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28th Regiment
New York Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

ARRIVAL OF THE 28TH REGIMENT.—Last evening at 8 o'clock this regiment arrived per Hudson River Railroad. The bells were rung for the firemen to assemble at their houses and under the direction of the Chief and Assistant Engineers they turned out and gave the war-worn veterans a torchlight reception.

Honor to the Brave.
It will be seen by the following notice that the noble project of erecting a monument to the brave Colonel Donnelly is to be commenced upon Friday. The gallant leader of the 28th, who went with them and before them, in to the field of carnage and of death, should be remembered by generations yet unborn. When the first note of treason was heard in the land and when the Executive called forth the first army of volunteers, to repel its foul assumptions, Col. Donnelly placed himself at the head of the heroic 28th and went to meet the foe. All honor to the memory of Col. Donnelly.

HEAD QUARTERS 28th N. Y. V.,
LOCKPORT MAY 25, 1863.
The officers, non-commissioned officers and privates of the 28th Regiment, N. Y. V., are requested to meet at the Fairgrounds, in this village, on Friday the 29th inst., at 10 o'clock A. M., where the Regiment will be formed and marched to the Cold Spring Cemetery, for the purpose of laying the foundation stone of the Monument to the late Col. Dudley Donnelly, with appropriate ceremonies.
Officers and men will parade in uniform with arms.
E. F. BROWN,
Col. 28th, N. Y. V.

More Regiments Returning.
The 28th Regiment (Lockport) left New York at 10 o'clock this morning, by rail road, and will reach the city this evening between 6 and 7 o'clock.

The 28th Regiment.
This Regiment passed through to Lockport on the noon train Wednesday. Preparations were made there to give the regiment a grand reception. The committee of reception from this place went up by same train, but up to the time of our going to press, (Wednesday evening) had not returned, so that we are not advised when Co. G. will come to Albion. Probably, however, to-day or tomorrow.

THE RECEPTION OF THE 28TH REGIMENT AT LOCKPORT.--The 28th Regiment, which passed through here yesterday, was received by an immense crowd upon the arrival of the train at Lockport. The people turned out en masse for many miles in the country, to welcome home the brave boys, whose sufferings and heroism have won the admiration of the whole country. The village, for once, might have been called a "deserted village," as the people flocked to the depot by thousands, to greet the men whose career had been watched with so much solicitude during the past two years. It was estimated by some that there was from 18,000 to 20,000 people present. The arrival of the train was greeted with prolonged and vociferous cheers.

LOCAL DEPARTMENT.
To the Citizens of Albany.
During the past week the Firemen of Albany have rendered willing service, at the request of the Common Council in extending attentions to the returned regiments. Suspending their accustomed labors cheerfully and promptly, they were on constant duty for three days acting as escort to the gallant heroes who have returned home from the battle-fields of Virginia. They do not deem themselves entitled to any special praise for the services so rendered, and yet they are gratified to be assured that their efforts have been appreciated by their fellow citizens. Now while so many are acknowledging their obligations to our Department, it may not be out of place to remind them that they can give substantial proof of their good feeling in a most praiseworthy manner. It is known to all our citizens that, connected with the Department, is a Board of Trustees, who have the control of a small invested fund, amounting to less than $6,000, the interest of which, together with the per-centage on premiums from foreign insurance companies, is disbursed by them in aiding the widows and orphans of deceased Firemen. Since the first of January last the calls on them for assistance have more than doubled. Among those now dependent on them to a very great extent for their support and maintenance, are the widows, and orphans of several Firemen who entered the army and sacrificed their lives while fighting for the Union. These widows and orphans must be provided for. They have a pecuiliar [sic] and sacred claim on the Department as well as our citizens. The available fund at the disposal of the Trustees is almost exhausted, and unless some steps are taken to replenish the Treasury, those who look to the Board for their monthly allowances must be left to suffer. This should not—must be. Surely the citizens of Albany will not be appealed to in vain. The object is a noble one indeed. It is cherished with extreme devotion by every Fireman, and now, while "their praise is in every person's mouth," let that praise be made manifest by contributions in aid of the widows. The Fireman seek no reward for his own services. He will gladly devote his time and energies to the performance of the duties assumed by him, without fee or recompense. But he does ask of you, citizens of Albany, to remember the soldier's widow and his orphan children. Let not his appeal be in vain. Every one should feel it a privilege to give something to this fund, and we hope we shall be permitted to acknowledge the receipt of donations, which will enable the Trustees to continue to cheer the hearts of those who now look to them so earnestly and prayerfully for relief.

A NEW REGIMENT TO BE RAISED IN LOCKPORT.--
We learn that Colonel Fiske, of Suspension Bridge, is about to raise a new regiment of Mounted Rifles, of which E. W. Cooks, of Lockport, late of the 28th Regiment, is to be Lieutenant Colonel. The headquarters of the new regiment will be established at Lockport, and it is to be largely officered from the late 28th Regiment, many of the members of which, it is expected, will join the new organization.

GOING TO PENNSYLVANIA.--Capt. W. W. Bush and Lieut. Peter B. Kelchner, both gallant members of the glorious 28th, have telegraphed to the proper authorities in Pennsylvania, for transportation, and, propose to take as many men as can by raised in a day or two to the relief of the Keystone State. They propose to volunteer for 60 days.
This is a most noble and patriotic move and we trust it may be most liberally responded to. Already volunteered and still they come. For volunteering or information call on Capt. Bush or Lieut. Kelchner at Shaft's Insurance office on Main street.

Arrival of the 28th (Lockport) Regiment, Col. J. Brown.
This Regiment reached the city at 8 o'clock last evening, and took supper at the Delavan House.
After supper, the Fire Department and Schrieber's Band, appeared as escort, with torches. The procession was gorgeous and highly creditable to the Department. It was a compliment which the heroes deserved and appreciated, and for which the Department have the thanks of their fellow-citizens—who appreciate their patriotic zeal in the discharge of this unusual duty.
After passing through several streets, the Regiment was escorted to the Barracks. They joined the 18th in its visit to the Governor this morning.
The 28th Regiment New York Volunteers was organized under the "Act of the 16th of April," and mustered into the service of the United States on the 23d of May, 1861, for the period of two years.
They reached Washington on the 27th of June, 1861, since which time they have been emphatically a marching regiment.
On the 6th of July, they left Washington and crossed the Potomac at Williamsport on the 9th, and joined Gen. PATTERSON in his march on Winchester. PATTERSON'S expedition only reached Bunker Hill, and then returned to Harper's Ferry, arriving there the 21st of July.
During the fall and winter the regiment was actively engaged picketing the Potomac. During this time a detachment of the regiment crossed the river and captured a company of Rebel cavalry.
They were ordered to join Gen. STONE in the disaster of Ball's Bluff, but arrived too late. They, however, rendered great aid in recrossing the troops of Gen. STONE'S command.
On the 6th of January, the command was marched to Hancock, Md., to repel the attack of JACKSON on that place. Here they remained until the 1st of March, 1862.
On the 1st of March they again crossed the river at Williamsport, and joined the forces of Gen. BANKS in their march on Winchester. They were engaged in skirmishing frequently, until they reached Winchester, and the Rebels were driven out. After the defeat of JACKSON by Gen. SHIELDS, they took up the pursuit of the flying Rebels, skirmishing with their rear guard all the way to Harrisonburg—a distance of ninety miles from the Potomac.
At Columbia Furnace, (near Woodstock,) Company E captured, by a forced march and a gallant charge, sixty men and horses, with their accoutrements complete.
About the 1st of May, BANKS' forces commenced retiring from Harrisonburg, and retreated as far as Strasburg. On the 28th of May the famous retreat of Gen. BANKS commenced. The 28th were engaged in a running fight with the Rebels all that day, and on the morning of the 25th were engaged in the second battle of Winchester—behaved with great gallantry, and were the last regiment to leave the field, which they did in line of battle and in perfect order.
They arrived at Williamsport on the morning of the 26th, having marched sixty miles and fought a battle of three hours duration in forty-eight hours. In the action and retreat the regiment lost about seventy men. The regiment recrossed the river with Gen. BANKS, and on the 9th of July were engaged in the battle of Cedar Mountain, leading in the famous charge of CRAWFORD'S Brigade. In this action the regiment went in with 320 men, and lost 209. The gallant Col. DONNELLY was killed, Lieut. Col. BROWN lost an arm, Adjutant SPROUT was killed, Major COOK was taken prisoner, and every line officer was either wounded or taken prisoner. During the retreat of Gen. POPE'S army the regiment was frequently under heavy fire.
At Antietam the remnant of the regiment was among the first engaged under Gen. MANSFIELD, fought gallantly, and were among the last of MANSFIELD'S Corps to be withdrawn from the field.
After the battle of Antietam the regiment built the extensive fortifications on Maryland Heights. During the past winter they have been lying near Stafford Court House.
In the late battle of Chancellorsville, Lieut. Col. COOK was in command. The regiment opened the engagement on Friday, May 1st, behaved with great gallantry, and were loth to retire when ordered so to do. On Saturday evening they were nearly surrounded by Rebels, and lost about eighty men, including Lieut. Col. COOK, formerly Major, who was again taken prisoner. The remainder managed to escape, only to be engaged in the bloody battle of Sunday.
In this action the total loss was nearly one hundred in killed, wounded and prisoners.
FIELD OFFICERS.
Colonel—Edwin F. Brown.
Lieutenant Colonel—E. W. Cook.
Major—T. Fitzgerald.
STAFF OFFICERS.
Surgeon—J. E. West.
Assistant Surgeon—R. T. Paine, Jr.
Adjutant—George Davis.
Quartermaster—E. A. Swan.
LINE OFFICERS.
Company A—Captain, C. L. Skeels; First Lieutenant, Jeremiah Long; Second Lieutenant L. D. C. Gaskill.
Company B—Captain, N. W. Bush; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, P. B. Kelchner.
Company C— Captain, William P. Warren; First Lieutenant, N. E. G. Wadhams; Second Lieutenant, Charles Baker.
Company D—Captain, L. Chaffee; First Lieutenant, C. T. Southworth; Second Lieutenant, F. B. Seeley.
Company E—Captain, W. W. Rowley; First Lieutenant, Harvey Padelford; Second Lieutenant, ____ Gulick.
Company F—Captain, W. S. Fenn; First Lieutenant, Geo. M. Ellicott; Second Lieutenant, L. R. Bailey.
Company G—Captain, A. B. Judd; First Lieutenant, Wm. N. Kenyon; Second Lieutenant, James Smith.
Company H—Captain, J. C. Terry; First Lieutenant, F. N. Wicker; Second Lieutenant ____ Buckbee.
Company J—Captain, T. P. Gould; First Lieutenant, J. D. Woods; Second Lieutenant. J. J. Sullivan.
Company K—Captain, J. D. Ames; First Lieutenant, M. F. Warfield; Second Lieutenant, N. O. Allen.

List of Officers and Men of the 28th New York Volunteers, Killed, Wounded and Missing in the late action.
Killed—J. H. Hogle, Co. E, May 1st.
Wounded—Jas. Cook, Co. D, gunshot wound in hand; Wm. G. Wade, Co. D, gunshot wound in abdomen; Loren Hayner, Co. D, gunshot wound in left arm; John Smith, Co. D, gunshot wound in groin; Fred. Lureman, gunshot wound in hip; Thos. Purcell, Co. D, gunshot wound in hand.
Missing—Lieut. Col. E. W. Cook Capt. John C. Terry, Co. H; Capt. La Fayette Chaffee, Co. D; 1st Lieut. William M. Kenyon, Co. G; Sergt. O. L. Teachout, Sergt. W. L. Hicks, Sergt. C. P. Akins, Corp. A. J. Warner, Corp. J. W. Moore, T. J. Anderson, La Fayette Lee, Porter Stephens, William Smith, J. Taylor, William H. Irwin, H. Ihnes, B. F. Gage, J. McMynn, M. L. Parkhurst, of Co. E; Sergt. William Collins, Sergt. C. S. Johnson, Corp. Thos. Brown, Corp. Peter Gulph, Sam. Avery, Albert Bean, Oscar Barber, James Deppa, John Duffey, John Hanratty, Elliott Hoagland, Wm. Lamb, Edward Lankist, E. W. Lansfield, Geo. M. Moore, Francis Mooney, Owen McAllister, Joseph McMahan, Warren W. Putnam, Edward St. John, John Welch, of Co. G; Sergt. L. M. Young, Sergt. N. B. Bradley, Sergt. Len Kimball, Sergt. Graham Moffitt, Corp. L. C. Vanduzor. Corn. J. W. Smith. E. Baker. B. Burns, R. Burr, Jos. Babcock, W. H. Curry, A. Eichman, N. H. Grant, C. T. Kent, A. Kinney, W. McEntire, John Miner, J. W. Pinney, S. Pratt, H. Staib, S. McWilliams, of Co. H; Sergt. Wm. Lewis, Sergt. Burrie Swift, Sergt. Oscar Bayne, Corp. Frank Sanderson, N. W. Cady, John O. Swan, musician, Geo. Nelson, D. Ainsworth, James F. Dunham, Charles W. Boyce, of Co. D.

