New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center - Unit History Project
     Unit History Project  
  Home
  About the Museum
  Contact Us
  Articles
  Armories & Arsenals
  Events
  Education
  Flags
  Forts
  Heraldry
  Links
  Pictures
  Press
  Research
  Unit History Project
    Conflict:
   - Revolution
   - Civil
   - Spanish American
   - Mex. Border, 1916
   - WWI
   - WWII
   - Korean
  Veteran's Oral History
  Search
   
  DMNA Homepage
  NYARNG
  NYANG
  NYG
  NY Naval Militia
  Friends

52nd Regiment, New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings
Please see the editor's Note below

FIFTY-SECOND NEW YORK.
Company E-First Lieut. Dexter G. Reed, thigh, severely; Corp T. H. Barson, killed; Horace Chase, killed; Franklin Hersey, killed; John S. Howe, killed; Ezra L. Miner, killed; Sergt. John H. Hunter, hand slightly wounded; Sergt. Baron L. Noyes, thigh, severely; Alonzo Hip; E. Ammidon, neck, slightly; H. Austin, head, slightly; Sanford T. Barton, thigh; William Corey, arm, severely; James Damash, shoulder, severely; Lloyd D. Forehand, leg; A. M. George, side, slightly; C. H. Hall, head, slightly; J. L. Hadley, head, severely; B. S. Kennison, slightly; Henry H. Stockwell, head, mortally; L. D. Straw, arm, severely; John Shaw, Jr., leg; Wm. Weston, arm and leg, severely; Albert Miner, hand and head, severely; A. Mason, face, slightly; P.
Rowan, chest, severely.
Company F--Corp. John Gifford, thigh, severely; B. W. Hill, breast, slightly; W. Dugan, side, severely; G. Henepin, wrist, severely; P. Malay, arm, severely; Ezra F. Nurse, abdomen, slightly; J. Reed, breast, severely; G. Saberville, head, slightly; G. Thurston, breast, severely; S. C. Stone, abdomen, severely; N. Wood, breast, severely; O. B. Curtis, arm, severely; George Handy, missing.
Company G—Sergt. C. W. Wetherbee, killed; J. Delmage, killed; C. N. Scott, killed; J. W. Nash, killed; J. Doland, arm amputated; Chas. E. Severence, knee, slightly; C. A. Hart, leg, slightly; Damon E. Hunter, arm, leg amputated; Hiram J. Abbott, shoulder, slightly; G. H. Hackett, leg, slightly; Thos. Burns, hand, slightly; L. F. Read, arm, slightly; J. Maley, arm, slightly; R. H. Chase, missing.
Company H.—Morrill Nute, killed; L. Murphy, arm, severely; Chas. A. Warren, abdomen, severely; D. Johnson, leg, severely; F. Richards, shoulder; H. Eldridge, arm; J. Young, head; G F. Leavitt, leg; J. F. Chesley, leg; A. M. Garland, shoulder; Noah Shaw, neck; C. H. Home, leg; G. E. Cates, leg; J. P. Cannay, shoulder; C. C. Rogers, head; H. Davis, leg; J. Whittier, leg; A. D. Strain, arm; J. W. Fogg, hand; C. W. Tillman, hand; E.
Avery, hand; Daniel Dow, missing; J. F. Corson, missing. Sergt. Stephen D. Smith deserted just as the action commenced.
Company I— Corp. A. J. Chamberlain, hand, slightly; S. F. Bohonon, groin, severely; C. Kimball, hand, slightly; W. Martin, arm, amputated; E. G. F. Stinson, head, slight; L. A. Way, hand, slightly; H. Welch, groin, severely.
Company K--H.W. Carlton, killed; L H. Hall, killed; R. Watson, killed; Sergt. G. S. Gove, arm; Cor. D. Harrington, severely; S. H. Attwood, knee; J. A. Carlton, shoulder; T. O. Connell, severely; J. C. Dore, breast; H. F. Johnson, arm; I. S. Johnson, shoulder; A. A. Lewis, slightly; J. Mack, ankle; A. N. Stevens, hand; G. P. Sargent, waist; C. H. Abbott, missing.
Total Killed, Wounded and Missing.—Officers—wounded, 5. Enlisted men—killed, 26; wounded, 140; missing, 11.

