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48th Regiment
New York Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

Operations at Morris' Island.
It seems that Gen. Gilmore has repeated the tactics with which he reduced Fort Pulaski. A correspondent writes as follows concerning the operations against Morris Island and Fort Sumter:
"Morris Island is separated from Folly Island by a narrow channel called Lighthouse Inlet. On this point of land, for the last few weeks, our troops have been busily engaged in building sand batteries and mounting guns right under the noses of the rebels, and within 800 guns of their works on Morris Island. The work was all performed under cover of the night, and so quietly that the rebels had no suspicion of our movements.—Screened from observation by the nature of the ground, hundreds of men were engaged night after night, silently and industriously throwing up earthworks and mounting heavy guns so near to the enemy that a loud word might have revealed the work. Shortly before daybreak brush would be so disposed as to conceal the work of the previous night, without exciting the suspicions of the enemy. The morning light would dawn upon a quiet and deserted scene—not a soul to be seen—not a sound to be heard—not a thing to indicate offensive operations that the night had concealed. In this manner batteries were thrown up, and forty-six guns and mortars put in position. So quietly and secretly were these operations carried on, that the intelligence of an attack about to be made on Morris Island was startling even to us. We were unprepared for the activity and energy displayed by Gen. Gilmore.

THE ATTACK.
At daybreak on the morning of the 10th the brush and boughs which had served to conceal the battery on Folly Island from observation were hastily removed and the guns exposed to the enemy. At 8 o'clock the first gun was heard from our battery, and it was soon followed by a succession of rapid shots, which told that the action had fairly commenced. Gen. Gilmore and his staff watched the contest from a high lookout, situated in the rear of the battery and out of range of the enemy's shells, while around and grouped upon the rising ground stood crowds of officers. The battery was screened from view by a grove of trees, but the incessant cannonade and the dense white smoke, which rose like a cloud in the air and above the tall pines, told how fearfully the contest raged.
The firing had continued for two hours without intermission, when three of our iron-clads were seen to approach the land and open an  enfilading fire on the right, and, soon after, four navy launches, which had made their way through the creek, opened on the left.
About this time the report came from the front that the first fire had dismounted one of the enemy's guns. The gratifying intelligence passed from mouth to mouth, and we grew elated with hopes of victory. Soon after this the fire from the enemy's battery slackened, and the signal was given for the force lying in the creek to land and attack. The men, impatient of delay, rushed forward with a shout to the first line of rifle pits where the enemy made but a slight resistance, and retreated in disorder. Our troops succeeded in surrounding a portion of them, and took 96 prisoners, including several officers. Those that managed to escape fled to the other end of the island, and took refuge in Fort Wagner.
The slow and laborious work of crossing artillery in a scow was now commenced, and the scene on the beach became confusing. Every preparation had been made, however, and no time was lost in following up our advantage. The troops were pushed forward, while the iron-clads proceeded to the other end of Morris Island and opened on Ft. Wagner, before the enemy had time to breathe freely again. The fort replied briskly, and the cannonading lasted until nightfall. In the meantime the artillery and infantry were still crossing the narrow channel which separates the two islands, and the returning boats took back the wounded. There were not many of them, thank God! What our loss was in this attack I was not able to ascertain. It is supposed to be not more than 30 or 40 killed and wounded.
An inspection of the enemy's works proved them to be very strong and well calculated for defense. Along nearly the whole length of the island nature has thrown a cluster of hills which rise in some places to a height of 50 or 60 feet. Upon these hills, which form an irregular earthwork, are mounted nine guns and three mortars. The guns appeared to be chiefly of heavy calibre, one being a Whitworth breech-loading piece of English manufacture. None of the guns were spiked—an indication of extreme haste on the part of the rebels.

THE ASSAULT.
The next day dawned upon our trrops [sic] in position, and shortly after daylight the order was given to attack. The men advanced on the fort, the 7th Connecticut in line of battle, the 76th Pennsylvania and 9th Maine in close column, but when within a few hundred feet of the battery they were met with a hot fire of grape and canister. The order was given to lie down to escape the murderous hail. Soon the order "Forward" was given, and the 7th Connecticut rushed impetuously forward, and by their dauntless and irresistible bravery gained the parapet of the fort. It was the work of but a moment, and the fort was in our hands,—and had the men who obstinately stood and battled upon the parapet been supported, they could have held the ground their bravery had secured, but—I regret to record it—the Pennsylvania and Maine Volunteers hung back, and their momentary indecision decided the fortunes of the fight. The Connecticut men had to give way, and what promised to be a victory was turned into a repulse, and our troops retired in confusion under a destructive fire from the fort. Our loss I could not accurately ascertain, but it is estimated at not more than 150 killed, wounded and missing.
Fort Wagner and the Cummings Point batteries must fall into our hands. It is merely a question of time. Cummings Point is within 1,250 yards of Fort Sumter. You can imagine that the position, in the hands of a man of Gen. Gilmore's wonderful engineering skill, would be promising of result which would startle the North, even amid the events now stirring in the vicinity of Washington.
Our iron-clads have been struck a number of times by well-directed shots from the Fort, but they have received no serious damage, and their reputation for invulnerability is sustained.

Our Fort Pulaski Correspondent.
FORT PULASKI,
Savannah River, Georgia,
June 18th, 1863.
To the Editor of the Brooklyn City News:
To-day the 48th was paid for four months—our late Commander Gen. Gilmore came up and we met him at the south dock saluting him with eleven guns from the Fort. It is now decided that the 48th move in a few days to Charleston or rather near that city, on Foley Island, perhaps to see severe service again. You doubtless have received the official accounts of the capture of the Savannah ram Atlanta, formerly called the Fingal. I saw the smoke of the guns and heard the cannonading. Our steamer, Island City, would have captured two small steamers loaded with ladies had she been up a little sooner for she had on board two brass howitzers while the excursionists had no guns, but on seeing the condition the celebrated, and much dreaded powerful ram was in, shifted their rudder right about for Savannah. The ladies and the soldies [sic] had danced togther [sic] all night at a ball in honor of the glorious trip they expected to take through batteries and iron-clads to Charleston and then back on railroad car to Savannah. If a rebel had deserted through their ranks from Richmond of course you heard the news the same day, but most likely you received it by Fortress Monroe, via. Washington.                       Will. Watkins.

Letters from the People.
The Heroes of Brooklyn.
To THE EDITOR OF THE BROOKLYN CITY NEWS:
Brooklyn has every cause to be proud of the men she has sent to the field. The officers and men of every Regiment that has left Brooklyn, have acquitted themselves with honor, and reflect credit on our city. Our latest laurels have been won by General Spinola, who, with the Excelsior Brigade charged the Wapping Heights, and carried then in the face of a heavy fire. So says a Brooklyn cotemporary. True, and "bully" for Spinola.—But, gentlemen, in our admiration for our personal friends, don't let us overlook the brave deeds and noble conduct of other officers and Regiment; issuing from Brooklyn. As yet, I have seen no mention of the daring acts and splendid conduct of the gallant 48th, of Brooklyn. Their landing on Morris Island, together with other Regiments, is one of the finest pictures of the whole war, and especially on this occasion did the 48th stand out in bold relief, on the foreground of this historical group. It was their orders to be the third Regiment to land, and as the swarm of boats pulled up to the shore, filled with men, looking in the face a brazen-faced battery filled to its teeth with grape and canister, the word was given for the Brigade to land. They hesitated. The gallant Col. Barton, of the 48th, shouted, "Land, men!" and like a shower of grape they were upon the beach, the first, not the third, charged upon the battery, and took it. The noble Barton received a bad wound in the hip, and is now at his residence, Oxford st., Brooklyn.
Another picture, unsurpassed for daring and military precision: "One day, during the erection of our works on Morris Island, the 48th was detailed to mount some heavy mortars at a point very near Fort Wagner. General Seymour, who was personally superintending the work, as they were going down the beach, sang out "Now, boys, we've got the Rebels cowed; let us mount the mortars right before their eyes, and show them we are not afraid of them." The boys did so, and got them all up with only one man wounded, although the Wagner guns were playing on them the while.—When they were through, General Seymour complimented them in the highest style of praise, telling them it was the first time he had ever seen heavy mortars mounted in open in the face of a fire of a hostile fort, so near as that. The 48th have cause to be pleased with the compliment, which, coming from Gen. Seymour, was worth something, and, indeed, should make every true citizen's heart beat with pride, at the noble conduct of the Brooklyn Boys.  
G. H.

LIEUT. COL. GREEN.--Robert Green, brother of the lamented soldier whose name heads this paragraph, arrived from Washington last evening, where he had been to procure the necessary papers authorizing him to recover the remains of his deceased brother. He will leave this morning for New York, from whence he will sail for Port Royal in the steamer Arago. Mr. G. had personal interviews with both President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton, and carries with him letters of recommendation signed by them.
—The following complimentary notice of the deceased, is from the Brooklyn Eagle, July 28:
Among the list of those killed at the second attack upon Fort Wagner, we find the name of Col. Green, of the 48th regiment, who was one of our most esteemed citizens, and who has proved himself to be one of our bravest soldiers. Col. Green was a young man of much promise; one who by his deeds of Christian love, by the deep interest he took in Sabbath schools, and as a prominent and active member of Dr. Robinson's church; and by his general Christian deportment, had endeared himself to a large circle of friends, who now are called—as many quivering lips and falling tears we noticed yesterday testified—to mourn his loss with the deepest sorrow. At the outbreak of the rebellion he enlisted as a private in the 71st N. Y. regiment, fought at the battle of Bull Run, where, as his comrades testify, he acquitted himself with  undaunted bravery, escaping without a scratch, but having his clothing perforated with the missiles of the enemy. He returned with the regiment at the expiration of three months, but with a wish and determination to return to the battle-field, which wish was gratified, for shortly after his return he was appointed Captain of one of the companies of the 48th regiment, then forming under Col. Perry. From a Captaincy he was soon promoted to a Majorship, and shortly after again promoted to the position he occupied at the time of his death. At the first attack upon Fort Wagner he led the 48th, and after a desperate struggle, as the readers of the Eagle know, was repulsed with heavy loss. A number of officers fell but Col. Green escaped, after having his scabbard shattered and the skirt of his coat shot away. In his last letter, dated July 11th, he gives a vivid description of that terrible onslaught, and speaks in glowing terms of the conduct of his men, to whom he was dearly attached, and whose affection was warmly reciprocated by those under his command. After speaking of the hardships he and his men endured, how long they had been without sleep and food, he closes his letter with the following words:—"I do not know what is before me, but trusting in God I will endeavor to do my entire duty." Christian patriot! Thy duty is done. Thou didst offer thyself upon the altar of thy country, and God has accepted the sacrifice. Yea, we do know that thou didst willingly offer up thy life's blood in behalf of the land that gave thee birth; that thou didst realize "dulce et decorum est pro patria mori." Therefore we would not call thee back, for thy work on earth is finished; but dropping many tears in sweet memory of thee, we would say "Peace to thy ashes! Rest! soldier of thy country, and soldier of the Cross.—Rest! until the archangel's trumpet shall sound, and then thou shalt come forth with all the redeemed , receive thy crown, and hear the welcome and joyful summons, 'Well done, good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of the Lord.' "
—One of the regiments with the naval expedition is thus spoken of:
The Forty-eighth New York, Colonel Perry's famous Continental Guards, is known as the Methodist regiment among the other troops, its Colonel having been formerly a Methodist minister, as well as eight or ten of its line officers; the other officers are nearly all ex-members of the New York Seventh, and these apparently incongruous elements are said to harmonize admirably; the religious portion, I im­agine, preponderates, for prayer meetings have been numerous in camp; conversions are common; a dozen or more privates were baptized on one Sun­day in Washington, and at Annapolis the fighting parsons organized a movement upon the forces of Sulaoi; went into the town, preached and prayed, and incited a violent revival of religion. They leave their mark among those quasi Southerners, and will doubtless do it in another and equally durable manner further towards the Gulf of Mexico.

PERSONAL.—Joshua T. Fonda, son of John T. Fonda of this city, a member of Co. F, Forty-eighth regiment, was killed at Fort Wagner. It is hoped that Mr. Robert Green will be able to recover his body and bring it home.—R. D. Marsh, left Keeseville on the 27th of June for Fort Edward, with four or five thousand dollars in his possession, for the purpose of investing that amount in business at the latter place. As nothing since has been heard from him his friends have commenced a search lor him.—Dr. Bontecou is on professional duty at Fort Wagner.—Father Theobaud, formerly pastor of St. Joseph's Church, has resumed that position.—Col. Crocker and other officers of the 93d are home to take charge of the drafted contingent of Washington county.

Charles A. Leibakner, who enlisted in the 48th N. Y. S. V., was killed in the attack on Morris Island, on the 13th Inst. A private letter shown us says he fought and died as became a brave man. He lived near the Powder Mills, in this ....

HOME ON FURLOUGH.—B. R. Corwin, who went from this village as 1st Lieut. In the 46th Reg. N. Y. Volunteers (Continental Guards), but has since received the appointment of Major and been in service for some time past in the 2d South Carolina Volunteers, arrived home on Monday. The Major looks as though he had seen hard service under a Southern sun. When he expects to return, or what special information he brings of the fate of the boys of the 48th, his old associates, we have not learned, as we have been unable to see him but for a moment.

PERSONAL.—Joshua T. Fonda, son of John T. Fonda of this city, a member of Co. F, Forty-eighth regiment, was killed at Fort Wagner. It is hoped that Mr. Robert Green will be able to recover his body and bring it home.—R. D. Marsh, left Keeseville on the 27th of June for Fort Edward, with four or five thousand dollars in his possession, for the purpose of investing that amount in business at the latter place. As nothing since has been heard from him his friends have commenced a search for him.—Dr. Bontecou is on professional duty at Fort Wagner.—Father Theobaud, formerly pastor of St. Joseph's Church, has resumed that position.—Col. Crocker and other officers of the 93d are home to take charge of the drafted contingent of Washington county.

PRESENTATION AT FORT PULASKI, GEO.—On the 15th ult., word was sent to Major James M. Green and First Lieutenant S. K. Wallace, that a disturbance had occurred in the quarters of Co. F, Forty-eighth Regiment. They immediately hastened to the scene of trouble, when they found the company drawn up in line, looking as trim and clean as veterans. As soon as the officers reached the locality, they were taken prisoner; the Orderly Sergeant advanced to the front, and in the name of the company, presented them each with an elegant and costly sword. The Major and the Lieutenant accepted the same, with brief responses, hoping they should never hesitate to lead the men at all times, and that they might never do anything of which themselves, or those who  followed them, would be ashamed.
The presentation ended with three cheers for each of the worthy recipients, and three more for Capt. Lockwood, the present Commandant of Co. F.

ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
48th REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V., Co. E,
FOLLY ISLAND, S. C. J u l y 7, 1863.
To THE EDITOR OF THE DEMOCRAT:—
At last we are in the field again.—After doing Garrison duty and fatigue in Fort Pulaski for one year and twenty-three days, we were ordered (8 Companies of the Regt.) to St. Helena Island, June 19th. There we were Brigaded with the 76th Penn., Vols., 3rd N. H. Vols., 9th. Maine Vols, and the "Pardeus les Enfans," or "Independent Battallion," and commanded by General Strong. On the evening of the 3rd, we got orders to be ready to strike tents at 5 A. M., the 4th at 6 A. M. the 4th struck tents and lay down until 12 M., when "fall in" and then we had to carry our tents to the dock a distance of 2 miles. At 4 P. M., we got off and embarked on board the steamer Canonicus and started for Folly Island. When we got up here we were too late to cross the bar for that night and had to return to the Head and stay there nearly all day Sunday on board the boat.—The men suffered from the effects of the sun, for the boat was small and much crowded. Sunday night made out to get there in time and crossed the bar the boat striking heavily four or five times. Landed at 12 at night and marched about three miles and halted for the night, but just as we had got comfortably settled on the beach and were resigning ourselves to morpheus, "fall in" sounded and we had to move again. We halted just at day-break and slept until sunrise and then moved on to our present encampment. We are encamped in a thick swamp behind a high bluff of sand. We are just out of range of the guns of Fort Sumpter [sic] and the Morris Island batteries.
Our tents came up last night just at dark and to day we have been working very hard putting them up and clearing up the streets and digging wells and I am so tired I can scarcely write. One of the 6th Conn. Vols., was shot yesterday on picket and three of the pickets the day before ... shell from the rebel battery. We ... to make the attack now in a very few days perhaps before you get this. It would not be prudent to mention the location of our guns or the number of them, but one battery is within a half mile of Fort Sumpter [sic]. The Surgeons have all had orders to-day to get an extra supply of lint and bandages, &c. Heckman's Brigade that caused all the trouble between Generals Hunter and Foster is expected here to-night. Also the 10th Legion and the Brigade to which they belong. We have had our work for nothing to-day for while I have been writing, orders came from Head-Quarters for us to cook three days rations and be ready to move to-night. Hoping my next may be dated in Charleston, I bid you and your readers good day.
More anon. P. B. M.

