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94th Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
We extract portions of a letter written by Lieutenant Joy, of Lafargeville, to his wife, wherein he gives an interesting account of the manner of his escape from the rebel lines, having been taken prisoner in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. Passing over his account of the fight, which our readers already well understand, we give his narrative of his brief prisoner life and escape. He says:
After we were taken, they kept us moving about from place to place, as the fighting shitted from one position to another, until Saturday, the 4th, when they began to send their trains, wounded and prisoners, towards Hagerstown, preparatory to a grand skedaddle.
In going through a narrow gap in the mountains between Fountaindale and Hagerstown, about 9 o'clock p. m., the road being filled with artillery and wagons, and it being pretty dark at the time, I managed to get outside of the line of the guards, and skedaddled up the side of the mountain through the woods. A good many others took advantage of the same opportunity. I don't know as any others of the 94th did. I got off about a fourth of a mile from the road and laid down in the bushes to rest and if possible to sleep. I could hear the teamsters and guards yelling and swearing, the wagons and artillery rattling, and altogether my slumbers were rather disturbed; so I concluded to change my base of operations, and take up a new position, I did so, and finally slept tolerably well under the circumstances, though it rained considerable during the night.
I was awakened in the morning (Monday, the 6th) by the baying of hounds, and thinking perhaps they were blood-hounds scouring the woods, and being unarmed, I thought I would get out of their reach, and accordingly climbed a thick leaved chestnut.
About 6 o'clock a. m., two rebel cavalry came along near me. They arrested a citizen within a dozen rods of me, took him and his horse; but, thanks to the rain and leaves, they did not discover me. About 10 a. m., I got rather dozy, and when I woke up and began to look around, just below me sat   another blue coat. We soon came to an understanding and I came down. We sat there talking, and soon saw two or three rebel cavalry patrols coming towards us. We concluded it was not a safe locality, and broke camp in different directions. After going down that mountain and over another, we came together again. As we could not keep separated, we agreed to travel together. We passed several places where the rebels had bivouacked the night before. We saw several squads of rebs, but as they were armed and we were not, we pursued the "let alone" policy, and left them to pursue their winding way, while we pursued ours. About 3 o'clock p. m., we concluded to go to some house and inquire our way, and if possible get something to eat. We called at the door of a house where we were met by a young lady who was so smiling and sociable that we felt we were among friends. We soon had a luncheon, and as we were rather tired and foot sore, we agreed to stop all night. Just before dark a captain who had escaped came along and staid with us. This morning (the 7th) we took up our line of march for Fairfield. On our way we found two rebs who had been arrested by two brothers who had availed themselves of the chance to go home. One of the brothers took his prisoners and started with us for Fairfield. Before we had got half way there, we heard of six more rebs who were at a house getting breakfast, and wished to give themselves up. We went to the house and caught them all at the table. We asked them if they gave themselves up. They replied Yes. They were a good deal surprised when they found out there were but three of us there, and unarmed at that; but they came along without any trouble, and we were soon hail fellows well met. We soon overtook the guard with the other two and continued the march. We found that our forces had all left Fairfield, and we changed our course for Emmettsburg, where we arrived about noon. Our guard left us when we changed direction. He went back to finish his visit, and we three marched into Emmettsburg, without arms and with eight prisoners. We delivered them over to the provost guard of the 5th corps, which was passing through the place, and we (the Captain and myself) concluded to stay here over night.
Albert Dixon was killed in the first day's fight, almost instantly, while fighting bravely with his company. I did not see him, but was so informed by those who did. I don't know anything about Lampson, but presume he got a way all right. Marshall was not with us. He is in hospital from a sprained ankle, I believe.

FROM COL. A. R. ROOT.—The following extract from a letter from Col. Root, to his mother, has been handed to us for publication. It should have appeared yesterday morning, but the gentleman to whom it was entrusted forgot to deliver it:
"During the action of the 1st inst., I was unhorsed by the explosion of a shell directly in front of me, and by which I was so stunned as to have remained quite helpless for several hours. During this time the 1st Corps was driven back a mile with heavy loss, leaving me a prisoner in the hands of the enemy. I was however treated with great kindness during the five days of my captivity, and when the enemy retired I was left on parole. * * * * My old friend Col. Albert G. Myer, on my arrival at Washington, insisted upon my making my home at his house, and I have accepted his kind offer. With the exception of severe pains in my head consequent upon concussion of the brain, I am in good condition, although not fit for duty. I hope to be soon exchanged and able to again lead my brave Regiment in the field. Have no fears for my safety.

DRAFTED MEN FOR THE 94TH.—Lieut. Col. CREST, Adjt. CHAS. SCOVILL, and Capt. Parsons, have been detailed from the 94th Regiment to organize some of the drafted men at Elmira, and attach them to the 94th.