Marching orders have been issued to the 52d Regiment, Col. Fiero, by Gen. Burnside. They will depart on Monday morning, but their destination is at present unknown. It is supposed to be Annapolis.

THE 52D REGIMENT HOMICIDE.
The investigation touching the death of William Reddington, the member of the 52d regiment, who was shot during the disturbance at Camp Stranahan, on the 20th of December last, continues to drag its slow length along before Coroner Hegeman. Now that the man who has all along been suspected of shooting deceased has voluntarily surrendered himself, no one appears to identify him as the man who fired the shot. The examination was resumed last evening at the school-house, Flatbush.
Lieutenant Henry Kleuin was sworn—Was on duty at the time of the disturbance; knew a man named Deiderick; he was a private in his company.
Two other witnesses were examined, who knew nothing material to the case, Charles Koch, a serjeant in Co. K, 28th regiment, deposed that Deiderick wore his coat with the sergeant's stripes, on the day of the disturbance.
Dr. Van Kleeck deposed that he had examined the body of deceased, and was of opinion that he came to his death by a gunshot wound.
Robert Deiderick, the suspected party, was placed on the stand, and deposed as follows: I reside at 378 Atlantic street; I was at the Asylum at Flatbush with the old guard; I was there when the difficulty took place; we were ordered to march out to the front of the building to be relieved by the new guard; when we got outside, the 52d commenced firing bottles, stones, bricks and bats of iron; I saw a man get struck with a brick and fall; also saw a musket with a bayonet fixed, coming down; we then commenced firing; we fired up at the part of the building where the things were thrown from; the order was then given to cease firing and charge bayonets into the house; I do not know who gave the order; some of the new guard charged into the building; I did not go with them; I did not go into the building after that at all; I heard some one say afterwards that a man was shot; I then went into the building and looked in the yard; from the back stoop I saw a man lying there; two or three of the new guard were standing on the stoop with me at the time; I heard no firing in the building or at the rear; I don't remember seeing any of our company in the building; I wore a Sergeant's overcoat with stripes, on that day; I fired my musket but once that day, and that was in the front of the building; I did not load my gun after that; I am a shoemaker by occupation; I have not heard any of our men say they had seen or heard of a man being shot.