ON THE BBATTLEFIELD OF MORRIS ISLAND, S. C. )
2 MILES FROM BATTERY BEE, 48th REG'T.N. Y. V.
JULY 11th, 1863.
EDITOR GOSHEN DEMOCRAT:—
On the evening of the 8th, our Reg't. was ordered to march to the Pawnee landing on Folly Island, where we were to embark in surf boats to land on Morris Island. After marching over there, we found there was not boats enough to carry us and marched back to camp, arriving there just before daylight. The evening of the 9th we started again for the landing, the rest of our Brigade embarked before us and left boats enough for four Companies of our Regt. who started under Lt.-Col. Green. The rest of us marched up to the upper end of the Island and lay down behind the batteries, fronting the batteries on Morris Island. At 6 A. M. the 10th, our batteries opened fire. The rebels replied lively and the shot and shell came in very unpleasant proximity to our ears. After firing about an hour and-a-half, several of the guns were silenced and our Brigade was ordered to land and charge; the boys pulled with a will and just then the rebels opened a tremendous fire on the boats; one boat was cut in two and one man had his leg carried away; none of them were drowned however. The 6th Conn. Vols., Col. Chatfield were the first to land. The detachment of our Regt. Should have landed last, but owing to some delay in the 2nd Regt. General Strong asked if our boys would land next, which they were only too glad to do and in about three minutes away went the boys across the marsh double quick, the 6th carried the batteries and our boys the rifle pits, Captain L. H. Lent, our senior Captain acting Major, was killed first, by a sharp shooter. The batteries are very strong and would never have been taken except by storm. As soon as the flag was planted on the first range of batteries, we crossed over and dashed up to the rescue and carried the whole line to within two miles of Battery Bee. The boys were then completely exhausted, for they had no rest the night before, so we halted. I was Acting Hospital Steward as our Steward was sick and I had my hands full for four or five hours. Our Regiment lost four killed and twenty-five wounded, many of them severely. Our loss was the heaviest of any Regt. by twelve men.—I had the wounded all sent over to Folly Island, from whence they were sent to Hilton Head. We have a large number of rebel wounded, they suffered severely in killed. One Captain said he posted five sharp shooters to kill Capt. Lent. At daylight this morning three Regiments charged the battery on the point of this Island next Fort Sumpter [sic], but they were repulsed with heavy loss. At present the Monitors are shelling them pretty lively. To-night our Regt. and the 67th Ohio, are going to try to take it by storm. Lieut.-Col. Green had his scabbard shot in two and his pants torn very much, two balls through his blouse and his hat was carried away by a cannon ball. We have captured seven rifled guns and three mortars, beside a large quantity of small arms and ammunition, sixty prisoners beside the wounded, which are numerous and the boys are bringing in the wounded all the time.

SUNDAY, July 12th.
Every thing progresses favorably.—The Rebs shelled our pickets this morning, and wounding three men severely. Our men are throwing up batteries within three-quarters of a mile of Fort Sumpter [sic]. I hope we will be in Charleston in less than a week. More anon.
P. B. M.

AMONG those wounded at the recent attack on Fort Wagner, we find the name of Lt. Tuttle, Co. F, 48th N. Y. V. Mr. Turtle's parents reside in this city. It is hoped his wounds are not of a serious nature.

ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
48th REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V., CO. E,
Folly Island, S. C., July 7, 1863.
To THIS EDITOR OF THE DEMOCRAT:—
At last we are in the field again.—After doing Garrison duty and fatigue in Fort Pulaski for one year and twenty-three days, we were ordered (8 Companies of the Regt.) to St. Helena Island, June 19th. There we were Brigaded with the 76th Penn., Vols., 3rd N. H. Vols., 9th Maine Vols, and the "Pardeus les Enfans," or "Independent Battallion," and commanded by General Strong. On the evening of the 3rd, we got orders to be ready to strike tents at 5 A. M., the 4th at 6 A. M. the 4th struck tents and lay down until 12 M., when "fall in" and then we had to carry our tents to the dock a distance of 2 miles. At 4 P. M., we got off and embarked on board the steamer Canonicus and started for Folly Island. When we got up here we were too late to cross the bar for that night and had to return to the Head and stay there nearly all day Sunday on board the boat.—The men suffered from the effects of the sun, for the boat was small and much crowded. Sunday night made out to get there in time and crossed the bar the boat striking heavily four or five times. Landed at 12 at night and marched about three miles and halted for the night, but just as we had comfortably settled on the beach and were resigning ourselves to morpheus, "fall in " sounded and we had to move again. We halted just at day-break and slept until sunrise and then moved on to our present encampment. We are encamped in a thick swamp behind a high bluff of sand. We are just out of range of the guns of Fort Sumpter [sic] and the Morris Island batteries.
Our tents came up last night just at dark and to day we have been working very hard putting them up and clearing up the streets and digging wells and I am so tired I can scarcely write. One of the 6th Conn. Vols., was shot yesterday on picket and three of the pickets the day before by shell from the rebel battery. We expect to make the attack now in a very few days perhaps before you get this. It would not be prudent to mention the location of our guns or the number of them, but one battery is within a half mile of Fort Sumpter [sic]. The Surgeons have all had orders today to get an extra supply of lint and bandages, &c. Heckman's Brigade that caused all the trouble between Generals Hunter and Foster is expected here to-night. Also the 10th Legion and the Brigade to which they belong. We have had our work for nothing to-day for while I have been writing, orders came from Head-Quarters for us to cook three days rations and be ready to move to-night. Hoping my next may be dated in Charleston, I bid you and your readers good day.
More anon.      P. B. M.

ON THE BATTLEFIELD OF MORRIS ISLAND, S. C.
2 MILES FROM BATTERY BEE, 48th Reg't. N. Y. V.
JULY 11th, 1863.
EDITOR GOSHEN DEMOCRAT:—
On the evening of the 8th, our Reg't. was ordered to march to the Pawnee landing on Folly Island, where we were to embark in surf boats to land on Morris Island. After marching over there, we found there was not boats enough to carry us and marched back to camp, arriving there just before daylight. The evening of the 9th we started again for the landing, the rest of our Brigade embarked before us and left boats enough for four Companies of our Regt. who started under Lt.-Col. Green. The rest of us marched up to the upper end of the Island and lay down behind the batteries, fronting the batteries on Morris Island. At 6 A. M. the 10th, our batteries opened fire. The rebels replied lively and the shot and shell came in very unpleasant proximity to our ears. After firing about an hour and-a-half several of the guns were silenced and our Brigade was ordered to land and charge; the boys pulled with a will and just then the rebels opened a tremendous fire on the boats; one boat was cut in two and one man had his leg carried away; none of them were drowned however. The 6th Conn. Vols., Col. Chatfield were the first to land.
The detachment of our Regt. Should have landed last, but owing to some delay in the 2nd Regt. General Strong asked if our boys would land next, which they were only too glad to do and in about three minutes away went the boys across the marsh double quick, the 6th carried the batteries and our boys the rifle pits, Captain L. H. Lent, our senior Captain acting Major, was killed first, by a sharp shooter. The batteries are very strong and would never have been taken except by storm. As soon as the flag was planted on the first range of batteries, we crossed over and dashed up to the rescue and carried the whole line to within two miles of Battery Bee. The boys were then completely exhausted, for they had no rest the night before, so we halted. I was Acting Hospital Steward as our Steward was sick and I had my hands full for four or five hours. Our Regiment lost four killed and twenty-five wounded, many of them severely. Our loss was the heaviest of any Regt. by twelve men.—I had the wounded all sent over to Folly Island, from whence they were sent to Hilton Head. We have a large number of rebel wounded, they suffered severely in killed. One Captain said he posted five sharp shooters to kill Capt. Lent. At daylight this morning, three Regiments charged the battery on the point of this Island next Fort Sumpter [sic], but they were repulsed with heavy loss. At present the Monitors are shelling them pretty lively. To-night our Regt. and the 67th Ohio, are going to try to take it by storm. Lieut.-Col. Green had his scabbard shot in two and his pants torn very much, two balls through his blouse and his hat was carried away by a cannon ball. We have captured seven rifled guns and three mortars, beside a large quantity of small arms and ammunition, sixty prisoners beside the wounded, which are numerous and the boys are bringing in the wounded all the time.
SUNDAY, July 12th.
Every thing progresses favorably.—The Rebs shelled our pickets this morning, and wounding three men severely. Our men are throwing up batteries within three-quarters of a mile of Fort Sumpter [sic]. I hope we will be in Charleston in less than a week. More anon.
P. B. M.

The Fight on the Charleston Railroad.
Correspondence N. Y. Times.
The special design of this enterprise was to destroy the tressel-work bridges at the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, crossing the Pocotaligo, Tullifinny and Coosawhatchie. These streams are all tributaries of the Broad River; and to appropriate them, it was determined, after a careful study of the map of this peculiarly impracticable and most difficult country for military operations, to make a landing at Mackay's Point, at the Junction or the Broad and Pocoralico Rivers, a distance of twenty-five miles from Hilton Head, where our troops could be debarked under cover of gunboats, and a march of ... miles would take them to the village of ... at which place it was supposed the enemy would make a stand. The attack was intended as a surprise.

DEPARTURE FROM HILTON HEAD.
At nightfall of Tuesday, the 21st, the expedition was ready for departure, but did not leave until midnight, as nothing could be accomplished by reaching its destination before daybreak. The vessels left in the order above designated, but the night was misty, and one or two of them ran aground, delaying their arrival at the rendezvous for some hours beyond the time which had been fixed.
Meanwhile the tug Starlight was despatched [sic] with some boats of the Paul Jones and a small company of soldiers of the Seventh Connecticut, under Captain Gray, to capture the rebel pickets at Mackey's Point and at a plantation on the Pocotalico River, a few miles distant. This project was only partially successful. At the plantation, Lieut. Banks, of the enemy's picket, and three men were made prisoners, but through the incompetency of a negro guide, the guard at the Point escaped, giving warning of our approach. From the rebel officer who was taken, General Brennan learned that our attack had been apprehended by the enemy, and for several days they had been preparing for the encounter.

LANDING OF THE TROOPS.
The tedious process of putting the men ashore in small boats was commenced soon after six o'clock A. M., on Wednesday, and by ten o'clock men, horses and guns were landed, excepting the detachment of the Third Rhode Island Volunteers, who were on the gunboat Marblehead, which was aground all day some miles down the river.
The line of march was taken up soon after ten, the section of Lieut. Henry's battery being at the head of the column, with skirmishers of the Forty-seventh Pennsylvania Regiment. Advancing slowly over an admirable road for seven miles, we failed, during the march, of encountering the enemy, who had prudently recoiled from a meeting until it should take place beyond range of our gunboats, although the nature of the ground over which we passed afforded many excellent positions for defence.

THE FIGHT.
The road alternated through dense woods, and through marshes, only passable over a narrow causeway, save at one or two points. Choosing a position at the opposite end of this causeway, the enemy opened a furious fire of shell and cannister [sic] on our advancing column, which was promptly met by the battery under Lieutenant Henry. Immediately the order was given by General Brannon for his brigade to form in line of battle, the centre resting on the causeway.—After a brisk fire of both musketry and artillery, the rebels retired to the dense woods in their rear, tearing up the causeway bridge, which delayed the advance of our artillery until it could be repaired. Meanwhile, the First Brigade pressed on to the woods, which they penetrated, driving the enemy before them, and closely followed by the Second Brigade, under General Terry, who came up with a cheer, and were quickly in the engagement. Here the fight,- it may be said, fairly commenced—the enemy's sharpshooters picking off our men rapidly.—The artillery fire from our side was not slackened while the bridge was being repaired, and it was not long before the batteries went forward to the work in support of the infantry.
This action began between twelve and one, and lasted about an hour, ending in the retreat of the rebels to another position at Frampton's plantation, which lies two miles beyond. The enemy were closely followed, and, after a fight more hotly contested than the first, our  troops were again victorious, the second time driving the rebels from their well-chosen position, and two miles beyond, which brought them up to Pocotaligo bridge—not the railroad bridge—over which they crossed, taking shelter behind earthwork's on the farthest side. To this point our troops nearly approached, but found farther progress impossible, as the bridge had been out by the enemy on his retreat. This fact we construe into a clear acknowledgment of his defeat. Although these events are thus briefly noted, it required upward of five hours of impetuous and gallant fighting to accomplish them. At no one time was the entire field of combat in view from a given point, and I therefore find it impossible to speak in detail of the operations of my own regiment. Both brigades participated in the action, and both Gens. Brannan and Terry were constantly under fire, leading and directing the movements of their men, awakening enthusiasm by their personal bravery and the skillful manner in which they manoeuvred their commands. Frequently, while the fight was progressing, we heard the whistles of the railroad trains, notifying us of reinforcements for the rebels, both from Charleston and Savannah, and even if we had had facilities for crossing the river, it would have been unwise to have made the attempt in view of these circumstances. Gen. Brannan therefore ordered a retreat, which was conducted in a most orderly manner; the regiments retiring in successive lines, carrying off their dead and wounded, and leaving no arms or ammunition on the field.
Of the exact force of the rebels, of course, we know nothing, although Gen. Brannan was of the opinion that it equalled [sic] our own. Certainly their artillery exceeded ours by four or five pieces, and this we have from the seven prisoners taken, one of whom, Wm. Judd, belonged to Company B, 2d South Carolina cavalry, whose horse was also captured. The prisoners informed us that Gen. Beauregard commanded in person.

COL. BARTON'S DIVISION.
While these events were taking place between the main forces or either side, Col. Barton, of the 48th New York, with 300 of his own men and 50 of the 3d Rhode Island regiment, under command of Capt. J. H. Gould, went up the Coosawhatchie river, convoyed by the Potroon to within two miles of the town of the same name. Landing this force here, a march was made to the village through which runs the railroad. Arrived there, they commenced tearing up the rails, but had scarcely engaged in the work when a long train of cars came from the direction of Savanna, filled with troops. This train was fired into by our party, killing the engineer and a number of others. Several soldiers jumped from the cars while they were in motion, and were wounded.
One was taken prisoner—thirty muskets were captured, and colors of the Whippy Swamp Guards taken from the color-bearer, who was killed by our fire. The work of tearing up the rails was not accomplished in time to prevent the onward progress of the train, and our men afterward completed the job—also cutting the telegraph, and bringing away a portion of the wire with them. Col. Barton next attempted to reach the railroad bridge, for the purpose of firing it, but was unable, as it was protected by a battery of three guns. Fearing that his retreat might be cut off by the enemy's cavalry, he gave the order to retire to the steamboat, which was done successfully. His men had nearly all embarked when the cavalry boldly came directly under the guns of the Planter and Potroon and fired upon both steamers. A few rounds of can­ister dispersed them and the only damage which they inflicted was the serious wounding of Lieut. J. B. Blanding, of the Third Rhode Island Artillery.

THE RETURN.
Nearly all Wednesday night was passed in bringing the wounded from the battle-field and placing them upon the transports. This humane work was personally superintended by General Terry and Brigade Quartermaster Corrigell, of Gen. Brannan's Staff. As fast as the boats were filled they returned to Hilton Head, and by Thursday night the whole force had embarked. Before our last regiment left Mackey's Point, the enemy's pickets had reappeared, but not in sufficient force to molest us.

