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80th Regiment Infantry New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

Company E, of the Ulster Guard went into the Gettysburgh [sic] battles with an aggregate of twenty-three men, in command of Lieutenant Brankstone.
The last day of the fight the company was composed of four men, in command of Lieutenant Merritt, Lieutenant Brankstone having been killed the first day.

FUNERAL OF A SOLDIER.—The remains of the late Lieut. Bloomfield, of Company E, Fourteenth Brooklyn regiment, were on Sunday, 31st ult. consigned to their last resting place in Cypress Hills Cemetery. The funeral ceremonies were conducted at No. 9 Liberty street, Brooklyn, by the Rev. Mr. De Hass, who preached a fitting and eloquent discourse on the occasion. The deceased was wounded in the last assault upon Fredricksburgh [sic], and died from the injuries then sustained. He was a corporal when the regiment first left home, and participated in every battle in which it was engaged. He was promoted for good conduct and bravery. The remains were escorted to the cemetery by the members of the Fourteenth now in the city, the exempts of the same organization, and the Twenty-third regiment, National Guard, accompanied by a very large concourse of citizens. A band of music preceded the military. The police, under charge of Sergt. Boyd, escorted the cortege to the Four Mile House, on Fulton avenue, where stages were in readiness to convey the remains and members of the regiment to the cemetery.

Colonel Pratt's Men.
About one hundred of Colonel Pratt's men go forward to-day with the Vermont regiment.

OUT AGAIN.—We observed Capt. Alexander, of the 20th regiment N. Y. S. M., out on the street yesterday. He is unable to walk without the use of crutches.

Of the members of the 20th Regiment, N. Y. S. M., the names of about 200 have been returned to the War Department as deserters.

(May 1, 1861)
THE ULSTER COUNTY REGIMENT.
Col. Pratt's Regiment attracted crowds to the Park Barracks all day yesterday, and the guards had plenty of work to keep the inquisitive outsiders from entirely overrunning the quarters. During the forenoon, the several companies paraded for drill, and were watched with much interest by the crowd, which cheered their movements repeatedly. In the afternoon, the regiment was the recipient of a donation of tobacco, sufficient for a month's rations.

EIGHTIETH REGIMENT.—The Company applications for the organization of the above regiment have been sent to Albany, corrected, and will be issued immediately. The commissions for the line officers will be forwarded with the charter for the commands, when an election will probably be held for Colonel. It is designed to hold a parade of the regiment on the 17th instant, the occasion of a parade of the Third Brigade and a review to Governor Seymour.
Lieut. Dean of Company B, 20th regiment, fell dead while conversing with a Hospital Surgeon in the streets of Alexandria one day last week. He is believed to have been poisoned.

THE TWENTIETH REGIMENT.
Yesterday morning great bustle and excitement were visible at the barracks in the Park, where the Twentieth regiment, Col. George W. Pratt, from Ulster county, is quartered. While the officers were at their breakfast the command to get into marching order was issued, and immediately after the confused incident of breaking up a camp ensued. The surgeons set to work packing up their medical stores, the Quartermaster bundled up his papers, men rolled their blankets and stowed them away under the cover of their knapsacks, those not having the last named article strapped their blankets around their bodies and long before the hour appointed to be in readiness the regiment was in complete marching order. At eleven o'clock the command to march was given, and the regiment mustered and passed in review, Col. Pratt being the Inspector. After going through numerous evolutions in the manual of arms, the command was dismissed and returned to barracks. The sudden order to break up camp was given to try the command in how short a time they could get ready in case of an emergency, and the celerity with which the regiment was turned out on this occasion elicited the encomiums of the commanding officer. During the forenoon Brigadier General Ewen visited the barracks, as well as a large number of friends of the regiment from Ulster county. Commissary William Lounsbery, of the Twentieth regiment, is the editor and proprietor of the Ulster Republican, of Kingston, this State, and has forsaken business, home and family to serve his country in this time of need. There are also a number of other gentlemen connected with the press attached to this, the crack regiment of the Third division.
It is very probable that the regiment will leave here on Saturday in one of the government steam transports, as the troops are becoming restive and eager to be mustered into service. In addition to the well stocked commissariat, twenty patent camp stores have been purchased, which are packed in large barrels and labeled [sic] with the letter of each company.

THE TWENTIETH REGIMENT.—The Rondout Freeman says: "On the formation of the Twentieth Regiment for three years, or the war, Ellenville contributed one full company of as hardy and stalwart fellows as ever shouldered rifles. Of this band of patriots only nine can be mustered fit for duty. Such are the vicissitudes of war!"

THE PARK BARRACKS.
The Twentieth (Ulster county) Regiment, which arrived in the city on Sunday night and temporarily occupied the armories over Centre Market, marched from their quarters last evening to the Park Barracks, which they will occupy till they receive orders to march.
It was intended to use these barracks only as a. feeding place for regiments in transitu to Washington; but they have been fitted with arrangements for sleeping, and are, perhaps, the most comfortable of the city barracks. The cooking arrangements are complete, and sufficient for three times the number of men now quartered in the barracks.

DOCTOR ROBERT LOUGHRAN, of the twentieth regiment, has charge of Seminary Hill hospital, at Gettysburg, one of the largest hospitals at that place. He has the sole management of this retreat for our sick soldiers.

TWENTIETH REGIMENT.—We are under obligations to Capt. Leslie, of this city, for the following list of killed, wounded and missing of the 20th N. Y. S. M., at the battle of Gettysburg:
KILLED.
Co. A.—John Donnelly, James E. Doxey, Charles C. Babcock, Corpl. Theodore Wheeler, Hewitt C. Hamlin, Duane S. Bush, Jacob Cook, Henry Belcher, Franklin Sleight, Francis S. Lee.
Co. B.—Ephraim Roosa, Theodore Garrison, John Knighton.
Co. C.—Corpl M S. Tyler, Constantino Van Steenburgh, Edward Coogan, Corpl, G. W. Pardie.
Co. D.—Sergt. Luther McClellan, Reuben C. Van Leuven, Amos C. Treat, Eben Higgins, Albert Collier.
Co. E.—Lieut. G. W. Brankstone, Alexander Tice, James Horsfall, Louis Snyder, Wm. Fetterman, Leonard Van Gorda.
Co. F.—Capt. J. S. Corbin, Geo. Pells, John Luft.
Co. G.—Sergt. L. Decker, James Halleck.
Co. H.—Anson Pierce, Corpl. E. A. Degroff, Corpl. James Angevine, A. J. Gillens.
Co. I.—Corpl. Joseph Leonard, John Tracy, Thomas Hyatt.
Co. K.—Capt. A. N. Baldwin, N. Southard, Sergt. M. Decker.
WOUNDED.
Major W. A. Van Rensselaer and Adjutant John N. Schoonmaker.
Co. A.—Philip Cookingham, Daniel Meader, William Baker, William A. Stocking, Michael Kilroy.
Co. B.—Capt. John R. Leslie, 1st Serg't I. C. Buswell, Serg't T. Wansbrough Bloxham, Serg't Andrew Taple, Corpl Wm. Kiesenburgher, Corpl John H. Swart, Corp'l Chas. R. Macniff, James Keegan, Adam Moore, James Wescott, Frank Bowman, Silas Perrine, Jacob Teal.
Co. C.—1st Lieut. A. S. Schult, 2d Lieut, Jas. Fleming, Serg't James Craig, Corpl I. Dunn, Jr., George A. Acker, John Boyle, J. A. Bonesteel, John Edelmann, Jerry Harrigan, Fred. Smith, Chas. A. Simmons, Joseph Shelightner, I. Dubois, Thos. Welles, Abm. A. Van Buskirk.
Co. D.—Capt. Dan'l McMahon, 2d Lieut. George B. Wolcott, 1st Serg't A. D. Miller, Corp'l John Cudney, Chas. Kniffins, Asa Jones, Dewitt Rose, Ira B. Taft, Samson Eggenburgh, D. H. Earnhardt, Ephraim Bush.
Co. E.—2d Lieut. Abm. Merritt, Henry Irwin, Serg't Dewitt, Corpl John Johnson, Lorenzo B. Healy, Sam'l Norfork, Wm. S. Van Keuren, Enos T. Vail, 1st Serg't Isaiah Decker, Serg't Louis Champagne, Serg't Stephen L. Karney, Jesse Kidney, George Babcock.
Co. F.—2d Lieut. John Delacroy, 1st Serg't A. Mullen, Col. Serg't E. Beckett, Corpl John Burns, Wm. I. Miller, M. McCloskey, Thomas Conlon, John Guy, Edward Ashley.
Co. G.—Capt. Wm. Cunningham, Lieut. G. B. Mulkes, Sergt. Higgins, ____ Bonest.., John C. Parks, Wm. Shaffer, A. Van Valkenburgh.
Co. H.—Capt. Thos. Alexander, 2d Lieut D. H. Tanner, 1st Sergt. George A. Mann, Sergt. George A. Capron, Corp'l John Ovendorf, Wm. H. Greaves, Morris Hein, John Sullivan, Chas. Keegan, Aaron Nichols.
Co. I.—1st Sergt. M. Farrel, Sergt. M. Whittaker, Sergt. Wm. Fuller, Geo. Roesman, Wm. A. Henson, James Larrin, John W. Plimley, Harry Tompkins, Emerson Scott, A. Flanders, Edward Wright, Nicholas Roeran, A. Van Aken, Corpl Abm. Swart, Barney Fitch, Peter Kelley, Frank De Marse, W. Parkinson.
Co. K.—2d Lieut. J. M. Young, 1st Sergeant Jehiel J. Judd, Sergt. Hill, Andrew Mabin, Addison S. Hayes, Corp'l John Martin.
MISSING.
Co. A.—lst Sergt. Asa C. Howard, Wm. Bishop, Geo. C. James, Corpl Franklin Hermance, Abm. Warren, John N.Ferris, David Ackert, Harry Eckert, Karner Cookingham.
Co. B.—H. C. Van Beuren, Jas. H. Ellsworth, Morgan Denegar.
Co. C.—Theron Auchmoody, Jas. Gannon, B. L. Hasbrouck, Wm. F. Cronk.
Co. D.—Wm. H. Howard, Harmon Collier.
Co. E.—Corpl Jacob Fister.
Co. F.—Thomas Croaks, Geo. McMichael, Thos. Doyle,
Co. G.—Jacob Ostrander, ____ Howard, Rob't Giles.
Co. H.—1st Lieut. E. A. Ross, (captured), Joseph Sickler, Wm. F. Snyder, Saml Greaves.
Co. I.—Lyman O. Waters.
Co. K.—Gould P. Austin.
RECAPITULATION.
Total.—Killed, 43; wounded, 107; missing, 32.

The 20th Regiment, N. Y. S. M., has again been assigned to duty in the Provost Marshal General's Department, of the Army of the Potomac.

Biography.
Col. Zadock Pratt has engaged an eminent Episcopal Clergyman to write the life of his son, Col. C. W. Pratt, late commander of the 20th Regiment.

The Whole of Lee's army.
The Battle near Gettysburg.
The Battle in Pennsylvania, which has been the fiercest of the whole campaign, has culminated in the complete victory of the Union troops. The latest dates give us the gratifying news that the enemy having made a stand at the Potomac, which they had failed in crossing, were routed in dismay, the troops being panic struck, scattering in all directions. From an eye witness of the battle, we have been furnished with the following list of killed and wounded in the late Battles in Pennsylvania, of those who had enlisted from Greene County, and were attached to the 20th and 120th Regiments:
20TH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. M.
Capt. J. G. Corbin, killed.
Capt. Baldwin, do.
Lieut. Bragston, do.
Lieut. Merritt, severely wounded.
Capt. McMahon, leg shot off.
Lieut. J. M. Young, wounded in face and arm.
Lieut. Mulks, wounded in leg.
Capt. Alexander, do.
Lieut. Dileroy, do.
Capt. Cunningham, do.
Lieut. Fleming, wounded.
Lieut. Tanner, severely wounded.
Adjt. J. M. Schoonmaker, Jr., wounded in hip.

ROBERT LOUGHRAN, of Saugerties, surgeon of the twentieth regiment, N. Y. S. M., was taken prisoner by the rebels during the late battle of Gettysburgh [sic] and held as such for three days, during which time they robbed him of his clothes, surgical instruments and his two horses. The instruments were taken from him while he was operating on one of our wounded.
Company E, of the Ulster Guard, went into the Gettysburgh [sic] battles with an aggregate of twenty-three men, in command of Lieutenant Brankstone. The last day of the fight the company was composed of four men, in command of Lieutenant Merritt, Lieut. Brankstone having been killed the first day.
The new flag presented to the twentieth regiment by the ladies of Saugerties, is already perforated with over twenty bullet holes.

Arrived in Town.
Col. T. B. Gates, of the 20th Regiment N. Y. S. M., arrived at his home, in this village, on Friday evening last. We never saw him looking better.