GAZETTE & COURIER.
From the 52d Regiment.
BATON ROUGE, March 24th, 1863.
Mr. Eastman—Dear Sir: I wish through you to acknowledge the receipt of twenty-five dollars from the Greenfield Young Men's Christian Association, to be used for the sick of the 52d regiment. After many meanderings the money came to hand, and will be sacredly used for the purpose for which it was designed, and will render good service in procuring delicacies which the sick so often need, and which are not included in army rations. We still have a good deal of sickness, and just now our Regimental Hospitals are all broken up and the sick made over to the care or neglect I am inclined to say of the General Hospital. They are having cases every day where men are suffering from gross neglect and yet no one seems to be to blame for it, certainly not our surgeons for the cases are not under their jurisdiction. The trouble seems to be a lack of system. One plan is founded and half executed, and then changed. Thirty-seven of our sick have been sent to the hospital at New Orleans. Of the sick here some are in tents, within the intrenchments, and some in the old U.S. barracks. I wish I could say they were as comfortable as they ought to be. It makes one's heart bleed to go around among these 2000 sick men, almost all of them young men, and witness the sufferings he cannot relieve. The women have done all their generous natures have prompted, and we have on hand piles of sheets and bed ticks and shirts and lint and bandages. A great deal of this will be of service.
Thanks to the generous patriotism and self sacrifice of the donors. But much more than these are needed to relieve the sufferings of this crowd of sick men. There is the feeling of being alone, away from kindred and friends, and the gentle ministrations of woman and the endearment of home, which is often harder to bear than physical pain and suffering. So far as I can learn the amount of sickness in the 52d has not been much, if any greater than the average. If we have had more deaths than some regiments, we have had less than others.
We have had a grand march to Port Hudson, and a grand march back again, to relieve the monotony of our camp life. I do not know whether to report a victory or a masterly retreat. Gen. Banks' order pronounces the object of the expedition accomplished, and yet we came back rather sooner and quicker than we should if our object of the expedition had been accomplished.
There had been for two or three weeks a great flourish of trumpets, orderlies, on lean horses, galloping to and fro, regiments marching hither and thither; steamboats whistling, and raising false alarms of a mail at most unseasonable hours. Every thing denoted something was to be done, and everybody said, "now we will see what Port Hudson is made of." On Thursday, the 12th, every thing seemed to be ready. All housekeeping duds, and superfluous baggage had been sent to the intrenchments. The order was given to "fall in" about nine o'clock. The 52d bravely shouldered their knapsacks containing only what they thought indispensable, swung over one shoulder their haversacks filled with two days rations, and over the other the cartridge box with forty rounds, and were confident they could march to Port Hudson with out stopping. The band played their best and on we started. But how is this? The column is headed to the South, Port Hudson was supposed to be in the opposite direction. By the time we had reached an open field it begun to enter first one head and then another, that it was a grand Review we were after, and no march on Port Hudson, and a grand Review it was, very pleasant to those on horseback, who did not get thrown off, and very tiresome to those on foot, who had some 40 pounds weight to carry. Gen. Grover with several well dressed gentlemen galloped before us, and then we marched before Gen. Grover, and Gen. Banks, and the other gentleman, and then we marched back to our camp, tireder and wiser men than we left it. We had found there were a good many things we had thought indispensable that we could do without. The next day the 13th, we got started in reality about 4 in the afternoon. A very grand imposing sight it was to see one brigade after another with its infantry and artillery fall into its assigned position, and take up its line of march towards the enemy's strong hold. The road was straight and level. We could see a great distance, but could see neither beginning nor the end. The bands played their most inspiring music for a while. As night came on the scene was beautiful indeed. The peach trees were in full bloom. The trees of the magnificent forests, through which we passed had put on their spring greenness. The birds sang merry songs on every side. Had it been a peaceful errand on which we had started, it would have been pleasant. Early in the evening we were marched into a muddy cane-field by the side of the road to spend the night, no fires were allowed, and no tents pitched. The ridges on which the cane had been raised, served for pillows, and there was not the slightest danger of falling out of bed, There was an excellent opportunity to study astronomy, and those who were not too weary for such observations could have told the relative positions of a good many of the constellations. At day break we were all aroused, all persisted they had never slept better in their lives. A hasty breakfast was prepared, some had hot coffee and bread and mutton chop, others had the bread without the coffee and chop. By sunrise the column was again in motion. The day was hot, the march was a long one for inexperienced men. Several from all regiments fell down by the side of the road. About eleven we were again led out of the road into an open field and there drawn up in battle array. The 2d brigade in the following order; First the New York 91st, then the Mass 52d, then the Conn., 24th, in the rear a battery of the regular army. We supposed the rebels were prepared to dispute our further progress.
But it was not so. The 91st moved on. We halted for dinner and rest. Before three P. M., we received orders to march without knapsacks, or blankets, and were soon put to the double-quick, which tired our men severely. We passed a wounded officer lying by the roadside, and further on two or three dead horses, which had been killed within a few hours.
The 52d were now in the advance, and were not more than four or five miles from Port Hudson, and not more than two from their outer line of works. Skirmishing parties were sent out, which approached within a mile of the enemy. It was growing dark, and all had been accomplished that could be, and the skirmishers were recalled. As there were no blankets to sleep under, to keep guard became a necessity as well as a duty. Your correspondent having a horse to carry him, returned to the camp, and had a blanket and a shelter tent over him. About 11 o'clock the booming of cannon awakened all the sleepers and announced that the serious work of the campaign had commenced. At first the firing was slow and measured, but gradually it increased in heaviness and velocity. The peals came so rapidly that they could not be distinguished, except when some gun of heavy calibre was discharged, which would make the earth tremble under us. From where we lay, we could see first the flash of light , then the shot or shell as it rolled through the air and fell in graceful curves or burst into fragments. Then would come the report as of thunder bursting from a cloud. It was worth a good deal of hardship and exposure to hear and see that bombardment!