INCIDENTS OF THE FIGHT.
Scarcely five minutes after the first engagement began, wounded men were brought to the rear. Surgeon Bailey, the Medical Director at
Beaufort, who accompanied the expedition, established a hospital almost under fire, by the roadside, beneath the shade of the stately pine, with Surgeons Merritt, of the Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania, and McClellan, of the Sixth Connecticut, and these gentlemen have had their energies taxed to the uttermost. It was a spectacle to make one shudder as the ... wounded and dying were emptied from the conveyances upon the green sward.
A striking instance of heroism came under my observation. During the thickest of the fight, Artificer Zincks, of Henry's Battery, seized a shell which had fallen into our ammunition box and threw it into the ditch where it exploded, seriously wounding him. Had it not been for his bravery and presence of mind the most serious consequences might have ensued. Lieut. Henry's horse was shot under him, and the shell that killed the animal also killed one man and wounded five others. It is a singular fact that Lieut. Gettings, of the Third United States Artillery, whose section also did good service in the fight, also lost one man killed and five wounded by the explosion of a single shell. Lieut. Gettings himself was wounded in the ankle.
Three howitzers from the Wabash, under command of Lieut. Phoenix and Ensigns Wallace and Larned, accompanied the land forces, and won a great deal of praise for gallantry and effective firing. Young Wallace was sent by Gen. Terry to cover the retreat from Pocotaligo Bridge, which he handsomely accomplished. He had delivered two rounds of grape into the enemy's ranks, when a shower of rifle balls were sent against him, wounding three of his men and perforating his own clothes. The heroic young fellow was then ordered to retire, which he reluctantly did, after vainly asking permission to fire another round.
The rebels left fifteen or twenty of their dead on the field, and the inference is that their loss must have been severe, or they would have had time to remove all in their successful retreats. Two caissons filled with ammunition were captured from the enemy during the second battle. Our own supply of ammunition at this time having been well-nigh exhausted, this proved very opportune.

WHAT THE EXPEDITION ACCOMPLISHED.
Although the main object of the expedition failed of success, yet the benefits conferred were not of trifling value. We have made a thorough reconnoissance of the heretofore unknown Broad River and its tributaries, and ascertained the character of the country, which knowledge is of immense importance, in view of future movements in that direction. We have also demonstrated the necessity of heavy reinforcements if the Government desire Gen. Mitchell to strike heavily in his department.

FROM FLORIDA.
THE 48TH NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS—REBELS ABOUT—HOW THE FREEDMAN LIVE—FAILURE TO RECEIVE THEIR DUE.
Correspondence of the Commercial Advertiser.
ST. AUGUSTINE, Florida, August 21.
The 48th regiment New York volunteers, under command of Major D. W. Strickland, is now well established at this post and in good working order. As many of its members were severely wounded, or killed, at the assault on Fort Wagner, the force here is not large. The soldiers, however, are of that class who, when danger threatens, are undismayed, and hence, especially as no particular cause for alarm exists at present, we feel that the force at this point is all that is needed.
Some restlessness is manifest outside of our lines. On Saturday night, 15th inst., a boat load of rebels was discovered to be inside of one of the picket posts, evidently intent on the capture of the post. The design was fortunately frustrated. For a night or two following alarms were given, but for these there was no good foundation.

A native of this city came in a day or two after, and reported that Captain Dickinson was outside with two hundred cavalry. They were in the same locality all of the last Spring. When Jacksonville was taken in April last, Capt. D. with his band crossed the St. John's river, and with the exception of small scouting parties, has not till now returned. He will doubtless find it to be the part of wisdom to remain outside.
The man who brought in the above news went to St. John's Bluffs, with the permission of the authorities here, to visit friends. The rebels regard him as an obnoxious person, and on hearing of his presence in those parts they attempted to entrap him. He, however, escaped their toils, and by taking the woods he made his way to town.
The condition of the negroes is about as it has been. They are now gathering the fruit of their Spring and Summer toil. The quantity is not large, but as, on account of the great demand for vegetables the prices received are high, they have made a pretty good thing of it. The ordinary price of peas has been fifty cents a peck, potatoes fifty cents a peck; small watermelons, forty and fifty cents, &c. It is now time to prepare their gardens for Fall and Winter crops. For this purpose seeds are much needed. We hope to receive a supply from friends at the North. It is said that crops cannot be procured from seeds raised here. The explanation of this phenomenon is to be found in the poverty of the soil occasioned by the neglect to manure and otherwise enrich it. It is to be regretted that much of the toil of this industrious class of citizens is unrequited. The frequent and sudden change of regiments, often between the visits of the paymaster, prevents the soldiers from paying their washbills, and thus the earnings of weeks, as well as the little stock of starch and soap, are swept away. The women, in this way, lose from three to thirty dollars each. An industrious shoemaker informs me that by these changes he has lost more than one hundred dollars. I am ashamed to state that in some cases our soldiers do not pay when they have the money. This is the exception not the rule.
Language is inadequate to express the horror which fills our minds as we read of the late riots in the metropolis of our land. We would not have believed it possible that men could become so much like fiends incarnate as to invade the sanctuary of innocence and ruthlessly trample upon the rights of persons who were peaceably plying their own avocations and yielding obedience to just and righteous laws.
A steamer has arrived to-day, but she brings no letters or papers from North of Port Royal. The old story is repeated, "As we were going out of Port Royal harbor the Arago with mail from New York was going in." We must wait now a fortnight or more. Our latest dates were of August 8th.   I. W. B.
DEATH OF LIEUT.-COL. GREEN.—By today's New York papers, we learn that Lieut.-Col James M. Green, of the Forty-eighth regiment, a well-known Trojan, was killed at Fort Wagner. He was a brother of Robert and John C. Green, and was a popular and estimable citizen, as well as a brave, competent soldier. He enlisted as a private soldier in the Seventy-first regiment and participated in the battle of Bull Run. He determined to adopt the profession of arms, and was appointed Major and afterwards promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the Forty-eighth regiment. But a short time ago he was home on a leave of absence. It appears that he was mortally wounded, and died in the city of Charleston. Hosts of friends at home will regret his early, heroic death.
More than half the time we were in the fort, the fight was simply a hand to hand one, as the wounds received by many clearly indicate. Some have sword-thrusts, some are hacked on the head, some are stabbed with bayonets, and a few were knocked down with butt-end of muskets, but recovered in time to get away with swollen heads. There was terrible fighting to get into the fort, and terrible fighting to get out of it. The cowardly stood no better chance for their lives than the fearless. Even if they surrendered, the shell of Sumter were thickly falling around them in the darkness, and, as prisoners, they could not be safe, until victory, decisive and unquestioned, rested with one or the other belligerent.

Official List of the Killed and Wounded in the Brooklyn 48th Regiment.
The following is the official list of casualties in the 48th Regt. N. Y. Vols., during the charge on Fort Wagner, July 18, 1863:
COMPANY A.
Lieut. Chas. E. Fox, wounded; Private Patk. Brady, killed July 18th; Corporal Jessie G. Smith, missing; Privates Patk. Dunnegan, missing; Coml. Cadmus, missing; Errick Limberg, missing; Bernard McCunn, missing; Wm. McCormick, missing; Luther S. Ketcham, missing; Walter S. Smith, missing; Sergeant T J Carman, missing; Private Danl. B Velsor, wounded; Corporal G D Vredenberg, wounded; Privates Jas Larkin, wounded; J E Ames, in hospital at Hilton Head; F. Commonfort, in hospital at do; Jas Brady, Jos Hutt, Peter Nolan, .... White, in hospital at Beaufort.

COMPANY B.
Captain N A Elfwing, wounded; Sergeant .... Depuy, Corporals John Gardner, Sidney ...., .... J Mason, Alex Hyers, Geo Truesdale, ...., Martin Coffee, John Curtis, Danl. J. Dyckman, John ...ghay, Danl. Madden, John Nice, Isaac Silcocks, Jhn Wildey, missing; Chas J Travis, Adam Wesiecht, Wm. Brown, Sergeant Peter W Smith, Privates Wm McCloud, Thos Van Tassel, in hospital at Beaufort; John Holton, Jas H Silvers, Danl B Smith, Carl Robericht, Wm J Owen, in hospital at Hilton Head; Corporal Freeman Attwood, Private Jas McGarry, wounded.                                     

COMPANY C.
J. Farrell, Captain, missing, probably killed going up the slope to Wagner; E. S. Edwards, Lieutenant, missing; J. T. Lawrence, Sergt., missing; Privates J, S. Marshall, missing; Peter Fennick, missing; John A. Smith, missing; George P. Becker, missing; James Nesbitt, missing; Amasa King, missing; Daniel Kane, killed; Dennis Levy, in hospital at Beaufort; Wm. Mason, in hospital at Beaufort; John J. Bondy, in hospital at Beaufort; Sergt. S. H. Frankenburg, in hospital at Beaufort; privates Wm. Osborne, in hospital at Beaufort; Josiah Sturgis, Corporal J. O'Brien; privates John Smith, Philip Larkin, James C. Hibson, John Love, in hospital at Hilton Head; Martin Carroll and Michael Sullivan, in camp wounded.

COMPANY D.
Capt. James A. Paxton, dangerously wounded, at Beaufort; Sergt. G. W. Crammer and Corporal S. O. Church, missing; Thomas McDowell, killed; Privates J. B. Berthel, Daniel Clifton, John Clark, C. W. Mounce, A. Mason, H. Smith, John I. Wilgus, A. Palmer, missing; Sergeants G. P. Patterson, J. G. Abbott, A. Lippincott, wounded; Corporals Levi Pimm, Thomas White, in hospital at Beaufort; S. K. Duffle, wounded; Privates C. M. Cole, J. De Camp, Thomas Jones, wounded; D. Emmons, Isaac D. Lodge, Elmer Sander, wounded, in hospital at Beaufort; J. P. Crosedale, James Spear, John Graham, Wm. J. Howell, John Ronck and Corporal Aaron Cole, in hospital at Hilton Head.

COMPANY E.
Joseph Taylor, Lieut. wounded, paroled and gone North; Corporals E. Johnson, missing; C. H. Haynes, do; C. A. Bates, do; Privates Jas. Brown, missing; Fred Gilmore, do; W. H. Hawkins, do; Peter Smith, do; B. B. Terry, do; Thos. Vasey, do; James VanZandt, do; Jas. Dolan, do; 1st Sergt.; Wm. Andrews, musician; Privates, Robert Anderson, Geo. Degamo, Jas. Hanna; Wm. T. Manley, Richard McNally, Fred. Post, Jos. B. Raynor, F. B. Taylor, Abraham Vreeland, E. Wakefield, wounded, in Hospital at Beaufort; Privates John Burton, Robert Douglass, Charles Messinger, Chris. Smith, paroled, in Hospital at Hilton Head: Corpl. George E. Gardner, in Hospital at Hilton Head.

COMPANY F.
Capt. S. E. Swartout, slightly wounded, gone North; Lieut. S. W. Master, sick in Hospital at Hilton Head; Privates J. T. Fonda, H. W. Kellogg, M. Limage, J. Murphy, M. McClenahan, and Corpl. R. C. Williams, missing; Sergt. E. J. Hutchinson, and Privates W. Furniss, D. McManus. J. Motishaid, wounded, in Hospital at Beaufort; Privates M. Bowa, and T. Lowery, wounded, in Hospital at Hilton Head; Corporals T. A. Hyatt, W. B. Howard, and Privates W. H. Foley and L. Bobbins, wounded, paroled and gone North.

COMPANY H.
Capt. W. L. Lockwood, and Lieut. J . A. Barrett, wounded and gone North; Corpl. Wm. Lyster, missing; Privates Jas. Allen, missing; Jer. Allen, do; Isaac Cornell, do; David Clark, do; John Clarkson, do; J. B. Fort, do; Privates Aaron Huff, missing; E. Miller, missing; J. B. Stebbins, missing; Jas. Weatherspoon, missing; Ben Wilson, missing; Wm. Ziroskie, missing; Ben Pierce, missing; 1st Sergeant E. Edwards, wounded, in Beaufort hospital; privates L. Burr, wounded, in Beaufort hospital; Thomas Curtis, wounded, in Beaufort hospital; James Freeman, wounded, in Beaufort hospital; John Laxey, wounded, in Beaufort hospital; J. Liman, wounded, in Beaufort hospital; Albert Pane, wounded, in Beaufort hospital; H. Walling, wounded, in Beaufort hospital; James Yerkes, wounded, in Beaufort hospital; J. Givenney, wounded, in Hilton Head hospital; J. Lee; Sergeant J. Clayton, wounded, paroled and gone north; private J. Morton, wounded, paroled and gone north; color sergeant George Sparks, wounded, paroled and gone north; corporal Andrew Walling, wounded and gone north; privates N. W. Pease, wounded and gone north; G. W. Nichols, died in Charleston July 21; Amos Havens, dies July 20; W. C. Stigler, died in Beaufort July 23.

COMPANY K.
Captain Fred Hurst, badly wounded, in Charleston; Lieut. A F. Miller, wounded, gone north; Sergeant John Smith, missing; private Daniel Johnson, missing; coporals A. A. Hillecker, missing; James Westerfield, missing; J. G. Gregory, missing; privates W. A. Bouton, missing; G. T. Conklin, missing; W. H. Conklin, missing; Thos. Kelley, dies in Charleston, July 20.

THE FIGHT ON MORRIS ISLAND.
Enemy Driven Back with Loss.
... NAVAL ATTACK ON LAND AND FORT WAGNER.
The Work Stormed by Night.
A BLOODY BATTLE IN THE DARK.
Heroic Courage and Useless Carnage.
FAILURE OF THE SUPPORTING BRIGADE TO ARR1VE.