COL. ZADOCK PRATT is erecting scaffolds and machinery against the rocks, above Prattsville, for the purpose of having chisled thereon, the statue of his son, the late Col. Geo. W. Platt.

IN HOSPITAL.—We notice by a paper just received that the following men belonging to the 20th Regiment from this county have been admitted in the West Philadelphia Hospital: M. Perseoness, C. Ostrander, Jacob F. Teal, L. C. Buswell, M. Dennegar, A. Yaple and H. C. Van Buren.
George Ackert, member of Co. C. of the same regiment, died in the above named Hospital a few days since.

XXth Regiment N. Y. S. M.
The following is a list of wounded in the Third Division, 1st Army Corps' Hospital, in Gettysburgh [sic], Pa:
Chas. Kniffins, co. D, thigh
John Knighton, co. B, leg
Asa Bishop, sergt. co D, thigh
Jas. E. Doxey, co. A, left shoulder
John Glendorf, corp. co. H, hips
Morris Hein, corp. co. H, knee
Louis Champagne, sergt co. E, thigh
Thos. Aulk, co. I, back
John C. Parks, co. G, right forearm
D. W. Kase, co. D, left shoulder
M. Van Valkenburgh, co. G, chest
John Gaz, co. F, right knee
Jas. Hagger, co. G, left hand
Lergt. Jos Hill, co. K, left thigh
A. Mullen, co. F, right leg
Jas. Reegan, co, B, do
Enos B. Vail, co. G, left side
Wm. Risenberger, corp. co. B, right leg
Jansen Lannin, co. I, left hand
Moses Whittaker, sergt. co. I, right hip
M. Rossman, co. I, right hand
John W. Henely, co. I , right arm
John Dunn, corp. co. I, right arm
E. H. Scott, co. I, right arm
Chas. Nichols, co. H, thigh, leg and abdomen.
J. H. Belcher, co. A, head
Wm. Parkinson, co. I, foot.
Dr. A. J. Ward, 2d Wis. Volunteers, is Surgeon in charge of the hospital, assisted by E. R. Huested, of the New York Sanitary Department.

COLONEL GATES informs The Kingston Journal that the twentieth regiment has again been assigned to duty in the provost marshal general's department, of the army of the Potomac. The colonel says: "We came down from Berlin with seven hundred and twenty-four prisoners of war, whom we turned over to the provost marshal of Washington yesterday, and to-morrow we start on our return to the army, which we shall probably find some where in Virginia. I enclose you a little item from The Washington Chronicle of July 19:"
"ARRIVAL OF REBEL PRISONERS.—Seven hundred and twenty-four rebel prisoners, captured at Falling Waters on the 15th instant, arrived in this city yesterday morning in charge of a guard under command of Colonel Gates, of the Twentieth New York State Militia of the army of the Potomac. The prisoners were all committed to the Old Capitol prison by order of Captain Todd, provost marshal. Among the party were twenty-eight officers, together with one colored servant."

The XXth Regiment.
FRIEND ROMEYN:—You can state in your paper, if you please, for the satisfaction of the friends of the XXth, that it has been again assigned to duty in the Provost-Marshal General's Department, of the army of the Potomac.
We came down from Berlin with 724 prisoners of war, whom we turned over to the Provost-Marshal of Washington yesterday, and to-morrow we start on our return to the army, which we shall propably [sic] find somewhere in Virginia. I enclose you a little item from the Washington Chronicle of July 19:
ARRIVAL OF REBEL PRISONERS.—Seven hundred and twenty four rebel prisoners, captured at Falling Waters on the 15th instant, arrived in this city yesterday morning in charge of a guard under command of Colonel Gates, of the Twentieth New York State Militia of the army of the Potomac. The prisoners were all committed to the Old Capitol prison by order of Captain Todd, provost marshal. Among the party were twenty eight officers, together with one colored servant.
Yours truly, THEODORE B. GATES.

ULSTER HISTORICAL SOCIETY.—The Ulster Historical Society met at the Court House, on Monday, the 8th inst., pursuant to announcement. The attendance was not as large as desired; .... business was transacted, and the .... adjourned to the 24th inst. The ...., commemorative of the late Col. George W. Pratt, by Rev. Mr. Temple, of Esopus, will be delivered in the evening. It is to be hoped that our citizens will honor the occasion with a general attendance. Lieut. J. Ross Horner.
It was the intention of the "E. C." Fraternity to pay a tribute of respect to the memory of Lieut. Horner at the proper time, but by some oversight the matter was passed. During a visit of Capt. A, N. Baldwin to the 144th last winter, we learned many particulars relating to the military career of our friend, all tending to the highest estimate of his merits as a brave soldier and a true patriot. His high worth, though unknown to some who met him while here, leaves a precious legacy to his many friends and associates both in the army and in civil life.
Whereas, In the mysterious workings of Divine Providence, the Almighty has seen fit to take unto Himself one of our members—Lieut. J. Ross Horner, 20th N. Y. S. M., who fell bravely fighting upon the disastrous battle-field of Bull Run, on the 30th August, 1862, we in respect and honor to our departed brother, do adopt the following resolutions:
Resolved, That brother Horner has been in honorable standing as a member of the E. C. Fraternity, and a true and faithful brother to our Order, and that we deeply mourn his loss and commemorate his many virtues.
Resolved, That although our hearts are filled with sadness, yet we are cheered by the consolation that he fell like a true patriot and soldier, with his face to the foe.
Resolved, That we extend our heart-felt sympathy to the aged father and relatives of the deceased, and that a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to them, and also that they be inserted in the public prints.
Hall of the Fraternity, Del. Lit. Inst. Franklin N. Y. May '62
T.WOOD MARTIN,
EUGENE A. McDOWEEL.
AUSTIN BEEBE,
Committee.
Thomas Wells, son of Mr. George Wells, of St. James street, in this village, a member of the 20th Regiment, N. Y. S. M., wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Gettysburgh [sic], has arrived home. He was paroled almost immediately after being taken prisoner. He has since been exchanged. He was wounded by a musket ball which lodged near the spine.

A SPLENDID TESTIMONIAL
TO COL. THEO. B. GATES.
Some time ago, a plan was agreed upon by one or two prominent individuals in this village, by which the citizens of Kingston, Rondout and Saugerties might have an opportunity of manifesting their high appreciation of the merits of Col. Theodore B. Gates, both as a soldier and gentleman. The plan was for raising a certain amount of money, and expending the same for a sword, sash, shoulder straps, spurs, &c.
Wm. M. Hayes, of this village, called upon numerous citizens in the aforesaid villages, and speedily raised the desired amount. The money being collected, a meeting of the subscribers was held in in this village in the afternoon of August 1st., at which Erastus Cooke, Esq., was made Chairman, and Wm. M. Hayes appointed Secretary. On motion Brig. Gen. Samson and Wm. M. .... were appointed a Committee to purchase the aforesaid articles, to be presented to Col. Gates, and that Hon. Wm. B. Wright be requested to present the same.
Accordingly, the above Committee proceeded to New York, and called upon Messrs. Fitch & Waldo, No. 15 Maiden Lane, and left their orders for the above articles.
On Friday last, Mr. Hayes received the following letter:
New-York, August .., 1862.
Mr. Wm. M. HAYES, Kingston, N.Y.: .... we hand you bill of Presentation Sword, &c., sent this afternoon to your address, per American Express.
We have taken a great deal of pains in getting up the different articles. They are elegant, and we feel confident they will meet your entire approbation.
Yours respectfully,
FITCH & WALDO.
They were received on Friday, and placed in the show-window of Charles B. Safford's Jewelry store, on exhibition, and are as follows:

IN HOSPITAL.—We notice by a paper just received that the following men belonging to the 20th Regiment from this county have been admitted in the West Philadelphia Hospital: M. Perseoness, C. Ostrander, Jacob F. Teal, L. C. Buswell, M. Dennegar, A. Yaple and H. C. Van Buren.
George Ackert, member of Co. C. of the same regiment, died in the above named Hospital a few days since.

XXth Regiment N. Y. S. M.
The following is a list of wounded in the Third Division, 1st Army Corps' Hospital, in Gettysburgh [sic], Pa:
Chas. Kniffins, co.D, thigh
John Knighton, co. B, leg
Asa Bishop, sergt. co D, thigh
Jas. E. Doxey, co. A, left shoulder
John Olendorf, corp. co. H, hips
Morris Hein, corp. co. H, knee
Louis Champagne, sergt co. E, thigh
Thos. Aulk, co. I, back
John C. Parks, co. G, right forearm
D. W. Kase, co. D, left shoulder
M. Van Valkenburgh, co. G, chest
John Gaz, co. F, right knee
Jas. Hagger, co. G. left hand
Lergt. Jos Hill, co. K, left thigh
A. Mullen, co. F, right leg
Jas. Reegan, co, B, do
Enos B. Vail, co. C, left side
Wm. Risenberger, corp. co. B, right leg
Jansen Lannin, co. I, left hand
Moses Whittaker, sergt. co. I, right hip
M. Rossman, co. I, right hand
John W. Henely, co. I, right arm
John Dunn, corp. co. I, right arm
E. H. Scott, co. I, right arm
Chas. Nichols, co. H, thigh, leg and abdomen.
J. H. Belcher, co, A, head
Wm. Parkinson, co. I, foot.
Dr. A. J . Ward, 2d Wis. Volunteers, 1st Surgeon in charge of the hospital, assisted by E. R. Huested, of the New York Sanitary Department.

COLONEL GATES informs The Kingston Journal that the twentieth regiment has again been assigned to duty in the provost marshal general's department, of the army of the Potomac. The colonel says: "We came down from Berlin with seven hundred and twenty-four prisoners of war, whom we turned over to the provost marshal of Washington yesterday, and to-morrow we start on our return to the army, which we shall probably find some where in Virginia. I enclose you a little item from The Washington Chronicle of July 19:"
"ARRIVAL OF REBEL PRISONERS.—Seven hundred and twenty-four rebel prisoners, captured at Falling Waters on the 15th instant, arrived in this city yesterday morning in charge of a guard under command of Colonel Gates, of the Twentieth New York State Militia of the army of the Potomac. The prisoners were all committed to the Old Capitol prison by order of Captain Todd, provost marshal. Among the party were twenty-eight officers, together with one colored servant."

SURGEON LOUGHRAN.—Robert Loughran, of Saugerties, Surgeon of the 20th Regiment, N. Y. S. M., was taken prisoner by the rebels during the late battle of Gettysburgh [sic] and held as such for three days, during which time they robbed him of his clothes, surgical instruments and his two horses.  The instruments were taken from him while he was operating on one of our wounded.
Dr. L. is now in charge of Seminary Hill Hospital, the largest one at Gettysburgh [sic], and the report of those of this village who have been on to the battle-field, that it is the best conducted and cleanest Hospital in that vicinity, speaks well for Dr. L. who has the sole management of the institution.--[Telegraph.

The Honored Old 20th.
HEADQUARTERS, THIRD DIVISION,
FIRST CORPS, July 6, 1863.
GENERAL ORDERS.
The Major General commanding the division desires to return his sincere thanks to the Vermont brigade, the One Hundred and Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, and the Twentieth New York State Militia, for their gallant conduct in resisting in the front line, the main attack of the enemy upon this position, after sustaining a terrific fire from seventy-five to one hundred pieces of artillery. He congratulates them upon contributing so essentially to the glorious and it is to be hoped final victory of yesterday.
By command of
Major General DOUBLEDAY.
E. C. BAIRD, Captain and A. A. G.
20th REGIMENT.
Killed, Wounded and Missing, reported 180.
Among the wounded we find the following Greene County names:
Serg't. M. Farrell, Hunter.
Capt. Wm. Cunningham, Lexington, Co. G.
Serg't. L. Decker,                     "        "
Serg't. Hlggins,                        "        "
Serg't. Bonesteel,                     "        "
John C. Parks,                         "        "
Wm. Schaffer,                         "        "
N. Van Valkenburgh,              "        "
Jacob Ostrander, S. D. Howard, and Robert Giles, of this Co., are missing.
Captain Baldwin, Jewett, Co. K, killed.
Lieut. John M. Young,   " wounded.
Serg't. M. Decker,                    " killed.
N. Southard,                  "    "
Serg't. Jehiel J. Judd,     " wounded.
Corp. John Chandler,    "    "
Andrew Maben,             "    "
Addison S. Hayes,                   "    "
Serg't. Hill,                     "    "
Gould P. Austin,            " missing.
Maj.-Gen. DOUBLEDAY issued a general order, July 6th, thanking the 20th N. Y. S. M., among others, "for their gallant conduct in resisting in the front line the main attack of the enemy."

