New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center - Unit History Project
     Unit History Project  
  Home
  About the Museum
  Contact Us
  Articles
  Armories & Arsenals
  Events
  Education
  Flags
  Forts
  Heraldry
  Links
  Pictures
  Press
  Research
  Unit History Project
    Conflict:
   - Revolution
   - Civil
   - Spanish American
   - Mex. Border, 1916
   - WWI
   - WWII
   - Korean
  Veteran's Oral History
  Search
   
  DMNA Homepage
  NYARNG
  NYANG
  NYG
  NY Naval Militia
  Friends

2nd Regiment Infantry
New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

TROY DAILY TIMES
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 9, 1863.
From the Second Regiment.
The following letter is from a Captain of the Second regiment, a participant in the recent bloody fight near Fredericksburg. A letter from another officer of the same regiment states that they were to start for home on the 9th, (to-day,) so that they might be here on the 14th, the end of, their two years enlistment.
ON THE BATTLE FIELD, May 4, 1863.
Dear Sir: There is a possibility of a letter reaching Troy, so I send this to let you know that I am all right. Our corps had a terrific fight yesterday morning, beginning at 4:30 o'clock. Gen. Berry, commanding the division, was killed; Gen. Mott, commanding the brigade, wounded. Every Colonel but one in the brigade was shot— one killed. Col. Park loses his right leg; Capt. McConihe and Lieut. Marcott are dangerously wounded ; Lieuts. O'Brien and Shook not dangerously. Gen. Carr now commands the division. Benedict and Gould each lost a horse. Can't tell the exact loss of our men, as we got mixed up with other troops and quite a large number are missing. The brigade went in a little short of 1600 men, and the killed and wounded, as far as known, number 468—5-17ths of the whole. In my company, (B,) Sergeant Dunham, wounded in the leg; Horace Priest, in the leg; Jas. Flood, killed. The regiment fought splendidly, as did the entire brigade. The First and Second brigades did well. Our brigade fought over an hour, unsupported, against four times their number. Much ground was lost. The First and Third divisions, on our left, gave way, and we were soon flanked on both flanks; and compelled to retire. Even then we rallied three times and drove them back, (once our regiment almost alone). The rebels lost three to one of ours in killed and wounded, and a very large number of prisoners. Our side lost but few prisoners. Gen. Whipple, commanding the Third division, was killed this forenoon. Col. Park is in good spirits. I wish Sergeant Dunham might be got home.
Card from Seyton Burns

FROM, The SECOND regiment—Letter From MAJOR WM. B. Tibbits--The following extract from a private letter written by Maj. Tibbits of the Second. regiment, to his brother, has been kindly furnished us (by request) for publication:
Battle Field, May 4, l863.
Dear----: Knowing your anxiety in regard to the result of this contest, I drop you a line which I send by a person in charge of an ambulance of wounded men. We are in the midst of the most bloody battle of the war. Yesterday our brigade went into the battle, and got terribly cut up. Col. Park, Capt. McConihe, Lieuts. O'Brien and Marcotte were wounded. The Colonel's leg has been amputated, and Capt. McC. is very low having been shot through the lungs.
Sixty of our men are killed and wounded, and as many more are missing. Col. P. was shot before he had advanced 25 feet. We lost Gen. Berry, our division commander, Gen. Motte, brigade commander, and four Colonels out of the brigade.
Our brigade rallied and charged the enemy five times, and the old Second, in the opinion of all, covered itself with glory. We "went in" at five A. M., and came out at twelve M., the rebels following us up, and occupying the ground which we lost. We have done nothing to-day, and it is as still as a morning at "Hoosick." Thank God for my good fortune in escaping. A piece of shell struck my side, and remained in my clothes.
We have some seventy eight men left, besides the stragglers, who have not yet come in.
Our army has, so far, killed the most men, and taken many prisoners. Our brigade captured over six hundred prisoners, and also captured seven stand of colors, yesterday.
First regiment left us in the field this morning, for home. The Fifth will leave to-morrow, and we will probably start in six or seven days.
I must close. We are expecting an attack every moment.
Yours, &c., W. B. T.
The "old Second" has, indeed, covered itself with glory not only in this battle, but in every conflict in which the army of the Potomac has been engaged. The announcement that only seventy-eight men of the regiment came out of the conflict, shows a sad but brilliant record. Maj. T. was in command of the regiment during the latter part of the conflict. That he performed his duty, and made others do it, too, there can be no doubt.— further and fuller particulars of the condition of the regiment will be looked for with interest.

THE NEW YORK SECOND.
The Second Regiment of New York were sworn in to-day—that is, what remains of them, some three hundred refusing to be sworn in for three years' service. All their uniforms except their pantaloons were stripped from them, and they came into the city from the encampment; and after making many noisy demonstrations got into a building, where they are quartered till to-morrow. Company G left in a body.
The commissary department of this regiment, which has been very badly managed, was much improved to-day.

Casualties In the Second Regiment.
Correspondence of the Troy Times.
CAMP SECOND REGIMENT, N. Y. V.,
NEAR FALMOUTH, Va., May 6, 1863.
Below you will find a correct list of the killed, wounded and missing of the glorious Second Regiment, in the action of May 3d;
Killed—William Wright, Co. A; John H. Baker, Co. I; Peter J. Van Zandt, Co. F; James Flood, Co. B.
Wounded.—Colonel Sidney W. Park, right leg, amputated. Co. A—Sergeant Zulmon Van Ness, right hip, prisoner; Patrick Kearney, arm, slightly; Thomas Cuthbetson, side, slightly; William Tucker, left hip, severely. Co. B—First Sergeant Henry L. Boneham, right knee, leg amputated; Horace Priest, left thigh, severely. Co. C—First Sergeant William Landon, near left eye, serious; Corporal Horace E. Sampson, right thigh, flesh wound; Corporal John A. Dean, near right eye, serious; Patrick Welch, right side, slight, on duty. Co. D—Second Lieutenant James O'Brien, leg; Corporal Archibald Buchanan, back, shell; Andrew Nailor, hand; — Wicks, fingers, Co. E—Sergeant Benjamin Morrell, right side; Corporal William Kendall, arm, slight; Lester Hodgins, right breast; James McGill, side, slight. Co. F—August Van Vleeck, right breast; Andrew Himes, right leg, slight; Hamilton A. De We, leg, slight. Co. G—Second Lieutenant Henry Marcotte, leg, amputated; Corporal S. Olker, leg, slight; Charles Newbury, hand, slight; P. Mc- Gohan, leg, slight; J. Prudor, leg, badly; J. Savoir, leg, slight. Co. H—Corporal William Frizzell, right arm, amputated; Corporal Joseph Wolf, left arm, flesh wound; William Jones, both thighs, flesh wound; Francis Bureau, left thigh; Henry A. Warren, fingers. Co. I—Captain William McConihe, arms and lungs; Second Lieutenant John Fairchild, right arm, on duty; Sergeant J. W. [sic G.W.] Holcomb, leg and breast; Corporal Oakley, Ames, slight; John O'Neal, wrist; Michael Mc- Govern, breast; Edward B. Stone, leg. Co. K— John Bessinnis, left breast; Jacob Neesley, ear and shoulder; George Jany, left leg. Luke Nichols, Co. F, slight wound in arm, May 4th.
Missing.—Co. E, William Whipple, Robert Ellison; Co. G, Thomas McGuire, William Steele; Co. H, Corporal William H. Boughton, Stephen Tymeson.
Terrible battle. All the rest of the officers and men are unharmed.
I am, yours, &c.,
WILLIAM A. OLMSTED, Lieut.-Colonel.

LIEUT. MARCOTTE, of the Second regiment who was wounded at Gettysburg, and has since then been confined at one of the Washington hospitals, reached home yesterday, and is now under the care of one of our Troy surgeons. Lieut. M. was struck in the leg by a bullet - injuring the bone below the knee pretty badly. He keeps up his courage well, however, and is a truly "plucky" soldier.

ARRIVAL OF MEMBERS OF THE SECOND REGIMENT from Richmond.—Four members of the Second Regiment arrived home yesterday morning from Richmond, where they were held as prisoners since the first crossing of the Rappahannock by Gen. Burnside. Their names are :—John A. Pitcher, Henry J. Green, Patrick Collins, and John A. Crance. They were captured while on picket duty, and were immediately conveyed to the rebel capital.

GENEROSITY OF THE SOLDIERS.—James Flynn, a member of Co. D, 2d Regiment, lost an arm at Bristow Station. On Tuesday his associates presented him the sum of $600, which had been contributed by them and other members of the regiment, on pay day.
Over $300 has already been contributed by the members of Co. E, towards the relief of a young man named Gamor, who lost an arm in his country's service.
A few evenings since a festival was given at Harmony Hall, Troy, for the benefit of Sergeant Trainor, a member of Co. K, who was maimed in the service, from which $200 was realized.

FUNERAL OF ORDERLY DUNHAM.—The funeral of Henry L. Dunham, Orderly Sergeant of Company B., of the 2d (Troy) Regiment, who died on the 6th inst., of wounds received on the 3d instant at the battle of Chancellorville, was attended on Saturday afternoon by his returned Comrades of Co. B., and others of the regiment.

FUNERAL OF ONE OF THE HEROES OF GETTYSBURG.— Yesterday, Ethan Blank, who was a member of the Second Regiment, New York Volunteers, and who fell while helping to repel the invading Rebel army of the South at Gettysburg, was buried from his former residence at Greenpoint. He had been a member of the Greenpoint M. E. Church, and was connected with the Sunday School. His funeral was attended by a long procession of the Sunday School children, who carried their banner draped in mourning. There was also a large attendance of members of the congregation, and numerous friends who knew him in life but to esteem him.

Wounded.-We learn from the Troy Whig that Capt. Wm. McConihe, of the 2d Regiment, was among the wounded during the conflict on the Rappahannock, on Monday. A dispatch to his father, stated that the Captain had received a dangerous wound in the stomach.

CAPT. WM. McConihe WOUNDED — IT is FEARED FATALLY. —The Troy Times says:— A dispatch received by us this afternoon, from Capt. Mac Arthur, states that Capt. William McConihe, of the Second (Troy) Regiment, has been shot in the stomach, and recovery is doubtful. This sad news will cause a feeling of gloom among the many friends of this brave officer, and his father, our esteemed fellow citizen, Judge McConihe. Of three sons whom he has in the army, William is the second victim—John having been wounded at Shiloh, but not so seriously as to deprive his country of his services. Capt. William McConihe was one of the original officers in the old Second regiment, and stands deservedly high as a soldier and a gentleman.

CAPT. JOHH ARTS WOUNDED—Capt John Arts, of the 2d N. Y. S. V. (Col. Carr's), formerly a resident of this city and Captain of the City Volunteers, a German Company, was wounded in the engagement in front of Richmond, on Wednesday last, and was obliged to submit to an amputation of a leg. Capt. Arts was long engaged in business here, and is well known and highly esteemed in this vicinity. He was a resident of Troy at the time he joined the service.

Col. Parks arrived by yesterday morning's boat from New York, and was immediately conveyed to his residence on Eighth street, by several officers of the Regiment, who were in waiting. Col- P. is doing well.
The Colonel was accompanied by Surgeon Mc- Lean, who has been constantly with him since he received his wound.
The Second Regiment was in no respect more fortunate than in its Surgeons. Dr. McLean won " golden opinions" from the officers and men thro’out the two years service; and Dr. CATLIN, the Assistant Surgeon, who joined the regiment a year since, enjoyed the regard and confidence of all.

THE FUNERAL of THOMAS SENIOR, formerly a member of the Second (Troy) regiment, and afterward transferred to a regiment of the Excelsior Brigade, will be attended this morning, at 10 o'clock, from the Congress street M. E. Church. He died in the hospital at Baltimore, from a wound received at Gettysburg. The body arrived last night. He was a youth of less than 18 years, but was already esteemed by his comrades as a good soldier. He lay nine days on the battle field before taken to hospital.

The Second Regiment Coming.
Battle-stained, with decimated ranks, its Colonel wounded and many noble spirits missing, the old Second regiment is to leave the Rappahannock for home to-day. It will probably arrive here on Monday or Tuesday, and should have a fitting reception. The finance committee of the Common Council will no doubt see that Troy acts justly towards her returning warriors.
Our information as to the time when the regiment leaves its camping ground is derived from a private letter written by an officer.

Troy Regiment,-- A letter from a Captain of the Second regiment, dated May 8th, says:
We leave for home on Monday, and expect to arrive there on Wednesday, as a regiment, and with our arms and equipment. Gen. Sickles told Col. Park this morning. "I can't do enough for the Second," and said that we should go home whenever we were ready, and he would like to send a guard of honor with us. Not a regiment in the army of the Potomac stands higher to-day than does the Second. The Third brigade (in which we are) has won a splendid reputation. Hooker wears our white diamond, and the entire corps stands first as a fighting corps. Our brigade (1,600 men) on Sunday fought the whole of Jackson's old division, three large brigades, and whipped them for over two hours, and only gave up our ground when the troops on our right and left fell back, and we were ordered back to avoid being surrounded. At one time, they were on three sides of us and we drove them off.
Hooker is all right yet, so the army thinks, and although we are on this side of the river again " the end is not yet." Hooker hasn't laid down yet. Though we fell back, the rebs received four times the punishment we did, and lost an immense number of prisoners. Col. Park is doing well, and will probably go to Washington to-morrow. Young Dunham has had his right leg amputated below the knee. He is in good spirits and doing well.

THE RETURNING REGIMENTS.—The Second (Troy) Regiment left Washington at noon, yesterday, for Troy; the Sixteenth left at the same time for this city, and the Twenty-Third for Elmira.
Our city authorities are making the necessary preparations to give the returning heroes a proper reception.

THE SECOND REGIMENT HOMEWARD BOUND.
Their Arrival and Reception in New York--Number and Appearance of the Men—-Honors Awarded Them by Gens. Sickles and Hooker.
New York, May 13, 1863.
You have doubtless been advised, ere this, by telegraph, of the arrival in this city of the Second regiment. Acting Quartermaster Taffe reached here early this morning, accompanied by Sergeant Shattuck, of his department, and eight privates belonging to Company A, who had got separated from the regiment on the route. Quartermaster T. immediately called upon the Citizens' Committee, Messrs. Kemp, Eddy and Arnold, and in company with those gentlemen, proceeded to make the necessary arrangements for the proper entertainment of the regiment.
The Committee had previously arranged with Quartermaster Van Vliet for the transportation of the regiment—he giving them authority to choose their own mode of conveyance, either by river or rail. It was decided to have the men go home on the "Vanderbilt"—Capts. Tupper and Hayward agreeing to provide the men with comfortable quarters and plenty to eat.
Quartermaster Taffe left Falmouth on Friday last for Washington, and there made the necessary preparations for the transportation of the regiment via Baltimore and Harrisburgh, that being the shortest route. His agreement with the authorities was, that the regiment should arrive in Jersey City at 9 o'clock this morning, but instead of that they did not arrive until 5 o'clock this evening.— The regiment was met at the depot by Doring's Band, the Committee of Arrangements, and a number of Trojans.
The feelings of the men on hearing their favorite Band, was manifested by cheers and other demonstrations of delight.
The men were speedily got into line, and preceded by the Band, the Committee, Lieut.-Colonel Olmstead, and the other field officers, marched on board the ferry boat, and were soon in New York. As previous arranged, the procession proceeded to Broadway and up to the Park Barracks. After marching around the Park, the regiment proceeded down Broadway to Courtland street, and then on board the "Vanderbilt."
At various points along the route, the regiment was greeted with cheers, and the tattered and blood-stained flags borne at the head, were observed with intense interest by the throng. The procession was a long one, embracing three other regiments besides the Second.
HOUR OF ARRIVAL.
The Vanderbilt will arrive at her dock tomorrow (Thursday) morning between eight and nine o'clock, when the regiment will disembark. The men will be provided with supper and breakfast on board the boat, and furnished with comfortable quarters.
LEAVING FALMOUTH FOE HOME—PARTING BETWEEN THE TWO YEARS AND THREE YEARS MEN.
The mandate from the Secretary of War, ordering the regiment to be discharged from service, reached Gen. Sickles' headquarters at Falmouth at one o'clock Monday morning last, and immediate notice of the fact was given to the officer in command of the Second by Gen. S.
The men had been expecting the order for some days previous, and soon after its reception, camp was broken up, and all was bustle and rejoicing.
At 7 A. M. on the same morning, the entire regiment was drawn up in line, and the order informing them of the expiration of their term of enlistment was communicated by Lieut. Col. Olmstead. Up to this time the members of the regiment enlisted since its departure from Troy, were confident of being mustered out of the service with the original two years' men. But such was not the case, and on being informed that they would be detained for three years, they appeared very much chop fallen, and many gave vent to their feelings in no very mild terms. Nearly all stated that they had been induced to enlist by the promises of recruiting officers that they would be discharged at the expiration of two years.
Finally, the roll was called, and the three years' recruits were each ordered to step forward from the ranks. The summons was very reluctantly obeyed by the men. They numbered about one hundred. These were instantly transferred to Sickles' headquarters, and were subsequently consolidated with one of the regiments of the Excelsior Brigade, Sickles' original command.
The parting between the two years' and three years' members of the regiment is represented as being extremely affecting--the latter watching the departure of their comrades with every manifestation of regret and disappointment.
The two years' men, to the number of about three hundred and twenty, immediately started for Washington, where they arrived in the evening,— The next morning, Tuesday, they left Washington at ten o'clock by rail for Baltimore. On the route the regiments were greeted with enthusiastic cheers.
— Previous to the departure of the regiment; from Falmouth, Gen. Sickles issued an order, thanking both officers and men for the heroism displayed by them while under his command. The General referred to the creditable record of the regiment, and complimented all in the handsomest manner. Gen. Hooker also expressed his regret at parting with the regiment, and bestowed many enconiums on its soldierly conduct and bearing.
The line officers of the regiment on detached service—Lieuts. Gould, Johnson, and others, return with the regiment on a leave of absence.