At length we fell asleep and when we next awoke a bright light floating down the river filled our minds with anxiety lest some disaster had befallen our noble fleet. It was clearly a boat on fire. The explosion of one gun after another told how rapidly the work of destruction was going on. A sudden flash which illumined the whole heavens, a dense cloud of smoke, rolling up in heavy masses, and then a report, less sharp and distinct, but louder than any we had heard, told us that the magazine had exploded. And the next day confirmed the report which early reached us, that the noble steam frigate Mississippi, which had borne our flag with honor in both continents, was no more. When the sun of Sunday morning rose upon us we all supposed we were to take a part in, or witness one of the great battles of the war. We supposed the 52d were sent forward to prevent rebel pickets from being sent out to any great distance. The men were eager for the contest. It was the work they came to do. But the morning wore away, and there were no signs of an advance, and what was our surprise to learn that an order had been issued from headquarters that the object of the expedition had been accomplished and the army would fall back. It seems that early in the morning this order had been sent to the transportation train, in the rear, and the teams had been headed towards Baton Rouge. It was noon before the order reached the 52d. They started at once; the bridges were burned behind them. They reached their camp at 2 o'clock, and had just time to drink a cup of coffee which had been prepared for them, when the order was given to fall in. It was pretty hard. There had been little sleep for two nights, a good deal of marching, but a military order is imperative. Not a wagon of any kind was to be had to carry any thing. The heavy camp kettles must be borne upon men's shoulders or left for the rebels to use. Some companies chose one alternative, some the other. By three, the whole column was in motion in reverse order. The march was rapid but in good order. Some men were scolding over a masterly retreat, others were rejoicing over a bloodless victory. Before night a thunder shower which had threatened us for some time, burst in all its fury upon us. The rain fell in torrents. The roads which before had been smooth and easy to the feet became muddy and painful to travel. It took but few minutes to wet us to the skin. Night came on, and the darkness was only relieved by the flashing of the lightning. The rain still continued. We had made up our minds that we were to be led back to Baton Rouge before we stopped. But such was not the plan. About seven we defiled into a field at the left of the road, and there spent the night. And such a night! It is one of the marked events of our life time. It was such an experience as old soldiers are used to, and make no account of,—but we are not old soldiers. The field had just been cleared and burned over; charred stumps and logs still remained; a vigorous growth of brambles testified to the natural fertility of the soil. The rain had made the whole field a swamp.
The water stood from three inches to a foot deep. There was no help for it. There we must stay. Some rails were brought from a fence, and a few camp fires struggled with the falling rain. It was in vain to think of pitching tents or of doing any thing. The only course was to stand and take it. Some curled around the fires and roasted one side, and soaked the other. Others sat upon logs, others laid down under logs and stumps, and others on the open ground and slept. So the night wore away, a long one to the men, wearied with marching and watching. We expected as a matter of course a great many colds and rheumatisms as the result.—There were very few. The next morning the sun shone out brightly and revealed the black mud in which we had passed the night. It had more the appearance of a neglected pig pen than any thing else. The men were in good cheer and had not suffered, except in their feet, which were parboiled and tender, and sore. We remained in the mud hole till 2 P. M., when we marched a mile west to the bank of the river where we found a beautiful camping ground. Wet of course, but dry compared with the one we had left. Here our shelter tents were soon pitched, and we began to have some of the comforts of soldiering. At four next morning we were called and ordered to be in marching condition at five. But the forenoon passed and two o'clock came before the familiar words were heard, "fall in." We were told we were going to march about four miles, but we went six or seven miles on the familiar road to Port Hudson, before we halted. The men already tired and foot-sore, suffered severely. We had hardly got our camp fires kindled for supper when the order came to return to the camp we had left. Several of the stragglers, who had fallen out of the way, had just come up. There was but one alternative, to march back over those seven long miles, or be left to the mercy of any rebels who might follow in our rear. It was dark when we commenced that return march; the men were ordered to load their guns and march in silence. It was probably a necessary precaution. There might be rebels in the woods on either side. It had the effect to keep the men in good order and to prevent straggling. It was, all things considered, the hardest march our regiment has seen. We reached camp at ten o'clock, and had marched fourteen miles with knapsacks.
It turned out afterward that the order was given to leave the knapsacks, but it was not delivered to our officers. "Some one had blundered." It is the heavy load which the soldier has to carry which wilts him down in a long march. Men fell by the way in this march who would easily have made much longer ones without the heavy burden on their backs. That night but few cared enough for a tent to pitch one. Most dropped into the first furrow that offered itself and slept till morning. Here we stayed till Friday noon, and then packed up and marched back again to our old ground, where we have been since the middle of January. Of the results of the expedition you probably know more than we do at this date. It seems now that it was no part of the plan of the expedition to make an assault upon Port Hudson, but only a reconnoissance in force, and to engage the attention of the rebels while some of the boats went past the batteries. The first two passed safely by. The third had nearly passed when she received a shot in her steam chest and was disabled and floated back. The fourth ran aground, was set on fire and burned. Both parties claim the result as a victory. The object of the second expedition was to guard a long line of wagons sent up to bring away cotton.
A large quantity was secured, but whether enough to pay for the fatigue and exposure of the men, others must judge. So ended the first week of active service with the 52d boys. On the whole they stood it bravely, and when the skin has grown on their heels and toes they will be ready to start again.
Chaplain.