Casualties of Our Regiments.
Elsewhere we publish such accounts of the victories gained by Gen. Meade, as the short time allowed us to collect the details, would permit. Annexed hereto will be found the names of those soldiers from Ulster and vicinity, who have been killed and wounded.
Our county is in deep mourning. Who within her limits has not lost a friend?
Our rejoicings rise with the magnitude of the victory, but our sorrow sharpens and deepens with the bitterness of our personal losses.
Gloom rests thick on many a household in Old Ulster. Self-sacrificing wives, fathers and mothers have met with the greatest bereavement of their lives. Brothers and sisters see in horrid imagination, ghastly forms of men bound to them by the tenderest childhood associations. Children are now tasting for the first time the gall and wormwood pressed to the Nation's lips.
By rebel hands our brothers died. By rebel hands our brothers have been bruised and wounded. The instigators of secession and their abettors, North and South, are guilty of their injuries and their blood. A damnable curse is upon them; and each one carries in his soul a stain that all oceans of water can never wash out.
Peace to the memories, felicity to the spirits, of those who laid down their lives in repelling rebel invasion. Universal gratitude, life long honor, to those who, scarred or maimed, passed through the harvest of death.

TWENTIETH REGIMENT.
Capt. J. S. Corbin, killed.
Lt. E. Bragston, killed.
Lieut. John Brankstown, supposed killed.
Capt. D. McMahon, wounded.
Capt. J. R. Leslie, wounded.
Adjutant John M. Schoonmaker, hip.
Lt. E. Merritt, severely.
Capt. K. Baldwin, killed.
Lt. K. Young, face and arm.
Lt. G. Mulks, leg.
Lt. D. Dileroy, leg.
Lt. C. Fleming, wounded.
Capt. G. Cunningham, leg.
Lt. H. Tanner, severely.
The Regiment in killed, wounded and missing, lost 125 men. We give above the names as they come to hand.

The Ulster Regiments.
The old 20th and the 120th Regiments, recruited in Kingston, were both in the battle of Gettysburg, and acquitted themselves with patriotic valor, as their casualities [sic] show, especially the 20th, whose brave record shines brighter and brighter, while the remembrance of its valiant dead casts a gloom around many a hearthstone at home.

TWENTIETH REGIMENT.
Capt. J. S. Corbin, killed.
Lieut. G. W. Brankstone, killed.
Capt. D. McMahon, leg shot off.
Lt. McMahon, wounded.
Capt. J. R. Leslie, wounded.
Adjt. J. M. Schoonmaker, hip.
Lt. A. B. Merritt, severely.
Capt. Baldwin, killed.
Lt. J. M. Young, face and arm.
Lt. G. B. Mulks. leg.
Lt. D. Dileroy, leg.
Lt. J. Flemming, leg.
Capt. G. Cunningham, leg.
Lt. A. H. Tanner, severely.
Major Van Rensselaer, wounded.
Ephraim Roosa, killed.
Serg't I. C. Buswell, wounded.
H. C. Van Buren, missing.
Lieut. A. S. Schutt, wounded.
Constantine Vansteenbergh, killed.
James Hallock, killed.
Corp. Gr. W. Pardee, wounded.
Amos C. Treat, wounded.
George Babcock, wounded.
William F. Krom, missing.
Several more were killed and a large number wounded, but here is all we could get and give thus week.
Schoonmaker, Mulks, Capt. McMahon, Merritt and Flemming have arrived here. The Regiment in killed, wounded and missing, lost 125 men. We here give the names as they came to hand.

THE 20TH REGIMENT.—The following names of killed and wounded in the 20th regiment are additional to those which we published yesterday:
Lt. Merritt, E, severely; Lt. Dileroy, D, leg; Lt. Fleming, O, wounded; Capt. Cunningham, G, leg; Lt. Tanner, H, severely; Capt. Thomas Alexander, H, leg; Capt. Baldwin, K, killed; Capt. McMeace, D, leg shot off; Lt. Young, K, face, arm; Lt. Munks, Gr, leg.
The regiment in killed, wounded, and missing, lost 125 men.

LOCAL RECORD.
MANUSCRIPT PAPERS.
Col. Pratt and His Command.
No. 4.
We give this week a condensed record of the doings of the Twentieth up to its first regular fight with the rebels.
Enlistments for the three years service, in the 20th Regiment commenced on the 5th day of October, 1861. On the 25th day of October, 1861, it marched from Kingston, en route for the seat of war, and reached Washington on the 278th. On the 28th it went into camp near Washington, on Kalorama Heights. At this time it was attached to a Provisional Brigade in Brigadier General Casey's Division—the brigade being under command of Colonel Pratt, who immediately commenced making the brigade fit for active duty by continuous severe drills. Although in command of a brigade, Col. Pratt wished to have his regiment in the front, even if it placed him in a subordinate position, and accordingly opened negotiations to that effect. Early in November the regiment crossed the Potomac, at Chain Bridge, and marched to Upton's Hill, (Va.,) where it went into winter quarters, being attached t o Gen. Wadsworth's Brigade, Gen. McDowell's Division. From that time until March, 1862, the regiment was engaged in picket duty, occasionally in a foraging or reconnoitering expedition, drill, and the usual routine of camp life. In February the army was divided in Corps d'Armee—Geo. McDowell being assigned to the command of the Corps to which the regiment was attached, Gen. Rufus King succeeding him as commander of the Division: Gen. Wadsworth retaining command of the Brigade. On the 10th of March, 1862, the regiment marched with the Army of the Potomac to near Centreville, where it remained until the 15th, when it returned to Upton's Hill; two days afterwards it marched to Bailey's Cross Roads and encamped. (Gen. Wadsworth was appointed Military Governor of Washington while the regiment was at Centreville, and left to assume his new station.) While here Brig. Gen. M. K. Patrick assumed command of the Brigade. The regiment remained in this camp until the 4th of April, when it again marched through Annandale, Fairfax Court House, Centreville and Manassas Junction, to Bristoe Station on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, which place it reached on the 6th, and where it remained until the 16th, when it proceeded to Cattlett's Station. On the 18th it marched for Fredericksburgh [sic], and, passing through Falmouth, encamped opposite the former place on the 19th. On the 5th of May a portion of the regiment, under command of Lieut.-Col. Gates, crossed the river and occupied a portion of the city, being the first United States troops that had ever been there. On the 10th the rest of the brigade crossed and encamped on what was called the Telegraph Road, at the point where, during the late battle of Fredericksburgh [sic], the rebels had their strongest works. On the 11th the brigade was ordered out on the Bowling Green Road, to check the enemy who were advancing toward the city in strong force.—Some slight skirmishing took place, resulting in killing the horse of one of Gen. Patrick's orderlies, when the enemy retired. The enemy lost 13 men and three horses, captured by a squad of cavalry under command of Lieut. Col. Gates. From this until May 26, the regiment was employed on picket duty back of the city, having occasional skirmishes with the enemy. On the 26th it marched some eight miles across the Massaponix River on the Richmond and Fredericksburgh [sic] Telegraph Road, and, on the 29th, returned, crossed the river and marched through Cattlett's Station, Greenwich and Hay Market, to intercept the retreat of Stonewall Jackson down the Shenandoah Valley. On the 6th of June it marched from Hay Market, and, passing through Warrenton, Warrenton Junction and Cattlett's Station, encamped on its old ground opposite Fredericksburgh [sic] on the 24th. On the 28th of July it again crossed the Rappahannock to Fredericksburgh [sic], where the  regiment was divided—six companies being posted below the city on the Bowling Green Road, and four companies above the city on the Orange Court House Road, and were employed on the duty of preventing any communication between the city and surrounding country. While stationed here, frequent reconnaissances under the com­mand of Col. Pratt were made. On the 5th of August the regiment was united at the lower post. On the 9th it marched to join Pope's army, crossing the Rapidan River at Ely's Ford; reached the Army of Virginia at Cedar Mountain on the 11th, and bivouacked in line of battle with or­ders to attack the enemy at daylight, but he retreated during the night. On the 18th began the movement now historical­ly known as Pope's Retreat. The Twen­tieth crossed the Rappahannock on the railroad bridge, at Rappahannock Station, the morning of the Twentieth at six o'clock.

CAPT. W. W. BECKWITH.—Capt. Beckwith has recently been commissioned as Captain in 20th N. Y. M., now 80th N. Y. Volunteers. The three years' men of the 35th Regiment were consolidated with the 80th Regiment, and Capt. Beckwith was credited and commissioned for them. There was no officer of the 35th Regiment more highly respected than Capt. Beckwith.

LOCAL RECORD.
MANUSCRIPT PAPERS.
Col. Pratt and His Command.
No. 6.
The insurgents had turned nineteen batteries on a United States fort, dishonored the Stars and Stripes and insulted the Government. Charleston was triumphal over the success of perjured traitors. The incendiary spirit was spreading like prairie fire over the South; vast forces were concentrating to strike the Union fatal blows; Washington was in danger; national death hovered almost in the very sight of the people; the vital air seemed dark with threatening evils and thick with direst dangers. The people of Ulster and Greene, like the people everywhere thro'out the North, were horror stricken. All were in panic. The Community lost, for a season, its interest in private affairs, its regard for social pleasures and its care for the ordinary concerns of life; even the calm and prudent felt delirium stealing over their senses, swaying their minds and affecting their judgment. Then were seen, then were felt and realized the is­sues of a great life. That the District must send men to support the nation, and that the Twentieth must be speedily filled and put in the field, was the unanimous sentiment of the people. All were ready to do their part: fathers and mothers gave sons; wives gave husbands; young men gave themselves; the rich gave their thousands, and others gave what they could. Money was freely offered, volun­teers came flocking in, but excitement and passion ruled the day. How import­ant, then, that the leader of the war move­ment be a man of true greatness, and one whose acts were the outgrowths of deep thought and exhalted [sic] purpose. The occa­sion did not produce such a leader for us, but the career of one in our midst for years previous, had ripened him for the emergency. In Col. Pratt we instinctive­ly placed our trust, and in him we were not deceived. We needed a man who could feel and appreciate the fearfulness of the crisis, but who would not be un-nerved when that crisis most terribly lashed the public mind. And such a man we found in the accomplished scholar and refined and courteous gentlemen who commanded the Ulster Guard.           

LOCAL RECORD.
MANUSCRIPT PAPERS.
Col. Pratt and His Command.
No. 7.
There is a class in every free American community who decide the popular standing of all prominent citizens. It is composed of men whose aspirations are governed by correct principles—men who have no personal hates to becloud their judgment, nor bitter party prejudices to warp their reason. They are men who, for the most part, know neither poverty nor riches; who live respectably and independently by honest labor; and who think their own thoughts and act out their own individualities. They are the real conservative element of the nationality—promoting every work of true progress, and resisting the assaults of disorganizers upon those old, established institutions which the present should bequeath to the future.
By such men was Col. PRATT'S name first brought out conspicuously before the public. They had well read his character; they had discovered his rare ability both as a thinker and as a worker, and they knew that either in affairs of honor or in great undertakings he would never fail.—They made for him this high distinction, not because he came from sound stock and was of the best American blood, not because he was a son of a business prince, and he himself possessed the eminent advantages of learning and wealth; but  because they were assured that he was above base purposes, and was  endowed with power of mind and with executive force in proportion to the integrity of his soul.
When he was a candidate for State Senator they rallied to his support with an unanimity never before known in the District. An influential politician went out to make a stumping and electioneering tour, a few days before the election in 1857. His own confessions made to a confidential friend on his return, showed the inutility of all attempts at weakening the Colonel in the estimation of the masses: "I saw our main men, and did all I could to stir them up to a vigorous prosecution of the canvass. Our party politicians are doing all they can, and for the most of our candidates I have made a good many votes outside of our organization; but the more I said about defeating Pratt the stronger public favor manifested itself. Even many of the best men on our side will hear nothing against him. Trying to work against him only injures our ticket. We had better do what we can for the rest of the ticket and let State Senator alone."
And let it be remembered that the heavy majority given him at that election, was not in any sense a disparagement to the reputation of the opposing candidate who was one of Ulster's solid men, or who always had hosts of fast and .... friends; it was simply because Col. Pratt's  popularity extended far beyond party lines, and was independent of party in­fluences.                                                    

Our Gallant Twentieth.
Ulster may well be proud of the record of her veteran regiment, the glorious old 20th. The flag of the "Ulster Guard" has been in the forefront of the fiercest battles of the army of the Potomac. It has sealed its devotion to the country by the blood of its brave men in many conflicts, and in the last and fiercest fight of the war, it has given a new and most disproportionate contribution to the list of the killed and wounded in that glorious victory. The following special order of the commander of the Division in which the 20th fought, is one of their hard won testimonials of a gallantry never exceeded:—
HEADQUARTERS , 3rd DIVISION 1st CORPS,
July 6, 1863.
The Major General commanding the division desires to return his thanks to the Vermont brigade, the One Hundred and Fifty-first Pennsylvania volunteers, and the Twentieth New York State Militia, for their gallant conduct in resisting in the front line the main attack of the enemy upon this position, after sustaining a terrific fire from seventy-five to one hundred pieces of artillery. He congratulates them upon contributing so essentially to the glorious and it is to be hoped final victory of yesterday. By command of Major-General DOUBLEDAY.
EDWARD C. BAIRD, Capt. and A. A. G.