[Correspondence of the Tribune.]
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., July 17, 1863.
In my last I wrote you that Gen. Gilmore, in order to accomplish the capture of Morris Island without the loss of too much blood, made a strong feint upon James Island, in order to draw off the main body of the rebel infantry from Morris Island. In this feint he was entirely successful. The rebels not having the least suspicion that batteries had been erected on Folly Island, bearing upon their own, sent nearly all their infantry to James Island, to resist the supposed advance of Gen. Terry upon Secessionville, a small village on Folly River. The morning the movement was made on their part, we took the batteries on Morris Island, and before noon occupied three-fourths of the island. The rebels discovering their mistake, and the advantage we had gained, could do nothing but wait for re-enforcements, which they immediately telegraphed to Richmond for. On the night of the 15th, 4,000 Georgia troops, formerly belonging to the old corps of Jackson, arrived, together with two batteries of artillery.
Yesterday morning, this fresh force of old  fighting men and the troops which had been upon Morris Island and in and around Charleston were hurled at daylight suddenly upon Gen. Terry, supposing he could be surprised in his camp, driven back to Stono River, and the main portion of his command destroyed or captured before he could reach his transports. Gen. Terry had placed the brigade of Col. Montgomery, consisting of the 2d South Carolina (colored) and 54th Mass., Col, Shaw (colored) in t he advance, with the 54th Mass. doing picket duty; the brigade of Col. Davis on the right, a short distance back from the line occupied by Colonel Montgomery, and the brigade of Gen. Stevenson on the left, on the line of Col. Davis.
The rebels advanced in solid column upon the 54th Mass., and at the same moment commenced a rapid cannonade upon the Pawnee and the Huron in Stono River, from a battery on their left, and on t he Mayflower and the John Adams from one they had left upon their right. The attack upon the army and the navy was simultaneous, and for a moment surprised and staggered both branches of our service. The Pawnee received several shots before she was able to return the fire on account of her position in the river; the 54th Mass. being upon picket and thinly scattered along the line they had to guard, were, of course, compelled to fall back until they could form in battle line which they did in admirable order, but not until they had lost fifty-four of their best men in killed and wounded.
Gen. Terry quickly discerning that the engagement on the part of the Rebels was intended to be a serious one, formed his whole command in battle line in nearly the same relative position they occupied the night before, and then advanced to meet the enemy and accept battle.—The 1st Conn., Artillery, Capt. Russell, constituted the artillery force he deemed sufficient to bring into action. He placed this battery so that he could harass the enemy on his right, and left, gave signals to the gunboats in Stono River and the creek to open fire, and then advanced along his whole line. The fire from the gun­boats in the Rebel right and left and the bold charge of the 54th Mass. (colored) were so severe that the whole Rebel line tell back, broke and finally retreated in disorder through Secessionville and behind the strong batteries they have in position but a short distance from the Village.
Gen. Terry, having been ordered not to bring on a general engagement, or continue one com­menced by the enemy beyond the time required to repulse him, fell back to the ground he occupied in the Morning, entirely satisfied with the result of his first battle with the enemy since he had assumed command of his division. Gen. Terry speaks in the highest terms of the   con­duct of the 54th Massachusetts, and says the best disciplined white troops could have fought no better. In fact, the 54th did about all the fighting, and suffered all the loss. Rebel pris­oners captured in this engagement estimate their own loss from the fire of the gunboats and from that of the 54th Massachusetts at from two to three hundred. They were about 6,000 strong, and expected to overwhelm us.  
Morris Island, S. C., July 19, 1863.
Again Fort Wagner has been assaulted and again we have been repulsed, and with, I regret to say, a much more formidable loss in killed,   wounded and missing then in the first attempt ….
Since the engagement of the 11th Gen. Gilmore has strained every nerve to strengthen his position on Morris Island, and so far as human foresight can discern, has made his lines of defense impregnable before advancing to the attack.
Gen. Gilmore designed to commence the bombardment of the fort at daylight yesterday morning, but on account of a terrific thunder storm, which commenced early in the evening and continued until morning, delaying the work of the engineers and dampening the ammunition the action did not open until half-past 12. At that hour Admiral Dahlgren signaled that he was ready, and in a few moments the Montauk (his flagship), the Ironsides, the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Weehawken and the Parapsco moved into line in the order in which I have named them, and commenced hurling their heaviest shot and shell around, upon and within the fort, and, with intervals of but a very few minutes, continued this terrible fire until one hour after the sun had gone down. During all the afternoon the iron fleet lay about one mile off from the fort, but just at the close of the engagement, and but a few moments before the first assault was made by Gen. Strong, the Admiral ran the Montauk directly under the guns of Fort Wagner, and, within 280 yards, fired round after round from his 15-inch gun, sending, as every shot struck, vast clouds of sand, mud and timber high up into the air, making one huge sand heap of that portion of the fort facing the sea, and dismounting two of the heaviest guns.
Deserters and prisoners tell us that Fort Wagner mounts thirteen rifled guns of heavy caliber, but during all this furious bombardment by land and sea, she condescended to reply with but two, one upon the whole fleet of iron clads, and one upon the entire line of land batteries. She may possibly have fired one shot to our one hundred, but I think even that number is a large estimate. There were no casualties on the Monitors or Ironsides, and but one man killed and one slightly wounded within the batteries. The firing was almost entirely from our own side. With the most powerful glass, but very few men could be seen in the fort. At half past two, a shot from one of our guns on the left, cut the halyards on the flagstaff and brought the rebel flag fluttering to the ground.
There seemed to be but one opinion, and that was that we had silenced nearly every gun, that the 15 inch shells had driven the Rebels from the bomb-proofs, and that if there had been a strong infantry force in the rear of the fort we had made it impossible for them to remain there and had slaughtered them by hundreds. But there were a few later developments that proved their opinion was the correct one, who said this profound silence on the Rebel side was significant, not of defeat and disaster, but of ultimate success in repulsing our assault; that they were keeping themselves under cover until they could look into the eye of our men, and send bullets through their heads, and would then swarm by thousands, with every conceivable deadly missile in their hands, and drive us in confusion and with terrible slaughter back to our intrenchments [sic].
For eight hours the Monitors and the Ironsides have kept up a continuous fire, and Fort Wagner has not yet surrendered. For eight hours fifty-four guns from the land batteries have hurled their shot and shell within her walls, and still she flaunts the red battle flag in our face.
"Something must be done, and that too quickly, or in a few days we shall have the whole army of Virginia upon us," said an officer high in command. "We must storm the fort to-night and carry it at the point of the bayonet!"
Gen. Strong, who has so frequently since his arrival in this Department braved death in its many forms of attack, was assigned to the command of the 1st Brigade. Col. Putnam of the 7th New Hampshire, who, although of the regular army, and considered one of the best officers in the Department, had never led his men into battle nor been under fire, took command of the 2d, and Gen. Stevenson the 3d, constituting the reserve. The 54th Mass. (colored regiment,) Col. Shaw, was the advanced regiment in the 1st Brigade, and the 2d South Carolina (negro,) Col. Montgomery, was the last regiment in the reserve. The selection of the 54th Mass. to lead the charge was undoubtedly made on account of the good fighting qualities it had displayed a few days before on James Island, an account of which you have in my letter of the 17th. In the midst of this terrible shower of shot and shell they pushed their way, reached the former portions of the 54th Mass., the 6th Conn., and the 48th N. Y., dashed through the ditches, gained the parapet, and engaged in an hand-to hand fight with the enemy, and for nearly half an hour held their ground, and did not fall back until nearly every commissioned officer was shot down. As on the morning of the assault of the 11th inst., these brave men were exposed to a most galling fire of grape and canister from howitzers, raking the ditches from the bastions of the fort, from hand grenades, and from almost every other modern implement of warfare. The Rebels fought with the utmost desperation, and so did the larger portion of Gen. Strong's brigade, as long as there was an officer to command.
Just as darkness began to close in upon the scene of the afternoon and the evening, Gen. Strong rode to the front and ordered his brigade, consisting of the 54th Mass., Col. Shaw (colored regiment), the 6th Conn., Col. Chatfield, the 48th N. Y., Col. Barton, the 3d N. H., Col. Jackson, the 76th Penn., and the 9th Maine, Col. Emery, to advance to the .... instant, the line was seen slowly advancing in the dusk toward the fort, and before a double-quick had been ordered, a tremendous fire from the barbette guns on Fort Sumter, from the batteries on Cummings Point, and from all the guns on Fort Wagner, opened upon it. The guns from Wagner swept the beach, and those from Sumter and Cummings Point enfiladed it on the left.
When the brigade made the assault General Strong gallantly rode at its head. When it fell back, broken, torn and bleeding, Major Plimpton, of the 3d New Hampshire, was the highest commissioned officer to command it. General Strong, Col. Shaw, Col. Chatfield, Col. Barton, Col. Green, Col. Jackson, all had fallen; and the list I send you will tell how many other brave officers fell with them. Stories are flying about that this regiment and that regiment broke and run, that but for the frightened 54th Massachusetts (negro) we would have carried the fort; that the 9th Maine did not reflect much honor upon the gallant State she represents, and a thousand other reasons which I care not to enumerate. It is absurd to say these men did not fight and were not exposed to perhaps the most deadly fire of the war, when so many officers and so many of the rank and file were killed.
It must be remembered, too, that this assault was made in the night—a very dark night—even the light of the stars was obscured by the blackness of a heavy thunder-storm, and the enemy could be distinguished from our own men only by the light of bursting shot, and the flash of the howitzer and the musket. The 54th Massachusetts, (negro) whom Copperhead officers would have called cowardly if they had stormed and carried the gates of hell, went boldly into battle, for the second time, commanded by their brave Colonel, but came out of it led by no higher officer than the boy, Lieut. Higginson.
The 1st Brigade, under the lead of General Strong, failed to take the fort. It was now the turn of Col. Putnam, commanding the 2d Brigade, com... of the 7th N. H., the 62d Ohio, Col. St..., the 67th Ohio, Col. Vorhees, and the 100th N. Y., Col. Danely, to make the attempt. But alas! the task was too much for him. Through the same terrible fire he led his men to, over and into the fort, and for an hour held one half of it, fighting every moment of that time with the utmost desperation, and, as with the first brigade, it was not until he himself fell killed, and nearly all his officers wounded and no reinforcements arriving, that the men fell back, and the rebel shout and cheer of victory was heard above the roar of Sumter and the guns from Cumming's Point.
In this second assault by Col. Putnam's brigade, Col. Turner of Gen. Gilmore's staff, stood at the side of Col. Putnam when he fell, and with his voice and sword urged on the thinned ranks to the final charge. But it was too late. The 3d brigade, Gen. Stevenson's, was not on hand. It was madness for the 2d to remain longer under so deadly a fire, and the thought of surrendering in a body to the enemy could not for a moment be entertained. To fight their way back to the intrenchments [sic] was all that could be done, and in this retreat many a poor fellow fell, never to rise again.
Without a doubt, many of our men fell from our own fire. The darkness was so intense, the roar of artillery so loud, the flight of grape and canister shot so rapid and destructive, that it was absolutely impossible to preserve order in the ranks of individual companies, to say nothing of the regiments.
More than half the time we were in the fort; the fight was simply a hand to hand one, as the wounds received by many clearly indicate.—Some have sword thrusts; some are hacked on the head; some are stabbed with bayonets, and a few were knocked down with the butt end of muskets, but recovered in time to get away with swollen heads. There was terrible fighting to get into the fort, and terrible fighting to get out of it. The cowardly stood no better chance than the fearless. Even if they surrendered, the shells of Sumter were thickly falling around them in the darkness, and, as prisoners, they could not be safe, until victory, decisive and unquestioned, rested with one or the other belligerent [sic].
In this night assault, and from its commencement to its close, General Gillmore, his staff, and his volunteer aids, consisting of Colonel Littlefield of the 4th S. C., and Majors Bannister and Stryker, of the Paymaster's Department, were constantly under fire and doing all in their power to sustain the courage of the troops and urge on reinforcements. All that human power could do to carry this formidable earthwork seems to have been done. No one would have imagined in the morning that so fierce a cannonade from both the navy and the batteries on shore could fail to destroy every bomb proof the Rebels had erected. But the moment our men touched the parapets of the fort 1,300 strong streamed from their safe hiding place, where they had been concealed during the day, and fresh and strong, were prepared to drive us back. We then found to our sorrow that the 15-inch shot from the monitors, even when fired at a distance of but 1,080 yards, had not injured them in the least. Only the parapets of the fort had been knocked into sand heaps.
The amount of shell thrown at Fort Wagner would almost build another Ironsides.             N. P.
BEAUFORD, S. C., July 22.
I left the battlefield last Monday to visit the hospitals in this city and at Hilton Head, and nearly all the wounded have been brought in.
The large old mansions are nearly all full, and if there are to be wounded and dying no better accommodation, so far as the main buildings are concerned, could be found. But in other respects, I regret to say, the medical department were not prepared for so large a demand upon their time and skill. Soldiers are still lying in their cots who have not yet had their wounds dressed or had bullets extracted from their bodies.
By the Ben. De... from Morris Island, we have intelligence .... this morning. The Monitors are still hard at work upon Fort Wagner, but seem to ....  nothing beyond preventing the Rebels from repairing the work.
From an officer on board of an Ironside, I learn that in the attack of last ...day, seven hundred shots were fired from that vessel, and about the same number from the .... As Fort Wagner made but a feeble return, of course no damage was sustained by the Ironsides.
Lieut. Col. Hall, Provost Marshal General for the Department of the South, met the commander at Fort Wagner under flag of truce on Sunday morning, in order to arrange in regard to the burial or our dead. The Rebel officer would not treat with him, but told him that the dead would be buried and the wounded cared for as well as their own. Much indignation was expressed on account of placing negro troops in front on the night of the assault—they desire to be killed by white men and not by stolen slaves.
They reported Colonel Putnam, of the 7th New Hampshire, dead and buried, and Col. Shaw, of the 54th Massachusetts, wounded and a prisoner.
Prisoners taken and deserters who have come in within the past few days, say that the Rebel loss during the fight of Saturday was quite three hundred; that at one gun there were four detachments of men shot down; and that late in the afternoon our fire became so hot that the officers commanding companies could not lead or drive their men out of the bomb-proofs.
The fighting qualities of the 6th Connecticut and the 48th New York they speak in the highest terms of, and say that the prisoners from these regiments will be unusally [sic] well treated. They also admit that the 54th Massachusetts fought well, but say all the prisoners captured from that regiment will be sold into Slavery.
They were all sent into Charleston the same night of the attack.
By the Cosmopolitan, just in from Morris Island, I learn that an exchange of prisoners to take place to-morrow. Our wounded are to be brought to this city. Col. Putnam is reported not dead, but severely wounded.