THE SECOND REGIMENT.
REVIEW BEFORE MAYOR WOOD ON THE BATTERYTHEY TAKE THEIR DEPARTURE FOR THE WAR TODAY
The Battery was besieged all day yesterday by thousands of persons watching the manoeuvres of the Second regiment, who are at present encamped there, and who will take their departure for Washington to-day. Everything is in readiness, and the men are joyful at the thought of a speedy change from the monotony of their position on the Battery to the excitement of a campaign. The regiment had a dress parade last evening, when they were reviewed by Mayor Wood and one or two of the Defence Committee. The men looked remarkably well, and went through the different manoeuvres of drilling with much precision and exactness. They seemed to have acquired a hardy and healthful constitution since inhaling the breezes from the bay on the Battery, and as they marched past in review the Mayor expressed himself much pleased with their appearance. The regiment went through several difficult evolutions with almost the exactness of regular soldiers, and the crowds who surrounded the parade ground signified their approbation by repeated cheering and clapping of hands. The loading and firing in solid square was excellent, and received peculiar marks of praise. When the men ran around the ground in double quick time, the even and regular tramp might be heard distinctly. On forming into line along the entire length of the ground, Mayor Wood, accompanied by a number of gentlemen, marched around in review, the men presenting arms, and the drum corps pealing out their stirring sounds, the parade concluded about six o'clock in the evening.
It appears that the regiment are in want of twenty-five more recruits, which will be sent on to Washington after the main body. Application for enlistment can be made at the Armory, corner of Seventh street and Third Avenue, to Capt. Joseph Byrne.

RECEPTION OF THE SECOND REGIMENT IN TROY. — The Second Regiment reached Troy early yesterday morning, and met with the heartiest reception. The Fire Companies were all in line, as were also the members of the Young Men's Association, the Moulder's Association, and Military Companies; and the streets throughout the entire route were lined with Flags, Banners, Ensigns, &c. A triumphal arch was erected on Washington Square, through which the regiment passed, and received their reception. The stores were nearly all closed, several of the large factories suspended operations, the public schools were closed, bells were rung, cannons fired, and the citizens were out en masse.
The Regiment numbers only 400 men. Colonel Park, the Commander, was wounded at Chancellorsville, where the Regiment was engaged. It was the first Regiment to land in Virginia, and, took part in every battle of note.

RECEPTION OF THE SECOND REGIMENT, N. Y. S.,V.-- The Second Regiment, N..Y.S.V. arrived at Troy, by the steamer Vanderbilt, yesterday morning. A despatch from that city says the reception of the regiment was the greatest gala day ever known in that city. It was received by the city authorities, military, fire department, and civic associations. Business was generally suspended, the streets were crowded with people, and public and private buildings were splendidly decorated. After a parade through some of the principal streets, which was a magnificent ovation to the returned heroes, the regiment was welcomed, on behalf of the city, on Washington Square, where a triumphal arch had been erected for the occasion. The whole affair reflected great credit on our sister city. The Second number about four hundred men. Colonel Park, its commander, was wounded at Chancellorsville, and the regiment on its arrival was under command of Lieut. Col. Olmstead, son of Charles S. Olmstead, Esq., formerly of this city. The Second took part in nearly every battle in Virginia.

ARRIVAL OF TROOPS.
THE SECOND REGIMENT OF TROY.
The Second Light Infantry regiment of Troy volunteers left Albany at eight o'clock on Saturday evening, in the steamboat New World, and arrived at the foot of Canal street at nine o'clock yesterday morning. They were to have come here in company with the Albany men; but previous to their departure some difficulty appears to have taken place, according to the statement of one of the Trojan officers, which is in substance as follows:-— We left Troy in two barges, about eleven o'clock on Saturday morning, and came to Albany. At about four o'clock in the afternoon we were joined by the Albany regiment, Colonel Townsend. All of our men were put into one barge, the Alida, and another barge alongside her having the Albany men on board. The barge alluded to was chartered by the people of Troy for our use; but Colonel Townsend would not let any of our men cross the Alida to get on board the barge. On this Colonel Carr ordered Colonel Townsend to let the barge loose or he would have the ropes cut, which had the effect of making the Colonel of the Albanians succumb, and the Trojans were cut loose from the Alida, and they were towed back to Albany by the steamboat Corning. Colonel Carr then reported the matter at headquarters, upon which the New World was hired to bring his men to this city.
The Second regiment of Troy are mostly short, thick set men, full of activity and vigor. They only got their uniforms and guns on Saturday; but notwithstanding they drill well and handle their muskets admirably. Soon after their arrival yesterday morning they marched up Broadway to Canal street, where they entered a large establishment known as Devlin's building, which has been set aside for a temporary military barracks. Here, it is stated, they will remain for three or four days, at the expiration of which they will depart for Fortress Monroe. The following is a list of the officers:—
Colonel, Joseph B. Carr.
Lieutenant Colonel, R. Wells Kenyon.
Major, Richard D. Bloss.
Adjutant, Timothy Quinn.
Surgeon, Reed B. Bontecou.
Surgeon's Mate, Leroy McLean.
Quarter muster, C. L. McArthur.
Chaplain, V. B. Lewis
Sergeant Major, L. G. Benedict.
Quartermaster Sergeant, J. P. Donnelly.
Drum Major, Thomas E. Bulger.
Company A—Captain, J. W. Armitage; First Lieutenant, Calvin W. Link; Second Lieutenant, Geo. W, Hitchcock.
Company B—Captain, Wm. A. Olmsted; First Lieutenant, T. C. Haddock; Second Lieutenant, Lee Churchill.
Company C-Captain, Geo. H. Otis; First Lieutenant, Lee Perkins; Second Lieutenant, W. H. Pitt.
Company D-Captain, Michael Cassidy; First Lieutenant, John Maguire; Second Lieutenant, John McCaffrey.
Company E-Captain, Geo. W. Wilson; First Lieutenant, John H. Quackenbush; Second Lieutenant, C. Wilson.
Company F-Captain, S. W. Park; First Lieutenant, Jas. Cross; Second Lieutenant, Wm. H. Harrison.
Company G-Captain, W. B. Tibbits; First Lieutenant, James Savage, Second Lieutenant, Wm. Sullivan.
Company H-Captain, J.G. McNutt; First Lieutenant, Wm. O'Brien; Second Lieutenant. W. H. McFeeters.
Company I-Captain, McConihe; First Lieutenant, Jos. Lafuira; Second Lieutenant, Geo. Tafft.
Company K-Captain, John Arts; First Lieutenant, Henry Jansen; Second Lieutenant, Auguste Kalbe.

...AND COURIER: ALBANY
THE SECOND REGIMENT.--This Regiment came home on the Vanderbilt last night. They will be received at Troy to day. Extensive preparations have been made. The military and fire companies, civic associations, &c., of Troy, Lansingburgh and Cohoes, will join in the procession. The line will be formed at 8 o'clock. The Committee and the citizens are uniting in preparations for a welcome.
The Committee on decoration have caused the following circular to be distributed, addressed " to the loyal men and women of Troy:''
" The undersigned are appointed a sub-committee on decorations of the Committee of Arrangements for the reception of the Second Regiment. Our brave and battle-scarred boys, by their undaunted heroism, and faithful service, have covered themselves with imperishable glory. Let us seek to give them a reception fitted to their position, among the noblest defenders of our national cause. We wish to suggest that every house upon the line of march should, so far as-possible, be decorated with flags, and such patriotic devices and appropriate mottoes as the taste of our citizens may dictate. Let there be a recognition at every point. The Committee will, of course, attend to the principal decorations, but, to make this department successful, all should assist."
A magnificent arch has been erected in Cannon Place, and the City Hall is decorated with evergreens and banners inscribed with the names of the different battles through which the regiment has passed.

Co. F—Captain, Henry Harrison; First Lieut.. R.B. Dickey; Second Lieut., J. H. Pierce.
Co. G—Captain, Edgar T. Wilson; First Lieut., Thos. H. Fisher; Second Lieut., Henry Marcotte.
Co. H—Captain, James A. Cross; First Lieut., Vacant; Second Lieut., J. H. Preston.
Co. I—Captain, Wm. McConihe; First Lieut., George Taffe; Second Lieut., John Fairchild.
Co. K-Captain, Joseph Egolf; First Lieut., James Johnson; Second Lieut., Vacant.
And thus ended the "welcome home" extended to the Troy Second Regiment.
" Each soldier's name
Shall shine untarnished on the roll of fame.
And stand the example of each distant age.
And add new lustre to the historic page."

RECEPTION OF THE SECOND REGIMENT IN TROY.—The reception of the Second Regiment in Troy, yesterday, on their return from two years service, was the greatest gala day ever known in Troy. The regiment arrived at an early hour and was received by the city authorities, while flags were flying in every street and a large procession escorted the brave fellows. Speeches were made in Washington Square under the triumphal arch erected for the occasion. The regiment numbers only 400 men. Col. Park, the commander, was wounded at Chancellorville where the regiment was engaged. It was the first regiment to land in Virginia and took part in every battle of note.

THE SECOND REGIMENT--The Second Regiment arrived in Troy yesterday morning by boat. It met with an enthusiastic reception. The principal stores were closed and every one appeared to take part in the ceremony. The procession was over a mile in length.

THANKS.—Major Richardson desires to return thanks to Chief of Police Barren, of Troy, who, unsolicited by him, attended, with an efficient corps of policemen, all yesterday, within sight of the "pay table," and preserved the best order while the Paymaster was engaged in paying off the Second regiment.- Albany Journal.
This adds another to the list of efficient acts performed by our excellent Chief of Police--who is regarded by citizens of all parties as an intelligent, enterprising, faithful officer.

Reception of the Second regiment Tomorrow Morning.
The Troy Committee in New York, sent the following telegrams yesterday : —
NEW YORK, May 12.
Hon. W. L. VAN ALSTYNE, Mayor:— They will go up on the Vanderbilt Wednesday night. Had not left Washington this morning. Number about two hundred. The severely wounded will not come.
WM. KEMP, for Committee.
NEW YORK, May 12.
Hon. W. L. VAN ALYSTYNE, Mayor:—The Regiment left Washington at noon to-day. Will arrive at noon tomorrow. Will leave New York on Wednesday, night, for Troy, by the Vanderbilt.
WM. KEMP, for Committee.
The Committee of Arrangements met last evening, at the Mayor's office. Changes were made in the line of march, which will be as follows :—
LINE OF MARCH,
Steamboat Landing. Line form on River street right resting on Division. Down River street, to Liberty; up Liberty to First; up State to Second; up Second to River; down River to Broadway; up Broadway to Second; countermarch down Broadway to River; up River to Second; down Second to Broadway. Reception.
Up Broadway to Third; up Third to River; up River to King, to Jacob and North Second; down North Second to Grand Division; down Grand Division to Fourth; down Fourth to State; down State to Third; down Third to Washington Park; around Washington Park to Second; up Second to Court House, and dismiss.
PROGRAMEE OF PROCESSION.
First Division.
Platoon Troy City Police.
Gen. Allen and Staff.
Band.
Twenty-fourth Regiment National Guard, George Babcock, Colonel Commanding.
Second Division.
Band.
Engineers Noble and Simmons of the Fire Department.
Washington Volunteers.
Empire State Engine Co. No. 5.
Hope Engine Co. No. 6.
Franklin Hose Co. No. 1.
Hydraulic Engine Co. No. 9.
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 2.
Hook and ladder Co. No. 3.
Lafayette Engine Co. No. 10.
Taylor Hose Co. No. 3.
Hugh Rankin Steamer No. 2.
J. C. Osgood Steamer No. 3.
Fire Companies from Cohoes.
Fire Companies from Lansingburgh.
Fire Companies from West Troy.
Third Division.v Band.
Troy Moulder's Association.
Troy Young Men's Association.
Fourth Division.
Band.
Committee of Arrangements in carriages.
His Honor the Mayor, Recorder, and Common Council in carriages.
Second Regiment New York Volunteers.
Wounded and sick soldiers of the Second Regiment in carriages.
All Military and Fire Companies or Associations not enumerated, who intend joining the procession will report to the Marshall, in order that a proper place in the line may be assigned them.
The procession will form Thursday morning at 7 1/2 o'clock precisely.
Streets will be kept clear in the line of the procession.

WILLIAM MADDEN, Marshal.
AIDES
Major, JOHN J. LEROY.
Capt. ROBERT GREEN,
Lieut., GORDON G. MOORE,
MARK V. THOMPSON
HEAD QUERTER'S 24TH REGIMENT,
NATIONAL GUARD, Troy, May 11, 1863.
General Orders, No. 7:
Commandants of companies will assemble their respective Commands at the Regimental Armory on Thursday, May 14th, at 7 o'clock A, M., for parade.
The line will be formed at 8 o'clock precisely, and the commandants of Companies are specially enjoined to see that their men are promptly on the ground, at the time specified.
Field and Staff officers will appear on foot, and in full uniform, excepting Chapeaus and Epauletts.
By order of GEORGE BABCOCK, Col.
C.H.M. . FERRE, Adjutant.
DECORATIONS.
The committee on decoration have caused the following circular to be distributed, addressed "to the loyal men and women of Troy:"
" The undersigned are appointed a sub committee on decorations of the Committee of Arrangements for the reception of the Second regiment. Our brave and battle-scarred boys, by their undaunted heroism, and faithful service, have covered themselves with imperishable glory. Let us seek to give them a reception fitted to their position, among the noblest defenders of our national cause. We wish to suggest that every house upon the line of march should, so far as possible, be decorated with flags, and such patriotic devices and appropriate mottoes as the taste of our citizens may dictate. Let there be a recognition at every point. The Committee will, of course, attend to the principal decorations, but, to make this department successful, all should assist."
On all sides 'the note of preparation' for the RECEPTION is heard. With favorable weather, the day will be a brilliant and joyous one. While the Committee are busy, private hands are employed in devising tokens of welcome to the soldiers. Many private residences, as well as public places, will be decorated. A splendid Arch of boughs, evergreens, flowers, &c., surmounted by a flag staff, is in course of preparation, on Washington square, fronting the Mansion House. The Court House will be appropriately decorated.
Delegations will be present from West Troy, Lansingburgh, Waterford, and Cohoes; and probably from the surrounding towns.
All can do something to add to the interest of the occasion. Let us make the day one long to be remembered as well by the brave boys who return after two years of absence, as by those who shall greet their arrival home.

RECEPTION OF THE SECOND REGIMENT.
There is every reason to believe that the turnout to-morrow to welcome the Second regiment, will be large and imposing. Many companies in the Fire department, Gen. Allen and Staff, the Twenty-fourth regiment, Troy Citizens' Corps, Young Men's Association, Moulders' Association, with other civic bodies, firemen and military from abroad, will parade.
The committee of arrangements met last evening and appointed the following sub-committees:
On Refreshments—Recorder Moran. Messrs. McConihe and Gay.
On Salutes and Bells—Ald. McKeon, C. W. Tillinghast and W. Kipp.
On Decorations—Messrs. Fuller, Gurley, Bills, Forsyth and Engineer Simmons.
On Invitations—Chief Engineer Starbuck, McKeon and McConihe.
On Marshals—Messrs. Moran. Gay and Tillinghast.
On Carriages—Messrs. Gay, Tillinghast and McKeon.
On Line of March— Messrs. Moran, McConihe and Simmons.
On Music—Messrs. Babcock and McKeon.
The line of march will be as follows:
Division street Landing. Line form on First, right resting on Congress: Up first to State, up State to Second; up Second to River; down River to Broadway; up Broadway to Second; countermarch down Broadway to River; up River to Second; down Second to Broadway. [Reception.] Up Broadway to Third; up Third to River; up River to King, to Jacob and North Second; down North Second to Grand Division; down Grand Division to Fourth; down Fourth to State; down State to Third; down Third to Washington Park; around Washington Park to Second; up Second to Court House and dismiss.
The committee of arrangements will meet at the Mayor's office at 8 o'clock this evening.
During to-day, arrangements have been actively progressing for the reception of the regiment. On Washington Square, where the speaking is to take place, a platform has been built, and a beautiful series of arches raised. The committee on decorations have caused the following circular to be distributed, addressed "to the loyal men and women of Troy":
" The undersigned are appointed a sub-committee on decorations of the Committee of Arrangements for the reception of the Second regiment. Our brave and battle-scarred boys, by their undaunted heroism, and faithful service, have covered themselves with imperishable glory. Let us seek to give them a reception fitted to their position, among the noblest defenders' of our national cause. We wish to suggest that every house upon the line of march should, so far as possible, be decorated with flags, and such patriotic devices and appropriate mottoes as the taste of our citizens may dictate. Let there be a recognition of the day at every point. The Committee will, of course, attend to the principal decorations, but, to make this department successful, all should assist."
We trust that this recommendation will be attended to, upon the entire line of march. There is every indication that the decorations will be worthy of the occasion. Every effort has been made to-day to find out the exact time at which the regiment will arrive in Troy. A telegram from Capt. Joseph J. Hagen to W. E. Hagan states that the regiment left Washington last night, and would arrive in New York this afternoon, and be in readiness to start for home on a special steamer which will start from Jersey City as soon as the regiment can embark, and enable the reception to take place to-morrow morning. Marshal Madden has appointed Robert Green, M.V. Thompson and Maj. J. I. Leroy, as his assistants. Capt. Arts was unable to ride a horse, and could not accept an appointment to act in this capacity. The steamer Arba Read will be held in reserve for duty; the Hugh Rankin and J. C. Osgood will probably parade.
— Col. Park is now at the Clarendon Hotel, Washington. Sergeant Henry L. Dunham, who was wounded at Chancellorville, died on the way from the Capital to New York. He was a brave soldier, and his loss is much lamented. He lived in West Troy.
— We hope to be able to announce in our second edition, the exact time of the regiment's arrival.