Recapitulation.
Killed       1
Wounded       6
Missing officers     4
Missing enlisted men    67
Total........................................ 78

A NEW REGIMENT TO BE RAISED AT LOCKPORT.—We learn that Col. Fiske, of Suspension Bridge, is about to raise a new regiment
of Mounted Rifles, of which E. W. Cooke of Lockport, late of the 28th Regiment, is to be Lieutenant Colonel. The headquarters of the new regiment will be established at Lockport, and it is to be largely officered from the late 28th Regiment, many of the members of which, it is expected, will join the new organization. Dr. Robert T. Paine, jr., late Assistant Surgeon of the 28th, has been appointed Surgeon of Col. Fiske's Regiment, and passed through the city yesterday to assume the duties of the position. Dr. Paine was with the 28th through all the long marches and terrific battles in which that regiment was engaged, and was most of the time acting surgeon. He was only absent once from the regiment—and then on a brief leave of absence—while it was in the service. Col. Fiske and Lieut. Col. Cook are both experienced military men, and we have no doubt the brave veterans of the 28th will rapidly rally round their standard. The drafted men of that district will find this a good regiment to enlist in.

Reception of the 28th Regiment—The Prisoners of the Regiment Returned Home.
Yesterday was the greatest day the village of Lockport has seen for a number of years. The occasion—the reception of the war-worn veterans of the 28th N. Y. V. The turnout was immense, and as the boys disembarked from the cars they were greeted with tumultuous cheering, and congratulations poured in upon all sides. A procession and reception was in the programme, which was carried out. But the absent ones caused many a heart to bleed, and the sobs and tears of the many who had lost near and dear friends were a sad comparison to the notes of joy and gladness. The regiment, however, received a befitting reception, and the hearts of the volunteers must have been touched by the affectionate attention and reception they had received.
One of the most joyful features of the return of the 28th Regiment was the arrival upon the succeeding train of sixty-eight of the Regiment, mostly Co. G, who were taken prisoners at Chancellorsville, they having been exchanged. Lieut. Col. Cook was held as hostage for one of equal rank as was likewise Lieut. Kenyon. The friends of these men who mourned their absence upon the return of the Regiment soon had reason to be most thankful.

(Medina May 30, 1863)
HONOR TO THE VOLUNTEERS.
On Saturday of the present week the citizens of this and Niagara County are invited to be present and join with us in honoring the glorious 28th, and all other soldiers who may be present with us. The 28th Regiment has borne itself nobly in the field, and it is due to the brave men composing it, that we show them that we appreciate their gallant conduct.
Hon. Noah Davis, Jr., is to present and address the assemblage. Judge Davis is an able and popular speaker and we shall be entertained on the occasion. It is peculiarly appropriate that he should deliver the address on this day, as he made the great speech in the organization of this Regiment and helped to secure the money pledged for their families. Let us have a grand turn out. Come one, come all! Bring out your mothers, wives, sisters and all. There will be a grand dinner, and all are invited to contribute and help make merry on Saturday next.

ARRIVAL OF A COMPANY OF PAROLED PRISONERS.—A company of about sixty-five paroled prisoners, attached to the 28th Regiment, N. Y. S V., reached here yesterday, and took the 9 o'clock train for Lockport. The regiment to which they were attached, left here at 11 o'clock night before last.

HONOR TO THE BRAVE.
Grand Demonstration in Honor of the Returned Soldiers.
At a meeting of the citizens of Medina, a committee was appointed to make arrangements for such a demonstration as would, in a measure, express the gratitude of the People to the gallant men of Company D, and other returned soldiers who may join with them on that occasion, for the services they have rendered our country during the two years of this wicked Rebellion; and in accordance with the wishes of the people, the committee unanimiously [sic] adopted the following resolutions:
RESOLVED, That we invite, in behalf of the citizens of Medina and vicinity Co. D, 28th Regiment, N. Y. Vols., to a public demonstration on Saturday, May 30th, in this place, in honor of its noble and brave men.
RESOLVED, That we invite the Field and Staff officers, and the commandants of Companies, with their respective commands of Companies A, B, C, E, F, G, H, and K, 28th Regiment, N. Y. Vols., to attend a public demonstration in this village, on Saturday, May 30th, in honor of Company D, of the same Regiment, and unite with them in the exercises of the day.
RESOLVED, That we also invite all honorably discharged soldiers of the present war, and those of other Companies, Batteries or Regiments now in the service who may be in this vicinity on furlough; and also soldiers of the war of 1812, residing in the vicinity of Medina and adjoining towns, to be present and participate in the festivities of the occasion.
RESOLVED, That the Bands of music and Fire Department of Medina be requested to join with us on that occasion.
RESOLVED, That we extend a cordial invitation to all the people of Medina and adjoining towns to contribute liberally of suitable refreshments for the table.
The Hon. Noah DAVIS, Jr., of Albion has consented to deliver an Address.
The following correspondence took place between the Committee and Col. Brown, on the subject:
Medina, May 26, 1863.
Col. E. F. Brown, 28th N. Y. Volunteers:
DEAR SIR:--The citizens of Medina and vicinity, through a Committee appointed for that purpose, have made arrangements to give a public demonstration in this place in honor of Co. "D," on Saturday of this week, at 11 o'clock A. M. The Committee unanimously extend to the field and staff officers of your Regiment an invitation to be present, and to unite with them in the exercises of the day. Will you have the kindness to communicate the above invitation to the remaining officers and forward at an early date with yours, their pleasure in this matter, and greatly oblige. Yours truly, S. C. Brown, Sec'y of Com.
HEAD QUARTERS 28th REG'T, N. Y. V.,
LOCKPORT, MAY 23, 1863.
To S. C. brown and others of the Committee:
Your letter of invitation through me to the Field and Staff officers of the 28th Regiment, to attend a public demonstration on Saturday, in honor of Co. "D," of my Regiment, has been received.
I have consulted with the officer named, and can assure you that it would afford them pleasure to accept your proffered hospitality.
Very respectfully, your ob't serv't,
E. F. BROWN,
Col. 28th Regiment, N. Y. V.

A Noble Deed.--The 28th Regiment was mustered out at Lockport Monday. We are informed by one of the members, who arrived in town yes­terday, that immediately after the Regiment was paid off the noble-hearted fellows contributed the sum of $1,500 towards procuring a monument, to be erected in the Cold Spring Cemetery, at Lockport, to the memory of their late lamented commander, Col. Donnelly, who was killed at the sanguinary battle of Cedar Mountain, Virginia.

ARRIVAL OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT N. Y. S. V.  (May 14, 1863)
The Twenty-eighth regiment New York State Volunteers, which was raised in Niagara county, arrived in this city at half-past seven o'clock last evening. They numbered about four hundred and twenty men, and came home with their arms and equipments. They remained at the Park Barracks last night and will leave for Albany this morning. The following are the officers:— Colonel—E. F. Brown. Lieut. Colonel E. W. Cook (now a prisoner). Major F. Fitzgerald. Surgeon— J. E. West. Asst. Surgeon—R. F. Paine. Adjutant— George Davis. Quartermaster—A. E. Secune. Company A—Capt. C. S. Kulks. Company B—Capt. H. W. Bush. Company C—Lieut. E. N. Wieker. Company D—Capt. L. Chaffin. Company E—Capt. W. Romley. Company F— Capt. C. H. Fern. Company G—Capt. A. B. Judock. Company H—Capt. C. J. Ferry. Company I—Capt. F. P. Gold. Company K—Capt. J. D. Adams.

ALBANY, MONDAY, MAY 18, 1863.
RETURNED REGIMENTS.
The 28th Regiment, Col. J. Brown.
Owing to the lateness of the hour of the arrival and reception of the 28th Regiment, Friday night we had but little time or space to speak of the Regiment, which has distinguished itself during the two years service. Its reception by our citizens and the Fire Department was most cordial and enthusiastic. On Saturday the Regiment paraded to the reception of the 18th, and both, under escort of the Fire Department, marched through the principal streets of the city, to the Capitol, where they were received and welcomed by the Governor, as stated elsewhere, after which the Department escorted them to the Barracks.    
The following account of the 28th, we take from the Journal:
The 28th Regiment New York Volunteers was organized under the "Act of the 16th of April, and mustered into the service of the United States on the 23d of May, 1861, for the period of two years.
They reached Washington on the 27th of June 1861, since which time they have been emphatically a marching regiment.
On the 6th of July, they left Washington and crossed the Potomac at Williamspott [sic] on the 9th and joined Gen. Patterson in his march on Winchester. Patterson's expedition only reached Bunker Hill, and then returned to Harper's Ferry, arriving there the 21st of July.
During the fall and winter the regiment was actively engaged picketing the Potomac. During this time a detachment of the regiment crossed the river and captured a company of Rebel cavalry.
They were ordered, to join Gen. Stone in the disaster of Ball's Bluff, but arrived too late. They, however, rendered great aid in re-crossing the troops of Gen. Stone’s command.
On the 6th of January, the command was marched to Hancock, Md., to repel the attack of Jackson on that place. Here they remained until the 1st of March, 1862.
On the 1st of March they again crossed the river at Williamsport, and joined the forces of Gen. Banks in their march on Winchester, and the Rebels were driven out. After the defeat of Jackson by Gen. Shields, they took up the pursuit of the flying Rebels, skirmishing with their rear guard all the way to Harrisonburg--a distance of ninety miles from the Potomac.
At Columbia Finance (near Woodstock), Company E captured, by a forced march and a gallant charge, sixty men and horses, with their accoutrements complete.
About the 1st of May, Banks' forces commenced retiring from Harrisonburfi [sic], and retreated as far as Strasburg. On the 28th of May the famous retreat of Gen. Banks commenced. The 28th were engaged in a running fight with the Rebels all that day, and on the morning of the 25th were engaged in the second battle of Winchester—behaved with great gallantry, and were the last regiment to leave the field, which they did in line of battle and in perfect order.
They arrived at Williamsport on the morning of the 26th, having marched sixty miles and fought a battle of three hours duration in forty-eight hours. In the action and retreat the regiment recrossed the river with Gen. Banks, and on the 9th of July were engaged in the battle of Cedar Mountain, leading in the famous charge of Crawford's Brigade. In this action the regiment went in with 320 men, and lost 209. The gallant Col. Donnelly was killed, Lieut. Col. Brown lost an arm, Adjutant Sprout was killed, Major Cook was taken prisoner. During the retreat of Gen. Pope's army the regiment was frequently under heavy fire.
At Antietam the remnant of the regiment was among the first engaged under Gen. Mansfield, fought gallantly, and were among the last of Mansfield's corps to be withdrawn from the field.
After the battle of Antietam the regiment built the extensive fortifications on Maryland Heights. During the past winter they have been lying near Stafford Court House.
In the late battle of Chancellorsville, Lieut. Col. Cook was in command. The regiment opened the engagement on Friday, May 1st, behaved with great gallantry, and were loth to retire when ordered so to do. On Saturday evening they were nearly surrounded by Rebels, and lost about eighty men, including Lieut. Col. Cook, formerly Major, who was again taken prisoner. The remainder managed to escape, only to be engaged in the bloody battle of Sunday.
In this action the total loss was nearly one Hundred in killed, wounded and prisoners.
FIELD OFFICERS.
Colonel—Edwin F. Brown.
Lieut. Colonel—E. W. Cook.
Major—T. Fitzgerald.