The Attack on Fort Wagner.
A BLOODY NIGHT ASSAULT AND REPULSE
Correspondent of the New York Tribune.
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., July 19, 1863.
Again Fort Wagner has been assaulted and again we have been repulsed, and with, I regret to say, a much more formidable loss in killed, wounded and missing, than in the first attempt.
The first assault failed, as I stated in my last letter on account of the tardiness of the 76th Pennsylvania and the 9th Maine to properly support the successful assault of the 7th Connecticut, who were left alone on the parapet and within the ditches of the fort to battle with the whole Rebel garrison.
In the assault of the 11th inst., but one brigade, and that a very small one, under the command of Gen. Strong, were engaged; in that of last evening a whole division, consisting of three full brigades, were drawn out in line to take part in the action, but on account of some misunderstanding of orders but two actually participated in the fight.
Since the engagement of the 11th Gen. Gillmore has strained every nerve to strengthen his position on Morris Island, and so far as human foresight can discern, has made his lines of defense impregnable before advancing to the attack.
Three-fourths of the island is in our possession; five batteries have been erected, in all containing nine 30-pound and four 20-pound Parrotts, and ten 10-inch mortars on the left, with two 30-pound Parrotts, ten 10-inch mortars, and three full batteries of light artillery on the right. The earthworks protecting these guns have all been erected by the New York Volunteer Engineers, under the direction of Capt. Brooks and Lieuts. Mirche and Suter, of Gen. Gillmore's staff. During the action of yesterday, Lieut. Col. Jackson, Chief of Artillery on Gen. Gillmore's staff, commanded on the left, and Capt. Langdon of the 1st U. S. Artillery, Company M., on the right. The extreme right rests on the ocean beach; the extra left, on the edge of a swamp, about 500 yards from the small creek separating Morris Island from James Island. The whole line of batteries sweeps in the form of a semicle, and is at all points about 1,800 yards from Fort Wagner. Nearly all the guns upon the left are about 4,000 yards from Fort Sumter; but being of light calibre compared with the one on that formidable structure, were not brought to bear upon her at any time during the action.
Gen. Gillmore designed to commence the bombardment of the fort at daylight yesterday morning, but on account of a terrific thunder-storm, which commenced early in the evening and continued until morning, delaying the work of the engineers and dampening the ammunition, the action did not open until half-past 12. At that hour Admiral Dahlgren signaled that he was ready, and in a few moments the Montauk (his flagship,) the Ironsides, the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Weehawken and the Patapsco moved into line in the order in which I have named them, and commenced hurling their heaviest shot and shell around, upon and within the fort, and, with intervals of but a very few minutes, continued this terrible fire until one hour after the sun had gone down. During all the afternoon the iron fleet lay about one mile off from the fort, but just at the close of the engagement, and but a few moments before the first assault was made by Gen. Strong, the Admiral ran the Montauk directly under the guns of Fort Wagner, and, within 280 yards, fired round after round from his 15-inch gun, sending, as every shot struck, vast clouds of sand, mud and timber high up into the air, making one huge sand-heap of that portion of the fort facing the sea, and dismounting two of the heaviest guns.
Deserters and prisoners tell us that Fort Wagner mounts thirteen rifled guns of heavy calibre, but during all this furious bombardment by land and sea, she condescended to reply with but two; one upon the whole fleet of iron clads, and one upon the entire line of land batteries. She may possibly have fired one shot to our one hundred, but I think even that number is a large estimate. There were no casualties on the Monitors or Ironsides, and but one man killed and one slightly wounded within the batteries. The firing was almost entirely from our own side. With the most powerful glass, but very few men could be seen in the fort. At half-past two, a shot from one of our guns on the left, cut the halyards on the flag-staff and brought the Rebel flag fluttering to the ground.
In a moment, almost before we had begun to ask ourselves whether they had really lowered their flag, and were upon the point of surrendering or not, the old red battle-flag, which the Army of the Potomac has so often had defiantly shaken in its face, was run up about ten feet above the parapet, a little cluster of men rallied around it, cheered, waved their hats, and then disappeared, and were not again seen during the day. Fort Sumter, the moment the Rebel flag came to the ground, sent a shot over our heads to assure us that it had been lowered by accident and not by design. In this shot she also denied us to distinctly understand that before Fort Wagner surrendered, she herself would have to be consulted. With the exception of this little episode almost profound silence, so far as the Rebel garrison themselves could maintain it, prevailed within the fort. A heavy cloud of smoke and sand, occasioned by our constantly exploding shell, hung over the fort all the afternoon, and it was only when the wind drifted it away that we were able to see the amount of damage we had done. In a few hours what had been the smooth regular lines of the engineer, and the beautiful sodded embankments, became ragged and irregular heaps of sand with great gaps and chasms in all the sides of the fort exposed to our fire. From my point of observation, a wooden look-out, fifty feet high, erected for Gen. Gillmore and staff upon a sand hill of about the same hight [sic], and situated a short distance back of the batteries, it seemed as if no human being could live beneath so terrible a fire whether protected by bomb-proofs or not, and in this opinion I was fully sustained by nearly every person around me. There seemed to be but one opinion, and that was that we had silenced nearly every gun, that the 15-inch shells had driven the Rebels from the bomb-proofs, and that if there had been a strong infantry force in the rear of the fort we had made it impossible for them to remain there and had slaughtered them by hundreds. But there were a few later developments that proved their opinion was the correct one, who said this profound silence on the Rebel side was significant, not of defeat and disaster, but of ultimate success in repulsing our assault; that they were keeping themselves under cover until they could look into the eye of our men, and send bullets through their heads, and would then swarm by thousands, with every conceivable deadly missile in their hands, and drive us in confusion, and with terrible slaughter back to our intrenchments [sic].
The afternoon passed, and the heavy roar of the big guns on land and sea gradually ceased. Slowly and sullenly the Monitors, with the exception of the Montauk, moved back to the anchorage-ground of the morning. The music of the sublime billows, forever hymning their sublime chants, was again heard along the shore; the sun went down, not in golden glory, but in clouds of blackness and darkness, and mutterings of thunder and flashes of lightning. In the slight interval between the cessation of the cannonade and the assault at the point of the bayonet, the artillery of heaven opened all along the Western horizon, and in peal after peal demonstrated how insignificant is the power of man when compared with that of Him who holds the elements in the hollow of His hand.
For eight hours the Monitors and the Ironsides have kept up a continuous fire, Fort Wagner has not yet surrendered. For eight hours fifty-four guns from the land batteries have hurled their shot and shell within her walls, and still she flaunts the red battle flag in our face.
"Something must be done, and that too quickly, or in a few days we shall have the whole army in Virginia upon us," said an officer high in command. "We must storm the fort to-night and carry it at the point of the bayonet!"
In a few moments signals are made from the top of the look-out, and soon Generals and Colonels commanding divisions and brigades were seen galloping to the headquarters of the commanding General. A few words in consultation and Gens. Seymour, Strong, Stevenson, and Cols. Putnam and Montgomery are seen hastening back to their respective commands. Officers shout, bugles sound, the word of command is given, and soon the soldiers around, upon and under the sand hills of Morris Island spring from their hiding places, fall into line, march to the beach, are organized into new brigades, and in solid colemn [sic] stand ready to move to the deadly assault.
Not in widely extended battle line, with cavalry and artillery at supporting distances, but in solid regimental column, on the hard ocean beach, for half a mile before reaching the fort, in plain sight of the enemy, did these three brigades move to their appointed work.
Gen. Strong, who has so frequently since his arrival in this Department braved death in its many forms of attack, was assigned to the command of the 1st Brigade. Col. Putnam of the 7th New Hampshire, who, although of the regular army, and considered one of the best officers in the Department, had never led his men into battle nor been under fire, took command of the 2d, and Gen. Stevenson the 3d, constituting the reserve. The 54th Massachusetts (col­ored regiment,) Col. Shaw, was the advanced regiment in the 1st Brigade, and the 2d South Carolina (negro,) Col. Montgomery, was the last regiment of the reserve. The selection of the 54th Massachusetts to lead the charge was undoubtedly made on ac­count of the good fighting qualities it had displayed a few days before on James Island, an account of which you have in my letter of the 17th.
These brigades, as I have remarked before, formed for this express duty. Many of the regiments had never seen their brigade commanders before; some of them had never been under fire, and, with exception of three regiments in the 1st Brigade, none of them had ever been engaged in this form of attack. All had fresh in their memories the severe repulse we had met on the morning of the 11th ult. For two years the Department of the South had been in existence, and until the storming of the batteries on the south end of Morris Island the army had won no victory fairly acknowledged by the enemy.
Just as darkness began to close in upon the scene of the afternoon and evening, Gen. Strong rode to the front and ordered his brigade, consisting of the 54th Mass., Col. Shaw, (colored regiment,) the 6th Conn., Col. Chatfield, the 48th N. Y., Col. Barton, the 3d N. H., Col. Jackson, the 76th Penn., and the 9th Maine, Col. Emery, to advance to the assault. At the instant the line was seen slowly advancing in the dusk toward the fort, and before a double-quick had been ordered, a tremendous fire from the barbette guns on Fort Sumter, from the batteries on Cummings' Point, and from all the guns on Fort Wagner opened upon it. The guns from Wagner swept the beach, and those from Sumter and Cummings Point enfiladed it on the left. In the midst of this terrible shower of shot and shell they pushed their way, reached the fort, portions of the 54th Mass., the 6th Conn., and the 48th N. Y., dashed through the ditches, gained the parapet, and engaged in a hand-to-fight with the enemy, and for nearly half-an-hour held their ground, and did not fall back until nearly every commissioned officer was shot down. As on the morning of the assault of the 11th inst., these brave men were exposed to a most galling fire of grape and canister from howitzers, raking the ditches from the bastions of the fort, from hand grenades, and from almost every other modern implement of warfare. The Rebels fought with the utmost desperation, and so did the larger portion of Gen. Strong's brigade, as long as there was an officer to command it. When the brigade made the assault Gen. Strong gallantly rode at its head. When it fell back, broken, torn and bleeding, Major Plimpton of the 3d New Hampshire was the highest commissioned officer to command it. Gen. Strong, Col. Shaw, Col. Chatfield, Col. Barton, Col. Green, Col. Jackson, all had fallen. Stories are flying about that this regiment and that regiment broke and run; that but for the frightened 54th Massachusetts (negro) we would have carried the fort; that the 9th Maine did not reflect much honor upon the gallant State she represents, and a thousand other reasons which I care not to enumerate. It is absurd to say these men did not fight and were not exposed to perhaps the most deadly fire of the war, when so many officers and so many of the rank and file were killed. It must be remembered, too, that this assault was made in the night—a very dark night—even the light of the stars was obscured by the blackness of a heavy thunder storm, and the enemy could be distinguished from our own men only by the light of bursting shell and the flash of the howitzer and the musket. The 54th Massachusetts (negro,) whom Copperhead officers would have called cowardly if they had stormed and carried the gates of hell, went boldly into battle, for the second time, commanded by their brave Colonel, but came out of it led by no higher officer than the boy, Lieut. Higginson.
The 1st Brigade, under the lead of Gen. Strong, failed to take the fort. It was now the turn of Col. Putnam, commanding the 2d Brigade, composed of the 7th N. H., the 62d Ohio, Col. Steele, the 67th Ohio, Col. Vorhees, and the 100th N. Y., Col. Danely, to make the attempt. But alas! the task was too much for him. Through the same terrible fire he led his men to, over into the fort, and for an hour held one-half of it, fighting every moment of that time with the utmost desperation, and, as with the 1st Brigade, it was not until he himself fell killed, and nearly all his officers wounded, and no re-enforcements arriving, that his men fell back, and the Rebel shout and cheer of victory was heard above the roar of Sumter and the guns from Cumming's Point.
In this second assault by Col. Putnam's brigade, Col. Turner of Gillmore's staff, stood at the side of Col. Putnam when he fell, and with his voice and sword urged on the thinned ranks to the final charge.—But it was too late. The 3d brigade, Gen. Stevenson's, was not on hand. It was madness for the 2d to remain longer under so deadly a fire, and the thought of surrendering in a body to the enemy could not for a moment be entertained. To fight their way back to the intrenchments [sic] was all that could be done, and in this retreat many a poor fellow fell, never to rise again.             
Without a doubt, many of our men fell from our own fire. The darkness was so intense, the roar of artillery so loud, the flight of grape and canister shot so rapid and destructive, that it was absolutely im­possible to preserve order in the ranks of individual companies, to say nothing of the regiments.
More than half the time we were in the fort, the fight was simply a hand to hand one, as the wounds received by many clear­ly indicate. Some have sword-thrusts, some are hacked on the head, some are stabbed with bayonets, and a few were knocked down with the butt-end of muskets, but recovered in time to get away with swollen heads. There was terrible fighting to get into the fort, and terrible fighting to get out of it. The cowardly stood no better chance for their lives than the fearless. Even if they surrendered, the shell of Sumter were thickly falling around them in the darkness, and, as prisoners, they could not be safe, until victory, decisive and unquestioned, rested with one or the other belligerant [sic].
The battle is over; it is midnight; the ocean beach is crowded with the dead, the dying and the wounded. It is with difficulty you can urge your horse through to Lighthouse Inlet. Faint lights are glimmering in the sand holes and rifle pits to the right, as you pass down the beach.—In these holes many a poor wounded and bleeding soldier has laid down to his last sleep. Friends are bending over them to staunch their wounds, or bind up their shattered limbs, but the deathly glare from sunken eyes tells that their kind services are all in vain.

From the 48th Regiment.
We are permitted to make some extracts from a letter from Lieut. A. H. INGRAHAM, CO. C, 48th Regt. N. Y. S. V., dated Morris Island, S. C.,
July 24th, 1863.
"I hasten to send word that you may rejoice and be thankful once again with me, that I am still unharmed, though such a feeling just now seems almost selfish. We have had ten days fighting since we came to this Island. But Sumter got the range of our camp and shelled it the greater part of the time.  We often dodged the shells by falling into sand pits of our own digging. Our last engagement was the storming of Fort Wagner, a battle which, for daring, bloodiness and disaster has not been equaled during the war. The attack being made at night, our forces fired into each other; also, the fort appeared to be mined—the rebs would appear at a certain place and give us a volley, and when, our boys would make a dash, they would leave under ground and soon appear in another place in our rear, confusing our forces entirely; had it been day-time, so that we could have seen to pick out, these places, no doubt we would have held the fort, as a part of it was in our possession nearly three hours. The 48th distinguished itself as twice heretofore; most of the officers were cut down before reaching the parapet; our colors, however, were planted there—the staff was shattered—the bunting riddled—only two other colors were planted. Sidney Wadhams is missing. The last I can learn of him, he was on the rampart of the Fort, calling to some of the men to "come on;" perhaps he was killed, though I hope not; if dead, he died nobly. * * * I have just received your letter of the 9th, am glad to hear from the 150th; they too have smelt powder. I do hope they will never be cut up as badly as the 48th.
"The wounded prisoners in our possession have been sent to Charleston, to be exchanged for ours. We hope soon to hear from many, whom we now think dead. I have no time for farther particulars; you will doubtless find full accounts in the papers. I am very well except fatigue."

THE SIEGE OF CHARLESTON.
The Last Attempt to Storm Fort Wagner.
TERRIBLE FIGHTING AND REPULSE.
Correspondence of the N. Y. Tribune.
MORRIS ISLAND, July 19. (1863)
Just as darkness began to close in upon the scene of the afternoon and evening, Gen. Strong rode to the front and ordered his brigade, consisting of the 54th Mass., Col. Shaw, (colored regiment), the 6th Conn., Col. Chatfield, the 48th N. Y., Col. Barton, the 3d N. H., Col. Jackson, the 76th Penn., and the 9th Maine, Col. Emery, to advance to the assault. At the instant, the line was seen slowly advancing in the dusk toward the fort, and before a double-quick had been ordered, a tremendous fire from the barbette guns on Fort Sumter, from the batteries on Cummings Point, and from all the guns on Fort Wagner, opened upon it. The guns from Wagner swept the beach, and those from Sumter and Cummings Point enfiladed it on the left.
In the midst of this terrible shower of shot and shell they pushed their way, reached the fort, portions of the 54th Massachusetts, the 6th Connecticut, and the 48th New York, dashed through the ditches, gained the parapet, and engaged in a hand-to-hand fight with the enemy, and for nearly half an hour held their ground, and did not fall back until nearly every commissioned officer was shot down. As on the morning of the assault of the 11th inst., these brave men were exposed to a most galling fire of grape and cannister, from howitzers, raking the ditches from the bastions of the fort, from hand grenades, and from almost every other modern implement of warfare. The Rebels fought with the utmost desperation, and so did the larger portion of General Strong's brigade, as long as there was an officer to command it.
When the brigade made the assault, Gen. Strong gallantly rode at its head. When it fell back, broken, torn and bleeding, Major Plimpton, of the 3d New Hampshire, was the highest commissioned officer to command it. Gen. Strong, Col. Shaw, Col. Chatfield, Col. Barton, Col. Green, Col. Jackson, all had fallen; and the list I send you will tell how many other brave officers fell with them.
Stories are flying about that this regiment and that regiment broke and run; that but for the frightened 54th Massachusetts (negro) we I would have carried the fort; that the 9th Maine did not reflect much honor upon the gallant State she represents, and a thousand other reasons which I care not to enumerate. It is absurd to say these men did not fight and were not exposed to perhaps the most deadly fire of the war, when so many officers and so many of the rank and file were killed. It must be remembered, too, that this assault was made in the night—a very dark night—even the light of the stars was obscured by the blackness of a heavy thunder storm, and the enemy could be distinguished from our own men only by the light of bursting shell, and the flash of the howitzer and the musket. The 54th Massachusetts (negro), whom Copperhead officers would have called cowardly if they had stormed and carried the gates of hell, went boldly into battle, for the second time, commanded by their brave Colonel, but came out of it led by no higher officer than the boy, Lieut. Higginson.
The 1st Brigade, under the lead of General Strong, failed to take the fort. It was now the turn of Col. Putnam, commanding the 2d Brigade, composed of the 7th New Hampshire, the 62d Ohio, Col. Steele, the 67th Ohio, Col. Voorhees, and 100th New York, Col. Danely, to make the attempt. But alas! the task was too much for him. Through the same terrible fire he led his men to, over and into the fort, and for an hour held one-half of it, fighting every moment of that time with the utmost desperation, and, as with the 1st Brigade, it was not until he himself fell killed, and nearly all his officers wounded, and no re-enforcements arriving, that his men fell back, and the Rebel shout and cheer of victory was heard above the roar of Sumter and the guns from Cumming's Point.
In this second assault by Col. Putnam's brigade, Col. Turner of Gen. Gillmore's staff, stood at the side of Col. Putnam when he fell, and with his voice and sword urged on the thinned ranks to the final charge. But it was too late. The 3d brigade, Gen. Stevenson's, was not on hand. It was madness for the 2d to remain longer under so deadly a fire, and the thought of surrendering in a body to the enemy could not for a moment be entertained. To fight their way back to the intrenchments [sic] was all that could be done, and in this retreat many a poor fellow fell never to rise again.
Without a doubt many of our men fell from our own fire. The darkness was so intense, the roar of artillery so loud, the flight of grape and canister shot so rapid and destructive, that it was absolutely impossible to preserve order in the ranks of individual companies, to say nothing of the regiments.

Army Correspondence.
A letter from Frank Cady of this city, a member of the 48th Regiment, has been shown us. It is dated Hilton Head, July 24th. This Regiment, it will be remembered, was the first to enter Fort Wagner, in the late assault near Charleston. Frank says:
"As soon as we got the orders the boys gave a yell and started on the double quick. They drove the Rebels off the parapet of the fort, but as soon as they were in, the enemy opened with grape and canister, mowing them down like grass. The water was also let into the moat at the same time, drowning many of the wounded. The 48th held the fort till 10 o'clock, awaiting reinforcements, and then had to retreat. While there they were fired upon by some of our regiments, through mistake.—They came out with only 152 effective men."
He reports "Black Sambo," a well known colored boy of Hudson, in the 54th Mass. regiment, looking very "natural." He encloses a paper containing rebel signals for blockade running, taken from a rebel officer's tent. They consist of a red white and blue color at intervals on the staff.
Lieut. Edw. Taylor, of Co. E, 48th, reported killed in the fort, has reached his home on Staten Island in safety on parole. He was wounded in the side. We were well acquainted with him—a young man scarcely of age, but "every inch a soldier." On the night of the battle, it is said, his father saw in a vision the body of his son enclosed in a coffin—a singular coincidence.
 

