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23rd Regiment
New York Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

RETURN OF THE 23D REGIMENT.
— RECEPTION OF CAPT. SCHLICK'S COMPANY.
The 23d Regiment—one of the first to respond to the first call for troops, two years ago—reached Elmira on Wednesday last, having served the full term of its enlistment. With a due appreciation of the services of this gallant Regiment, the citizens of Elmira turned out en masse and gave the boys a rousing reception. This Regiment has been peculiarly fortunate, and returned with more able men, we believe, than any other from this section of the State, that volunteered under the call for two year troops. But this arises from no lack of prompt and efficient service, for the 23d has always sustained itself nobly, and did its whole duty. The selection of prudent and thoroughly military officers went far toward accomplishing so desirable a result, and we feel truly thankful that so many brave boys are spared from the dangers and privations which they so cheerfully encountered two years ago, when the first booming of rebel cannon reached the ears of the freemen of the North.
At a late hour on Friday, our citizens were notified that Capt. Schlick’s Company would arrive in Bath at 2 P. M. on Saturday, and up to that hour all seemed either busy with preparation or impatient for the hour to arrive that was to bring their friends.
At the appointed hour an immense crowd had assembled at the Depot, and as the train drew up to the platform and the soldiers made their appearance, a genuine old-fashioned hurrah rent the air—a welcome to the weather-beaten heroes—the martial band struck up a lively tune, and the procession moved up the street, headed by the band, followed next by the firemen, then by Capt. Schlick’s Company, and a miscellaneous rear guard of citizens, sufficient in number for a first class Army corps. The procession was under direction of Capt. Monroe Brundage, assisted by Marshal Breck, and as it moved through the principal streets of the village, a thousand handkerchiefs were waved by fair hands from the windows and balconies of the houses, in token of their admiration of the little band of patriots.
Arriving at the Court House, the soldiers were addressed by Rev. O. R. Howard, in a few well selected and timely remarks, when they were ushered within, where a most bountiful and capital dinner, prepared by the ladies, awaited them. It was a novel spectacle—those sun-burnt veterans of the war forced to an assault unlike anything laid down or provided for in Scott's, or anybody else's, military tactics; completely flanked and surrounded by a swarm of pretty girls and fair ladies, and compelled to ignore "hard tack" and pork, while they feasted upon the abundance of good things spread for their reception. Like true American soldiers, they played their part gallantly: but like too many unfortunate "lords of creation," they were obliged in due time to "beat a retreat," and leave the ladies masters of the field.
The reception given to Capt. Schlick and his command was a most pleasant affair, and was appreciated fully by the soldiers, who were frank to admit that it exceeded their highest expectation.
Since the organization of the 23d, Capt. Schlick's Company roll cumbered 87 men.—He returns with 60, including officers. Two of his company who went out in the ranks, B. Bennitt, Esq., of Hammondsport, and Geo. B. Staniford, of this village, return as Lieutenants, and both have made capital of officers. The company has participated in eight general engagements, among which were the second battle of Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, and the first battle of Fredericksburg, besides numerous skirmishes. Four men have been killed outright, four have died, a few were detached for battery service, and quite a number discharged on account of wounds and ill health.
Capt. Schlick has been with his company since its organization, and has never missed a march or battle. He has proved himself an able, thorough and competent commander, and should he again enter the service, we confidently expect him to receive a higher position than the one he has so faithfully filled for the past two years, and to which his experience and military ability so justly entitles him.
The Company is to return to Elmira this afternoon, where they are to be formally mustered out of service.
The citizens of Elmira are taking measures to give a grand reception to the 23d Regiment, which is expected home before the 16th inst. The President of the village, T. S. Spalding, Esq., has written to Col. Hoffman to notify him of the fact, and to learn when the Regiment will reach Elmira. This Regiment has earned a glorious reputation during its two years of service. A majority of those who so gaily went forth have been discharged from sickness, died of disease, or been slain in battle, and this fact will be painfully apparent and awaken emotions of anguish to many as they behold the thinned ranks of the returning Regiment. While we mourn for those who come not back with them, for those who sleep beneath the turf, victims to this Slaveholder's Rebellion, let us rejoice at the opportunity to welcome with full hearts and open hands the shattered remnant of the "Twenty-Third."
Capt. L. Todd, late of the 23d Regiment, is ...ing a company for the 15th N. Y. Cavalry. This is an excellent opportunity for those who wish to get into the Cavalry services. Captain Todd is an experienced officer, having served two years with much credit, and those who wish to secure good pay, bounty and an attractive service, will do well to sign his roll.