SECOND REGIMENT.—BATTLES IN WHICH IT HAS PARTICIPATED.—A volume might be written describing the services of the Second regiment, which started from Troy on the 18th of May, 1861, with over nine hundred in the ranks, and will return to-morrow with about ninety-two men. The regiment has not met this sweeping loss by war's casualties alone, yet its survivors form only a small part of the proud band that left Troy, with glittering bayonets, two years ago. The regiment remained at Fort Monroe and Newport News, during the first few months of its service. It was transferred to the Peninsula during McClellan's advance,—arriving just too late for the battle of Williamsburg. Participating in the memorable "Seven Days " fight, it reached Harrison's Landing and remained there until General Pope's movement, when it was sent to Alexandria and made a forced march to join the Army of Virginia. At Chantilly it was in reserve, but at Bristow Station met the most severe loss that it suffered during its two years service— encountering and repulsing Ewell's rebel division. It returned to Washington so much cut up that it could not take part in the battle of Antietam. At Burnside's attack on Fredericksburg it was held in reserve, and at Chancellorville it bore a memorable part in the battle—forming a part of Berry's division, Sickles' corps. It has been engaged, either actively or as a reserve, in the following battles:
Newmarket Bridge.
Bethel.
Capture of Norfolk.
Hanover Court House.
Fair Oaks.
Gaines' Mill.
Savage's Station.
White Oak Swamp.
Malvern Hill.
Chantilly.
Bristow Station.
Second Bull Run.
Fredericksburg.
Chancellorville.
— A noble record for a noble regiment.

THE RECEPTION TO-DAY
{Daily Whig, May 14, 1863
With fair weather, the Reception of the Second Regiment to-day will be brilliant; but, whatever the weather, it will be cordial and enthusiastic. The Committees have been busily at work, and individuals have not been idle. River street throughout will present a gay display of bunting and many of the stores and other establishments will be handsomely decorated.
The Arch, in front of the Mansion House, is a fine affair, and will be one of the principal features of the occasion.
County Clerk Brownell has decorated the Court House in excellent style. Evergreens span the columns, and various appropriate mottoes, paintings, & c., have been arranged. The principal motto is, " Troy Second Regiment: First in the Field, and First in the Hearts of our people."
At the Arch in the front of the Mansion House, the Reception Exercises will take place. Mayor Van Alstyne will make the welcoming speech, and the Chaplain of the Regiment, Rev. E.T. Chapman, will probably make the response. It is expected there will be addresses by others.
ARRIVAL OF THE REGIMENT IN NEW YORK.
[By Telegraph.]
NEW YORK, May 13,1863.
To Editor of the Whig: Regiment arrived at 5 o'clock this afternoon. Proceeded up to Broadway, and marched around the Park, and then to the Vanderbilt, for Troy.
K.
The boat will arrive at an early hour. The members of the Regiment will be furnished with breakfast on board, and leave the boat to join immediately the line of the procession.
Proclamation by the Mayor.
MAYOR'S OFFICE, TROY, May 14,1863.
It is particularly requested that the streets through which the procession will pass this morning, be kept free from teams or other obstructions. Policemen are instructed to be vigilant in seeing that this done. The firing of small cannon along the line of the procession is strictly forbidden. Our citizens, generally, it is hoped, will afford every facility for making the reception what it should be. Any attentions shown the returning soldiers, calculated to add to their comforts, will essentially aid the objects in view by those who have the Reception in charge.
W.L. VAN ALSTYNE, Mayor.
The Marshals have arranged the procession according to the following:
PROGRAMEE.
First Division.
Platoon Troy City Police.
Gen. Allen and Staff.
Band.
Twenty-fourth Regiment National Guard, George Babcock, Colonel Commanding.
Second Division.
Band.
Engineers Noble and Simmons of the Fire Department.
Washington Volunteers.
Empire State Engine Co. No. 5.
Hope Engine Co. No. 6.
Franklin Hose Co. No. 1.
Rough and Ready Engine Co. No. 9.
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 2.
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 3.
Lafayette Engine Co. No. 10.
Taylor Hose Co. No. 3.
Hugh Rankin Steamer No. 2.
J. C. Osgood Steamer No. 3.
Fire Companies from Cohoes.
Fire Companies from Lansingburgh.
Fire Companies from West Troy.
Third Division.
Band.
Troy Moulder's Association.
Troy Young Mew's Association.
Fourth Division.
Band.
Troy Citizens Corps.
Committee of Arrangements in carriages.
His Honor the Mayor, Recorder, and Common Council in carriages.
Second Regiment New York Volunteers.
WOUNDED AND SICK SOLDIERS OF THE SECOND REGIMENT IN CARRIAGES.
The first division will form on River street— right resting on Division. The second division will form on River street—right resting on Ferry. The third division will form on River street— right resting on Congress. The fourth division except the Second regiment will form on River street—right resting on State.
All Military and Fire Companies or Associations, not enumerated, who intend joining the procession, will report to the Marshall, in order that a proper place in the line may be assigned them.
The procession will form Thursday morning at 7 1/2 o'clock precisely.
Streets will be kept clear in the line of the procession.
WILLIAM MADDEN, Marshal.
AIDES
Major, JOHN I. LEROY,
Capt. ROBERT GREEN,
Lieut., GURDON G, MOORE,
MARK V. THOMPSON,
HEADQUARTERS 24Th REGIMENT,
NATIONAL GUARD, TROY, May 11,1863.
General Orders, No, 7: Commandants of companies will assemble their respective commands at the Regimental Armory, on Thursday, May 14th, at 7 o'clock A.M., for parade,
The line will be formed at 8 o'clock precisely, and the commandants of companies are specially enjoined to see that their men are promptly on the ground at the time specified.
Field and Staff officers will appear on foot, and; in full uniform, except chapeaus and epauletts.
By order of GEORGE BABCOCK, Col.
C. H. M. FERRE, Adjutant.
LINE OF MARCH.
Steamboat Landing. Line form on River St., right resting on Division. Down River st. to Liberty : — up Liberty to First; up First to State; up State to Second; up Second to River; down River to Broadway; up Broadway to Second; countermarch down Broadway to River; up River to Second; down Second to Broadway. [Reception.] Up Broadway to Third; up Third to River; up River to King; up King to Jacob and North Second; down North Second to Grand Division; down Grand Division to Fourth; down Fourth to State; down State to Third; down Third to Washington Park; around. Washington Park to Second; up Second to Court House, and dismiss.
Green Island—Reception of Co. "H."
Our friends on the Island have taken measures, as will be seen below, to give Co. H. of the Regiment a Reception. It is presumed the necessary arrangements can be made to carry out their plan, immediately after the exercises close here:
RECEPTION.
At a meeting of the inhabitants of the village of Green Island, held May 12th, the following among other proceedings were had:
Resolved, That inasmuch as we learn with much satisfaction that the Second Regiment of New York Volunteers are about to return to their homes, and feeling that Company H is in a great measure a part and parcel of our villagers, that the inhabitants make some suitable demonstration and preparation to receive them in a becoming manner — Therefore, the President, Trustees and Clerk of the village, were instructed to proceed to Troy and meet the Regiment, and to extend an invitation to Company H to meet their fellow citizens and accept of the escort provided. An invitation is also cordially extended to any and all other members of the Regiment who may feel disposed to accompany our friends to the village.

THE RECEPTION OF THE SECOND REGIMENT AT TROY.
Immense Turnout of Citizens—Incidents, Decorations, & c.
The reception of the Second Regiment, yesterday, says the Troy Whig, was an event that will long be remembered in local history. As a public demonstration, it has never been surpassed. The weather was pleasant, the arrangements complete, and well carried out; while the public display was all that could be desired. The procession embraced nearly every organization, civic, military, or otherwise, in the city, and also several companies from surrounding villages. The streets, along the line of march, were densely crowded with people, and at various points, as the bronzed and sun-burnt heroes passed by, the cheering was hearty and long-continued. Nothing had been neglected by the committees in charge of the affair that could add to the heartiness and enthusiasm of the ovation.
ARRIVAL OF THE REGIMENT.
The announcement that the Regiment was to arrive on the "Vanderbilt," attracted an immense crowd to the wharf. The steamer reached her dock a few minutes after seven o'clock, and a salute of thirty-four guns gave public notice of the fact. Soon after, the procession began to form, and at half-past eight o'clock, the regiment was escorted from the boat up Broadway, and the procession commenced moving. Before starting, and along the line of march, the friends and relatives of the members of the regiment gathered around them, and friendly congratulations were freely exchanged. The procession followed the line, of march as published yesterday, with the exception of proceeding down Second to Jackson street, and up Fourth to Washington, instead of countermarching around Washington Park. In addition to the organizations previously named to parade, Mohawk and Cataract Engine Companies, of Cohoes, and Conqueror and Oswald Companies, of West Troy, appeared in line with full ranks, and headed by bands of music. The Moulder's Association turned out 300 strong, under the Marshalship of President Douglas. The Twenty-fourth Regiment, Col. Babcock, made every creditable display, as did also the Citizens' Corps, Capt. Sims. Five brass bands—Doring's and Sullivan's, of Troy, Schrieber's, of Albany, Rosses', of Cohoes, the Campbell brass brand, and Reynold's drum crops—were in line, and added greatly to the enthusiasm of the occasion. Our home fire companies turned out with full ranks, and the Osgood and Rankin steamers were handsomely decorated. Trojan Hook and Ladder 3 was out in full force, under command of Foreman Green.
The entire procession was about half a mile in length, and after halting repeatedly, reached the Court House at half-past 12 o' clock.
At ten o'clock the formal "Welcome home" to the regiment took place on Washington Square. The field and line officers of the regiment, with his Honor Mayor Van Alstyne and the Reception Committee, assembled on a platform under the magnificent Arch in front of the Mansion House. The Mayor welcomed the soldiers in an address of some length, in which he referred to their noble career since entering the service. Lieut. Col. Olmstead, although suffering from a weakness of voice, responded in an appropriate speech.
On the conclusion of the Mayor's remarks, rousing cheers were given by the multitude, for the Second regiment, and Gen. Carr.
The crowd, at this point, was immense, the entire square being literally packed with people.
The line was again reformed, and at half-past twelve o'clock, the procession arrived at the Court House, where it was dismissed.— The Second regiment, by invitation, visited the residence of the Mayor Van Alstyne, on Fourth street, where they were provided with a liberal supply of refreshments. Subsequently, they marched to the Armory, deposited their arms and knapsacks, and were dismissed by Lieut. Col. Olmstead until Tuesday next at which time they will be mustered out of the service, and receive the $100 Government bounty.
DECORATIONS—INCIDENTS, &c.
During the day, the streets presented a holiday appearance, many stores being closed, and strangers being everywhere met with. Flags floated from every staff in great profusion, and patriotic devices and emblems adorned many private as well as public buildings. The war-worn veterans were warmly welcomed and were greeted with clapping of hands and waving of handkerchiefs. They received a noble reception, but nothing more than what they richly merited; nothing in comparison with their sacrifices and sufferings; nothing when viewed with the record of their public service and heroic achievements.
Many incidents, both of a pleasant and a painful character occurred during the march. Frequently, a sister or a mother could be seen rushing through the crowd and eagerly watching for the appearance of some loved one. When it is known that the regiment lost more than half its members, an idea may be formed of the number of hearts made sad yesterday.
A number of the sick and wounded of the regiment were left in the hospitals at Potomac Creek, and also in Washington.
One of the finest displays of bunting was that at the Female Seminary. On one flag were the words "The Second Regiment: It has written its name in History;" on another " God and our Country," &c. From Mrs. E. Willard's residence was suspended a banner inscribed "Welcome Brothers." As the regiment passed the Seminary, the men were literally showered with boquets by the young ladies on the balconies. The decorations on the Court House were really magnificent, as were also the residences of Messrs. McConihe, J. L. Flagg, Dr. Blatchford, J. W. Fuller, E. L. Mallary, C. S. Sill, B. T. Cushman, J. M. Francis, Jas. Forsyth, Mayor Van Alstyne, Gen. Wool, W. W. Rosseau, J. A. Griswold, A. Reed, W W. Whipple &c.

THE BATTLE FLAG.
The regimental color presented a sad spectacle, as it was borne aloft by the color-bear, Thos. Farwell--a young man whose courage and bravery is the subject of general remark among the officers of the regiment. He enlisted as a drummer, but preferred the post of danger, and was appointed to the above position.
CREDIT TO WHOM DUE, &c.
The Arch on Washington square was designed by Cummings, the architect, and the trimming by Messrs. J. W. Garfield and Thos. Buckley. The wreathing was the work of the members of Trojan Hook and Ladder Co. No. 3, and was arranged by Capt. J. C. Green, assisted by members of his company. The committee on decorations, and also the citizens' committee chosen to proceed to New York, are entitled to much credit for the manner in which their respective duties were performed. His honor the Mayor, also, has devoted much time and energy in looking after the details, & c.
COMPANY H,
was escorted to Green Island in the afternoon by a delegation from the Board of Trustees of the village. The men were hospitably entertained, and returned late in the afternoon. This company was raised by Capt. McNutt, who was succeeded by Capt. Cross.
FIREMEN ENTERTAINED.
The visiting firemen were very handsomely entertained at the house of steamer No. 2. before leaving for home. A sumptuous spread had been prepared, reflecting the highest credit on the Department, the company, and all concerned. Hugh Rankin Esq., welcomed the strangers in a few brief remarks. The members of the Common Council were also guests at the banquet.
SERENADING.
Doring's and Sullivan's Band were out last evening, serenading the officers of the regiment.
SALUTES FIRED.
A salute of 100 guns was fired by the City Artillery—34 on the arrival of the Vanderbilt, and 60 during the moving of the procession. A salute of 34 guns was also fired at the Arsenal.
OFFICERS OF THE SECOND REGIMENT.
The following is a list of the field officers of the Second regiment:—
Colonel—Sidney W. Park.
Lieutenant-Colonel—Wm. Olmstead.
Major—Wm. B. Tibbits.
Adjutant—J. H. Fratt.
Surgeon—Le Roy McLean.
Assistants—N. H. Camp, R. F. Catlin.
And thus ended the "welcome home" extended to the Troy Second Regiment.
" Each soldier's name
Shall shine untarnished on the roll of fame,
And stand the example of each distant age,
And add new lustre to the historic page."