OUR WAR CORRESPONDENCE.
Losses in the 20th N. Y. Militia at Gettysburg—Charles Keegan, of Cazenovia, and Other Former Members of the 35th Among Them.
Camp 20th N. Y. State Militia.
Near Boonesboro, July 12, 1863.
To the Editor of the Cazenovia Republican:
I send you a list of the casualties of our regiment, and have the honor to request that you will publish the same for the benefit of the 35th N. Y. Volunteers, as they were in the same brigade with our regiment.
I was recently commissioned Assistant-Surgeon in the 20th N. Y. S. M., and am from Old Madison Co., and a reader of your excellent little paper, which my parents send me each week.
You will excuse all errors, &c., &c., as this was written behind the works thrown up last night by our boys, without table, or tent to cover us; and besides, I had a scanty supply of paper. You may use my name, &c. Very respectfully, yours, 
Wm. Taylor, M. D.,
Asst.-Surgeon 20th N. Y. S. M.
The 20th N. Y. S. M., the only remaining regiment of Patrick's Brigade, to which the 35th N. Y. Vols. were attached during their term of Service, was among the regiments en­gaged at the late battle near Gettysburg. It will be remembered that a number of three years' men from the 35th were transferred to this regiment on the expiration of the time of service of the remainder of that regiment. The 20th had been doing provost duty at Aquia Creek, and covered the evacuation of that place on the 16th ult. On the 30th they reported to the 1st Army Corps, and joined the 3d Division just in time to be engaged with it at Gettysburg on the 1st inst. They shared the severe fighting and hard handling which that corps received that day from the enemy, and were forced to retreat from the town with a loss of over one-half their number killed and wounded. They were under fire on the night of the 2d, and all day of the 3d, and aided so materially in repulsing the attack of Longstreet's corps on the center of our position that day, as to win the thanks of Maj. Gen. Doubleday, in General Orders, for their good conduct and success.
Annexed will be found a list of the casualties, from which it will be seen that of 277 officers and men engaged, 176 are killed, wounded, or prisoners, and among the number 17 officers.
Some of the late members of the 35th are on the list.

List of the casualties in the 20th N. Y. S. M., in the late action of Gettysburg, July 1st, 2d, and 3d.:

Maj. Walter A. Van Rensselaer, wounded; Adj. John M. Schoonmaker, do.

COMPANY A—Corporal Theodore Wheeler, killed; Charles C. Babcock, Henry Belcher, Duane S. Burk, Francis Lee, do; Corporal Franklin Hermance, wounded, and prisoner; John Donnelly, head; James E. Doxie, arm; Dewitt Hamlin; Daniel Meader, wounded, and prisoner; Wm. Baker; Franklin Slight; Wm. A. Stocking, flesh wound; 1st Serg't Asa C. Howard, prisoner; Jacob Cook, Wm. Bishop, George E. Jones, John W. Ferris, David Ackert, do; Serg't John Ridings, missing; Abram Warner, Michael Killroy, Harvey Ackert, do.

COMPANY B—Capt. John R. Leslie, wounded; Ephraim Roosie, killed; Thos. Garrison, do; Serg't W. Bloxham, wounded; Serg't Isaac Buswall, do; John Knighton, James Kegan, do; Serg't Yaple, do; Wm. Risingburger, John H Swart, Adam Moore, James Wescoat, Charles McNiff, Frank Bowman, Silers Pryne, Jacob Teele, do; James Ellsworth, prisoner; Rob't McCarrick, do; Henry Van Buren, missing, M. Druyan, do.

COMPANY C—1st Lieut. A. S. Scott, wounded, (slight); 2d Lieut. Jas. Fleming, wounded; Sergeant James Craig, do, (since died); Corp'l Walter Tyler, killed; C. Van Sternburgh, Edward Crogan, do; Corporal G. W. Pardee, wounded, and prisoner; John Dunn; Geo. A. Ackert; John Boyle, wounded, and prisoner; John Ellerman, (slightly); J. Kerrigan; Frederick Smith, wounded, and prisoner; Joseph Shelightner, (face); Jonathan Dubois, wounded and prisoner; Thos. Wells, Abram Van Buskirk, do; Benjamin L. Hasbrouck; George G. Lowe, prisoner; Chas. A. Simmons, wounded, and prisoner; Theron Archmoody, missing; James Gannon, prisoner; Wm. Crum, missing.

COMPANY D—Captain Daniel McMahon, wounded, (leg, &c., amputated); Lieut. Geo. B. Wolcott, do, leg and face; Serg't Luther McClellan, killed; Eben Higgins, Reuben C. Van Luren, Albert Collier, Samson Eggenbergh, Amos C. Treat, do; Charles Kniffins, mortally wounded; Serg't Asa Bishop, wounded; Asa Jones, slightly; Dewitt Rose, shoulder; Ira B. Taft; Corp'l John Cudney, prisoner; Dan'l A. Bainhart, Ephraim Bush, do.

COMPANY E—Lieut. Geo. W. Brankstone, killed; Lieut. Abram Merritt, wounded, (arm and chest); Alexander Tice, killed; George Babcock, Leonard Van Gorder, do.; Lewis Snyder, side; Henry Irwin, mortally; James Harsfall, badly; Wm. Tetterman, wounded; Corp'l John Johnson, do; Lorenzo B. Headly, Samuel Norfolk, Wm. S. Van Kenson, Enos B. Vail, do; Serg't Louis Champagne, do; Serg't Stephen, L. Kearney, do; Jessie Kidney, prisoner; John Dunn, I. Waite, do; 1st Serg't Isiah S. Decker, missing; Corporal Jacob Fister, do.

COMPANY F—Captain Joseph S. Corbin, killed; Lieut. John Delacroy, wounded, (both thighs); Joseph Tuft, killed; Serg't Edward Beckett, wounded, and prisoner; Serg't A. Mullin, wounded; Corp'l John Burns, do; Wm. J. Miller, Michael McClusky, do; Geo. Pells, side; John Gray, Edw. Ashley; Thos. Crooks, prisoner; Thomas Doyle, do; Geo. McMichael, missing.

COMPANY G—Captain Wm. Cunningham, wounded, Lieut. Geo. B. Mull..., Lucian Decker, killed; James ...., Serg't James Higgins, wounded, hand; James Bomstead, leg; Peter Van W...., ankle; John C. Parks, arm; Wm. Shaffer, leg; Nicholas Van Valkenburgh, breast.

COMPANY H—Thomas Alexander, wounded, (leg); Lieut. E. A. Ross, prisoner; Lieut. Alfred Tanner, wounded; Corp'l Eli De Groff, killed; Ansel S. Pierce, do; ____ Gibbon, wounded; Corp'l John C. ...dorf, do; Corp'l Jas. C. Angerine, do; Chas. Keegan, both legs, (badly); Morris Klein, leg; Aaron Nichols; Wm. L. Snyder; Serg't George A. Capman, prisoner; Wm. T. Graves, Joseph Stickler, do; John Sullivan, missing; Sam'l Graves, do.

COMPANY I—Corp'l Joseph Leonard, killed; John Tracy, do; Thos. Hyatt, wounded, (probably killed); Squire Flanders, do; 1st Serg't Michael Farrell, wounded, and prisoner; Moses Whittaker, side; William Tuller, arm; George Rossman; Corporal Abram W. Swart, leg, (severely); James Laren; John Scott, arm; S. Strong; David Post; Barney Fitch, arm broken; Alexander Van Aken, arm; Wm. S. Hanson, arm (badly); Nicholas Rossman; Wm. Parkinson, foot; Edward Wright, wounded, and prisoner; Francis Demorse, prisoner; Lyman G. Waters, do.

COMPANY K—Capt. D. N. Baldwin, killed; Lieut. J. M. Young, wounded; Serg't Moses Decker, killed; N. Southard, do; 1st Serg't Jehiel G. Judd, wounded; Serg't Joseph Hill, leg, (badly); Corp'l John Chandler; Addison S. Hays, arm; Gould P. Auston, prisoner.

KINGSTON, N. Y.
Casualties of the Twentieth.
Col. Gates has sent to the Journal a list of the late casualties in the 20th Regiment, from which it makes the following corrections in, and additions to, the previous statement:

COMPANY A.
Corporal F. Hermance, wounded and prisoner.
John Donnelly, wounded in head.
James E. Doxie, wounded in arm.
Daniel Header, wounded and prisoner.
Serg't Asa C. Howard, prisoner.
Jacob Cook, prisoner.
Wm. Bishop, do.
George C. Jones, do.
John W. Ferris, do.
David Ackert, do.
Serg't John Ridings, missing.
Harvey Eckert, do.

COMPANY B.
John Knighton, wounded in leg.
James Ellsworth, prisoner.
Robert McCarrick, prisoner.
Henry Van Buren, wounded in leg.

COMPANY C.
Serg't James Craig, wounded on the 3d, and died on the 4th.
John Boyle, wounded and prisoner.
Fred. Smith,      do.              do.                 
Abram A. Van Buskirk, wounded in back and prisoner.
Bnjamin [sic] L. Hasbrouck, wounded.
George G. Low, prisoner.
Charles A. Simmons, wounded and prisoner.
James Gannon, prisoner.

COMPANY D.
Samson Eggenburgh, killed.
Charles Kniffin, leg amputated.
Serg't Asa Bishop, wounded.
Corporal John Cudney, prisoner.
Daniel A. Barnhart, prisoner.
Ephraim Bush, prisoner.

COMPANY E.
George Babcock, killed.
Henry Irvine, mortally wounded.
Louis Snyder, wounded in side.
James Hausfall, thigh, flesh wound.
William Fetterman, right leg.
Jesse Kidney, prisoner and wounded.
John Dunn, prisoner.
J. Waite,        do.
Serg't Isaiah S. Decker, missing.

COMPANY F.
Sergeant Edward Beckett, wounded and prisoner.
George Pells, wounded in side.
John Grey, wounded.
Thomas Crooks, prisoner.
Thomas Doyle,      do.

COMPANY G.
Peter Van Wag...

COMPANY H.
A.J. Gibb ....
Corp. Jas. ... wounded.
William Snyder, shoulder.
Serg't George A. Cap..., prisoner and wounded.
William T. Graves, prisoner.
Joseph Sickler, prisoner.
John Sullivan, missing.

COMPANY I.
Thomas Hyatt, wounded, since died.
Squire Flanders, wounded, supposed killed.
Sergeant Michael Farrell, wounded and prisoner.
S. Strong, wounded;
David S. Post, wounded.
Edward Wright, breast, and prisoner.
Francis Demorse, prisoner.
Lyman O. Waters,   do.

COMPANY K.
Gould P. Austin, prisoner.

Capt. Joseph S. Corbin.
Among the slain at Gettysburg, is Capt. Jos. S. Corbin of Co. F, 20th Regiment N. Y. S. M. This is Rondout's especial company, and Capt. Corbin was one of our best known citizens. He was from Roxbury, Delaware Co., originally, and for some years prior to the war, was at the head of District School No. 7. He went out with the 20th on its first three months service, as a Sergeant in the company at whose head he has now fallen. On the reorganization for three years service, he took the command.—He was a most energetic and efficient officer.—Nothing brings more vividly to view the havoc of war, than to recall the vigorous and manly person of one like Capt. Corbin moving among us so brief a time since, and now among the fallen. He was in his 34th year.--Rondout Courier.

From the Gallant Old Twentieth.
The latest special news we have from the Ulster Guard, is in a letter from Daniel Treat to his father Alfred A. Treat of this village. It is dated Boonsboro, Md., July 9th.
He says the regiment is reduced to 97 men fit for duty, and had then just received orders to join the First Army Corps, to which it is now attached.
Daniel is a drummer in Co. D. His brother Amos C. Treat, a private in Co. D., aged 23, was killed July 1st, by balls through his breast and head. His last words were, "stick to the colors, boys!" Just before going into battle he said to his brother, "Tell father if I fall, I won't die a coward." And, poor fellow! He bravely kept his word.
Capt. McMahon of Co. D., was wounded in four places, and has a leg amputated. There are only 9 effective men of his company left.
Daniel, who is but 19 years of age, very touchingly complains of his lonely feeling, for nearly all his comrades are dead or wounded. Mr. Treat has another son, William, in the 20th, but now detached and doing duty as an Orderly at Annapolis. The drummer boy, like his brothers, has a brave heart, and we wish that everybody could emulate him in "looking on the bright side," as he urges his father to do under the most disastrous auspices.

20th Regiment, N. Y. S. M.
Major Van Rensselaer, wounded.
Adjt. J. M. Schoonmaker, do.

COMPANY A.
John Donnelly, killed, Duane S. Bush, killed; James E. Doxey, killed; Henry Belcher, killed; Chas. C. Babcock, killed; Jacob Cook, killed; Corp. Theo. Wheeler, killed; Philip Cookingham, wounded; Francis Lee, killed; DeWitt Hamlin, killed; Daniel Meader, wounded; Wm. Baker, wounded; Franklin Sleight, wounded; Wm. A. Stocking, wounded; Sergt. Asa C. Howard, missing; Wm. Bishop, missing; George C. James, missing; Corp. Franklin Hermance, missing; Abram Warner, missing; John W. Ferris, missing; Michael Kilroy, wounded; Daniel Ackert, wounded; Harry Eckert, wounded; Karner Cookingham, wounded.

