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82nd Regiment Infantry
New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

THE GETTYSBURG DEAD.—Aldermen Long, Mitchell and Ottiwell, and Councilmen Brandon, Webster and Haviland, in accordance with resolution to this effect passed by the Committee on National Affairs, proceeded to Gettysburg last evening to bring home the body of Brigadier General Zook, and the remains of the other New York officers who fell in the recent battles; and also to afford such aid to the wounded of the New York regiments as may be necessary for their comfort.
Every hour brings intelligence of unexpected losses. Sheriff Lynch received the following dispatch this morning:
GETTYSBURG, July 4th.
James Lynch, Sheriff, N. Y.
Colonel James Husten, of the 82d N. Y. V., (late of the 2d N. Y. S. M.,) was killed in battle yesterday. Body will be forwarded.
E. L. SPROAT, A. Q. M.

Recruits for the Second Regiment State Militia.
A squad of recruits, probably one hundred, for the Second regiment, Colonel Tompkins, will go forward on Monday. As many more will be received, application may be made at 168 Fulton street or at the armory. About two hundred have so far been sent on.

THE SECOND REGIMENT, N. Y. S. M.
The Second Regiment, N. Y. S. M., Col. Hudson, are recruiting rapidly under the auspices of Lieut. J. W. DEMPSEY, at the corner of Hall-place and Seventh-street, at No. 26 Cherry-street, and tent in Tryonrow. The steamship Vanderbilt carries out to-day the second squad of recruits to reinforce this fighting regiment, which has so often been publicly complimented by Gen. MCCLELLAN. Where the same privileges are extended to new recruits as those the oldest members enjoy, we cannot see why this regiment should not fill within a week; for certainly no corps now on the battle-field have done more service for their country. They can inscribe on their banners every battle since MCCLELLAN commanded the Army of the Potomac, from Yorktown to Malverton. No officers required.

THE DEATH OF COL. HUSTEN.
From the following dispatch to Sheriff LYNCH, we learn of the death of Col. HUSTEN, formerly of the Second regiment N. Y. S. M., and recently appointed Colonel of the Eighty-second regiment New-York Volunteers:
Baltimore, July 5, 1863. Sheriff James Lynch, New-York:
Col. JAMES HUSTEN, of the Eighty-second New York Volunteers, late of the Second New-York State Militia, was killed yesterday in battle. The body will be forwarded. (Signed,) E. L. SPROUT,
A. Q. M., Gettysburgh.
Col. JAMES HUSTEN, long known as an officer of the New-York State Militia, left this City with his regiment, May 1, 1861, as Captain of Company E; was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, in which capacity he commanded the regiment at the battles of Fredericksburgh and Chancellorsville, and has since been commissioned by Gov. SEYMOUR as
Colonel.
His energy and zeal in encouraging his regiment to stand firm against the repeated attacks of Ewell's corps, exposed him to the sharpshooters of the enemy, and he fell pierced by three snots at the head of his columns, while giving his commands.
His noble regiment did not long survive him. It is reported that of three hundred and sixty-five rank and file, but three officers and fifty-seven men remain of the Second New-York State Militia, (Eighty second New-York Volunteers,) "the oldest Militia regiment in the State, and the first to volunteer for the war."
His bereaved widow and his numerous friends in this City, have the sympathy of the community in their irreparable loss. His remains are expected to arrive here this week.

Col. JAMES HUSTEN, of the Eighty-second New York Volunteers, was killed in the battle of Gettysburg. Col. Husten left New York in May, 1861, as captain of company E of the Eighty-second; was promoted to the lieutenant coloncy, in which capacity he commanded the regiment in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, and was commissioned colonel by Gov. Seymour. It is reported that of three hundred and sixty-five rank and file, but three officers and fifty seven privates remain.

SECOND N. Y. S. M. (EIGHTY-SECOND VOLUNTEERS.)
The following is a correct list of the casualties among the officers of the above mentioned regiment in the battles at Gettysburg:—
KILLED.
Colonel James Huesten.
Captain J. C. Hoyt.
Lieutenant J. H. McDonald.
WOUNDED.
Captain Thomas Cummins, thigh, slightly.
Captain C. Murphy, arm, slightly.
Captain George W. Ryerson, arm and back, slightly.
Lieutenant John Cransom, both legs, ankle and hip; not dangerously.
Lieutenant William Palmer, ankle, slightly.
Lieutenant Burrell, foot, slightly.
Lieutenant Fowler, hip, slightly.
Lieutenant Shaws, groin, slightly.
Lieut. Everson, leg amputated below the knee; doing well.
Lieutenant McKee, arm, slightly.
Lieutenant Sloan, back, slightly.
Capt. Murphy and Capt. Ryerson arrived home on Monday. Persons having friends in the regiment, and desiring information regarding them, are at liberty to call upon Captain Murphy, corner of McKibben street and Graham avenue, Brooklyn; or Captain Ryerson, No. 82 East Twenty-second street, New York.