Returning Regiments.
THE NINETY-FOURTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VETERAN VOLUNTEERS, under the command of Lieut. Col. Samuel A. Moffitt, arrived in this city at one o'clock this morning.
The Ninety-fourth N. Y. V. V. was organized at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., in the fall of 1861, and was mustered in March 10th, 1862, and left for the seat of war under the command of Col. Henry K. Viele, and was attached to the Army of the Potomac. On the trip from Albany to New York city the cars ran off the track into the river, resulting in a loss of five men killed and twenty wounded. May 2d Col. Viele resigned and was succeeded by Col. Adrian R. Root, Lieut. Col. Twenty-first N. Y. On the 10th of March, 1863, the One Hundred and Fifth N. Y. V. V. was consolidated with the Ninety-Fourth N. Y. V.
The Ninety-fourth has participated in twenty-five engagements, and its tattered colors evince their severity. It has contained during its service over 3,000 men, and now numbers 599 men. Its Colonel has been twice brevetted for faithful and meritorious service.
The following is a roster of the 94th N. Y. Veteran Volunteers:
Colonel—Adrian R. Root, Brevet Major General.
Lieutenant Colonel—Samuel A. Moffitt.
Major—Byron Parsons.
Adjutant—Charles H. Spague.
Quartermaster—Jere. S. Reed.
Chaplain—P. G. Cook.
Captains—Orlo J. Mason, Dexter C. Sears, Chauncey W. Kilbern, Joseph Mallison, E. Chas. Parker, Augustus Fields, Walter T. Chester, Chas. F. Scoville, Charles V. Mesler, Michael Leonard.
1st Lieutenants—James P. Thomas, J. D. Holley, Russell B. Merriam, John P. Cole, George Mather, James C. Phillips, Samuel C. De Marse.
2d Lieutenants—Myron M. Ludlow, Daniel Whalen, Hayden Strong, Henry H. Pheles.
A despatch was received last evening announcing the embarking of the regiment, but was not placed in the hands of the Citizens' Committee until this morning. The consequence was that the regiment waited until it got tired, and then marched to the Barracks. As soon as he received the despatch, the Chairman of the Committee proceeded to the Barracks, arrangements were made by the Committee for breakfast, and the regiment returned to the city to partake of it.

FROM 94TH REGIMENT, FORMERLY 105TH.
Sergeant Samuel Fuller, of Co. G, 105th, writes to one of his relatives in this city under date of Gettysburg, July 7th, giving some account of that regiment's share in the late battles. Sergeant F. says he was "cornered up along with Capt. McMahon, and ordered to surrender. Poor Jack! I never shall forget the look he gave me as he smashed his sword over a log.—He had to go to Richmond. But I am in hopes he will be retaken before he gets out of this State. He requested me to write to his family. We know him to be brave and true. Never was there a man fought better than he did that day. * *  I cannot give you a correct account of the casualties in our company. There were 150 of us paroled, to take care of the wounded inside of the rebel lines. The rebels then retreated and left us behind; so we remain here. What is to be done with us, or where we are to be sent, I cannot say."

THE 94TH.—The Watertown Reformer publishes the following extract from Major Moffat, of the 94th:
"The ___ went into the action of Wednesday with ___ . We can now muster only about ____ __mained at the front until we were ____ __led, and then fell back, supposing we could go back the same way we came, but were met by a whole line of rebels. We consequently had to turn to the left and run the gauntlet for about half a mile to the village, and in going the distance were exposed to a fire from sharpshooters. Of course we have not many left. Col. Root was wounded in the beginning of the engagement, and the command fell upon me. Thank God, I have come out unharmed. When we had fallen back to what we supposed a safe place, a bullet from a sharpshooter went through Capt. Parson's arm and clipped a piece from the sole of my boot. A great many had to halt from exhaustion, and were taken prisoners. We know of 50 that were killed or wounded, and there may have been others we did not see fall. But I have not time to write more. I do this in my saddle, and we must now be on the move again."
Adjutant Scoville telegraphs from Gettysburg, July 4th, that the regiment was in action three ...

PERSONAL.—Col. A. R. Root of the 94th Regiment has had his health much impaired by recent fatigues and exposures, and is reported to be coming home for a brief season to recruit his strength. On account of the consolidation of two brigades, one of which Col. Root has commanded for six months past, he is relieved from his duties as Brigadier General.

Casualties.
The following casualties are reported in regiments recruited wholly or partly in this vicinity: NINETY-FOURTH NEW YORK.
Lost and wounded--Capt. White, Capt. Parsons, Lieut. Mesler. Missing--Col. R. Root, Capt. White, Lieut. Sears, Lieut. Parker, Lieut. Hacklin, Capt. Whiteside.

From the 94th Regiment--Letters from this Regiment, dated July 24th, represent the remnant of its members as near Warrenton, Va., where breastworks were being thrown up and a double line of pickets established. An officer writes: "We find no trace of the enemy here. We hear cannon in the distance every now and then, but it is from our cavalry who are chasing theirs through the mountains. Whether the enemy are in force near here or not, I have not heard. I don't believe they will bother us much until we get up nearer Culpepper. They will oppose our crossing the Rappahannock perhaps."
Col. Root, we hear, has gone to Gettysburg to look after the 150 men of his regiment who were taken prisoner and paroled. The 94th has much need of reinforcements. Company A. commanded by Lieut. Fish, has only one corporal and seven men.
Captains WM. GLENNY, and L. H. FASSETT, Lieut. B. C. KETCHAM and six enlisted men of the 9ith regiment arrived at this rendesvouze yesterday, being detailed to take charge of the drafted men which may be assigned to that regiment.