COMPANY B.
Capt. J. R. Leslie, wounded; Ephraim Roosa, killed; Theodore Garrison, killed; John Knighton, killed; Sergt. W. Bloxham, wounded; Sergt. I. C. Buswell, wounded; James Keegan, wounded; Sergt. Andrew Yaple, wounded; Corp'l Wm. Risenbergher, wounded; Corp'l John H. Swart, wounded; Adam Moore, wounded; James Westcott, wounded; Corp'l C. K. Macni.., wounded; F. Boman, wounded; Silas Perrine, wounded; H. C. Van Beuren, missing; J. H. Ellsworth, missing; M. Denegar, missing; Jacob Teal, wounded.

COMPANY C.
Lieut. A. S. Schutt, wounded; Lieut. James Flemming, wounded; Corp'l W. S. Tyler, killed; Constantine Van Steenburg, killed; Edward Coogan, killed; Serg't Craig, wounded; Corp'l G. W. Pardee, do; Corp'l J. Dunn, Jr., do; Geo. A. Acker, do; John Boyle, do; S. A. Bonesteel, do; John Eddleman, do; Jerry Harrigan, do; Fred. Smith, do; Chas. A. Simmons, do; Joseph Shelightner, do; Jon. Dubois, do; Thomas Wells, do; Abram A. Vanbuskirk, do; Theron Auchmoo.., missing; James Gannon, do; B. L. Hasbrouck, do; Wm. F. Krum, do.

COMPANY D.
Capt. McMahon, wounded, lost leg; Lieut. George B. Wolcott, wounded; Serg't Luther McClellan, killed; Eben Higgins, killed; Reuben C. Van Leuven, killed; Albert Collier, killed; Serg't A. D. Miller, wounded; Serg't Chas. Kniffins, do; Serg't Asa Jones, do; Corporal John Cudney, do; De Witt Rose, do; Ira B. Taft, do; S. Eggenburgh, do; Wm. H. Howard, missing; Amos C. Treat, killed; D. H. Barnhart, wounded; Ephraim Bush, wounded; Harmon Collier, missing.

COMPANY E.
Lieut. G. W. Brankstone, killed; Lieut. Abram Merritt, wounded; Alex. Tice, killed; James Hausfall, do. Wm. Fetterman, do; Lewis Snyder, do; Leonard Vangorder, do; Henry Irwin, wounded; Serg't Dewitt, do; Corp'l John Johnson, do; Lorenzo B. Healey, do; Samuel Norfolk, do; Wm. S. Van Keuren, do; Enos B. Vail, do; Serg't Isaiah S. Decker, do; Serg't Lewis Champagne, do; Serg't Stephen L. Carney, do; Corp'l Jacob Fister, missing; Jesse Kidney, wounded; Geo Babcock, do.

Company F.
Capt. J. S. Corbin, killed; Lieut. Dela-croy, wounded; Geo Pells, killed; John Luft, do; Serg't A, Mullen, wounded; Serg't Edward Beckett, do; Corp'l John Burns, do; Wm. J. Miller, do; M. Mc-Cluskey, do; Thomas Conlon, do; John Guy, do; Edward. Ashley, do; Thomas Croaks, missing; George McMichael, do; Thomas Doyle, do.

COMPANY G.
Captain Cunningham, wounded; Lieut. George B. Mulks, do; Serg't L. Decker, killed; Serg't Higgins, wounded; Serg't Bonesteel, do; James Hallock, killed; John C. Parks, wounded; William Schaffer, do; N. Van Valkenbergh, do; Jacob Ostrander, missing; S. D. Howard, do; Robert Giles,
missing.

COMPANY H.
Captain Alexander, wounded; Lieut E. A. Ross, prisoner; Lieut A. Tanner, wounded; Anson S. Pierce, killed; Serg't Geo. A. Mann, wounded; Serg't George A. Capron, do; Corp'l John Ovendorf, do; Corp'l James E. Angevine, killed; William T. Greaves, wounded; Morris Hein, do; Corp. E. A. Degrafff, killed; John Sullivan, wounded; Samuel Greaves, missing; Charles Keegan, wounded; William L. Snyder, missing; Aaron Nichols, wounded; Joseph Sickler, missing; A. J. Gibbons, killed.

COMPANY I.
Corp'l Joseph Leonard, killed; Serg't M. Farrell, wounded; Serg't M. Whittaker, do; Serg't William Fuller, do; Serg't Geo. Rossman, do; William L. Henson, do; Thomas Hyatt, killed; James Larin, wounded; John W. Plimley, do; Harry Tompkins, do; Emerson Scott, do; S. Flanders, do; Edward Wright, do; N. Rossman, do; A. Van Aken, do; Corp'l Abram Swart, do; Barney Fitch, do; Peter Kelly, do; John Tracy, killed; L. O. Waters, missing; F. Demarse, wounded; W. Parkinson, do.

COMPANY K.
Captain Baldwin, killed; Lieutenant J. M. Young, wounded; Serg't M. Decker, killed; N. Southard, do; Serg't Jehiel J. Judd, wounded; Corp'l John Chandler, do; Andrew Maben, do; Addison S. Hayes, do; Sergeant Hill, do; Gould P. Austin, missing.

Capt. Joseph S. Corbin.
Among the slain at Gettysburg, is Capt. Joseph S. Corbin, of Co. F, 20th
Regiment N. Y. S. M. This is Rondout's especial company, and Capt. Corbin was one of our best known citizens. He was from Delaware Co. originally, and for some years prior to the war, was at the head of District School No. 7.
He went out with the 20th on its first three months service, as a Sergeant in the company at whose head he has now fallen. On the reorganization for three years service, he took the command. He was a most energetic and efficient officer, and possessed in the highest degree the confidence of his men.
Captain Corbin leaves a wife and several children, who have been residing here since he took the field. On receiving news of his death, Mrs. C. went South in order to bring her husband's remains home for burial.
It is but a few short weeks ago that Capt. Corbin was home on a brief furlough. Nothing brings more vividly to view the havoc of war, than to recall the vigorous and manly person of one like Capt. Corbin moving among us so brief a time since, and now among the fallen. He was in his 34th year.

LOCAL RECORD.
MANUSCRIPT PAPERS.
Col. Pratt and His Command.
No. 12.
The regiment lay in the rifle pits after joining the balance of the Brigade, until about 12 o'clock, noon, when the Brigade was ordered to Fairfax C. H. They had marched but a short distance, however, when the order was countermanded and they returned to their former position.—At 2 P. M. they were ordered again to march, and moved immediately to Fairfax C. H., being the last infantry of the Army to pass through that place. After a very short halt, they again took up the line of march down the Little River Pike, and, passing through Annandale and Bailey's Cross Roads, reached Upton's Hill at 10 P. M. of that day--Sept. 2d.
On the 4th, the enemy attacked some wagon trains, which, under an escort of cavalry, had gone out after forage in the vicinity of Falls Church, and, planting some guns on "Barrett's Hill," drove them back in considerable confusion. Patrick's Brigade was ordered out to their support and moved to Falls Church. The enemy, perceiving the infantry supports coming up, retired. At 9 P. M. the Brigade, with the exception of the 20th, which was ordered on picket in front, returned to their camp. The 20th did picket duty till 1 P. M. the next day, when it was relieved and it returned to camp. The next morning, at 2 A. M., they marched from Upton's Hill, and, crossing the Acqueduct Bridge at Georgetown, D. C., proceeded to Leesboro, Md., where they bivouacked. They continued their march the next morning, and, passing through Mechanicsville, Lisbon and New Market, reached the Monoccacy Bridge on the 13th.
On the 14th, they marched at 7 A. M., and passing through Frederick and Middletown, crossed Catochtin Creek, and, passing a short distance beyond turned to the left, following an obscure road along the foot of South Mountain for about a mile and then turned to the left to ... port the 35th N. Y., which was thrown forward and up the mountain side on the right of the road as skirmishers. The Regiment then deployed and followed the movement of the line of skirmishers, who advanced over the ridge of the mountain at that point, and descended some distance on the other side. The skirmishers were then recalled, and the 20th was ordered to join the 21st N. Y., which was on the mountain side and about midway between the two roads crossing the mountain in front of Middletown. Forming on the left of that Regt., the two Regiments moved up the mountain in line of battle, preceded by a line of skirmishers. Arriving near the crest of the mountain, the skirmishers became engaged. The two Regiments pushed forward, and, passing over the mountain crest at that point, the 20th passed the line of skirmishers, and poured an unexpected and destructive volley into the enemy, who were lying behind a fence and in a confield [sic], which threw them into confusion. They rallied immediately, however, and a fierce contest ensued, lasting till some time after dark.
At daylight, the next morning, it was discovered that the enemy had retired, leaving their dead and wounded on the field. The 20th then rejoined the Brigade and soon afterwards commenced their march towards Boonsboro, which place it passed through about 4 P. M., and then continued its march to near Antietam Creek, where it bivouacked at dark.

Departure of the Twentieth.
The 20th Regiment N. Y. S. M. left this village last Friday, about 3 o'clock, for Virginia. The Regiment formed in line at the Eagle Hotel, and left about
2 o'clock, marching in the following order:
Rondout Band.
Regimental Drum Corps.
Veterans of the Twentieth Regiment.
Recruits of the 20th Regt.
Veterans of the 20th.
The Regiment moved down Main street to Wall, down Wall to North Front, down North Front to A. Kugler's, where a platform had been erected, and where a flag was to be presented. After the regiment had been formed in line, fronting Mr. Kugler's, Rev. Mr. Peck, of the 2d M. E. Church, of this village, made an introductory address, complimenting the regiment, and giving a general review of, and praising the officers now in command of the Union armies, and predicting greater victories under their leadership.
Hon. George T. Pierce then made the presentation speech. He said that Mr. Kugler was formerly a member of the 20th, having served in the ranks during their three months' term of service, and on their return home had intended to re-enlist for three years, but was advised by his commandant to stay home, in order that he might more closely attend to the wants of a feeble wife. But prompted by feelings of patriotism and respect for his fellow comrades, he resolved—not being able to depart with them—to give them this flag as a token of remembrance. In speaking to the men, he remarked that they had fought with honor on the hardest fought fields of the war, and had done credit to the county they represented; and that it was not at all presumptuous in him in saying that they would bear these colors aloft with as much valor and zeal in the future as they had done in the past. In conclusion, he wished them a safe return.
On behalf of the regiment, Col. Gates received the colors in a very appropriate speech. He said he could fully appreciate the circumstances of Mr. Kugler's withdrawal from the regiment, and the feelings which prompted him to present the flag. He then alluded to the Germans of the country, and paid a high tribute to their patriotism—how nobly they had responded to the calls of the President, and with what honor to themselves and their adopted country they had fought on many a bloody field. He said that the regiment had always borne the name of Ulster Guard, and he believed that they had sustained the honor of Ulster County on every battle field, and that the people of Ulster County fully appreciated the record they had left, and were proud of them.—He felt very grateful to the citizens of the county for the welcome they had received at their hands, and the numerous tributes of respect, confidence and gratitude they had shown them since their return. He remarked that the soldiers had always been right in this war, and were not willing that any compromise whatsoever should be made or that one foot of the public domain should be given up to traitors; and that if the people at home would be as true to the country as the men in the field, the result would be all that could be desired.
The sum of $205 was then presented to Capt. McMahon by Hon. T. R. Westbrook, in a brief and spicy speech. The money was contributed by the friends of the Cap­tain, to purchase him a horse. Capt. McMahon responded, and thanked the contributors for this token of their sym­pathy and esteem.
A prayer having been made by Rev. Dr. Lillie, and a benediction pronounced by Rev. Dr. Collier, the regiment took up its line of march as follows: From North Front into Crown street, up Crown street to Main, up Main to East Front, up East Front to St. James, up St. James to Ron­dout Avenue, and thence to Rondout which place they left in the steamer Thomas Cornell for New York. On arriving at New York, they took the steamer America for Annapolis.

