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3rd Regiment New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

THE THIRD REGIMENT (ALBANY) NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.
Field Officers.
Colonel, Frederick Townsend; Lieutenant-Colonel, Samuel M. Alvord; Major, George D. Bayard.
Staff Officers.
Adjutant, J. Owen Moore; Quartermaster, Jackson H. Chase; Surgeon, Dr. Alexander H. Hoff; Assistant Surgeon, J. J. Van Ransellear; Quartermaster Sergeant, Andrew J. White; Sergeant Major, Augustus Limburger.
Line Officers.
Company A--Captain, Abel Smith. Jr.; First Lieutenant, John S. Fay; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, M. L. Stearns.
Company B--Captain, Stephen W. Fullerton, Jr.; First Lieutenant, E. A. Jones; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Alexander Mann.
Company C--Captain, E. G. Floyd; First lieutenant, George E. Minos; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, George Van Veoliteh.
Company D--Captain, John S. Butler; First Lieutenant, C. H. Burdick; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, E. D. Wicks.
Company E--Captain, Justus W. Blanchard; First Lieutenant, B. B. Whalen; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, R. M. Goldwait.
F--Captain, H. S. Hulbert; First lieutenant, W. N. S. Sanders; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, T. Ellery Lord.
Company G—Captain, Edward N. Jenny; First Lieutenant, Wm. E Blake; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, Leon H. Ballard.
Company H—Captain, J. H. Ten Eyck, Jr.; First Lieutenant, Henry Cooper; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, R. Hunter Chapin.
Company I—Captain, Isaac Catlin; First Lieutenant, W. N. Babcock; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, F. H. Stone. [This is doubtless the officer who has been reported wounded in the engagement at Fortress Monroe, but whose name has been telegraphed as Lieut. E. W. Stone, of Company H.--Ed. Herald.]
Company H--Captain, John E. Mulford; First Lieutenant, Hiram L. Couch; Second Lieutenant or Ensign, E. C. Tuthill.

THE THIRD REGIMENT OF ALBANY—DEPARTURE POSTPONED.
Contrary to general expectation the Third regiment of Albany, Colonel Townsend, did not get off to the war yesterday. It appears that the troops are unwilling to start for Virginia without rifles; and besides that, they are short of uniforms and blankets. Colonel Townsend's regiment has been encamped
upon the Battery for a week or more, and we should think it was high time they were properly provided for. The men are anxious to be off, but say they would prefer going in good shape. General Dix says they can wait a few days longer for the rifles, &c., and they are determined not to lose the opportunity. Attached to the regiment is a splendid specimen of the St. Bernard breed of dogs, the property of the Colonel. Sancho, for such is the name of the noble quadruped, is quite a favorite with the soldiers, and is always presented to visitors at the officers' quarters. Although he is only eight months old, he weighs 125 pounds and is possessed of extraordinary strength. The regiment will not get away before Saturday or Sunday.

JOIN THE VETERAN REGIMENT.
A FEW ABLE BODIED MEN WANTED TO FILL UP THE 3d Infantry Regiment, N. Y. V. NOW IN THE FIELD.
By special order from the War Department, dated May 14th, 1863, Re-Enlistments for one and two years are authorized to be made for this Regiment only.
BOUNTY! BOUNTY! BOUNTY!
$552 for three Years' Re-Enlistments.
$263 for Two Years' Re-Enlistments.
$115 for One Year's Re-Enlistment.
$190 for New Recruits.
Now is the time to join one of the best Regiments in the service. Good Rations, Clothing and Quarters furnished.
Transportation to the regiment will be furnished upon enlistment.
Capt. GEORGE W. WARREN.
Recruiting Officer,
No. 1 Green street, Albany, N. Y.

LOCAL AFFAIRS. From the Third (Albany) Regiment.
The Regiment in Action--They Whip The Enemy--The Young Hero Simons-His Instant Promotion.
Bermuda Hundred, June 23, 1864.
Mr. Editor--Thinking it might be of interest to the public of Albany to hear of the doings of the 3d N. Y., it being an Albany Regiment, I take it upon myself to notify them through your largely circulated paper. On May 3lst we arrived at White House Landing, and having been assigned to Third Brigade, Third Division, Eighteenth Army Corps, we were ordered to join our command, who were lying at Cold Harbor, seven miles from Richmond. We remained there until June 12th, with nothing of interest occurring, except occasional picket firing, and a few shell; so on the 12th we were ordered to return to White House Landing, where we arrived about 6 o'clock of the same day; and next morning, about 10 o'clock, we were on board a transport, and moving for Bermuda Hundred, where we arrived about noon of the 14th, and advanced some four miles, and pitched tents for the night. Next morning about 2 o'clock, we were routed from our slumbers, and told to pack up and be ready, which took but little time; and in another hour we were on our way to Petersburg. Crossing the Appomattox River on pontoons, our route of march was kept up until we were within about two miles of the city, and there we were brought to a sudden halt. Being in the woods, we were ordered to lie down; and the Rebel works, which were only about 800 yards in advance of us, opened a vigorous fire of 12-pounders, shot and shell, on us in the woods, which was not very agreeable, though doing but little execution. We remained in the woods until about sundown, when we advanced to an open field, and deployed skirmishers. The musketry from the fort became very annoying, which made both officers and men eager to rush upon and silence them. We had but few moments to wait before orders were given to advance the skirmish line to the brow of a hill, some distance in advance, and with a sudden yell, that made the welkin ring, we advanced to the hill, but there we did not stop. The boys being mad with excitement, rushed onward to the rebel works, and in less than half an hour the 3d N. Y. were upon the parapet of the fort, capturing 250 prisoners belonging to Wise's Brigade, and the battle flag of the 25th Virginia, and some 9 or 10 pieces of artillery. In an instant we turned their own guns upon, and hurled the missiles of death into the retreating enemy, with terrible execution. John B. Simons, Co. G, 3d Infantry, N. Y. V., was the one who captured the colors, and was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Regular Army by Gen. Butler, for meritorious conduct before the enemy. John being an Albany boy, it may be of interest to your readers to see his advancement noted in your paper, and is now on his way to Albany to procure his outfit. After remaining in the works about one hour, we advanced still further on, and formed a line in an orchard, and remained there all night. Next day we moved to the left about one mile, and went outside our lines and dug rifle pits for our protection all night. On the morning of the 17th, the 3d was ordered to fall back. On the same evening the Rebels made seven desperate assaults on the ….

VOLUNTEERS ON THE MARCH.—It is expected that Capt. Butler’s Syracuse Zouaves will pass through this city to-day on their way to join
Col. Townsend's Regiment at Albany.

WHO GOT THE DINNERS AND WHO DID NOT GET THE MONEY.
Soldiers as well as the rest of mankind have stomachs and appetites, and there is no disputing the imperativeness of food in their cases; but then there are honorable as well as dishonorable ways of satisfying this irrepressible want. Three days since some fifty men of Company G, Albany Regiment, N. Y. S. M., now stationed at the Battery, but then quartered in the City Hall Park, obtained dinners at Lovejoy's Hotel, in a way that has not resulted in the proprietors of the hotel getting their pay for the dinners. Mr. Huggins, one of the proprietors, was told by one of the men who negotiated in advance for the dinner that they were told to come there by Col. Townsend, who, on presentation of the bill, would pay it. Col. Townsend was subsequently seen, but he repudiated the bill, having given no such authority, as also did the captain of the dining company.
While it is unpleasant to cast any imputation upon the character of our citizen soldiery, there is a lesson in the above incident hotel proprietors can take note of advantageously to themselves.

NEWS SUMMARY.
Saturday evening, the ladies of Albany presented Col. Fred. Townsend with a beautiful sword, belt and epaulettes. The gift was accompanied by a patriotic speech from Senator Hammond.

THE ALBANY REGIMENT.
The following order was issued from Major-General Dix's office yesterday:
Headquarters, New-York, May 28. (1861)
Special order No. 3.
Colonel Frederick Townsend, of the Third Regiment New-York Volunteers, will get his command in readiness and embark to-morrow afternoon for Fortress Monroe. Upon his arrival at that point he will report to the commanding officer.
By order of
S. B. Holabird, MAJOR-GENERAL DIX.
Division Inspector.

CAPT. JENNY’S COMPANY.—This company, enlisted at Oneida, and numbering among its members many volunteers from the western part of Oneida county, is with the Third (late Col. Townsend's) Regiment, N. Y. V., which has been withdrawn from Fortress Monroe, and is now located at Baltimore. It is to take the place of the three months men gone home. Letters from members of Capts. Butler’s and Jenny’s companies state that all are well, and that they are highly pleased with their present location.
ARRIVAL OF THE THIRD REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.
The regiment of volunteers in command of Colonel Frederick Townsend, late Adjutant General of the State of New York, which has been recruited from different portions of the State, but had their headquarters at Albany, arrived in this city yesterday morning at half-past nine o'clock, in the steamboat Alida. They left Albany on Saturday afternoon at one o'clock, having, prior to their embarkation, received a great ovation. The fire department escorted the regiment to the boat, and on leaving the wharf great enthusiasm was displayed. The regiment musters eight hundred and fourteen men, and this number being evidently too great a load for so small a steamboat as the Alida to carry, the boat, on getting to Castleton bar, ten miles below Albany, grounded there and was not floated off until past ten o'clock. Otherwise the regiment would have been in this city on Saturday night.
On their final arrival in the bay, the transport anchored in the stream, opposite Morton street, where she remained until after one o'clock, when the troops were landed at the dock opposite where the Alida lies. The regiment, preceded by the fine band accompanying them, marched through Morton street to Hudson, down Hudson to West Houston, through West Houston to Broadway, and thence to the Park barracks, where the command is now quartered.
The march down Broadway must have been very encouraging to the officers and members of the Third regiment, inasmuch as their martial bearing and gentlemanly appearance attracted considerable attention. As is usual whenever a band of music marches through the streets, an immense crowd was soon gathered. But on this occasion the approbation manifested by our citizens in behalf of the Third regiment was really well bestowed. They are as fine looking a body of men as any officer might wish to command. As a general thing they are all of more than the medium height, and not a few measure over six feet in their stockings.
For marching and keeping step these recruits vie with some of our veteran regiments, and notwithstanding the difficulty of marching in column without firearms, the regiment presented a solid phalanx which any common enemy would rue to dislodge, after they are furnished with weapons. Colonel Townsend may well be proud of his command, and the report that has preceded it of being the crack volunteer regiment outside of New York city seems to be verified thus far. The Third also appears to be the banner regiment, for every company in the line possesses a handsome ensign presented by their friends. Besides these flags, the ladies of Albany, to evince their admiration for the regiment and their patriotism, presented them with a stand of beautiful and costly colors, which also appeared in the ranks. The regiment having had to pass through the ordeal of circumlocution at the hands of the Military Board, arrived in this city sans weapons, and if Colonel Townsend had not happened to be popular as an efficient military officer, his men would not even be equipped. The Third regiment were offered old muskets, which they refused, and preferred to await better arms during their stay in New York, which is supposed to be about five or six days, and then proceed to the seat of war, subject to orders from the War Department.
The Third regiment was inspected and mustered into the United States service on the 14th inst. by Captain Frank Wheaton, of the United Slates Army. The uniform of the troops consists of a dark blue fatigue jacket, overcoat and cap, and light blue pants. The officers wear the regulation uniform. The regiment occupy the Park barracks, while the officers have been assigned quarters at the Astor House. A military band of seventeen pieces accompanies the regiment, having enlisted to serve during the war.
The annexed is a list of the field staff and line officers:—
Colonel--Frederick Townsend.
Lieutenant Colonel—Samuel M. Alford.
Major—George D. Bayard.
Adjutant—J. Owen Moore.
Quartermaster--Jackson H. Chase.
Surgeon—Dr. Alexander H. Hoff.
Assistant Surgeon—J. J. Van Ransellear.
Quartermaster Sergeant—Andrew J. White.
Sergeant Major—Augustus Limburger.
Company A—Captain, Abel Smith, Jr.; First Lieutenant, John G. Fay; Second Lieutenant, M. L. Stearns.
Company B—Captain, Stephen W. Fullerton, Jr.; First Lieutenant, E. A. Jones; Second Lieutenant, Alexander Mann.
Company C—Captain, E. G. Floyd; First Lieutenant, Geo. E. Minck, Second Lieutenant, George Van Vechten.
Company D—Captain, John G; Butler; First Lieutenant, C. H. Burdick; Second Lieutenant, E. D. Wicks.
Company E—Captain, Justus W. Blanchard; First Lieutenant, B. B. Whalen; Second Lieutenant, R. M. Goldwait.
Company F—Captain, H. S. Hulbert; First Lieutenant, W. N. S. Sanders; Second Lieutenant, T. Ellery Lord.
Company G—Captain, Edward N. Jenny; First Lieutenant, Wm. E. Blake; Second Lieutenant, Leon H. Ballard.
Company H—Captain, J. H. Ten Eyck, Jr.; First Lieutenant, Henry Cooper; Second Lieutenant, R. Hunter Chapin.
Company I—Captain, Isaac Catlin; First Lieutenant, W. N. Babcock; Second Lieutenant, F. M. Stone.
Company K—Captain, John E. Mulford; First Lieutenant, Hiram L. Couch; Second Lieutenant E. C. Tuthill.

FURTHER ACCOUNTS OF THE BETHEL AFFAIR.
Glorious Conduct of Duryea's and Hawkins' New York Regiments.
SIX WEEKS' RECRUITS AS STEADY AS VETERANS.
IMBECILE LEADERSHIP.
New YORK, June 11.
The Herald's account of the affair at Bethel states that after the unfortunate mistake was rectified, the forces comprising 1st; 2d, and 3d New York Regiments, (under Cols. Allen of New York, Carr of Troy, and Townsend of Albany,) joined by detachments of the 4th Massachusetts, the 1st Vermont, and 7th and 9th New York Regiments, with two light field pieces, under Lieut. Grebble, came upon an advanced guard of rebels, defeated them, driving them back, taking 30 prisoners, including a Major and a Lieutenant, when they advanced on Great Bethel in York County, where they came upon the enemy, 4,000 strong, and dashed right into them. They were in a position protected by 6 heavy batteries, mounting 6 and 12 pounders, and heavy rifled cannon.
Lieut. Grebble returned the intensely hot fire of the enemy.
Duryea's Zouaves and Hawkins' Regiment charged right up to the batteries, but could not pass the ditch and were compelled to fall back.
After two hours hot contest, the ammunition gave out, and the force retired in perfect order.
The Tribune's report says that all but one rifled gun of the enemy was silenced, and that when the Zouaves charged, the enemy were scattered, but were rallied.
Not more than half of the force was brought into action at once, and if a concerted movement had been ordered, the place would have been carried.
Lieut. Grebble's body was gallantly saved by being brought off the field on his own cannon.