OUR RETURNING VETERANS.
(Herald -- July 8, 1865)
THE FIFTY-SECOND REGIMENT.
The remnant of this gallant regiment arrived in this city, where it was organized in 1861, a few days ago. It went out soon after the disasters which befell the national arms in the early days of the rebellion, and only tardily returns when there is nothing left for them to fight for—only when the national arms are triumphant everywhere. The regiment was organized by and went to the field under the command of Colonel Paul Frank. It was at once assigned to the First division, Second army corps—the division known among the troops as "Sumner's Old Division." When it first advanced to the "perilous edge of battle" it numbered nine hundred strong. It made its first devoir in the presence of the enemy before Yorktown, from the abandonment of which by the foe to the abandonment of the Peninsula by the Union troops it participated in every battle which marked the campaign.
The Fifty-second formed part of the advance force which McClellan hurried forward to check the rebel invasion of Maryland, and distinguished itself at Antietam and South Mountain. During the brief lull which followed, the regiment, as it had been previously, was again reinforced by willing levies from our German fellow-citizens, and on the reassumption of hostilities on the banks of the Rappahannock the Fifty-second were all there for a fight.
Under Burnside, Hooker and Meade they fought at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and again returned to the banks of the Rappahannock to commence that glorious conquering advance under the Lieutenant General of the armies, which was to know no change of base—no retiring ebb, until, by the sword, Grant had conquered peace. The muster rolls of the Fifty-second while in service show an aggregate of twenty-eight hundred men. They return two hundred strong. During their four years of service they lost thirty-four officers killed and disabled. Colonel H. M. Karples, who returns in command, marched down Broadway on the departure of the regiment a private in the ranks. The gallant veterans of the Fifty-second are at present in quarters at 101 Hester street, where Colonel Karples will have them, in the midst of friends, paid and mustered out of the service.