STAFF OFFICERS.
Surgeon—J. E. West.
Assistant Surgeon—R. T. Paine, Jr.
Adjutant—George Davis
Quartermaster—E. A. Swan.

LINE OFFICERS.
Company A—Captain, C. L. Skeels; First Lieutenant, Jeremiah Long; Second Lieutenant, L. D. C. Gaskill..
Company B—Captain, N. W. Bush; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, P. B. Kelchner.
Company C—Captain, William P. Warren; First Lieutenant, N. E. G. Wadhams; Second Lieutenant, Charles Baker.
Company D—Captain, L. Chaffee; First Lieutenant, C. T. Southworth; Second Lieutenant, F. B. Seeley.
Company E—Captain, W. W. Rowley; First Lieutenant, Harvey Padelford; Second Lieutenant, ____ Gulick.
Company F—Captain, W. S. Fenn; First Lieutenant, George M. Ellicott; Second Lieutenant, L. R. Balley.
Company G—Captain, A. B. Judd; First Lieutenant, Wm. N. Kenyon; Second Lieutenant, James Smith.
Company H—Captain, J. C. Terry; First Lieutenant, F. N. Wicker; Second Lieutenant, ____ Buckbee.
Company J—Captain, T. P. Gould; First Lieutenant, J. D. Woods; Second Lieutenant, J. J. Sullivan.
Company K—Captain, J. D. Ames; First Lieutenant, M. F. Warfield; Second Lieutent [sic], N. O. Allen.

Arrival and Reception of the 28th Regiment N. Y. S. V.
The 28th Regiment N. Y. S. V., commanded by Col. ____ Brown, and numbering about 350 men, reached this city, from New York, via Hudson River Railroad, last evening. The Firemen were on hand, with torches, and extended a hearty welcome to the gallant fellows. Although they had been on duty all day, having marched to the Barracks twice—with the 3d and 14th Regiments— they responded to the summons for their services at 8 o'clock last evening with commendable alacrity, and before 9 o'clock marched to the Delavan House, preceded by the Brigade Band, where they received the soldiers, and escorted them to the Barracks. The display was very fine, the Firemen being provided with torches and Roman candles. The streets were filled with people, and much enthusiasm was manifested.
The 28th belongs to Niagara county, and went away about 800 strong. At Chancellorsville it lost about 90 men, principally taken prisoners. The Lieutenant Colonel, E. W. Cook, is now in Richmond.
We suppose the 28th will to-day dissolve into citizenship. Most of them will make useful citizens. Last night they were paid off and their obligations as soldiers in Uncle Samuel's Army are cancelled.

A NOBLE DEED.—The 28th Regiment was mustered out at Lockport, Monday. We are informed by one of the members, who arrived in town yesterday, that immediately after the Regiment was paid off the noble-hearted fellows contributed the sum of $1,500 towards procuring a monument, to be erected in the Cold Spring Cemetery, at Lockport, to the memory of their late lamented commander, Col. Donnelly, who was killed at the sanguinary battle of Cedar Mountain, Virginia.

GREETING.
To The Soldiers of the 28th N. Y. V.
Read by Rev. Allen Steele at the public Demonstration in medina, on the 30th ult. in honor of the returned Soldiers, and written for the occasion.
By Mrs. A. A. Barnes.

Heroes all! we give you greeting!
Battle scarr'd and glory crown'd!
On the blood-red field of conflict!
In the front your ranks were found!

Soldiers! in the war for Union--
Prouder title none may earn--
Patriotic pride is mingled
With our joy at your return.

With the magic of your presence,
Shadow'd homes grow bright again!
From our hearts you've been absent
All these weary months of pain.

We have gloried in your progress,
In the cause we'll never yield;
Watch'd with hearts grown faint with
anguish,
Tidings from the ensanguined field.

But the muse has sung the story
Of the feats your prowess won;
How your brows were wreathed with laurels
Gathered 'neath Virginia's sum.

And for those a requiem chanted,
We may never meet again!
Ah! the fallen for our Union
Wear the crown of martyr'd men!

But the loftiest moral tribute—
Brighter than immortal bays;
Or the Poet's fragrant garland,
Is your Leader's need of praise;
List again, the crowning homage
Which your brave commander pays:—

"They'll be loyal to the Ruler
Chosen constitutionally!
And the General they would follow
Who leads on to victory!" *

These are words of weightiest import—
Would to heaven that all might heed—
Treasure them for present guidance,
In our country's gravest need.

It were worth a host embattled,
To our sacred, glorious cause;
With dismay would smite the traitors
Arm'd against the Nation's laws.

Let each Northman stay his censure—
Surely he can bide his time,
When his grievance is devotion,
At the "Constitution's" shrine!

Since that boasted "Constitution,"
Traitors South have torn in shreds,
Be it ours then first to gather
Once again the broken threads.

Ere we waste our indignation
Gatherings on Vallandigham;
Let him taste a while the freedom (?)
Of his friends, the Southron clan;
Then mayhap, he'll come back wiser,
And we'll hope a loyal man.

But a word in kindly parting
Soldiers of the twenty-eighth!
You have won renown historic
For our noble Empire State.

But the name sublime of PATRIOT,
Is henceforth your title great.
May the God of battles ever
Shield you from untoward fate!

You, to save our peril'd Union,
Were the earliest Volunteers,
This shall be a crown of glory
Hallowing all the coming years.

Loyal ever to the Ruler
Chosen constitutionally;
May the Leader you shall follow
Ever move to Victory!

* "Should you ask men of the 28lh Regiment today, who is their choise [sic] for president of the United States, they would tell you without hesitation, the man who is constitutionally elected by the people. Should you ask them what General they would prefer for a leader, they would tell you they have no other choice than the one who can lead them on to victory."—[Extract from the speech of Col. E. F. Brown, at Lockport, May 20th, 1863, on the reception by the people at that place, of the 28th Regiment.

LOCAL AND LITERARY.
THURSDAY, JUNE 4, 1863.
Demonstration for the 28th Regiment.
Last Saturday the citizens of Medina and the surrounding towns, turned out to receive Company D. of the 28th Regiment, and all of their companions in arms who should see fit to be present. Ample  arrangements had been made to entertain all who should come, and at an early hour of the day the bells of the various churches were rung, and our streets were filled with those who desired to do to the brave men who had served them so faithfully. An arch had been erected on Main street adorned with evergreens, mounted with the American shield, and bearing on one side:

"Brave Defenders of our Country."
and on the reverse:
"We Bless Your Cause as Holy."

At 11 o'clock the procession was formed on Main street, under the direction of S. C. Bowen as Chief Marshall, assisted by Don C. Bent and Lewis Marshall, and marched through the principal streets of our village. The soldiers looked fine, with their guns and flags. Col. E. F. Brown with the Field, Staff and Line officers rode in front. Capt. Spalding, of the 8th Artillery, and Lieut. Sickels, of the 17th Battery, were in the front. The Firemen turned out in goodly numbers. The Stars and Stripes were displayed at the head of the procession, and were followed by the Brass Band of Medina, officers of the Day, the Speaker, the Clergy, members of the Press, Committee of Arrangements. The Martial Band of Millville, composed mostly of small boys, attracted considerable attention. Co. D. was out in goodly numbers, and all looked fine and full of spirits. It was commanded by Capt. L. Chaffee. Co. G, of Albion, was also out in full force, and was under command of Lt. Kenyon. All in all the procession presented a grand appearance. Just at this time the rain began to come down, and of course changed the whole programme, and the procession was dismissed for a time.
Subsequently the procession was re-formed and marched to the Beecher House where and elegant dinner was in waiting. On account of the rain the tables were removed from the grove, where they were originally spread, to the large Hall. The tables literally groaned with the luxuries that wealth could furnish. The Ladies had everything admirably arranged. They labored assiduously to accommodate all, and it is estimated that at least one thousand persons partook of refreshments on the occasion, and yet there were provisions enough left to feed half as many more. Beautiful boquets [sic] decorated the various tables, and numerous inscriptions were on the walls and on the tables. The Rev. Mr. Root invoked the Devine blessing before partaking of the food. The following gentlemen officiated as officers of the day:

President--John Parsons.

Vice Pres'ts--Jeremiah Freeman, D. B. Abell, L Barrett, E P Gilbert, B Fairman, J M Cornell, H J Van Deusen, George Clark, W H Pells, Asa B Moore, Philip Winegar, W S Fenn, John Ryan, G M Barnes, O Scoville, H Spaulding, W Hoag, Homer Sherwood, P B Jackson, J S McCormick, C L Stevens, H A Glidden, C H Lum, Samuel C Chaffee, Aaron Drake, Joseph C Davis.

Secretaries--D W Cole, O Whedon, A M Ives and B C Blake.

After dinner the soldiers, firemen and citizens, assembled in front of the Beecher House, when the rev. Mr. Steele read a Poem, prepared for the occasion by Mrs. A. A. Barnes of Ridgeway, welcoming the brave soldiers. The Hon. Noah Davis, jr. of Albion, was then introduced to the audience, and made one of his most able, eloquent and patriotic speeches. He paid a high compliment to the officers and soldiers of the 28th Regiment, and invoked all good citizens to stand by the Government in this struggle for National existence.
Notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather every thing passed off pleasantly, and not a single accident occurred to mar the festivities of the day.

A Success.--The Committee of Arrangements for the grand demonstration held in this place on Saturday last, consisted of Wm. S. Tamblin, A. W. Newell, Richard Becker, S. G. Purdy, B. M. Anthony, I. W. Swan, A. V. Pells, S. C. Bowen, A. Pike and S. H. Clark. Every effort was made by these gentlemen to make it a success in every way, and had it not been for the inclemency of the weather their efforts would doubtless have been crowned with complete success. The finances show that in that department at least they were unusually successful. They collected about $166 and expended something over $100 for the demonstration, leaving a balance of nearly or about $60 to be paid into the Treasury of the ladies Soldiers Relief Society of Medina.