Gen. Butler's Official Report.
Washington, June 12, 1861.
The following is Gen. Butler's official report of the affair at Little and Big Bethel:
HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,
FORTRESS MONROE, June 10, 1861.
To Lieutenant General Scott:—
GENERAL:--Having learned that the enemy had established an outpost of some strength at a place called Little Bethel, a small church about eight miles from Newport News, and the same distance from Hampton, from whence they were accustomed nightly to advance both on Newport News and the picket guards of Hampton to annoy them, and also from whence they had come down in small squads of cavalry and taken a number of Union men, some of whom had the safeguard and protection of the troops of the United States, and forced them into the rebel ranks, and that they were also gathering up the slaves of citizens who had moved away and left their farms in charge of their negroes, carrying them to work in intrenchments at Williamsburg and Yorktown, I had determined to send up a force to drive them back and destroy their camp, the headquarters of which was this small church. O had also learned that at a place a short distance further on, on the road to Yorktown, was an outwork of the rebels, on the Hampton side of a place called Big Bethel, a large church, near the head of the north branch of Black river, and that here was a very considerable rendezvous, with works of more or less strength in process of erection, and from this point the whole country was laid under contribution.
Accordingly I ordered General Pierce, who is in command of Camp Hamilton, at Hampton, to send Duryea's regiment of Zouaves to be ferried over Hampton creek at one o'clock this morning, and to march by the road up to Newmarket bridge, then crossing the bridge, to go by a byroad and thus put the regiment in the rear of the enemy, and between Big Bethel and Little Bethel, in part for the purpose of cutting him off, and then make an attack upon Little Bethel. I directed General Pierce to support him from Hampton with Colonel Townsend's regiment, with two mounted howitzers, and to march about an hour later. At the same time I directed Col. Phelps, commanding at Newport News, to send out a battalion, composed of such companies of the regiments under his command as he thought best, under command of Lieutenant Col. Washburn, in time to make a demonstration upon Little Bethel in front, and to have him supported by Col. Bendix's regiment, with two field pieces. Bendix's and Townsend's regiments should effect a junction at a fork of the road leading from Hampton to Newport News, something like a mile and a half from Little Bethel. I directed the march to be so timed that the attack should be made just at daybreak, and that after the attack was made upon Little Bethel, Duryea's regiment and a regiment from Newport News should follow immediately upon the heels of the fugitives, if they were enabled to cut them off, and attack the battery on the road to Big Bethel, while covered by the fugitives; or, if it was thought expedient by General Pierce, failing to surprise the camp at Little Bethel, they should attempt to take the work near Big Bethel. To prevent the possibility of mistake in the darkness, I directed that no attack should be made until the watchword should be shouted by the attacking regiment, and, in case by any mistake in the march the regiments that were to make the junction should unexpectedly meet and be unknown to each other, also directed that the members of Col. Townsend's regiment should be known, if in daylight, by something white worn on the arm. Thee troops were accordingly put in motion as ordered, and the march was so timed that Col. Duryea had got to the position noted upon the accompanying sketch, and Lieutenant Colonel Washburn, in command of the regiment from Newport News, had got into the position indicated upon the sketch, and Col. Bendix's regiment had been posted and ordered to hold the fork of the road, with two pieces of artillery, and Colonel Townsend's regiment had got to the place indicated just behind, and were about to form a junction as the day dawned.
Up to this point the plan had been vigorously, accurately and successfully carried out; but here, by some strange fatuity, and as yet unexplained, blunder, without ant word of notice, while Colonel Townsend was in column en route, and when the head of the column was within one hundred yards, Col. Bendix's regiment opened fire with both artillery and musketry, upon Col. Townsend's column, which, in the hurry and confusion, was irregularly returned by Col. Townsend's men, who feared that they had fallen into an ambuscade. Col. Townsend's column immediately retreated to the eminence near by, and were not pursued by Colonel Bendix's men. By this almost criminal blunder two men of Col. Townsend's regiment were killed, and eight more or less wounded.
General Pierce, who was with Colonel Townsend's regiment, fearing that the enemy had got notice of our approach, and had posted himself in force on the line of march, and not getting any communication from Colonel Duryea, sent back to me for reinforcements, and I immediately ordered Col. Allen's regiment to be put in motion, and they reached Hampton about seven o'clock. In the meantime, the true state of facts having been ascertained by General Pierce, the regiments effected a junction, and resumed the line of march. At the moment of the firing of Col. Bendix, Col. Duryea had surprised part of an outlying guard of the enemy, consisting of thirty persons, who have been brought in to me.
Of course by this firing all hopes of a surprise above the camp at Little Bethel was lost, and, upon marching upon it, it was found to have been vacated, and the cavalry had pressed on toward Big Bethel. Colonel Duryea, however, destroyed the camp at Little Bethel and advanced. General Pierce then, as he informs me, with the advice of his Colonels, thought best to attempt to carry the works of the enemy at Big Bethel and made dispositions to that effect. The attack commenced, as I am informed--for I have not yet any official reports--about half-past nine o'clock.
At about ten o'clock General pierce sent a note to me, saying that there was a sharp engagement with the enemy, and that he thought he should be able to maintain his position until reinforcements came up. Acting upon this information, Colonel Carr's regiment, which had been ordered in the morning to proceed as far as Newmarket Bridge, was allowed to go forward. I received this information, for which I had sent a special messenger, about twelve o'clock. I immediately made disposition from Newport News to have Col. Phelps, from the four regiments there, forward aid if necessary. As soon as these orders could be sent forward I repaired to Hampton, for the purpose of having proper ambulances and wagons for the sick and wounded, intending to go forward and join the command. While the wagons were going forward a messenger came, announcing that the engagement had terminated, and that the troops were retiring in good order to camp. I remained upon the ground at Hampton, personally seeing the wounded put into boats and towed round to the hospital; and ordered forward Lieut.
Morris, with two boat howitzers to cover the rear of the returning column in case it should be attacked. Having been informed that the ammunition of the artillery had been expended, and seeing the head of the column approach Hampton in good order, I waited for Gen. Pierce to come up. I was informed by him that the dead and wounded had all been brought off, and that the return had been conducted in good order, and without haste. I learned from him that the men behaved with great steadiness, with the exception of some few instances, and that the attack was made with propriety, vigor and courage, but that the enemy were found to be supported by a battery, variously estimated as of from fifteen to twenty pieces, some of which were rifled cannon, which were very well served, and protected from being readily turned by a creek in front.
Our loss is very considerable, amounting perhaps to forty or fifty, a quarter part of which you will see was from the unfortunate mistake—to call it by no worse name—of Colonel Bendix.
I will, as soon as official returns can be got, give a fuller detail of the affair, and will only add now that we have to regret especially the death of Lieut. Greble, of the Second artillery, who went out with Col. Washburn, from Newport News, and who very efficiently and gallantly fought his piece until he was struck by a cannon shot. I will endeavor to get accurate statements to forward by the next mail. I think, in the unfortunate combination of circumstances, and the result which we experienced, we have gained more than we have lost. Our troops have learned to have confidence in themselves under fire, the enemy have shown that, they will not meet us in the open field, and our officers have learned wherein their organization and drill are inefficient.
While waiting for the official reports, I have the honor to submit thus far the information of which I am possessed.
I have the honor to be, most respectfully,
Your obedient servant,
Benj. F. Butler, Maj. Gen. commanding.

UTICA MORNING HERALD AND DAILY GAZETTE.
FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1861.
THE GREAT BETHEL AFFAIR.
" General Impatience," who, General Scott has said, "has most to do with our military affairs just now," suggested the attack on Great Bethel. "General Impatience" devised the plan of assault. "General Impatience" formed the estimate of the opposing forces. "General Impatience" made the arrangements. "General Impatience" led the columns. The result will doubtless do something towards the abdication of "General Impatience" from the despotic position it has assumed in all that concerns the conduct of the military arm of the Government. If the disastrous result of this advance shall dethrone, expel, crush out this impudent, troublesome, dangerous feeling from army and country, costly as the expenditure has been, the Republic will gain by it in the end.
We are to expect some disasters, some reverses. The Rebels are Americans and have nerve and spirit. They are not meanly supplied with arms. They hold the positions we must take. In such attacks as that on Great Bethel, the steadiness and determination of tried soldiers is required on the part of the assailants. Much less of high soldierly character will keep firm, men who have only to repel advancing troops, particularly when as in this case superior guns are on the side of the assailed. "Possession is nine points" in a conflict as well as in law. It is not strange therefore that our troops failed to drive from their position an equal force of Rebels, carefully entrenched behind masked batteries.
The repulse has proved the mettle of our men. They have met adversity nobly, and deserve triumph if they did not secure it. They have under the most disastrous circumstances, shown courage, steadiness and discipline not to be expected from raw recruits. They behaved as well as veterans from often fought fields, could have done, under such a blunder, and in the face of such disadvantages of leadership, and against superior cannon. The affair has proved, too, that the Rebels will fight; that they are rich in batteries; that their numbers are large, and that they will not willingly abandon their ground. They have chosen Virginia for their battle-field. They will hold it with the energy of despair.
The lamentable incompetency of Gen. Pierce, sadly as it affected this skirmish, justifies no such sweeping conclusions as are by some deduced from it. Gen. Hull sacrificed Detroit in the war of 1812, but the same war developed Jackson and Scott. Pierce should have quick dismissal to private life; other generals will redeem his blunder, and hold up the flag of our country. Not all are competent military commanders; yet there are those who will follow not remotely in the footsteps of the heroes who have hitherto maintained our military fame.
Great Bethel, let us hope, will be the last place where the loyal troops will meet the Rebels under disadvantage. It should be the end of insufficient preparation; of unequal arms; of forces inadequate to an easy and a certain victory. The Government army should be overwhelming at every point where a demonstration is made. It is not enough that it should be equal to the opposing forces; it should be double, treble if necessary, so as to make the blow quickly effectual, and thus save both life and property. No excuse can be given for subjecting our men to the fire of guns both more numerous and more destructive than their own. In armament as well as numbers, our troops should be overwhelming. In all respects the preparations should be irresistible. Will this cost both time and money? Let them both be granted. The Government may require more men. They stand craving to be permitted to go forward. The Rebels ought not to glory again over the repulse of the Stars and Stripes. They will not, for Gen. Scott will hereafter direct in lieu of "General Impatience."

L. L. Clark, of the 3d New York Regiment, deserted the night before the affair at Great Bethel. He obtained a citizen's dress from a secessionist, and gave the rebels full information of our movements. He is now at Richmond.
The rebels would not receive him into their service.
Parker, not hearing the order to retreat, was overtaken by a party of rebel infantry, and on the eve of flight was marched to Yorktown with the main body of their force. His hands were tied behind his back, and from that point he was taken to Richmond, and there he was kept until exchanged. He was carefully guarded, but in every respect was well treated. He reports the rebel force at Yorktown as very large, and every steamer brought down additional troops. Provisions were scarce, and the Confederate troops were badly fed and clothed. There were but few passengers between Yorktown and Richmond.

...Yorktown. Believing from the reports that they had thrown up entrenchments and generally extended their line of pickets, he determined after consultation with other officers to whip them away, and accordingly gave orders to several regiments to hold themselves in readiness to march at a moment's warning. At the same time, the Chief of the Ordnance Department received orders to send a battery of howitzers, which was soon under line of march, comprising four twelve pounders and a detachment of U. S. Artillerists, Lieut. Grebble, and a part of the Naval Brigade was also quickly mustered, for the purpose of conveying a troop across Hampton Creek, which was done by means of fishing boats sent down Saturday from the Susquehana river.
The detailed force of the Volunteers consisted of three Regiments: the Albany Regiment, under Col. Townsend, the New York Zouaves, Col. Duryea, and the 7th Regiment, Col. Benedix, with Companies from other Regiments, comprising a force of nearly 3,000 men. The command moved at half-past 12 o'clock Sunday night, the Zouaves being nearly an hour ahead, and owing to a most unfortunate mistake in reference to the signals, two of the regiments got into a collision, when the regiment of Col. Benedix, mistaking that of Col. Townsend for the enemy, fired into them, not discovering their mistake until the dawn of day, when the supposed enemy left them masters of the field. It is not known exactly how many are killed and wounded, but the number will not be inconsiderable. After an explanation and mutual understanding between the two regiments, it was agreed to move on to Great Bethel, and the entire force took up the line of march, which is three miles from the place where the error was committed. As soon as the right column got near the place, they were apprised of the presence of their foe, very strongly entrenched, who opened fire upon them with a battery of rifled cannon.
The Federal troops promptly responded, but the volleys of the infantry, and a small park of howitzers were unavailing against such a formidable battery, and in the course of half an hour a retreat was sounded, and executed in good order. The regiments moved well, and the men, it was acknowledged on all sides, acted with great spirit of determination. The most melancholy feature of the battle was the killing of Lieut. Grebble. It was impossible to tell the number of killed and wounded on the side of the Federal troops, but I was told by Gen. Butler that his estimate was about thirty killed and one hundred wounded. It was found that Major Winthrop, Aid to Gen. Butler, had been killed, as he could not be found. When the news of the action reached the Fortress, the utmost sadness prevailed and there was a mournful aspect visible throughout. The first wounded man that reached the Fortress was private James Garbett. He came in an ambulance, which was very carefully driven.
As soon as Gen. Butler heard of the affair, which was about 7 o'clock, he mounted his horse and rode at the top of his speed to Newport News Point for the purpose of ascertaining all the facts of the case. Col. Dimmick also rode around the ramparts, and inspecting the side near the land approach, ordered the howitzers and mortars to be got ready.
About 9 o'clock the steamer Cataline reached the wharf with some of the dead and wounded. In the meantime nearly all the armed fleet proceeded up the river to Newport News Point.
The Hospital for the regular force of the regiments of volunteers who are stationed in the Fortress, is in first rate order, and under the directorship of Dr. Kyler will continue so. It is officially announced that the health of the garrison is excellent, and but few are on the sick list.
I have endeavored to get a full list of the killed and wounded in the affair at Great Bethel, but succeeded only partially, as but few of them had reached the place up to the time of the departure of the bout, which usually leaves at 4 o'clock, but was detained for your correspondent till 9 P. M.
The following are the names of those who have arrived:
Joseph Richards of Co. C, 3d Infantry, New York, slight bayonet wound in the thigh; W. C. Cady of Co. F, same Regiment, wounded by a ball in abdomen, and supposed to be dying when I left his room; James Garbett of Co. G sustained a fracture of the thigh. It is very bad and must suffer amputation, even if he recovers; James Connelly of Co. A, same regiment, shot in the right leg, ball not penetrating the joint; Philip Sweeny of Co. C, 3d Infantry, also sustained a very severe wound in the thigh, but may escape amputation; E. W. Stone of Co H, same regiment, slight wound in leg; Frank A. Baker, shot in the calf, only a flesh wound.
Of these, such as are conscious are cheerful.
Amongst the killed was Lieut. Grebble of the U. S. Artillery. He was struck on the right side of the forehead by a rifled cannon ball which tore away the upper part of the head. He was an efficient officer, and greatly beloved by his brother officers, who, as might be expected, are keenly grieved by the sad bereavement. The funeral will take place on Wednesday, and his remains will be placed in a metalic coffin, specially ordered from Baltimore.
Orderly Sergeant Goodlellow, Co. D of 1st New York Regiment, was struck by a cannon ball and supposed to be dead. Three members of the same company were badly wounded.
It appears that the Albany Regiment, Col. Townsend, were in the reserve.
It was thought that Lieut. Col. Grinnell had been killed, as he was missing.
Capt. Judson Kilpatrick, of Co. H, Zouaves, was wounded in the fleshy part of the thigh by the bursting of a shell, but gallantly led his company across the field to the attack.

DIED.
At Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Md., Oct. 26, 1861, John Daley, formerly of Vernon, aged 21 years.
At a meeting of the Vernon Fire Co. No. 1, of which the deceased was formerly a member, at their Engine House on Monday evening, Nov. 4th, it was unanimously
Resolved, That we have learned with the deepest sorrow of the death, at Fort McHenry, of our friend and brother fireman, John Daley, of Co. I, 3d Regiment N. Y. Volunteers.
He was the support and comfort of his aged parents, and was respected by all who knew him for his manly virtues and his honest heart; the memory of such a member we would always cherish, but especially we would honor one who has laid down his life upon the alter of his country in this hour of peril, and who has sacrificed all the bright hopes that cluster round one's early manhood for our security and welfare.
We tender our sympathy to his relatives in their deep sorrow, and as a slight token of respect to his memory, do hereby resolve to attend the funeral services in a body and to wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days.
D. T. Jenkins, Foreman.
W. F. Leete, Clerk pro tem.