FROM THE 23d REGIMENT.
Belle Plain, Virginia,
January 23d, 1863.
FRIEND BARNES:
The Army of the Potomac have made a "forward and back again" movement, this time, however, the hindrance emanating from a higher source, than the Southern Confederacy. Some of the Artillery men inform us that on the second day's advance they were only able to make two miles, and some of their guns a mile apart, at that. We presume the next move well be "Halleck's grand change." When the Army of the Potomac, will be one of the "has beens;" But, "go on with the music." Unless inducements are held out, large enough to keep us on the "floor" for another "sett," we expect to "seat our partners" in about one hundred days.
As for this detachment of the 23d Reg't., we get along with our duties, as "Provost Guard," very well, although the weather has been quite stormy, and "soft" underfoot, for the last week. The men get wet one twenty-four hours, and then have forty-eight, to dry themselves in. The most of the "forage" for the army is unloaded at this landing. We guard the grain and hay from being wrongfully taken away; prevent all "contraband goods," which generally means whiskey, being brought on shore; arrest all dealers in the article; drive away all pedlers, except authorized sutlers, and occasionally pick up a "three years, unless sooner shot" soldier, who has got homesick and attempts to get there without the "papers."
We have our quarters arranged, again, so as to be agreeable. Capt. Schlick has a "Sibley tent" and stove, for his special use in which "Court Martials" are held, being appointed "Acting Field Officer" of the Regiment, for that purpose. All violators of military rules are brought before him, to have their case investigated and be dealt with "according to law."
The health of Co. A is quite good, with the exception of two or three slightly ailing in camp, and Gil. H. May, who has been in Hospital some days, with "Typhoid fever," but is getting better, so that he has been visiting the Co., to-day, Yours. &c.
E. E. O.

The Twenty-third Regiment reached Elmira on Wednesday. Among those awaiting it was a young lady from Cortland, who, on its arrival, was to marry one of its officers, Capt. Clark, to whom she was engaged before the war. The train came, but instead of bringing the young Captain full of life and with buoyant hope, it bought his corpse. He had been killed but a few hours before near Williamsport by coming in contact with a bridge. The bride was overwhelmed with grief, and was borne away by sorrowing friends. The party returned to Cortland, bearing the remains of Capt. Clark-a mourning troupe indeed.

Another good soldier from this town has fallen a victim to disease. Corporal Timothy Gillins of East Painted Post, of Co. F, 23d Regiment, died at his fathers residence on Friday. We regret that none of his friends have sent us the particulars concerning his age and services. We learn that he was an intelligent, upright and faithful soldier. He was wounded at the battle of Antietam, and rejoined his company as soon as he recovered.
About the middle of March, we were about to step on the boat at Belle Plains, Va., as he spoke to us and introduced himself. He was then on guard. He expressed himself well pleased with the service notwithstanding its dangers and hardships, and stated that he thought he should re-enlist. He spoke warmly of the anticipated return home within two months. He was then in full health, but was soon after taken with a fever and when the Regiment came home he was left at Washington. He improved so that he was brought home a few days ago, only to die. He was buried on Sunday. It was not generally known here or there would have doubtless been many from this village present to pay the last tribute of respect to our patriotic townsman.