WELCOME HOME
TO
COMPANY E. 28th REGIMENT.
ENTHUSIASTIC RECEPTION.
On Thursday afternoon last, upon the arrival of the train from the West, at half past two o'clock, P. M., Company E. of the 28th Reg'nt arrived at the depot.
They were met by thousands of our citizens who had congregated to give them a fervent and enthusiastic welcome home.
Upon alighting from the cars, the soldiers were formed into line, by the Marshal, Darwin Cheeney, Esq., headed by the Canandaigua and Hopewell Bands, and followed by a large procession of citizens in double file, marched to the Town House, where the soldiers wheeled into line, and were welcomed home in the following neat and appropriate address, by Alexander H. Howelr, Esq.:
FELLOW SOLDIERS:
Noble veterans of the Potomac, we greet you to-day with open hands and extended arms. We bid you welcome, a right, good hearty welcome, back to your homes and friends. You have labored long and faithfully on the field, and have evinced the most heroic bravery and daring in every conflict in which you have been engaged. You have crowned yourselves with honor and glory, and history will record your deeds of noble daring among the foremost of the heroes of the war. Many brave men who went out with you, full of hope and laudable ambition, fell while defending the flag of their country, and will be with us no more. Yet they will not be forgotten. We shall always think of them while we live, and embalm their memories in our heart's choicest affections. In your absence you have always had our sympathy, and we have watched you with the kindest solicitude in all of your conflicts. You come home to us with your ranks thinned, and with noble scars, giving full evidence that you have been where the iron hail of war fell thick and fast. You have nobly sustained the Constitution and the laws on the field of battle, and now that you have come back to your homes to take your places among us again, we hope you will be equally vigilant and determined to uphold and respect them in the capacity of private citizens.
In conclusion, we bid you again, a hearty and generous welcome back to the homes of your friends and neighbors, after your long and tedious absence on the field of battle.
At the conclusion of the address the procession re-formed, and moved up Main st., for a short distance, then turning, marched directly to the Webster House where an elegant and sumptuous dinner was in readiness.
Here the soldiers, in company with numerous private citizens, sat down to tables enriched with every luxury, prepared in Mr. FAILING'S unique style of incomparable beauty delighting the fancy and satifying [sic] the heart's most generous wish.
After dinner the Band performed a delightful overture, when ELIHU MORSE, Esq., was called upon and delivered the following beautiful and eloquent address:
Veterans of the Army of the Potomac! The citizens of Canandaigua welcome you home. Honest faces are bright with joy, rosy lips are wreathed with smiles. With banner and with song, with drum beat and bugle call, with eulogy and wild huzzas, with loving hearts and tender words, we greet you, we welcome you—gallant men! war worn heroes!  to the dear old hearths and homes.
We thank you for your efforts in the cause of freedom. We rejoice with you in the fame you have garnered up in your country's annals. We mingle our tears with yours in memory of the illustrious dead. The gratitude of a nation is yours. Yours are the honors of the brave. You have borne a noble part in putting down rebellion. You have gathered the "blood-red blossom of war" on many a southern field, and now you return to make an easy conquest of your friends and neighbors. To you who never surrendered, the valiant fellows who fight at home most cheerfully strike their colors, and the fair daughters of the north, who cannot be subdued by the men of peace, bring sweetest flowers of early summer, and wave their white flags of truce, and bid you "hold, possess and occupy" the fortresses that have hitherto remained impregnable.
We prayed for you: you fought for us. You guarded our liberties: we shall guard your fame. You won the laurels of victory: ours be the honor of placing it on your brows. The stars of thirty-four States were on your battle-flag, and when the shouts of victory echoed over the land, we unfurled the same national emblem. We all loved the same country, the same priceless freedom, the same revered Constitution, the same old scared Union, and we love them now more tenderly than in all the years of the past. For the cause in which you fought, for the noble deeds you performed, for the precious blood you shed, for the memory of those who will never come back, for your laws, and our religion, and our inalienable rights, for humanity, for freedom and native land, we give you hearty cheer, we bid you welcome home.
But we cannot welcome all who went out to baptise [sic]their patriotism in their blood. When leaves were green in northern woods, two twelve months, gone, and we put in your brave hands the standard of the Republic, I saw among you many radiant faces that are not here to-day. Where are they now? Where is the strong man, and where the boy of promise? We gave them to you but you have not bro't them back to us. Yours are shattered ranks, and homes are desolate, and hearts bereft.—The cypress is woven with the laurel, and I need not ask the fate of those whose places are vacant in this festive hall. We know the battles where they fought, we have consecrated in our memories the fields where they fell.— From the sweet valleys where the Shenandoah
sings of liberty, from old Potomac's sacred shores, from every murmuring stream that seeks the eastern sea, from the hill-sides and the cliffs, and the dark ravines and dusky wilderness, came the sad story, days ago, of gallant heroes going down in the shock of battle, and giving up their lives for their country, but always falling with the flag of the old Union, the flag of our fathers, the dear, precious, victorious flag of stars floating gloriously over their stricken forms. You did not bring those comrades home: you laid them to rest where the soldier loves to sleep—on the very spot consecrated by their own matchless valor—on ground hallowed by the blood of the martyr's of liberty, where pilgrim knees shall bend when the turf of a thousand years grows green ... the warriors rest.
To the hearts that love you, and the homes your valor has ennobled, to the people that are proud of your achievements, to holiday and banquet hall and triumphal procession, to the breezy hills, and fragrant vales, and shining cities, and beautiful villages of our northern land, to a happy rest from your arduous labors, to historic honor and immortal glory, we bid you thrice joyously welcome, surviving heroes, famous veterans of the new war of liberty in
In reply to Mr. MORSE, Lt. PADDLEFORD, on the part of the soldiers, spoke briefly, but appropriately, as follows:
FELLOW CITIZENS:
We thank you, for your kind and hearty reception. In your generosity to greet us and bid us welcome, you meet us at the very thresh--old with open arms and kind hearts.
I stand here to bear witness that these soldiers have,—each one,—acted well their part, and noble performed their duty. No matter in what position they have been placed—in the camp, on the long and wearisome march—in the shock of battle, or on the dangerous picket guard, they have always performed their duty like men.
Now let me tell you—for what I am going to say is the truth—the man at the head of the Nation, who has been constitutionally elected, they regard as their President; and whoever he appoints to command them, as a General, him they will obey.
Let me tell you gentlemen, this war can never be put down by a party or clique. It can never be put down while the people of the North are cavaling about it and finding fault with the means being put forth to do it. There must be unity of action before the Rebellion can be put down. In conclusion, fellow citizens, allow me to thank you for your kind and generous welcome.
At this point, the dinner being over, the soldiers retired.
The ladies now remaining, in company with several gentlemen, it was suggested that they form in line, which they did, and gave Mr. FAILING three rousing cheers, which made the dining room ring.
Mr. FAILING being taken entirely 'unawars,' as the eastern gentleman was with western etiquette, at this unlooked for expression from the Ladies, immediately mounted the rostrum, and spoke as follows:
LADIES—Allow me to return to you my most sincere thanks for this generous demonstration of your regard. I have been very busy, and this is the third dinner I have got up to-day.—What I have done has been done in a hurry, and ladies, if I have done anything wrong I hope you will excuse me.
This speech was received with shouts of applause, and thus ended the demonstration in the dining room, and was the finale to the public expression.

THE NINTH NEW YORK REGIMENT.
Colonel Stiles Asking for Artillery.
Trouble in the New York Twenty-Eighth.
[Special Despatch [sic] to the Evening Post.]
WASHINGTON, June 21.--Captain Rutherford and Corporal Steward of Company F, Ninth regiment of New York, have arrived here with despatches [sic] from Colonel Stiles to General Sandford. The regiment is at Poolesville, Maryland, thirty-seven miles north of Washington, and moves to-day towards Harper's Ferry. The men are all well and in good spirits.
Colonel Stiles requests that the artillery now stationed at Camp Corcoran may he sent to join his regiment, but General Sandford thinks it will be wanted here, and will probably decline to send it.
The Fourth Maine regiment has just arrived here.
There is trouble in the New York Twenty-eighth regiment, and the officers talk of disbanding it.
The Thirty-eighth regiment of New York (Scott Life Guards) is in splendid condition, and as it is finely, officered, the War Department expects much from it.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
The 28th Regiment--Col. Edwin F. Brown.
Yesterday morning the 28th Regiment, under command of Col. Edwin F. Brown, of Medina, reached this city at 10 o'clock en route for Orleans and Niagara counties, where it was recruited. The regiment numbered about 400 men. It was mustered into the service of the United States, on the 23d of May, 1861, for the period of two years, and was then over 900 strong. They reached Washington on the 27th of June following and since then have been in many a well fought battle and hard skirmish. They return with a record as unsullied, and a reputation for bravery not excelled by any of the two years' men. In fact, every man of the regiment is a hero, and their follow citizens at home appreciate their patriotism and services.
On the 6th of July, they left Washington, and crossed the Potomac at Williamsport on the 9th, and joined Gen. Patterson in his march on Winchester.
During the fall and winter the regiment was actively engaged picketing the Potomac.
On the 6th of January the command was marched to Hancock, Md., to repel the attack of Jackson on that place. Here they remained until the 1st of March, 1862.
On the 1st of March they again crossed the river at Williamsport, and joined the forces of Gen. Banks in their march on Winchester. After the defeat of Jackson by Gen. Shields, they pursued the flying rebels to Harrisburg—a distance of ninety miles from the Potomac.
On the 28th of May the famous retreat of Gen. Banks commenced. The 28th were engaged in a running fight with the rebels all that day, and on the morning of the 25th were engaged in the second battle of Winchester--behaved with great gallantry, and were the last regiment to leave the field, which they did in line of battle and in perfect order.
They arrived at Williamsport on the morning of the 26th, having marched sixty miles and fought a battle of three hours' duration in forty-eight hours. In the action and retreat the regiment lost about seventy men. The regiment recrossed the river with Gen. Banks, and on the 9th of July were engaged in the battle of Cedar Mountain, leading in the famous charge of Crawford's Brigade. In this action the regiment went in with 325 men, and lost 209. The gallant Col. Donnelly was killed, Lieut. Colonel Brown lost an arm, Adjutant Sprout was killed, Major Cook was taken prisoner, and every line officer was either wounded or taken prisoner. During the retreat of Gen. Pope's army the regiment was frequently under heavy fire.
At Antietam the shattered remnant of the regiment was again in the field under the gallant Gen. Mansfield. They were among the first to be engaged, and were the last withdrawn from the field, fighting gallantly throughout the day. After this battle, the regiment constructed the extensive fortifications on the heights above Harper's Ferry. During the winter the regiment lay most of the time at Stafford Court House, Va.
The 28th were also engaged in the recent battles of Chancellorsville, and were in command of Lieut. Col. (formerly Major) Cook. The regiment was the first in at the fight on Friday, and fought with bravery, retiring with great reluctance when ordered to do so by their officers. The regiment was placed in the same division with the 11th corps, which so ignominiously fled. Lieut. Col. Cook tried to rally the retreating soldiers, and succeeded in getting about 2,000 of them in line; but upon the approach of the enemy they fired one volley and again retreated, covering themselves with disgrace and dishonor.
The 28th bravely threw themselves into the breach, and tried to hold the intrenchments [sic] against a vastly superior force. They were nearly surrounded, and lost 80 men as prisoners, including Lieut. Col. Cook, who was thus compelled to make a second unwilling pilgrimage to Richmond. Of the number taken prisoners, almost the entire Albion company was "gobbled up," including Lieut. Kenyon, who was in command. Only fourteen of this company passed through with the regiment. The remainder escaped, and were again engaged in the fierce and bloody conflict of Sunday.
Upon arriving at Albany, the 28th met a glorious reception. They were honored with a torch-light procession. The fire and military organizations turned out, and they were welcomed with music and cheers. All the men were provided with an elegant supper at the Delevan House, and Adjutant General Sprague received them with a highly complimentary speech. All along the route the regiment has been received with respect and honor. At Lockport, yesterday, their reception was a perfect ovation. The 28th are highly gratified at the honor and respect that is shown them upon every hand.
Col. Brown informs us that nearly all of his men will re-enlist. The Colonel, in consequence of the loss of his arm, which has impaired his health, will resume the duties of his official position as County Clerk of Orleans county, to which position he was c h o s e n by the unanimous suffrages of his fellow-citizens.
The following is a list of the staff and line officers with the regiment on its return:
Colonel—E. F. Brown.
Lieutenant Colonel—E. W. Cook. *
Major—T. Fitzgerald.
Surgeon—J. E. West.
Assistant Surgeon—R. T. Paine, Jr.
Adjutant—George Davis.
Quartermaster—E. A. Swan.
Chaplain—Rev. C. H. Platt.

LINE OFFICERS.
Company A—Captain C. L. Skeels.
Company B—Captain, N. W. Bush.
Company C—Captain, Wm. P. Warren.
Company D—Captain, L. Chaffee.
Company E—Captain, W. W. Rowley.
Company F—Captain, W. S. Fenn.
Company G—Captain, A. B. Judd.
Company H—Captain, T. C. Terry.
Company J—Captain, T. P. Gould.
Company K—Captain, J. D. Ames.
* A prisoner at Richmond.

Col. Donnelly's Monument.
We learn from the Lockport Journal that the foundation stone of Col. Donnelly's monument was laid on Friday last by the officers of the 28th. Chaplain Platt delivered an address on the occasion.
The brave Col. E. F. Brown, of the 28th Regiment, in consequence of the loss of his arm, which has greatly impaired his health, will resume his  duties as County Clerk of Orleans County, to which position he was chosen by the unanimous suffrages of his fellow citizens. The regiment arrived at Lockport at noon on Wednesday, and met with a brilliant reception, the number present being estimated at 20,000.

COL. DONNELLY'S MONUMENT.—The foundation stone of Col. Donnelly’s monument was placed Friday, at Lockport, by the officers of the 28th.