EIGHTY-SECOND N. Y. VOLUNTEERS.—By the finding of a court martial, Col. Hudson, of the above regiment, has been cashiered. By the action of the Conscription Act, the sentence of a court is to be approved by the commanding officer in the field, hence the improbability of a disapproval of such sentence. The charges against t h e Colonel were for being intoxicated at the last battle of Fredericksburgh. The evidence to prove the charge was not very clear, nor were the parties for the prosecution clearly unbiassed. The Colonel had been detailed to furnish 100 volunteers from his regiment, for a forlorn hope. He received the order from a staff officer of the staff of Gen. Gibbons, and, as was proved, carried it out correctly. The defence proved clearly, that he was not drunk, yet the court adjudged him guilty, and cashiered, him.
The prominent character in this prosecution was formerly a public disturber in the Second regiment. By the Colonel's dismissal he becomes a candidate for the Lieut. Colonelcy, hence the apparent zeal in the prosecution. We regret the apparent partiality in t h e decision of this matter, from the fact, that Colonel Hudson has been in the service a long time, having passed through thirteen battles. That he might have been under the influence of stimulants, it may be possible, for it is a common thing, even with commanding generals. Yet it does not appear that it affected him enough to prevent his carrying out orders correctly or executing duty. We hope that a more desirable spirit than is shown has actuated the court in this case, as we think it unjust that evidence should not prove an officer's guilt or innocence.

Second New York Militia—Eighty-second Volunteers.
KILLED.
COMPANY A—Fider Chessey, Lyman C. Kulp.
COMPANY B—John Whalen.
COMPANY C—H. C. Goodman, Joseph H. McCorcle.
COMPANY D—Sergeant George Wilson, William Riorden..
COMPANY E—Corporal Gerraghty, James Simpson, Thos. Montgomery.
COMPANY F—Sergeant Cornelius Foley, Corporal Fred R. Morris, Mitzenger, John Kelly.
COMPANY H-Corporal D. H. Gilligan, Patrick McLaughlin.
COMPANY I—Adam Klein, Jeremiah Kelly, Charles Heeker, James Tirial, Patrick Carry.
Total killed—22.

WOUNDED.
COMPANY A—Captain F. A. Young, Lieutenant J. T. Pryer, Corpora! A. V. Green, Louis Bell, G. F. Burbank, John Crown, Henry Decker, Thomas Green, Joseph Plant, John J. Simonson.
COMPANY B—Sergeant John McPeoke; Corporal Francis A. Perry, Charles Griffin, Dennis Barrett, Edward Reynolds, Joseph Sheet, Colour Corporal Joseph J. Hayes, M. B. Graft, James Carty, James E. Jamison.
COMPANY C—Privates Richard More, John McIntosh, Pat O'Brien, Daniel J. Riley, Thomas Ramsey, Thomas Smith.
COMPANY D—Sergeant James Garrey, Privates Johua Dichen, William Grey, John Hinley. Samuel Smith, Thos. Sinclair, J. H. Seedurn, Wm. Williams, Wm. Duty.
COMPANY E—Captain A. H. Rubler, Sergeant _____ Donnelly, Corporal Fletcher, G. Aston, M. J. Dally, H. Fitzsimmons. Wm. H. Fletcher, J. Haley, F. O'Neale, M. Ryan, G. Smith, D. D. Shay.
COMPANY F—Cornelius Sullivan, Lawrence Powers. David Waylan, James Lyons. Thomas Gordon, Terrance McDermott, George Erb, John Moffitt, William McKenna, William Lennox, Roso Mathew, Bernhard Witt, William N. Kelly.
COMPANY G—Sergeant Franklin S. Moore, Sergeant Patrick McFadden, Corporal Thomas Thomas, Corporal James V. Fenton, James Eagan, Cornelius Tubbs.
COMPANY H—Patrick H. Cunningham, Robert Dixon, Thomas Hurley, Thomas C. Lee, Michael Lane, Michael McCae, William H. Woodhouse, Michael O'Brien, Daniel O'Keefe, Thomas Griffin, Chas. Miller.
COMPANY I—Lieutenant P. W. Herbert, Sergeant J. M. Sweidon, James Barrett, Michael Clifford, John Finley, Jr., Noble McDonald, William McKnighte, Patrick Smith, William Oakman.
COMPANY K—Corporal Thos. Deer, Pat J. McGearcy, James Pamson, Dayid Wilson, H. S. Murrin.