THE ARGUS.
WEDNESDAY MORNING, MARCH 23, 1864.
A GALA DAY FOR ULSTER!
Friday last had been appointed as the day for the Ulster Guard to leave the county for the third time in the service of their country, and a great day was naturally expected.—When it came, crowds of people came with it to witness the departure of the old guard, who had fought at Antietam and South Mountain, and who had won the praise of their General in an order making special mention of their services in the greatest battle of the age, that of Gettysburgh [sic]. The roll was called at about 1 o'clock, and nearly every man who returned with the regiment, promptly responded to his name—thus disappointing the predictions of many, that those who had stood by on so many other and more dangerous contests, would turn up missing in this. About 120 new recruits had been turned over to the Regiment since its return, by the Provost Marshal here, and who were promptly on hand at roll call. The Regiment then moved around into North Front street, where the presentation of a most beautiful Stand of Colors took place. This ceremony over, it marched towards the point of its destination, the Rapidan and the Army of the Potomac; where, upon its arrival, as we are informed, it will consist of about 650 men.
The Colors alluded to were the gift of our German friend and neighbor, Mr. KUGLER, of this village; and the ceremonies below sufficiently explain the circumstances and occasion of their presentation, and do full honor to the generous donor. The presentation speech, as will be seen, was made by Mr. Commissioner PIERCE and the reply by Col. GATES; both of which we give below, and both of which speak their own praise for the tone and temper as well as ability in which they are couched.—Mr. PIERCE said:
Col. Gates, Officers, and men of the 20th:
I am honored by being made the instrument of your fellow-citizen. Mr. KUGLER, and his good wife, in presenting you this beautiful stand of colors—the work of their hands.—Mr. KUGLER was formerly a member of your Regiment, who went out in the three months' service; and returning, would have gone again, but was advised by his commandant that perhaps duty to an invalid wife and to his family, demanded that he should remain at home. But chafing under his anxiety to serve his country, he determined to make due amends for his inability to go with you to the field. And his wife desiring to make some slight compensation to the Regiment for permitting her husband to remain at home, they have acted accordingly, and this magnificent flag which I now present you, is the result.—Would to God that every man and woman in the community would feel thus ill at ease with themselves, until they had done something half as noble for their country, in this trying crisis of its existence. But our German fellow citizens have generally been loyal to the old flag, from the very commencement of our troubles—have kept the Star of the Republic steady in their eyes, and have not permitted party or personal considerations to divert their attention or detract from their devotion to one country—one Union—one destiny.
You have just returned, Colonel, from visiting the shrine of your late Commandant, Col. PRATT, where you went to present to his widow and his fatherless son, the remnant of the battle flag which you carried with you for two years past. It was an offering well and worthily made. But it was this circumstance which suggested to Mr. KUGLER that you would now stand in need of another flag. You have it; and in view of the record which you have brought back from the war already, and of the deeds which you have performed on the field, and which are known of all men, it would be presumptuous in me to charge you to keep that emblem sacred, and never permit it to be desecrated or disgraced. When borne aloft at the head of your columns, let each man remember it is no mere ornament there, but that it represents the sovereignty of the nation, and the majesty of thirty millions of people. And as it proved a scourge and a terror to tyrants in the hands of your fathers, so may it prove a scourge and a terror to traitors in the hands of you, their sons.
Men of the 20th: It was over two years ago, and yet it seems but a few days, that you left us before, amid the mingled tears and acclamations of ten thousand of your neighbors and friends, your fathers and mothers, brothers, and sisters, wives and children. You returned to be crowned with the blessings of 75,000 people, who waited with open arms to receive you. You went out as men—you returned as heroes. And if you shall return again,   having accomplished the object for which you go forth, and which every patriot has at heart, the restoration of the authority of the Government over every inch of its soil, and of consequent peace and prosperity to the country, you will be received by thirty millions of people who will be ready to fall down and worship you as little less than gods.
Colonel, you return again to the field. Heaven grant, that it may be to see no more of the clash of arms or of the conflict of battle—but to give the finishing stroke to the rebellion and end the war And the hideous shriek of terror and despair which emanates from Richmond would seem to indicate that you had already struck the monster a blow in his very vitals, and that he even now totters to his fail. Your friends who fight from the mountain tops of East Tennessee, above the clouds, think they can discern the beginning of the end. God grant that it may be so; and that it may be re­served to you to become the bearers of food and freedom to those of our brethren who are  
connned [sic] in southern prison houses—to plant the standard of the republic on the turrets and temples of the southern confederacy, and speedily to return to us again, bringing the joyful tidings of the Union restored, the supremacy of the laws and free government maintained, and the rebellion crushed and overthrown.
But whatever may be your fate in this respect—whatever your lot may be cast—whatever may befal [sic] you—it will be a consolation for you to know that the people of this county are a grateful people. You have had ample evidence of this at every step of your progress since your return. They hold in constant remembrance those of their kith and kin who have gone forth to the defense of the country, and are in the field as the protectors of their homes and of their firesides. The 20th, the 120th, and the 156th, are numbers indelibly impressed upon the memory of the people of Ulster, and which will hereafter be engraven upon the granite of her mountains. To those of you who survive the conflict and return to enjoy the frits [sic] of your labors in a peaceful and undissevered [sic] country, we pledge a heartfelt welcome and God's benison. To those who shall leave their bones to bleach on a southern soil, we pledge a place upon the monumental marble, upon an equality with and along side of your fathers of 1776, which every returning year shall brighten with the halo of glory which the blessings of increasing millions shall shed upon it.
We regret that Col. GATES' reply was not received in time, but we shall try to give it to our readers next week.

ANOTHER VICTIM OF THE WICKED REBELLION.—Edward Augustus Higham, of this city, died in the Prince street Hospital, Alexandria, Va., on Thursday last. A few weeks since he attached himself to the 20th Regiment, N. Y. V., commanded by the lamented Col. Pratt. He was wounded in the leg at the battle of Bull Run, and on being removed to the Hospital it was hoped the leg might be saved. It soon became evident, however, that amputation was necessary, and he submitted manfully to the operation. But it was of no avail. He continued to fail, until death put an end to his sufferings. His mother was with him at the time of his death, and his father left here to receive his remains on Saturday.

Col. Pratt's Veteran Regiment.—The 20th New York volunteers, which Col. Pratt of this city raised in river counties, some three years since, and in leading which at the second battle of Bull Run, he received a fatal wound, have reinlisted [sic] for the war. They reached home a week ago yesterday, on a thirty days furlough. They went away 1100 strong and re-turn with about 169. One hundred of these visited this city yesterday, preceded by a full brass band and a large number of civilians, who had been in the regiment, but resigned or were discharged. The object of the visit yesterday was to present to the family of their lamented Colonel, the flag under which he fell. The presentation speech was made by the Lieut. Colonel of the regiment. The son of Col. Pratt received the color, and Gov. Seymour responded in behalf of the family. The affair took place at the residence of Col. Pratt's family. After these ceremonies the regiment partook of dinner at the American and left in the afternoon.—the remnant of this noble band is under the command Col. Gates.

MONDAY EVENING, AUGUST 10, 1863.
Local Items.
MILITARY MOVEMENTS.
THE 20TH REGIMENT N. Y. S. VOLUNTEERS, which have served for three years and had opportunity to face the enemy in some hot engagements, is to be reorganized, by authority of the Governor. Eagelbert Schnepf, formerly Lieut. Colonel of the regiment, will be Colonel and most of the old officers have taken a position in the organization. For this district Capt. Edward Roehr, son of the well known printer, has his headquarters at the Turners Hall, 63 and 65 Meserele street, where he is busily engaged in filling his company. Our readers will remember that this is the favorite regiment of the Germans, as it was first started by the Turners of New York and Williamsburgh [sic], therefore there is no doubt that the ranks will be filled much faster by the Germans than any other regiment now organizing.

Bust of Col. Pratt.
Col. Zadock Pratt has caused to be cut on the face of the high rocks which are conspicuous near the village of Prattsville, a colossal bust of his son, Col. George W. Pratt. The bust is cut in military costume, and bears a striking resemblance to the departed hero. Underneath the bust is the following inscription:

HON. GEORGE W. PRATT, Ph. D., Col. XXth Regt. N. Y. S. M., Ulster Guard.—Born April 18th, 1830, wounded in the 2d Battle of Manassas, Va. Died at Albany, N. Y., Sept. 11, 1862.
GOOD, BRAVE, HONORABLE.

From One of Our Boys.
The following is an extract from a letter published in the Rondout Courier written by "IKE BUSWELL," formerly of this village, and a brother of WILBER BUSWELL who fell at Antietam. He is a Sargeant [sic] in the 20th Regt. N. Y. S. M.; has been wounded, and a prisoner in Richmond; and be knows how to handle a "shooting iron," being a practical gunsmith. He says:—
"I hesitated considerably before I made up mind to leave the many ties and associations I had formed while a resident of Rondout, but I could not resist the lore and attachment that I bore for that glorious old flag, The Stars & Stripes. Traitors to our country had tramped in the dust with impunity that flag which they have lived under and prospered for generations so well. We had become a mighty Republic, and one that was to be feared by foreign powers. Our ships sailed all over the waters of the globe, and go where you would there you would find the industrious Yankee; and could I sit idle at home and see this glorious Republic severed in twain, and our constitution set at naught, which my forefathers had helped to establish! Ah! by no means. My grand father fought in the Revolution; and I was determined to help keep the fighting stock of the Buswells good. Hence my enlistment in the army. I have suffered more than tongue can tell. I have been in the hands of the enemy, and obliged to pay a visit to the Rebel capital, and the famous Libby Prison, as well as Belle Island. I have been three days and a half, while in their hands, without a mouthful to eat, but still I did not complain, for I had given up my life for my country. It seemed as though they could not starve me to death, but on the contrary, fasting done me good; for ever since I have been exchanged and back to my Regiment I have been fat and saucy; and at the battle of Fridericksburg [sic] last December, I had a good chance to get revenge for the treatment I had received while in the hands of the Hottentots. Hottentots did I say; they are a civilized people compared to the Southern heathens. I was surprised while marching through Richmond to see the feeling against the Union Soldiers. The little children insulted us, every one heaped insult upon insult on our unfortunate heads, and even the dogs would snap and snarl at us. But I will not discus War matters or southern chivalry any longer, only that I am bound to stick to them and not give up the ship until the Star Spangled Banner floats over every and each southern State. This must be done even though we lose a million of brave hearts in accomplishing it. We must let the world know that we can fight victoriously, not only foreign enemies, but traitors and enemies at home. If we fail to do so then we lose the principle that our Government is foundered upon.
Sergt. IKE BUSWELL."

Casualties of Our Regiments.
Elsewhere we publish such accounts of the victories gained by Gen. Meade, as the short time allowed us to collect the details, would permit. Annexed hereto will be found the names of those soldiers from Ulster and vicinity, who have been killed and wounded.
Our county is in deep mourning. Who within her limits has not lost a friend!
Our rejoicings rise with the magnitude of the victory, but our sorrow sharpens and deepens with the bitterness of our personal losses.
Gloom rests thick on many a household in Old Ulster. Self-sacrificing wives, fathers and mothers have met with the greatest bereavement of their lives. Brothers and sisters see in horrid imagination, ghastly forms of men bound to them by the tenderest childhood associations. Children are now tasting for the first time the gall and wormwood pressed to the Nation's lips.
By rebel hands our brothers died. By rebel hands our brothers have been bruised and wounded. The instigators of secession and their abettors, North and South, are guilty of their injuries and their blood. A damnable curse is upon them; and each one carries in his soul a stain that all oceans of water can never wash out.
Peace to the memories, felicity to the spirits, of those who laid down their lives in repelling rebel invasion. Universal gratitude, life long honor, to those who, scarred or maimed, passed through the harvest of death.

20th Regiment, N. Y. S. M.
Headquarters 20th N. Y. S. M. Near Gettysburg, Pa.,
July 4, 1863.
WM. H. ROMEYN:
Sir--It is my painful duty to announce another loss in this command, in the terrible battles of July 1st and 3d. The following is the list of casualties:
Major Van Rensselaer, wounded.
Adjt. J. M. Schoonmaker, do

COMPANY A.
John Donnelly, killed.
Duane S. Bush, killed.
James E. Doxey, killed.
Henry Belcher, killed.
Chas. C. Babcock, killed.
Jacob Cook, killed.
Corp. Theodore Wheeler, killed.
Philip Cookingham, wounded.
Francis Lee, killed.
DeWitt Hamlin, killed.
Daniel Meader, wounded.
Wm. Baker, do
Franklin Sleight, do
Wm. A. Stocking, do
Serg't Asa C. Howard, missing.
Wm. Bishop, missing.
George C. James, missing.
Corp'l Franklin Hermance, missing.
Abram Warner, missing.
John W. Ferris, missing.
Michael Kilroy, wounded.
Daniel Ackert, wounded.
Harry Eckert, "
Karner Cookingham, wounded.

COMPANY B.
Capt. J. R. Leslie, wounded.
Ephraim Roosa, killed.
Theodore Garrison, killed.
John Knighton, killed.
Serg't W. Bloxham, wounded.
Serg't I. C. Buswell, wounded.
James Keegan, wounded.
Serg't Andrew Yaple, wounded.
Corp'l Wm. Risenbergher, wounded.
Corp'l John H. Swart, wounded.
Adam Moore, wounded.
James Westcott, wounded.
Corp'l C. K. Macniff, wounded.
F. Borman, wounded.
Silas Perrine, wounded.
H. C. Van Beuren, missing.
J. H. Ellsworth, missing.
M. Denegar, missing.
Jacob Teal, wounded.