CO. H., 28TH REGIMENT.
Co. H., 28th Regiment, passing thro' Middletown the day the reception was given the returned soldiers of the Walkill Guards, was invited to take part in the ceremonies.—an invitation which they accepted. Charles C. McQuoid, Esq., in his welcoming speech, paid them the following tribute:—
"And you, brave volunteers of Sullivan, we also welcome on your journey to your homes. We are not unmindful of the noble part you have performed and the patriotic services you have rendered in this struggle. Your honor and interests are intimately connected with our own. You, too, went forth at an early period in this contest, with the high and noble resolve to do your part in maintaining the government and integrity of the nation. You have faithfully redeemed your pledge and filled the high expectations which were then formed. Your conduct needs no eulogy from me. The records of your valor and the history of your toils, sufferings and privations will be your proudest eulogy, and the purest and richest legacy you can leave your children.
We will remember your passage thro' this village to the seat of war. Your ranks were then full. But oh! how fearfully have they been thinned! How many of those who then went with you in the pride of their manhood and strength now fill a soldier's grave! But they fell in a noble cause—in defence of the noblest government the world has ever seen. They, like you, went forth conscious of the perils they were to encounter, and with a full sense of their duties and obligtions [sic] to their country in her hour of peril. You will cherish their memories, and bear ample evidence to the mourning ones how bravely they fought and how nobly they fell. The records of the deeds of valor, of the toils, sufferings and self-sacrificing devotion of the sons of Orange and Sullivan will form some of the brightest pages of the historian who shall write the history of this struggle—to be read and re-read, not only by your children and their children, but by all generations of men who shall claim the protection of and owe allegiance to the American flag. We wish you a safe journey to your homes, where you doubtless will receive that warm and joyous greeting which should be everywhere extended to the returning volunteer soldiers of the Union.''

LAST FRIDAY NIGHT, after the reception of the 28th Regiment, the Mayor and some members of the Select Committee of the Common Council, in company with Col. Brown, stepped into a saloon on Lydius street for refreshments. While there a fellow entered who announced that he was looking up a fight, whereupon he was seized by the collar  by the Mayor, who, after telling him that he was Chief Magistrate of the city, gave him a severe shaking, when the fellow skulked away, with all the fighting spirit squelched out of him.

The Twenty-Eighth Regiment.
This Regiment reached East Albany via Hudson River Railroad, about 8 o'clock last night. The Fire Department were again called out, and under their escort the soldiers marched direct to the Barracks. The streets were crowded with citizens who frequently cheered the men as they passed along.
Between two and three months' pay is due all these soldiers, and as the paymaster and mustering-out officer are ready to perform their duties, there will be no delay beyond what is occasioned by the officers of the regiment in preparing and presenting their muster rolls.

ARRIVAL OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT.
The 28th (Lockport) Regiment arrived on a special train from New York last evening. The regiment was received at the ferry by the Common Council Committee and the entire Fire Department. After receiving supper, the regiment, preceded by the Fire Department (each of its members bearing a torch), proceeded to the Barracks. The Fire Department deserve the greatest credit for the display made upon this occasion. From early morn till late at night the firemen have been on the march—a rare occurrence.

(Chancellorville, May 1863)
Official Lists of Losses in New York Regiments.
TWENTY-EIGHTH NEW YORK.
Killed.--James Hogie. Wounded.--James Cook, finger, amputated; W. G. Wade, mortally; J. A. Smith, groin.

...AY, MAY 13, 1863.--TRIPI...
severely; Lorin Hayner, arm, slightly; F. Lauriman, leg, severely; Thomas Purcell, hand, slightly. Missing.--Lieutenant Colonel E. W. Cook, Captain J. C. Terry, Captain Lafayette Chaffee, Lieutenant William M. Kenyon.

From the 28th.
Col. Brown writes the Rochester Union under date of the 8th inst from Washington as follows: "For the information of those interested, will you please state to your readers that the 28th Regiment in the fight near Chancellorville were flanked by the enemy, and Lieut. Colonel Cook, commanding, Capt. Chaffee, Co. D, Capt. Terry, Co. H, Lieut. Kenyon, Co. G, and about 100 men of Cos. D, E, G and H, captured. I can learn of only one man killed—Hogle, of Co. E. Companies A and C, under Capt. C. S. Skeels, Division Provost Marshal, were acting as Provost Guard, and a few of them were also captured. Companies B, F, I and K, under Major Fitzgerald, were guarding supply and ammunition trains, and escaped without loss. From all I can learn, I believe very few were killed or wounded of the four companies under Lieut. Col. Cook, but mostly taken prisoners."

CASUALTIES IN COMPANY F.--We are indebted to Major FITZGERALD, of the 28th Regiment N. Y. S. V., who writes from Stafford Court House under late of the 7th instant, for the following list of killed and missing of Company E, of that regiment, in the recent fight near Fredericksburg:
Killed--John H. Hogle.
Missing, probably prisoners--Sergts. O. L. Teachout, W. L. Hicks, C. P. Akins; Corp'ls A. J. Warner, J. W. Moore; Privates, F. J. Anderson, Lafayette Lee, Wm. Smith, Porter Stevens, Ja's Taylor, Wm. H. Irwin, Henry Shire, B. F. Gage, Ja's McMinn, M. L. Parkhurst.

From Company H, 28th N. Y. Vols.
A letter just received from H. Lounsbury of Co. H, 28th Regiment, N. Y.
Vol., states that 23 of them were taken prisoners. Their names are as follows: Capt. J. C. Terry, Orderly Sergeant L. M. Young, Sergeant N. B. Bradley, Sergeant Lee Kimball, Sergeant G. Maffitt; Corporals L. C. Van Duzor and Jasper N. Smith; Privates R. Burr, E. Barker, Jas. H. Babcock, B. Burns, A. Eichman, W. H. Curry, N. H. Grant, C. P. Kent, A. Kinne, W. McIntyre, John Misner, S. J. McWilliams, S. Pratt, J. W. Finney, H. Stibe. E. Cuddington was taken, but made his escape.
Sergeant Bradley is reported wounded—how dangerously we know not; tho' probably not very severely, or he wo'd have been left in hospital. Henry E. Gillett was slightly wounded by a piece of shell, but is still able for duty.
Our correspondent says nothing of Lieut. Buckbee, though he is also reported a prisoner in a New York paper.

In The Field.
EDJTOR REPUBLICAN: We ... at Stafford Court House on the ... with five days rations in our knapsacks and three in our haversacks. After four days marching we found ourselves eight miles in the rear of Fredericksburg where we halted for the night. The roar of artillery roused us from our slumbers rather early in the morning, and our Brigade (1st Brigade, 12th Army Corps) was ordered in the front. After four hours fighting we were relieved, and fell back to our position that we left in the morning. The roar of musketry was kept up all night, and on the morning of the 2nd it commenced with renewed vigor. About three o'clock in the afternoon the 11th Army Corps gave way and let the Rebels in on us. The following is a list of the missing in Co. H:
Capt. John C. Terry. Serg'ts.—L. M. Young. N. B. Bradley, Levi Kimball, G. Maffitt,; Corp'ls L. C. Vanduzor, J. N. Smith. Privates—James Babcock, B. Burns, E. Barker, R. Burr, W. H. Carry, A. Eichman, N. H. Groat, C. F. Kent, A. Kinney, William McIntyre, S. T. McWilliams, J. Minor, S. Pratt, J. W. Pinney, H. Staib.
The above are all supposed to be prisoners. The few left in the Regiment got together the same night, and in the morning was again under fire for two hours. Thousands of Rebels are piled up in heaps wherever they charged on us; and the slaughter was dreadful on both sides.
Yours in haste, Serg't. R. B. COOPER.
Co. H., 28th Reg't N. Y. V.

From the Battle-Field.
STAFFORD COUNTY, Va., May 7, 1863.
MR. EDITOR: I embrace this opportunity to inform the friends of Co. H. that they have met with another hard rub: they have been in three days hard fighting, but thanks be to our good luck there was not one killed in the Company, but there was, on the night of Saturday last, twenty-three of them taken prisoners. Ebonezer Cuddington, who escaped after being taken, says he saw Capt. Terry after he had surrendered, and he was all sound.—The way we came to lose so many was, the 11th Corps that used to "fight mit Siegle," broke, and our boys was taken trying to stop them, and also trying to hold their position in the entrenchments. The Rebels got in their rear. Colonel Cook ordered the surrender, after which our boys poured a volley into the Rebels, and all that could made their escape. They have had a week's hard fighting here, and every thing has been well conducted. Hooker stole three days march on the Rebels, crossed the 11th and 12th Corps at Kelly's Ford, then marched to the Rapidan, where they found a company of Rebels building a splendid bridge.—They captured the builders and turned the bridge to their own use. They also captured the enemy's outpost pickets, and marched on until they got good position and made the Rebels come out of their fortifications and fight on our own ground; and while they were fighting us, our men took the city of Fredericksburg and the hights [sic], with some 5,000 prisoners. Our men have since fallen back across the river, and our Corps has returned to the old camp. As far as I have been able to find out, the Rebel loss has been larger than ours. We do not know what was the object of the attack, but we think it was to draw the Rebels from other points. We know one thing, we have not been whipped, and do not know why Hooker did not continue the fight. The boys are all in good spirits in the Army of the Potomac; and still maintain the idea that they can give the Rebels all they want. Things have been kept so quiet here that I am unable to give you the particulars, but by promising to write again as soon as there is anything new, I remain yours with respect,
HERBERT LOUNSBURY.
Co. H., 28th Regiment, N. Y. V.

RETURNED REGIMENTS.
The 28th Regiment, Col. J. Brown.
Owing to the lateness of the hour of the arrival and reception of the 28th Regiment, Friday night, we had but little time or space to speak of the regiment, which has distinguished itself during the two years service. Its reception by our citizens and the Fire Department was most cordial and enthusiastic. On Saturday the regiment paraded at the reception of the 18th, and both, under escort of the Fire department, marched through the principal streets of the city, to the Capitol, where they were received and welcomed by the Governor, as stated elsewhere, after which the Department escorted them to the Barracks.
The 28th regiment New York Volunteers was organized under the "Act of the 16th of April," and mustered into the service of the United States on the 23d of May, 1861, for the period of two years.
They reached Washington on the 27th of June, 1861, since which time they have been emphatically a marching regiment.
On the 6th of July, they left Washington and crossed the Potomac at Williamspott [sic] on the 9th, and joined Gen. Patterson in his march on Winchester. Patterson's expedition only reached Bunker Hill, and then returned to Harper's Ferry, arriving there the 21st of July.
During the fall and winter the regiment was actively engaged picketing the Potomac. During this and captured a company of Rebel cavalry.
They were ordered to join Gen. Stone in the disaster of Ball's Bluff, but arrived too late. They, however, rendered great aid in re-crossing the troops of Gen. Stone' command.
On the 6th of January, the command was marched to Hancock, Md., to repel the attack of Jackson on that place. Here they remained until the 1st of March, 1862.
On the 1st of March they again crossed the river at Williamsport, and joined the forces of gen. Banks in their march on Winchester, and the Rebels were driven out. After the defeat of Jackson by Gen. Shields, they took up the pursuit of the flying Rebels, skirmishing with their rear guard all the way to Harrisonburg--a distance of ninety miles from the Potomac.
At Columbia Finance (near Woodstock), Company E captured, by a forced march and a gallant charge, sixty men and horses, with their accoutrements complete.
About the 1st of May, Banks' forces commenced retiring from Harrisonburfi [sic], and retreated as far as Strasburg. On the 28th of May the famous retreat of Gen. Banks commenced. The 28th were engaged in a running fight with the Rebels all that day, and on the morning of the 25th were engaged in the second battle of Winchester--behaved with great gallantry, and were the last regiment to leave the field, which they did in line of battle and in perfect order.
They arrived at Williamsport on the morning of the 26th, having marched sixty miles and fought a battle of three hours duration in forty-eight hours. In the action and retreat the regiment recrossed the river with Gen. Banks, and on the 9th of July were engaged in the battle of Cedar Mountain, leading in the famous charge of Crawford's Brigade. In this action the regiment went in with 320 men, and lost 209. The gallant Col. Donnelly was killed, Lieut. Col. Brown lost an arm. Adjutant Sprout was killed, Major Cook was taken prisoner. During the retreat of Gen. Pope's army the regiment was frequently under heavy fire.
At Antietam the remnant of the regiment was among the first engaged under Gen. Mansfield, fought gallantly, and were among the last of Mansfield's corps to be withdrawn from the field.
After the battle of Antietam the regiment built the extensive fortifications on Maryland Heights. During the past winter they have been lying near Stafford Courthouse.
In the late battle of Chancellorsville, Lieut. Col. Cook was in command. The regiment opened the engagement on Friday, May 1st, behaved with great gallantry, and were loth to retire when ordered so to do. On Saturday evening they were nearly surrounded by Rebels, and lost about eighty men, including Lieut. Col. Cook, formerly Major, who was again taken prisoner. The remainder managed to escape, only to be engaged in the bloody battle of Sunday.
In this action the total loss was nearly one hundred in killed, wounded and prisoners.
FIELD OFFICERS.
Colonel—Edwin F. Brown.
Lieut. Colonel—E. W. Cook.
Major—T. Fitzgerald.
STAFF OFFICERS.
Surgeon—J. E. West.
Assistant Surgeon—R. T. Paine, Jr.
Adjutant—George Davis.
Quartermaster—E. A. Swan.
LINE OFFICERS.
Company A—Captain, C. L. Skeels; First Lieutenant, Jeremiah Long; Second Lieutenant, L. D. C. Gaskill.
Company B—Captain, N. W. Bush; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, P. B. Kelchner.
Company C—Captain, William P. Warren; First Lieutenant, N. E. G. Wadhams; Second Lieutenant, Charles Baker.
Company D—Captain, L. Chaffee; First Lieutenant, C. T. Southworth; Second Lieutenant, F. B. Seeley.
Company E—Captain, W. W. Rowley; First Lieutenant, Harvey Padelford; Second Lieutenant, ____ Gulick.
Company F—Captain, W. S. Fenn; First Lieutenant, George M. Ellicott; Second Lieutenant, L. R. Bailey.
Company G—Captain, A. B. Judd; First Lieutenant, Wm. N. Kenyon; Second Lieutenant, James Smith
Company H—Captain, J. C. Terry; First Lieutenant, F. N. Wicker; Second Lieutenant, ____ Buckbee.
Company J—Captain, T. P. Gould; First Lieutenant, J. D. Woods, Second Lieutenant, J. J. Sullivan.
Company K—Captain, J. D. Ames; First Lieutenant, M. F. Warfield; Second Lieutent [sic], N. O. Allen.