From the 94th Regiment.
As there are a good many men from this vicinity in the ranks of the 94th Regiment—the 105th having been consolidated with it—the following
extract from a private letter to the Buffalo Courier referring to the part the command took in the recent battle at Gettysburg will be interesting:
I have not much time to give you details of the action. We have hurried into it at double quick, and fought a double quick all the afternoon under a blazing sun. The old 94th did, as ever, all that was required of them, obeying, at one time, a diabolically reckless order, which could only proceed from the mouth of drunkenness, to charge, in the face of a brigade of rebels, across an open field, planting their tattered flag far in advance of any other regimental ensign. In the field, which the fire of our brigade had been sweeping for fifteen minutes before, the dead were thickly strewn. Our position was soon, indeed, immediately, rendered untenable, the enemy taking us in strong force on both sides, and the order to retreat was given, or understood, for few orders were given in that field. Another stand, or a semblance of one, was made in a wood in the rear of this meadow, but sauve qui peut was the only hope, and back through the town of Gettysburg, under the most galling fire the writer has ever experienced, streamed the did First Corps, beaten but not disgraced. In a graveyard on a hill southeast of the town, the 2d Division halted, and told each other with quivering voices and tear-bedewed eyes the terrible tales of death and disaster. Many brave, strong men of the regiment sobbed like children, thinking of the seemingly utter wreck of our noble corps.
The regimental loss is about as follows:
Killed 7, wounded 60, missing 160. How many of this latter class are killed or wounded we cannot tell. There are at present 160 enlisted men with us.
The glorious days that followed, Thursday and Friday, have amply recompensed for the defeat of Wednesday. In these it was not our good fortune to actively participate, although we were under fire almost constantly and lost several men. Of the whole battle, and especially our part in it, I will give you a more elaborate account as soon as time and convenience present themselves. A seat in the mud, a bad lead pencil and the only sheet of paper in the regiment, as far as vigorous search can discover, are not circumstances conducive to animated or extended newspaper correspondence.

LETTER FROM CHAPLAIN COOK.—CAMP 94TH N. Y. V. Middleberry,
LOUDON COUNTY, July 22nd, 1863.
Dear Express:—I am not aware whether the telegraph keeps you informed of the movements of the army of the Potomac—nor am I quite certain whether such information is regarded as contraband. Presuming, however, that a mere statement of the whereabouts of this portion of it, will not be improper, and that information from an old friend will be acceptable to your readers, I will improve an unexpected opportunity to forward a line.
After an absence of ten days, which I spent among the wounded at Gettysburg, I rejoined the regiments at Berlin on the 17th inst. The 1st corps, with which we are connected, moved early in the morning across the Potomac and took the road to Waterford—10 miles distant, where we camped for the night. The whole corps, infantry and artillery, were located on two or three of those slopes with which the country abounds, and presented—especially at nights—a beautiful appearance.
I am happily disappointed in the demeanor of the troops. After the severe and exhausting labors of the previous three weeks and the disappointment which I knew they experienced in not having been permitted to attack and destroy Lee's army at Williamsport, I expected to find the men low spirited and grumbling at the prospect of re-entering upon the hated soil of Virginia. But so far as I can judge from appearances, the men are in good spirits, and I have heard no mutterings or complaints at the prospects before them. While the rank and file of the army wished and hoped to attack the Rebs at Falling Water and were confident of their ability to beat them, and thus as they believed virtually destroy the Richmond army they seem to submit with a much better grace than I feared they would to the judgment and direction of the "Powers that be."
The inhabitants here and hereabouts are strongly secesh. The doors and window blinds of stores and private residences were nearly all closed.  Scarcely a dozen of faces save those of the colored population appeared in sight through the whole village, and that notwithstanding our fifers and drummers gave them one of their liveliest and best tunes. This was the first exhibition of the kind the boys had seen for many months, and both amused and provoked them. I am told that as soon as they could get away from camp they returned to pay their respects to whatever they could find in the gardens of their secesh friends.
The Quartermasters Department are ordered by the government to put in force the confiscation act, in reference to whatever they can find for the subsistence of the army.
Paving the loyal and compelling the disloyal to pay the forfeits. This is as it should be. I am told that in some directions they made pretty good hauls yesterday, though I doubt whether very much will be obtained in this way. It is hardly possible that the inhabitants should allow us to find much even though they may have property in their possession.
Small bands of guerrillas are hovering around us, and have picked up some of our stragglers. Not only have they captured this class of our men, but also some of our prominent officers. Lieut. Col. Sanderson, acting Corps Commissary, and Capt. Russet, Assistant Adjutant General on General Newton's staff, being a little in advance of the army were suddenly surrounded by 15 or 20 cavalry men, a little this side of Goose Creek, and compelled to accompany their captors at a double quick through the town. It is said that when this squad and their victims were leaving one end of the village, our Orderlies were entering the other, and that some of the Secesh ladies came out and engaged the Orderlies in conversation till their friend had escaped.
It is supposed that we are en route for Warrenton, I left our Colonel at Berlin, and about to proceed to Gettysburg to look after his 150 paroled prisoner boys, and will soon, I hope be in a situation to rejoin us.
Yours, etc., P. G. C.