July 24, 1861
THE HONVED REGIMENT has the best prospects for a speedy organization. Two companies are already full and four others who intended to join other regiments not yet completed, have offered unite themselves with the Honved. Recruiting offices will now be established in several wards of the city. By the aid of many kind friends preparatory expenses have been furnished, but in order to make an effective organization more liberal contributions are required. The officers who are detailed for this corps are men of experience, most of them having served in Europe. The head- quarters are situated at 307 Broadway.

THE SHEPHARD RIFLES.
A new regiment, called the Shephard Rifles, Colonel Edward Ferrero, is rapidly filling up, and is intended to be in all respects a first class regiment. It is named for Colonel Elliot F. Shephard, First Aid to Governor Morgan, and he is giving it his warm support. Colonel Ferrero enjoys a high reputation as a military man and a gentleman, and he is devoting a remarkable degree of energy in preparing the regiment for immediate service. The head-quarters are at Palace Garden.

SHEPARD RIFLES.
This fine new regiment is filling up rapidly. In two weeks four hundred men have been recruited, from the city and country, and Colonel Ferrero intends in a few days to be fully ready to take his men into the field. His headquarters, at Palace Garden, presents a very military appearance. (Sept. 9, 1861)

DEPARTURE OF THE FIFTY-SECOND REGIMENT.
The Fifty-second regiment New York State Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Paul Frank, left quite unexpectedly Monday afternoon for the seat of war. The field and principal staff officers of the corps are:—
Colonel—Paul Frank.
Lieutenant Colonel—P. Lichenstein.
Major—C. Fridenburg.
Adjutant---Charles Laty.
Quartermaster—C. Geisser.
The regiment left their encampment, on Staten Island, about six o'clock, and proceeded direct by boat to Amboy, taking the cars at Philadelphia for Washington. The regiment number about one thousand rank and file.