THE TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT.—PROMPT ORGANIZATION.—This Regiment is composed of the following companies, mainly from the counties composing the 29th Senatorial district:
Capt. E. W. Cook, Lockport.
" W. W. Bush., "
" Wm. H. Mapes, "
" Henry H.Paige, "
" Erwin A. Bowen, Medina.
" David Hardie, Albion.
" Theodore P. Gould, Niagara Falls.
" James R. Mitchell, Batavia.
" Theophilus Fitzgerald, Canandaigua.
" John Walter, Jr., Monticello, Sullivan co.
It was organized on Saturday last, at one o'clock, Brigadier-General RATHBONE presiding, by the election of the following officers:—
Colonel—Dudley Donelly, Lockport.
Lieut.-Colonel—Edwin F. Brown, Medina.
Major—James R. Mitchell, Batavia.
The regiment has already been mustered into the United States service.

A VOLUNTEER ACCIDENTALLY SHOT.—A young volunteer named Edward Bridell was accidentally shot this morning at the Fair Ground, in Lockport, where his company was encamped. He was engaged with several companions one of whom was fixing the lock of a pistol, when it was accidentally discharged, the slug with which it was loaded entering his groin. He died about two hours afterwards. (May 1861)
The Old 28th.—A meeting of the surviving officers of our old 28 Regiment—our first offering for the war—was held at the office of Capt. Ames, at Lockport, on the 21st ult. to make arrangements for a future meeting of all the surviving members who can come together on such an occasion.
The following officers were present.
Col. F. F. brown, Lt. N E G Wadhams,
Col. E W Cook, Lt J D Wood,
Col. E A Bowen, Lt J Repass, Jr.,
Capt. J D Ames, Lt. Wm M Ringer,
Capt. L Chaffee, Lt. Volney Farley,
Capt. H H Paige, Lt. Norman O Allen,
Capt. D Hardy, Lt. E A Swan.
It was resolved to have a meeting of the members of the 28th at the American Hotel in Lockport on Saturday the 21st, and all the members were constituted a committee to invite each member to be present. The regimental organization was perfected May 22d, 1861.

PERSONAL.—Assistant Surgeon Robert T. Paine, Jr., and Colonel Jas. O. McClure, of Jordan, were in town last evening, en route for Lockport. They stopped at the Osburn House and went up on an early train. They go to Lockport to attend the ceremonies of laying the corner stone of the monument to the late Colonel Donelly, of the 28th N. Y. V. Dr. Paine was with the lamented Colonel at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, when he fell, bore him from the field and attended him in his last moments. The 28th has seen much, and passed through many of the battles of Virginia, the last being at Chancellorsville, in the late crossing of the Rappahannock by Hooker. After the fall of Colonel Donelly, Col. Brown took command, and under him the regiment continued to distinguish itself.
The citizens of Lockport are doing themselves great credit in paying a fitting tribute of respect to the memory of Col. Donelly. They have raised by subscription $2,500 for this monument to mark the resting place of a departed hero.  Our old townsman, Capt. Z. R. Brockway, Superintendent of the Detroit Penitentiary, is in town to-day stopping at Congress Hall.
Mr. Neafie, the well known tradegian, is at Congress Hall.
Hon. Freeman Clarke left for Chicago last night. he goes to attend the Canal Convention.

GENERAL BANKS'S RETREAT.
THE BATTLE AT WINCHESTER.
Lists of Killed, Wounded, and Missing.
(May 31, 1862)
Further details of the retreat of Gen. Banks and the engagement at Winchester show that the Union forces consisted only of seven infantry regiments, a few squadrons of cavalry, and an imperfect supply of artillery. The particulars of the surprise of Col. Kenly and his Maryland regiment at Front Royal have already been given. We have to-day further intelligence concerning the conflict at Winchester, in which the whole of Gen. Banks's available troops were engaged.
At the time of the attack on Front Royal, Col. Donnelly's Brigade, consisting of the 46th Pennsylvania, the 28th New-York, and the 5th Connecticut Regiments, was stationed six miles south-west of Strasburg. Upon learning the news of our disaster, orders were issued to fall back to Winchester.
Early on Saturday morning this brigade reached Strasburg, where it was joined by that of Gen. Gordon, commanding the 2d Massachusetts, 29th Pennsylvania, 27th Indiana, and 3d Wisconsin Regiments. Maj.-Gen. Williams directed the two brigades, the entire command being under Gen. Banks, who assumed control at Strasburg. On reaching a point six miles north of Strasburg, the column was intercepted by force of Rebel cavalry, which burst upon it from woods at the side of the road. The 4th Pennsylvania, which was in advance, at once charged upon the enemy, and drove him ahead for four miles, after which he took to the woods again and disappeared, leaving two killed and one wounded. From that time until Winchester was reached there was no interference.
Saturday night, Donnelly's brigade bivouacked on the Front Royal road, while Gordon's held the Strasburg road, a little outside the town. The Rebels were hot in pursuit, and their skirmishers came up soon after our troops. There were contests between the pickets all night. On Sunday morning the position of our troops was taken as indicated in the accompanying map, [this map will be found on our eighth page.--Ed.] Gordon holding the right and Donnelly the left. The Rebels attacked at 4 o'clock. Our signal officers counted 28 infantry regiments of the enemy, to which we could only oppose seven. The first desperate struggle was between a North Carolina regiment and the 46th Pennsylvania, the latter being surprised by the Rebels, who were however driven back with great impetuosity. The entire left wing held its own, against overwhelming odds, until the right wing was forced to give way. A bayonet charge was made by more than twice our entire numbers upon Gordon's brigade. Three of its regiments stood firm, but the 27th Indiana broke and ran, after which our rank was exposed. Our artillery also retreated in great haste, whether by order or not, does not yet appear. Gen. Banks was, in fact, nearly surrounded. Stuart's Rebel   cavalry had charged through Winchester, in the rear of our force, and had roused the inhabitants to take part against us. After fighting four hours, Gen. Banks gave, at 8 1/2, the word to retreat. In passing through Winchester, our men were fired upon by the populace from almost every house. Women and children joined in the onslaught. Gen. Banks narrowly escaped being shot from an open doorway. Our rear guard was pursued by the enemy's infantry at a distance of only 200 yards. A short distance north of Winchester, however, the pursuit was relaxed, and the Rebels allowed a distance of about two miles to be put between themselves and us. With this slight intervening space, they followed on, shelling our troops continuously, until within three miles of Martinsburg. They then, about 3 o'clock on Sunday afternoon, halted, while Gen. Banks pushed onward, reaching the banks of the Potomac by nightfall. In the morning, they crossed in ferry boats to Williamsport.
The entire retreat, of 65 miles, was performed in two days, including the time occupied in battling the enemy. During all those hours our men were unprovided with rations, the commissary stores having been destroyed south of Strasburg. Their only subsistence was what they could gather at hazard by the way. The heroism of the action has not been surpassed during this war. Much was due to the resolute and undaunted spirit of the officers. Gen. Banks was perpetually in the thickest of the engagement. During the retreat he was always at the rear, and he was of the last party to cross the Potomac into Maryland. Incidents of individual heroism are recounted of every regiment—almost of every company engaged. The circumstances of the battles fought were peculiarly perilous. The smallness of Gen. Banks's command prevented the possibility of holding a force in reserve. Every regiment was actually engaged, and there is no record of any flinching, except in the case of the 27th Indiana and a part of the cavalry engaged.
The conduct of Gen. Banks's body-guard, the Zouaves d'Afrique, a little company of some 70 men, under Capt. Collis, was unequaled for bravery. They were separated from the rest of the army from the moment of leaving Strasburg, and they fought their way free, losing only three killed and one wounded. They had been left at Strasburg on Saturday to destroy the bridges in case of necessity; but late in the afternoon, hearing heavy cannonading in advance. Capt. Collis abandoned the idea of burning the bridges, lest our own troops should have to retire, and pushed on toward Winchester. At Middletown, six miles north of Strasburg, they were attacked by three entire regiments, with cavalry. They sheltered themselves behind a stone wall, and held the Rebels at bay for some time, until they were flanked on both sides, and compelled to retreat the way they had come, which they did in perfect order, four abreast, double-quick, without the slightest show of alarm or panic.
The ensuing events are thus told by The Philadelphia Inquirer:
After having fallen back about a mile they discovered Hampton's Pennsylvania Battery of four guns coming to their relief. This was their salvation; so rallying on the guns, Capt. Hampton placed them in battery and opened upon the advancing enemy, who had now formed in line of battle, seven regiments strong. This was only a temporary check, however; on they came, and the retreat continued to Strasburg, where Capt. Collis was re-enforced by Col. Tompkins, with six companies of cavalry and fifty infantry men, who had been guarding the commissary stores.
Driven to the wall, this little handfull of men, about five hundred, gave the enemy battle, and drove them back with great loss and confusion to
Middletown.
Capt. Collis lost—killed, Wm. McClane, James Britton, and Jaques Laurier; and wounded, Charles Fedalen, who was also taken prisoner.
The Zouaves then took possession of 35 wagons which had been abandoned by the troops, and taking a circuitous route over the mountains and through the woods, they got within three miles of  Winchester on Saturday night; here they met Gen. Ewell's pickets and turned back, changing their course toward the Romney pike, and marching twelve miles, by which route they arrived before Winchester at 10 o'clock on Sunday morning, just as Gen. Banks evacuated it. Again cut off, heart-broken, tired, hungry, and barefooted, they made one more effort, and took the mountains a second time, intending to cross the Potomac at Pan Pan tunnel. Arriving at Bloomery Gap, a distance of 35 miles, they were in-

