. We have been placed in another division, now Second Brigade, Second Division, Eleventh corps, of the Army of the Potomac."—Telegraph.

FROM GENERAL BANKS' DIVISION.
Darnestown, Md., Oct. 4,1861.
A gentleman, who came from near Poolesville last evening, states that he heard firing at noon in the direction of Edward's Ferry. He saw a great smoke arising from the same point, and thinks it was caused by the burning of a warehouse on this side of the river.
Rumors are current that General Stone will shortly lead our advance across the Potomac. The force under his command has been strengthened largely of late.
Private W. L. Myers, of the New York Nineteenth, was recently tried and sentenced to be shot, for desertion, by the General Court Martial; but from the evidence it appeared that he was on his return to his regiment when arrested, and that he was overtaken by liquor, causing him to be absent longer than his permit allowed. The members of the Court therefore unanimously recommended him to mercy. Upon his solemn promise never to drink any intoxicating liquors, General Banks commuted the sentence into a forfeiture of five dollars per month of his pay for one year, and the gratified culprit was yesterday returned to his regiment.
An unconfirmed rumor was circulated yesterday that the rebels had fired into and sunk a canal boat, conveying heavy baggage for a brigade stationed on the Upper Potomac.
The Potomac is now passable at several of the fords between the Great Falls and the Point of Rocks.
The enemy are known to have a largely augmented force in the vicinity of Leesburg, but military authorities are of the opinion that it is only a feint, and that on the first demonstration by our forces they will fall back upon the Manassas Gap Railroad, and then go down to the Junction. No apprehension is felt of any attempt on their part to cross the river, or make any serious attack upon us at long range over the Potomac.
There is not a word of truth in the statement of the assassination of Colonel Knipe, of the Pennsylvania Forty-sixth regiment, or the attempted murder, or execution of the murderer Lanahan.

INTERESTING FROM THE UPPER POTOMAC."
HYATTSTOWN, August 26, 1861.
Information has reached our encampment that there has been much firing across the river by the rebels at our pickets at various points between Conrad's and Harper's Ferry since Saturday last, and it is reported that an attack was threatened on Saturday at the Point of Rocks.
The rebel encampments at Leesburg have been moved back some distance from the river.
Yesterday two supposed rebel spies were arrested by Captain Morrison's picket, of the Indiana Twelfth regiment. They claimed to be wagon-master and assistant belonging to General Stone's brigade, but on being closely questioned apart by Captain Morrison their replies gave the lie to their professions. They were turned over to General Banks for a further examination.
Considerable delight was experienced to-day in the camp of the Nineteenth New York regiment by the return to duty of over one hundred of its recusant members, including all the company of Captain Stevens. More are expected to return to-morrow. It is but justice to state that all the commissioned officers, and all but one or two of the sergeants, remained loyal from the first appearance of the defection, and it is mainly attributable to the endeavors of the former, coupled with the arguments of Major Ledlie, that so many have returned to their loyalty.
All letters for this division are now forwarded to Frederick, and brought hither by a government express.
The health of the troops has greatly improved since occupying their new encampment. Many of the invalids at Frederick will shortly be restored to the ranks.