FIFTY-SECOND NEW YORK.
Company E—First Lieut. Dexter G. Reed, thigh, severely; Corp. T. H. Barson, killed; Horace Chase, killed; Franklin Hersey, killed; John S. Howe, killed; Ezra L. Miner, killed; Sergt. John H. Hunter, hand slightly wounded; Sergt. Baron L. Noyes, thigh, severely; Alonzo Hip; E. Ammidon, neck, slightly; H. Austin, head, slightly; Sanford T. Barton, thigh; William Corey, arm, severely; James Damash, shoulder, severely; Lloyd D. Forehand, leg; A. M. George, side, slightly; C. H. Hall, head, slightly; J. L. Hadley, head, severely; B. S. Kennison, slightly; Henry H. Stockwell, head, mortally; J. D. Straw, arm, severely; John Shaw, Jr., leg; Wm. Weston, arm and leg, severely; Albert Miner, hand and head, severely; A. Mason, face, slightly; P.
Rowan, chest, severely.
Company F— Corp. John Gifford, thigh, severely; B. W. Hill, breast, slightly; W. Dugan, side, severely; G. Henepin, wrist, severely; P. Malay, arm, severely; Ezra F. Nurse, abdomen, slightly; J. Reed, breast, severely; G. Saberville, head, slightly; G. Thurston, breast, severely; S. C. Stone, abdomen, severely; N. Wood, breast, severely; O. B. Curtis, arm, severely; George Handy, missing.
Company G—Sergt C. W. Wetherbee, killed; J. Delmage, killed; C. N. Scott, killed; J. W. Nash, killed; J. Doland, arm amputated; Chas. E. Severance, knee, slightly; C. A. Hart, leg, slightly; Damon E. Hunter, arm, leg amputated; Hiram J. Abbott, shoulder, slightly; G. H. Hackett, leg, slightly; Thos. Burns, hand, slightly; L. F. Read, arm, slightly; J. Maley, arm, slightly; R. H. Chase, missing.
Company H.—Morrill Nute, killed; L. Murphy, arm, severely; Chas. A, Warren, abdomen, severely; D. Johnson, leg, severely; F. Richards, shoulder; H. Eldridge, arm; J. Young, head; G. F. Leavitt, leg; J. F. Chesley, leg; A. M. Garland, shoulder; Noah Shaw, neck; C. H. Home, leg; G. E. Gates, leg; J. P. Cannay, shoulder; C. C. Rogers, head; H. Davis, leg; J. Whittier, leg; A. D. Strain, arm; J. W. Fogg, hand; C. W. Tillman, hand; E. Avery, hand; Daniel Dow, missing; J. F. Corson, missing. Sergt. Stephen D. Smith deserted just as the action commenced.
Company I—Corp. A. J. Chamberlain, hand, slightly; S. F. Bohonon, groin, severely; C. Kimball, hand, slightly; W. Martin, arm, amputated; E. G. F. Stinson, head, slight; L. A. Way, hand, slightly; H. Welch, groin, severely.
Company K—H. W. Carlton, killed; L. H. Hall, killed; R Watson, killed; Sergt G. S. Gove, arm; Cor. D. Harrington, severely; S. H. Attwood, knee; J. A. Carlton, shoulder; T. O. Connell, severely; J. C. Dore, breast; H. F. Johnson, arm; I. S. Johnson, shoulder; A. A. Lewis, slightly; J. Mack, ankle; A. N. Stevens, hand; G. P. Sargent, waist; C. H. Abbott, missing.
Total Killed, Wounded and Missing.—Officers—wounded, 5. Enlisted men—killed, 26; wounded, 140; missing, 11.

NEW YORK DAILY TRIBUNE.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1864.
LOCAL MILITARY MATTERS.
WELCOME TO THE FIFTY-SECOND REGIMENT N. Y.
VETERAN VOLUNTEERS.
Thirty-five men and five officers, all that remains of the proud and gallant 52d Regiment of Volunteers, which left this city three years ago, 1,000 strong, to defend their adopted country from traitors, met with a public welcome yesterday afternoon at the hands of their friends. The decimated regiment was escorted to the City Hall Park by the 5th Regiment, National Guard, Col. Burger, commanding; also by the officers of the 88th and other veteran regiments, and the civilians to whom the welcome was due. Judge Daly delivered the address of welcome in front of the City Hall. He said their diminished numbers were more expressive and eloquent of their deeds than any words he could utter. It is not often, he said, in the experience of war that a regiment returns with so few in numbers, or with such a record as you (the 52d) exhibit. Your services began at Fair Oaks. You took part in the memorable battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and have been led by such heroes as Sumner, Zook, Barlow and Hancock. You have laid up for yourselves one of the richest legacies which your children can inherit. It has been your experience to see many a cherished comrade laid low on the battle-field, fighting in as holy a cause as was ever engaged in. I regret that your brave commander, Col. Frank, is not present to receive our appreciation which his high and heroic qualities deserve. Important duties have made it necessary for him to remain at Washington. Your patriotism will emulate the youths of this country to follow your example. I now have the honor, on behalf of those who have watched over your career, to present you with this wreath.
At the conclusion of the above remarks of Judge Daly, the wreath was presented to Major Ritzius, commanding the regiment. In the center was a wide silk ribbon with the following inscription: "Welcome to the brave 52d Regiment." Major Ritzius, on accepting the gift, returned his thanks on behalf of the Regiment, and said they should welcome with pride their return to this city. He closed his remarks by proposing three hearty cheers that the Union might be preserved, which was given by the soldiers with hearty good will. The Regiment then re-formed and proceeded to the Metropolitan Rooms, No. 101 Hester-st., where a rich repast awaited them, which, after being disposed of, was concluded by a ball which lasted until a late hour in the evening.