THE RECEPTION YESTERDAY.
THE MAYOR'S ADDRESS,
Response for the Second Regiment.
As soon as it was possible to produce anything like order, Mayor Van Alstyne advanced to the front of the platform, and addressed the regiment as follows:
Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Privates of the Second Regiment: With feelings of pride and joy, the city authorities and this vast concourse of people bid you welcome, thrice welcome, to Troy—to home, to friends, and to companions of former days. Believe me, that during your long absence the prayers and thoughts of this community have been constantly of and with you; every movement of your regiment has been carefully noted; every word of intelligence from it has found listening ears, and in your days of immediate trial and peril there has been no limit to public solicitude for you,—and all this has been so natural, so irresistible, that we claim no credit for ourselves. To your hands was consigned the honor of the city; every where you were known as the Troy regiment, and as such we always referred to you; your officers and nearly your entire ranks had been residents of Troy, and left behind here their families, associates and friends; to part with them was one of the first trials you knew as soldiers; to part with you, was to very many the first sacrifice this war demanded of them. Strange indeed, it would have been, therefore, had public anxiety in your behalf been less, and stranger still perhaps would it be, if the general joy so fully shown at your return were less overwhelming than it is.
To trace the rise and progress of your regiment is to give in outline much of the history of the war from the commencement to even a very late period. On the 13th of April, 1861, the intelligence first reached us of the attack of Fort Moultrie's guns on Fort Sumter. Sunday morning, April 14th, brought us news of the surrender of that fort by Major Anderson. Monday, the 15th, brought us the proclamation of the President, calling for 75,000 volunteers. On the same day, Gov. Morgan, of our State, recommended, and the Legislature passed, a law for enrolling 30,000 volunteers, and appropriating for all necessary expenses, $3,000,000. On the same evening, the first war meeting in Troy was held at Harmony Hall, and subsequently adjourned to the Union depot, large in numbers, high in the respectability of those who participated in it, and enthusiastic in spirit. It was resolved that Troy would do her duty in the crisis, and that the city alone would raise a regiment for the war, to defend, maintain and perpetuate the Union. A second meeting— not less earnest than the first—was held on the succeeding Thursday evening, at which a committee was appointed to wait on the Common Council and ask for an appropriation of $10,000 from the city treasury in aid and support of the families of volunteers. The request was no sooner made than granted, and forthwith the citizens themselves opened a subscription for a volunteer fund, which soon reached the large sum of $35,- 000. Before the week which opened with the exciting news from Charleston Harbor was closed, the fact that Troy was to furnish a regiment of her own was placed beyond all contingencies, for, seconding these patriotic movements of the people and city authorities, young men having some knowledge of military matters, and prompted by a laudable ambition to serve their country, commenced to enroll volunteers. Their success was all that could be desired, and very soon the regiment, with officers of its own selection, was full in numbers and reported to the Adjutant- General at Albany for orders—the first organized in the State, but second mustered in, under the call.
On the morning of the 18th of May, 1861, you left your camp ground, and passing through our streets (lined and crowded with people) to the Court House, there you received from the young ladies of the city a Regimental Flag. From the hour of your departure on that bright May morning, what most of us have known of you, we have learned from the public prints and through private sources. For more than a year you were located at Fortress Monroe, and in the vicinity, where for the most part of the time the enemy was within range of your guns, though here you did not see much active service in the field. Nevertheless, you had duties to perform. The enemy were vigilant, and were ever threatening your position. You guarded most important points and on many occasions were called upon to repel the enemy's advance, and punish him for his guerrilla practices. You were besides the guardians of most valuable Government property, greatly coveted by the enemy. You saw actual service at Big Bethel, and on two or three other occasions, before you joined the hosts of the gallant McClellan and moved with them up the Peninsula. You were in the fight at Fair Oaks, June 25, 1862, in a skirmish at the same place, June 28th, at Savage Station, June 29th, at Glendale, June 30, at Malvern Hill, July 1st.—. You were at Bristow Station, August 27th, at the second Bull Run under Gen. Pope, August 29th, at Fredericksburg, under Gen. Burnside, Dec. 16th, supporting a battery, and at a very recent date, under Gen. Hooker, at Chancellorville.
Many of these engagements were among the most severe and trying recorded in modern warfare. The tremendous losses of life—the stubborn resistance to the last—the doubtful issues— sufficiently attest that they were the Battles of Heroes. Such, briefly, in the main, is your history. With no wish to flatter--with no design even on an occasion like the present, to depart from the strict line of truth, I may say, and this vast throng about me will join in the expression, that you have nobly acted your part and that you have deserved well of the community from which you went forth. You have given signal aid to the Government in whose service you have been engaged. You have made an honorable place in history for the Second regiment, and you have earned for yourselves, individually, the thanks of the People.
Officers and privates: It is, of course, apparent to us, as it is doubtless more fully apparent to you, that you return with thinned ranks. You left behind you, beneath unfriendly soil, and unmarked by any token of affection and remembrance, many of your noble comrades; others who left with you in health and vigor, are lingering with wounds received in battle, and are perhaps never to know perfect health again, (among them may be named your recent worthy commanding officer, Col. Park.) Such are the melancholy incidents of war; such the sacrifices that wicked men, in armed rebellion to the Government, called you and us to make. Gladly would we escape them if we could without dishonor; but if we cannot, while we drop a tear for the fallen and cherish their memories, we must press on, remembering that as our Government was first established by sacrifices such as you have made during your absence; by such sacrifices it is to be maintained against this rebellion.
It is a pleasure to know that not a few of the officers and privates of your regiment have earned during their service honorable promotion, and have received from the Government tokens of approbation and confidence. Prominent among those, may well be mentioned your first commanding officer, Col. Carr, now at the head of a brigade.
The city has received, and has now in its possession, trophies captured by your regiment on the field of battle; and will long preserve them as evidences of your zeal and bravery. The flag you received on the morning of your departure (as I have before said) was the gift of a number of young ladies of the city. In confiding it to your hands at parting, Judge Gould said: "We give the flag in honor; you will bear it in honor, and in honor you will bring it back!" Prophetic words. You have borne it in honor—in honor you have returned it to-day. There it is, pierced and torn in battle. Faithful has been your guardianship over it. In triumph, in disaster, on the advance, in the retreat, on the long march, and in the monotonous camp, we believe you have never forgotten the fair hands whose gift it was, never become unmindful that it was alike the symbol of your own and your country's honor. To our welcome, this day, to you as soldiers, we add a welcome to the soldiers' flag.
It only remains for me, returned soldiers, once more to bid you welcome home, and as you shall pass along the line of march this morning, the heart's true welcome will everywhere be shown you, and when you shall leave the ranks and mingle again, with old friends, on all sides warm hearts will leap to greet you. Your families and friends from whom you have so long been separated, will bless your return to them. They will devoutly thank the kind Providence who has watched over and protected you in hours of peril and permitted you once more to-visit your peaceful homes and rejoin the social and business circles from which the demands of the country and patriotism called you and did not call in vain. Bearing with you, as you must, the consciousness of having performed your duty, the only further reward your fellow citizens can present you is the assurance of their gratitude and their most sincere wishes for your future happiness and welfare.
The response on behalf of the regiment was made by Lieut.-Col. Olmsted—its brave and devoted leader, Col. Park, being in the hospital at Washington, suffering from his wound received at Chancellorville, which will be a life-long address to his fellow-citizens. Lieut.-Col. Olmsted said:
Mr. Mayor and Gentlemen of the Common Council: The honor you have done to us by your magnificent reception to-day overwhelms us with gratitude, and mingles with the emotions of pleasure on again beholding our homes and the scenes hallowed with associations of the past, in making this an occasion of unmeasured joy. But while we are pleased, we are not astonished; for we knew the deep and abiding sympathy felt for us by our townsmen, and your unbounded interest in the holy cause of patriotism which called us from you, and which since our departure has summoned us to so many scenes of peril. To have borne a part in the services which, by God's blessing, are to bring our nation out of its fiery trials, is credit enough; to have for this performance such approbation as you have given us today, is sufficient reward. You remark that we return to you with thinned ranks. Our own hearts have felt the sad truth of the contrast you have made; we have looked along the line, and noted here and there the vacant places of those who have been laid as sacrifices upon the altar of liberty, or of others who are now languishing, upon the cots of hospitals from wounds received in battle. But such are the needs of the hour, and while we are sad we have not murmured; nay, we were ready to give much more if thereby we could hasten the triumph of our country's righteous cause. Our Colonel, the soul of honor and of bravery, is among the wounded--but... though he cannot share the honors of this occasion, he has a higher and more lasting honor, in the grateful sympathy your hearts give him. Our former leader, Col. Carr, deserves all the praise you have bestowed upon him, and it pleases me to say that instead of leading a brigade, he is now in command of a division—the old fighting division formerly led by the noble and heroic Hooker.
My voice is exceedingly weak from constant use and exposure, and I must therefore be brief. Permit me, in closing to read the order issued by Major-General Sickles in reference to the departure of our regiment, as a better commentary upon its conduct than any I can offer:
HEADQUARTERS THIRD ARMY CORPS,
May 11, 1863.
Special Orders, No. 72.—The Second regiment New York volunteers will move to-day, and proceed to Troy, New York, the place of enrolment, and will be there mustered out of the service of the United States.
The Quartermaster's department will furnish the necessary transportation.
The arms and accoutrements of the regiment, on reaching its destination, will be turned over to the nearest ordnance depot. And all other public property will be turned over to Capt. Cannon, Acting Assistant Quartermaster, at their headquarters, subject to the orders of the Chief Quartermaster of this corps.
The commanding officer of the regiment, on his arrival at the city of New York, will report to the Major-General commanding the Department of the East, and will be held responsible that all deficiencies in accountability for public property be charged on the muster rolls against the proper persons, and notification be sent to the Paymaster General before the regiment shall be paid off.
Detailed men will join the regiment without delay. The three years men in the regiment will be transferred to the First regiment Excelsior brigade, (Seventieth New York volunteers). Captain Boutelle, First Lieutenants James Johnson and George Gould will be retained in service, and report to the commanding officer of the First Excelsior, who will see that they are mustered into service.
In parting with the Second New York volunteers, the Major-General commanding acknowledges with satisfaction the valuable service it has rendered the Government during the term of enlistment. Joining the army of the Potomac during its advance on the Peninsula, the regiment shared with Hooker's veteran division the honors and perils of the campaign before Richmond. It served with credit under Gen. Pope, in front of Richmond, and with increased distinction under Gen. Hooker in the recent operations on the Rappahannock.
Fair Oaks, Glen Dale, Malvern Hill, Bristow, Manassas and Chancellorville, should be borne on the regimental colors, and ever remembered by the officers and soldiers of the regiment.
The commanding General trusts the Second New York volunteers will soon again take the field, emulating the zeal of their old comrades in winning yet higher fame. By command of
Major-General SICKLES.
(Signed) O. H. HART,
Assistant Adjt.-Gen.
HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION,
THIRD CORPS, May 11,1863.
Official.
(Signed)
CHARLES HAMLIN,
Maj. and Ass't. Adjt;. Gen'l.
HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE,
THIRD Div., THIRD CORPS, May 11,1863.
Official.
(Signed)
T. W. EAYEL,
Capt. and Ass't. Adjt. Gen'l.
We have tried to do our duty, and we have our reward. But one thing shadows the joy of this day,-and that is, that the cause in which we enlisted has not yet triumphed, and that more trials must be borne and more blood shed before its full success. But whatever the needs, they will all be met,—and if our country needs us again, we are ready.

DAILY WHIG
FRIDAY MORNING; .... May 15
HOME AFFAIRS
THE RECEPTION OF THE SECOND REGIMENT.
Immense Turnout of Citizens.---Incidents, Decorations, &c,
The reception of the Second regiment, yesterday, was an event that will long be remembered in local history. As a public demonstration, it has never been surpassed. The weather was pleasant, the arrangements complete, and well carried out; while the public display was all that could be desired. The procession embraced nearly every organization, civic, military, or otherwise, in the city, and also several companies from surrounding villages. The streets, along the line of march, were densely crowded with people, and at various points, as the bronzed and sun-burnt heroes passed by, the cheering was hearty and long-continued. Nothing had been neglected by the committees in charge of the affair that could add to the heartiness and enthusiasm of the ovation.
ARRIVAL OF THE REGIMENT,
The announcement that the regiment was to arrive on the "Vanderbilt," attracted an immense crowd to the wharf. The steamer reached her dock a few minutes after seven o'clock, and a salute of thirty-four guns gave public notice of the fact. Soon after, the procession began to form, and at, half-past eight o'clock, the regiment was escorted from the boat up Broadway, and the procession commenced moving. Before starting, and along the line of march, the friends and relatives of the members of the regiment gathered around them, and friendly congratulations were freely exchanged. The procession followed the line of march, as published yesterday, with the exception of proceeding down Second to Jackson street, and up Fourth to Washington, instead of countermarching around Washington Park. In addition to the organizations previously named to parade, Mohawk and Cataract Engine Companies, of Cohoes, and Conqueror and Oswald Companies, of West Troy, appeared in line with full ranks, and headed by bands of music. The Moulder's Association turned out 800 strong, under the Marshalship of President Douglass. The Twenty-fourth regiment, Col. Babcock, made a very creditable display, as did also the Citizens' Corps, Capt. Sims. Five brass bands - Doring's and Sullivan's, of Troy Schrieber's, of Albany, Rosses', of Cohoes, the Campbell brass band, and Reynold's drum corps were in line, and added greatly to the enthusiasm of the occasion. Our home fire companies turned out with full ranks, and the Osgood and Rankin steamers were handsomely decorated. Trojan Hook and Ladder 3 was out in full force, under command of Foreman Green.
The entire procession was about half a mile in length, and after halting repeatedly, reached the Court House at half-past 12 o'clock.
At ten o'clock the formal "welcome home" to the regiment took place on Washington Square.— The field and line officers of the regiment, with his Honor Mayor Van Alstyne and the Reception Committee, assembled on a platform under the magnificent Arch in front of the Mansion House. The Mayor welcomed the soldiers in an address of 'some length, in which he referred to their noble career since entering the service. Lieut.-Colonel Olmstead, although suffering from a weakness of voice, responded in an appropriate speech.
[Both addresses will be found in the preceding page.]
On the conclusion of the Mayor's remarks, rousing cheers were given by the multitude, for the Second regiment, and Gen. Carr.
The crowd, at this point, was immense, the entire square being literally packed with people.
The line was again reformed, and at half-past twelve’ o’clock, the procession arrived at the Court House, where it was dismissed. The Second regiment, by invitation, visited the residence of Mayor Van Alstyne, on Fourth street, where they were provided with a liberal supply of refreshments.— Subsequently, they marched to the Armory, deposited their arms and knapsacks, and were dismissed by Lieut.-Col. Olmstead until Tuesday next, at which time they will be mustered out of the service, and receive the $100 Government bounty.
DECORATIONS--INCIDBNTS, &c.
During the day, the streets presented a holiday appearance, many stores being closed, and strangers being everywhere met with. Flags floated from every staff in great profusion, and patriotic devices and emblems adorned many private as well as public buildings. The war-worn veterans were warmly welcomed and were greeted with clapping of hands and waving of handkerchiefs. They received a noble reception, but nothing more than what they richly merited; nothing in comparison with their sacrifices and sufferings; nothing when viewed with the record of their public service and heroic achievements.
Many incidents, both of a pleasant and a painful character occurred during the march. Frequently, a sister or a mother could be seen rushing through the crowd and eagerly watching for the appearance of some loved one. When it is known that the regiment lost more than half its members, an idea may be formed of the number of hearts made sad yesterday.
A number of the sick and wounded of the regiment were left in the hospitals at Potomac Creek, and also in Washington.
One of the finest displays of bunting was that at the Female Seminary. On one flag were the words " The Second Regiment: It has written its name in History;" on another "God and our country," &c. From Mrs. E. Willard's residence was suspended a banner inscribed, "Welcome Brothers." As the regiment passed the Seminary, the men were literally showered with boquets by the young ladies on the balconies. The decorations on the Court House were really magnificent, as were also the residences of Messrs. McConihe, J. L. Flagg, Dr. Blatchford, J. W. Fuller, E. L. Mallary, C.S. Sill, B, T. Cushman, J. M.. Francis, Jas. Forsyth, Mayor Van Alstyne, Gen. Wool, W. W. Rousseau, J. A. Griswold, A. Read, W. W. Whipple, &c.
THE BATTLE FLAG.
The regimental color presented a sad spectacle, as it was borne aloft by the color-bear, Thos. Farwell— a young man whose courage and bravery is the subject of general remark among the officers of the regiment. He enlisted as a drummer, but preferred the post of danger, and was appointed to the above position.
CREDIT, TO WHOM DUE, &c.
The Arch on Washington square was designed by Cummings, the architect, and the trimming by Messrs. J. W. Garfield and Thos. Buckley. The wreathing was the work of the members of Trojan Hook and Ladder Co. No. 3, and was arranged by Capt. J. G. Green, assisted by members of his company. The committee on decorations, and also the citizens' committee chosen to proceed to New York, are entitled to much credit for the manner in which their respective duties were performed. His honor the Mayor, also, has devoted much time and energy in looking after the details, & c.
COMPANY H,
was escorted to Green Island in the afternoon by a delegation from the Board of Trustees of the village. The men were hospitably entertained, and returned late in the afternoon. This Company was raised by Capt. McNutt, who was succeeded by Capt. Cross.
FIREMEN ENTERTAINED
The visiting firemen were very handsomely entertained at the house of steamer No. 2, before leaving for home. A sumptuous spread had been prepared, reflecting the highest credit on the Department, the company, and all concerned. Hugh Rankin Esq., welcomed the strangers in a few brief remarks. The members of the Common Council were also guests at the banquet.
SERENADING.
Doring's and Sullivan's Band were out last evening, serenading the officers of the regiment.
SALUTES FIRED.v A salute of 100 guns was fired by the City Artillery — 34 on the arrival of the Vanderbilt, and 66 during the moving of the procession. A salute of 34 guns was also fired at the Arsenal.
OFFICERS OF THE SECOND REGIMENT.
The following is a list of the officers of the Second regiment:—
Colonel—Sidney W. Park.
Lieutenant-Colonel—Wm. Olmstead.
Major-Wm. B. Tibbits.
Adjutant- J. H. Fratt.
Surgeon—Le Roy McLean.
Assistants—N. H. Camp, R. F. Catlin.
Co. A.—Captain, George V. Boutelle; First Lieutenant, J, W. Cornell; Second Lieutenant, N..F. Hogeman.
Co. B.—Captain, J. J. Hagan ; First Lieutenant, George Gould; Second Lieutenant, James Merrill.
Co. C.-—Captain, John H. Quackenbush ; First Lieutenant Vacant; Second Lieutenant, Daniel McGuire.
Col D.—Captain Wm. G. McNulty; First Lieutenant, James H. Hill; Second Lieutenant, James O'Brien.
Co. E.--Captain, Thomas Sullivan; First Lieutenant, W. H. Shook; Second Lieutenant, James H. Fonda. __

RECEPTION OF THE SECOND REGIMENT.—
The following are the items of the bill of $1,565, incurred by the committee for the reception of the second regiment. There are about $100 still unpaid:
Bills by J. W. Fuller, connected with arch.........$145.15
Bills of expenses at Court House...........................49.45
Schriber's Band......................................................88.00
Doring's Band to N. Y., on parade, and serenade.196.00
Sullivan's B a n d . . .........................................73.00
Campbell's Band....................................................43.00
R. H. Noble, expenses.............................................3.50
Troy City Artillery, salute...................................100.00
Telegraphing...........................................................2. 49
Rankin Steamer, No. 3, teams, &c........................13.00
Entertaining Firemen.............................................69.00
Osgood Steamer, teams, &c....................................9.87
Expenses of Committee to New York...................48.13
Steamer C. Vanderbilt.........................................425.00
$1565.35

—— THE EXPENSE OF RECEIVING THE SECOND REGIMENT in Troy.—The expense of receiving the 2d Regiment N. Y. S. V., in Troy, as passed by the Common Council of Troy was $1565.64.