COMPANY C.
Lieut. A. S. Schutt, wounded.
Lieut. James Flemming, wounded.
Corp'l W. S. Tyler, killed.
Constantine Van Steenburgh, killed.
Edward Coogan, killed.
Serg't Craig, wounded.
Corp'l G. W. Pardee, wounded
Corp'l J. Dunn, Jr., do
Geo. A. Acker, do
John Boyle, do
S. A. Bonesteel, do
John Eddleman, do
Jerry Harrigan, do
Fred. Smith, do
Chas. A. Simmons, do
Joseph Shelightner, do
Jon. Dubois, do
Thomas Wells, do
Abram A. Vanbuskirk, do
Theron Auchmoody, missing.
James Gannon, missing.
B. L. Hasbrouck, missing.
Wm. F. Krum, missing.

COMPANY D.
Capt. McMahon, wounded, lost leg.
Lieut. George B. Wolcott, wounded.
Serg't Luther McClellan, killed.
Eben Higgins, killed.
Reuben C. Van Leuven, killed.
Albert Collier, killed.
Sergeant A. D. Miller, wounded.
Sergeant Chas. Kniffins, wounded.
Sergeant Asa Jones, wounded.
Corporal John Cudney, wounded.
De Witt Rose, wounded.
Ira B Taft, wounded
S Eggenburgh, wounded
Wm. H Howard, missing
Amos C Treat, killed
D H Barnhart, wounded
Ephraim Bush, wounded
Harmon Collier, missing

COMPANY E.
Lieut. G. W. Brankstone, killed
Lieut. Abram Merritt, wounded
Alex. Tice, killed
James Hausfall, killed
Wm. Fetterman, killed
Lewis Snyder, killed
Leonard Vangorder, killed
Henry Irwin, wounded
Sergeant Dewitt, wounded
Corporal John Johnson, wounded
Lorenzo B Healey, wounded
Samuel Norfolk, wounded
Wm. S Van Keuren, wounded
Enos B Vail, wounded
Sergeant Isaiah S Decker, wounded
Sergeant Lewis Champagne, wounded
Sergeant Stephen L Carney, wounded.
Corporal Jacob Fister, missing
Jesse Kidney, wounded
Geo Babcock, wounded

COMPANY F.
Capt. J. S. Corbin, killed
Lieut. Delacroy, wounded
Geo. Pells, killed
John Luft, killed
Sergeant A Mullen, wounded
Sergt. Edward Beckett, wounded.
Corp. John Burns, wounded.
Private Wm. J. Miller, wounded.
Private M. McCluskey, wounded.
Private Thomas Conlon, wounded.
Private John Guy, wounded.
Edward Ashley, wounded.
Thomas Croaks, missing.
George McMichael, missing.
Thomas Doyle, missing.

COMPANY G.
Captain Cunningham, wounded.
Lieutenant George B. Mulks, wounded.
Sergeant L. Decker, killed.
Sergeant Higgins, wounded.
Sergeant Bonesteel, wounded.
James Hallock, killed.
John C. Parks, wounded.
William Schaffer, wounded.
N. Van Valkenbergh, wounded.
Jacob Ostrander, missing.
S. D. Howard, missing.
Robert Giles, missing.

COMPANY H.
Captain Alexander, wounded.
Lieutenant E. A. Ross, prisoner.
Lieutenant A. Tanner, wounded.
Anson S. Pierce, killed.
Sergeant George A. Mann, wounded.
Sergeant George A. Capron, wounded.
Corporal John Ovendorf, wounded.
Corporal James E. Angevine, killed.
William T. Greaves, wounded.
Morris Hein, wounded.
Corporal E. A. Degraff, killed.
John Sullivan, wounded.
Samuel Greaves, missing.
Charles Keegan, wounded.
William L. Snyder, missing.
Aaron Nichols, wounded.
Joseph Sickler, missing.
A. J. Gibbons, killed.

COMPANY I.
Corporal Joseph Leonard, killed.
Sergeant M. Farrell, wounded.
Sergeant M. Whittaker, wounded.
Sergeant William Fuller, wounded.
Sergeant George Rossman, wounded.
William L. Henson, wounded.
Thomas Hyatt, killed.
James Larin, wounded.
John W. Plimley, wounded.
Harry Tompkins, wounded.
Emerson Scott, wounded.
S. Flanders, wounded.
Edward Wright, wounded.
N. Rossman, wounded.
A. Van Aken, wounded.
Corporal Abram Swart, wounded.
Barney Fitch, wounded.
Peter Kelly, wounded.
John Tracy, killed.
L. O. Waters, missing.
F. Demarse, wounded.
W. Parkinson, wounded.

COMPANY K.
Captain Baldwin, killed.
Lieutenant J. M. Young, wounded.
Sergeant M. Decker, killed.
N. Southard, killed.
Sergeant Jehiel J. Judd, wounded.
Corporal John Chandler, wounded.
Andrew Maben, wounded.
Addison S. Hayes, wounded.
Sergeant Hill, wounded.
Gould P. Austin, missing.
The enemy were repulsed at all points with great slaughter, and with the loss of thousands of prisoners. Our "boys" took a large number.
The Adjutant, who was wounded in the first day's fight and left on the field, was taken into Gettysburg by the enemy, who held the city until last evening, when we got possession of it, and with it our wounded of the 1st inst, and also our Surgeon.
Capt. McMahon has had a leg taken off above the knee and is doing well. The Adjt. is not seriously wounded, and all the other wounded are doing well.
I send you a copy of an order just received, which renders it unnecessary for me to say any thing of t he conduct of the troops. Truly yours,
THEODORE B. GATES, Col. Com.

HEADQUARTERS, THIRD DIVISION,
FIRST CORPS, July 6, 1863.
GENERAL ORDERS.
The Major General commanding the division desires to return his thanks to the Vermont brigade, the One Hundred and Fifty first Pennsylvania Volunteers, and the Twentieth New York State militia, for their gallant conduct in resisting in the front line the main attack of the enemy upon this position, after sustaining a terrific fire from seventy-five to one hundred pieces of artillery. He congratulates them upon contributing so essentially to the glorious and it is to be hoped final victory of yesterday.
By command of,
Major General DOUBLEDAY.
EDWARD C. BAIRD, Captain and A. A. G.

FOR THE ALBANY EVENING JOURNAL.
On the Left at Gettysburg.
Respectfully dedicated to the Twentieth Regiment, N. Y. S. M.
BY H. L. ABBEY.

Soldier of the picket guard,
Keeping midnight watch and ward,
While a mighty nation sleeps:
On your dark, beleaguered steeps—
On the heights at Fredericksburg—
Tell us how at Gettysburg,
On the left at Gettysburg,
Valor stayed disaster;
When the raiding Rebel crew,
Hurled upon our weary few
Columns dense, and vaster,
Ten to one, than they who stood,
For a grateful nation's good,
On the left, at Gettysburg,
Beating back disaster.

"Deeds befit a soldier best.
We were of the van who pressed
First to meet the braggart Lee,
With his tattered chivalry,
In their great invasion.
On they came, a hungry pack,
Watching, at their leader's back,
For a town to burn and sack—
Deeming such occasion
Then they fell upon our right,
Knowing well our force was small—
Seamed our ranks with cannon ball,
Which we paid them later.
Though, before their fierce attack,
Right and centre both fell back,
Scarce three hundred Ulster men,
Linked with brawny sons of Penn,
All that day at Gettysburg—
On the left at Gettysburg—
Held at bay the traitor.

Weary with the march and heat,
Dead and wounded at our feet,
Battle round us like a sea,
Stood we earning victory;
While our dauntless manner
Bought respect, the coin of worth—
Yet they sent their cohorts forth,
Round their lying banner:
Charging on us, up they toil,
Eaters of the sacred soil,
Wavering at each volley—
Till at last they turn with fear,
Losing relish for our cheer:
Thus we made their charges dear,
On the ridge at Gettysburg—
On the left, at Gettysburg,
Taught them of their folly.

"Storm of thunder broke and fell,
Whizzing shot and bursting shell;
While in Gettysburg, each bell
Clashed its frightened clangor.
O'er us moaned the sudden ball,
Now our comrade heroes fall,
Loud the drummers' tattoos beat,
Folds the smoke, a winding sheet,
Or in plumes for many a bier,
And the grim guns, far and near,
Flash their iron anger.
A captain down the traitor ranks,
Blood upon his horse's flanks,
Rides, and cheers each man on;
Still we brush them off like straws,
Feeling now a noble cause
Worth a hundred cannon.
In the night, relief was born.
Re-enforcements with the morn,
Poured in fast, and faster.
Then we beat the vipers forth,
From the gateway of the North,
Vile white trash, and master.
But that day at Gettysburg,
On the left at Gettysburg,
Valor stayed disaster."

Ho! watcher of our destiny
Tell us yet if liberty,
On the Nation's forehead
Sets her crown, no longer scoffed
By the blazoned curse, that oft
Made her name abhorred.
If the stain be cleansed away,
Not in vain upon that day,
On the left at Gettysburg,
Fought our sons and brothers.
If the curse must still remain,
Vain their fight, our longing vain;
And the tears of mothers
Will not find a balm to soothe—
Marah never will be smooth,
Torn with waves of sorrow.
But the right shall rule, we know,
Lo! the morning splendors glow
Of the golden morrow.
Mothers' tears are pearls, that buy
Many a nation's liberty,
Making freedom vaster.
Pray for those who vainly weep
For their darling sons, who sleep
Where they fell at Gettysburg,
On the left at Gettysburg,
Beating back disaster.

Regimental Order.
HEADQ'RS 20TH REGT. N. Y. S. M.,
KINGSTON, Feb. 16, 1864.
SPECIAL ORDER.
The Battalion of "Veteran Volunteers" of this Regiment will parade in Main
Street, Kingston, right resting on East. Front Street, on the 22d day of February, instant, for the purpose of proceeding to Albany to present a set of the Colors of this Regiment to the son of our late revered commander, Col. George W. Pratt.
By order of
THEODORE B. GATES,
Col. Commanding.

RETURN OF THE TWENTIETH.
One hundred and sixty-one of the veteran Twentieth Regiment New York State Militia returned to this village on Monday last. They arrived at Rhinecliff, per Hudson River Railroad, a few minutes after 2 o'clock P. M., and immediately came over to Rondout and marched directly to this village. They were received at Rhinecliff by a committee of deputized citizens, and escorted from Rondout to this village—the procession being as follows:
Fife and Drums.
Kingston Fire Department.
Fife and Drums.
Rondout Fire Department.
Jefferson Dragoons.
Village Directors.
Gen. Samson and Staff.
Committee with Badges.
Rondout Brass Band.
Then followed Col. Gates and Field Officers and the veteran members of the 20th, with the noble horse of their first Colonel—the lamented George W. Pratt.
They marched through several of our streets to the Second R. D. Church, where a collation had been prepared by the Ladies of Kingston in readiness for them. Here they were eloquently and appropriately addressed by H. H. Reynolds, Esq., Col. Geo. H. Sharp and Hon. T. R. Westbrook; to which addresses Col. Gates responded in behalf of his Regiment. Then followed the collation, which was spread out before them in great profusion, with articles which would tempt the epicurean and the most fastidious. After this had been partaken of, amid scenes of the happiest kind, they all departed whithersoever they chose.
We have followed the Twentieth from their arrival at Rhinecliff to their discharge at the Church. All along the route between Rondout and Kingston, citizens and strangers collected to welcome them as they passed along. Our streets were beautified with flags and banners, and people thronged the streets, while cheer after cheer rent the air with their greetings, amid firing of cannon and the ringing of all the bells in the village. Not since the departure of the Twentieth in 1861, has Kingston witnessed so grand and earnest a demonstration as that made on their return last Monday. This reception was justly due these heroes of eleven hard fought battles. They have borne the brunt of nearly all the doings of the Potomac Army. Their care-worn countenances and weather beaten uniforms give evidence of hardship and fatigue; and it is well that they have been permitted to return to their homes to recruit their physical energies. They bring with them the shattered remnant of their Regimental Colors, while every perforation is the mark of heroism and every rent significant of all that carries patriotism and glory in the breasts of those who have fought victoriously under its folds. We greet these valiant men with hearts which swell with welcome feelings. But while all our citizens greet them, what must be the joy of their nearer and dearer   friends at home! And though they return to us only to go back and renew the old scenes of the camp and battle-field, it is good to see them even for so short a time. Time-honored Old Ulster is made to glow on history's page by the valiant deeds of her heroic sons; and when the rebellion has been effectually put down, may all these brave soldiers return and share the bless­ings of tranquility and peace, which their united efforts, prompted by glowing pa­triotism, shall have assisted in effecting.