FIFTY-SECOND NEW YORK.
Company B.--Killed—T. W. Sawyer. Wounded--Albrecht, Sergeant Brawer, F. Betzold.
Company C--Killed--T. Stein. Wounded-Bringmann, Rotth, Sergeant Dienstach, Freitag, Lieut. Ehiers, Buraes, Busch, Capt. Ruegar, Lieut. Col. P. Lichtenstein, Sergeant Simon Pincus, Corporal Adolphus Pincus, Jacob Winklehaus, Corporal Chas. White, Francis Ferlant, Daniel Miller,
Sergeant Christ. Henzler. Missing--Olzeskey, Sergeant Frederke.
Company D.--Wounded—Sergeant John Deeds Corporal Sylvester S. Kelley, Charles Bruner, John Broughill, Tim. Flanagan, Patrick Fox, Chs. Lautsberger, Thomas Meehan, Michael McGowan, Tim. Purcell, John Welsch.
Company E—Wounded—Sergeant Joseph Schuster, Corporal Peter Witmyer, Jacob Straus, Christ. Stude, Jos. Bombeyer, Franc. Raushkoll, Jacob Ruger, Mathias Fisher, Fred. Schwartz, Fred. Skelley, Louis Hultz.
Company F.—Killed—Patrick Heenan, William Kan. Wounded—Corporal Owen Dunne, Lucius Barnes, Corporal Walter G. Wynne, Corporal Danl. Sanders, And. Dow, Daniel Harrop, G. R. A. McGregor, Jas. McKenney, Isaac Osterheimer, Wm. Rooney, David McNeil, Wm. Otis.
Company G.— Killed—R . Mullholnd. Wounded—James Joloph, Charles Dance, John Dougherty, Michael Conway, Geo. Uhline, John Whalen, Jos. Morrison.
Company H.—Killed--Patrick Martin. Wounded—Corporal James L. Paige, Corporal James McMichael, William Curren, John Curren, Patrick Fernan, Henry Gibson, Patrick Rafferty, Owen Suffolk, Wm. Shradford, Edward H. Royce, Thos. Campbell, Thomas Earley, John Bergen John Hunter.
Company I.—Wounded—Corporal Edward Cornell, W. H. Satterley, Henry McGregor.
Company K--Killed-- Corporal Philip Vath, Sam'l Marcus, William Weidlick.

Editor's Note: Thank you to Jason Longo for submitting the following:
I noticed that the e-mail address to contact the Library and Archives directly has been taken down from your website. I have several corrections regarding the Civil War Newspaper Clippings archive for the 52nd NYSV that is posted on the internet, but did not know any other way to contact you.
There seems to be twelve separate articles on the website, but only five of them are related to the 52nd NYSV.
The 1st article is a list of casualties from Fair Oaks for the 5th New Hampshire.
The 2nd is a newspaper misprint. Col. Ferrero was in command of the 51st NY.
The 3rd article is an incident involving the 52nd NYSM while they were trying to organize it for volunteer service in 1862. That failed, and the men they managed to enlist ended up in the 176th NYSV I believe. I saw other articles relating to a shooting among the members of the 52nd NYSM and the 28th NYSM in the Brooklyn Eagle.
The 4th article is a letter from the 52nd Massachusetts. They had served with Gen. Banks and served with the other units mentioned in the article in Louisiana.
The 7th and 8th articles talk about the 51st NY, under Col. Ferrero.
The 10th article is also a list of the casualties of the 5th New Hampshire at Fair Oaks.
The 5th, 6th, 9th, 11th and 12th articles are all definitely about the 52nd NYSV.

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: November 15, 2010
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/52ndInf/52ndInfCWN.htm

Valid HTML 4.01!

 
Home | Contact Us | Language Access