The Battle Flag of the Forty-eighth.
Raise gently now the shattered staff! O! sergeant tried and true!
And blend its folds of azure with kindred heavenly blue;
It shook above the bloody fight, it fanned the dying brave,
When gore leaped forth from gaping wounds and stained the hero's grave;
When death shot sped, when swords were clenched round Wagner's flame-girt wall,
Fluttered its plumes as wounded doves to see its bravest fall;
Though torn and worn by ball and shot it glistens proudly yet,
As first it crowned 'neath Northern skies the unstained bayonet.
Like maddened waves our dark lines beat the foeman's walls of sand,
And bayonets flashed like flying spray upon that island strand,
As mangled flower it floated on above the soldier's head,
And reared its crest on Wagner's peak, 'midst dying and the dead;
While valient hearts rushed to its shade, a steel-encircled zone
Clung to its form as needles cling around the polar stone,
Till Strong lay bleeding on the brink and Green's brave voice was still,
And death-thinned ranks wound slowly from the cannon-bristling hill.
Unwrinkled once its silken folds, as infants' stainless cheek,
Now ragged as the cloud which crests the heaven-reaching peak;
But dearer far in present guise than when its hues were young;—
Each bloody fold and tattered stripe speaks with a fairy tongue.
They tell of comrades sleeping chill along the Southern fields,
The hard fought light which to Death's hand his woeful harvest yields;
Our eyes grow dim to see it wave, our soldiers eye their scars,
We look with pride upon its form—God bless our Stripes and Stars!

THE REPULSE AT FORT WAGNER. Partial Lists of Killed and Wounded in the New-York and New-England Regiments.
The following reports of casualties among the New-York and New-England regiments which participated in the assault upon Fort Wagner on July 19, are the most complete which have been received. It must be remembered, however, that very many are included whose wounds will not incapacitate them for active duty for more than a few days:
NEW-YORK REGIMENTS.
FORTY-EIGHTH NEW-YORK.
Col. W. B. BARTON, severely in hip,
Lieut.-Col. James M. Green, killed.
COMPANY A.
Missing.
Lieut. Charles E. Fox, sup-     B. M. Cann.
posed to have been wound-    Patrick Dunegan.
ed and have since died.                      Henrich Limburg.
Sergt. T. B. Carman, sup-       Wm. McCormick.
posed killed.                            James Larkin.
Corp. Vrederling,                                Daniel  Nelson.
Corp. Jessie Smith.                  Walter Smith.
Patrick Brady—supposed       Luther Ketchum.
killed.                                      Cornelious Cadmus
Wounded in Camp or Hospital.
Sergt. Robert McKellar.                      Joel Amos.
James Hill.                                           John Nolan.
James Brady.                           John Holehan.
David White.                          Patrick Smith.
Peter Nolan.                            George Carman.
Francis Summerford.              S. McCarty.
John Lewis.
COMPANY B.
Capt. Nere A. Ellfering—leg.
Missing.
Sergt. J . R. Depew.                Daniel Dyckman.
Corp. John Gardner.               John Donaghy.
Corp. Sidney Wadhams.                     Daniel Madden.
Corp. Isaac J. Mason.              John Vanness.
Corp. Alex. Byers. (color        Wm. J. Owen.
guard.)                                                 Carl Rolricht.
Corp. Geo. Tuesdell.               Joseph H. Sielvers.
Martin Coffee.                                    Daniel B. Smith.
John Coffee.                           Isaac Silcocks.
John Curtis.                                         John Milday.
Wounded and in Camp or Hospital.
Sergt. Peter W. Smith.                        Charles Travis,
Corp. Freeman Atwood.                     Thos. Van Tassel.
Wm. Brown.                           Adam Weisart.
John Haiton.                            Robert Maxwell.
Thomas McGarry.                               Charles Scott.
Wm. McCloud.

COMPANY C.
Killed.
Capt. James Farrell.                 Daniel Kane.
Lieut. Robert S. Edwards.
Missing.
____ Becker.                           ____ Marshall.
____ Fenwick.                                    J. A. Smith.
____ King.                                          ____ Sturgis.
____ Lord.                                          ____ Nesbitt.
____ Levy.                                          ____ Hibson.
____ Lankin
Wounded.
Sergt. F. Frankenburg                         ____ Gorman.
severely.                                              ____ Osbourne.
Sergt. Shultz.                          ____ Ryan.
Corp. L. Bond.                                    John Smith.
Corp. J. O'Brien.                                 W. Mason.
Corp. Warner.                                     M. Carroll.
____ Bondy.                           M. Sullivan.
____ Betts.                                          John O'Brien.
____ Dempsey.

COMPANY D.
Wounded.
Capt. Jas. O. Paxton—dan-    D. Emmons.
gerously.                                              J. Graham.
First Sergt. Patterson.                         W. J. Howell.
Sergt. J. G. Abbott.                 T. Jones.
A. Lippencott.                                     Timothy Moore.
Corp. L. Prim.                                     J. Spear.
Corp. Christoph'r Harbison.    E. Souder.
Corp. S. White.                                   B. Stites.
E. H. Croasdale.                                  J. Zerwick.
Missing.
Sergt. Crammer—breast, se-   C. W. Cole.
verely.                                                 J.D.Lodge.
Corp. L. O. Church.                C. W. Mammer.
D. Basworth.                           A. Mason.
J. B.Bechtel.                            A. Palmer.
D. Clifton.                                           H. Smith.
J. Clark.

COMPANY E.
Killed.
Lieut. Joseph Taylor, in the fort.
Wounded.
Sergt. J . Sweeney.                  Thomas Walters.
First Lieut. Geo. Morton.        George Degarmo.
Corp. Jas. Dunn, Color G'rd   W. T. Manley.
Corp. Edw. Johnson.              Frederick Post.
W. Andrews, Bugler.              J. B. Raynor.
Andrew Evans.                                   F. Taylor.
W. T. Major.                            A. Vialand.
D. B. Rumsey.                                    E. Wakefield.
C. Smalls.                                            J. Hanna.
Missing.
Corp. George Gardner.                       F. Gilmore.
Corp. Charles Haines.                         William Hawkins.
Capt. Easwell.                                     Charles Messenger.
Capt. A. Bates                                    R. McNally.
R. Anderson.                           P. Smith.
J. Benton.                                            C. Smith.
J. Brown.                                             W. B. Terry.
James Dolan.                           T. Vesey.
Robert Douglas.                                  J. Vangant.                                                     

COMPANY F.
Killed.
J. F. Fonday.                           Corp. Samuel Swartwank.
W. H. Foley.
Wounded.
First Sergt. Hutchinson                       D. McManus.
Cor.p Onderkirk.                                 H. McFarland.
Corp. L. E. Lyon.                                M. Nolan.
M. Bower.                                           J. Ryan.
J. H. Deacon.                          E. Sheridan.
W. Furniss.                                          W. Tuttle.
J. Motteshed.                          L. Vorheef.
Missing.
Corp. J. A. Hyatt.                               M Lemage.
Corp. R. C. Williams.              T. Lannery.
Corp. W. H. Howard.                         J. Murphey.
W. Burns.                                            M. McLinehan.
H. W. Kellogg.                                    S. Robbins.

COMPANY H.
Wounded.
Capt. Wm. S. Lockwood.       A. Havens.
arm and shoulder.                               Hall.
Lieut. James A, Barrett-                      Johnston.
thigh.                                                   Charles Liminey.
First Sergt. Edward Coler.      Lynch.
Sergt. Sparks.                          Laxy.
Corp. W. W. Luyster.                         Mackay.
Brown.                                                E. Miller.
Curtis.                                                 Powers
Freeman.                                             H. Walling.
Groves.                                                J. Yerks.

Missing.
Sergt. Clayton.                        Morton.
Corp. Walling.                         Nichols.
Joe Allen.                                Pease.
Joseph. Allen.              Payne.
Cowell.                                    Price
Church.                                   Stebbings.
Clarkson.                                 Wilson.
Ford.                                       Witherspoon.
Governey.                               J. Yorasky.
Hoff.                                       Job Liminy.
Lee.                                         Striger.

COMPANY K.
Killed.
Capt. Fred. Hurst—large shot through the breast.
WOUNDED.
Lieut. A. F. Miller--bullet and bayonet wound in leg.
First Sergt. Umbleby--badly.
Wounded or Missing.
Sergt. John Smith.                   H. Dingee.
Sergt. F. Johnson.                   Wm. Hess.
Corp. A. Hillicker.      J. J. Johnson.
Corp. A. Ellison.                     Thomas Veiley.
Corp. J. M. Westerfield.         Chas. Mills.
Corp. G. J. Gregory.   James McPherson.
Corp. Benj. Seward.   J. L. McKee.
Corp. J. Brower.                      P. Ostrander.
N. S. Ackerly.                         Lake Rose.
Wm. Bouton.              Wm. S. Scudder.
M. R. Conklin.                        Horatio Jewell.
W. H. Conklin.                        Wm. Vance.
G. F. Conklin.                         M. Vanerken.
Frank Conklin.
Of those classified as wounded and missing, eight are the former and twenty-four the latter, but the list does not designate which were the wounded ones. Companies G and I are not at Morris Island. Total casualties in the eight companies 255, including three officers killed, three missing, and believed to have been killed, and six wounded, and brought off the field. Only three of the officers came out of the fight untouched—Capt. COAN, Lieut. ROBINSON, and Adjutant CHRISTOPHER HALE, and each of these three had their clothes hit. Capt. COAN is in command of the regiment.

From the Brooklyn 48th.
To the Editor of the Brooklyn City News:
ST. AUGUSTINE, Florida,
August 4th, 1863.
My Dear Sir—The Brooklyn 48th have landed here, and six companies of the 7th Connecticut, leave here to-day for Morris Island. We expect to stay in the ancient city for a time—all quiet and healthy here—everything delightful. Enclosed is a copy of the New South. I am just off guard and the steamer Boston leaves with the mail in half an hour. Send my papers here, they are a treat worth having, especially now that the rebellion is getting drunk.
Yours truly, WILL WATKINS.

We extract the following paragraph from the copy of the New South forwarded by our correspondent:
THE 48TH NEW YORK.—A detachment from this regiment, now greatly reduced by the casualties in their brave and determined charge on Fort Wagner, was one day, while we were constructing our works at the front on Morris Island, detailed to draw some mortar down to them, under Gen. Seymour's direction. The latter addressed them "now men, we have got the enemy pretty well cowed—let us show them we are not afraid of them; we will mount these mortars right before their eyes." The boys gave a shout and dragged the mortars, one after another to their positions where they were mounted in plain view of the enemy. They were of course vigorously shelled, but had only one man wounded. After the work was done, Gen. Seymour had the men formed, in line and spoke to them as follows: "My brave men, you have done well; this is the first time I have ever seen heavy mortars mounted directly under a hot fire from our enemy's fort, in broad daylight, and I give you the praise due for your coolness and bravery." Gen. Seymour has the reputation of being "hard" on Volunteers, but we are convinced that where they come up to the proper standard of discipline and bravery, he will never do them injustice. Capt. Wm. B. Coan, of Co. E, who had his coat torn by a grape shot, in the late fight, is now in command of the 48th.

A Letter from Will Watkins.
ST. HELENA ISLAND,
Evening of Friday, July 23, 1863—10 P.M.
To the Editor of the Brooklyn City News:
MY DEAR SIR—The Arago leaves Port Royal in the morning for New York. The camp of the 48th are alive to-night packing up and cooking rations for a sail in the morning, destination where—cannot tell.
We go, without doubt, to Folly Island, with all the regiments on this Island, negroes and all. Gen. Gilmore is wide awake. It is quite certain an effort will be made to drive the rebels off Morris Island in order to plant guns to reduce Fort Moultrie, which will be something before the final attack on the other forts and the city of Charleston. General Gilmore is one of our first class engineers, and, no doubt, warm work is ahead. The 3d New Hampshire are ordered to land on Folly Island at 8 o'clock to-morrow morning. They constitute a part of our brigade, and were with us to-day.
The negro regiments now here will have an opportunity to do something, and the Massachusetts blacks feel pretty smart.
The weather is fine, and green corn and watermelons are plenty. Yours truly,
WILL WATKINS.

Letter from Morris Island, S. C.
The Post Hospital—Efficient Surgeons—Under the Guns of Fort
Sumter—The Doom of Charleston—Beauregard's Blunder—Death of Lieut. Col. J. M. Green.
Special Corr. of the Advertiser and Tribune.
Picket Post, August 7th, 1863.
MR. EDITOR—I last wrote you from the Post Hospital on Folly Island. The climate and excessive labor of the soldiers are such here as to prostrate at times the most athletic and healthy. A few days rest, however, and the skillful treatment of Dr. C. M. Clark, the accomplished Post Surgeon, usually enables most persons with ordinary cases of disease to return to duty. There are now in the hospital about fifty cases, the most of whom are convalescent. There are a few there who were so seriously wounded that they could not be moved North, who, of course, receive particular attention. In addition to the regularly detailed nurses, we have here Miss Barton, from
Massachusetts, and Miss Gage, from Ohio, who, like good angels, are devoting their united and untiring energies to the comforts and wants of the wounded. These appear to be the only females in this Department whose nerves are sufficiently strong to enable them to extend their mission of mercy even where the cannon roars and the musket rattles. Permit me in this connection to make honorable mention of Dr. C. M. Clark, of the 39th Illinois, and Dr. Sames Westfall, of the 67th Ohio. These officers have both followed the war-path with their regiments for the past two years, and have been very successful in the general discharge of their duties. Recently they have had that which I suppose every young Surgeon desires, viz: a fine opportunity to try their surgical skill,—and most handsomely have they acquitted themselves.
Dr. Clark has performed several very critical cases of amputation, and with such perfect success that his skill is acknowledged by the entire medical corps of the department. He was formerly a student under the celebrated Dr. Mott of New York city, and, it is said, he possesses many traits of his preceptor's character.
Dr. Westfall is a graduate of the medical department of your own State University, and handles the scalpel with a will and dash which clearly indicates that he has been under the "big Gunn" of that popular institution.
I am in front to day, on picket duty with the 39th Illinois. Less than half a mile divides us from Fort Wagner, whose sharpshooters are constantly exchanging conical compliments with those who still stand by the Stars and Stripes, while from the frowning walls of Fort Sumter constantly come forth shot and shell that fall harmlessly at our feet, or bury themselves in the sandbanks that surround us. Wagner keeps her artillery silent; several of our heavy guns are pointing directly towards it, and the iron-clads are lying in close proximity, which doubtless tend to keep it quiet.
Fort Johnson is farther in the distance, and near the suburbs of the noted Secesh city. It however constantly reminds us of the fact that it is not ignorant of our locality, and feels that we are operating on ground sacred to its own safety.
Of Charleston we have a very fine view. The spires of her churches, from whose altars devout prayers doubtless daily ascend for secesh, tower up in beauty and grandeur. Yet my faith in God and our land and naval forces is such as to lead me to think that even over this city of pride and impudence there hangs a doom.
I see not far in the future, what I trust every loyal heart desires to see, flames flashing through her streets and smoke and ashes ascending heavenward, as an atonement for her sins and transgressions, of which modern times cannot furnish a parallel.
I am not at liberty to speak of our doings or designs, but 1 hope soon to be able to chronicle crowning acts in this Department. Our friends in Charleston are becoming fearful of the gradual approach of our forces, and greatly lament that we were ever permitted to gain a footing on Morris Island. Beauregard is blamed, and that too, in my estimation, not without cause.
Beauregard evidently committed a great error in leaving Folly Island in the condition that he did. Concluding, as he evidently did, that it was impossible to fortify it sufficiently strong to resist the onslaught of the iron-clads, the judgment of a boy ten years in trowsers would have dictated that the timber on the island should have been slashed and that the great sand-banks—Nature's fine forts—that lined Light House Inlet be levelled [sic] to the ground. Had this been done, we should have been deprived of the fine cover which we have had for our operations, and we could have erected batteries where we did only under a terrible and decimating fire of the enemy's heavy guns on the island, which would have been next to impossible.
We have had several interviews with the enemy under a flag of truce, relative to the exchange of wounded prisoners, which had finally been effected. Several valuable officers who it was supposed were dead, have been returned to us; and yet as the smoke and dust clear away from Fort Wagner, we find that we lost in the unfortunate charge upon it, many very excellent officers, whose death we deeply mourn. Among that number is Lt. Col. J. M. Greene of the 48th N. Y. Regiment and formerly a highly esteemed citizen of Grand Rapids, Michigan.
He fell on the parapet of the stubborn old Fort, while impetuously urging his regiment on to the terrible charge. Col. Green was a private in the ranks in the first Bull Run battle, where he fought gallantly, and thence rose gradually to the rank which he honorably held when death met him. A sensible, sociable, and true friend, a gentlemanly, brave and judicious officer, Col. Green had unconsciously drawn around him a large circle of co-patriot friends, who are left to mourn his early but heroic death.
"Sound the clarion, fill the fife,
To all the sensual world proclaim—
One crowded hour of glorious life,
Is worth AN AGE without a name."
ANTHROPOS.