WELCOME TO RETURNED SOLDIERS.
The Steuben Advocate of last week publishes full particulars of the return home of the officer's and privates of Capt. Schlick's Company of the 23d Regiment, to that village, on the Saturday previous, of the cordial welcome tendered them, and of the sumptuous dinner provided for the occasion. Among its allusions to some of the officers of that regiment, we notice the following complimentary history of Capt. F. B. Doty, commanding Co. G of the 23d Regt., who was present and participated in the entertainment.
" Capt. Doty is a son of the old hotel keeper of that name, well-known to the older citizens of Hornellsville and Steuben county. At the time of the breaking out of the rebellion he was at Fort Pickens near Mobile. He hastened home and joined the first Hornellsville company, then being organized by Lieut.-Col. Crane, as a private. When Mr. Crane was made Lt.-
Col. at the organization of the 23d Regiment, Mr. Doty was selected as the most suitable person to take command of the company; and he was promoted to Captain. Without any ostentation or noise, he brought his company to a State of discipline and perfection in drill, scarcely excelled by any in the Regiment.—His quiet, unassuming disposition as a man, and his firmness as an officer, have made him beloved by both officers and men. His company have made no march without him at their head. He fought at their head at Rappahannock Crossing, Sulphur Springs, Gainesville, Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredcricksburg. At Bull Run he lost six of his company killed and wounded, and one taken prisoner. At Antietam he lost eleven more, and others in different fights. His company is sadly reduced from its original number. Lieut. Bennett informs us that at Antietam he saw Capt. Doty take and disarm a secesh with his own hands.

Gen.Wadsworth and his Old Brigade.
The following extract from a letter, written by Major Wm. Gregg, of the 23d Regiment New York, shows the estimation in which Gen Wadsworth is held by the members of his old Brigade;—
We learn with pleasure that our old Brigadier General, James S. Wadsworth, is the candidate of the Union party for Governor. It would be gratifying to his old brigade to add their united vote to his majority in the State. If it were possible for them to go to the polls, their vote would be given to him without a dissenting voice, even Colonel Hoffman, Lieut. Hiram Smith, and Lieut. Davoe—ultra Democrats as they always have been—have expressed a wish to see him elected, and would gladly give him their votes if they had the privilege.
I see that John Van Buren says he would willingly let the New York Volunteers settle the question, but he is no more in earnest in that than he was when in 1848, he assured the people that his father would be elected to the Presidency. It was painful to me to read his last speech. I had hoped that a year's quiet and retirement would have restored him to reason. It was no doubt painful to you and all his old friends who are familiar with his political history. I think if he would compare his last effort with the speech he made at Herkimer, in 1847, at a convention got up by himself for the purpose of defeating the Democratic ticket for the alleged reason that the
Syracuse Convention had refused to endorse the Wilmot proviso, he would probably follow the advice he then tendered to Croswell, who had by a flourish, similar to John's letter to Gov. Morgan, tendered his services to the Government then at war with Mexico. The advice was that the crafty editor should tender his services upon the side of the enemy, and then betray them as he had the Democracy.
Now, if Mr. Van Buren is in earnest, and wishes to get the country out of the trouble he has contributed so largely to get us into, I would suggest that a man of his experience in the kind of tactics he pointed out for Mr. Croswell, would be of great benefit to it by enlisting under the Confederate banner, and at a convenient time betray them, as he did his old political friends' James S. Wadsworth, Robert Campbell, Jr., L. Robinson, and thousands of others in our State, and then coolly asks Jeff. Davis after all was over if he was really in earnest in the rebellion.
Yours, &c.,
WM. GREGG.

To The Front.— We learn from private sources that Capt. Dan. Blatchford left Elmira on the 18th inst., for the seat of war, with a fine company of men recruited in this city for the 179th Regiment N. Y. Vols., to be commanded by Col. Wm. F. Gregg, late Major of the 23d N. Y. Vols.
Capt. Blatchford has associated with him as officers, 1st Lieut. John Hoy and 2nd Lieut., John Ottenot, late of the 21st N. Y. Vols. The Captain has been an energetic servant for the Government, having recruited upwards of 140 men for the service. Capt. Blatchford and his Lieutenants are self-made men, and we have no doubt they will prove efficient officers to the service.
We wish them further success.
We understand that a work is about to be issued by some one in the 23d
Regiment entitled: "Camp Fires of the Twenty-Third." It will contain a spicy recital of the doings of the 23d, and will be eagerly sought and read.
The Remarks of Lieut. Felton.--The remains of Lieut. Charles G. Felton of the 22d N. Y. V., arrived this morning, and were taken in charge by undertaker Ryan. One notice of the funeral will be given hereafter.