Continued from First Page.
formed that the enemy were in force at Cacapon Bridge, about ten miles in advance.
Again changing their course, they turned to the right, and made for Hancock, on the Potomac, a further distance of 33 miles which point they reached on Monday, at noon, bringing with them the 35 wagons and stores. They have received the highest praise from the Commanding General and all the officers who witnessed their cool bravery.
The full reports of the casualties of the retreat have not been received. We give, however, official lists of the killed and wounded so far as they have arrived. The correspondent of The Evening Post supplies the following lost if the 2d Massachusetts Regiment.
COMPANY A.—Wounded—Serg. B. H. A. Sawyer, severely; Privates M. J. M. Loughlin (severely), H. S. Bailey, Wm. W. Ladd, John Burns. Missing—Rosalvo M. Walker, George R. Morse, William Moss, Charles E. Perkins, Lyman Lane.
COMPANY B.—Wounded—Eliz Stevens, Michael Fagan, Samuel G. Alton, Edward B. Buckland, John Carney, James Carney. Missing—Serg. Rundy (since come in from Harper's Ferry), Corp. Doherty, Privates James G. VCrouson, Benj. F. Cook, Alva Diamond, Charles French, Eldridge C. Goldons, Daniel Garrity, Daniel S. Grinnell, John Gleason, Albert Gilson, Dwight G. Griswold, Gardner L. Hunson, Timothy Hnrley, Francis Maloy, Edward H. Mosher, James A. Walton, Peter McKim, Charles Newman, James M. Pope, Daniel Reardon, Jesse K. Simpson, Reuben Smith, Stephen Shoefeldt, Henry Weldon.
COMPANY C.—Killed—Charles H. Emerson, 1st, ____ Sanbern. Wounded—Privates Frames, Rice, and Le Herne. Missing—Sergeant Larrobel, Corporal Langmaid. Privates Cleaver, Dennis, Duffy, Hutchinson, Kimball, John McCarty, Charles McCarty, Kneeland, Caraher, Oliver, Moore, Stacey, Stapler, Williams.
COMPANY D—Killed—Privates ____ Colvin, Jefferson Larkin. Wounded—Second Sergeant Crocker; Private Peterson. Missing—First Sergeant Parker; Fifth Sergeant Thurston; Corporals Moulton, Cleaves, Woodward; Privates Billings, Bisbel, Bunce, Coleman, Deer, Fitzgibbons, Heald, Crosby, Lakin, Orne, Prescott, Lickner, Tombe.
COMPANY E—Wounded—G. Hunt. Missing—Privates Bolton, Buckley, Bulien, Daniels, A. Fales, Foss, Grant, J. Grant, Hogan, Kenney, Mather, G. L. Metcalfe, Erastus Richardson, H. S. Sparrow, John Swarman.
COMPANY F.—Killed—Sergeant Williams, Private H. U. Smith. Wounded—Captain C. R. Mudge (missing), Privates Gould, Osborne, Pierce, Shaughnessy. Missing after battle, but since returned from Harper's Ferry—Sergeant Martin, Privates Billings, Bawbour, Churchill, Curant. Dodge, Hayward, G. W. Larabee, McKay, Morrissey, Mulholland, Merritt, G. E. Smith, Townsend, Tyler. Not heard from—Corporal Marsh, Privates Butler, Hall, Higgins, Powers, Charles Buxsams, Vose.
COMPANY G.—Killed—Privates Chauncey, Peck, Wm. Dane. Wounded—Thos. Delay, Allan A. Marsh, Wm. Foley, Robert Goodbear. Missing—Second Lieut. Charles Whidden, Corporals James Purcill, Edward Farrell, S. W. Crowninshield. Privates Benjamin M. Alley, Wm. Andrews, Thomas Barry, James J. Billings, Wm J. Blanchard, Henry N. Cornell, Eugene Conner, John Crowin, Philip F. Dillon, Richard Dobbins, Wm. D Draper, Charles G. Fisher, Richard Goodkind, Martin Green, Henry Hovey, Edward Johns, Edward Kirby, Thomas Lamb, Patrick Lee, John McCarty, John M. Nelson, Morris O'Connell, Alvah J. Parker, Wm. J. Pentland, James Samuell, George W. Sprague, Alvin Liffense, John Roust, Wm. Welch, John E. Young.
Company H—Wonnded—Sergeant Wm. Harris, Corporal James E. Powers; Privates Patrick Noonan, Michael O'Reidy, Chas. Flynn. Missing—Corporals Webber, Longfellow. Privates Dennis Crowin, Benj. W. Gardner, John Holyoke, Wm. H. Jellsion, Morris Keating, Henry Kelly, Michael Kennedy, James Lehane, John M. Leonard, John P. Lyon, James McCready, Geo. Morse, John G. O'Connell, Henry Saunders, James M. Tibbetts, Ezra J. Whittemore, Oliver Wright, Geo. Ball.
Company I.—Killed—Charles Higgins. Wounded: Corporals A. B. Munroe, S. O. Meynard, William C. Hancock; Privates C. E. Bickford, Horace Bosmah, A. S. Bradish, John Downer, John A. Drugan, Minot H. Eaton, John Holmes, Thomas Lydon, George W. Quinn, Joseph Steele, Charles Traynor. Missing: Privates John E. James, Wallace Bonney, David B. Brown, Stephen Cady, Joseph Carlson, Francis D. Avignon, Lorenzo Davis, Thomas Kearnes, Thomas Lennon, Charles Sheerin, Bernard Finn.
COMPANY K.—Wounded: Second Sergeant Henry W. Cole. Missing: First Sergeant Daniel Cleary, Corporal Jeremiah J. Murray; Privates John Bunning, Timothy Donovan, Jere. Daley, John Elder, George Morris, William A. Springer, James Sye, Thomas Watson, Albert Hayward, and Henry Martin have been missing since the regiment left Harrisonburg.
Surgeon Leland was taken while attending to the wounded on Saturday night. Assistant Surgeon Stone was made a prisoner at Winchester. Major Dwight was wounded at Winchester and made a prisoner. Drum-Major Kesselhuth is also missing. It is thought that Capt. Mudge will be heard from, as he had a horse. Lieut. Robert G. Shaw, son of Francis G. Shaw of Staten Island, would have been killed but for his watch, which received a rifle ball that otherwise would have entered his stomach.

Correspondence of the Associated Press.
WILLIAMSPORT, Wednesday, May 28, 1862.
The first intelligence of the attack on Front Royal was brought to Winchester by one of the Ira Harris Guard, and was telegraphed to Gen. Banks at Strasburg by Capt. Flagg, Assistant Quartermaster U. S. A. But fifteen minutes elapsed after the Rebels were discovered before Col. Kenly's command was completely surrounded.
The large quantity of medicines and surgeon's instruments and hospital stores at Winchester were destroyed by medical purveyor Baxter while the enemy were in town. Dr. Baxter passed through a storm of balls and shells, and was several times fired on from the Taylor House, where he had boarded for weeks.
Collis's Zouaves d'Afrique, a battalion of Ira Harris Guard, under Col. De Forrest, Capt. Hampton of the Pittsburgh Battery, a few of his men, and a small body of infantry, were cut off by the main body of the enemy, between Middletown and Winchester.
The whole force consisted of less than one thousand men. The Zouaves and cavalry had been detailed to destroy the bridges after our retreat. Capt. Hampton, after securing his guns, went to the rear to bring off his battery wagon and forge. Finding their retreat cut off, they retraced their road to Strasburg. Several times Hampton checked pursuit by the enemy's cavalry by mounting a stove-pipe on his carriage and placing it in position till the infantry had passed ahead.
The ruse was not discovered by the enemy. Reaching Strasburg, this force collected 35 abandoned wagons loaded with commissary stores. Thence they took the mountain road north, and by a circuitous route, and came in sight of Winchester only to find themselves in the enemy's rear. Taking the road to Bath, followed by a battalion of Rebel cavalry, they finally reached the Potomac near Hancock, and arrived here last night with but small loss.
On one occasion, the Zouaves (only about 70 in number) kept at bay for a quarter of an hour a brigade of the enemy, and, perhaps, saved the whole force. The Zouaves are Gen. Banks's body-guard, and appear to have been well selected for such an important duty. The following is their loss:
KILLED—James Laurier, Wm. McClane, James M. Britton.
WOUNDED—Chas. Fedelan.
MISSING—None.
At Hancock, the Zouaves found secreted, and brought off, six cases of rifles.
Less than fifty wagons out of about five hundred, including many considered worthless by General Shields when he left this column, have been lost, and the enemy have derived but little benefit from what was abandoned on the road. A large amount of old camp equipage, turned over to the Quartermaster, was burnt.
One of the principal acquisitions by the enemy was between 600 and 1,000 European rifles, left there by Gen. Shields when he joined Gen. Banks's command. The safety of so large a portion of our transportation and stores is undoubtedly attributable to the experience of Capt. Holabird, Chief Quartermaster, and Capt. Beckwith, Chief Commissary.
Brig.-Gen. O. W. Crawford, late Surgeon under Anderson at Fort Sumter, and afterward Inspector-General under Gen. Rosecrans in Western Virginia, has been appointed to the 1st Brigade of General
Williams's Division, recently commanded by Col. Donnelly.
Messengers just report (3 p. m.) heavy firing between Harper's Ferry and Charlestown. Our pickets on the Virginia side of the Potomac, have been driven by a superior force of the enemy.

LOSS OF THE FORTY-SIXTH PRNNSYLVANIA.
The following are the losses of Company C, 46th Regiment:
John Leo, wounded in in the head, and missing.
Alex. Doneghay, wounded in the head, slightly.
Hugh Lyon, wounded in the right shoulder.
John Moore, wounded in the head, slightly.
James Adams, wounded in the foot.
Joseph Sois, prisoner.
Wm. Mast, prisoner.
Edward Troxell, missing.
Hugh Dougherty, missing.
W. H. Meyers, missing.
Dan'l Desmal, wounded in the thigh.
Albert Birch of Read'g, miss'g.

Among the wounded are the following:
H. G. Hoyer, in the head.
W. H. Fox, finger shot off and ball in thigh.
____ Baker, in lip and right eye, slight.
Levi Hildebrand, slightly in leg.
L. Miller, right hand by shell, and captured.
____ Beitencup, in the head, supposed killed.
The 5th Connecticut lost only two killed and nine wounded.