Presentation of a Battle Flag.
One of the most interesting presentation events that has occurred in our city since the War began, took place yesterday—the occasion being the presentation by the 20th Regiment, N. Y. S. Militia, of one of their Battle Flags, to Master George S. Pratt, son of their old Commander, the lamented Colonel George W. Pratt. The Regiment, which is reduced to about one hundred and twenty-five men, rank and file, left Kingston yesterday morning, arriving here about half-past twelve, accompanied by a full band, and a large delegation of citizens from Ulster county. They marched to the Capitol, and from there to the residence of Mrs. Pratt, in Hawk street, where the presentation took place.
Col. Gates, speaking in behalf of his Regiment, after alluding to the high-toned and unspotted character of the deceased, said that seven years ago, the officers of the battalion induced him to accept the office of Colonel. At that time the Militia of the State was in anything but a desirable condition, and the 20th was small in numbers; but it was not long after Colonel Pratt took command before it reached proportions that none had anticipated, and occupied a position second to but few in the State. He was among the first to tender his services and his Regiment to the country when she needed and heroic example on all occasions, inspired his men with a lasting admiration for him. Our love for his memory—our respect for his family—brings us here to-day. We come from the battle-field, where we have left many a comrade, to tender to his son one of the tattered banners under which his noble father fell. When the Rebellion broke out Colonel Pratt was one of the very first to tender his Regiment. It seemed as though every missle [sic] hurled against Fort Sumter shook and thrilled his fragile frame, and, if possible, filled him with a deeper love for his country. It seemed as though he felt that he could make no sacrifice too great in aid of his country, against this unholy Rebellion.—On the 26th of April, 1861, the Regiment marched to the seat of war nearly one thousand strong. It had then enlisted for three months; and after serving that term faithfully, returned home, re-organized, and again enlisted, this time for three years, and again under the lead of their favorite Colonel; and it was fated that our beloved and heroic commander should fall in the defence of his country. He received his fatal wound in the second Bull Run battle. Always kind, always generous, always good and noble, I cannot (said Col. G.) depict the grief of the Regiment on learning of their loss. He has gone to his long rest, and knowing him as well as I did (said the speaker), I cannot doubt but that his rest is both peaceful and happy. We feel that his life was closed all too soon. We know that it was not lived or lost in vain; and it should be, as it is, I believe, our study and hope to emulate his example, to the end that when peace is restored to our country, and the majority of the law is again supreme, we may enjoy a portion of general respect, which was so largely his share, and which is now paid his memory. In behalf of the Regiment, (said Colonel G., addressing the boy) officers and men, and the men not less than the officers, I present you this Battle Flag. Its wounds were received where your father fell.—When it was presented to the Regiment, he pledged himself that it should ever be religiously defended. It has no mark of dishonor. All its scars are honorable, and we believe that it will be beloved and held sacred by you, as it has been and is by us, for the sake of the me­mory of your deceased father.
Master Pratt said, in reply:—I thank the Twentieth Regiment for these colors. I thank them for remembering my father. I will try to be as good and brave a man as he was.   
Governor Seymour, responding for Master Pratt, said:—Soldiers of the Twentieth Militia, on behalf of a sorrowing and stricken father,—on behalf of a mourning family—and speaking for the orphan children,—I thank you for this manifestation of love for the memory of one who distinguished himself as your leader.—They will treasure up this sad memento as among their most precious gifts. We have watched the history and course of every Regi­ment that has left our State, with anxiety as well as with pride, and none have challenged greater admiration than your Regiment. How many of your comrades have lost their lives your diminished numbers tell in language more eloquent than the mouth can utter; and let me assure you that in the future there will be one household where you will ever be remembered with mournful interest—one family that will always feel the deepest interest in your career and welfare—one house where it will be felt that, between it and your organization, a new relationship exists. This banner will be dearly cherished by him into whose hands you have placed it to-day. It will speak to him of the spotless character of his father—of his virtues and of the love borne him for those virtues by his comrades in arms; and God grant that he emulate the example thus set him.
Once more, I thank you for this evidence of devotion to the memory of your late commander—for the generous, manly, soldierly affection that has led you to manifest, in this delicate way, your continued regard for his memory, and the respect that you entertain for his family; and I again assure you that your invaluable gift will ever be most dearly prized—that there is one family where your happiness will be a source of solicitude—one family where everything that relates to your Regiment will be of fireside interest.
Subsequently the Regiment, as the guests of Mrs. Pratt, sat down to a sumptuous dinner at the American Hotel. While there, Master Erastus Corning, son of E. Corning, jr., and a nephew of the late Colonel Pratt, made his appearance amongst them, and presented each of the soldiers with a tract, evidently to their great pleasure. Soon after 4 o'clock they took the cars for home, Master Pratt, with others, accompanying them across the river, and as the cars were leaving they gave him rounds of hearty cheers.

...TON DEMOCRATIC...
LOCAL RECORD.
MANUSCRIPT PAPERS.
Col. Pratt and His Command.
No. 16.
From Fredericksburg to Gettysburg.
On the 17th of December, 1862, the Regiment marched at 9 A. M. to a point opposite the city of Fredericksburg and a short distance southeast of Falmouth Station, on the Richmond, Fredericks­burg and Potomac Railroad, where it en-camped and remained until 9 A. M. of the 20th, when it again resumed the march, passing White Oak Church at 11 A. M., and encamping at 5 P. M. on the bank of the Potomac River three miles below Potomac Run,—having marched thirteen miles. It remained at this place until 8 A. M. of the 23d, when it marched to Hall's Landing, four miles distant, where it encamped at 1 P. M. On the 27th, they moved half a mile further north, and occupied huts erected by the rebels... stationed there to support a small redoubt and bastion fort, designed to command the mouth of Potomac Run and to obstruct navigation on the River. While it remained here, it furnished daily details of one hundred men for fatigue duty at Hall's Landing.
On the 7th of January, 1863, the Regiment was transferred from the First Corps and placed in a "Provisional Brigade" under command of Brig.-Gen. M. R. Patrick, Provost Marshal General Army of the Potomac, in pursuance of Special Order No. 6, from the Head Quarters of that Army, On the 10th, it embarked on the steamboat Rockland at 8 A. M., and debarked at Aquia Creek, at 10 A. M., and, proceeding immediately up the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad, it established a line of guard posts along that road from Aquia to Potomac Run Station—the Head Quarters of the Regiment being at Brook's Station. It remained on this duty until the 21st, when it marched through a fearful storm of sleet and rain to Aquia Creek, six miles distant, to do guard duty at and near the Landing. On the 22d, one Company was placed on picket duty along the River from Aquia to Potomac Creek, and Sergeant Buswell with ten men at Liverpool Point, Md., opposite Aquia Creek.
On the 10th of February, they moved camp to a hill near the River, where they remained until the 29th of April, when they marched to Brook's Station—establishing guard posts along the Railroad, and placing detachments as garrisons for field works at Accocac Creek, and a tete du pont at Potomac Creek. These detachments remained at the different points
until May 9th, when "B" Co. was sent from Brook's Station to Washington, to do Provost duty, on the Government Wharf at that place. It remained there until the 13th, when they returned to Brook's Station.
On the 15th, Head Quarters were removed 9 miles, to Falmouth,—Col. Gates having been appointed Provost Marshal of that place and placed in military charge of the Railroad. Companies "A," "B," "E" and "H" also moved to Falmouth; "D" Co. to Potomac Creek Station; "E," "I," "F" and "K" Companies to Aquia Creek; "G" Company to Stoneman's Switch; while "C" Company remained at Brook's Station—all performing Provost duty. On the l6th, "D" Company was moved to Headquarters Army of the Potomac; and on the 17th, "K" and "I" Companies were also moved there—followed on the 18th by "E" Company.
On the 30th, "C," "D," "E," "I," and "K" Companies, under command of Lt.- Col. Hardenbergh, marched to Belle Plain to perform Provost duty, Lt.-Col. H. being Post Commandant.
On the 14th of June, the different detachments of the Regiment united at Aquia Creek at 12 M., and reported to Brig-Gen. G. K. Warren, (now commanding the 5th Corps.) and at 3 P. M., moved by Rail to Potomac Creek to garrison field works, perform picket duty, and remove Government property. On the 15th, marched at 7 A. M. to Brook's Station, where they remained doing picket duty and protecting the removal of Government property until 12 M., when, all being removed, they proceeded by rail near Aquia Creek and garrisoned forts Nos. 1 and 2. At 3 P. M. a detachment under command of Major Van Rensselaer proceeded by rail on a reconnoisance to Potomac Creek, and returned at 5 P. M.
On the 16th, they marched at 4 P. M. to Aquia Creek, and embarked on steamer Hero, debarking at 6 A. M. the next day at Alexandria, and marched to the "Soldiers' Rest," where they breakfasted, after which they marched to the edge of the City and bivouacked; resumed march at 5 P. M., passed through Alexandria, across Long Bridge, through Washington to the "Soldiers' Home," where they remained until the next morning, when they again resumed march at 5 o'clock, passed through Washington and Georgetown, marched on the Washington Aqueduct to near Great Falls of the Potomac, where they bivouacked at 7 P. M., having made 16 miles.
Resumed march on the 19th at 6 A. M., proceeded to Great Falls of the Potomac, where they embarked on canal boats on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, and proceeded to Seneca, where they debarked, and, marching through Seneca Mills and Poolesville, bivouacked a short distance beyond the latter place at 5 P. M., having made 24 miles. Marched the next day at 8 A. M., and went six miles to the Mouth of the Monoccacy, where they encamped and commenced performing picket duty and guarding Aqueduct of Chesapeake and Ohio Canal over the Monoccacy River. They performed this duty until the 22d, when they marched at 3 P. M. to Edward's Ferry (eleven miles) and encamped at that place at 9 P. M. They remained at this place performing Provost and guard duty, until the 27th, when they were relieved by the 110th Pa. Vols, and ordered to join the First Corps. They commenced their march at 10 A. M., crossed the Monoccacy on the Aqueduct, and bivouacked at 6 P. M., four miles beyond, having marched 13 miles. Resumed march at 7 A. M. the next day, crossed the Katochtin Mountains at Katochtin ...., passed through Adamstown and Jefferson, and proceeded to near Middletown, when, learning that the 1st Corps had gone to Frederick, they took a bye road and recrossed the Katochtin Mountains at New Pass, and bivouacked near Frederick at 8 P. M., having marched 16 miles. Marched again the next dry at 6 A. M. to and through Frederick and Lewistown, and bivouacked at 5 P. M. on Emmetsburg Pike, 16 miles from last bivouac, where they remained till 4 A. M. the next day, when they resumed march and reached Emmetsburg at 12 M., where they halted and reported their arrival to Major-General Reynolds commanding 1st Corps, who ordered them to report to Maj.-Gen. Doubleday commanding the 3d Division, who assigned them to the 1st Brigade then on picket.

MANUSCRIPT PAPERS.
Col. Pratt and His Command.
No. 9.
GAINSVILLE.
On the 27th of August, the 20th Regiment marched from Warrenton Springs, with King's Division, at about noon, and taking the road towards Gainsville, bivouacked at midnight some fifteen miles from the Springs. The next morning they marched just after daylight with the intention of possessing themselves of Thoroughfare Gap, and thus prevent the rebels from crossing the mountain into the valley. This intention was defeated by the enemy arriving first, and taking possession of the Gap. The Division thus found themselves in a precarious situation—having no support but Rickett's Division, and the enemy being in front, rear, and on both flanks.
The 20th Regiment had reached a point two miles beyond Gainsville, on the Centerville road, when the enemy were reported to be in front in strong force, and the Division was halted while the roads and woods were reconnoitered by General Hatch's Brigade. At this time the booming of artillery to the left and rear, announced that Gen. Rickett's Division was engaged; in a few moments afterwards the cracking of the Rifles of the 14th Brooklyn, who were acting as skirmishers, was heard, and their red pants could be distinctly seen as they fell back before the superior force of the enemy. A few shots from Battery B drove them back, but they again came on and forced Gen. Hatch's Brigade back upon General Gibbons.
Col. Pratt who was attentively engaged in watching through his glass the woods in front, discovered a battery coming out and taking up a commanding position.—He immediately dispatched Adjutant Schoonmaker with the information to Gen. Patrick; but before he returned, the battery opened fire, and Battery L, 1st N. Y., immediately replied. Gens. Hatch and Gibbons' Brigades were deployed in line to meet the rebels, who were coming out of the woods, and pouring down the hill in large numbers, while Gen. Patrick's Brigade was held in reserve. The fighting commenced immediately, and was continued with fierceness until after darkness set in. The enemy undertook several times to perform flanking movements, but each time were defeated by the prompt and energetic movements of Gen. Patrick, who appeared to divine their intentions before they had hardly commenced to execute a manoeuver. About 8 o'clock at night the rebels made a bayonet charge, but were met by the 30th N. Y., with such a rush that they turned and fled, which ended the fight—it being so dark that manoeuvering was impossible.
The 20th was then ordered to do picket duty on the roads to the west, and on
a portion of the battle field. At about 2 o'clock A.M. the pickets were withdrawn, and the Regiment acting as rear guard, marched to Manassas Junction, which was reached just after daylight, and where the first rations that the men had received for some time were served out to them.

 

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