THE ATTACK ON FORT WAGNER.
Description by a Participant in the Fight--Gallant Conduct of the Forty-Eighth, Brooklyn, Regiment.
HILTON HEAD, July 29, 1863.
To the Editor of the Brooklyn City News:
MY DEAR SIR:—I have for some weeks kept silent, because I had nothing special to say. On the 4th day of July we left St. Helena Island for Folly Island. The weather was hot, and the marching and fatigue work on Folly Island was hard indeed for the Regiment. On the nights of the 7th and 8th we were out in line, spending part of the night in the woods by dim moonlight, and part in scouting and marching. On the morning of the 9th the Regiment approached Morris Island, giving us a fine chance to witness the cannon duel between the Secesh and our batteries, opening on the Rebs at 6 o'clock with artillery. About 8 o'clock a Monitor drew near, and opened on the Morris Island Fort; not long after, our men appeared, landing in flat-boats on the Island, off to the left; then howitzer shots were made by them at the battery, keeping up a brisk fire, the shells whizzing over our heads, and causing us to dodge. One ball struck at the rear of me, within a few paces of a man who was coming over to the Regiment. He walked on, not seeming to notice it. Now three Monitors are engaging the batteries, signal flags in all directions, and the frigate Ironsides, still out to sea, has not fired a gun. A shell has just burst over our heads, coming from some distance toward Charleston, and still another. Our men lie in ambush behind sand-hills, palmetto trees, &c. Ten o'clock—the ball goes on; we can see the four companies of the 48th drawing near—double-quick at intervals,—preparatory to a charge, and the Rebs shelling our small boat howitzers. Gen. Strong's Brigade is the storming party. The 48th belong to him. Cos. I and G only, are left behind him at Pulaski. We learn that Gen. Terry has made a landing on James Island. Fort Sumter is just ahead in plain view, which makes our men feel like fighting. The cannon duel continues; our four companies, with sharp-shooters, draw near the battery, picking off the gunners. Now for our order to go. It comes, and the other four companies start, double-quick, through and out of our battery or fort, down to the water, under fire from the Secesh battery; we cross in boats, the solid cannon-shot striking all around us, and soon landing on the other side, on Morris Island, (joining the other four companies which came up through the marsh from the left,) charge on the fort. The Rebs surrender. Other Regiments are landing in force, but the 48th follow up towards Charleston, and take two more batteries, turning some of the guns on the enemy, who are retreating between the sand-hills to Fort Wagner. The Monitors are at work all around the Island. Shell and solid shot fly all around us, and the troops are much exposed.
July 11th—In the early morn the 6th Connecticut Regiment charge a battery of great strength, and mount the parapet. The Ninth Maine break in their support, and lose to us the battery, with a destruction of many men. The 48th lost, the first day, seven killed and thirty-nine wounded. Brave Capt. Lent fell gallantly leading his Company. Six Rebel sharp shooters were posted to kill him, as they thought him a general.—The Forty-Eighth were called up in line, and slept last night on our arms. To-day the ironclads are at work at Sumter, while the wooden gunboats are engaging Fort Wagner and the rebel batteries. Our reinforcements are coming up, the dead and wounded are attended to, and rations are coming over. Heavy loads of ordinance, guns, artillery and siege pieces are arriving, shells flying, from the guns, and death is all around us. Near the rebel batteries we gained whole camps—tents and cooking utensils all falling into our hands, as well as pigs, chickens, corn meal, flour, &c., too numerous to mention—letters to be sent, and that had come here, from secesh towns and villages.—For the present we notice only something to eat, having slung away our haversacks containing three days' rations, in order that we might make a better fight.
Evening—Troops continue to come over. Telegraph wires are being laid to follow our troops. Monitors are opening on James's Island batteries. Gen. Gilmore and staff are just over, and I notice a fatigue party of three hundred men drawing up heavy cannon towards the secesh batteries near the other side of the island.
Six o'clock—Sharp firing on James Island from both sides; at tattoo we are in camp, in line of battle, the 48th sleeping on the ground without blankets, all armed and equipped.
July 12th—The rebel gun-boat is off James's Island, in the creek. Slow firing this morning.—. The rebs are landing troops (under Sumter's guns) on this Island. A light battery goes forward, drives off the gun-boat, and sinks a Charleston steamer. A rain storm in the night, and very dark. Two rebel spies, it is supposed, have been in our camp.
July 13th—Our troops have been under shell fire all day and part of the night, from Sumter. One of our men was killed by a shell. Our regiment in great danger all day. Hills covered with men—mortars and seige [sic] pieces brought forward.
Evening—The 48th advance in the entrenchments. Men tired and exhausted—heavy fatigue work continually. In the night our pickets were driven in, also Co. C, which had just relieved Co. B. It was dark, but we soon understood the matter, and pitched into the rebels, driving them back and taking a number of their men prisoners, and thus preserving a battery of Gen. Gilmore's then nearly completed, Company B (Capt. Elefwing)  occupying the advance picket ditch, near Wagner, which the Company had held for some time during the night.
All the next day sharpshooters busy on both sides—at one time four bullets struck quite near me at the same time almost. It was an ugly picket fight, watching for heads. The camp was severely shelled from Sumter until about noon. Their favorite pieces taken from the Keokuck burst, they having overcharged them, and I watched the shell whizzing over our camp through the air, reaching near Folly Island, a distance of about five miles.—The previous shells had burst almost in the tent of Gen. Strong and the 48th, which regiment he liked and preferred to keep near his quarters. Fortunately no one was even hurt by these threatening fragments of destruction which fell all around.—We hear that the men in Fort Moultrie mutined [sic] and turned their guns upon Fort Sumter, and that ten men were hung in Charleston.
July 14th—All day annoyed by sharpshooters in the intrenchments [sic].
July 15th—Firing on both sides while batteries were being built or finished—sharp cannonading on James' Island with our gunboats—men still in the intrenchments [sic].
July 16th—Work of mounting guns progressing —expect to be completed to-night—our camp shelled for a good part of the day—gunboats reply at intervals.
Midnight—Thunder, lightening, wind, rain, and grease light, down in a hole with fleas, reptiles and wet sand, by the side of a knoll, in a beautiful spot of that lovely and attractive place spoken of so often during the rebellion, I am writing with a lead pencil, in an old secesh, mouldy, ugly, and torn tent.
July 17th, night—Thunder, lightening, and rain. We are working by companies and regiments, conveying ammunition, shell and shot under the guns of secesh, very laborious work. The sea is lined with marines in small boats, sounding, and watching the Rebel Forts.
July 18th—This morning the 48th Regiment came into camp, wet through, and completely used up after all these days and nights of excitement and hard work. They have had one ration of whiskey—and received a few hours sleep, when the regiment were ordered to move to the front, in line of battle. The batteries and Navy had allready [sic] opened and were directing their fire on Fort Wagner, when suddenly Fort Sumter and other well-known rebel strongholds were all speaking by the cannon's loud voice.
It was a grand sight for us to witness. About 5 or 6 o'clock P. M. we received a ration of whiskey, having had but little to eat during the day; all around us as far as the eye could see was one swarm of shells flying and exploding. As evening grew near the breeze of the sea fanned us a little, when we started double quick up the beach for Fort Wagner, cheers were given the 48th by other regiments, Gen. Strong riding along without hat or cap—noticing us as if it might be for the last time—but it was a brave and honest expression of hope for victory. We heartily cheered the General, and on we went, under a severe shelling from Sumter, from which place we could be seen and our motive understood. When within a few yards of Fort Wagner, volley followed volley, and the Minie balls took down our men, while we in turn aimed at the heads of Secesh. A steady battle was now the work, the shades of night overtook us, and the fight grew more desperate, our men falling, but steadily gaining, crossing the moat over the first ditch, and on the parapet with our colors. Colonel Barton was wounded, Lieut. Col. Green (of Troy, N. Y.) killed while driving his knife into a Secesh gun; Gen. Strong wounded—but on they come to the slaughter! Our men are in close action, and two bayonets were run through a rebel colonel who boldly came out in the night endeavoring to rally his men to "Glory," as he remarked. Private Burnett, of Co. K, took the rebel's sword and brought it from the battle-ground. Now was the "tug of war." The Ninth Maine played on us the same trick that they had previously done on the same ground with the 76th Pennsylvania. It seems hard to go back on any regiment that has anything to do in this war, but so very important to us was the capture of Fort Wagner—so plainly was it to be seen that it involved nothing less than the fall of Charleston—that any regiment which failed to support a storming party already grasping the prize, should receive the worst of censure. Our men were being taken prisoners, and in turn we were taking them. It was a hand-to-hand fight. I was taken prisoner and escaped the same night. On my way back, a shell from Sumter exploded, probably within two or three feet of my face, and from that instant I have not been able to write until to-day (July 29th)—not knowing anything until the next day, about eleven o'clock, when I was brought off the battleground by two privates of another regiment, who in the excitement of the hour, took me to be a rebel. The One Hundredth New York, by some mistake, fired into our regiment, doing much injury to the 48th. Glass bottles, nails, hand grenades, grape and canister, explosive bullets, buckshot and small pigeon shot, were used against us; and it can be proved that chain-shot was used—a piece being brought off by our men. South Carolina will break the law of nations, and break her own neck.
In closing, I must add that but few of the old 48th (Perry) Volunteers are now left. It was a short work of death. But the Rebels say the 48th did not fight like men but like tigers, and also that no short contest since the war has equaled [sic] the desperate charge on the night of the 18th of July at Fort Wagner. We found that the fort was arched, also caves, and holes in the earth, entrenchments and ditches all filled with the enemy waiting for us. There were sand heaps of great thickness, Palmetto logs, cotton bales, iron, and being regularly casemated will take much, very much of navy power to reduce it. Could the regiments but have had light to see, and working harmoniously, the fort would have been ours, but so strong a place as it is, and dark as was the night, it is no wonder that so large a number were killen [sic] and wounded. By this time you probably have a list of the killed and wounded. I have not time to send them here, but that our Brooklyn frends [sic] may know something of the twelve day's work, with three fights put in for variety I would be glad to have this noticed in your valuable daily. Will Watkins.

THE FORTY-EIGHTH NEW YORK.
One day, during the erection of our works on this island, a detachment of the Forty-eighth New York regiment were detailed to mount some heavy mortars at a point very near Fort Wagner. Gen Seymour, who was personally superintending the work, as t h y were going down the beach, sang out,
"Now, boys, we've got the Rebels cowed; let us mount these mortars right before their eyes, and show them we are not afraid of them." The boys did so, and got them all up with only one man wounded, although the Wagner guns were playing on them the while.
When they were through, Gen. Seymour complimented them in the highest style of praise, telling them that it was the first time he had ever seen heavy mortars mounted in open day in the face of a fire from a hostile fort so near as that. The Forty-eighth men were very much pleased with the compliment, which, coming from Gen. Seymour, was worth something.
The gunboat Seneca, Lieut. Commander Wm. Gibson, has taken a very prominent part in the naval bombardment of Fort Wagner. She has been up very near to the fort, and with her 11-inch Dahlgren and 50 pounder rifle did good execution. She fought every morning and afternoon, and during the bombardment on Saturday was engaged fourteen hours.

FORTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT.—The following compose the field and staff of the Forty-eighth militia regiment, as given by the Palladium. Of course, no person will infer that political considerations entered into their appointment.
Colonel—James A. Beckwith.
Lt. Colonel—A. B. Randall.
Major—C. Vanness Houghton.
Quartermaster—Chester Penfield.
Adjutant—Michael Cummings.
Engineer—A. G. Comstock.
Surgeon—Dr. S. F. V. Whited.
Chaplain—Rev. Jacob Post.
Drum Major—B. D. Houghton.

CONTINENTAL GUARDS.
The Secretary of War having intimated his readiness to accept Col. James H. Perry's proposed regiment of Continental Guards of Brooklyn in case of being authorized by Congress to raise more troops, active measures are being taken by the officers of this regiment to enroll young men of good moral character and physical ability to serve for three years, or during the war. The officers intend, as far as possible, to accept of such complete companies as are already formed, or may hereafter be formed, either in the city or in the country, provided the rank and file are composed of men possessing the requisite qualifications.

Departure of the Continental Guard.
The Continental Guard (Forty-eighth regiment New York Volunteers) left the encampment at Fort Hamilton at three o'clock this morning, and embarked on the steamer John Potter, of the Camden and Amboy line, for Washington. The steamer touched at pier No. 1 North river at eleven o'clock this forenoon.
The regiment numbers about one thousand men, well equipped and armed with Enfield rifles. The uniform is the United States regulation. A considerable number of the men were formerly members of the Seventy-first. About sixty recruits, not yet uniformed, were left in charge of the camp, near Fort Hamilton, under Lieutenant Wallace.
Colonel Perry, the commandant of the regiment, is well known as a West Point graduate.
The following are the names of the staff officers:
Colonel, James H. Perry; Lieutenant-Colonel, Wm. B. Barton; Major, Oliver T. Beard; Adjutant, Anthony D. Goodell; Quartermaster, Irving M. Abell; Surgeon, Dr. A. Perry; Assistant-Surgeon, Dr. J. Mulford; Chaplain, Rev. Dr. W. P. Strickland.

PROMOTED.—John A. Fee, of this city, has been again promoted. He was foreman of Engine Company No. 7 when the war broke out. He resigned his office in the Department and enlisted in the 91st Regiment N. Y. V. He left here as Orderly Sergeant. He was promoted in September, 1861, to Second Lieutenant and transferred to the 48th Regiment. N. Y. V. He has been again promoted to First Lieutenant of the same regiment. We are indebted to him for a late Savannah paper, with the information that contrabands are flocking to our lines, from Savannah, in droves.