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE KILLED, WOUNDED, AND MISSING IN THE TWENTY-NINTH PENNSYLVANIA REGIMENT.
It is supposed that a large number included in the list of missing have made their escape, and crossed the Potomac River at other points, but have not yet returned to their regiment.
Names of Officers Engaged in the Action at Winchester, Va., Sunday, May 25, 1862.
Col. John K. Murphy, missing.
Company I—Capt. Wm. Rickards, jr., missing.
Company K—Capt. Wm. D. Rickards, missing.
Company B.—First Lieutenant, George E. Johnston, missing;
Second Lieutenant, Joseph Maguigan, missing.
COMPANY G.—Capt. William D. Richardson, missing; First Lientenant [sic], James C. Linton, missing; Second Lieutenant, John H. Goldsmigh, missing.
COMPANY B—Capt. D. M. Lane. missing.
Ser. W. P. Brown, missing.               PRIVATES.
Ser. W. J. Sloan, missing.                 Israel Gries, missing.
Ser. E. T. Mercer, missing.                Isreal R. Hunter, missing.
Corp. J. P. Lewis, missing.               Jacob Hardy, missing.
Corp. C. Shubert, missing.               David S. Harps, missing.
Corp. Jacob Zinser, missing.             Joseph Hoskins, missing.
Corp. C. B. Talmadge, missing.        Wm. E. Hawkins, missing
Corp. W. McMathn, missng.            Joseph Isley, missing.
Drm. I. R. Bullock, missing.             J. A. J. Johnson, missing.
PRIVATES.
Aug. Bakeoven, missing.
Daniel Boyce, missing.
Walter Burnwood, missing.
Jas. Casner, missing.
George Collins, missing.
John Cavanagh, missing.
Wm. D. Cassidy, missing.
Charles Duffy, missing.
John Dougherty, missing.
John B. Eckert, missing.
Joseph Foster, missing.
George Free, missing.
David Gillan, killed.
John H. Paul, missing.
Richard Parsons, missing.
Henry Rice, missing.
George Schaffer, missing.
Wm. Shannon, missing.
David Stein, missing.
John Sullivan, missing.
Wm. Sellars, missing.
John Jardine, missing.
Charles H. Letford, son of the Adjutant, missing.
Charles Lafferty, missing.
Thomas Lemmon, missing.
John Liebeck, missing.
Robert Cammel, missing.
Adam Matsinger, missing.
John McCrea, missing.
Howard Mullen, killed.
Lewis McNelly, missing.
Michael McGowen, missing.
Wm. McDonal, missing.
Thomas Ottey, missing.
W. Sewell, son of the Chaplain, missing.
Wm. Trout, missing.
Abel Taylor, missing.
Caspar Warner, missing.
Oliver H. Wood, missing.
Francis Wylle, missing.
Wm. E. Olmstead, missing.
COMPANY A
Sergt. W. Buchanan, missing. Corp. C. Helmbold, missing.
Corp. P. Gallagher, missing.
PRIVATES.
James Allen, missing.              Wm Whitaker, missing.
Charles Brown, missing.         Benj. F. Sandey, missing.
Matthew Dorman, missing.     Louis Shaffer, missing.
Thomas Gibson, missing.        Wm. Shivers, missing.
John Gliney, missing.              Michael Standback, missing.
John Hudson, missing.            Peter M. Statzell, missing
James Kellam, missing.           John Toomey, missing.
Wm. McManeman, missing.    Charles Fietz, missing.
John Robey, missing.              Joseph Wilson, missing.
Wm. J. Rowan, wounded slightly.
COMPANY C.
Corp. Eli Boyle, missing.
PRIVATES.
John Kille, missing.                 Henry Nagle, missing.
Anthony Lynch, missing.        James Phillips, missing.
Joseph Miller, missing.            Joseph Strang, missing.
John Money, missing.             John Tiernay, missing.
Charles McColgan, missing     Michael ____, missing.
James McCarter, missing.       Joseph Ziegefus, missing.
Albert Mask..., wounded.
Corp. J. C. Bell, missing.
Corp. R. J. W___, missing.
Wash. Amos, missing.
Daniel Foos, missing.
Michael Gillis, missing.
Barnard Hanegan, missing.
COMPANY D.
Corp. B. Fellbrook, wounded.
Drummer S. Ashford, missing.
PRIVATES.
Wm. McPeak, missing.
Robert Thompson, missing.
Cornelius Toy, missing.
John Taylor, missing.
COMPANY E--CORPORALS.
Wm. H. Moore, missing. William Boehm, missing.
William Cromley, missing.
PRIVATES.
Robert Brown, missing.
Christian Bichler, missing.
John Calhoun, missing.
Jacob Clavey, missing.
Robert Callahan, missing.
John Cosslin, missing.
William Dunn, missing.
John Damon, missing.
John Humes, missing.
John Ibaugh, missing.
Matthias Kelly, missing.
Dennis Lannin, missing.
Thomas Mansfield, missing.
Charles Pomroy, missing.
Henry Topper, missing.
George Richmond, missing.
Hugh Riddle, missing.
Thomas Sheeran, missing.
John Taylor, missing.
Richard Vickray, missing.
Frederick Vose, missing.
William Vandegrift, missing.
COMPANY F.
1st Ser. J. T. Brown, missing. Corp. J. Downey, missing.
PRIVATES.
Casper Shutter, missing. Geo. Harmon, missing.
James Burns, missing. Wm. King, missing.
George Friend, missing. Frank Hazlitt, missing.
Chas. Gilfrey, missing. Robert Bankert, missing.
Jacob Hindermire, missing. Casper Shaw, missing.
COMPANY H.
Sergeant Anthony E. Thomas, missing.
PRIVATES.
Samuel Gaylord, missing.       Woods Karr, missing.
Edward Callahan, missing.      Henry Lewis, missing.
William Dobson, missing.       Lawrence McGrail, missing.
Andrew Haas, missing.           James McGrail, missing.
Frederick Hicks, missing.        Jeremiah Sullivan, missing.
John F. A. Hooper, missing.   James E. Shannon, missing.
Samuel Jacobs, missing.          Robert Wallace, missing.
George Kochersperger, missing.
COMPANY I.
Serg. Summerkamp, missing. Corp. Mountain, missing.
Serg. De Bow, missing. Corp. Wm. Haydock, missing.
Fifer George Higgins, missing.
PRIVATES.
Wm. Allheizer, missing.          Patrick McKeys, missing.
Francis Fritz, missing.             John Steward, missing.
Jacob Holcroft, missing.          John Toohay, missing.
Philip Hortenstein, missing.
COMPANY K.
Corp. Wm. Leech, missing. Corp. John Lyle, wounded.
PRIVATES.
John Ebur, missing.                 Benjamin Reed, missing.
Michael Erickson, missing.      Sept. Monkhouse, missing.
Thomas Wrenn, missing.         Charles Allen, missing.
Jacob Wagner, missing.           Charles Hunter, missing.
Wm. J. Paulin, missing.           Joseph Felty, missing.
Wm. Rowland, missing.          Richard O'Neal, missing.
George Philips, wounded.
Making a total of 265 killed, wounded and missing, of 622 officers and privates engaged in the two battles.

TWENTY-EIGHTH NEW-YORK—COL. BROWN NOT KILLED.— It has been stated that Lieut.-Col. Brown of the 28th New-York Volunteers was killed. We are happy to say that this rumor is incorrect.
His family at Medina have received information from him, via Chambersburgh, Pa., stating his arrival, uninjured, at Dam No. 4, on the 26th inst. Capt. Bowen was with him.

LOSS OF THE VERMONT CAVALRY.
From the Burlington Daily News, May 28.
A gentleman of this village received last evening a dispatch from Hagerstown, Md., from an officer in the cavalry regiment, which states that 300 of the regiment were missing, including Major Collins, Capt. Geo. H. Bean, of Company G, and Lieuts. John S. Ward, of Company K, and A. H. Danforth, of Co. G. In Co. A, (Captain Platt's), all but five are missing. Capt. Platt, Lieut. Edwards, and Corporals Frost, Reynolds and Whipple are safe.
This news will cause many sorrowing hearts among us, as Company A was recruited entirely in this county. The body of the company were from Burlington and Westford.
As we have yet no mention of our cavalry regiment in any of the news dispatches from Gen. Banks's army, we trust that when official intelligence is received, it will greatly reduce the extent of this their disaster. It will also be remembered that the 1st Maryland Regiment was at first reported as losing 300—all but 40 have since come in.

LOSS OF THE MAINE REGIMENTS.
PORTLAND, May 30, 1862.
Capt. De Hoteville telegraphs the following to Gov. Washburn:
WILLIAMSPORT, Thursday, May 29, 1862.
I am directed to inform you that the loss of the Maine regiments under Gen. Banks was as follows: First Maine Cavalry—Major Cilley, mortally wounded, and left at Middletown; Assistant Surgeon Halley, prisoner, left with Major Cilley; Acting Assistant Surgeon Howard, prisoner; rank and file missing, 71; killed and wounded, unknown.
Tenth Maine Infantry—Killed, none; wounded, 6; missing, 77, which will be reduced. Officers all safe.

LOSS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS SECOND REGIMENT.
Boston, Friday, May __, 1862.
A special to The Journal gives the full list of casualties in the Massachusetts 2d Regiment, under Gen. Banks, as 9 killed, 43 wounded, 163 missing. Total, 215.

DEMOCRAT AND AMERICAN.
TUESDAY MORNING, DEC. 30.
A BRAVE AND GALLANT OFFICER.—A MIRACULOUS ESCAPE.—The battle of Cedar Mountain, near Culpepper, was one of the hardest fought battles—considering the numbers of our troops engaged—of the war, and many a brave soldier on that day wrought deeds of heroic valor that would have done honor to any page of the world's history. And none of them fought with more valor, or exhibited more bravery, or courageous, manly bearing than Capt. William W. Warren, of the 28th Regiment. This noble regiment went into the  contest with a heroism and a reckless daring truly sublime, making one of the most spirited and beautiful charges of the day; but dearly they paid the penalty of their brave effort to force back superior numbers. The lamented Col. Donnelly was at the head of the regiment, and the gallant Colonel—then Lieut. Colonel—Brown, was also in the hottest of the fire. The brave regiment pushed fearlessly on and were met with a murderous fire of musketry and artillery. Wide gaps were made in the ranks, and soldiers dropped here and there to die upon the field of arms and a bed of glory. The gaps were closed up and still the column moved forward. Col. Donnelly was shot through the body while on his horse urging on his men. While being supported in the arms of Surgeon Paine he was taken to the rear, and in a few days died of his wounds. The command of the regiment now devolved upon Lieut. Col. Brown. He soon received a terrible gun shot wound in the left arm, and was carried to the rear. Officer after officer fell upon every side, still the brave men fought on with terrible obstinacy until night closed the scene. The most miraculous escape of all was that of Capt W. W. Warren, then Lieutenant of Company C, of Lockport. He was wounded early in the action by a ball, which struck him in the forehead, and passing in an oblique direction, it penetrated to the skull and passed out again over the eye. Another ball passed through the fleshy part of the left arm, above the elbow. Soon another shot struck him in the neck and passed through the threat between the jugular vein and the windpipe, and lodged in the muscles at the back of the neck. The brave Lieutenant still kept up, and while in the thickest of the fight two shots struck him in the left leg breaking the bone and completely disabling him. He fell to the ground and, as our troops were obliged to abandon the field, Lieut. Warren was left with the dead and wounded. The weather was intensely hot and the wounded suffered severely from thirst. The rebels for a time, supplied them with a scanty supply of water; but soon they left them entirely. Lieut. Warren was left on the field to die, as his wound was supposed to be mortal. He lay thus for over forty-eight hours, and for a long time suffering excruciating agony from thirst. Before the rebels left him they stuck down four short stakes and spread his rubber blanket over him, to shade his face from the sun. The next night a shower came up and the rubber blanket over the wounded man caught about a gallon of water. From where he lay Lieut. W. could reach one hand over the top of the blanket and, with his cup, he could dip up enough to quench his raging thirst. The supply lasted some hours, and to this, as it seemed, a special interposition of Providence, he owes his life. He was at last taken up and placed in a hospital. The Surgeons took him out at one time, to amputate his limb, but thought he could not recover any way, and the operation was not performed. He was finally taken to Richmond, exchanged and sent home. Although a cripple for life, yet, for bravery in that terrible action, he has been commissioned as Captain of Company K, in the same regiment, and draws full pay. Few men have passed through as much suffering and lived, as Capt Warren.  His story has not, as far as we know, ever before been seen in print. We are proud to record his name as a hero and a soldier. His body is scarred with honorable wounds. His name and his deeds have become a part of his country's history, and will be honored and respected wherever they are known.

Arrival of a Western New York Regiment.
THE TWENTY-EIGHTH NEW YORK REGIMENT ON ITS WAY
TO THE WAR.
The Twenty-eighth volunteer regiment (Colonel Donnelly, arrived in the city from Albany to-day, in three barges, towed by the steamer Andrews. This evening the regiment will go forward by way of Elizabethport and the New Jersey Central railroad to the seat of war.
This regiment was enlisted in the western part of this state, and made up of men of nearly all occupations, prominent among whom are school teachers. One company (that from Medina) contains nineteen of the latter class, and Company K, of Lockport, has nearly as many. All the companies contain a fair proportion of teachers.
The 28th is a well drilled, well equipped rifle corps, armed with the United States rifle of 1851, with the sabre bayonet, about as formidable a weapon as they desire. They brought on board one of the barges twenty thousand ball cartridges, with a smaller supply on the others. The volunteers are to load their rifles soon after leaving New York.
They take ordinary tents sufficient for the use of the regiment, but have a very large one in addition for use in debate, amusement, &c. The principal officers are mounted. Their horses are the only ones accompanying the regiment.
It is understood that the Kill von Kull will convey the volunteers to Elizabethport. It is not the intention to land in New York.
The following is a list of the principal officers.
Dudley Donnelly, Colonel.
Edwin F. Brown, Lieutenant-Colonel.
James R. Mitchell, Major.
Chas. P. Sproat, Adjutant.
C. L. Skeels, Quartermaster.
Rev. C. H. platt,Chaplain.
Dr. Helmer, Surgeon.
Dr. Reagan, Assistant Surgeon.

CAPTAINS AND COMPANIES.
Company A—(Lockport).—Captain, E. W. Cook.
Company B—(Lockport).—Captain, W. W. Bush.
Company C—(Lockport).—Captain, W. H. H. Mapes.
Company D—(Medina).—Captain, Erwin S. Bowen.
Company E—(Canandaigua).—Captain, T. Fitzgerald.
Company F—(Batavia).—Captain, Charles H. Fenn.
Company G—(Albion).—Captain, David Hardee.
Company H—(Monticello).—Captain, John Walker, Jr.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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