PARADE AND MUSTERING OUR FO THE SECOND REGIMENT.-The existence of the Second regiment as a military organization, terminated yesterday afternoon-its members having been mustered out of the United States service by an officer detailed for that purpose.
Previous to being mustered out, the regiment, led by Doring's Band, formed in line, and started from the Armory at 2 o'clock, paraded through the principal streets, and was reviewed by Col. Park from the window of his residence on Eighth street. Col. P., although convalescent, is still feeble, and was unable to sit up during the march of the regiment past his residence.
The line of march was continued over Eighth street to Hoosick, down Hoosick to North Second, down North Second to King, down King to River, and down River to Washington Square, where the regiment countermarched, and was reviewed by Capt. Corning, the mustering out officer. The review being over, the regiment marched to the Armory, where the process of mustering out was begun.
The men were marched by companies to the vacant lot in rear of the Armory, where the formality of "mustering out" was gone through with. Each company was drawn up in line, and as the names of the men were called by Captain Corning, they stepped one pace to the front. The officer marked each name on the company muster roll, and after being counted, the order "break ranks" was given, and the men marched out—no longer soldiers of Uncle Sam. The following is the order in which the companies were mustered out, and the numbed of men presented by each company:
Company I, Capt. McConihe—28 men.
Company C, Capt. Quackenbush—29 men.
Company A, Capt. Boutelle—40 men.
Company B, Capt. Hagan-40 men.
Company H, Capt. Cross—49 men. .
Company F, Capt. Harrison—48 men.
Company G, Capt. Wilson—28 men.
Company K, Capt. Egolf—34 men.
Company D, Capt. McNulty—39 men.
Company E, Captain Sullivan—42 men.
Total 377. Only the privates and non-commissioned officers were mustered out—the officers remaining in service until the men are paid off, and company accounts settled.
— The mustering out ceremony occupied about two hours, and was witnessed by a large number of persons.
Many of the men were quite indignant because of the absence of the Paymaster. Capt. Corning, however, intimated that that officer would arrive on Friday next, probably to-morrow, Thursday.
The regiment marched splendidly, and the men behaved in the most creditable manner. The following officers were on horseback, and at the head of the line: Lieut. Col. Olmstead, Capt, McConihe, (Acting Major,) Adjutant Fratt, Chaplain Chapman, Surgeons McLean, Catlin and Camp, and the mustering officer, Capt. Corning. Chief Barren, with a squad of policemen, marched at the head of the procession, and kept the streets clear. Everything connected with the demonstration passed off satisfactorily— reflecting credit upon all who took part in it.
— And thus closes the career of the noble Second regiment—better and more appropriately known as the "Troy Regiment." As a military organization, it leaves a truly creditable record behind— a record and a name that will forever be honorable to both officers and men.

PAY OF THE SECOND.-—Six companies of this Regiment (all whose muster rolls were properly made out) were paid in Troy yesterday by Major RICHARDSON. The remainder of the Regiment--Cos. D, F, G and K, with all the Officers, will be paid by him on Monday.

MORNING EXPRESS Mustered Out Of the United States Service ---The Second Regiment, N.Y S. V. was mustered out of the United States service, at Troy, Tuesday afternoon, by Capt. Corning. The total number of men in the regiment was 377.

Pay Of the Second.-- Six companies of this Regiment, (all whose muster rolls were properly made out), were paid in Troy on Friday by Major Richardson. The remainder of the regiment- Co's D, F, G and K, will be paid by him to-day.

[Occured at Troy, May 29, 1863]
Suicide of the Quartermaster of the Second REGIMENT-- We learn from the Troy Times of last Friday that Lieut. Wm. P. Shear, Quartermaster of the Second (Troy) Regiment, committed suicide at the Marshall Infirmary between nine and ten o'clock that morning, by cutting his throat with a penknife, from ear to ear. He died in five minutes after the infliction of the wound. The deceased was in good circumstances at the outbreak of the rebellion, but enlisted in Capt. Olmstead's company, on the formation of the Second Regiment, to gratify a taste for military life. He was afterwards transferred to Capt. Tibbits' Company, promoted to the rank of Quartermaster-Sergeant, and eventually advanced to the important position of Quartermaster. He served faithfully with the Regiment from the time of his appointment until its return to Troy. On his return he yielded too eagerly to the temptations of city life, and began a career of dissipation which alarmed his friends. Lieut. Colonel Olmstead caused him to be sent to the Marshall Infirmary, and it :was supposed that he had fully recovered. In a day or two more he would have been discharged. Friday morning an attendant took Lieut. Shear his breakfast, and on quitting the room left him standing in front of a mirror. A peculiar noise was soon heard, and on entering the room the unfortunate man was found weltering in his blood. He had taken from his pocket a knife with a very small blade, inserted the point under one of his ears, and slowly and deliberately drawn it until the keen edge touched the other ear. He was laboring under no aberration of mind at the time, and it is supposed that family difficulties must have prompted the fatal act. Lieut. Shear formerly resided to this city, and transacted a large business. He married a daughter of Ex-Comptroller James M. Cook, and had many influential relatives here. Coroner Hall held an inquest.

TRINITY church-Rev,. E. T. Chapman, late Chaplain of the 2d Regt. N. Y. S. V., conducted the services at his Church, last Sunday. Service will be held at the usual hours hereafter each Sunday.

RESOLUTIONS.—-the officers of the late Second regiment met at the Troy House last evening, to take action in reference to the death of Col. G. L. Willard. Lieut.-Col. Olmstead presided. Captains John Quackenbush, J. Egolf and Jas. A. Cross were appointed a committee to draft resolutions. They reported a series of appropriations… which was adopted by the meet... They shall print them to-morrow.

ALBANY
LOCAL DEPARTMENT
A New Regiment.—The Troy Whig says:-We understand that a number of officers of the Second regiment have in contemplation the organization of a new regiment in this city and county. The matter has already been laid before the military authorities at Albany, but no definite conclusion has been arrived at yet. Some of the gentlemen interested express themselves in favor of an infantry or artillery regiment, while others prefer the cavalry branch of the service.
We would suggest to the gentlemen identified with the movement that if they seriously contemplate again entering the service, the sooner they set about it the better, and the more successful will be their efforts. Many — very many--of the members of the old Second regiment, will doubtless again enter the army. If an opportunity is not offered them to enlist here, they will, of course go elsewhere.
The name of a prominent, young officer of the old Second is mentioned in connection with the command of the proposed organization.

SECOND REGIMENT.—A large number of the officers of the late Second Regiment, met last evening at the American House for the purpose of re-organizing the different companies as a cavalry regiment. Without transacting any business the meeting was adjourned to 8 o'clock this evening.

THE PRESENT TO THE COLOR BEARER OF THE SECOND.—Cusack, the jeweller, has on exhibition in his show window, the testimonial which is to be presented to Color-Bearer FARRELL, of the Second regiment, by a number of prominent citizens. It is a magnificent Gold Watch, (hunting case lever make) beautifully finished, and appropriately inscribed. On the face of the case is the following: "THOMAS FARRELL, Color-Bearer, Second Infantry, N. Y. S. V. From his Fellow citizens, Troy, N. Y., 1863." On the reverse: "Fair Oaks, June 25, '62; Glendale, June 30, '62; Bristow Station, Aug. 27, '62; Manassas, Aug. 29, '62; Chancellorville, May 3, '63." In the getting up of the testimonial, Mr. Cusick has exhibited his accustomed skill and good taste.
The presentation of the Watch to Mr. Farrell will probably take place on Saturday next.

WATCH PRESENTATION.—Thomas Farrell, the brave Color-Bearer of the Second regiment, was on Saturday evening presented with the magnificent gold watch which has been gotten up under the auspices of a few public spirited citizens as a testimonial for his bravery and good conduct. The gentlemen very properly dispensed with all speech making on the occasion. The present was handed to Mr. Farrell in the Troy House, in the presence of a few gentlemen who had interested themselves in the affair. He very modestly received it, bowed his acknowledgement, and retired. The manner in which the testimonial was got ten up, as well as the observance of all buncombe or spread-eagle gas, on its presentation, was creditable alike to the liberality and good sense of the donors.

ROBBERY OF SECOND REGIMENT soldiers. Troy Times says: Timothy Flaherty and Patrick Grace, two members of the Second Regiment, were attacked by four ruffians in a saloon on Congress street Wednesday evening. The fellows attempted to rob Flaherty of his watch, and made a desperate assault upon him and his . comrade. They resisted, and eventually escaped from the gang. Thursday morning, officer McMulkin arrested Timothy Casey, charged with being concerned in this robbery. He was lodged in jail, but afterwards gave bail.

WHAT A COMPANY OF SOLDIERS IS MADE UP OF.—Many of our citizens are little aware of what material a company is made up. Capt. Wm. McConihe has furnished us with the personnel of his late Company I of the Second regiment, N. Y. V., and it will be seen that nearly every trade is represented. It is as follows: 29 farmers, 38 laborers, 3 soldiers, 1 cabinet-maker, 8 carpenters, 3 printers, 1 carder, 1 engineer, 1 school-teacher, 1 axe-maker, 1 butcher, 2 seamen, 8 clerks, 4 boatman, 1 fisherman, 2 painters, 1 carriage-maker, 1 baker, 3 blacksmiths, 5 teamsters, 1 moulder, 1 miner, 1 rope-maker, 2 tailors, 1 machinist, 3 shoemakers, 1 saw-maker, 1 mill-man, 1 harness-maker, 1 boat-builder, 1 file-cutter, 1 spinner, 1 drummer, 1 gunsmith. Total age of the Company, 2878 years; average age of each man, 24 years. Total height of the Company, 672 feet; average height of each man, 5 feet 7 1-4 inches. 57 were born in the State of New York, 1 in New Jersey, 13 in Maine, 6 in Vermont, 3 in Massachusetts, 1 in Pennsylvania, 1 in Maryland, 2 in England, 29 in Ireland, 4 in Scotland, 1 in Germany and 2 in Canada. The color of their eyes was as follows: 4 had black eyes, 15 hazel, 37 grey, 12 brown and 53 blue. The colors of their hair were as follows: 77 had brown hair, 5 black, 14 sandy, 20 light, 3 dark, 2 grey. The original Company consisted of 74 enlisted men. There have been 121 men who belonged to the Company, of which 37 were mustered out of service May 26th, 1863; 7 died of disease and wounds, 25 deserted (this includes the men who enlisted but were not sworn into the United States service), 27 were discharged for disability by wounds received in action and by promotion; 25 were transferred to other regiments by order.

INTERESTING LETTER FROM GEN. CARR-HIS EXPERIENCES AT THE BATTLE OF GETTTSBURGH:
— A gentleman of this city, yesterday received a very interesting letter from our distinguished townsman, Brig. Gen. Carr. We have been permitted to make the following extract, from which it will be seen that the General lost his highly prized horse, "Willie,'' during the Gettysburgh fight. This was the animal which was presented to Gen. C. by his friends, previous to his departure from Troy.

DEMOCRAT and AMERICAN
SATURDAY MORNING, AUG. 17.
The Two Years' Volunteers.
From the Troy Whig.
THE TROY REGIMENT IN A BAD WAY AGAIN.— An officer of the Troy Regiment thinks there is quite a prospect of its return home before the expiration of the two years for which its members enlisted—perhaps even within a few days.— The United States Attorney General having decided that two classes of Volunteers were called for—those enlisting for three months and those for three years--all regiments designing to serve for a less period than the latter term are to be counted as three months' men, and discharged at the expiration of that time. "
There have been so many conflicting rumors about the disposition which the Government proposes to make of the two years volunteers, that Gov. Morgan deemed it of sufficient importance to have the matter officially settled. He accordingly telegraphed to Washington in reference to this rumored opinion of the Attorney General, and received the following emphatic response:
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14, 1861,
To Gov. Morgan:
The Attorney General has given no such opinion. The whole Government holds the troops bound for two years, and will discharge none of them.
WM. H. SEWARD.
We hope this may put an end to these mischievous rumors. The Government would be very silly to send home men at the expiration of three months who have enlisted for two years, when additional troops are needed for immediate service."
We-copy the above from the Albany Journal of Thursday evening.
The letter is dated "In the Field, near Beverly's Ford, on the Rappahannock, Va., August 4th, 1863." He writes: "I would like to give you a description of the campaign which we have just been through; but to go over it all, would only be reiterating what you have already seen in the public journals. It is sufficient to say that we have had the most severe campaign of the war, and thank God, we have been successful.
Since we left Falmouth on the 11th of June, we have marched 365 miles, and fought four days— some days marching 29 and 30 miles per day. It has almost worn me out, but I am in hopes, if we lay in camp for two or three weeks inactive, I will again recruit. I have lost over twenty pounds in weight since the 11th of June.
I will send home a copy of my report, from which you will get an idea of what we have done, and what my loss was in the battle of Gettysburgh. That was the battle of the war. It certainly was the hottest place I ever was in. How I escaped, God only knows. You say I have a charmed life—yet I am of the opinion, that my time is to come yet. I can scarcely believe that I am to go through the whole war without being touched.
My noble horse "Willie" fell after receiving five bullets—two of them passing through his body.— He refused to fall under four of the bullets; although staggering with weakness, on he went over the field. The fifth shot brought him to his side—falling very heavy on my right leg, causing me a great deal of pain; but I remained in command, mounting another horse, which Gen. Humphrey sent me. My loss in the battle was 800 killed and wounded—just one-half the number I took into the fight. The loss in officers was 66—just one-half. Since the first of May, I have lost in action, killed and wounded, 1500 officers and men. You can imagine what my brigade has been through, and it will average the same through the whole Third Corps. The average loss of this Corps, since the first of May, is 9,000, in killed and wounded, and I think that if there was going to be another fight, the same Corps would be selected to make the attack. It is called here, the " Invincible Corps,"—and if they work it as they have for the last year, my opinion is, that it will be the " Invisible Corps," for at the present time it is not much larger than a brigade.
This afternoon considerable firing was heard in the direction of Culpepper Court-House. I think it was a cavalry fight. Lee's army is missed in and about that place, and they don't like the idea of our building a bridge over the Rappahannock for cars to run on; consequently, they are attacking our cavalry, so as to destroy the bridge."

REORGANIZING.—The 2d Regiment N. Y. S. V., of Troy, recently mustered out of the service of the United States, is being reorganized into a cavalry regiment. THE SECOND AT troy.—The welcome to the Second at Troy was unparalleled in its magnificence and enthusiasm. Troy honored herself in honoring her heroic sons.

Local
SECOND REGIMENT.—An effort has been made of late to rescusitate the above command. It will be recollected that the 2d, desirous of enrolling themselves for the field, left our State under the command of Col. Tompkins, against the commands of the Governor. The regiment, at its departure, consisted of the original officers and men and a large delegation of volunteers. On the arrival of the command in Washington, they volunteered in the service of the government for three years or the war. The subsequent course of the regiment was chequered. Commanded and controlled by indifferent officers, swayed to and fro by the ignorant and designing, scarce a year elapsed ere those who induced the regiment to entrap themselves, left them to their fate. The privates retained their identity, but the officers sought another field. They took advantage of an unjust privilege, that of government making a distinction between the officer and the soldier, and they returned to their homes. Scarce had they returned, ere the same scheme was planned and the same result followed. A movement was made by the "returned heroes," to get possession of the titular denomination, and vote themselves into office.
Very recently an election was ordered for Colonel. The clique that urged this matter were the same who professed a large amount of patriotism, and who only liked the field of action romantically. They entered the arena, and the result was as follows :
Of 18 votes cast for Colonel,
John H. Wilcox received...... 10
James Brady " ....... 6
For Lieutenant-Colonel,
G. W. Turnbull received.. 10
James Brady " ........ 6
For Major,
Adjutant Ray " .11
Capt. Kennedy " ...... 2
Capt. DeCourcy " ...... 1
The result being, Wilcox, Colonel; Turnbull, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Ray, Major. The minority claim an appeal. As the matter stands, Col. Wilcox, who is at present Division Inspector, declines the election, and if the remaining candidates knew as much of this quasi organization as we do, they would cut loose from the whole affair.

THE SECOND REGIMENT.
This regiment of volunteers, Col. G. W. B. Tompkins, now in Washington, is not, as at first stated, entirely disbanded. The 300 men who refused to take the oath, were sent home, but recruits will take their places. Six hundred and fifty men are still on duty.

SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 1861.
SECOND NEW YORK.
Killed-John Looby.
Wounded:
Capt. John Arts, knee, leg amputated.
Henry Gorman, great toe, amputated.
Patrick Stanfield, right hand amputated.