MISSING.
Company A—James Alien, Peter Paro, John E. Johnson, John Hoffman.
COMPANY C—John Hallahan.
COMPANY E—Sergeant Fowler, Corporal Bray, J. Asson, G. Carsan,
COMPANY F—Christopher Rooney.
COMPANY G—Thos. Butler, Wm. Parker, John Lally.
COMPANY H—Pat Lappen.
COMPANY I—William Quick.

RECAPITULATION.
Killed 20
Wounded 92
Missing 15
Total. 127

SECOND REGIMENT NEW YORK STATE MILITIA.
(June 28, 1861)
Paymaster John G. Armour will leave on Monday July 1, at four o'clock P. M., for Washington, for the purpose of paying off the Second regiment, now in Virginia. As this will be the last chance for recruits to join the regiment it will be necessary for them to report themselves at twelve o'clock on Monday. Recruiting office at the Armory, Seventh street, and at 168 Fulton street.

THE NEW-YORK SECOND MILITIA.
HEADQUARTERS SECOND N. Y. S. MILITIA,
(EIGHTY-SECOND NEW-YORK VOLUNTEERS,)
IN THE FIELD, Saturday, July 4.
To the Editor of the New-York Times:
By publishing the following list of casualties of officers of this regiment, you will greatly oblige their friends and the regiment:
JULY 2.—Killed—Lieut.-Col. James Huston, Capt. J. C. Hoyt. Wounded—Capt. Cummings, Capt. Ryerson, Capt. Murphy; Lieuts. Sloan, Burrell, Cramton; Palmer, Fowler. Lieut. Huggins taken prisoner, Major Baird wounded; Capt. J. G. Hughes, slightly, Adjt. W Simmons, wounded slightly in head, still ....
Wounded— Lieuts. J. H. McDonald, John Evertsen, H. W. Shores, Wm. McKee.
Number of officers killed, 2; wounded, 14; missing, 1; total 17.
JNO. DARROW.

SECOND N. Y. S. M. (EIGHTY-SECOND VOLUNTEERS.)--
The following is a correct list of the casualties among the officers of the above mentioned regiment, in the battles at Gettysburg:
KILLED.
Colonel James Huston.
Captain J. C. Hoyt.
Lieutenant J. H. McDonald.
WOUNDED.
Major Baird.
Captain Thomas Cummins, thigh, slightly.
Captain C. Murphy, arm, slightly.
Captain George W. Ryerson, arm and back, slightly.
Lieut. John Cransom, both legs, ancle and hip, not dangerously.
Lieut. William Palmer, ancle, slightly.
Lieut. Burrell, foot, slightly.
Lieut. Fowler, hip, slightly.
Lieut. Shaws, groin, slightly.
Lieut. Everson, leg amputated below the knee, doing well.
Lieut McKee, arm, slightly.
Lieut. Stone, back, slightly.
Major Baird, Captain Murphy, and Captain Ryerson arrived home on Monday. Persons having friends in the regiment, and desiring information regarding them, are at liberty to call upon Captain Murphy, corner of McKibben street and Graham avenue, Brooklyn, or Captain Ryerson, No. 82 East Twenty-second street, New York.
Lieut.-Colonel John Darrow, who is now in command of the regiment, and Captain, James G. Hughes, are, we believe, the only commissioned officers of the regiment who passed through the terrific battle of Gettysburg without injury. The same officers have participated in nineteen engagements, with great gallantry, and on every occasion escaped serious injury. The regiment numbered 336 muskets on entering the fight, and but 57 answered to the roll call after the battle.
Col. Huston was pierced with three balls, while gallantly leading his regiment into one of the most desperate charges made in repelling Ewell's troops, in their attempt to break Gen. Meade's centre. He was a very efficient officer, and had been recently promoted to the command of the regiment.