THE PARADE OF THE NINETEENTH.
Speech of Secretary Seward.
From the Auburn Daily Advertiser, May 29th.
At 10 o'clock this morning t he Old Nineteenth mustered in front of the Court House, by order of Gen. Ledlie, where they were formed in line under Col. Charles H. Stewart, commanding, presenting a gallant and martial appearance, arrayed in line at open order, and going through a partial dress parade.
Their excellent band, led by Mr. Parmalee, gave some beautiful airs, and crowds of people thronged the vicinity.
At the close of the parade, Hon. William H. Seward addressed the veterans of the Nineteenth in a few brief and touching remarks, and, after marching up Genesee street, the regiment passed in review, each company paying him a salute as they passed the platform, the officers presenting arms, and the colors dipping in honor of the staunch Statesman who had just welcomed them so nobly and thanked them so deservedly in behalf of their homes and their country.
The following are Gov. Seward's remarks:—My Old Neighbors and Friends:—I esteem it fortunate for myself that my return to this place, determined as to the time by accident, has come at the moment when I can meet you and welcome you back to the greetings and embraces of friends, families and homes. I looked with pride at that flag of yours when as yet it exhibited not a single wrinkle and its colors were fresh and bright. I regard it now with a thousand times more of pride and satisfaction when I see it worn, dimmed and torn, but bearing in legible inscriptions between its stripes, the names of fields, bravely contested and nobly won.
Soldiers, citizens, a nation, though composed of many individual members, is in sight of God and of mankind one aggregate, thinking, reasoning, moral, responsible person. As such aggregate persons, nations are subject to the same accidents, passions, dangers and responsibilities as individual men. Troubles, dangers, calamities, disasters and death are appointed to individuals by an All-wise Providence; and the same Providence appoints them equally for the experience of nations. As no man ever yet lived who was exempt from trouble, contention and strife,--so no nation that has ever existed, or ever will exist, has escaped, or can, altogether, the evils of strife and contention abroad and at home.
Of national calamities, civil war is the worst of all, for two reasons: First, the depth of the sufferings which attend it; and second, if hopelessly protracted, it brings in anarchy, foreign intervention, usurpation and subjugation. When an individual is assaulted with a violent hand, what is then his interest? It is to prostrate his assailant and thus save himself. Self defence thus at once becomes his chief wisdom, and courage his highest virtue.
When a nation is assailed by Treason, the interest, duty and virtue it is called to exhibit, are precisely the same. It will look back to inquire through what possible errors, faults, short comings or even crimes it has fallen into such a strife, but with the purpose of drawing from the inquiry the wisdom necessary for extrication from the calamity.
Having done this it will look forward, not straining itself to see how it shall govern itself and regulate its action at long distant periods, but to ascertain where to find the enemy and how most effectually to baffle, overthrow and bind him so that the Nation can yet safely live.
Civil war divides the community, even in those places where the Government retains its accustomed strength and authority, into two classes. One that has the courage adequate to the crisis, the other that has not. Those that have the courage, in other words the virtue, adequate to the crisis rush to the field.
This country has seen 800,000 men rush in this manner to confront the Public Enemy, and this town of 15,000 souls has sent out 4,000 such, of whom you are the first installment which has returned. Among the 800,000 as well as 4,000 there was not one coward nor one traitor. There were none whose minds were troubled about the causes of the conflict, the manner in which it is conducted, or the consequences which shall follow it. Having devoted their strength, and their lives if necessary to the cause of their country, of truth, of humanity, they leave the rest to the care of that Providence which arbitrates at last in all the issues of human strife. The other class are those who stay at home to consider. Many of these, multitudes of them, as loyal and brave as their compatriots in the field are prevented by sickness, infirmity and age from joining the ranks, and others have duties not less important than those of