THIRD REGIMENT., N. Y. S. V.--The term of service of the Third Regiment, N. Y. S. V., will expire on the 14th instant. It was stated Saturday, by friends of members of the regiment, in this city, that, letters had been received by them announcing that the regiment was to leave Fortress Monroe Saturday, and be mustered out in this city on the 14th inst. We are not able to state whether this intelligence is reliable. It is quite certain, however, the regiment will be at home in a week or ten days at the most.

THE THIRD REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.—The term of service of the Third (Albany) Regiment, New York State Volunteers, will expire on the 14th of May, and they will probably reach this city about the 20th.

PERSONAL--Capt. E. S. Jenny, who commanded the Oneida county company in the Third N. Y. V., (formerly Col. Townsend, now Col. Alford,) has resigned that position, and is now raising a Light Artillery company to be attached to Col. Brown's new Syracuse regiment. His company is nearly full, and is in a large proportion composed of German and Prussian artillerists.

THE THIRD REGIMENT.—This regiment embarked from Portsmouth on the 29th ultimo, with sealed orders, which were found to require the division Second of Seventh Army Corps, Colonel Alford commanding—to report to General Gilmore, in Charleston Harbor, where it arrived on the first instant.

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—Col. Townsend has left his (3d) Regiment, and it is now at Fort McHenry, under command of Col. Alford.— There is an Oneida county company in this regiment, under Capt. Jenny. A private in the regiment writes home as follows:
We received our pay the day before we left Fortress Monroe for this place, so we have had a little something to eat since we arrived here. We are treated here very badly—get nothing to eat only what we buy from our order money. Our officers do not care whether we have anything or not. Our Colonel is under arrest. Several charges are against him. He is drunk all the time. This is what you call "fighting for your country"—working for $11 a month, and buying your own food and clothes. They talk of "starving the rebels out," but they are only starving us out instead of the rebels. Forty of our men have deserted our ranks within three days. Out of 900 men in the regiment, we can not now muster 600. I want to leave the regiment, but I never shall desert. Our regiment is as good as any that have left New York, but our officers are not fit to command us. I hope our regiment will disband, or else secure officers who will not get drunk, and not drill us four hours at a time in this hot climate.

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—Col. Townsend (who is now a Major U. S. A.) has written a letter of resignation to the Third Volunteer regiment. Harry Hubbell, of New York, will probably be chosen to fill the vacancy.

THE THIRD REGIMENT.--A correspondent of the Herald, writing from Fortress Monroe, under date of Sunday last, states that Major Batchelor, Assistant Paymaster of the State of New York, is down there to pay the State bounty to the men belonging to the Third Regiment New York Infantry, Colonel S. M. Alford, who have re-enlisted. Thus far nearly one hundred and fifty of these men have again joined the regiment, and avail themselves of the bountiful inducement offered them by the State and national governments.

CAPT. JOHN E. MULFORD, Co. K, 3d N. Y. V., has been appointed Major of his regiment. He is fully competent to hold the position to which he has been promoted.

RECEPTION OF THE 3D REGIMENT.
To the Fire Department.
The members of the several companies attached to the Fire Department, are hereby notified that the bells of the city will be rung to announce the arrival of the 3d Regiment N. Y. S. V., at which time they are requested to assemble at their respective houses, in full uniform, and as soon thereafter as possible, proceed to the Chief Engineer's office, to unite in the reception of the Regiment.
James McQuade, Chief Engineer.

RETURN OF THE THIRD REGIMENT.
Their Reception and Parade.
The 3d Regiment reached this city this morning, and were escorted, by a Committee of the Common Council and the Fire Department, to the Delavan House, where a sumptuous Breakfast was prepared for them.
The officers and men appear well. Their duties have been less arduous and perilous than some other Regiments; but they have always been in the line of duty—going wherever they were sent and remaining wherever they were ordered, without questionings or murmurings, although their ambition has led them, from the first, to desire more active work than has been ordinarily assigned them.
The 3d has been celebrated for its admirable drill. No Regiment in the service had acquired greater proficiency, and Gen. Dix held it in such high estimation that he would never consent it be separated from it.
The Third Regiment left this city seven hundred and eighty-strong, under the command of Col. Townsend, on the 16th of May, 1861 arriving in New York on Sunday the l9th, and remained encamped at the City Hall, until the following Tuesday, when they camped on the Battery and remained there until the 1st of June. On that day they left for Fortress Monroe, reaching Camp Hamilton on the 3d. On the night of the 9th, they started for Big Bethel, were fired into on the way by the 7th Regiment, in which they lost one killed, and twelve wounded. Having no ammunition, the battery was not captured, and the regiment returned in good order to their camp. On the 2d of July, Col. Townsend was succeeded by Col. Alford, who went out as Lieutenant Colonel. July 30th the Regiment left the Fortress for Baltimore, where they remained hi camp at Fort McHenry until April 1, 1862, when they relieved the 5th Zouaves at Fort Federal Hill. They remained there until June 7th, when they embarked for Suffolk, where they were on duty until September 12th, when they again returned to Fortress Monroe, where they have been on garrison duty until they started for home. Their present strength is seven hundred and ninety-six men, four hundred and twenty-two of whom have returned under command of Major Floyd. The residue— partly new enlistments for three years remain at the Fortress in the new organization. The following are the present officers of the Regiment (those marked with a * remain on duty at Fortress Monroe):—
FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.
Colonel—S. M. Alford.*
Lieutenant Colonel-H. P. Hubbell.*
Major—E. G. Floyd.
Adjutant—F. W. Weaver.*
Chaplain—R. Kerfoot.
Acting Regimental Quartermaster—Lieut. N.
W. Davis.
LINE OFFICERS.
Company A—Captain, J. G. Fay; First Lieutenant, E. R. Johnson;* Second Lieutenant, A. D. Limberger.*
Company B—Captain, A. Mann; First Lieutenant, J. D. Mabie;* Second Lieutenant, J. H. Reeves.
Company C—Captain, G. W. Warren; First Lieutenant, J. W. Street; Second Lieutenant, James Lang.
Company D—Captain, J. M. Wicks;* First Lieutenant, E. C. Tuttle; Second Lieutenant, W. B. Chapman.
Company E—Captain, T. E. Lord; First Lieutenant, J. H. Curtis.
Company F—Captain, Wm. N. S. Sanders; no First Lieutenant; Second Lieutenant, F. A. Smith.
Company G—Captain, E. H. Middleton; First Lieutenant, T. S. Seabury (in the Signal Service); Second Lieutenant, D. Beebe.
Company H—Captain, L. A. Kohly; First Lieutenant, N. W. Davis; Second Lieutenant, F. H. Penny.*
Company I—Captain, G. E. Mink; First Lieutenant, T. D. Hindman.*
Company K—Captain, J. A. Mulford;* First Lieutenant, E. H. Couch; Second Lieutenant, ____ Whipple.*
About two hundred of the Regiment have re-enlisted, and the Regiment has been reorganized, receiving all held in service from the Hawkins's Zouaves, and how number about seven hundred men. It is accepted for two years or the war.
There have been, from its organization, but eleven deaths in the Regiment, (only one from wounds in battle); 72 desertions--17 of whom were apprehended; 1 captain and 16 subalterns have been promoted; 2 captains and 2 subalterns have been dismissed; 162 recruits have joined the Regiment; 46 have been discharged for disability, 22 by order of Secretary of War, and 4 by court martial; (2 of the latter were pardoned).
Soon after 11 o'clock, the Fire Department, Chief McQuade as Marshal, received the Regiment at the Arsenal, and acted as escort through the principal streets of the city, which were lined by crowds anxious to give the Regiment a fitting and enthusiastic welcome.
On reaching the Capitol, they were introduced to the Governor by Mayor Perry, and His Excellency addressed them as follows :—
Soldiers of the Third Regiment: This is not the first time I have had the honor of meeting your noble Regiment. While in Virginia I heard a veteran General speak in the highest terms of your discipline, your valor and your deportment. It affords me pleasure to meet you again in the State of New York, and congratulate you on your return to your homes on the banks of the noble Hudson, after your service in the Armies of your Country for two long years. Whether you decide to remain here, or once more to go forth to fight the battles of your country, may it be with the same earnestness and the same success that has characterized your efforts for the past two years. As Chief Magistrate of the State of New York, and Commander of its Military forces, in behalf of the people of the State, I welcome you back to its duties, its priviliges and its responsibilities.
The Ovation was creditable to all who participated in it. Being an Albany Regiment, there were many special welcomes given to sons, brothers and friends, whose return in safety excited grateful emotions. And our citizens generally felt a personal interest in doing proper honor to the Regiment, which was among the very first to respond when her patriot sons were called upon to give their lives for their country.
The Regiment will be quartered at the Barracks, until paid off and mustered out of the service; and this will be done, for all the Regiments, the moment the muster and pay rolls are properly made out.

LOCAL DEPARTMENT.
The Arrival and Reception of the Third Regiment.
It was confidently expected that the Third Regiment would reach this city yesterday afternoon or last evening, and the members of the Fire Department remained at their houses until a late hour, expecting to be called into service at any moment. All that could be definitely ascertained last evening was that the regiment had reached New York, but whether it had taken its departure, or at what hour it might be expected here, could not be learned. It is supposed they will arrive here this morning, when it is hoped, the Fire Department can be called together in force to extend a reception to "our own boys."

ALBANY, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1863.
RETURN OF THE THIRD REGIMENT.
Their Reception and Parade.
From the Evening Journal.
The Third regiment reached this city this morning, and were escorted by a Committee of the Common Council and the Fire Department to Delavan House, where a sumptuous breakfast was prepared for them officers men appear well. Their duties have been less arduous and perilous then any other regiments; but they have always been in the line of duty--going wherever they were sent and remaining wherever they were ordered, without questionings or murmurings, although their ambition has led them, from the first, to desire more active work than has been ordinarily assigned them. The Third has been celebrated for its admirable drill. No regiment in the service had acquired greater proficiency, and Gen. Dix held it in such high estimation that he would never consent to be separated from it.
The Third Regiment left this city seven hundred and eighty strong, under the command of Col. Townsend, on the 16th of May, 1861, arriving in New York on Sunday the 19th, and remained encamped at the City hall until the following Tuesday, when they camped on the Battery and remained there until the 1st of June. On that day they left for Fortress Monroe, reaching Camp Hamilton on the 3d. On the night of the 9th they started for Big Bethel, were fired into on the way by the 7th Regiment, in which they lost one killed and twelve wounded. On the second of July Col. Townsend was succeeded by Col. Alford, who went out as Lieutenant-Colonel. July 30th the regiment left the Fortress for Baltimore, where they remained in camp at Fort McHenry until April 1, 1862, when they relieved the 5th Zouaves at Fort Federal Hill. They remained there until June 7th, when they embarked for Suffolk, where they were on duty until September 12th, when they again returned to Fortress Monroe, where they have been on garrison duty until they started for home. Their present strength is seven hundred and ninety-six men, four hundred and twenty-two of whom have returned under command of Major Floyd. The residue—partly new enlistments for three years—remain at the Fortress in the new organization. The following are the present officers of the regiment (those marked with a * remain on duty at Fortress Monroe):—
FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.
Colonel--S. M. Alford.*
Lieutenant Colonel--H. P. Hubbell.*
Major--E. G. Floyd.
Chaplain--R. Kerfoot.
Acting Regimental Quartermaster--Lieut. N. W. Davis.

LINE OFFICERS.
Company A--Captain, J. G. Fay; First Lieutenant, E. R. Johnson;* Second Lieutenant, A. D. Limberger.*
Company B--Captain, A. Mann; First Lieutenant J. D. Mabie;* Second Lieutenant, J. H. Reeves.
Company C--Captain, G. W. Warren; First Lieutenant, J. W. Street; Second Lieutenant, Jas. Lang.
Company D--Captain, J. M. Wicks;* First Lieutenant, E. C. Tuttle; Second Lieutenant, W. B. Chapman.
Company E--Captain, T. E. Lord; First Lieutenant, J. H. Curtis.
Company F--Captain, Wm. N. S. Sanders; no First Lieutenant; Second Lieutenant, F. A. Smith.
Company G--Captain, E. H. Middleton;* First Lieutenant, T. S. Seabury (in the Signal Service); Second Lieutenant, D. Beebe.
Company H--Captain, L. A. Kolby; First Lieutenant, N. W. Cavis; Second Lieutenant, F. H. Penny.*
Company I--Captain, G. E. Mink; First Lieutenant, T. D. Hindman.*
Company K--Captain, J. A. Mulford;* First Lieutenant, E. H. Couch; Second Lieutenant, ____ Whipple.*

About two hundred of the Regiment have re-enlisted, and the Regiment has been re-organized, receiving all held in service from the Hawkins' Zouaves, and now numbers about seven hundred men. It is accepted for two years or the war.
There have been, from its organization, but eleven deaths in the Regiment, (only one from wounds in battle); 72 desertions--17 of whom were apprehended; 1 captain and 10 subalterns have been promoted; 2 captains and 3 subalterns have been dismissed; 162 recruits have joined the Regiment; 46 have been discharged for disability, 32 by order of Secretary of War, and 4 by court martial; (2 of the latter were pardoned.
Soon after 11 o'clock, the Fire Department, Chief McQuade as Marshal, received the regiment at the Arsenal, and acted as escort through the principal streets of the city, which were lined by crowds anxious to give the Regiment a fitting and enthusiastic welcome.
On reaching the Capitol, they were introduced to the Governor by Mayor Perry, and His Excellency addressed them as follows:
Soldiers of the Third Regiment: This is not the first time I have had the honor of meeting your noble regiment. While in Virginia I heard a veteran General speak in the highest terms of your discipline, your valor and your deportment. It affords me pleasure to meet you again in the State of New York, and congratulate you on your return to your homes on the banks of the noble Hudson, after your service in the armies of your country for two long years. Whether you decide to remain here, or once more to go forth to fight the battles of your country, may it be with the same earnestness and the success that has characterized your efforts for the past two years. As Chief magistrate of the State of New York, and Commander of its Military forces, in behalf of the people of the State, I welcome you back to its duties, its privileges and its responsibilities.
The ovation was creditable to all who participated in it. Being an Albany regiment, there were many special welcomes given to sons, brothers and friends, whose return in safety excited grateful emotions. And our citizens generally felt a personal interest in doing proper honor to the regiment, which was among the very first to respond when her patriot sons were called upon to give their lives for their country.
The regiment will be quartered at the Barracks until paid off and mustered out of the service; and this will be done for all the regiments the moment the muster and payrolls are properly made out.

THE RECEPTION OF THE THIRD REGIMENT.--As yet no steps have been taken to secure a proper reception for our 3d Regiment, which will be home with us in the course of ten days. We trust our authorities and citizens do not intend to allow representatives in the Union Army to enter our city without cordial welcome. In Utica the 14th Regiment is to be enthusiastically welcomed. The citizens are already moving, and everything is being done make the reception brilliant as well as hearty. The Herald of that city well says: "Let the old regiments as they return be warmly welcomed. They went early forth, responding to the first calls of the Government for help. They have borne brunt of fight. They have proved that good citizens make good soldiers. They return honorably after serving fully for the period of their enlistment. They come with broken ranks, for many of the bravest and best have fallen, giving their lives for the cause of the country. They come scarred and weather-worn, embrowned by Virginia suns and breezes. They come to homes they rendered more secure, to enjoy institutions they have defended. Welcome them as a grateful people can welcome faithful, battle-worn protectors."
P.S.--We are glad to note that a resolution was adopted by the Common Council yesterday afternoon to make arrangements for the reception of the gallant soldiers.