Interesting Letter from the 94th—The Buffalo Company and its Loss.
IN BIVOUAC NEAR GETTYSBURG, PA.,
Sunday, July 5, 1863.
DEAR COURIER,—I send you herewith an account, as correct as possible, of the casualties in Capt. Ernst's Buffalo Company (D) of the 94th New York Regiment, in the action of Wednesday, July 1st:
Killed—Private John Glaire, Jr.
Missing, (probably killed)—Privates Miehael Donahoe, Albert Ackroyd, John Lineberger, Edgar S. Rudd, James Mangin, Christian Von Schneider.
Missing—Private Theophilus Dole.
Wounded, and in our hands—Private Edward Williams, in the forearm, H. S. Bulson, in hand. In action of Friday the 3d inst., Private Albert Conover, in arm, slightly.
Prisoners—Sergeant Myron Conklin, Sergeant Henry C. Hathaway, Corporals William Caython, George C. Bournes, Watkins Williams, Jesse W. Parker, Privates George W. Green, John Galavin, James G. Corcoran, William Baxter, William Luck, Adolphus P. Gebhard, Ira F. Jarvis (2d time), George Harding, Robert T. Baines, George Hall, Charles E. Day, Stanles Chicker, Peter Rich.
Present with the company, who were in action—Capt. J. Fred. Ernst, Second Lieut. Walter T. Chester, First Sergeant Porter Crawford, Second Sergeant Michael Donahoe, Fourth and Color Sergeant James Hendricks, Corporal Myron M. Ludlow, Privates James K. Chadderden, Martin Flanigan.
Of other Buffalonians, Col. Root and Lieut. Parker are prisoners, Lieut. Fish is safe with the regiment, Lieut. Colton was absent on leave.
I have not much time to give you details of the action. We were hurried into it at double quick, and fought at a double quick all the afternoon under a blazing sun. The old Ninety-fourth did, as ever, all that was required of them, obeying, at one time, a diabolically reckless order, which could only proceed from the mouth of drunkenness, to charge, in the face of a brigade of rebels, across an open field, planting their tattered flag far in advance of any other regimental ensign. In the field, which the fire of our brigade had been sweeping for fifteen minutes before the dead were thickly strewn. Our position was soon, indeed immediately, rendered untenable, the enemy flanking us in strong force on both sides, and the order to retreat was given, or understood, for few orders were given in that field. Another stand, or a semblance of one, was made in a wood in the rear of this meadow, but sauve qui peut was the only hope, and back through the town of Gettysburg, under the most galling fire the writer has ever experienced, streamed the old First Corps, beaten but not disgraced. In a graveyard on a hill southeast of the town, the 2d Division halted, and told each other with quivering voices and tear-bedewed eyes the terrible tales of death and disaster. Many brave, strong men of the regiment sobbed like children thinking of the seemingly utter wreck of our noble corps.
The regimental loss is about as follows: Killed 7, wounded 60, missing 160. How many of this latter class are killed or wounded we cannot tell. There are at present 120 enlisted men with us.
 The glorious days that followed, Thursday and Friday, have amply recompensed for the defeat of Wednesday. In these it was not our good forture [sic] to actively participate, although we were under fire almost constantly and lost several men. Of the whole battle, and especially our part in it, I will give you a more elaborate account as soon as time and convenience present themselves. A seat in the mud, a bad lead pencil and the only sheet of paper in the regiment, as far as a vigorous search can discover, are not circumstances conducive to animated or extended newspaper correspondence.
Yours ever, C.