the field. These study only how to sustain, cheer, encourage and reinforce their country's armies. But beside these and among them, mingled with them as the tares with the wheat, are all the cowards, all the traitors that the community has, and it has such because all communities are human, and vice as well as virtue inheres in humanity. In this large assemblage which has come out to greet you, or to witness this solemn ceremony of your discharge from the public service, both these classes are found. We cannot distinguish, nor is it worth our while to attempt to distinguish the one from the other. By their actions hereafter they shall be known. Those who are wise and virtuous will be found urging you to return to the field, and persevere until the battle is won, and will spare no pains, going themselves, if possible, to recruit the ranks which death honorably met has decited. Those who are otherwise will be found still caviling about the causes of the war, about the responsibilities of its unavoidable defeats, about the distribution of honors for the victories gloriously won; they will be found accumulating treasure with one hand and storing it away from the tax gatherer with the other, that they may enjoy it after the patriotism and heroism of better men than themselves have secured the triumph which will enable them to enjoy it in safety. To the young men who I see around me I have to say it is for you to, choose to which of these two classes of the community you will attach yourselves. If you are prepared to join the former the greeting you give to these our brave neighbors returned from the field, are as honorable to you as gratifying to them. If, on the other hand, you think more of your lives, more of your fortunes, more of your personal expectations than you think of your country, your salutations are a mockery, and the sight of these war-worn veterans ought to strike you with confusion and shame.
For myself, if I were within the ages and other conditions of military service, I would not have appeared here on this occasion unless it was to take up the fire lock that one of those our honored neighbors has now come to lay down.
I love the man that will not suffer his name to be written upon the register of the Provost Marshal. It is bad enough to be balloted for as a candidate for a civil office. An honest and loyal man, however, must submit to that sometimes. On the contrary, my neighbors and countrymen should never have a chance to cast lots over me as a conscript, so long as they should leave me at liberty to volunteer. Fair play is a jewel—equality in risks and hazards as well as in profits and honors is the only true justice.
Fellow soldiers, I am desirous only that you shall know that I estimate you as you deserve. I am proud of the whole army of the United States. I bear a grateful affection to every Division and every Corps of it. I am prouder of you and cherish you for a more grateful affection than others, because equally meritorious with the best, you are my nearest, truest and most faithful friends. I have shown this by opening my lips and my heart to you,—lips and a heart that I have never before opened on any occasion since the seal of official responsibility was imposed upon me, when this unhappy war first broke out.
The honor that you receive this day is but the beginning of honors which will be increasing as long you live. In my childhood I followed with love and veneration the steps of the heroes of the Revolution. I saw that love and that veneration become the universal sentiment of the American people, so far that he who had differed from them or opposed them or denied the homage of his respect was deemed unworthy to be an American citizen. Such love and veneration begin to cluster upon you to-day, and they will continue till they reach such a height that when the humblest of you finds his last resting place, here or elsewhere, under the restored and complete authority of our glorious National Union, his son will be deemed to have in his father's fame an inheritance richer than the treasure that can be transmitted to his heirs by the wealthiest among us. Our posterity will look out for the heirs of the soldier and cover them with the gratitude which the father's life-time was too brief to exhaust.
Mr. Seward's speech was received with the greatest applause and enthusiasm by the multitude, and the regiment, after parading through Genesee street, were dismissed.
The case of Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, for shooting and killing Gen. Nelson, has been continued until the next term of the Louisville Circuit Court.