A Member of the 3d Regiment N. Y. S. V. Shot by the Guard.
A dispatch from Fortress Monroe, dated April 29th, says that private Parker, of the 3d Regiment N. Y. S. V., was shot inside of Fortress Monroe Tuesday night, at 11 o'clock, by the guard on duty. Parker was much respected by his fellow soldiers in the regiment, and at the time was passing where it is supposed, he was not aware the countersign was require, and did not halt when challenged by the guard, whereupon the latter shot him; killing him instantly. It is regarded as a deplorable affair, but no fault of the guard.

LOCAL DEPARTMENT.
The Arrival and Reception of the Third Regiment.
It was confidently expected that the Third Regiment would reach this city yesterday afternoon or last evening, and the members of the Fire Department remained at their houses until a late hour, expecting to be called into service at any moment. All that could be definitely ascertained last evening was that the regiment had reached New York, but whether it had taken its departure, or at what hour it might be expected here, could not be learned. It is supposed they will arrive here this morning, when, it is hoped, the Fire Department can be called together in force to extend a reception to "our own boys."

A DAY OF EXCITEMENT.—The city was in a whirl of excitement from an early hour yesterday morning. The arrival of the 16th Regiment, Colonel Seaver, was announced between four and five o'clock, by a salvo of artillery. The gallant fellows were met at the railroad ferry by delegates from the Fire Department, and escorted to the Delavan House, where they were furnished with breakfast. At eight o'clock all the church bells rung forth a merry peal, and for half an hour this music was kept up, calling the Firemen together to formally receive arid welcome the war-worn heroes. The streets were thronged with people, and the public buildings. As well as private residences, were decorated in an appropriate manner.
As "we" did our share toward the reception of the 16th, we avail ourselves of the account of the same as published in the Journal of last evening. It will be found full and interesting.
During the day it was currently reported that the 3d and 18th Regiments (both Albany organizations) would reach the city at three o'clock P. M. , and the ringing of the bells soon after that hour induced the people to believe the report was correct. State street and Broadway were consequently filled with people, and the Firemen were kept in service to await orders at any moment to extend a reception to the expected regiments.
The whole day was one of extraordinary excitement and peculiar incident.

Reception of the Third Regiment—To the Fire Departments.
The members of the several companies attached to the Fire Department are hereby notified that the bells of the city will be rung to announce the arrival of the 3d Regiment N. Y. S. V., at which time they are requested to assemble at their respective houses, in full uniform, and as soon as possible thereafter proceed to the Chief Engineer's office to unite in the reception of the Regiment.
James McQuade, Chief Engineer.

COMPLIMENT TO THE THIRD REGIMENT.
HEADQUARTERS DEP'T OF VIRGINIA,
SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,
FORTRESS MONROE, Va., May 12, 1863.
To the Third N. Y. Volunteers (Infantry):
The Major General Commanding cannot withhold the expression of his deep regret that the term of service, for which a large number of the men of the Third New York Volunteers enlisted, is about to expire, and that he is compelled to part with them.
In discipline, good conduct, and a faithful discharge of their duties, under all the circumstances in which they have been placed, he ventures to say they are not surpassed by any other regiment in the service.
Though the care, vigilance and fidelity of their officers and their able commander, and through their own just sense of all their obligations, under the military laws by which they have been governed, they have earned a most enviable reputation.
To those who have re-entered the service—with an unshaken determination to uphold the cause of their country against its faithless enemies—he tenders his sincere thanks; and if those who are about to return to their families and friends for awhile, should rejoin their comrades whom they leave behind, they will receive as warm a welcome as that which awaits them at home. JOHN A. DIX,
Major General Com'g.
Official: Wilson Barstow, Aid de Camp.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
RETURN OF THE THIRD AND FOURTEENTH REGIMENTS—THEIR RECEPTION, &c.—Yesterday was another gala day for the citizens of Albany. At an early hour in the morning, the booming of cannon and the ringing of Church bells announced to the people that the Third Regiment had arrived. The regiment came up in the steamer Kennebeck, and landed at the Steamboat Square, where they were met by the Common Council Committee and a delegation of firemen, and escorted to the Delavan House, where they obtained breakfast. Subsequently they were escorted to the Arsenal, where they stacked arms and took "a rest until 11 o'clock, when the Fire Department made its appearance. At that hour the line of march was taken up, and the procession moved in the following order:
Police under command of Chief Johnson.
Brigade Band.
Chief McQuade and Assistants Lightfoot and Campion.
Tivoli Hose Co. No. 1.
Washington Hose Co. No. 2.
Putnam Hose Co. No. 3.
Phoenix Hose Co. No. 4.
Protection Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1.
Mountaineer Engine Co. No. 5.
Niagara Engine Co. No. 6.
Eagle Engine Co. No. 7.
D. D. Tompkins Engine Co. No. 8.
Neptune Engine Co. No. 10.
Relief Engine Co. No. 11.
Americus Engine Co. No. 13.
Common Council Committee in Carriages.
Third Regiment.

After parading through the principal streets, the procession halted at the Capitol, when his Excellency Gov. Seymour addressed the regiment in a becoming manner. At the conclusion of his remarks, the regiment gave nine hearty cheers. The line was again formed, and the regiment escorted to the Arsenal, where they received their knapsacks, &c., and from thence proceeded to the Barracks.
Thousands of people gathered along the thoroughfares through which the procession passed, who manifested great enthusiasm, regiment being heartily cheered at several points. Our citizens generally appeared to feel a personal interest in doing proper honor to the regiment which was among the first to respond to our country's call.
The Third regiment left this city seven hundred and eighty strong, under the command of Col. Townsend, on the 16th of May, 1861, arriving in New York on Sunday the 19th, and remained encamped at the City hall until the following Tuesday, when they camped on the Battery and remained there until the 1st June. On that day they left for Fortress Monroe, reaching Camp Hamilton on the 3d. On the night of the 9th, they started for Big Bethel, and were fired into on the way by the Seventh Regiment, in which they lost one killed and twelve wounded. Having no ammunition, the battery was not captured, and the regiment returned in good order to their camp.-- On the 2d July, Col. Townsend was succeeded by Col. Alford, who went out as Lieu- tenant Colonel. July 30th the regiment left Fortress for Baltimore, where they remained in camp at Fort McHenry until April 1, 1862, when they relieved the Fifth Zouaves at Fort Federal Hill. They remained there until June 7th when they embarked for Suffolk, where they were on duty until September 12th, when they again returned to Fortress Monroe, where they have been on garrison duty until they started for home. Their present strength is seven hundred and ninety-six men, four hundred and twenty-two of whom have re- turned, under command of Major Floyd. The residue-- partly new enlistments for three years--remain at the Fortress in the new organization.

THE RETURNING REGIMENTS.
Arrival and Departure of the Third and Fourteenth New York State Volunteers.
The above two regiments arrived in this city yesterday from the seat of war, and soon after proceeded to Albany, where both organizations were raised. The Fourteenth arrived at about three o'clock, and landed at the foot of Cortlandt street.
The Sons of Oneida county had made preparations to receive them, and, although they arrived before the hour anticipated, yet they were met at the Cortlandt street ferry by a delegation of the former residents of the county where the regiment was mainly recruited. After a dinner given to the officers of the regiment by Charles Stetson proprietor of the Astor House, presided over by E. W. Dodge, Esq., the Chairman of the Committee of Reception, and a handsome repast to the men at the Park Barracks, the regiment was formed in line in the Park, and was addressed by Mr. Charles Tracy in a very eloquent and patriotic speech.
After the conclusion of Mr. Tracy's remarks and a response thereto by Colonel McQuade, the regiment formed in line of march, and, with Dodworth's Band, were escorted by the Sons of Oneida up Broadway to the Thirty first street station of the Hudson River Railroad, where they took the train in waiting for Utica. It is understood they are to have a reception at Hudson tomorrow, and that on their arrival at Utica a numerous delegation from each town in Oneida county will extend to them a warm welcome.
This regiment has been engaged in eleven battles, having volunteered at the battle of Chancellorsville after the expiration of their term of service. The national flag, which has been carried by them, has been perforated by twenty-three rebel bullets.
The Third regiment also arrived on board of the steamer Kennebec at an early hour, and after a short delay proceeded to Albany. General Dix issued the following complimentary order in relation to the Third on their departure:—
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT of VIRGINIA.
SEVENTH ARMY CORPS, FORT MNROE, Va., May 12, 1863.
To the Third New York Volunteers (Infantry):—
The Major General commanding cannot withhold expression of his deep regret that the term of service for which a large number of the men of the Third New York Volunteers enlisted is about to expire, and that he is compelled to part with them.
In discipline, good conduct, and in a faithful discharge of their duties, under all the circumstances in which they have been placed, he ventures to say they are not surpassed by any other regiment in the service.
Through the care, vigilance and fidelity of their officers and their able commander, and through their own just sense of all their obligations, under the military laws by which they have been governed, they have earned a most enviable reputation.
To those who have re-entered the service, with an unshaken determination to uphold the cause of their country against its faithless enemies, he tenders his sincere thanks; and if those who are about to return to their families and friends for a while, shall rejoin their comrades whom they leave behind, they will receive a warm a welcome as that which awaits them at home.
John A. Dix.
Major General Commanding.
Wilson Barstow, Aid-de-Camp.

MAY 15, 1863.
COMPLIMENT TO THE THIRD REGIMENT.
HEADQUARTERS DEP'T OF VIRGINIA,
SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,
FORTRESS MONROE, Va., May 12, 1863.
To the Third N. Y. Volunteers (Infantry):
The Major General Commanding cannot withhold the expression of his deep regret that the term of service, for which a large number of the men of the Third New York Volunteers enlisted, is about to expire, and that he is compelled to part with them.
In discipline, good conduct, and a faithful discharge of their duties, under all the circumstances in which they have been placed, he ventures to say they are not surpassed by any other regiment in the service.
Through the care, vigilance and fidelity of their officers and their able commander, and through their own just sense of all their obligations, under the military laws by which they have been governed, they have earned a most enviable reputation.
To those who have re-entered the service—with an unshaken determination to uphold the cause of their country against its faithless enemies—he tenders his sincere thanks; and if those who are about to return to their families and friends for awhile, should rejoin their comrades whom they leave behind, they will receive as warm a welcome as that which awaits them at home.
John A. Dix.
Major General Com'g.
Official: Wilson Barstow, Aid de Camp.

DAILY KNICKERBOCKER.
ALBANY.
SATURDAY MORNING, MAY 16, 1863.
Our Returning Regiments.
The Third Regiment, organized in this city, with Fred. Townsend as Colonel, arrived home yesterday, and was welcomed in a hospitable manner. The Eighteenth, organized by the lamented Colonel William Jackson, afterwards
commanded by Colonel Young, and now in charge of Colonel George Myers, is expected this morning. They will have an enthusiastic reception. Both regiments, when organized, were mainly composed of our own young and patriotic citizens. But few regiments have seen more active service than the Eighteenth. They have had a hand in every general engagement in Virginia, from the first battle of Bull Run to the last battle of Fredericksburg.
They have a record every man may well feel proud of. We recall the excitement and alarm, pending the organization of these two regiments.
The Capital of the Union was in danger. Beauregard, it was expected, was on his way from Charleston with an army of ten thousand men, which had been for months in camp, and were coming flushed with fresh victory. Washington clustered around Capitol Hill in fear and trembling, awaiting the attack from foes without, the more fearful attack from foes within -- looking with doubtful eyes at the handful of volunteers on which alone they had to rely for defences--straining their eyes in vain to the free States for succor. The whole country trembled for their safety. These regiments were hurried forward with all dispatch. Well do we remember their departure. The excitement and the grief of parting were new; but, except in the swimming eyes of mothers, wives, sisters and sweethearts, who crowded our streets to catch one last look of those whom they dearly loved, there was no grief visible, only excitement. Haste to Washington! Save the Capital! Sustain the Flag! Defend the Union! This was the universal feeling, and Albany turned out to bless her gallant sons, and bid them God-speed in the good work.— Those were stormy days. And even while they were falling into rank, came startling news of dangers and disasters. They had read of their murdered brethren in the streets of Baltimore. They had heard of rebel threats. Was there one thought of holding back by fathers, mothers, sisters and new-made wives? Hurry! Hurry! was the word; Save the country from disgrace! The march of the regiments down State street is not to be forgotten. They return
with thinned ranks, browned by a Virginia sun, and bearing the evidence of hard service and the dust of many battles. They have discharged their duty to their country like true men, and we welcome them back with warm hearts and cordial hands. God bless the brave fellows. May they all die in feather-beds.

THE RETURNING REGIMENTS.
The 31 (Albany) Regiment reached our city early yesterday morning after an absence from home of two years. They were marched to the Delavan House, where the Select Committee of the Common Council had caused to be provided for them a substantial breakfast. Here they were visited by crowds of friends, who in various ways testified pleasure at their return home. From there they marched to the Arsenal and at 11 o'clock were taken in charge by the Fire Department, under whose escort they proceeded through several streets and up to the Capitol, to pay their respects to the Governor.
His Excellency, who was introduced to them by Mayor Perry, addressed them briefly. He tendered to each and all of them the heartiest welcome home, in the name of the people; complimented them on the excellent reputation they sustained while in the service, saying that a distinguished and veteran General had spoken to him in unqualified praise of their admirable discipline; and closed by expressing the hope that whether they shall desire once more to go forth to fight the battles of their country, or remain at home, their course of action may be attended by the same earnestness of purpose, devotion to the right, and success that has marked their history during the past two years. Loud and repeated cheers were the response of the brave fellows to the words of his Excellency. The line of march was again resumed and the Regiment proceeded to the Barracks, where they will remain until mustered out.
The Third Regiment left this city seven hundred and eighty strong, under the command of Col. Townsend, on the 16th of May, 1861. On the night of the 9th of June they started for Big Bethel and were fired into on the way by the 7th Regiment, by which they lost one killed and twelve wounded. On the 2d of July, Col. Townsend resigned to except a position in the regular service, and was succeeded by Col. Alford, who went out as Lieutenant Colonel. July 30th the regiment left the Fortress for Baltimore, where they remained in camp at Fort McHenry until April 1, 1862, when they relieved the 5th Zouaves at Fort Federal Hill. They remained there until June 7th, when they embarked for Suffolk, where they were on duty until September 12th, when they again returned to Fortress Monroe, where they have since been on garrison duty. Their present strength is seven hundred and ninety-six men, four hundred and twenty two of whom have returned under command of Major Floyd. The residue—partly new enlistments for three years--remain at the Fortress in the new organization.
The following are the present officers of the regiment (those marked with a * remain on duty at Fortress Monroe):
FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.
Colonel—S. M. Alford.*
Lieutenant Colonel—H. P. Hubbell.*
Major—E. G. Floyd.
Adjutant--F. W. Weaver.*
Chaplain--R. Kerfoot.
Acting Regimental Quartermaster--Lieut. N. W. Davis.
Company A—Captain, J. G. Fay; First Lieutenant, E. R. Johnson;* Second Lieutenant, A. D. Limberger.*
Company B—Captain, A. Mann; First Lieutenant, J. D. Mabie;* Second Lieutenant, J. H. Reeves.
Company C--Captain, G. W. Warren; First Lieutenant, J. W. Street; Second Lieutenant, James Lang.
Company D--Captain, J. M. Weeks; First Lieutenant, E. C. Tuttle; Second Lieutenant, W. B. Chapman.
Company E—Captain, T. E. Lord; First Lieutenant, J. H. Custis.
Company F—Captain, E. H. Middleton; First Lieutenant, T. S. Seabury (in the Signal Service;) Second Lieutenant, D. Beebe.
Company H—Captain, L. A. Kohly; First Lieutenant, N. W. Davis; Second Lieutenant, P. H. Penny.
Company I—Captain, G. E. Mink; First Lieutenant, T. D. Hindman.
Company K—Captain, J. A. Mulford; First Lieutenant, E. H. Couch; Second Lieutenant, _____ Whipple.