LOCAL.
SECOND N. Y. S. M. (EIGHTY-SECOND VOLUNTEERS.)—
The following is a correct list of the casualties among the officers of the above mentioned regiment, in the battles at Gettysburg:
KILLED.
Colonel James Huston.
Captain J. C. Hoyt.
Lieutenant J. H. McDonald.
WOUNDED.
Major Baird.
Captain Thomas Cummins, thigh, slightly.
Captain C. Murphy, arm, slightly.
Captain George W. Ryerson, arm and back, slightly.
Lieut. John Cransom, both legs, ancle and hip, not dangerously.
Lieut. William Palmer, ancle, slightly.
Lieut. Burrell, foot, slightly.
Lieut. Fowler, hip, slightly.
Lieut. Shaws, groin, slightly.
Lieut. Everson, leg amputated below the knee, doing well.
Lieut. McKee, arm, slightly.
Lieut. Stone, back, slightly.
Major Baird, Captain Murphy, and Captain Ryerson arrived home on Monday. Persons having friends in the regiment, and desiring information regarding them, are at liberty to call upon Captain Murphy, corner of McKibben street and Graham avenue, Brooklyn, or Captain Ryerson, No. 82 East Twenty-second street, New York.
Lieut.-Colonel John Darrow, who is now in command of the regiment, and Captain James G. Hughes, are, we believe, the only commissioned officers of the regiment who passed through the terrific battle of Gettysburg without injury. The same officers have participated in nineteen engagements, with great gallantry, and on every occasion escaped serious injury. The regiment numbered 336 muskets on entering the fight, and but 57 answered to the roll call after the battle.
Col. Huston was pierced with three balls, while gallantly leading his regiment into one of the most desperate charges made in repelling Ewell's troops, in their attempt to break Gen. Meade's centre. He was a very efficient officer, and had been recently promoted to the command of the regiment.

THE FIRST NEW YORK CAVALRY.—Captain Battersby, of the 1st New York Cavalry regiment, comes to this city with orders from Gen. Couch, in order to confer with Gov. Seymour, relative to the filling up of his regiment. This fine corps left the city in the summer of 1861, since which time they have been doing most arduous duty in Virginia, having served with McClellan on the peninsula, with Burnside at Fredericksburg, and throughout the other important campaigns. The regiment went out over one thousand strong, and has been greatly reduced from disease and sickness.

THE FIRST LONG ISLAND REGIMENT AT GETTYSBURG.— The First Long Island Regiment, Colonel Cross, distinguished themselves greatly on Friday, in the battle at Gettysburg, In an attack to recover some rifle pits occupied by the enemy, the 122d N. Y. regiment led the way, and they had fired their sixty rounds of cartridges when the Long Islanders advanced to relieve them. The fire of the latter became so severe that the rebels soon displayed white flags from the pits, and finally surrendered to the regiment Col. Cross's command was entirely uninjured in this attack.

PARADE OF THE SECOND REGIMENT.
The Second regiment, New York State Militia, Colonel Tompkins, paraded yesterday, previous to their encampment on the Battery to-day, The special order announcing the parade provided that the officers and members of the regiment should assemble in their respective company drill rooms yesterday morning, at nine o'clock, for regimental drill, the field and staff officers mounted, to report to the Colonel in the Armory at the same time; and the commandants, with their companies, together with the non-commissioned staff and drum corps, to report to the Adjutant, at Tompkins square, at a later hour—all to be there at ten o'clock A. M. The officers reported to the Colonel in accordance with the requirements of the special order; but, in consequence of the unfavorable condition of the weather, the regimental parade was postponed until the afternoon. At one o'clock P. M. the regiment, by companies, proceeded in front of the armory, in Seventh street, to Tompkins square, where the line was formed. The men appeared in fatigue dress, without knapsacks or overcoats. A large crowd collected around the square, and witnessed, apparently with unusual interest, every movement of the regiment. Several showers fell during the course of the afternoon, on account of which various field maneuvres were dispensed with--so that the entire tactics embraced in a full regimental drill were not completed. After executing a number of evolutions, the regimental line was formed inside the square, and the battalion took up the line of march. Preceded by a pioneer corps, five in number, came the twenty drummers, in their scarlet coats, followed by the engineer corps, numbering twenty-five members, under command of Captain Sage and Lieutenant Vanderpoel, bearing a beautiful banner, which had been presented to them on the previous evening. Next marched the howitzer corps, also numbering twenty-five, with some of their guns, followed by the staff and field officers and men, in all to the number of a thousand. In this order the regiment marched through St. Mark's place to and up Broadway to Fourteenth street, to Fifth avenue, down to Eighth street, and thence back to the armory. All along the line of march the regiment, completely uniformed and equipped, and manifesting unmistakeable evidences of the incessant labors of the officers in its discipline, elicited universal admiration. After returning to the armory, where the regiment is quartered, and where certain orders were issued for the morrow, the line was dismissed. The following is the special order concerning the encampment on the Battery to-day:—