THE MUTINEERS.
OUR HYATTSVILLE CORRESPONDENCE.
Hayattsville, Montgomery Co., Md., Aug. 23, 1861.
The Mutineers of the New York Nineteenth Regiment, &c.
The following is a list of the non-commissioned officers and privates in the Nineteenth New York regiment, Major Ledlie commanding, who refused to obey orders on the 21st inst., and were immediately placed under arrest, the First Pennsylvania Rifles, Colonel Biddle, taking charge of the recusants. The circumstances attending their case have already been communicated to the public through all the commissioned officers that not one of them left the regiment, although some of them are left without companies. These officers will probably proceed North to recruit the regiment, which the Major commanding confidently anticipates will be 1,100 strong in a few weeks. Arrangements have already been perfected for adding to the comforts and amusements of the Nineteenth, and the patriotic citizens of the region in which they were enlisted, the county of Cayuga and that neighborhood, may be expected to contribute material aid in assisting to this end. Major Sedlie has done everything in his power to keep the regiment together, and he is entitled to the credit of retaining as many of the Nineteenth as now express their determination to stand by the government and the honor of old Cayuga until they assist in conquering an honorable peace from the enemy or are honorably discharged. The list of recusants embraces a number of brave fellows, who have been misled into the course they have so unwisely taken. The following is the list:—
LIST OF MEN OF NEW YORK NINETEENTH UNDER ARREST FOR
MUTINY, IN CHARGE OF COLONEL BIDDLE, FIRST PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS.
Company A, Captain John T. Baker—Sergeants J. T. Potter, David McCreary. Corporals—V. B. Wilkinson, Wm. Ferguson. Privates—Andrew Bouen, Chester D. Barnes, John B. Coile, John Frost, Thos. H. Furness, Robt. E. Firth, Moses Grant, Franklin Hayden, Fred Hitchcock, Joseph How, John Lynd, Thos. H. Marks, Chas. Patten, Chas. E. Quigley, Chas. H. Richardson, David Ray, Edward H. Spencer, Andrew J. Tuttle, Judah M. Taylor, Oscar E. Van Buskirk, John Hall, Richard S. White, Henry L. Warner.
None from Company B, Captain Kennedy, of Auburn.
Company C, Captain Ashcroft—Corporal W. E. Bishop. Privates—Robert H. Connell, Patrick Dillon. John Murray, Henry McLaughlin, Peter Jones, Thomas Skidmore, John Sloat.
Company D, Captain Gavigan—First Sergeant Patrick Dinyer, Third Sergeant T. Burke, Fourth Sergeant J. Nolan. Corporals E. Ryan, P. Hamblin, Thomas Head, F. Anderson. Privates—Jas. Donnell, Thomas Holihan, John McKeon, Patrick Keleher, L. McCurtin, Michael Barrett, Thomas Jackson, H. Finlan, Wm. Galvin, Thomas Quirk, D. Scholins, P. Deegan, John O'Brien, James Dwyer, P. O'Brian, D. Doyle, James Moore, Thomas Groen, P. Cullin, Robert Boyle, M. Lacy, F. McCartin, John Hogan, Thomas McGovern, John Purcell, Wm. Buckley, James Ryan, Jas. O'Brien, P. McLaughlin, D. Happy, John Tierney, John Rattigan, A. Reegan, Thos. Murphy, J. Coughlin, Jas. Conley, Thos. T. Ryan, E. Finlin, B. Bohan, John Mullin, Thos. Mulvey, James Tracey, Thomas Burke, E. Murphy, James McCabe, P. Burns, William Finlin, John Sheehan, M. Barnes, D. Monahan, D. Turner, John Howell, John Kelley, John Tierney, D. Dwyer, P. Conway, G. Conway, (drummer), D. McCarthy.
Company E, Captain Schenck—Corporal Rollin D. Wade. Privates—Horace P. Baker, James S. Betts, Samuel Briggs, Stephen Briggs, Charles Brooks, Joseph L. Cronree, William H. Currie, Henry Davis, George O. Dean, William Everts, John Frees, William H. Ferguson, James Gaffney, Darwin Graves, Myron Harrington, Albert Hayward, William Huntley, George Ingersoll, Joseph Kay, George Martin, Irving Palmer, Peter Rosat, Reuben Remington, Charles F. Rynders, Orson Sherwood, Stephen H. Vandermark, John Ward, Augustus Buchanan, James Harris.
Company F, Captain Stevens—First Sergeant E. B. Warren, Second Sergeant D. F. Bothill, Third Sergeant R. Haynes, Fourth Sergeant P. E. Hummell. Corporals—M. Chappell, P. Ames, Orson Clark. Privates—G. H. Barlow, P. Beatts, J. Clark, T. Collier, W. Collier, M. B. Cranson, J. D. Cranson, T. Cordon, J. H. Diverson, D. Frees, C. M. Frith, E. E. Greenfield, D. W. Goodrich, P. Gunman, H. Hoglan, R. Hoglan, A. Hotchkiss, G. Holliday, M. Howard, J. Jane, H. Johnson, T. Kennedy, J. S. Lebron, O. Lily, J. P. Lowe, V. Mann, G. M. Mosier, W. G. Peters, B. Powers, F. Mumney, W. Shriver, M. S. Statee, A. Spoon, J. Spoon, W. Loveland, W. Taylor, J. Taylor, J. Thum, W. Van Tassel, M. Watts, C. C. Whipple, Wm. Whipple, W. P. Wood, W. E. Sanford.
Company G, Captain Stewart—Privates Morgan L. Joslin, Alexander Graham.
None from Company H, Captain Giles.
Company I, Captain Ammon—Privates Edward Babcock, John P. Barber, A. H. Beebee, Elijah Bowen, Samuel Barr, George W. Coates, Wallis Everson, W. W. Fowler, William Mack, Enoch Miles, James Pressor, Roger Quinn, Morris Ryan, James O. Sullivan, Ira Terwilliger, John F. Woodward, Frank B. Nichols.
Company K, Captain Angel—Private Martin C. Wood.