About two hundred of the Regiment have reenlisted, and the Regiment has been re-organized, receiving all held in service from the Haw-….

FROM FORTRESS MONROE AND NEWPORT NEWS.
Correspondence of the Evening Journal.
SUNDAY, Sept. 4, 1862.
THE THIRD NEW YORK.
The Third New York Regiment took quarters at Fortress Monroe Friday morning last. The first intimation I had of it was from Quartermaster Chase, whom I met just inside the fort, while in search of the Signal Corps, and Gen. Dix's headquarters. Soon after the Regiment, 850 strong, in good condition, armor burnished, were drawn up in line, guard mounted, and awaited the cleaning of the barracks, just made vacant by the retiring regiment. I saw Col. Alvord, Capts. Blanchard, Mink, Ten Eyck and others. Henry Martin and Mr. Johnson I also recognized. The Regiment is spoken of as a special favorite of Gen. Dix, and being from Albany, I was proud of it. It is the best I have seen on my south- ward journey.
Thursday, in Baltimore, while waiting for the departure of the boat for the Fortress, my name was mentioned, and looking up discovered Henry Wilson, an Albanian, who was spending a short time in hospital. He was improving, and hoped soon again to be with his regiment. Mr. E. A. Sutliff, grocer, is his brother-in-law.
On applying at the office of the Provost Marshal for a pass to Newport News, I again ran upon an Albanian, W. E. Blake, formerly of the firm of Blake & Kewin, auctioneers. I think he is a Lieutenant in the Third Regiment, and has been detailed to this duty. He was very courteous, discharging his duties with promptness and fidelity. The Provost Marshal is a very important personage, and much of the comfort of those in search of the sick and wounded in action, or the dead, depends upon his quick perception and appreciation of their character and motives.

NEWPORT NEWS.
The steamer Rockland—not the Rockland formerly commanded by Capt. Allen, and which plied between Hudson and Albany some years since, but a craft about her size--landed us safely at the "News" about one o'clock P. M. Friday. The charred remains of the man-of-war "Congress" first attracted attention, then the careened masts of the "Cumberland," sunk by the Merrimac, and then the famous "Monitor," the "Galena," iron clads, drawn up in battle array—the "Genesee" near by.
The News is studded with tents and barracks. At present there are some 1,600 sick and disabled soldiers, all under the general superintendence of Dr. Hand, of Philadelphia, who is well supplied with physicians and nurses. With Dr. Buckman, of Philadelphia, and Miss Moses, of Connecticut, I have become acquainted, and know of their devotion to the care of the suffering soldiers. The others seem, and no doubt are, equally devoted to their welfare and comfort. kin's Zouaves, and now numbers about seven hundred men. It is accepted for two years or the war.
There have been, from its organization, but eleven deaths in the regiment, (only one from wounds in battle); 72 desertions--17 of whom were apprehended; 1 captain and 16 subalterns have been promoted; 2 captains and 2 subalterns have been dismissed; 162 recruits have joined the Regiment; 46 have been discharged for disability, 22 by order of the Secretary of War, and 4 by court martial; (2 of the latter were pardoned).

RECEPTION OF REGIMENTS.
Arrival of the Third Regiment. The 3d Regiment, Col. Alford, (formerly
Col. Townsend) arrived here yesterday morning. Upon their arrival, a committee of the Common Council, and of the Fire Department escorted them to the Delavan House, where they partook of breakfast.
Between 11 and 12 o'clock the Fire Department received the Regiment at the Arsenal, and escorted them through the principal streets. A large gathering of people in the streets welcomed them. Many buildings were decorated
with flags, and the welcome was everywhere enthusiastic.
Upon reaching the Capitol, they were addressed by Gov. Seymour as follows:
SOLDIERS OF THE THIRD REGIMENT: This is not the first time I have had the honor of meeting your noble Regiment. While in Virginia I heard a veteran General speak in the highest terms of your discipline, your valor, and your deportment. It affords me pleasure to meet you again in the State of New York, and congratulate you on your return to your homes on the banks of the noble Hudson, after your service in the armies of your country for two long years. Whether you decide to remain here, or once more to go forth to fight the battles of your country, may it be with the same earnestness and the same success that has characterized your efforts for the past two years. As Chief Magistrate of the State of New York, and Commander of its Military forces, in behalf of the people of the State, I welcome you back to its duties, its privileges and its responsibilities.
After the reception ceremonies, the Regiment proceeded to the barracks, where they will be quartered until they are paid off and mustered out, which will be as soon as the muster and pay rolls are properly made out. It has not been the fortune of the 3d to participate in any of the battles, except at Big Bethel. But this is no fault of their's. If they had been more frequently engaged, they would doubtless have given a good account of themselves, as they are remarkable for their discipline, and have conducted themselves creditably in whatever positions they have been placed.
The regiment left here on the 16th of May 1861, numbering 780 men. They reached Fortress Monroe on the 3d of June and left for Big Bethel on the 9th. On the way they were fired into by the 7th Regiment, being mistaken for the enemy, and lost one killed and twelve wounded. On the 30th of July, they went to Baltimore and remained in camp at Fort Mc-Henry until April, 1, 1862, when they went to Fort Federal Hill. Thence they were transferred to Suffolk, remaining there till Sept. 12, when they again returned to Fortress Monroe, where they have since been on duty. Out of 796 men, 422 have returned; about 200 have re-enlisted.
The following are the present officers of the Regiment (these marked with a * remain on duty at Fortress Monroe):—
FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.
Colonel—S. M. Alford.*
Lieutenant Colonel—H. P. Hubbell.*
Major—E. G. Floyd.
Adjutant—F. W. Weaver.*
Chaplain—R. Kerfoot.
Acting Regimental Quartermaster—Lieut. N. W. Davis.

LINE OFFICERS.
Company A—Captain, J. G. Fay; First Lieutenant, E. R. Johnson;* Second Lieutenant, A. D. Limberger.*
Company B—Captain, A. Mann; First Lieutenant, J. D. Mabie;* Second Lieutenant, J. H. Reeves.
Company C—Captain, G. W. Warren; First Lieutenant, J. W. Street; Second Lieutenant, James Lang.
Company D—Captain, J. M. Wicks;* First Lieutenant, E. C. Tuttle; Second Lieutenant, W. B. Chapman.
Company E—Captain, T. E. Lord; First Lieutenant, J. H. Curtis.
Company F—Captain, Wm. N. S. Sanders; no First Lieutenant; Second Lieutenant, F. A. Smith.
Company G—Captain, E. H. Middleton;* First Lieutenant, T. S. Seabury (in the Signal Service); Second Lieutenant, D. Beebe.
Company H—Captain, L. A. Kohly; First Lieutenant, N. W. Davis; Second Lieutenant, F. H. Penny.*
Company I—Captain, G. E. Mink; First Lieutenant, T. D. Hindman.*
Company K—Captain, J. A. Mulford;* First Lieutenant, E. H. Couch; Second Lieutenant, _____ Whipple.*

At a meeting held in the Sanctum of the Havana Journal Office, for the purpose of perfecting measures to receive, in a fitting manner, Co. K., 3d N. Y. V., Rev. Dr. Brown was made President, John Campbell Secretary, and O. M. Clauharty Assistant Secretary.—
The following Committees were appointed:
ARRANGEMENTS.—Hon. Charles Cook, Peter Tracy, Minor T. Brodrick, Wm. H. Skellenger, Joseph M. Weed, Mrs. John Campbell, Mrs. M. T. Brodrick, Mrs. N. Winton, Mrs. J. Mcguire and Mrs. T. L. Minier.
FINANCE--T. L. Minier, Wm. Skellenger, Adam G. Campbell.
RECEPTION.— Adjt. Hull Fanton, Hon. W. T. Jackson, S. B. Shearer, Rev. Dr. Brown; O. M. Clauharty.
MARSHAL—Capt. E. C. Clark.
MUSIC. M. Weed, W. L. Patchin, Charles Harris, Charles Stanley, Geo. F. Bowlby.
AMOS BROWN, President.
JOHN CAMPBELL, Secretary,
O. M. CLAUHARTY, Assistant Secretary.
— We are unable to state when Company K will arrive, but we are informed that Lieut. Couch will give notice, by telegraph, previous to their departure from Albany. This will give us twelve hours to prepare for their reception.
Ed. Journal.
(May 1863)

THIRD REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.--The term of service of the Third Regiment, N. Y. S. V., will expire on the 14th instant. It was stated Saturday, by friends of members of the regiment, in this city, that letters had been received by them announcing that the regiment was to leave Fortress Monroe Saturday, and be mustered out in this city on the 14th inst. We are not able to state whether this intelligence is reliable. It is quite certain, however, the regiment will be at home in a week or ten days at the most.

THE 3d REGIMENT.--We regret to see that there is quite a bitter feeling engendered among many of the 18th and other returned regiments against the 3d Regiment, which has led to several unpleasant collisions between members. This feeling appears to have arisen from the fact that the 3d has not smelt so much gunpowder as the other regiments have. This is all wrong, as it was not the fault of the 3d that they did not participate in the many sanguinary battles of the Potomac, &c. Every soldier in that regiment was eager to meet the foe, and all felt indignant that they were not permitted to share in the glory won by the 18th and other brave regiments. There is not a more thoroughly drilled or a braver body of men in the service then the 3d, and we venture to say that had they an opportunity of faning the enemy they would have won a name that would have ranked them among the bravest of the brave.

MORE OF THE THIRD DISCHARGED.--Since the muster out and payment of the Third regiment, a detachment of twenty-five more has arrived from Fortress Monroe. These have been mustered out and paid on Saturday. They belong mainly to Co. K, and were enlisted at Havana.
PAYMENT OF THIRD REGIMENT.—Yesterday afternoon the men of the 3d Regiment N. Y. S. V., were mustered out of the service of the United States at the Barracks by Capt. C. H. Corning, 17th United States Infantry. Major Richardson will pay the men in full (including the bounty of $500 each) at the large room in the Arsenal, commencing at 10 o'clock this morning.

MORE OF THE THIRD DISCHARGED.—Since the muster out and payment of the Third Regiment, a detachment of twenty-five more has arrived from Fortress Monroe. These have been mustered out to-day by Capt. Corning, and will be paid by Major Richardson at 4 o'clock this afternoon. They belong mainly to Co. K, and were enlisted at Havana.

THE WILLIAMSBURGH VOLUNTEERS.
To the Editor of the Times:
My attention has been called to an article in your journal, signed by Capt. John G. Fay, of Co. A, Williamsburgh Volunteers, in which he makes the statement that only a portion of that Company returned. Now in justice to the boys who have returned, let me say that we were only minus seven men of what were left of the eighty-three who went in the Battery on the 3d of June, 1861, under the command of Capt. Abel Smith, Jr., saying nothing about the large number of deserters in the above company. I will also take the opportunity of saying, that it was not through Captain Fay's doings that the company were noted for their good discipline. The only ones we can thank are Capt. Smith and Orderly Sergeant Rupp. As for Capt. Fay, he was always behind the age, and my honest opinion is, that if Capt. Fay will shave off that moustache, recruiting for this company will go on lively enough, without a doubt.—Yours,
One of many members of Co. A, 3d N. Y. V.

THE BROOKLYN DAILY TIMES.
SATURDAY EVEN'G, MAY 23, 1863.
The latest information by Telegraph, together with local incidents, will be found on the fourth page, Third Edition, issued at 4 1/2 o'clock P. M.

LOCAL ITEMS.
Return of the First Williamsburgh Company that went to the War.
One of the Companies of the Third Regiment of Volunteers from this State was raised in this District by Captain Abel Smith, Jr., who has, since been promoted to a Lieutenant-Colonelcy in another regiment. His Company in the Third passed under a different command, and bravely served the two years for which it enlisted, until the time expired. This morning the Third returned from the war, and the company of 'Burgh boys arrived at the foot of South 7th street, at half-past nine o'clock. There they were welcomed by the members of Engine Companies Nos. 6 and 9, who with their apparatus had assembled to do them honor--at the same time honoring them selves. Captain Woglom with a detachment of police was also on hand. Under his lead, with his two platoons, the company preceded by brass and martial bands, marched up South 7th street, followed by the two companies above mentioned.
The returning company looked well, marched with the steady tread of true soldiers, as they are, and presented the same imperturbable front that they had so often shown to the enemy. Throughout the march they were the observed of all observers, and many were the recognitions had on the way by friends who two years ago had tearfully bade them good by for a long, arduous and dangerous mission. The boys are now safe home again, and can rest beneath the shade of the laurels they have helped to win. All honor to the brave men who first fearlessly marched forth in defence of our imperilled Union.

MORE Of THE THIRD DISCHARGED.—Since the muster out and payment of the Third Regiment, a detachment of twenty-five more has arrived from Fortress Monroe. These have been mustered out to-day by Capt. Corning, and will be paid by Major Richardson at 4 o'clock this afternoon. They belong mainly to Co. K, and were enlisted at Havana.

PAY OF THE SECOND.--Six companies of this Regiment (all whose muster rolls were properly made out) were paid in Troy yesterday by Major Richardson. The remainder of the Regiment--Cos. D, F, G and K, with all the Officers, will be paid by him on Monday.

RETURN OF SYRASUCE MEMBERS of THE THIRD regiment.—About twenty of the original members of Captain--now Colonel—Butler's company of the 3d regiment New York Volunteers, arrived home Saturday evening, the regiment having been mustered out of the service and paid off at Albany on Friday. Capt. J. M. Wicks, who has commanded the company since the promotion of Capt. Butler, together with the other commissioned officers, remain in active service. Lieut. F. W. Stone, of the Third Regiment New York Volunteers, Col. Townsend, and who was wounded at the battle of Big Bethel, has been appointed to the Professorship of Rhetoric at Madison University, Hamilton village.

THIRD NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—The following are the field and staff officers of the Third New York Volunteers (formerly Col. Townsend's Regiment,) organized in this city at the commencement of the war, and now stationed at Fortress Monroe:—
Colonel--S. M. Alvord.
Lieutenant Colonel--H. P. Hubbell.
Major--Abel Smith, Jr.
Adjutant--F. W. Weaver.
Surgeon--C. W. Stearns.
Assistant Surgeon--J. J. Van Rensselaer.
Quartermaster--J. H. Chase.
Co. A--Capt. John G. Fay; Vacancies in commissioned offices.
Co. B--Capt. Alex Mann, 1st Lieut., J. D. Mabie, 2d Lieut., _____ Reeves.
Company C--Capt. R. G. Floyd, 1st Lt. Geo. W. Warren, 2d Lt. Geo. W. Street.
Co. D--Capt. vacant, 1st Lt. J. M. Wicks, 2d Lt. W. B. Chapman.
Co. E--Capt. vacant, 1st Lt. B. B. Whalen, 2d Lt. F. T. Johnson.
Co. F--Capt. W. N. S. Sanders, 1st Lt. T. Ellery Lord, 2d Lt. _____ Smith.
Co. G--Capt. J. H. Ten Eyck, 1st Lt. T. S. Seabury, 2d Lt. H. Middleton.
Co. H--Capt. L. Augustus Kohly, 1st Lt. vacant, 2d Lt. N. W. Davis.
Co. I--Capt., Geo. E. Mink, 1st Lt., vacant, 2d Lieut., M. Cooper.
Co. K--Capt. J. R. Mulford, 1st Lt. H. L. Couch, 2d Lt. E. C. Tuthold.
At evening parade, we learn that of late this regiment musters but twenty or thirty men to each company, so great have been the demands made upon it for details of guard and special details in and about Fortress Monroe. The outer wall of the Fortress encloses sixty five acres; the parade ground is twenty-five acres. The Fort mounts over 600 guns of the largest calibre, including the famous "Lincoln" and "Union" guns; the drill of the "Third" is as well in artillery as infantry, which makes their duties still more arduous. They number between 800 and 900 men, are well and comfortably quartered, and, in appearance and discipline, bear more the appearance of regulars in the army than volunteers. Although not in action, save at Big Bethel, their duties at Forts Mc-Henry and Federal Hill Baltimore, and now at the Fortress, are as great, if not greater than those of any regiment in the field.