SPECIAL ORDER NO. 22.
HEADUQARTERS FIRST DIVISION, N. Y. S. M.,
NEW YORK, May 1, 1861.
Pursuant to directions from the Commander-in-Chief, the Second regiment New York State Militia, under the command of Colonel Tompkins, is hereby directed to go into camp upon the Battery, relieving the Fifty-fifth regiment, and will remain in camp until further orders from headquarters. The Second regiment will relieve the Fifty-fifth at three o'clock P. M. to-morrow.
By order of Major General Charles W. Sandford.
GEORGE W. MORELL, Division Inspector.

FATAL ACCIDENT TO A MEMBER OF THE SECOND REGIMENT.
Lawrence Mooney, a native of Ireland, 32 years of age, and a member of the Second regiment N. Y. S. M., was found on Monday night lying in Broadway, near Fourteenth street, bleeding from a wound in the neck. He was taken to the Bellevue Hospital where he died yesterday. Deceased stated shortly before his death that he had been drinking on Monday and that he was quite unable to recollect how he received his injuries. It is supposed that in falling he struck his bayonet against his neck and caused the wound which he died. Coroner Schirmer held an inquest in the case.
MOVEMENTS OF TROOPS IN NEW YORK. RETURN OF A PORTION OF THE SECOND REGIMENT.
FOUR HUNDRED OF THE REGIMENT DISBANDED— CONTRADICTORY REPORTS OF THE CAUSE OF THEIR LEAVING THE SERVICE.
Between four and five hundred of the members of this regiment returned to New York yesterday from Washington, having been disbanded by the military authorities on their refusal to take the oath to serve for three years, unless sooner discharged. The report that the regiment, as a body, has been disbanded seems to be entirely incorrect, as there still remain at Washington over six hundred who have taken the oath for three years to support the constitution of the United States, and to fight for the honor of the Stars and Stripes. The causes which led to the resolve of this portion of regiment dissolve itself from the main body appear to be somewhat contradictory. The men say they have been badly treated, while, on the other hand, officers state that they were too well provided for. Nearly all the officers remain true to the regiment, and Captain James Brady and Lieutenants Murray, Campbell and Dimick have come on from Washington in order to organize a number of recruits to fill up the places of those who hare left. The privates state that they were half starved while in camp, and a young man of the regiment, Peter Snedden, private of Company D, commanded by Captain Kennedy, makes the following statement:—We arrived in Washington on Tuesday, 21st instant, and were camped on Capital Hill, about one mile from the Capitol. As a number of the regiment went away without being uniformed, those in that condition were in a sad plight, and I among the number. I had to walk around for two days with nothing but a bit or drawers on, having no pantaloons of any description. The officers of the regiment did not attend to us at all. They were in Washington half the time, boarding at hotels, and did not pay the least regard to anything concerning our immediate necessities. During the time we were in camp we got nothing to eat except a small piece of bacon twice a day to each man, with a bit of biscuit, the bacon being so bad that many preferred fasting a whole day to eating it. Our other accommodations were good enough, but we would have been dead in a month if we had to live on the same food which we were receiving. Left Washington on Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, not receiving a cent of money or food for the road. We arrived in New York to-day at twelve o'clock.
How far this statement can be relied on we cannot say. Lieutenant Dimick, of the regiment, contradicts all this, and says that the men were too well treated. A recruiting office will be opened at the regimental armory in Seventh street, for the reception of volunteers to serve for three years, instead of those who refused to take the oath.
On the arrival of the men in New York yesterday no demonstration whatever took place on the part of the people. They were treated rather coldly by all, and wandered about the streets during the day apparently in a State of destitution.
We have received the following despatch from Quartermaster Foots, of the Second regiment, now in Washington:—
WASHINGTON, May 30, 1861.
The report that the live Second regiment has been disbanded, is a gross misrepresentation. One hundred and ninety-three men only refused to take the oath, and their places are already rapidly filling up.
We have since received the following from Colonel Tompkins, which corroborates our remark above as to the mistake in the figures of the first despatch:—
HEADQUARTERS STATE GUARD,
Second Regiment N. Y. State Light Infantry,
Washington, May 30, 1861.
The report in your paper of yesterday in regard to the Second regiment is false. The regiment was sworn in and mustered into the United Sates service yesterday for the war. Three hundred men refused to serve for longer than three months. I refused to take them, and sent them home. The regiment is a unit and on duty,
GEO. B. TOMPKINS, Colonel.
From our reports, and from information received from some of the officers of the Second, we have been informed that at least three hundred men left the ranks, refusing to take the oath, leaving about 660 men in the regiment. The men arrived in this city yesterday, their fare, amounting to nearly $3,000, having been most generously paid by the regiment. From this it would appear that there must be a mistake in the despatch, probably an error in the figures.