DEPARTURE OF THE CONTINENTAL GUARD.
The Continental Guard, which is commanded by Colonel James H. Perry, pastor of the Pacific street Methodist Episcopal church, Brooklyn, received marching orders at a late hour on Monday night, and left their encampment, near Fort Hamilton, early on Tuesday morning. Their departure was determined upon quite suddenly, and it was only by the greatest degree of despatch and preparation that the regiment was enabled to leave at the requisite moment.
The Forty-eighth regiment, or Continental Guard, as they are denominated, have been encamped at Fort Hamilton for the past two months, and a great deal of care, has been exhibited by the officers of the corps in the selection of their men, the regiment being composed of a select and hardy body of troops. The Guard numbers 971 men in all, over which are placed a reliable and efficient body of officers. Colonel Perry is a graduate of West Point, and has served in the position which he now occupies in the wars of Mexico and Texas. He carries a sword by his side, which he has hitherto used in three campaigns with efficiency and bravery. Being a minister of the Gospel and a sound democrat at heart, Colonel Ferry deserves a good deal of credit for the organization of his regiment. The men are armed with the Enfield rifles, and are dressed in the regular United States Army uniform. Most of them have seen three months' service, having been among those who smelled powder at Bull run and other expeditions of the present campaign. A second regiment is about being formed in Brooklyn with the same title, it being intended, if possible, to make a brigade, to be commanded by the Rev. Colonel Perry.
At twelve o'clock on Monday night positive orders for immediate departure were received, and the men were busily engaged until three o'clock yesterday morning preparing the necessary accoutrements for an advance. At that time they embarked on board the steamer John Potter, of the Camden and Amboy line, which conveyed them en route to Washington. Previous to their final departure they put in at pier No. 1 North river in order to take in any stragglers that might be around. Everything connected with the moveable soldier was produced, and the regiment leaves us fully equipped, armed and uniformed.
The following is a list of the officers:—
Field—Colonel, James H. Perry; Lieutenant Colonel, William B. Barton; Major, Oliver T. Beard.
Staff—Adjutant, Anthony W. Goodell; Quartermsster, Irving M. Avery; Surgeon, A. Perry, M. D.; Assistant Surgeon, J. Mulford, M. D.; Chaplain, W. P. Strickland, D. D.
Non-Commissioned Staff—Quartermaster Sergeant, Van Rensselaer K. Milliard; Acting Commissary Sergeant, G. P. Bicker; Sergeant Major, Samuel H. Moser.
Company A—Captain. L. H. Lent; First Lieutenant, R. R. Corwin; Second Lieutenant. H. W. Robinson.
Company B—Captain, E. K. Travis; First Lieutenant, N. A. Ewing; Second Lieutenant, T. Vidall.
Company C—Captain, Farrell; Lieutenants, McCartle and Hatfield.
Company D—Captain, D. C. Knowles; First Lieutenant, L. Paxton; Second Lieutenant, J. T. Edwards,
Company E—Captain, W. B. Coan; First Lieutenant, F. Hurst; Second Lieutenant, J. Bodine.
Company F—Captain, J. M. Green; First Lieutenant, S. K. Wallace: Second Lieutenant, A. H. Ferguson.
Company G—Captain, A. Elmendorf; First Lieutenant, W. H. Dunbar; Second Lieutenant, J. P. Nichols.
Company H—Captain, D. W. Strickland; First Lieutenant, W. L. Lockwood; Second Lieutenant, C. M. Patterson.
Company I—Captain, J. G. Ward; First Lieutenant, S. M. Swaitwout; Second Lieutenant, J. H. Perry, Jr.
Company K—Captain, S. J. Foster; First Lieutenant, S. Gale; Second Lieutenant, A. F. Miller.

Deaths in the Forty-eighth New York Regiment.
Colonel Perry, of the Forty-eighth New York regiment, reports the following deaths among his soldiers:
November 7th, off Port Royal, South Carolina, of typhoid fever, Isaiah H. Davis, late of Fallsburg, Sullivan county, New York.
November 24th, at Hilton Head, South Carolina, Thos. E. Walling, of Keyport, New Jersey, inflammation of the brain.
November 26th, at Hilton Head, Wm. G. Hopkins, of South Norwalk, Connecticut, inflammation of the lungs.
November 27th, at Hilton Head, Solomon W. Price, of Hauppange, Long Island, inflammation of the lungs.
November 28th, at Hilton Head, John C. Welsh, of Claverack, Columbia county, New York, of gun shot wound. (1861)

[Special Correspondence of the Sunday Mercury.
HEAD-QUARTERS FORTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.
ANNAPOLIS, MD., October 13, 1861.
To the Editors of the Sunday Mercury:
To-day being Sunday—and the only day in which a soldier has any chance of doing anything for himself—I thought I would just sit me down and pen a few lines to the numerous readers of that great paper, the SUNDAY MERCURY, in order to keep them posted as to the ins and outs of a soldier's life. I will endeaver [sic] to tell you what I have seen in the beautiful city (so called) by its citizens) of Annapolis.
Well, I visited the city, and could see nothing very nice or pretty about it, as I walked about the streets; but on going to the top of the dome of the State House, I had the most splendid view I ever witnessed in the United States. The white tents, of an army of 18,000 men, stood out in bold relief to the green fields and hills that surrounded them; and the Severn River, running, as it does, in all directions, around the different camps, making them healthy and delightful spots to camp in.
Our camp is situated on a narrow strip of land, bounded on the one side by a strip of water called Graveyard Creek, and the Severn, in all its beauty and stateliness, on the other. The French army of our Revolution was encamped here, and afterwards the American forces in 1812; so, you see, we have something to be proud of—fighting, as we are, for the preservation of this most noble of governments, as did the men that were on this same ground in years gone by fight to give us the Union, which we are now trying to uphold. As you enter the State House, on your right hand you see the Senate Hall of the State of Maryland, in which room the immortal Washington resigned his commission. I stood on the very spot where he stood when he tendered his resignation to the president of the Congress and the assembled delegates, after rescuing his country from a tyrant. Over the door opposite the Speaker's seat is a large painting representing this great act, and around the room are hung portraits of Charles Carroll, of Carrolton, Samuel Chase, Wm. Paca, and Thomas Stone—all signers of the Declaration of Independence from the State of Maryland, the ante-chamber leading out of this room has a portrait of Wm. Pitt delivering his speech upon the greatness and goodness of the undertaking of the Colonists (this picture was painted by Charles W. Peale, and presented to the State in the year 1794). There is also a picture of John E. Howard, Esq., the hero of Cowpens. Immediately opposite the Senate Chamber is the Hall of Delegates, which is a tastefully and neatly fitted-up room. In the large hall there is a stairway, leading to the Governor's Room, and the Circuit Court; immediately over the stairway are placed the State arms; the stairway leading to the left takes you to the Circuit Court-room, where, over the Judge's seat, is a full length portrait of Gen. Washington, attended by Gen. Lafayette and Col. Tilgham (his aid-de-camp), the American army passing in review—he holding the articles of the capitulation of Yorktown in his hands. Passing out of this room, you turn to your right and pass into t he State-Room, where I saw Governor Hicks, who kindly invited me in, and allowed me to examine the room—in which you will see two letters in the handwriting of George Washington, one of which appertains to the capitulation of Yorktown. Out of this room you pass out on the dome, from which you can see all that I have described in the first part of this letter.
After leaving the State House, the next place of interest for you to visit is the Naval Academy, the buildings of which it is worth anybody's while to visit. On the grounds there are monuments erected to the memory of Capt. Herndon, of the Central America, and to the memory of Captains Somers, Caldwell, Decatur, Dorsey, Wadsworth. and Israel—all of whom fell while fighting in the different attacks on the city of Tripoli, in the year 1804; and for their gallant behavior their brother officers have erected these monuments. There are, at present, two regiments quartered here—the Michigan Seventh and the Eighth Connecticut Volunteers.
The next place of importance to visit is St. John's College, which is situated on an eminence at the upper end of the city, and on the banks of the Severn. It is a four story brick building, and admirably adapted to those who wish to make the law their profession—as the General Assembly and the Courts of Appeal and Circuit, meet in the adjacent buildings, affording decided facilities to all students of the law to hear such arguments as are frequently heard in these courtrooms.
On the left of these buildings is a venerable poplar tree, measuring twenty-three feet in circumference, said to be 200 years old, and which the citizens of this ancient city would not part with. Thus ends the description I promised to give you.
Fearing that I have encroached upon your valuable space too much already, I will now close. You may expect to hear from me again next week.
I am yours, truly, CORPORALE.

FUNERAL OF CAPT. FEE.—The funeral of the late Capt. John Fee, 48th Regiment, who died from wounds received before Richmond, took place yesterday afternoon. It was attended by Engine No. 7 as a guard of honor, members of the Fire Department, and the Masonic fraternity. The cortege was one worthy of the gallant hero.
BURIAL OF A SOLDIER.—The remains of Capt. John A. Fee, of the Forty-eighth regiment N. Y. S. V., was this afternoon conveyed to the Cemetery. He died from wounds received on the 15th of July in front of
Petersburg.
The funeral cortege consisted of Firemen and the Order of Odd Fellows, of which he was a member.

THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1861.
MILITARY MOVEMENTS IN THE CITY.
CONTINENTAL GUARD.
The Secretary of War having expressed his readiness to accept the Continental Guard, now being organized in Brooklyn, under the command of Colonel Jas. H. Perry, at present pastor of the Pacific street Methodist Episcopal church in said city, in case Congress shall authorize the raising of additional troops, active measures are now being taken by Colonel Perry and his officers to enroll men of good character and physical ability to serve for three years or the war. This regiment have already had a large force of men offered, but not having the prior authority from the government, did not deem it advisable to accept them; but now, as they consider their acceptance of no further doubt, are ready to take into consideration such full or parts of companies as may be offered from either the city or country, provided the rank and file of such companies shall be found to possess the required qualifications. As soon as their acceptance is official, immediate steps will be taken to give their men quarters and rations, and great pains will be taken to render this one of the most efficient and best disciplined regiments in the army.
Colonel Perry received his military education at West Point, and therefore considers the country fully entitled to his services, which he has tendered to the government. He served through the entire Texas war of independence, where he displayed great skill as a brave and efficient officer.
The headquarters of the Continental Guard is at room No. 2 Montague Hall, opposite the City Hall, Brooklyn.

At a meeting of Eagle Engine Co. No. 7, held at their house on Wednesday evening, July 20th, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, The report of the death of Captain John Fee, Co. I, 48th Regiment N. Y. S. V., a former member and ex-Foreman of this Company, has been most painfully confirmed by an authentic announcement of his demise at Chesapeake Hospital, July 15th, from wounds received before Petersburg, June 30th; and
Whereas, While bowing in humble submission to the especial dispensation of the Inscrutable Will, we are pained to realize the loss of one whose long association with us has deepened every sentiment into the warmest of earnest attachment.
Resolved, That in the death of Capt. J. A. Fee, the sorrowful realization is brought home to every member of this Company that the spirit of one of its most zealous friends and warmest supporters has returned to Him who gave it.
Resolved, That while we deplore the loss of one upon whom the opening of early manhood were just casting the golden promises of eminence and honor, we would not forget the glory which surrounds him in the grave of a hero and patriot.
Resolved, That to the discharge of the position to which he had so meritoriously advanced he brought every essential qualification, and while worthily receiving commendation from his superior officers for his skill as a disciplinarian, we refer with pride to the attachment which he has secured from his command by his unvarying kindness.
Resolved, That to the relatives of the deceased we tender our heartfelt condolence in their bereavement and implore for them the tender consolation of Him who holds in his hands the lives and destinies of all.
Resolved, That we attend the funeral of deceased in a body, wearing the usual badge of mourning, and that the house of the Company be draped in mourning for the space of thirty days.
Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolutions, properly engrossed, be transmitted to the family of deceased, and the command of deceased, and published in the daily papers.
MICHAEL O'BRIEN, President.
John McKaig, Secretary.

Missing Soldier Heard From.
We find the following in the N. Y. Herald of last Sunday:—"WILLIAM FRAZER WOOD, of the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York Volunteers, who was wounded and taken prisoner in May last, while serving under General Butler, and who was supposed to have died, has just been heard from. He is at the Military Hospital at Annapolis; has a leg amputated, and is doing well. He has been in service since the breaking out of the war, and never received but one furlough, and that was to come home for thirty days and re-enlist as a veteran. His numerous friends here, as well as in Clarkstown, Rockland Co., N. Y., will be pleased to hear that he is still alive."

(Tribune, 1864)
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22
BROKLUN ITEMS.
RECEPTION OF THE 48TH REGIMENT VOLUNTEERS.—The 48th Regiment Volunteers returned home yesterday, after three years' active service. The regiment was organized in the Summer of 1861, by Col. James H. Perry, under the title of "Continental Guards." They were encamped at Fort Hamilton, where they remained until the 17th of September, of the same year, when they embarked in the expedition under Gen. Sherman and Commodore Dupont. They witnessed, from transports, the capture of the Forts at Port Royal, since which time they have participated in a number of battles and seiges of which the following are the principal ones: Port Royal Ferrv, Pocotaligo, Fort Pulaski, siege of Fort Wagner, Olustee, Port Walthall, Drury's Bluff, Coal Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom and Hatcher's Plantation.
The regiment, when it left Fort Hamilton, numbered over 1,000 men. The returned veterans number 128 men, while about the same number are left at the front, in the vicinity of Petersburg.
The returned officers are, Lieut.-Col. Coan, commanding; Quartermaster Avery, and Surgeon Mulford. The line-officers remain with that portion of the regiment which still occupies the front.
When it was ascertained that the regiment had arrived in New-York, they were waited upon by the committee of the Common Council, consisting of Aldermen Van Buren, Norton, Whitney, Belknap, and E. Murphy. The 23d Regiment Militia, Col. C. E. Pratt, having been ordered out, marched to New-York and escorted them to Brooklyn by way of the Fulton Ferry A large number of persons welcomed the veterans on their arrival on this side of the river. They were escorted up Fulton-street to Montague Hall, where a sumptuous repast was prepared, and with which all seemed satisfied. Brief addresses of welcome were made by Alderman Van Buren, Norton, and Belknap, Auditor Faron, and Street Commissioner Nodyne. Responses were made by Col. Barton, Lieut.-Col. Coan, Col. Pratt, T. B. Wyman, esq., and Dr. Strickland, formerly chaplain of the regiment. After the edibles were disposed of the regiment was dismissed. They will be paid off and mustered out of the service on Saturday.
The flags of the City Hall and Court House were displayed in honor of the arrival of the regiment.
DRAFTING FOR THE 48TH REGIMENT, N. G.—Col. BECKWITH, of the 40th Regiment, National Guards, has notified the County Clerk, that a draft will take place in the First Assembly District of this county, on Friday next, to fill from the reserve militia of the District the several companies therein belonging to the 48th Regiment.

SENT FORWARD.—Surgeon Charles Devendorf, of the Forty-eighth New York, who was left behind with the wounded at Olustee, Fla., was sent by the rebels to Fortress Monroe and has arrived at New York. The Surgeon is a son of Dr. Devendorf, of Amsterdam, and may be expected home in a few days. From him we may be able to learn something from our men who were made prisoners at Seymour's late Florida massacre.

RETURNED HOME.—We were pleased this morning to take by the hand our fellow townsman CHARLES E. MATTHEWS, who returns home after a three years absence as a member of the 48th N. Y. V. Regiment, which has been under Maj. Gen. GILMORE. Besides the honorable scars of a soldier, he wears a testimonial presented to him by Major. Gen. GILMORE personally, for meritorious conduct and bravery displayed at the storming of Fort Wagner, Morris Island, where he was the first to tear down from the parapet of the Fort the stars and bars, and hoist in its stead the Stars and Stripes.

NEW-YORK, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 6, 1865.
BROOKLYN NEWS.
THE FORTY-EIGHTH VETERAN REGIMENT VOLUNTEERS—THEIR COOL RECEPTION IN BROOKLYN.—The Forty-eighth Veteran Regiment which was raised in Brooklyn, four years ago by Rev. Mr. PERRY, of the Fleet-street Methodist Church, assisted by Mr. LUTHER B. WYMAN, a distinguished citizen of this city, arrived home yesterday. Mr. WYMAN and his lady received them on the part of the citizens, and when the regiment passed through the City Hall Park they were reviewed by Lieut. CHARLES SCHURIG and two reporters. The Lieutenant was a member of the Fourteenth Regiment Militia, and served three years, during which time he lost his arm. He now occupies the position of Mayor's messenger, and as such represented the city. Supervisor SAMUEL BOOTH was also present, and that ends the list of either city or county officials. The regiment departed from Brooklyn about 1,100 strong, and after being recruited on several occasions to make up for losses in battle and by disease, comes back 800 strong, and as fine a looking set of men as ever shouldered a musket. They participated in the battles of Pocotaligo, Morris Island, the siege of Fort Wagner, Pulaski, Olustee, Chester Heights, in Virginia, Drewry's Bluff, Coal Harbor, Petersburgh, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Explosion of the Mine at Petersburgh, Cemetery Hill, Chapin's Farm, Fort Gilmore, New-Market Road, Fort Fisher and Wilmington. The regiment left Raleigh, N. C., on the 2d of September, and arrived here yesterday. Dodworth's Band, hired at the expense of Mr. L. B. WYMAN, Furnished the music in their march through the streets of the city, and they were provided with lodgings for the night in the Armory of the Fifty-sixth Regiment, Raymond-street. They doubtless had their own rations, as nothing was provided for them.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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