HAVANA JOURNAL (May 23, 1863)
RETURN OF OUR SOLDIERS.
On Saturday last some thirty or thirty-five members of Captain Mulford's Company returned to their homes, in Havana, and vicinity. A telegram had
been received, about twelve hours before their arrival, announcing their departure from Albany; consequently, not less than 1,000 people were present to witness their return, and bid them hearty welcome; and, surely, they were received with all the joy that the heart is capable of expressing.
After being marched from the Depot to the front of the Montour House, by Marshal O. M. Clauharty, they listened to the following reception address from Adjutant Hull Fanton, to which the soldiers, together with the entire audience, gave the best of attention:
SERGEANT SEELEY AND SOLDIERS :—This is not the first time I have had the pleasure of meeting the members of this company, since you so nobly went forth, from this place, two years ago. How well I remember you, while camped on the Battery, in New York, looking away, with the ideas of "raw recruits," towards the then future of a soldier's life; How anxiously we watched, shortly thereafter, for every item of news from Big and Little Bethel, many, besides myself, can tell. With what pride and satisfaction we have followed you since, let us to-day signify and bear generous testimony.
We remember the fatherly pride of the veteran General who looked upon the regiment, of which you formed a part, with so much love. His satisfaction with your discipline, your valor and your deportment, is but an epitome of ours. It affords us pleasure to meet so many of you on your return to your homes, now that the time of your service has expired, even though this pleasure is tinged by the sad thought that all, who went forth with you have not returned. Wherever your services were required, there have you achieved renown for yourselves, and done honor to the place of your residence. The benefits conferred upon your country cannot be measured by words; and now, whether you decide to return to the pleasant pursuits of peaceful life; or to re-enlist in the defence of that common country, we shall most earnestly beseech the Almighty Protector, (the keeper of the soldier, as well as the citizen,) to bless and protect you all. Your well known zeal and promptness, at the first call for the defence of an imperrilled Union, ought, and does, call forth our warmest gratitude and most faithful recollection. And now, soldiers, here, at this time, we are charged, by the citizens of this village, men and women, to bid you welcome; and having had some little experience myself, I venture to say, that no reveille, tattoo, or taps, nor hostile cannon, nor deadly musketry, shall disturb you; that no guard or picket shall be mounted or sent forth, while they give you a further and more substantial token of welcome that these words of mine. Once more, officers and men of Co. K, in behalf of these, my fellow citizens, of Havana, I welcome you back to our midst.
Sergeant Wm. A. Seeley responded to Adjutant Fanton in an impromptu, brief, but fitting speech, which was justly and loudly applauded by the soldiers and citizens in attendance. Rev. Dr. Amos Brown, Rev. S. B. Shearer, and Peter Tracy, Esq., responded, briefly to calls from the audience, and were listened to with the utmost attention, only being interrupted by cheers, that, apparently could not be restrained. The speeches were interspersed with music by the Havana Brass and Martial Bands, and the firing of cannon.
At the conclusion of Mr. Tracy's remarks he announced to the soldiers that dinner was in readiness for them and their friends, and we hazard nothing in saying, that all who sat down at the table (80) were perfectly satisfied that
Sheriff Weaver "knows how to keep a hotel." Rev. C. H. Chester officiated at the table.
Dinner over, the soldiers went quietly to their homes to enjoy the society of their friends, from whom many of them had been absent over two years.
When we saw them departing, we thought:
" For gold the merchant ploughs the main,
The farmer ploughs the manor;
But glory is the sodger's prize,
The sodger's wealth is honor.
The brave poor sodger ne'er despise,
Nor count him as a stranger:
Remember he's his country's stay,
In day and hour o' danger."

DEM. UNION ASSOCIATION AT FLEMINGVILLE.
The Secretary, T. Elliott Royal, late of Co. H, 3d Regiment N. Y. Volunteers, sends us the following list of Officers of the Democratic Union Association recently organized at Flemingville:
President—Calvin Pritchard.
V. President—Lyman Stedman.
Secretary—T. Elliott Royal.
Treasurer—S. H. Pritchard.
Executive Committee—Nelson Brink,
Isaac Mead, Henry Phillips.

—On Thursday morning last, a man was found dead in an unfinished building in Hamilton st., Albany. Upon inquiry, it was ascertained that his name was James Durham, of this village, a returned volunteer of the Third Reg't N. Y. Vols. He was a segar maker by trade, and his age was about 30 years. His body was brought to this village on Thursday evening. His death was occasioned by a fall upon the timbers when he was intoxicated.

300 ABLE-BODIED MEN WANTED FOR THE THIRD INFANTRY REGIMENT, N. Y. V.
$263 BOUNTY FOR TWO YEARS SERVICE
$113 BOUNTY FOR ONE YEAR'S SERVICE
This old and favorite Regiment, now stationed at Fortress Monroe, Va., has been re-organized for the war. By special order from the War department, dated May 14th, 1863, re-enlistments for one and two years are authorized to be made for this Regiment only. Men re-enlisting with- in thirty days date of their discharge will receive the above Bounties. One Hundred and Ninety Dollars Bounty will be paid to new recruits enlisting for three years. Now is the time to join one of the best Regiments in the service. Good Rations, Clothing and Quarters furnished. Transportation to Regiment will be furnished upon enlistment.
Capt. Wm. N. S. Sanders, 52 State st., cor. Green.
Capt. Geo. E. Mink, 11 Washington Avenue.
Capt. Geo. W. Warren, 56 Washington T. Capt. Ellery Lord, 52 State st., cor. Albany, N. Y.
Recruiting Officers, 3d Infantry, N. Y. S. V.,
Albany, N. Y.

50 Able-Bodied Men Wanted For Co. A, 3d Infantry Reg't N. Y. S. V.
$263 Bounty for 2 Years' Service.
$113 Bounty for 1 Year's Service.
This old favorite regiment, now stationed at Fortress Monroe, Va., has been re-organized for the war. By special orders from the War Department, dated May 14, 1863, re-enlistments for one and two years are authorized to be made for THIS REGIMENT ONLY.
Men re-enlisting within 30 days from the date of their discharge will receive the above bounties.
$190 Bounty will be paid to new recruits enlisting for three years. Now is the time to join one of the best regiments in the service. John J. Fay.
Capt. Co. A, 3d Infantry, N. Y. V.
Office 145 Grand st., Williamsburgh, L. I.
CONTRABANDS.
The contrabands devote most of their time to fishing and washing—the men to the former vocation, the women to the latter. One of them seemed the owner of a skiff, and I applied to him for a passage to the Monitor. It was about ten A. M. Saturday. He was maunching away at a basket of cooked crabs—cracking the claws with his teeth, and drawing the food with his fingers, and paid little attention to my request; but finally informed me that he was eating his breakfast—that he had been fishing--or he would be more eager for a job—that I had better look farther—and I did.

UNCLE TOM.
" Uncle Tom" presides over the culinary department where I get my rations—the veritable old gentleman, probably, whose piety and ill-treatment have rendered him—through Mrs. Stow's quill--of literary fame, and thrown so many young ladies into the "melting mood." I have, no doubt, seen the veritable hero. He is "all that fancy painted him," and will pass you a piece of "dat ham," or a "biled tater," in the same tottering gait that he formerly toated Miss Eva through the orchard, and with the same trembling, aged, hand, that he stroked her head or led her to the garden.

THE DIVERS.
Capt. T. P. Wells, of Boston, with a party of divers, arrived here from Fortress Monroe this morning, in a sail vessel, to make examination preparatory to attempting to raise the sunken Cumberland. A diver descended to the hull of the vessel twice, and reports favorably; and also that the hull of the Merrimac is sound, the top only having been blown off in the attempt of the Rebels to harri karri the craft which committed such havoc upon members of the old navy, but whose career the Monitor checked. The boiler and engine are in good condition. The outside plating of the Merrimac is three inches in thickness; the inner, two inches.
Capt. Gerard Reynolds, 11th Pennsylvania cavalry, Company M, is Provost Marshal here. His company is stationed here, and has been since the 8th of March. I find him very obliging. He is recovering from a two weeks illness.
The 85th New York infantry, organized in Cattaraugus and Allegany counties, I discovered this (Sunday) morning out on inspection. The regiment numbers some 460 men—was in the seven days' battle on the Peninsula, and was badly cut up at Fair Oaks. Lieut. Butts, of the 85th, is the Post Quartermaster.
Four large steamers, under flags of truce, passed up the James river Friday, understood to be bound for City Point, some 70 miles up the river, to bring down released army prisoners. They did not appear to have any exchange prisoners on board.
The iron-clads here are constantly on the look-out, and fired up for Merrimac No. 2, or any other craft. A steamer from the Fortress visits them twice each day, probably to keep good the supply of cod and ammunition, receive reports, take orders and receive and deliver the mail.
Major Runyan, of the 11th Pennsylvania, in command here until recently, is superceded by Major King.
Lieut. Gage, of the 99th New York, is the Commissary's Assistant.
There is a colored school here, with colored teacher.
Chaplain Meech preaches Sunday afternoons.
Daniel Morse, nurse, from West Troy, N. Y. is in the 1st division, General Hospital.
E. C. Brayton, Corp. Co. B, 44th New York, is in the same division, doing well.
Wm. McCall, of Saratoga Springs, is the Ward Master in the same division.
Edwin T. Gillett, Albany, N. Y., detailed from the 3d Regiment to the Signal Corps, is in a hospital here, very low of typhoid.
I propose visiting the Monitor, Galena, Cumberland, and Congress, if the Rebels do not interfere with my arrangements, and will write you again.

LIFE AT NEWPORT NEWS--SUNDAY EVENING MEETING.
SEPTEMBER 15, 1862.
Learning that there would be a meeting held Sunday evening, I accepted an invitation and attended. The barracks—a room nearly 100 feet in length by 50 wide, formerly occupied, by troops, but now as a hospital mess room-- having a table through its entire length, on which was placed at intervals half a dozen lighted candles—were well filled. As many as three hundred persons were present, one-third colored, the remainder the invalid soldiers and those attached to the regiment stationed here, the 85th New York.
" Uncle Tom" opened the services by commencing singing in a familiar tune a long hymn, of which the following are two verses:
Jesus my all to heaven has gone.
I belong to the band, hallelejah:
Halleljah! Hallelujah!
I belong to the band, hallehujah!
'Twas late I heard my Saviour say,
I belong to the band, halleljah:
Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
I belong to the band, hallelujah!

The colored brethren and sisters joined in singing the hymn, and most of the audience in the chorus. The best of order prevailed, as much as at most any collection of worshippers. Rev. Mr. Meech, the Chaplain here, having come in, read a passage from the New Testament, dwelling upon the passage that a man must be born again to enter into the kingdom of heaven.
Uncle Tom followed, in prayer, repeating part of the passage read, and praying that all there might be born into the kingdom of heaven— concluding by commencing to sing,
And am I born to die.
Prayer was again offered by another of the colored members—closing by commencing the hymn,
And must this body die,
Prayer again by still another of the colored members--concluding by commencing to sing the hymn,
The voice of God regard.
A white person present, connected with the Sanitary Department I learned, then addressed the meeting, as well those connected with the service as the blacks, and then Rev. Mr. Meech, after appointing meetings for the week, pronounced the benediction, and the audience quietly dispersed, the colored portion singing as they left the house.
The prayers were remarkably intelligible and pointed. One colored person prayed fervently for the success of the Union troops. Indeed, I have heard less intelligent prayers offered in churches in the State of New York.

FUNERALS
On Sunday there were four burials. Just as I closed my former letter I heard the funeral march played, and going to the door of my quarters saw the funeral procession. Half a dozen bare-headed young darkeys came trotting along the avenue, then the drum corps, then two sections of the company to which the deceased belonged. The hearse followed, and then the members of the company. I joined the procession. The burial ground is about a mile east of the landing, and there are a number of newly made graves there. The brave men who were killed on the Cumberland and Congress, and whose bodies have been recovered, are there interred. Arriving at the grave, the company wheeled and halted. The chaplain officiated; the plain board coffin was lowered in the grave, and the body of Almer Perrin, of Willing, Allegany county, N. Y., rests at Newport News. He had been ill, had returned home, where he passed two months, returned again to his regiment in fall health, was again taken sick and died. Young Perrin is the first in Company H who has died of disease since the company left home, nearly a year ago. Sunday afternoon, Simon Howard, Co. K, 9th Mass., Calon Patterson, Co. I, 49th Penn., and George B. Ayare, wagoner, Porter's Corps, were buried in the same grounds.

SUNDAY.
At noon on Sunday, the stores along the beach, the post office, and all the places of business are closed. The colored population are not at all behind the white in the observance of Sunday. Here and there could be seen invalid soldiers, with crutch or cane, taking an airing, and Miss Dinah, in her Sunday rig, sporting hoops and heeled shoes, would occasionally display her ankles and long heels, while promenading with Master Sambo; but the quiet of a Connecticut Sunday prevailed, disturbed only by the "Tars" from the vessels in and about the harbor, who had ten hours' absence from ship. The barber's shop was closed. Neither oysters nor fish were being caught or sold. Bathing in the morning, walks upon the shore, and visits to the hospitals opened and closed the day. Five boats with exchanged prisoners came down the James River Saturday and Sunday.

FROM FORT MONROE.
(From Our Own Correspondent.)
FULL DETAILS OF THE BATTLE AT GREAT BETHEL.
FORT MONROE, Tuesday, June 11.
The eventful scenes of the two engagements of yesterday, one of them peculiar misfortunes to our troops, still form the great topic of interest here. I propose at present to furnish you further details than I could crowd into the hurried dispatch of yesterday, written amid the dust and din of the field.
The object of the whole affair was to check the marauding expeditions of a company of daring and dashing rebels who had recently made a frequent practice of descending to the very outposts at Hampton, seizing negroes, and pressing the Union whites into service, and firing upon our pickets. The expedition was under the control entirely of Brigadier General Pierce, and its ill success, if I may judge from the unanimous opinions I have since heard in camp, has done very little to awaken any confidence in his military abilities. The opinion seems to prevail that, had other and more experienced commanders undertaken the expedition, the stars and stripes would to-day have been floating over the batteries of Great Bethel, and another great step been accomplished toward the issue of this horrid war. I hear to-day reports that the unfortunate (to say the least) general will resign his position.

THE RECEPTION OF THE ORDER.
When the order came, Sunday evening about 10 o'clock, from headquarters, directing the immediate preparation of the troops for action, and announcing "an attack planned to-night," I had just returned with a company of Colonel Allen's men from an adventurous scouting expedition, about five miles out, to a large house where arms were reported to have been concealed in a private vault and a number of armed Secessionists awaiting the arrival of more to join them in an expedition against our outposts. Two runaway slaves (and, by the way, these "contrabands" make their thorough knowledge of the country exceedingly useful on such occasions), were our guides. We found the house and the secret vault, but neither arms nor armed secessionists, both having very evidently been recently removed.
Arriving in camp we found all busily engaged in preparing for the expedition, and elated at the prospect of an engagement, though not a soul of course knew where or how far they would be ordered, or what force they were to meet. Our scouting party, numbering about fifty, though wearied by marching and the excitement attendant upon the "sport," were all ready to prepare themselves, and quickly formed in the ranks. The regiments were ordered to take with them their fall equipments and rations for two days, and at 11 o'clock marched out four abreast, and ready to meet the foe in any quarter. They were marched to Hampton, three miles, and halted on this side the river. Col. Duryee's Regiment—the "red devils"--and Col. Townsend's Third regiment, had reached the point in advance, and were waiting their arrival.