MOVEMENTS OF TROOPS IN NEW YORK
THE TREATMENT OF THE SECOND REGIMENT AT WASHINGTON.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
NEW YORK, May 31, 1861.
I perceive a statement of one Peter Snedden, of Company D, Captain Kennedy, Second regiment New York State Militia, in your paper this morning. I herewith give you an extract from a brother-in-law of mine, attached to the same regiment, and having the same quarters, which statement I can vouch upon his veracity.
ISAAC W. SITTER.
420 Fourth avenue, southwest corner of Thirtieth street.
Washington, May 22, 1861.
* * * We have plenty of everything we want, refreshments of all kinds, liquors and so on.
ANDREW CARROLL,
Howitzer battery, Second regiment.

SECOND REGIMENT NEW YORK STATE MILITIA. (June 6, 1861)
We learn through several gentlemen belonging to the Second regiment that the reports that are published in the papers are very much exaggerated and far from the truth.
The regiment is now quartered in Washington and have over six hundred and fifty men sworn in for the war, and they have enough recruits to more than make good the vacancies occasioned by those who refused to serve for three years. The regiment is in the condition, and the men are in the best spirits, very happy that their discontented comrades have left them. Those that wish to join the regiment can do so by applying immediately at the armory, or 168 Fulton street.
A recruiting office has been opened at the regimental armory of the Second regiment for the purpose of again filling up the regiment to the proper number of men. As soon as a sufficient number are received they will be at once sent on to join the regiment at Washington. The recruiting officers will be more careful this time as to the men they select, and there will be little danger of a repetition of the trouble that the Second has just gone through with.

HOW COL. TOMPKINS LOST HIS HORSE.
Col. Tompkins of the 2d New-York lost a horse the other night at the hands of a vigilant sentry. The horse was tied near the door of a house where the Colonel was visiting. One of the sentinels belonging to his regiment, in the darkness, mistaking the horse for a man, challenged him, and receiving no answer, fired a number of shots, several of them entering the body of the horse, killing him instantly.

SECOND REGIMENT VOLUNTEERS.
EXTRACT FROM A LETTER FROM A PRIVATE IN COMPANY C—ARREST OF A SECESSIONIST COLONEL.
We have been permitted to make an extract from a private letter of a member of Company C of the Second regiment of volunteers, now encamped in the rear of the Capitol buildings, Washington, dated WASHINGTON, June 10, 1861.
At a false alarm on Friday the whole camp was alarmed and turned out and loaded, ready for the supposed enemy. The howitzer corps came over to the well—half a mile—within five minutes after the alarm, with four guns loaded ready to give any one a warm reception.
* * * * We have now considerable business on hand, as our scouts last week found out a rendezvous of some four hundred secessionists about eight miles from our camp, on the other side of the Eastern branch of the Potomac, and in Maryland, and as soon as we sent word to General Scott we received orders to be on the lookout, and have already sent out two squads of men. One of them on Monday, or rather Tuesday night, brought back a rebel Colonel, whom we took the oath from and let go, but next day received orders to rearrest him, which we did. Last night another party went, but saw nothing.

SECOND REGIMENT. (June 18, 1861)
Alderman Richard Barry, Captain of Company G, Second regiment, New York State Militia, now encamped in Washington, will start to-morrow at six o'clock for Washington, with his company, to join the regiment. An inspection will be held at the armory, corner of Seventh street and Hall place, at three o'clock P. M. precisely. A few more respectable young men will be received, by applying as above, to join any company of the regiment.