FROM THE BATTLE FIELD AT GETTYSBURG.
How the Rebels treat North Carolina Soldiers—A Picture of the Battle—Brig. Gen. Hays—Fiendish Outrage by the Rebels—Taking Care of the Wounded—The 94th Regiment.
GETTYSBURG, Pa., July 8th, 1863.
DEAR COURIER:—Since I wrote you last, which epistle contained a promise of a future fuller account of the great battle that, for three days and nights, raged around this pretty village, the battle has become to you, undoubtedly, somewhat rusty, so that any attempted narration of its progress, from one whose part in it was simply to do his duty in the line of a single regiment, would be quite "stale and unprofitable."—Hence I abandon my plan and break my promise.
But there are matters connected with this conflict, which have come under my personal observation, that are perhaps worthy to be noted down. One very prominent is the fact, long suspected, that North Carolina is, at this day, as much a Union State as Maryland or Kentucky, if not, indeed, more truly so. Never was this so fully brought out as in these battles. Everywhere North Carolina troops were put into the front of the conflict, and at all points they surrendered themselves by regiments and brigades. The language of their wounded and prisoners was all tuned to the same key. They whined, said they were forced to fight, that Mississippi and Georgia soldiers were put in their rear with bayonets fixed when they had to make a charge, whom they feared more than they did our forces. Not by me alone was this noticed. Last Saturday night I stood in a broad field covered with rebel wounded, when Gen. Alex. Hays, of the 3rd Division, 2nd Corps, than whom a more gallant soldier breathes not, rode up, and hearing a poor fellow tell me that he was forced into the conflict, asked him what State he was from.—When answered, "North Carolina,"—"There it is again," said the General, "all the whiners are North Carolinians."
But this feeling seems to exist nowhere but in the Pine-wood State. Our prisoners from the Gulf States are as impudent as you please, not in an objectionable way—rather independent. They say they are rebels to the back bone; Jeff. Davis men to the last pinch of their hearts. And I must say, in all candor, that the average of their rank and file are better appearing men than ours. They are not one tithe as profane. Indeed, some of our boys, whom they captured, were reproved by them for swearing while within their lines. Very many of them are real praying Southern Methodists, sandwiching their fights between a prayer for preservation and one of thanksgiving. All this was a singular revelation to me, quite contrary to my ideas, but it is, to a great extent, the real state of the case. Of course they have their rowdies, their Mississippi boatmen, and their New Orleans plug-uglies, but the large majority of their rank and file are simple-minded, pure-hearted, courageous men, with unbounded confidence in God and General Lee.
I have spoken just above of our Gen. Hay.—I wish you could have seen a picture, just at the close of last Friday's battle, on the left of our centre, of which his splendid figure formed a prominent part. Our little brigade, which had been lying on Cemetery Hill, was ordered over to the position that was so valiantly but unsuccessfully charged by Pickett's rebel division. We hur­ried there through a storm of shot and shell, but only arrived in time to see the grand finale, the tableaux vivants, and, alas, mourants, at the close of the drama. The enemy's batteries were still playing briskly, and their sharpshooters kept up a lively fire, but their infantry, slain and wound­ed and routed, were pouring into our lines throughout their whole extent. Then enter Alex. Hay, Brigadier General U. S. A., the brave American soldier. Six feet or more in height, and as many inches the length of his mighty mustache, erect and smiling, lightly holding well in hand his horse—the third within an half-hour, a noble animal, his flanks bespattered with blood, tied to his streaming tail a rebel flag that drags ignominiously in the mud—he dashes along our lines, now rushing out into the open field, a mark for a hundred sharp-shooters, but never touched, now quietly cantering back to our lines to be welcomed with a storm of cheers. I reckon him the grandest view of my life. I bar not Niagara. It was the arch spirit of glorious Victory wildly triumphing over the fallen foe.
The night after, I met Gen. Hay again. After the fight of Friday afternoon, we held the battle-field, our skirmishers forming a line on the outer edge of it. This field was strewn with rebel wounded. It was impossible for us to bring them in Friday night, every apology for a hospital being crowded, our own wounded, in many cases, lying out all night. But Saturday morning bandsmen were sent out with litters to bring in the poor fellows, and were fired upon by the rebel sharp-shooters so briskly that it was impossible to help them. Stories similar to this I had often heard, but never believed. This came under my own observation. So all day Saturday the poor fellows lay there, praying for death. When night fell, another officer of my regiment and myself got a few volunteers to go out with us, thinking there might be some who could creep into our lines, supported, on either side, by one of us. May God preserve me from such a position again! We could do almost nothing. Of a thousand wounded men we found one whom four of us carried into our lines in a blanket. Other poor souls would think they might accomplish it, but at the slightest change of position, would fall back, screaming in awful agony. Litters we had none. Then appeared Gen. Alex. Hay in another light, less of the bravado, perhaps not less of the hero. He sent out two companies, who cleared the rebel sharpshooters from a position they held in a ruined building, busied himself in procuring litters and bearers, and before morning many of the poor fellows were safe within our lines. It is not my good fortune to be personally acquainted with this Gen. Alex. Hay, but I wish every one, as far as I can effect it, to honor him as the bravest of soldiers, and love him as the best-hearted of men. A true chevalier he must be, sans peur et sans reproche.
In our regiment (the 94th N. Y. V.,) affairs stand about the same as when I wrote you last. In the Buffalo company nothing has been heard of the seven that I reported as "missing (probably killed)," except that Edgar S. Rudd, of Alden, lies in the 2d Division Hospital nearly dead. I leave to other hands, and days not far distant the task of exposing the drunkenness in high positions that caused our terrible defeat of Wednesday, for such it was, however glossed over.—We could not have hoped for victory, pitted against a force so far superior, but had Gen. Reynolds lived our repulse would have been of another sort. When fifteen thousand men retreat in confusion for two miles, exposed to a severe fire from three sides, some one is to blame. A day of reckoning will yet come.
Col. Root, with 160 prisoners of his regiment, was paroled on conditions. The men attend to the wounded, and agree not to bear arms until exchanged, their present parole to be considered in force, if accepted by our government, but if not they are to give themselves up again as prisoners of war. The Colonel has gone to Washington to put this business through, and the men remain here, where they are much needed. The town is crowded with citizens, both sight-seers, and those who, in connection with the Sanitary Commission, attend to the wounded and sick. Of this latter class is the Rev. J. Hyatt Smith, formerly of Buffalo. A large number of Sisters of Charity, worthy of the name, are here from Emmettsburg, Md, where they have a great convent.
Yours, C.

The 94th, and the 1st Brigade.
A few days ago, and we had hoped that the 94th might, in consequence of the amount of work performed by them, have a little respite from hard fighting. But it appears that they were created to fight and that continually. Although they were on Provost duty at Aquia Creek, and the last to leave that station, still when the great battle was opened at Gettysburg. Their Brigade was the first to sustain that fierce shock.
Gen. Reynolds opened the fight on Wednesday with one Brigade, in which was the 94th—this was the 1st Brigade, 2d Division of the 1st Corps. It was commanded by Gen. Paul, who fell early in the action, next Col. Leonard of the 13th Massachusetts, commanded the Brigade; he being very soon wounded. Col. Root of the 94th assumed command and was himself wounded and left in the hands of the enemy.
At no time did our force at this point amount to 10,000 men, while the enemy had in supporting distance, 30,000.
This table will show the strength and loss of the Brigade:
13 Massachusetts, 800
107 Pennsylvania, 600
94 New York, 450
16 Maine, 300
104 New York, 100
Total, 2250
The number killed, wounded and missing, is, 897.
Col. Root, leg amputated,
Capt. White, Co. A, wounded.
Capt. Parsons, Co. C, wounded.
Lieut. Meester, Co. G, wounded.
The Adjutant of the 94th telegraphs the following to his father in this village:—GETTYSBURG, July 4.
Have been in action three days. I am uninjured. Regiment lost heavily. Col.
Root a prisoner.
C. E. SCOVILLE.