THE TROOPS CROSSING HAMPTON RIVER.
All Sunday the Naval Brigade, under the direction of a company of United States marines, were engaged off Fortress Monroe practicing the management of eight or ten scows, each carrying twenty-four oars, and capable of transporting 130 men each, beside the rowers. When evening approached every oar-lock was carefully muffled, and the scows manned each by a coxswain and twenty-six rowers from the Naval Brigade. Under the darknees of the night, in regular file, and every oar striking in measured time, these transports glided out from the fort, and rowed in the harbor to the mouth of Hampton River, and up the bosom of the sleeping stream. At about midnight they were moored on the hither shore in Hampton, and just below the remains of the bridge destroyed in their retreat just two weeks since. The stream at that point is from sixty to one hundred yards in width. Two or three shots were fired by our own sentries upon the boats as they passed, as though a kind of preface to that enormous and melancholy blunder which, in an hour or two more, was to follow.
Thus when the regiments of Colonels Duryee, Allen, and Townsend arrived at the bank of the river, they found the means of transportation awaiting them, and in a few minutes Colonel Duryee's and Colonel Townsend's had crossed, and were on their march to Little Bethel Church, about five miles further on.

THE VILLAGE AND THE MARCH.
Colonel Allen's Regiment, not being deemed necessary for the approaching action, were ordered back to camp (three miles) as a reserved force, to march, however, early in the morning to Little Bethel.
The scene presented by the moving regiments, who passed on through the village, and then along the winding road beyond, in the dim gray twilight, while not a word was uttered or a sound heard save the heavy simultaneous tread of nearly four thousand feet, was impressive indeed.

RENDEZVOUS OF "CONTRABANDS."
The negroes, who are now almost the only inhabitants of the beautiful village, were filled with consternation when, in the darkness, they found the streets thronged with soldiers. "The secessionists is come," was whispered around, and they for a time believed their rendition to slavery, or, what they dread perhaps even more, a transportation to Norfolk to work upon secession batteries, impending. It has been the practice, for some time, of the band of rebels which this excursion was designed to break up, to descend upon these rendezvous of escaped slaves, capture as many as they can command at once, and conduct them to Norfolk. There they are treated with unprecedented cruelty, and forced to work upon the batteries. These invading attacks have made the lives of the poor fugitives one of constant terror, and no language can adequately describe their rejoicing when the troops were discovered to be "Unioners," as they call them.
I arrived at Hampton village at 6 o'clock A.M. with Col. Allen's Regiment, on their way to the scene of action. It is a beautiful little place, full of trees and pleasant dwellings, but is now almost inhabited by these runaway blacks. Leaving the residence of ex-President Tyler on the left, we arrived on the banks of the broad, placid stream that divides it. The greater part of the village is on the western side of the river. There the houses were literally thronged with negros, who looked on in terrified astonishment at the number of armed men tramping the street. Black forms of every sex, color, and size, and dark faces of every hue might be seen at the windows and doors and on the street corners. As we passed, the poor fellows raised their hats in profound respect, and the females bowed obsequiously. I paused at the only open store in the place, to procure stationery for notes of the expedition. I seated myself to write, and, in a few moments, the room was literally crowded with negroes—the most of them stalwart, able bodied men, who stared at me most unmercifully, though if I raised my eyes they were looking in quite another direction—the sly blackamoors. I could hear such whispers as, "No, he'm no secessioner!" "He'm Union sojer!" and many guesses or rather "reckons" as to the effect my writing might have upon them. Finally, I inquired how far it might be to Back River. In an instant every hat was raised: "Teee miles, massa!"
The throng were still indulging in speculations as to me employment, etc., when one of them approached me very formally, holding down before him his hat with both hands:
" Massa, dese colored peoples wants to know if you belongs to de Unioner Calvary?" My assurance to the contrary was followed by many appologies for asking so important a question, and assurances that they were "on the Unioner side."
At length a black woman came in very much affected. "Oh," said she, the tears meanwhile coursing down her cheeks, "I hope and pray de Lord for dese sojers, and dat dey may go on from conquer to conquer!"
Such is the prevalent feeling among them, and they understand well what the word liberty means, though they have never learned to read it. Not one of those before knew his letters.

THE FIRST ENGAGEMENT.
When we arrived at Hampton the most confused reports poured in upon us in regard to the engagement at Back River, about three miles further on. Col. Allen, after forming them in line of march, called his officers apart, charged them to depend upon their bayonets, and by no means to fire until the order came explicitly from him. If accounts were to be believed the secessionists had assembled in enormous force, and were hewing Colonel Townsend's regiment into pieces. Forty of his soldiers had deserted and fled in confusion back to Hampton, where they were arrested by a company of McChesney's regiment of Zouaves, and their arms taken from them and stacked by the roadside. Among the deserters was the entire band, and the wildest excitement at the news of the battle, and indignation at the conduct of Colonel Townsend's retreating prevailed. Colonel Allen's regiment pressed rapidly on to the succor of those who still maintained the fight.

THE FIGHT BETWEEN THE THIRD AND SEVENTH (STEUBEN GUARDS) REGIMENTS.
Gen. Pierce's plans for the attack yesterday, if he had any, have not yet been made known. The following are the facts of the first engagement, and a sketch, which your correspondent completed soon after upon the spot.
Three companies of each—from the Seventh, N. Y., Fifth, Mass., and First, Vermont—were to march in from Newport News, and join the Third Regiment and Fifth Regiment, New-York, at the junction of the two routes, just beyond Back River. The detachments of the Vermont and Massachusetts troops preceded the detachment of the Steuben Guards (Seventh), and, arriving at the appointed place, proceeded on toward Great Bethel Church. Soon after (about 2 o'clock in the morning), Col. Bendix's detachment reached the forks. Strange to say, they heard the Third Regiment coming up, and, instead of recognizing them or preparing to hail them, immediately commenced an ambush in the angles of the road, planting their howitzers for a raking fire down the road. As the Third approached, they were preceded by
Gen. Pierce and his staff. In an instant, without any premonition to the advancing regiment, Col. Bendix's men opened a most distressing fire of musketry, and a few minutes after, poured in from the howitzers. At the instant, Gen. Pierce turned and fled to the rear, while the whole regiment, believing the discharge to come from secession forces, were thrown into confusion. About one hundred of them turned like the brigadier-general and fled. They escaped back over the road, about forty arriving at Hampton, where as already stated, they were taken prisoners. With great difficulty, Col. Townsend succeeded in rallying the remainder of his men for the action, though the shot was not returned with very great vigor. The charges by Col. Bendix's men were repeated and lively. At length, a suspicion was aroused on Col. Townsend's part, that their opposers in the way were not rebels but another branch of the same expedition. The wounded were gathered up (at the close of the encounter, about fifteen in number), and carefully carried to a house back a short distance by the roadside.
The firing from Col. Bendix continued at intervals until the dawning light revealed about the dame time to each of the regiments the startling fact that they bore the same colors. A meeting of most touching sadness followed between the two commanders, and caring partially for the wounded in the melancholy affray, they proceeded together on the way toward Little Bethel. Col. Duryee's Zouaves, who were even in advance of the Massachusetts and Vermont detachments, hearing the heavy firing began to turn back, supposing that a troop of secession cavalry were engaging Col. Townsend's regiment. By this delay, the object of the whole expedition was probably lost. Had the whole expedition rushed on as intended, an advance guard of the rebel forces at York would have been captured at Little Bethel, and the alarm being cut off, the surprise would have been complete at Great Bethel as anticipated.
As it was, the two hundred were driven hastily forward to Great Bethel, dispatches for reinforcements were sent to Yorktown, and when our troops approached their masked fortifications the enemy were ready to give them a warm reception, and, as it proved, a successful repulse.

WHY MORE WERE NOT KILLED AT THE FIRST ENGAGEMENT.
It would seem strange that after the rapid and heavy firing of Col. Bendix's regiment, only one was killed on the opposite side and twenty-one (official) wounded. This is only accounted for from the fact of the protecting position, though seemingly exposed one, occupied by Col. Townsend's regiment. The road at the point held by them is cut, being some two feet lower in its level than the fields adjoining. Townsend's men thus falling upon the ground and in the ditches by the roadside, and the principal fire coming at an angle with the road, instead of raking directly down it, they were able to escape much of it. The firing, too, from the howitzers, is said to have mostly been at such a defective range that the grape and shell were thrown nearly a mile and one half over and beyond them. Most terrible must have been the consequences but for these providential defences.

THE SCENE AT HAMPTON—THE DEAD CARTS.
Hampton, at 6 o'clock in the morning was wild with excitement. The cannonading had been heard, and the action was supposed to be pending between the secession and Union forces. Col. Allen's men, who were just arriving, were anxious to press on and join in the battle, and soon the command to "march" was followed by a quick movement on toward the scene. Next came Col. Carr's Second Regiment, with their havelock caps, rowing as rapidly as possible across the river, and then rushing out to the conflict. It was not till sometime after, when the first dead cart arrived, laden with the wounded, that the real nature of the engagement was understood, and the sad fact revealed that our own arm, had been employed against our own men. People rushed to the side of the cart, which, like all those employed for the purpose, was drawn by a little donkey, and gazed surprised and tearfully into the features of the wounded soldiers, and inquired of the driver the issue of the battle. The bodies were carefully removed on mattresses to an oar boat prepared and armed for the purpose, and then conveyed across the stream to the opposite shore, where a temporary hospital had been prepared. Soon another cart made its appearance, bearing one wounded and one dead soldier, and then several others in succession, until all were taken across or rowed around to the fort.

PRISONERS TAKEN—A HOUSE BURNED.
Great Bethel Church is about nine miles from Hampton, and hither the expedition pressed, arriving at between 11 and 12 o'clock. On their way they had routed the advance guard at Little Bethel, and taken three prisoners, Capt. A. Whiting and two privates, who were sent back under guard. Report says that thirty secessionists were taken prisoners by our troops yesterday.
Your correspondent regrets that he is unable to find this report substantiated. The above is probably correct.
From a beautiful country dwelling house, not far out from Little Bethel, shots were fired upon the passing troops. The orders from Gen. Butler are to spare no house from which a shot is fired, but to burn it down at once. This order was put in effect and soon the beautiful house was in flames and the secession soldiers, who probably fired from it had escaped to the woods.

THE SECOND ENGAGEMENT.
Col. Duryee's men were still ahead, and the troops were approaching in the direction indicated by the following sketch:….

As they approached, the mortars on the upper battery and the heavy rifled cannon commanding the road opened upon them from behind their masks, like a volley of thunderbolts. Fortunately for our soldiers the aim was defective and the missiles carried nearly a mile and one half beyond the position the troops occupied. Then came a discharge of musketry, answered to strongly by regiments right of the road, and the battle was fairly opened. The scene was awful, beyond all powers of description. It seemed as if earth and heaven were shaken. Still our men flinched not an inch. General Pierce was astonished and surprised to such a degree that, for a time, the command was unattended. The colonels counseled his action, and he assented to their proposals in such a manner that they made their movements, each regiment pretty much at will. Had the sides been flanked, I am informed by military men, the batteries might have been quite easily carried by charge. The field pieces, two 12-pound and one 6-pound howitzers, were soon located nearly as in the sketch, and opened upon the enemy, soon silencing one of their guns. The cannonading and musketry still continued. The effect was frightful. Thunders belched from the mouths of the batteries, and heavy balls ploughed the earth, and scathed and shivered the trees in every direction.

SHOT FROM THE RIFLED CANNON.
After each discharge from the battlements, the leaves and limbs fell from the trees like rain, and the musketry rattled among the limbs like hailstones. In the road the fire from the rifled cannon was especially terrific. The troops were able to dodge the balls, but they plowed the hard earth all in furrows, besprinkling the soldiers with dust. The day was very hot and many of the soldiers had been very much exposed and were not fresh for the action. The sun poured down a broiling heat; and the enemy showers of canister and grape, bombs and schrapnel, and whizing, whirling masses of iron that made the very air to groan. Their commander was inefficient, and their colonels had no right to act save in obedience to him. Yet with all these discouragements they pressed upon the works with great effect, and stood their ground manfully. Great credit is especially due to the First Regiment, under Col. Allen, and the Fifth, under Col. Duryee, who bore the principal part of the fire. Meantime a dispatch had been sent to Yorktown for aid, and Col. Magruder and a large force had arrived. The shots told of a skillful hand and a well trained gunnery. Our men avoided them as best they could by dodging and the protection of the trees. At length a company of cavalry attempted to sally forth front the battery. Capt. Kilpatrick of Co. H, Fifth Regiment, shot one from his horse, and the troop retired without crossing the bridge over the bayou.
Col. Townsend proved the hero of the fight. Undaunted, he rushed before his men when the bullets and grape flew fast and thick, and urged them on. The ignominy which a portion of his men had suffered from their disgraceful conduct in the early part of the day seemed to have inspired him with a desperate courage though all his movements—the theme of general admiration—were as cool as they were brave and courageous.
Captain Kilpatrick, with a company of Zouaves, at one time made a rush across the bayou, and nearly under the very mouth of the cannon. He was subsequently slightly wounded by a ball, which at the same instant shot an epaulette from Col. Duryee's shoulder.

THE RETREAT.
The men were wearied and exhausted with heat, excitement, and fatigue. The general had given an order upon which they could effect the purpose of the attack and, at 2 o'clock the order was given to retreat. But very little disorder existed among the regiments as they wheeled off, the Fifth taking the lead, and the First bringing up the rear, having not broken ranks a single time while on the field. Those regiments on the left retired in the cover of a house standing near by. The rear of the entire force was covered by the howitzers, which charged upon the pursuing cavalry until they fell back toward the batteries.
A terrible expectation that the enemy had sent a force to flank them during the action, and cut them off on the retreat, was quite generally entertained, and might have been easily accomplished. The wounded and dead, with a few exceptions, had been gathered up, and were carried by the weary retreating force and in the baggage wagons. One baggage wagon, containing 17,000 cartridges and 200 muskets, besides the tools of the sappers and miners, came near being left behind to fall into the hands of the enemy. Nothing, I believe, was lost except a few knapsacks and broken muskets.
The retreat was necessarily very slow and tedious, many almost falling back and with difficulty made to keep their places. All expected that the rebels had flanked around into Hampton and would fight them at the ferry.
The disheartening news of the retreat arrived at Hampton long before the troops and the ferry transports were all moored along the shore by the order of Gen. Butler, who was on the Monroe-ward side of the stream. When at last the poor soldiers came in and saw their way safe, a shout of joy sprang from the ranks and many of them sang most heartily. The march to Washington was soon accomplished and the events of the day were over.
I reserve many thrilling incidents of the battle for my next, on account of the prolixity which my account has already attained.

LIST OF KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING.
Killed.
Orderly Sergeant Goodfellow, Company D, First Regiment; right side carried away by a cannon ball.
George Baxter, drummer First Regiment band; died last night of wounds in the thigh.
George E. Tibout, Company E, Fifth Regiment.
James Griggs, Company H, Fifth Regiment.
David Treforth, Company I, Fifth Regiment; shot in the left side and arm.
Patrick White, Company I, Fifth Regiment.
Daniel Mooney, Company E, Second Regiment; body left on the field.
Lieutenant Greble, Fourth Artillery, regular service; left side of skull carried away by a cannon ball.