DEPARTURE OF RECRUITS FOR THE SECOND REGIMENT.
The recent refusal of a number of the Second regiment, now at the seat of war, to take the oath to serve the government for three years, has caused several officers of the regiment to come from Washington in order to enlist men to fill their places. Some three hundred refused to take the oath, and were accordingly sent back to New York. A recruiting office has been opened at the regimental armory, in Seventh street, and yesterday a number of men, in all one hundred and twenty-five, took their departure from this city to join the Second regiment at Washington. One hundred of these men are under command of Captain Barry, Alderman of the Second district of this city. The remaining portion of the men go to join Company C, Captain Heath, at present at Washington, and are under command of Sergeant Wallace until their arrival in camp.
At four o'clock yesterday afternoon the men were inspected by Colonel Jenkins of the United States Army, and duly mustered into the service of the federal government. They are a fine lot of men, and seemed to be all respectable tradesmen who had forsaken the workshop for the more dangerous action of the tented field. They have not yet received their uniforms or arms, but will do so on their arrival at camp. With regard to drill, no time has been had to make them proficient in military tactics, but when they join their regiment the recruits will be put through a severe and arduous course of training, which will soon make them quite as efficient as their brother soldiers. At five o'clock everything was in readiness to start, and the recruits were drawn up in line opposite the armory, each being handed sufficient rations for twenty-four hours. The usual leave takings and affecting scenes on such occasions then took place, which lasted for some time. The command "Forward, march!" was then given, when the men marched down to the Jersey City ferry, headed by two drummers and four of the Seventy-ninth regiment, who go to join their comrades After arriving at the ferry they were transported to the cars, and soon another batch of men were hurried off to fight the battles of their country.

SECOND REGIMENT NEW YORK STATE MILITIA.
Paymaster John G. Armour will leave on Monday July 1, at four o'clock P.M., for Washington, for the purpose of paying off the Second regiment, now in Virginia. As this will be the last chance for recruits to join the regiment it will be necessary for them to report themselves at twelve o'clock on Monday. Recruiting office at the Armory, Seventh street, and at 168 Fulton street.

SECOND REGIMENT N. V. S. M.
The squad of recruits that was to have left on Monday, was unable to leave, owing to the U. S. officer, Col. Franklin, being out of the city, but they will be mustered into the service this (Wednesday) afternoon, and leave immediately for Washington, under the charge of Paymaster J. G. Armour. The recruits must report at the Armory at two o'clock.
Those wishing to join this squad, will apply at the Armory in Seventh street, near 3d-avenue, 168 Fulton street, or 26 Cherry street.

A CARD TO THE PUBLIC.
To the Editor of The N. Y. Tribune.
SIR: It having been announced through the daily press of this city that the undersigned had bean appointed to the post of Chaplaincy in the 36th Regiment of N. Y. S. V., the subsequent appointment of another individual to that post is a point that needs explanation, which explanation, as far as the writer of this card is concerned, he here gives for the information of his friends and the public. It is a truth that positive verbal assurances were given and promises made to the undersigned at the very earliest period of the formation of the above regiment when it was known to the public under the cognomen of the 1st Regiment of Washington Volunteers, both by Col. Charles H. Innes and Major Nathaniel Finch, that if the regiment were entitled to chaplain, upon which point there seemed to be some doubt at the time in the minds of the embryo commanding officers, the writer of this explanatory note should have that appointment. It is a truth that after the regiment was organized by the State Military Board, at Albany, the name of the undersigned was publicly announced through the city press, and by the order of Col. Innes was published to the 36th Regiment as chaplain on his staff, and which appointment was to be respected accordingly. It is another truth that a change was subsequently made without giving any information thereof to the writer, or without assigning any reasons for the change whatsoever. It is still another truth that Major N. Finch distinctly informed the undersigned, in a private conversation had with him at a later period in reference to the subject, that the position had been purchased by the individual in question, at the same time prefacing his statement with the remark that a man must be a fool to buy his way into a commission in a regiment. It is another painful truth, which the bitter experience and the more extended observation of the writer has served to confirm, that if false baits had not been held out by some who are now occupying high military positions in the volunteer forces of this State, whereby others have been induced to labor night and day to secure the promotion of said individuals, under the promise and with the expectation of receiving military positions in return, the aforesaid individuals would not be occupying the places which they fill, nor would there have been so much loss of valuable time and means on the part of their victims who have so severely suffered at the hands of these military humbugs and deceivers.
J. D. GARGILL, late Acting Chaplain of the 36th Regiment of N. Y. S. Volunteers.

RECRUTING FOR THE SECOND REGIMENT.
Some two or three hundred of this fine regiment having refused to enlist for three years, a few of the officers have been sent on here from Washington to recruit, and the ranks are fast filling up. They still want about seventy-five able bodied, respectable men. The recruiting office is at the Second regiment armory, corner of Hall place and Seventh street, back of Tompkins market. Capt. John Kennedy will be in attendance there during the entire of this day. The recruiting officers now here deny that the regiment met with any bad treatment, either here or at Washington. It is a gallant regiment, consisting for the most part of athletic Irish-American youths, who will give a good account of themselves on the battle field, and maintain with honor the hereditary traditional fighting qualities of the race.