Commercial Advertiser.
Wednesday Evening, July 8, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
Col. A. R. Root Safe in Washington.
We received a private telegram this morning dated Washington, July 7, stating that Col. A. R. Root, of the 94th N. Y. Volunteers, arrived there on that day, having been paroled by the rebel Gen. A. P. Hill. Col. Root is at the house of Col. Albert J. Meyers, Chief Signal Officer. The telegram says that Col. Root is ''doing well."
We are sincerely rejoiced that this brave young officer—one of whom Buffalo is so justly proud—is again among his friends, and that his injuries are not of a serious nature.
We trust that as soon as he is able to bear the fatigue of travel, he may wend his steps homeward, and remain among us until again called to the field. No soldier would be more heartily welcomed.

CASUALTIES IN THE 94th NEW YORK VOL.—
The following casualties in the 94th Regiment, N. Y. Vol., are given by a correspondent of the New York Times: Lost—Captain White, Capt. Parsons, Lieut. Mesler; wounded—Col. A. R. Root, Capt. White, Lt. Sears, Lt. Parker, Lt. Locklin, Capt. McMahon, Capt. Whiteside, missing. Lieut. Parker is a Buffalo man.

Casualties.
The telegraph brings the following report of casualties in the 94th (formerly the 105th) recruited here:
NINETY-FOURTH NEW YORK.
Lost and wounded—Capt. White, Capt. Parsons, Lieut. Mesler. Missing—Col. R. Root, Capt. White, Lieut. Sears, Lieut. Parker, Lieut. Locklin, Capt. Whiteside.
Wounded—In the Tribune's list of the wounded on Thursday and Friday, we find the name of Capt. Byron Parsons, of the 94th N. Y. Vols.

THE 94TH AT GETTYSBURGH.—Major Moffatt, of the 94th, writes to a friend in this village, from which we take the following extract. He says:
The 94th went into the action of Wednesday with 350 rifles. We can now muster only about 80. We remained at the front until we were nearly surrounded, and then fell back, supposing we could go back the same way we came, but were met by a whole line of rebels. We consequently had to turn to the left and run the gauntlet for about half a mile to the village, and in going this distance were exposed to a fire from sharpshooters. Of course we have not many left. Col. Root was wounded in the beginning of the engagement, and the command fell upon me. Thank God, I have come out unharmed. When we had fallen hack to what we supposed a safe place, a bullet from a sharpshooter went through Capt. Parsons' arm and leg, and clipped a piece from the sole of my boot. A great many had to halt from exhaustion, and were taken prisoners. We know of 50 that were killed or wounded, and there may have been others we did not see fall. But I have not time to write more. I do this in my saddle, and we must now be on the move again.

CAPT. JOHN MCMAHON.—Among the names of the missing from the 94th N. Y. reported in the New York Herald's account of the battle at Gettysburg, was that of our townsman Capt. John McMahon. His friends have been relieved from anxiety by the receipt of a letter from Sergt. Samuel Fuller, of his company, stating that Capt. McMahon is a prisoner in the hands of the rebels and has probably been sent to Richmond. The particulars of his capture are briefly stated. The company was fairly cut off and had no alternative but to surrender or be cut up to the last man. Capt. McMahon reluctantly surrendered. He refused to give up the sword which was presented him by citizens of Rochester and broke it over a log, that it might not he held as a trophy by the rebels. His parole was offered him but he refused to accept it.
Capt. McMahon has the true grit and is the sort of man who ought to hold a higher position. We want more of that kind of men in command of regiments and brigades. It is said that there is a vacancy among the field officers of the 94th. We hope to see Capt. McMahon called to fill it.