Promoted.—Capt. Schlick, late of the 23d Regt., and who raised the first Company organized in our village, has been commissioned Major in the 22d N. Y. Cavalry. Lieut. Bennitt, also of the old 23d. has been commissioned Captain in the 22d N. Y. Cavalry.--Bath Advocate.

UNION MEETINGS.
Rev. J. De Bois, late Chaplain 23d New York State Volunteers, will speak in behalf of Union principles and candidates, at
Mayville, Sept. 29 Delanti, ..................Oct. 15
Rusti, " 30 Sinclearville, ..........................." 16
Kiantone, Oct. 1 Bucklin's Corners .........." 17
Frewsburg, " 2 Ellery Center, ..................." 19
Kennedy, " 3 Jamestown, ........................." 20
Ellington, " 5 Ashville, ................................" 21
Cherry Creek," 6 Panama, ........................." 22
Omar, " 7 Clymer, ....................................." 23
Arkwright, " 8 Sherman, ............................" 24
Forestville, " 9 Mina, ................................." 26
Silver Creek, " 10 Quincy, ........................." 27
Sherman Center, 12 Westfield, .................." 28
Dunkirk, " 13 Centerville, .........................." 29
Fredonia, " 14 Salem, ................................" 30
Speaking will commence at 7 o'clock, P. M.
By Order Co. Com.

UNION MEETINGS.—Rev. J. DeBois, late Chaplain 23d N. Y. S. Vols. will speak in behalf of Union principles and candidates, at
Forestville, Oct.................. 9.
Silver Creek,.................... " 10.
Sheridan Center,.............. " 12.
Dunkirk,........................... " 13.
Fredonia,.......................... " 14.
Delanti, ............................." 15.
Sinclerville,........................ " 16.
Bucklins Corner, ................" 17.
Ellery Center,..................... " 19.
Jamestown,........................ " 20.
Ashville,............................ " 21.
Panama,............................. " 22.
Clymer,.............................. " 23.
Sherman,.............................. 24.
Mina,.................................... 26.
Quincy,................................. 27.
Westfield,........................... " 28.
Centerville,......................... " 29.
Salem,................................. " 30.
Meetings at 7 o'clock in the Evening.
By order of the Co. Union Com.

Union Meetings.--Rev. J. DeBois, late Chaplain 23d N. Y. S. Vols. will speak in behalf of Union principles and candidates, at
Sinclerville,................................Oct. 16.
Bucklins Corner,.......................... " 17.
Ellery Center,.............................. " 19.
Jamestown,.................................. " 20.
Ashville,...................................... " 21.
Panama,....................................... " 22.
Clymer,....................................... " 23.
Sherman, ………………............ " 24.
Mina, ……………………………" 26.
Quincy,........................................ " 27.
Westfield,………….................... " 28.
Centerville,................................. " 29.
Salem,......................................... " 30.
Meetings at 7 o'clock in the Evening.
By order of the Co. Union Com.

UNION MEETINGS.--Rev. J. DeBois, late Chaplain 23d N. Y. S. Vols. will speak in behalf of Union principles and candidates, at
Frewsburg,............... October 2.
Kennedy ………………….." 3.
Ellington,………………… " 5.
Cherry Creek, .................... " 6.
Omar, …………………….." 7.
Arkwright ………………...” 8.
Forestville ……………......." 9.
Silver Creek, …………....." 10.
Sheridan Center,............... " 12.
Dunkirk, …………………" 13.
Fredonia, ………………..." 14.
Delanti, …………………." 15.
Sinclerville,....................... " 16.
Bucklins Corner ………...." 17.
Ellery Center, ……………" 19.
Jamestown, ………………" 20.
Ashville, ........................... " 21.
Panama,............................. " 22.
Clymer,............................. " 23.
Sherman, ……………….." 24.
Mina ……………………." 26.
Quincy,…………………. " 27.
Westfield ,........................ " 28.
Centerville,...................... " 29.
Salem,............................. " 30.
Meetings at 7 o'clock in the Evening.
By order of the Co. Union Com.