ABSTRACT.
Company A, Non Commissioned 4 Privates 23
Company C, Non Commissioned 1 Privates 7
Company D, Non Commissioned 7 Privates 58
Company E, Non Commissioned. 1 Privates 30
Company F, dNon Commissioned 7 Privates 44
Company G, Non Commissioned -- Privates 2
Company I, Non Commissioned -- Privates 17
Company K, Non Commissioned -- Privates 1
Total 20 182

OFFICERS OF THE NINETEENTH NEW YORK REGIMENT.
Major Commanding, James H. Sedlie.
Regimental Surgeon, Theodore Simon.
Assistant Surgeon, Benjamin Howard.
Adjutant, Lieutenant Henry M. Stone.
Quartermaster, John Chedell.
Commissary, George Ashby.

COMMANDERS OF COMPANIES.
Lieutenant Charles White, commanding Company A. Fifty-nine left.
Captain Terence J. Kennedy, Company B. (Senior Captain.) Full company.
Captain Ashcroft, Company C. Seventy in line.
Captain F.... Cavigan, Company D. All left.
Captain ___ ___, Company E. Thirty-….
Captain Theodore H. Schenck, three men remain.
Captain N. T. Stevens, Company F. Nine men remain, commanded by Lieutenant Squiers, in absence of Captain Stevens.
Captain Charles Stewart, Company G. Full company.
Captain Solomon Giles, Company H. Full company.
Captain John Ammon, Company I. Fifty men remain.
Captain Angel, Company K. Full company.
Whole number enlisted men 702
Recusants 202
Total remaining loyal 500
Thirty-eight commissioned officers remain, making grand total of rank and file of 538.
It should be stated that the mutineers were arrested by Major Sedlie's command, assisted by United States regulars.
Second Lieutenant Eugene Pickett, Company A, Ninth New York regiment, has been presented by his New York friends with an elegant sword and belt. The compliment is worthily bestowed.

HONOR TO THE BRAVE.
Funerals of Capt. Sullivan and Lieut. Irwin.
The remains of two officers who perished in their country's service were conveyed yesterday, with appropriate honors, to their final resting places.
Both these officers died at Key West, Florida, in 1862, by yellow fever. Their remains were brought to this city in accordance with a resolution of the Common Council. The bodies were enclosed in handsome coffins.
The inscription on Lieutenant Irwin's coffin was as follows:
" Lieutenant John J. Irwin, Nineteenth Regiment New York Volunteers, died at Key West, Florida, August 31st, 1864, aged twenty-three years."
A detachment of the Thirteenth Regiment, N. G., formed the military escort of Capt. Sullivan's funeral. A large number of friends accompanied the procession. The remains were taken to the Cemetery of the Holy
Cross.
A battalion of the Forty-seventh Regiment N. G. paid the last honors to the body of Lieut. Irwin. The remains were taken to the Mount Olive Cemetery, in Newtown, Queens County.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: August 6, 2007
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/19thInf/19thInfCWN.htm

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