TROY DAILY TIMES
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 18,1861.
OUR REGIMENT OFF.
ALL THE MEN IN LINE.
THE STREETS CROWDED,
Military and Civic Escort.
Presentations and Speeches.
INCIDENTS.
Troy has never before seen such a sight as that presented by the departure of the Second New York Regiment from our midst this morning,— an event coming so closely to the hearts of a large proportion of the people, and addressing itself so strongly to the sympathies of all. Eight hundred men, most of them young, from our stores, our workshops, and (most suggestive of all,) our firesides, have left all they held dear, to go forth at the call of an imperilled country, and battle for its honor and its liberties. Around each of these soldiers of the Republic, entwine the hearts and hopes of the "dear ones at home," and about them all cluster the ties of friendship and association, severed at the demand of imperious duty. The consideration that many of these brave men who go forth so strong and hopeful, may never return—that they are destined for the field of carnage and conflict, where lives must be lost for country, gave a character of sadness to the scenes that not even the deep and earnest enthusiasm of the people could dissociate from it; and while the heart swelled with pride at the sight, so proud a one for Troy, the lips quivered as they exclaimed, "God bless our noble volunteers!" and the eye filled with tears as they passed.
The marching orders, as our readers are aware, were received at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon, by Col. Carr, and immediate arrangements were made by him to respond to it with soldier-like promptitude. Owing to the inexplicable dilatoriness and mismanagement of the State Military Board, the uniforms came dragging on slowly and in parcels, and when they were received, it seemed as though the contractors had made them more suitable for Odin's warriors than for ordinary men, so capacious was the girth of the pantaloons, and so liberal the allowance of cloth in the coats. But the soldiers overlooked this inconvenience, in their gratification that at last they were to get under way. The greatest alacrity was exhibited in packing up the clothing, camp stock, and general baggage, and making the necessary preparations for leaving. The camp was a scene of bustle and excitement until quite a late hour, in consequence. Some of the men were not uniformed until morning.
Leave of absence was granted last evening to an unusually large number of the soldiers, in order to give them an opportunity to visit and bid farewell to their friends. Quite a number had received a furlough of twenty-four hours before the marching orders came. But this morning, the men were on hand again, at muster call, with commendable promptitude. Several absentees, only, were reported, and these either joined the regiment on march, or will meet it at New York.
The men were up and about this morning at 4 o'clock, and by half-past 5, everything was in readiness for a start. Breakfast was had at 6, and while it was being partaken of, many remarks were passed by the men in reference to the comfortable quarters they were about leaving, and the active future just opening before them. The utmost determination and good spirits were manifested by all.
After breakfast, a dress parade was had, and the men of some of the companies were addressed by their captains. Subsequently, several interesting incidents took place. Capt. John W. Armitage, of Company A., was presented a beautiful pair of epaulettes by his friends. Second Lieutenant Henry Harrison, was likewise the recipient of a full uniform—coat and pants, sword and sash—from the coachmakers of the city and his personal friends. Ald. Donohue made the presentation address, which was very affecting.
About 8 o'clock, an escort procession, consisting of Doring's Band; the Troy Citizens' Corps, Capt. Shields; the Troy City Artillery, Lieut. Myers; the Irish Volunteers, Lieut. Fleming; the Columbian Guards, Capt. Evers, the Jackson Guards, Capt. Bowen, Wool Guards, Premier Engine Co. No. 1, Washington Volunteers, Niagara Engine Co. No. 7, Franklin Hose Co., Torrent Engine Co. No. 4, Hook and Ladder Co. No. 3, Rough and Ready Engine Co. No. 9, Lafayette Engine Co. No. 10, and Joseph C. Taylor Hose Co. No. 3, formed on River street and marched to Batestown, where they met the regiment. This was in line and ready to march, in the following order,—the list embracing the name of every officer and man in the ranks:
FIELD AND STAFF.
Colonel—Joseph B. Carr.
Lieutenant Colonel—R. Wells Kenyon.
Major -Richard D. Bloss.
Adjutant—Timothy Quinn.
Quartermaster—Charles L. Mac Arthur.
Surgeon—Reed B. Bontecou.
Surgeon's Mate—Le Roy McLean.
Sergeant Major—Le Grand Benedict.
Quartermaster Sergeant-Arthur J. Donnelly,
Drum Major—Thomas E. Bulger.
Regimental Standard Bearer—Francis Temple.
Right General Guide—John Preston.
Left General Guide—Andrew Dexter.
COMPANY A.
Captain, John W. Armitage; First Lieutenant, Calvin W. Link; Ensign, George A. Hitchcock, First Sergeant, Joseph H. Preston; Second Sergeant, John R. Horan, jr.; Third Sergeant, John W. Higgins; Fourth Sergeant, Sylvester Wheeler; First Corporal, Felix Curran; Second Corporal, John Thompson; Third Corporal, Charles Ballintine; Fourth Corporal, Charles H. Webster; Privates, C. -Westevelt, M. O'Brien, Jas. Finley, Wm. H. Stanley, Benj. Downing, P. W. Gamble, Thos. Brown, Wm. Galt, Obed Hard, Thomas Cuthbertson, Jas. Maliff, F. McClellan, J. C. Carroll, John H. Preston, Thos. Manger, Abram B. Folmsbee, Wm. Bounds, A. G. Webster, G. P. Gantz, Levi W. Mann, John R. Horan, jr., James Becroft, C. D. Hollis, jr., Sam. Johnson, W. Beers, J. Madill, J. H. Baker, A. Touners, Chas. S. Shattuck, Henry Raymond, J. R. Harris, Chas. Almon, John Callahan, H. G. Primer, Phillip Hayner, G. J. Chippendale, Jos. Hayner, George H. Cole, N. Edwards, D. Johnson, Jno. Ferris, Philander Rodgers, F. G. Brett, A. Staude, Leolin Rodgers, Wm. H. Cranwell, N. Hodgman, W. H. Van Kleeck, J. T. Van Arnum, J. M. Riley, W. J. Tucker, T. E. Hymes, Thos. Long, Isaac Shaw, Thos. A. Connery, Paul S. Conner, Wm. B. Lave, Teunis Vanderwerken, G. Van Ness, J. D. Bowen, F. Carlow, Simeon Myers, Geo. Hall, W. O'Harlen, Lucas Hayner, Jas. Russell, Geo. A. Root, Jas. Smith, James Murray, S. M. Hall, John Hollis, John Russell, Henry M. Husen.
COMPANY B.
Captain, Wm. A. Olmstead; First Lieutenant, T. Clement Haddock; Ensign, Lee Churchill; First Sergeant, C. H. Gardner; Second Sergeant, A. J. Caswell; Third Sergeant, A. Ruth; Fourth, Sergeant, B. A. Weaver; First Corporal, G. Rysdorf; Second Corporal, T. Forcier; Third Corporal, D. M.. Rankin; Fourth Corporal, Wm. Henry. Privates, C. W. Ayliffe, Jno. Bussy, F. A. Boltrood, O. Brewer, C. H. Baty, J. Boyce, R. Brown, Jno. Brown, Thos. Burns, J. Carroll, J. Cunningham, T. Cormick, Joseph Cocks, J. M. Cornell, Jas. Carman, P. Carman, G. A. Dyer, H. Dunham, S. V. Downing, J. B. Davis, T. Doyle, J. Doren, D. Farrell, M. Farrell, G. Garrison, Jas. Flood, Arthur Curran, J. Boyle, R. Hill, C. Haskins, T. Horn, M. A. Hazard, A. Hulsopple, Thos. Hoar, W. Henry, S. Jones, Wm. John, P. Herrigan, Jno. Haveny, G. Santon, Jno. Lucy, P. B. Luker, J. Langley, Jno. Mitchell, H. Mott, J. Merrill, G. Murray, H. Murry, H. McLaughlin, M. McSweeny, H. Priest, O. H. Porter, J. R. Pike, Chas. Parker, Jas. Russell, E. Richards, P. Hobson, L. A. Tyler, C. Truesdell, J. E. Thomas, Jas. Trainor, W. S. Usher; H. Vickers, Wm. B. Scott, Jno. B. Smith, Wm. Wilson, S. P. Gardner,
COMPANY C.
Captain, Geo. H. Otis; First Lieutenant, S. D. Perkins; Ensign, Wm. H. Pitt; Orderly, Geo. B. Craven; Second Sergeant, Wm. F. Bullis; Third Sergeant, R. B. Dickey: Fourth Sergeant, H. E. Snow; First Corporal, Wm. H. Ostrom; Second Corporal, Philip McDonough; Third Corporal, Paul Manor; Fourth Corporal, David Lansing. Privates, Wm. Becket, Henry Valentine, J. Homan, H. Richer, Wm. Skully, W. C. Martin, T. Ryan, Wm. F. Smith, G. W. Morris, A. F. Roberts, Nelson Ide, L. G. Kilmer, Geo. T. Ashley, Nicholas Myers, Jas. Cannon, N. W. Benjamin, M. Shaunessy, Chas. McCoduct, R. G. Brown, A. Burlingham, Edwin Muir, John Jones, P. Ryan, O. W. Weaver, E. Elliott, H. Gatchell, S. H. Pullin, J. Valentine, J. T. Andrews, Michael Dowd, Archibald Watson, Levi Hayner, Jas. A. Skully, W. A. Campbell, Geo. Delaire, D. L. Simmons, James Burke, T. E. Rogers, J. A. Dean, Edward Tuthill, Alex. Ayett, C. A. Waller, T. Long, John Greir, E. A. Dayton, Jaffrey Bowman, David Eail, Joseph Russell, Geo. Hudson, Barnard C. Lee, A. Morrison, Wm. Landon, Leon Vane, Joseph Nelson, J. B. Penfield, Geo. Monosso, Wm. Hildibrant. H. E. Sampson, Daniel Kelly, John Gillett.
COMPANY D.
Captain, Michael Cassidy; First Lieutenant, John Maguire; Ensign, John McCaffry; Orderly, Joseph Egolf; Second Sergeant, Michael Russell; Third Sergeant, Edward Connors; Fourth Sergeant, James Judge; First Corporal, John Ward; Second Corporal, Patrick O'Brien; Third Corporal, David Luce; Fourth Corporal, Walter S. Douglass; Musician, Thomas Farrell. Privates, John Brand, John Broderick, Henry A. Bloomingdale, James Brady, William Bayne, William Bonell, Archibald Buchanan, Edward Conners, Jeremiah Conners, John Cain, John Conroy, Donald D. Cameron, Christopher Dahlen, Walter S. Douglass, James Duffy, Thomas Dwyer, Joseph Egolf, James J. Egan, Thomas Farrell, James H. Flynn, John Flynn, Timothy Flaherty, Michael Flaherty, Patrick Fitzpatrick, Albert French, Patrick Grace, John Grace, Thos. Hackett, James H. Hendry, James F. Hill, James Halpin, Michael Hollan, William Hunter, Thos. Hennessey, James Judge, Lawrence Kingsley, Andrew Lawless, Thos. Lawless, Edward Looby, Michael Looby, John Looby, David P. Luce, George Lumby, John Lyons, Thomas Lyons, Matthew McMahon, John McGovern, James Mc- Gann, Michael Manning, Lawrence Meniman, Francis Meyatt, Jas. McCormick, John O'Reilly, Francis O'Neill, Patrick O'Brien, Adam Pitcher, William Powers, George Payne, Martin Quinn, Thomas F. Raney, Charles Rieth, Samuel Rivers, Michael Russell, John Ryan, James Sullivan, Bernard Smith, Richard Scholes, John Shattuck, Michael Shaughnessey, John Smith, James Shanley, Joseph C. Taylor, Michael Towhill, Patrick Thornton, John Ward, John A. Wylie, James Whalen.
COMPANY E.
Captain, Geo. W. Wilson; First Lieutenant, Jno. Quackenbush; Ensign, Edgar Wilson; First Sergeant, Joseph J. Hagen; Second Sergeant, Robert G. Vassar; Third Sergeant, James H. Fonda; Fourth Sergeant, Fred. A. Moore; First Corporal, Fred P. Fonda; Second Corporal, Jas. McGill; Third Corporal, Thos. Gainor; Fourth Corporal, Benj. Morrill; Musicians, Willard Goodspeed and Lewis R. Morris. Privates, Wm. Kendall, Thos. Halsey, Edw. Hill, Edw. Agen, Geo. R. Senior, Albert Somes, Jas. Terry, Wm. Robinson, Lawrence McNamara, John Downing, Jas. A. Churchward, Davis McGill, Chas. Wolfe, Frank Ryan, Pat. Gainor, John Grant, Geo. Totten, Thos. Totten, Chas. Hagadorn, Geo. Ferguson, John Armstrong, Wm. H. Cunningham, Geo. Debar, John Larkins, Tillman K. Wooster, Pat. Bailey, Jno. H. Albright, Simeon Moronville, Horace H. Crandell, J. H. Stevenson, Clarence E. Wilson, John Farley, Elias Van Steenbergh, Daniel Mooney, John O'Neil, Fred. Woolhiser, Wm. Alston, Thos. Fletcher, Alex. Wilcox, John Ebrahardt, Pat. McHahon, John Atchison, Jas. Costello, Dennis Brennan, Terrence Carr, Jos. Robinson, Michael Murray, Fred. Wilson, Wm. Bray, Wm. Skinkell, Wm. Derby, Kendell Hodgeson, John N. Smith, John Skully, Wm. Abby, Wm. II. Pulver, Thos. B. Casey, John Keefe, Michael Redman, Fred Morrison, Thos. Latty, Jas. McGaffen, John Hemphill, John Finley, Bryan Rooney, Pat. Quinn.
COMPANY F
Captain, Sidney W. Park; First Lieutenant, James A. Cross; Ensign, Henry Harrison; Orderly, Wm. G. Taylor; Second Sergeant, John Mearns; Third Sergeant, David O. Patten; Fourth Sergeant, John W. Dodge; First Corporal, Wm. H. Shook; Second Corporal, Jacob H. Fratt; Third Corporal, John Roland; Fourth Corporal, John F. Kane; Musicians, Charles E. Jevins and John Gorthy. Privates, Alfred W. Allen, Hiram Andres, Milton W. Barber, Wm. Bates, James Beale, Chas. Brazee, Jas. E. Clark, Jas. Cleveland, David Cramp, Adelbert Cummings, Chauncey E. Cummings, Wm. T. Derrell, Jeremiah Dennehey, James Doyle, Haskell A. Evarts, George K. Felt, Andrew Ferguson, Wm. Frear, Daniel E. Gardner, Geo. Gardner, Morgan Harris, David Hanver, Chas. Hatfield, Ambrose B. Herrick, Warren Harrington, A. Himes, Henry A. Holden, Jesse G. Huse, Geo. Kay, John Keeler, Clark Kellogg, Philip Merriam, Wm. McCormick, S. T. McClelland, A. Montcrief, John Moore, George Morris, Geo. W. Neleous, John P. Newcomb, Cyrenus W. Newcomb, Luke W. Nichols, Rollin W. Palmer, John H. Pierce, Geo. Pierce, Levi Quay, Peter S. Ray, John Robinson, Robert Rogers, Jas. M. Roots, J. W. Hoots, Jno. Stanley, Wm. Shannon, Edwin R. Smith, L. S. Smith, Wm. W. Smith, Leslie Smyth, James M. Sturtevant, George Thompson, John Wells, Jno. Welsh, Benj. F. Williams, Edward Wilson, Geo. Wood, Wm. J. Yearsley.
COMPANY G.
Captain, William B. Tibbits; First Lieutenant, Jas. A. Savage; Ensign, Thos. Sullivan; Orderly, John Conway; Second Sergeant, Warren Benjamin; Third Sergeant, C. A. Kirker, Fourth Sergeant, Wm. Sullivan; First Corporal, Francis Smith; Second Corporal, Nicholas Hickey; Third Corporal, John McGahan; Fourth Corporal, Jas. O'Brien. Privates, Samuel Alker, James Atkins, Amos Briggs, Adam Bancroft, Charles Buckley, John Brinn, Robert Casey, James Donley, John Elson, John Finley, Harry Glass, Jacob F. Gardner, Simeon G. Glass, Edward G. Hull, Eugene Hoffman, Jacob H. Honck, Thos. Horan, Wm. T. Hickey, Albert Hopkins, George Shay, George James, George Kline, Timothy Kelly, Wm. Kennedy, Nurses Ledo, Henry Ludford, John R. Lockey, John Madden, Peter Masker, Geo. Mason, John McCormick, John Millis, John Nurnane, Charles Newbury, Bernard O'Hare, Lewis Phillips, Joseph Pruder, John Patridge, John Ryan, Jas. Russell, Fred. Safford, Harry Spain, Joseph Savor, Geo. Sullivan, Michael Shay, Jas. Todd, Wm. H. Thurber, Jas. Utter, Pat. Welch, Geo. W. Wilson, Henry Williams, Fred. P. Rigley, Isaac Wheeler, John Dormady, Fred. Newton, Thos. Maguire, Wm. Hunter, Jas. Donohoe, Patrick Haggerty, Henry J. Nailor. John Medlicott, Henry G. Jackson, James Fritt, Alpheus Dyer, Robert Rikel.
COMPANY H.
Captain, Jos. G. McNutt; First Lieutenant, Thos. O'Brien; Ensign, Wm. McPheters; Orderly, Donald Gillis; Second Sergeant, Peter Forrester; Third Sergeant, Bernard B. Riley; Fourth Sergeant, Fred. Foster; First Corporal, Alexander Williams; Second Corporal, Michael Ryan; Fourth Corporal, Hiram Norton. Privates, Wm. Brunt, Wm. Brunell, Wm. Frizelle, Jos. Rothery, Jas. Morehead, John E. Stowe, Jas. Farrell, John H. Powers, Wm. S. Lewis, Wm. Lee, Hosea R. Fuller, Martin O'Donnell, Wm. H. Smith, Henry Lynch, M. O'Brien, Joseph Wolf, John Hope, J. D. Canniff, Patrick Conway, John Halpin, Edward King, Wm. W. Grinnell, Geo. Fuller, John Higgins, Reuben Lawrence, Michael Tully, Harmon Sons, Robert Henery, John Ward, Wm. Jones, Jno. Savage, Robt. Morehead, Jos. Mey, Geo. Telley, P. … P. Dorey, Thos. Hickey, Pat. Dyer, P. Stanford, Thos. Daly, Leo Tiernan, Dennis Ryan, M. Carroll, Jas. Muldrick, J. Torcey, J. Torrance, Wm. Hamilton, Alf. Atwood, Jos. W. Groat, George Cole, W. B. Gardner, Augustus Purdy, G. L. Lawrence, C. F. Newton, Chas. Stevens, J. Elsiz, Benj. Timeson, P. O'Donnell, Chas. Quinn, C. A. Seymour, G. A. Law, C. Weldon, S. Tymeson, J. V. Tymeson, Wm. Kirkpatrick, Nat. Purdy, M. Prinder, G. W. Briggs, H. W. Lewis, J. Conroy, A. K. Taylor, J. Van Vranken, J. Simpson, Eugene Dewey, J. Connell, Jas. Rooney.
COMPANY I.
Captain, Wm. McConihe; First Lieutenant, Joseph Lafuira; Ensign, George Tafft; Orderly, Johnson; Second Sergeant, McNulty; Third Sergeant, Taylor; Fourth Sergeant, John Fairchild; First Corporal, Sweet; Second Corporal, Marcotte; Third Corporal, Holcomb; Fourth Corporal, McCullough; Musician, Orr; Privates, Allen, Adams, Baker, Burham, Blake, Bently, Benway, Bourke, Chapman, Cummings, Comer, Dunn, Dutcher, Dill, Dunham, Donovan, Daly, Dennis, Delany, Farrell, Fisher, Golden, Gorman, Greenwood, Gaffney, Hinds, Heady, Hayes, Hopper, Harrington, Halpin, Kenlon, Lefferts, Livingston, Montgomery, McGrath, McCotter, McClay, Murray, McNeamy, McGovern, Mallon, Nogel, Northrup, Phillips, Raymond, Robinson, Rise, Stapleton, Skelton, Seely, Sweet, Stone, Slatterly, Tracy, Trumbull, Vandezee, Vosburgh, Welsh, Wilson, Welsh, Ames, McGuire. [We regret that the full names were not furnished us.]
COMPANY K.
Captain, John Arts; First Lieutenant, Henry W. Jansen: Ensign, Augustus Colby; Orderly, Adolphus Becker; Second Sergeant, John Sussmann; Third Sergeant, Wm. Lessman; Fourth Sergeant, Augustus Wilbut; First Corporal, Caspar Waldt; Second Corporal, Henry Todd; Third Corporal, John J. Schlafler; Fourth Corporal, Jacob Orth. Privates, John Wilbert, Godfrey Warmt, Peter Hoddo, Andrew Hirsch, Christopher Laubmeir, Max Stagnuir, Alexander Kellog, Reinard Hoffman, Anthony Nuneman, John Lahan, John Thiesen, Stephen Strowber, Richard Pahl, John Ebel, John Burkert, James Klien, H. Zeggle, Oscar Appally, George Young, Chas. Van Legorsky, D. Bestle, John Entsburgher, Chas. Clowsen, Louis Geer, Chas. King, Chas. Paltz, George Zones, Patrick McGrath, Marco J. Mitchell, Christopher Fahl, Wm. Brennan, Frank Geer, Ernest Egolff, Max Vitter, Louis Read, Peter Nott, Thomas Theane, William Collins, William Kettler, Henry Wood, Louis Schwartz, J. F. Johnson, James A. Nible, Ferdinand Weiss, Cunard Fritz, Alex. Kindsler, Edward Sheppard, Frederick Batze, Vitual Goodwater, F. Bierwith, Chas. Stickney, Edward Rutliger, Adam Clare, Wm. Heiser, John Schilling, Edward Walton, C. Bode, Christopher Seagebold, J. Jervis Hillsley, Chas. Calton, Lewis Firchs, Wm. Everly, Casper Schuyler, Andrew Achor, Chas. Nible, Chas. Johnson, Louis Laqui.
After receiving the regiment, the escort returned with it. At the Victor Works of Ald. Eddy, they were met by Mayor Warren and the Common Council, and a force of over sixty policemen— they having volunteered for the service. Under this escort, the Second regiment marched into the city whose honor they are soon to maintain upon the field.
The reception they met with was such as must have swelled the heart of every soldier with manly pride. Along the whole line of march, through River street to Washington Square, and down Second to the Court House, the line of march was through one dense mass of people, closely packed, while every window was thronged, and from hundreds of roof-tops and flag-staffs, the stars and stripes floated in the clear morning air, and underneath hundreds of beautiful women waved their handkerchiefs as a parting adieu to the gallant men. It was a sight long to be remembered. Seemingly, the entire population of the city, men, women and children, had left their avocations, to bid the regiment God-speed upon its mission. At various points along the march, salutes were fired, and the soldiers were loudly cheered as they passed. A hardy, resolute, brave-looking body of men, they bore themselves in a manner worthy of the compliment they were receiving. Every one felt proud that Troy had been able in this hour of danger to respond so nobly to the country's call.
At the Court House, where it had been announced that the presentation of a regimental flag was to take place, the crowd was even more dense and compact than anywhere else. The capacious area of the steps was devoted almost entirely to ladies, and completely filled by them — a small space only at the South being reserved for the presentation exercises. The police having with great difficulty cleared a way through the swaying mass of humanity, the regiment took a position of front face, the right resting on Ferry street, with the escort in the rear.
The following young ladies, by whom the flag was presented, occupied a place at the South wing:
Misses Gould, Cramer, E. Freeman, M. Freeman, Knox, Townsend, Seymour, Howland, Burden, Schriver, S. W Hart, A. Dauchy, J. Dauchy, Hawley, S. Willard, M. Willard, Thompson, Buckley, Martha Warren, the Misses Wells.
Col. Carr and Lieut. Col. Kenyon having taken their stand upon the steps, Judge Gould addressed the Colonel as follows:
Sir—On behalf of a few young ladies of this city, I take pride in presenting to your regiment the emblem of our nation's honor and our nation's might. The few pale stars that shone dimly on our national infancy were looked on by the world with doubt and distrust, and despotism watched to see them set in gloom. But they have continued to increase in brilliancy and in number, till they now form the brightest constellation of the broad blue arch of Freedom. This banner has been borne in honor and in fame, not merely to every part of the habitable globe, but at the ice barrier of the far North it has looked out on the waters of the open Polar Sea; and at the extreme South it has skirted the vast boundary of perpetual desolation. In every zone, and in every breeze, wherever "winds can waft or waters roll," it has been spread as the ensign of the only Free Republic, of the land which Liberty has chosen as her peculiar abode.
This ensign has been insulted; the power of the nation has been defied. Not by a foreign foe, but by traitors who have grown to be able to insult it, only under its protection, and because our united power was mighty. Their very independence was achieved by the blood and the treasures of the North, whom they now vilify; and small indeed was their share in the battle for Freedom. To redress this wrong: to make us again one united country, from where Bunker Hill rises to meet the sun in his coming to where the shores of the vast Pacific redden late with his descending beams;—you are called to the field. To this country, to this flag as its emblem, you have taken the oath of allegiance,—the most solemn oath ever administered by man. In the ancient republics, the military oath was deemed so much more sacred than any other, that it bore its own peculiar name:—it was called the sacrament. By such an oath you have bound yourselves to stand by the honor of your country.
The cause, in which you are summoned to your duty by the Government, is that of protecting the very existence of the Government. In its existence are bound up the graves and the memory of generations past!—the homes, the hearths, and the altars of the present; the inheritance and the hopes of the future. That Government is a Government of laws, which coerce obedience to their mandates. There is no Government, unless it can enforce such obedience. The only reason that we have our great blessings, our accumulated prosperity; that we differ from the Bedouin of the desert, and the savage of the wilderness; is that the force of our laws protects our persons, and the fruits of our industry; and the outcry against coercion is the senseless clamor of madmen.
In sustaining the government you do something more than preserve civil liberty. Civil liberty,—the freedom of thought and of speech; the sacredness of personal freedom, and the equality of political rights; carry with them, and maintain among them religious liberty. The latter cannot exist without the former. Civil liberty preceded religious, and may survive it. It was civil freedom which "dispelled the mists of superstition, and invited the nations to behold their God." And in defending this cause you are defending that of pure religion. In such a contest it is not too much to say that "God himself musters the hosts to war."
In this struggle,—be it brief or be it long,— you are but the advance-guard of a mighty and a united people. The whole awakened land of freemen is roused, and millions of strong hands, and true hearts are ready to follow you to the field; and "the feeble hands, unequal to any other weapon, will grasp the sword of the spirit," in prayer for your protection and success. So supported, you have every means, and every assurance, of a glorious termination to your toils.
Should even "the fountains of the great deep" of public opinion be broken up, the ark of the Constitution,—built by our forefathers,— will still float upon the waters, and outride the storm. And when the troubled flood abates, it will rest on the Ararat of Freedom! A brighter sun will shine on our renewed prosperity; the bow of promise will glow on the clouds of the o'erpast tempest; and our once more united millions will join in thanksgiving to "the Power that has made, and preserved us a nation." God speed the right! God guard the flag!
In response, Col. Carr said:
Sir—In behalf of the New York Volunteers, I receive this flag with gratitude, and trust you will rest assured that we shall honor and protect it with our lives. The time for talking has passed, and we are on our way to action; we trust that when the time comes, we shall act well. To the citizens of Troy who have administered to our comfort since we have been in camp, and especially to the ladies who have so generously and so nobly provided us with articles of necessity, we all return our heartfelt thanks. Now, sir, we must bid you farewell. Again I say, we take the flag with pride, and shall try to bear it with honor.
Judge Gould exclaimed, with evidently deep emotion:
We give the flag to you, in honor; you will bear it in honor; and in honor will you bring it back!
On the conclusion of these exercises, Rev. J. T. Duryea, on behalf of the County Bible Society, presented a beautiful Bible to Col. Carr, saying, as he did so :
We believe, sir, that the cause in defence of which you lead your men, is not only the cause of the people, but also the cause of God. Together, therefore, with the ensign of the people, we give to you the Book of God. In your hours of conflict, trial or pain, may the God who gave it be your friend, and the Savior who proclaimed it be your trust, the Spirit who inspired it your comforter. And, be assured, while you bear before us in our defence the pillar of fire, we shall send behind you the pillar of cloud—the prayers of grateful and thankful hearts.
On receiving the Bible, Col. Carr, said simply, but with deep feeling, " Sir, I thank you." The ranks were immediately re-formed, and the line of march taken up, down Second to Washington street, down Washington to First, and up First to the Troy House. At the residence of Gen. Wool, the veteran patriot was seen standing in the doorway, with Capt. Willard and Lieut. Arnold of his staff, and several personal friends. As the companies passed, each of them in succession cheered heartily for the veteran warrior. Colonel Carr, driving up saluted Gen. Wool, who said:
" Are you going on board, Colonel?"
Colonel Carr—" Yes, Sir."
General Wool—" My heart will go with you. I trust I shall soon be in your neighborhood. This is no time for street speeches. All I have to say to you, is, do not dishonor that glorious flag—the stars and stripes—and never return without it. My best wishes attend you." Then, turning to the immense crowd of spectators, he added, "There is fine material here for another regiment. Troy must have another one."
The regiment at once marched to the steamboat dock, and on board the vessels which were to convey it down the River. These, instead of the Alida, which had been promised, were two old, small and uncomfortable barges—conveyances which reflected discredit upon the Military Board, by which they were assigned for the purpose. Our citizens were unanimous in their indignation that no more suitable provision had been made for our noble solders—but on their part, there was no complaining.
The docks from Albany to State street were thronged with people, many of them relatives of the men in the ranks—and here the most thrillingly affecting scenes took place. Wives clung to their husbands, in a long, last, fond embrace, whispered to them hurried words of endearment, and bade them not to forget the loved ones at home on the field of battle. Grey-haired fathers and mothers pressed the hands of departing sons, and while the tears streamed down their wrinkled cheeks, conjured them to behave like true men. Sisters kissed the brothers they loved, while other gentle women bade adieu to those who claimed even closer relationship of affection. Friend bade good-bye to friend,—and amid the deep emotion of the vast throng, the boat swung out into the stream, saluted by all the steam whistles in the vicinity, and with flags flying, handkerchiefs waving, those on the dock and on the boats cheering, and the band on the shore playing, the regiment passed down the River and out of sight. We only echo the fervent utterance of each one in the great throng, when we say, "God bless each brave-hearted soldier!"
Numberless incidents occurred of thrilling interest, but which it would of course be impossible to detail. We can only briefly allude to several of them:
The wife and children of Col. Carr, with about twenty relatives and intimate friends, were in Willard's news room, where he went to bid them good-bye, just before the regiment sailed. While all around him were weeping, the Colonel controlled himself with evident effort, and said, " Good-bye, all. When you hear from me on the field, you will hear that I have done my duty!" Brave soldier! We know we will.
As the regiment passed up First street, Capt. McConihe said to a member of the relief committee who was standing near, "Good bye. See that the families of my men don't suffer!" If they do, may the disgrace be theirs who are left behind.
" Good-bye, Tom!" shouted a soldier in Capt. Olmsted's company. "If you hear I'm killed, you may know I was found face up, wounded in front!"
An old, infirm man of seventy, approached his son in Capt. Tibbits' company, and said, "Farewell, my boy! God bless you! I may never see you again. If news comes back that you are dead, I shall mourn you. But if you retreat before your company does, don't come back to your old father."
" Here, my son," said a man to a young soldier in Captain McNutt's company, "take this little bible. Read it much and pray often. But when the time comes, follow up your prayers with your bullets."
The students in the Troy Academy presented Mr. V. A. Lewis, chaplain of the regiment, a beautiful revolver. It was a touching scene; nearly all the lads shed tears in parting with their valued friend.
A woman ran to ranks and drew out her son, a member of Capt. Parks' company. Kissing him fervidly, while her tears rained upon his cheeks, she said, "God protect you, my son.— Write to us often. But keep up your courage, and be a good soldier." Many a stout-hearted man near by wept like a child at the thrilling sight.
" You are my only son," said a lady in mourning to a soldier on the steamboat dock, "but I would to God I had more to give, or that I could go myself. Don't disgrace your father's memory.
" I tell you," said a member of Capt. Olmsted's company, who has seen service before, "I feel like myself with these clothes on. I hope I'll have a chance to try how hot they are down in South Carolina."
At the steamboat dock, a lad named Garland, twelve years of age, fell from a wagon, and striking upon his side, was very badly injured. He was removed to his home on Fourth street.
Owing to a misunderstanding, Doring's Band did not go on with the regiment, as was expected.
— The hearts of the people go with the defenders of our flag and our honor, and they will prove themselves worthy of the sympathy they [bear] from us.