SECOND REGIMENT, N. Y. S. M.
Lieut. Campbell is now in the city, and he will take on twenty-five men for Captain Reid's company the last of this week. Captain Brady will also take a few good men for his company. Apply at the armory in Seventh street, near Third avenue.
Captain Brady and Lieutenant Campbell will leave on Monday for this regiment, now in Virginia, and they will take on a few men for their companies. Those wishing to join and leave immediately for Washington will apply at the armory, in Seventh street, near Third avenue.

SECOND REGIMENT NEW YORK STATE MILITIA.
There will be another squad of recruits leave to join this regiment on Monday next, in charge of Captain Richard Barry and Lieutenant Morehouse. The regiment is now stationed near Fairfax Court House. Any persons wishing to join will apply at the Armory, in Seventh street, near Third avenue; No. 168 Fulton street, or at No. 17 Centre street. All recruits will report at the Armory on Monday, at one o'clock.

SECOND REGIMENT, N. Y. S. M.
The Squad of recruits that was to have left on Monday was unable to leave, owing to the United States officer, Colonel Franklin, being out of the city; but they will be mustered into the service this afternoon, and leave immediately for Washington, under the charge of Paymaster J. G. Armour. The recruits must report at the armory at two o'clock. Those wishing to join this squad will apply at the armory in Seventh street, near Third avenue, 168
Fulton street, or 26 Cherry street.

SECOND REGIMENT NEW YORK STATE MILITIA.
Colonel Tompkins will send on a squad of recruits this afternoon for this regiment, now stationed at Poolsville, Md. Those wishing to join this regiment will apply at the armory in Seventh street, near Third avenue.

SPLENDID CAPTURE OF NINE HUNDRED RIFLES.
Captain Graham, of Company A, Second Regiment, N. Y. S. M., arrived in this city yesterday from Washington. He reports a splendid capture made by the regiment on Wednesday last, in which nine hundred rifles and as many uniforms were taken possession of in the village of Rockville, Maryland, about eighteen miles north-west of Georgetown.
The regiment received orders to leave Washington on Thursday 8th inst., and immediately proceeded en route to Rockville. While encamped there, Captain Graham received information from one of his men that a large number of arms was concealed in a certain building in the town. The captain, with twelve men, assisted by Captain Rear and several of his men, immediately proceeded to investigate the matter, and surrounded the building. On the premises they discovered altogether nine hundred rifles and the same number of uniforms, the caps belonging to which are a blue body with red band and red crowns. The rifles had been carefully stowed away in pantries and between beds, and a large number of them were found buried in the rear of the house, whither they had been concealed upon hearing of the arrival of the Second Regiment. Captain Graham also found, at the head of a bed, between the mattresses of which the rifles were discovered, about a dozen small-sized Colt's revolvers. Upon taking possession of the rifles, etc., Capt. Graham repotted to Colonel Stone, who received them and handed them over for use to the Tammany Regiment, stationed at Washington.
The way in which this splendid haul came to be made was, as we have stated above, through information conveyed by one of Captain Graham's men, who received the information while enjoying a little bit of a spree in Rockville.

SECOND REGIMENT, N. Y. S. M.
Lieut. James G. Hughes, of Co. F, Second Regiment, who has been in this city the past three weeks, engaged in recruiting for the regiment, will return to Washington to join his regiment to-morrow. He has sent on about thirty recruits, and will take on with him about twenty-five more. Lieut. Hughes will leave the Armory, corner of Seventh street and Hall place (rear of Tompkins' Market) on Monday afternoon, at three o'clock. He is prepared to take with him a hundred more recruits, who will be immediately mustered into service. A good opportunity is thus offered those who desire to join this gallant regiment. (Nov. 28, 1862)

Reorganization of the Second Regiment New York State Militia.
Since the old militia organization has been merged into the Eighty-second regiment New York State Volunteers, and can no longer hold possession of the regimental armory, corner of Seventh street and Hall place, or the property thereto appertaining, an application is to be made to headquarters for the reorganization of the Second regiment New York State Militia, it being averred that six of the old captains and nearly two hundred of the original members of this command are still in the city, and willing to do duty as part of the new National Guard. It is advisable for the Governor to favor this reorganization of the Old State Guard Second regiment New York State Militia.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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