Interesting from Our Regular Army Correspondent.
Letter from Fred. Burritt.
CAMP 23D, UPTON'S HILL. VA.,
October 23, 1861.
Editors Advertiser:—
I had promised myself to not write another letter until some brilliant achievement of this battalion should furnish the occasion for a little exultant jollification over a successful battle, but conclude to profit by the illustrious example of the prudent Gen. Patterson in July last, and have the glorification in advance,—the minutiae and details of valorous deeds in expectancy.
The order was to cook three days' rations immediately at ten o'clock Monday night and the same allowance of pork and pilot bread is required to be kept ready for the haversack, but the peremptory command to harness and fall in, though momentarily due may not be given in a week.
Conjecture was busy yesterday morning between the probabilities of a diverting attack toward Manasses and an expedition to remove the piratical blockade of the river below, and in the midst of a cold autumnal rain with the Virginia mud as treacherous to the sole as the skin of a live eel to the grasp of a fisherman, a long pedestrian excursion promised no delights. A load of telegraphic wire was brought up here some days since, to be used somewhere in the wake of an advancing column. The hospitals across the Potomac are prepared for the reception of an increased number of inmates, and those who are so diseased or disabled as to be of no service in the ranks for months to come, will be sent home if possible. Among this class are a few who have persisted in becoming and remaining sick and disabled in the hope of discharge. Shirking their share of the labor of soldiering, a drag to the army, a bore to the Surgeons and a damage to the service,--for if they acquire any knowledge of tactics, their attainments are of as much value to Beauregard as to us, without the expense of their maintenance. To the few who have so mistaken their calling and honorable obligations, we all say—God speed homeward.
This and the Twenty-First regiment have finished their labors on two small pentagonal earth works a short distance in front, which will mount seven guns each, and the cannon are also mounted in the fort at Upton's House, so we consider our digging duties finished in this immediate neighborhood.
We have also erected two field breastworks here for the use of the light battery at our left elbow in case they might be needed for the protection of the cannoniers. The Massachusetts 18th, 22d and 9th, with several batteries are still tented on the hills to the right and nearly a mile distant from our "right bower" the Twenty-First. All of these troops are in hourly readiness to pull up stakes. Behind them and in the neighborhood of where Hall's house was burned are a number of Pennsylvania regiments and Stuart's regiment among them. I paid them a visit on Monday, and found all well and in good spirits and improving their time much in drilling.
The Twenty-Fifth New York, are also in their vicinity having left our brigade last week. Colonel Kerrigan, ex-Councilman of N. Y., Congressman & c., lately in command of that regiment is now under arrest charged with attempt to encourage insubordination and mutiny.
We all have the utmost confidence in Gen. Wadsworth and respect for his bravery—though he seems utterly regardless of personal safety and never sends a man, even when scouting, where he would not go himself. The N. Y. 14th Militia, of Key's brigade say that he was the only General they could see, on the battle field at Bull Run.
He made a reconnoisance last week, with a small squad of Cavalry and four Companies of the 35th, in all one hundred and seventy men, to a point within a mile of Fairfax, C. H., the rebel pickets firing and falling bock at his approach. He stationed his men and went alone to inspect the enemy, and found a brigade of infantry with cavalry and cannon in line of battle, expecting an attack. He remained with his handful of men in that neighborhood till he was ordered back.
Gratifying order just come to pack, hitch up and leave at three P. M. Air cool and bracing, and we are much rejoiced—but wish the General would tell us all who can keep a secret where we are going. You at home will know before this reaches you.—
Yours, &c.,
FRED BURRITT.

 

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