Wounded.
John Larkin, Co. E, Second Regiment, struck by a shell in the arm. Fragment not yet extracted.
Adolph Richards (or Vincent), of Co. A, Fifth Regiment; slightly.
John L. Taylor, Co. B, Fifth Regiment; slightly.
Corporal Drinkerhoff, Co. E, Fifth Regiment; slightly.
John Brocher, Co. D, Fifth Regiment; slightly.
Edward Moore, Co. D, Fifth Regiment, slightly.
James Knowles, Co. E, Fifth Regiment; right hand shot off by cannon ball, hanging only by small pieces of intgeument. A comrade amputated it with a pocket knife.
L. W. Cartwright, Co. D, Fifth Regiment; not dangerously.
Capt. KIlpatrick, Co. H, Fifth Regiment; left leg slightly wounded.
Corporal Cowen, Co. H, Fifth Regiment; dislocation of shoulder.
John Dunn, Co. H, Fifth Regiment; right arm lost.
Corporal James H. Cochran, Co. H, Fifth Regiment; slightly.
John H. Conway, Co. A, Fifth Regiment; slightly.
First Sergeant William McGuffin, Co. C, Second Regiment; badly contused wound in back.
Besides fourteen reported yesterday. These, and those very slightly wounded, swell the number to 71.

Missing.
George Mason, Co. G, Second Regiment.
Sergeant Hopper, Co. C, Fifth Regiment.
Allen Dodd, Co. I, Fifth Regiment.
Daniel Mooney, Co. E, Second Regiment.

No reports are yet obtained from Colonel Bendix's regiment, who suffered severely in the first engagement, nor from the detachments at Newport News. I visited the hospitals to-day. The wounded are carefully provided for, and under the best of surgical and medical treatment.
It was rumored to-day that an attempt was to be made to-night, with heavy artillery, to take the Bethel batteries.

NEW-YORK CITY.
List of Killed, Wounded and Missing in the Third (Albany) Regiment, N. Y. V.
The following is a complete list of the casualties in the Third (Albany) Regiment:
KILLED.
J. W. Randall, Co. B; W. S. Bates, Co. I; S. Armstrong, Co. K; J. A. West, Co, K.

WOUNDED.
Lieut.-Col. E. G. Floyd. Capt. H. L. Couch.
Company A—Sergeant A. Hineson, Sergeant D. Leary, A. Brown, E. L. McBride, E. Casgro.
Company B—Corporal J. Creech, S. Dorimus, J. Murphy.
Company C—Sergt. J. Ryall, Corporal A. Walker, C. Moizer, F. Creigan, R. T. Bond, T. Passenger, W. Mickle.
Company D--J. Boyd, E. Griffen, J. Saxe, H. Crameil, E. H. Harrington, J. Callahan, R. Curtin.
Company E—Sergeant P. Nolan, Sergeant T. B. Dailey, D. Brassman, A. Kennedy, J. Doyle, J. Holland, G. N. Barber, O. O. Bolland, J. Riley.
Company F—Sergeant J. Van Kuran, E. Tisdell, W. H. Hull, J. Pangburn, J. H. Dally, P. Stratton.
Company G—J. H. Deitzel, A. Earing, W. H. Tadden, W. A. Lack.
Company H--Corporal J. Scrafford, A. Springsteed, C. Mosher, R. T. Bangton.
Company K— Sergt. A. M. Stramp, J. Walker, W. C. Paucher, T. Mooney (slight), J. Matthews.

MISSING.
Sergeant J. C. Spaulding, Co. D; Sergeant B. D. Todd, Co. H; W. H. Davis, Co. D; W. Tiffiney, Co. D; A. F. Kenter, Co. F; J. Sherman, Co. E.

TOTAL.
Killed 4
Wounded 52
Missing 6
Total 62

WHAT THE OLD THIRD REGIMENT HAS BEEN DOING. Correspondence of the Albany Evening Journal.
BERMUDA HUNDRED, Va., May 21.
The Old Third left Folly Island, S. C., April 18, and since that time have been knocking about all over, paying a flying visit to Gloucester Point, Va.; also, to West Point; making a reconnoissance to within a few miles of King William Court House, then embarking on board transport and skating up James river, landing with the balance of our corps (the Tenth and the Eighteenth) a few miles above City Point. The place is called Bermuda Hundred, and is about six miles below our camp. Our brigade is known as the First Brigade, commanded by Colonel Samuel M. Alford, and consists of the Third, Eighty-ninth, One Hundred and Seventeenth and One Hundred and Forty-second New York Volunteers, and Fortieth Massachusetts. We are in the Second Division, which is commanded by Brigadier General J. H. Turner, Tenth Corps, commanded by Major General Q. A. Gillmore. Since our arrival here, we have seen a good share of fighting, having been engaged in three brushes in five days—on the 12th, 14th and 16th inst. We sustained a loss in the regiment during the engagements of fifty wounded, five killed and seven missing. But two officers were hit. Colonel Floyd, hit in the left leg, below the knee, fracturing the bone slightly. He will not have to lose the leg, but will not be able to assume command of his regiment for a long time.
Captain H.L. Couch was shot in the left arm, during a charge, and the arm was amputated above the elbow. We had but about two hundred and eighty-five men in the regiment when we left camp. We carried everything before us, until the morning of the 16th when the enemy, under cover of a dense fog, flanked the right of our line, getting in the rear of Heckman's Brigade, of the Eighteenth Corps, and desperate fighting ensued along our whole line. The enemy had been heavily reinforced during Sunday and Sunday night, and bore down upon us in overwhelming numbers. Our right was broken, a great portion of Heckman's Brigade taken prisoners, and the line on the right began to waver. Our regiment was then ordered to move forward, and to the right, forming line, right resting on an angle of earthwork, and left against some old log barracks, there to rally the troops that had broken, and were retreating in confusion. We had but just commenced such operations, when General Turner ordered us to charge across the open field and regain the works that our retreating forces had just abandoned, and which was then occupied by a regiment six hundred strong of the enemy, as admitted by prisoners taken. With cheer after cheer, the regiment moved forward, and soon gained the line, under a murderous fire of musketry and artillery, driving the enemy and capturing a number of prisoners.
It was about half an hour after that that the enemy broke the lines on our right, and got a flank and enfilading fire on us. We soon received orders from the General to fall back upon a line of earthworks, which was done, under a galling fire from the enemy, our flank and rear being exposed. We had but just gained the works, when orders were received to join the column, which was falling back slowly, fighting every inch of the ground. It was somewhat discouraging to us, after having gained their outer works and within seven miles of the Rebel Capital and two from Drury's Bluff, to march to camp. But I am not supposed to know, and must take it for granted, that the desired object was gained. We have not had much rest since our arrival in camp; late on the night of the 16th. Just gave us time to clean up the 17th, when "Johnny Rebs" came down to pay us a visit. I was in hopes that it would be but a flying visit, but they seem desirous to prolong their stay, no matter how much they discommode us. We were under arms the night of the 17th, but there was nothing but skirmishing. The 18th we were ordered up to the support of Gen. Terry, on the extreme right, and remained there, without being engaged, until about 7 P. M., when we were marched to camp, with orders to turn out and form line preparatory to moving and occupying the same position at 2 1/2 A. M. At the appointed hour we were in motion, and no engagement being brought on, we returned to camp at 11 A. M. The night of the 19th, at about 12 o'clock, heavy skirmishing commenced on our right and left centre, rapidly increasing until volley after volley of musketry fell upon the ear, and the thundering of artillery added not a little to the excitement. Our Brigade was ordered to hold themselves in readiness to march at a moment's notice. After about an hour's severe fighting, there was a lull, and everything remained quiet until about 10 A. M., when the ball again opened, right smart. The Brigade was ordered to the front, where it remains yet, 12 M, the 21st. None of the Brigade has been engaged except the Eighty-ninth and One Hundred and Forty-second New York, who were sent out on the line deployed as skirmishers. The former lost 7 men wounded, and the latter about 25 killed and 40 wounded. The fighting became desperate, as the day advanced, and it was thought that a general engagement would be brought on.
The Rebels charged on different parts of our lines during yesterday eleven times, and were repulsed each time with great slaughter. They were infuriated with liquor--several prisoners captured being quite intoxicated. They must have lost yesterday at least two-thousand killed, wounded and prisoners, while ours was less than one-sixth that number—probably will not exceed two hundred and fifty. We captured nearly five hundred prisoners, among them Gen. Walker, a Major General, I believe—who was brought in mortally wounded, being shot in four places, while leading his command to a charge. He conversed and shook hands with Gen. Gillmore, and wished to see Gens. "Baldy" Smith and Terry before he died. The firing almost entirely ceased last night at dark, and naught occurred to disturb our slumbers, except the occasional firing of artillery to let the enemy know that we were not all asleep. This morning a skirmish ensued for about a quarter of an hour, when musketry firing ceased, and nothing but artillery duels are going on now, which do not seem to be very fierce.
I have not been out with the regiment since yesterday morning, being detailed as Brigade and Field Officer of the Day. I asked to be relieved this morning, but have not been as yet.
With many regards for your welfare, I remain, very respectfully, G. W. W.

THE LATE CAPT. JAY M. WICKS.
The Death of this Gallant Officer—Resolutions of the Officers of the Third N. Y. Volunteers. Capt., Third N. Y. Vols. Near Richmond, Va., Nov. 6, 1864.
To the Editor of the Saratoga Journal:
We regret to have to announce the death of Capt. Jay M. Wicks, of Syracuse, N. Y., who was mortally wounded during the reconnoisance of the Army of the James on the 27th ult. In the early part of the day Capt. Wicks, who, for some time past, has commanded the Third Regiment of Infantry of N. Y. Vols., was sent out to take charge of the skirmish line covering the front of his brigade. While urging forward his troops, he exposed himself so freely as to become a mark for the enemy's sharpshooters and was pierced through the breast with a rifle ball. He was taken to Fort Monroe, and no resource of medical skill was left untried which could favor his recovery, but the wound proved fatal. He died on the 30th of October. On hearing of his death a meeting of the officers and men of the Third Regiment was held at which the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, Providence has seen fit to remove our commanding officer, Capt. Jay M. Wicks, from this his chosen field of honor and of usefulness,
Resolved, That while regretting in his death the loss of a brave and beloved commander, we can proudly testify that he fell at the front, gallantly fighting the battles of his country.
Resolved, That, in Jay M. Wicks, the Union has lost a noble son, a thorough patriot, and a true soldier; and the officers and men of his command a faithful leader, a kind-hearted friend, and a brilliant example.
Resolved, That the entire regiment extends its earnest sympathies to his bereaved family upon which the heavy blow has fallen, and prays that the same Omnipotent hand which has thus afflicted may sustain them.
Resolved, That in testimony of our affection and respect for the deceased, the regimental colors be draped, and the usual badge of mourning worn for thirty days. A copy of these resolutions be transmitted to the family of the deceased, and that they be published in the Syracuse and Albany newspapers.
Capt. James H. Reese, Pres't,
Thomas C. O'Brien, Lieut. and R. Q. M., Sec'y.

FRIDAY EVENING, SEPT. 1,A 1865.
ARRIVAL OF THE THIRD NEW YORK VETERAN
VOLUNTEERS--This old Albany Regiment, which left the city in May, 1861, under command of Colonel Fred Townsend, reached this city this morning, and was received and fittingly entertained by the Citizens' Committee.
The Regiment went out 800 strong, and recruited during its first term some 200 men. It reorganized for the war at Fortress Monroe in 1863, about 200 re-enlisting, and the Ninth New York (Hawkins' Zouaves) being consolidated with it. From this source, it received about 400 men, making its total strength at the beginning of its service as a veteran Regiment about 800. It has since received some 700 conscripts and 200 recruits. It returns with 630 men and 20 officers. During its first term of service (two years) the regiment did garrison duty at Forts McHenry, Federal Hill and Marshall, Baltimore, Md., and at Fortress Monroe, Va., where it was stationed at the time of its re-organization.
It has participated in the following battles:
Big Bethel, Suffolk, Va., Siege of Longstreet, Hanover Junction, Siege of Charleston and Wagner, S. C.; Swift Creek, Proctor's Creek, Drury's Bluff, Cold Harbor, Petersburgh Heights, Bermuda Hundred, in front of Petersburgh, Petersburgh MIne, Fort Gilmer, Chapin's Farm, Darbytown Roads, first and second Fort Fisher and Wilmington, N. C.
The regiment has achieved an enviable fame for bravery, devotion and endurance. At Fort Gilmer four color bearers were wounded, and all the color guard killed or wounded. At Fort Fisher the State Color which it carried was the first regimental color hoisted on the works. It was carried by Color-Sergeant F. O. Wallace. All the officers in the regiment have been promoted for heroic conduct, especially in the capture of flags.
The following is a list of the officers:—
Lieutenant Colonel— G. W. Warren, commanding.
First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant—S. C. Pitt.
First Lieutenant and Regimental Quartermaster—T. C. O'Brien.
Company A--Captain, G. H. Dixon; Second Lieutenant, A. M. Green.
Company B—First Lieutenant, Peter Oakes.
Company C—Captain, James Ryall.
Company D--Captain, G. E. Fordham; First Lieutenant, J. T. Williams; Second Lieutenant, A. Cobb.
Company E—First Lieutenant P. McDermott.
Company F—Captain, G. E. Avent; First Lieutenant, W. H. Wright; Second Lieutenant, Benj. F. Whipple.
Company G—Captain, E. A. Behan.
Company H—First Lieutenant, M. J. Brown.
Company I—Captain, J. W. Knowles; First
Lieutenant,_____ Hawley; Second Lieutenant,
Charles A. McKevitt.
Company K—Capt. E. W. Raynsford.
The Lieutenant-Colonel went out as a private in the First Vermont. All the officers, also, entered the service as privates, and have risen to their respective positions by the force of their own energy and patriotism. All honor to them and the brave men whom they command.
Brevet Major-General J. E. Mulford, Commissioner of Exchange of Prisoners, is Colonel of the Regiment, but has not been with it since 1862.
He is retained in service.
T. Ellery Lord, Chief Commissioner of Musters of the Department of Virginia, is Major of the Regiment. He has been breveted Lieutenant- Colonel of Volunteers, and is retained temporarily in service. The boys will remain at the barrackes until paid off.

OBITUARY.
Thomas Campbell, late of Albany, and a private of Company C, Third Regiment Infantry, N. Y. V., was instantly killed near Petersburg, Va., on the 8th of July, 1864, by the explosion of a mortar shell. At a meeting held by the members of his Company, in the intrenchments , on the 20th of July, 1864, the; following preamble and resolution were unanimously adopted:
Wheras, It has pleased the Almighty to remove suddenly from among us our beloved comrade, Thomas Campbell, whose long association with us has deepened every sentiment into the warmth of earnest attachment; therefore Resolved, That while bowing to this dispensation of an Allwise Providence, we sincerely mourn over the decree which has thus cut him off in the flower of his youth, and in the mids of his usefulness.
Resolved, That in him our country has lost a true soldier, always faithful in the discharge of his duties and unflinching in the hour of danger; his family an affectionate son and brother; and we a worthy example, and an associate who had endeared himself to us by his many virtues and by the open frankness of his character.
Resolved, That to the relatives of the deceased we tender our heartfelt condolence in this, their sad bereavement, and implore for them the consolation of Him who "doeth all things well," and who holds in his hands the lives and destinies of all.
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be transmitted to the family of the deceased and that they be published in the Albany Evening Journal and the Albany Knickerbocker.
Committee—Sergeant J. W. Knowles, Privates
Geo. C. Scott, E. G. Palmer, T. O.
Waters, Lewis Desch, Nathaniel J. Palmer,
John P. Randall.
Capt. Geo W. Warren, Pres. Corp. A. D. K. Palmer, Sec.

 

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