Col. Geo. L. Willard, killed; Col. Jos. B. Carr, Brig. Gen'l; Col. S.W. Park, in Troy. Lieut. Col. R. Wells Kenyon, in Troy; Lieut.-Colonel William A. Olmsted, in Troy; Major R. Lansingburgh; Major William B. Tibbits, Col. 21st N.Y. Cavalry. Adjutant Timothy Quinn, Major 1st N. Y. Cavalry; Adjutant LeGrand Benedict, Captain & A. A. G., Washington; Adjutant Jacob L. Fratt, Troy. Quartermaster, Charles L. MacArthur, Troy; Quartermaster William T. Shear, dead. Surgeon R. B. Bontecou, Washington, D. C.; Surg. Le Roy McLean, Troy; Asst. Surgeon Henry B. Whitnig, [sic Whiton] Surgeon 60th N. Y. Volunteers; Assistant Surgeon Benjamin S. Catlin, Surgeon 21st N. Y, Volunteers; Assistant Surgeon Nathan H. Camp, Troy. Chaplain W. A. Lewis, Troy; Chaplain G. Meittenger, unknown; J. Enoch Chesshire, Philadelphia; Chaplain E. W. Chapman, 169th N. Y. Volunteers.
Co. A—Capt. Jno. W. Armitage, Washington; Capt. Geo. V. Boutelle, Major 21st N. Y. cavalry. 1st Lieut. Calvin S. Link, Troy; 1st Lieut. Francis Temple, Cohoes; 1st Lieut. Joseph W. Carnell, Troy. 2d Lieut. Geo. Hitchock, Troy; 2d Lieut. E. Merritt, unknown; 2d Lieut. Charles O. Davis, dead; 2d Lieut. Nathan Hodgman, Troy.
Co. B—Captain T. Clement Haddock, dead; Captain Joseph J. Hagan, Troy. 1st Lieut. George Gould, Sutler Army, Potomac; 2nd Lieut. Lee Churchill, 1st Lieut. 125 N. Y. Volunteers; 2nd Lieut. James Merritt, Troy.
Co. C—Captain John H. Quackenbush, Troy; 2d Lieut. Daviel Maguire, Troy.
Co. D—Capt. M. Cassidy, Albany; Capt. John Maguire, Albany; Capt. Wm. McNulty, Capt. 21st N. Y. Cavalry. 1st. Lieut. William M. Ostrom, Troy; 1st Lieut. James Hill, Adjutant 21st N. Y. Cavalry. 2nd Lieut. John McCaffrey, killed; 2nd Lieut. James O'Brien, Troy.
Co. E-—Capt. S. Lee Perkins, killed; Capt. Jas. A. Savage, Troy; Capt. Thomas Sullivan, Troy. 1st Lieut. Charles G. Otis, Major 21st N. Y. Cavalry; 1st Lieut. William H. Shook, Troy; 2nd Lieut. F. Fonda, Lansingburgh.
Co. F—Capt. Henry Harrison, Troy. 1st Lieut. Robt. B. Dickie, Massachusetts. 2nd Lieut. Wm. Taylor, Philadelphia; 2nd Lieut. John H. Pierce, Troy.
Co. G—Capt. Edgar T. Wilson, Lansingburgh. 1st Lieut. Thomas Fisher, Aid-de-Camp, General Mott's Staff. 2nd Lieutenant Cornelius Kirker, 21st N. Y. Cavalry; Henry A. Marcott, Invalid Corps.
Co. H—Capt. James G. McNutt, G. I.; Capt. Joseph LaFuira, army; Capt. James A. Coon, Troy. 1st Lieut. T. O'Brien, 69th N. Y.; 1st Lieut. Wm. McFeeters, Troy. 2d Lieut. Donald Gillis, Army of Potomac; 2d Lieut. John H. Perston, Waterford.
Co. I—Capt. Wm. McConihe, Washington. 1st Lieut. Geo. Taffe, Troy. 2d Lieut. John Fairchild, Troy.
Co. K—Capt. John Arts, Troy; Capt. Joseph Egolf, Troy. 1st Lieut. Jansen, unknown; 1st Lieut. George Merrill, unknown; 1st Lieut. James Johnson, Capt. A. A. G., Army of Potomac; 2d, Lieut. August Kolbe, Lansingburgh; 2d Lieut. John Schlaffer, Capt. 16th N. Y. cavalry; 2d Lieut. James Jansen, unknown.