Interesting Letter from the 94th—The Buffalo Company and Its Losses.
IN BIVOUAC NEAR GETTYSBURG, PA.,
Sunday, July 5, 1863.
DEAR COURIER,—I send you herewith an account, as correct as possible, of the casualties in Capt. Ernst's Buffalo Company (D) of the 94th New York Regiment, in the action of Wednesday, July 1st:
Killed—Private John Glaire, Jr.
Missing, (probably killed)—Privates Michael Donahoe, Albert Ackroyd, John Lineberger, Edgar S. Rudd, James Mangin, Christian Von Schneider. Missing—Private Theophilus Dole.
Wounded, and in our hands—Private Edward Williams, in the forearm, H. S. Bulson, in hand. In action of Friday the 3d inst., Private Albert Conover, in arm, slightly.
Prisoners—Sergeant Myron Conklin, Sergeant Henry C. Hathaway, Corporals William Caython, George C. Bournes, Watkins Williams, Jesse W. Parker, Privates George W. Green, John Galavin, James G. Corcoran, William Baxter, William Luck, Adolphus P. Gebhard, Ira F. Jarvis (2d time), George Harding, Robert T. Baines, George Hall, Charles E.Day, Stanles Chicker, Peter Rich.
Present with the company, who were in action— Capt J. Fred. Ernst, Second Lieut. Walter T. Chester, First Sergeant Porter Crawford, Second Sergeant Michael Donahoe, Fourth and Color Sergeant James Hendricks, Corporal Myron M. Ludlow, Privates James K. Chadderden, Martin Flanigan.
Of other Buffalonians, Col. Root and Lieut. Parker are prisoners, Lieut. Fish is safe with the regiment, Lieut. Colton was absent on leave.
I have not much time to give you details of the action. We were hurried into it at double quick, and fought at a double quick all the afternoon under a blazing sun. The old Ninety-fourth did, as ever, all that was required of them, obeying, at one time, a diabolically reckless order, which could only proceed from the mouth of drunkenness, to charge, in the face of a brigade of rebels, across an open field, planting their tattered flag far in advance of any other regimental ensign. In the field, which the fire of our brigade had been sweeping for fifteen minutes before, the dead were thickly strewn. Our position was soon, indeed immediately, rendered untenable, the enemy flanking us in strong force on both sides, and the order to retreat was given, or understood, for few orders were given in that field. Another stand, or a semblance of one, was made in a wood in the rear of this meadow, but sauve qui peut was the only hope, and back through the town of Gettysburg, under the most galling fire the writer has ever experienced, streamed the old First Corps, beaten but not disgraced. In a graveyard on a hill southeast of the town, the 2d Division halted, and told each other with quivering voices and tear-bedewed eyes the terrible tales of death and disaster. Many brave, strong men of the regiment sobbed like children, thinking of the seemingly utter wreck of our noble corps.
The regimental loss is about as follows: Killed 7, wounded 60, missing 160. How many of this latter class are killed or wounded we cannot tell. There are at present 120 enlisted men with us.
The glorious days that followed, Thursday and Friday, have amply recompensed for the defeat of Wednesday. In these it was not our good forture [sic] to actively participate, although we were under fire almost constantly and lost several men. Of the whole battle, and especially our part in it, I will give you a more elaborate account as soon as time and convenience present themselves. A seat in the mud, a bad lead pencil and the only sheet of paper in the regiment, as far as a vigorous search can discover, are not circumstances conducive to animated or extended newspaper correspondence.
Yours ever C.

The 94th in the Battle at Gettysburg.
The following interesting extract is from a letter written by a Buffalo officer of the 94th Regiment, dated Gettysburg, July 20th:
One week ago to-day our regiment was ordered away from Edward's Ferry to join our old Brigade, (1st Brigade, 2d Division, 1st Corps,) for the purpose of driving the rebels out of Pennsylvania. Yesterday, about noon, we reached here, in the midst of a fierce battle. Our corps fought Lee's whole army during the afternoon, and was driven back through the town in dire confusion about 5 P. M. Our loss is terrible. That of our regiment we can form no idea of. We went in with 420 muskets, and this morning have 78. Our loss however, cannot be as large as these figures show. We did splendidly. We broke the enemy by a well directed fire of some fifteen minutes duration, and then charged upon them across a field, carrying our colors within their lines, further than any others went. In that place we took many prisoners, and up to that time all went well. But, alas, they flanked us on both sides, getting us, as it were, in the centre of a horse-shoe, with only one way of exit.
Then sauve qui peut was the cry and out we went in inglorious confusion. To rally was impossible. On three sides of us a superior force hurled in a murderous volley. Back through the town we streamed, poor fellows dropping all about—many from fatigue; and many were taken prisoners. How I escaped is miraculous. Once a man's neck saved me. His blood spouted all over me. Twice, horses intervened between me and wounds or death. But, thank God, I came through untouched, and am ready to fight again to-day with good heart. I was in command of the Company, the Captain and First Lieutenant being absent. Col Root was stunned in the early part of the fight by the explosion of a shell under his horse, and was afterwards, I hear, wounded in the leg and taken prisoner. Capt. White was wounded in the foot; Lieut. Mesler in the knee; Ed. Williams' arm was broken; John Glaire is probably killed, and old Mike Donohue was left on the field, killed or wounded.
To-day we have immense reinforcements and I have high hopes. We are held in reserve. Of Company D, there is no one with the regiment this morning but Sergeants Crawford and Donohue, Corporal Ludlow, and Privates Conover, Chadderdon and Flanigan. The rest are scattered, and many must be prisoners. I saw George Bourne very nearly through the town. I think he is all right. I have lost every thing but the clothes on my back and my warlike equipments. Be as little anxious about me as possible. Do not think I am killed if you do not hear from me for some time, for I may be taken prisoner. W. T. C.

94TH REGIMENT.
Lost and wounded—Capt. White, Capt. Byron Parsons, Lieut. Mesler. Missing—Col. R. Root, Capt. White, Lieut. Sears, Lieut. Parker, Lieut. Locklin, Capt. Whiteside.