SECOND REGIMENT VOLUNTEERS
The squad of recruits sent on to Washington last Saturday to take the place of those who refused to take the oath for three years, arrived there in safety and have taken their place in the regiment. Recruiting is still going on for this regiment at the armory in Seventh street, and at No. 168 Fulton street. Another squad will be forwarded on Friday next. It is a this, as well as all other regiments that are at present recruiting, a better class of men are coming forward to enlist. A number of letters have been received of late from parties in the country desiring to enlist for the war, stating that they would come to this city to enlist, provided that they could be insured of comfortable quarters and food being furnished them on their arrival in this city; the complaints of the short comings The Second regiment, having already been mustered into the army, those enlisting to fill up the vacancies will be provided for by the United States authorities as soon as they announce themselves.

Capt. Michael Cassidy, a former Trojan, and recently an officer of the Second regiment has been elected Colonel of the Twenty- fifth militia at Albany - an excellent selection for the regiment.

A Card--The relative of the late Capt. S. ... Perkins, Second Regiment New York State Volunteers, desire to return their heart felt thanks to those friends who have manifested so many evidences of sympathy, and rendered so many kind services during their hour of bereavement. They particularly thank the officers and privates of the Troy regiment, now in this city -- the Troy Citizens Corps, Captain Sims, the Troy City Artillery, Capt. Davis, and the Troy City Rifle Company, Capt. Rapp, for their presence at the funeral obsequies-- and express their obligations to the former companions in arms of the deceased for the offering so kindly made by them, and the expressions of regard by which it was accompanied.

FUNERAL--
The funeral of the late Thos. Farrell, formerly color-bearer of the old Second regiment, who was in good health when discharged, but survived only a few months, - took place at St; Joseph's church, yesterday afternoon. He paid a high tribute to the deceased as a true Christian. The remarks of Rev. Father Thebaud, pastor of St. Joseph's, were exceedingly appropriate. In the taking away of this young man, is realized one of the many mysteries of life and death. Strange, indeed, is it that one who had passed unharmed where the bullets were thickest should return to his peaceful home, to be so soon " mustered out " forever.

A Lieutenant of Company G, 2d Troy Regiment, had a leg shattered by a shot at Chancellorville, but by good care is saving the leg. He was riding out a few days ago, and meeting a brother officer of the same regiment, was telling him the condition of his leg, saying: "I have had forty pieces of bone taken out, and here (throwing open his vest and touching his breast pin) is one of them." And sure enough, there it was with the word Chancellorville neatly engraved on it. A man with a breast pin made out of his own shin bone is peculiarly adorned.

COLONEL OF THE TROY REGIMENT.-- The Herald of today announces that Capt. William B. Tibbits has been made Colonel of the Second regiment, vice Joseph B. Carr. There is no information here of such a change.
Gov. Morgan informed a gentleman of this city on Thursday evening, that he had appointed Capt. S. W. Parke to the Colonelcy of the Second regiment. The above rumor is undoubtedly false.

To REJOIN THE REGIMENT--It was rumored last evening that Capt. Boutelle, Lieut. Harrison, and Sergeant McCormick, of the Second regiment recruiting party, were to leave in a day or two to rejoin their regiment—Capt. Quackenbush to have charge of recruiting for the future.

REBEL FLAG
(SEVENTEENTH VIRGINA)
CAPTURED BY
SECOND TROY REGIMENT

Second Regiment Anniversary
The officers of the Second regiment, with a few invited guests, celebrated the third anniversary of their organization (April 24, 1861) by a dinner at the Troy House last evening. The affair was a quiet, informal "sit-down," rather than a public dinner. There were just enough present to promote conviviality, and not too many to prevent each and every one of the guests from feeling at home. The veterans spent three hours very pleasantly in partaking of the good cheer of "mine host" Jones, and listening to reminiscences of the past or taking part in the narration of "moving accidents by flood and field." Col. Park, one of the heroes of Chancellorsville, where a missing limb lies to attest the bravery and prowess of the old Second, occupied the head of the table. On his right hand was Maj.-Gen. Wool; on his left, Col. Crandell, of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth. Lieut.- Col. Olmstead faced Col. P., and between them were from forty to fifty soldiers, citizens and officials. Of the officers of the regiment, there were present the following: Col. Park, Lieut. - Col. Olmstead, Major Otis, Major Wilson, Surgeon McLean, Assistant-Surgeon Camp Quartermaster MacArthur, Capts. Arts, E. T. Wilson, Hagan, Sullivan, Quackenbush, Egolf, Savage, Harrison, Cross, Lieuts. Fairchild, Preston, McFeeters, Churchill, Taffe, Pierce, Carnell.— We could almost imagine these relics and successors of the original officers who left Troy, repeating the stirring words of Miles O'Reilly:
Three years ago to day
We raised our hands to Heaven,
And on the rolls of muster
Our names were thirty-seven;
There were just a thousand bayonets,
And the swords were thirty-seven,
As we took the oath of service
With our right hands raised to Heaven.
When the table had been cleared, Col. Park arose and gave a welcome to the officers and guests. He was followed by Capt. MacArthur, who spoke briefly of the experiences of the regiment and the historic scenes in which it had taken part. He shared the enthusiasm, although he was not a fighting officer. He alluded very gracefully to Gen. Wool, described the capture of Norfolk, and proposed the health of the hero of that occasion. Gen. Wool, who was received with enthusiastic applause, in response made a speech of military brevity, but of deep feeling and strong point. He alluded to the danger of civil war, which he had foreseen and of which he had forewarned James Buchanan—modestly speaking of his services at the outset in arming nine States, until he was ordered to Troy to " take care of his health," which was never better than at that date. Up to the present time every stranger asks: "General, how's your health?" The speaker gave some stirring reminiscences of the capture of Norfolk and the destruction of the Merrimac. In conclusion, the veteran hero said: "We must put down this rebellion. We must have no lines of demarcation— no compromises. Our motto must be 'The Union—none but the Union.' In conclusion I gave as a sentiment 'The gallant Second,— whose officers, as far as I know, all did well, and some greatly distinguished themselves.' " Soon after this speech, the General retired-- the guests standing and saluting him as he passed. Other remarks and sentiments followed. Col. Crandell, of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth, said he respected the members of the Second regiment as citizens of the same place; as among the first to rally round the flag; as men who had fought on the same fields with himself, and who had done their duty. Capt. J. M. Landon responded patriotically the late and ever-honored George L. Willard. This was drank standing and in silence. Capt. MacArthur proposed Capt. W. P. Tillman, who had gained a 'sore-head' in the service of his country. Capt. I. S. Scott, Deputy Provost-Marshal R. W. Laithe, J. S. Thorn, of the Times, Major Wilson, Major Otis, Capt. Potts, Lieut.-Col. Olmstead, Major Hyde, Captains Quackenbush, Arts, E g o l f and others were called out. A guest proposed "the health of Surgeon McLean, whose pills are more destructive than rebel bullets." The Doctor said that was so, and if everyone in the army had killed as many as he, the war would have been over long ago. Lieut. Taffe proposed the health of Gen. Hooker, " fighting Joe," which was received with a furore of applause. Capt. Hagen gave Gen. Carr, with wishes for health, success, and confirmed prosperity. Paymaster Kemp was also recollected. Several names of honored dead were remembered by silent toast to their memory—among them, the soldiers of the regiment who fell at Bristow, Capt. Lee Perkins, Gen. Mansfield, Lieut. McCaffrey and others. Col. Park gave a clear, complete and interesting sketch of the Second regiment, its History, services, and movements; and Col. Crandell followed in a similar sketch of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth. Letters of regret, with appropriate sentiments, were read by Col. Park, from Lieut.-Col. Cassidy, Chaplain Lewis, Major C. G. Otis and others. Provost Marshall Hughes telegraphed his indisposition, which kept him at home and deprived the company, as was truly said by a guest, of a tip-top speech.
Shortly before midnight, the cork-popping batteries became exhausted of their ammunition, and the company gave signs of falling back, when the silver-neck reserves were ordered up into line and the fire was reopened with renewed effect. But the "rations" were all expended, and random volleys of conversation succeeded the well-directed oratorical roar of battle. And then Sullivan's Band; which had been discoursing appropriate music all the evening in the balcony, gave "Happy be thy dreams," as a gentle hint that it was about time for the air which soon followed—" Home, Sweet home." And thus separated a pleasant, well conducted party, assembled to celebrate an anniversary which should never be suffered to fall into non-observance, but ever honored by the presence of brave hearts and generous souls.— With each annual recurrence of the celebration, the ranks may be thinner, but the spirit that animated the old Second and still exists in the minds of all its iron-tried veterans, will never die. Dr. B.F. Catlin, late of the Second regiment and Marshall Infirmary, has been appointed Assistant Surgeon of the Cavalry. Dr. C. is known as one of the most promising young men in his profession, and the regiment is fortunate in securing his services. With Drs. McLeon and Catlin, the organization is well provided for in the medical and surgical line.

Promoted—The Lansingburgh Gazette says:--We are gratified to learn that 2d Lieut. Thomas H. Fisher, of the 2d (Troy) Regt. N. Y. S. V., for his bravery and good conduct at Bristoe Sta. and Centraville has been promoted to 1st Lieutenancy.

THE SECOND REGIMENT (TROY) NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.
Field Officers
Colonel, Joseph B. Carr; Lieutenant Colonel, R. Wells Kenyon; Major, Richard D. Bloss.
Staff Officers, &c. Adjutant, Timothy Quinn; Quartermaster, Charles L. McArthur; Surgeon, Reed B. Bontecon; Surgeon's Mate, Le Roy McLean; Sergeant Major, Le Grand Benedict; Quartermaster's Sergeant, Arthur J. Donnelly; Drum Major, Thos. E. Bulger; regimental standard bearer, Francis Temple; Right General Guide, John Preston: Left General Guide, Andrew Dexter.
Line Officers.
Company A—Captain, John W. Armitage; First Lieutenant, Calvin W. Link; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Geo. A. Hitchcock.
Company B—Captain, Wm. A. Olmstead; First Lieutenant, T. C. Haddock; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Lee Churchill.
Company C-Captain, Geo. H. Otis; First Lieutenant, S.D. Perkins; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Wm. H. Pitt.
Company D—Captain, Michael Cassidy; First Lieutenant, John Maguire; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, John McCaffrey.
Company E-Captain, Geo. W. Wilson; First Lieutenant, John Quackenbush; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Edgar Wilson.
Company F—Captain, Sidney W. Park; First Lieutenant, James A. Cross; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Henry Harrison.
Company G-Captain, Wm. B. Tibbits; First Lieutenant, Jas. A. Savage; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Thomas Sullivan.
Company H-Captain, Joseph C. McNutt; First Lieutenant, Thomas O'Brien; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Wm. McPheters.
Company I—Captain, Wm. McConihe; First Lieutenant, Joseph Lafuira; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, George Tafft.
Company K—Captain, John Orts; First Lieutenant, Henry W. Jansen; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Augustus Colby.

MUNICIPAL WAR MATTERS
RECRUITING FOR THE ARMY
Recruiting continues dull, only twelve men having been enlisted this month, viz :~Eight at Chatham and Cedar streets and three at Hudson street. Branch offices have been opened in Cherry and South streets, and the recruiting parties seem to display great activity in looking up recruits, who, however, evince a preference for the volunteer over the regular service.

THE ENCAMPMENT OF THE SECOND REGIMENT
[May, 1861]
Pursuant to directions from the Commander in Chief, the Second regiment, New York State Militia, under the command of Colonel Tompkins, went into encampment at the Battery yesterday afternoon, relieving two companies of the Fifty-fifth regiment (Colonel Le Gal) that were stationed there.
The fore part of the day was taken up in collecting and forming the companies at the armory, from which point they marched in companies to Fourteenth street, where the regiment formed, previous to going into camp, the hour for assembling was three o'clock, but owing to various delays it was after four o'clock before the men began to move, and it was six before the Fifty-fifth were relieved.
There was a great crowd gathered at the armory watching the men preparing to march, but the majority were friends and relatives of the soldiers, who had come to bid them adieu, and to see them in their new dignity, as defenders of the flag of their country. There was great difficulty in getting the men together, and when three o'clock, the how for gathering, had arrived, there were but four companies ready to respond to the roll call; but having, after some patience on the part of the commanding officer, got the companies together, they started for the square at Fourteenth street, where a still greater crowd awaited them. Here they were delayed about an hour, but the scenes that always occur at such times between our police force and the people, made the time pass over rather agreeably, and at last they began to move down Broadway, headed by a police force of thirty men, under the command of roundsman Roe. The regiment was escorted by a detachment of the Ninth regiment, Sergeant Kiersted commanding. The escort was gotten up at about ten minutes notice, no idea of such a thing being in existence when the second left the armory.
As they proceeded down Broadway the street became densely crowded, and many a hearty cheer was given for the Second. At the Lafarge House they were complimented by the appearance of Vice President Hamlin, who occupied the balcony, and saluted them as they passed by, the officers and men responding in true military style. The propel became excited and cheered, Mr. Hamlin and the soldiers alternately. Nothing else of interest occurred until the men reached the Battery, where they were heartily welcomed by their comrades in arms, who had been waiting for them since three o'clock, expecting each moment to hear the joyous sounds of the approaching regiment that was to relieve them from the tedious duties of camp life. After the orderly exchange of courtesies on the part of the officers, the sentinels of the Fifty-fifth were relieved by others from the Second, and all things being in readiness Colonel La Gal marched his men out of the camp, leaving Colonel Tompkins in peaceful procession. The detachment from the Ninth acted as an escort to the gallant Fifty-fifth, and they left Camp Anderson amid the cheers of the populace. The moment the Second had the camp to themselves, military discipline and camp laws were enforced; all intruders, or, at least those not belonging to the regiment, being in the most unceremonious manner expelled from the camp, such a thing as an explanation was out of the question, the order was "go," even the reporters of the press, who are supposed to gain admittance everywhere, were put out at the point of a bayonet, one of the officers rendering himself very conspicuous by his efforts to have them ejected, and he looked particularly pleased when he found that he had succeeded in his efforts.
The Second regiment are finely equipped, having everything necessary for a soldier. The men themselves bear the appearance of being able to endure all the fatigue incidental to camp life and the battle field; they are in the best of spirits and enter with zeal into the novelty of their new position. We have on other occasions referred to the howitzer corps that are attached to the regiment; the men composing it are all tall and able-bodied fellows who seem to have a great feeling of veneration for their two guns. These guns are placed in a prominent position on the Battery and would take a very active part in case of attack. The camp itself looks as if it had seen service, the late storm having deranged things somewhat, but the men will be put to work at once to rearrange matters, and erect fresh tents, there not being a sufficient number up to serve all the men, there being in the camp nearly 900 soldiers. The Second regiment are to remain in Camp Anderson until they receive fresh orders.
The following list comprises the names of the officers:— G.W. B. Tompkins, Colonel; John H. Wilson, Lieutenant Colonel; A. W. Rea, Adjutant; A. K. Ling, Quartermaster; John Newman, Paymaster; F.C. Sage, Jr. , Engineer; J. Reynold, Chaplain; A Powell, Sergeant; J S. Ferguson, Assistant Sergeant; H. R. Foote, Assistant Sergeant; A. M. Cofiln, Commissary; Clinton Barry, Assistant Commissary; J. J. Armour, Orderly Sergeant; A. Ostheim, Assistant Quartermaster; Company A, Captain Graham; Company B, Captain Reed; Company C, Lieut. Smith, commanding; Company D, Captain Kennedy; Company E, Captain Husted; Company F, Captain —; Company G, Captain Jaehrling; Company H, Captain DeCourcy; Company I, Captain DeLany; Company K, Captain Darrow.

MEETING OF THE VETERANS OF THE OLD SECOND OF NEW YORK.—The officers of the old Second N.Y.V. held a meeting last night at the Parlor of the Troy House for the purpose of taking measures for the celebration of the third anniversary organization of the regiment. There were present Col. Park, Lieut.-Col. Olmsted, Maj. Geo. H. Otis, Maj. Le Roy McLean, Surgeon, Captains Arts, Quackenbush, Hagen and C. L. MacArthur, A. Q. M., Lieuts. Carnell, Shook and other old officers of the Regiment. Letters were received from other officers of the regiment, who could not be present, approving the objects of the meeting.
On motion Col. Park was called to the chair and Capt. C. L. MacArthur was appointed secretary.— On request Capt. MacArthur stated the objects of meeting.
Capt. Quackenbush moved that there be a celebration of the anniversary of the organization of the regiment, and that as the anniversary (the 24th inst.) came on Sunday, that the commemoration of the event be celebrated on Monday the 25th inst., [Carried.]
Lieut.-Col. Olmsted moved that the day be celebrated by a public dinner. [Carried.]
Major Otis moved that there be a Committee of arrangements appointed who should take the preliminary steps for the proposed celebration, and that such committee be instructed to report to the next adjourned meeting of the officers of the old Second. Carried.
The following officers were appointed as such committee,—Col. Park, Lieut.-Col. Olmsted, Major Otis, Major Le Roy McLean, Surgeon, Captains MacArthur; A. Q. M. Quackenbush, Hagan, and Arts.
The meeting then adjourned to meet at the parlor of the Troy House on Tuesday evening next at 8 o'clock.
The following is a list of the officers of the old Second N. Y. V., and their present whereabouts, so far as is known--read to the meeting by Lieut. Col. Olmsted.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: March 7, 2014
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/2ndInf/2ndInfCWN.htm

Valid HTML 4.01!

 
Home | Contact Us | Language Access