Biographical.
DAVID COLE, of Co. F, 94th Reg. N. Y. S.V., died near Centerville, Va., June 15th, aged 37 years.
Brother Cole was converted some over eight years ago, under the labors of Rev. C. Phelps, of Black River Conference, and united with the M. E. Church, of which he remained an acceptable and useful member until called to his reward. He came to his death under the following afflictive circumstances: He was a teamster, and the train to which he belonged had been on the move four days. When they halted he sat down on the ground and leaned against the hind wheel of his wagon and fell asleep, and laid over back on the ground, and when the train started the hind wheel run over his breast and so injured him that he died in two hours and a half. Brother Cole was a member and steward of Brownville charge, Black River Conference when he enlisted, and had the confidence and love of the Church and community. He was a man of much practical good sense, although deprived of many early advantages. He possessed a noble and generous spirit, and was benevolent almost to a fault. He loved the Lord, the Church, and his country. He was faithful in the use of all the means of grace, and ready for every good word and work. He was very much missed in the Church when he left; but we all hoped for his safe return. Providence has ordered otherwise, and we must submit without a murmur. He maintained his religious character amid all the temptations, as his letters, and his chaplain, Rev. Wm. A. Nichols, testify. We feel, therefore, fully assured, that although unexpectedly summoned away, he was ready for the great change.—He has left a wife and other friends to mourn his unexpected departure. May we imitate his virtues and meet him in heaven. The funeral services were attended by the writer, and some remarks were made by Rev. Wm. A. Nichols, who was present.
MOSES LYON.

LETTER FROM CHAPLIN COOK.—
CAMP 94TH N. Y. V. MIDDLEBERRY.
LOUDON COUNTY, July 22nd, 1863.
Dear Express:—I am not aware whether the telegraph keeps you informed of the movements of the army of the Potomac—nor am I quite certain whether such information is regarded as contraband. Presuming however, that a mere statement of the whereabouts of this portion of it, will not be improper, and that information from an old friend will be acceptable to your readers, I will improve an unexpected opportunity to forward a line.
After an absence of ten days, which I spent among the wounded at Gettysburg, I rejoined the regiments at Berlin on the 17th inst. The 1ST corps, with which we are connected, moved early in the morning across the Potomac and took the road to Waterford—10 miles distant, where we camped for the night. The whole corps, infantry and artillery, were located on two or three of those slopes with which the country abounds, and presented—especially at nights —a beautiful appearance.
I am happily disappointed in the demeanor of the troops. After the severe and exhausting labors of the previous three weeks and the disappointment which I knew they experienced in not having been permitted to attack and destroy Lee's army at Williamsport, I expected to find the men low spirited and grumbling at the prospect of re-entering upon the hated soil of Virginia. But so far as I can judge from appearances, the men are in good spirits, and I have heard no mutterings or complaints at the prospects before them. While the rank and file of the army wished and hoped to attack the Rebs at Falling Water and were confident of their ability to beat them, and thus as they believed virtually destroy the Richmond army they seem to submit with a much better grace than I feared they would to the judgment and direction of the "Powers that be."
The inhabitants here and hereabouts are strongly secesh. The doors and window blinds of stores and private residences were nearly all closed. Scarcely a dozen of faces save those of the colored population appeared in sight through the whole village, and that notwithstanding our fifers and drummers gave them one of their liveliest and best tunes. This was the first exhibition of the kind the boys had seen for many months, and both amused and provoked them. I am told that as soon as they could get away from camp they returned to pay their respects to whatever they could find in the gardens of their secesh friends.
The Quartermasters Department are ordered by the government to put in force the confiscation act, in reference to whatever they can find for the subsistence of the army.
Paying the loyal and compelling the disloyal to pay the forfeits. This is as it should be. I am told that in some directions they made pretty good hauls yesterday, though I doubt whether very much will be obtained in this way. It is hardly possible that the inhabitants should allow us to find much even though they may have property in their possession.
Small bands of guerrillas are hovering around us, and have picked up some of our stragglers. Not only have they captured this class of our men, but also some of our prominent officers. Lieut. Col. Sanderson, acting Corps Commissary, and Capt. Russel, Assistant Adjutant General on General Newton's staff, being a little in advance of the army were suddenly surrounded by 15 or 20 cavalry men, a little this side of Goose Creek, and compelled to accompany their captors at a double quick through the town. It is said that when this squad and their victims were leaving one end of the village, our Orderlies were entering the other, and that some of the Secesh ladies came out and engaged the Orderlies in conversation till their friend had escaped. It is supposed that we are en route for Warrenton, I left, our Colonel at Berlin, and about to proceed to Gettysburg to look after his 150 paroled prisoner boys, and will soon, I hope be in a situation to rejoin us.
Yours, etc.   P. G. C.
From Col. Root.—The following extract from a letter from Col. Root to his mother, has been handed us for publication:
"During the action of the 1st instant, I was unhorsed by the explosion of a shell directly in front of me, and by which I was so stunned as to have remained quite helpless for several hours. During this time the First Corps was driven hack a mile, with heavy loss, leaving me a prisoner in the hands of the enemy. I was, how-ever, treated with great kindness during the five days of my captivity, and when the enemy retired I was left on parole. On my arrival at Washington, my old friend, Col. Albert Meyer, insisted on my making my home at his house, and I have accepted his kind offer. With the exception of a severe pain in my head, con­sequent upon concussion of the brain, I am in good condition, although not fit for duty.
"I hope to be soon exchanged and able to again lead my brave regiment in the field. Have no fears for my safety."

THE CITY AND VICINITY.
The 94th in the Battle at Gettysburg.
The following interesting extract is from a letter written by a Buffalo officer of the 94th Regiment, dated Gettysburg, July 20th:
One week ago to-day our regiment was ordered away from Edward's Ferry to join our old Brigade, (1st Brigade, 2d Division, 1st Corps,) for the purpose of driving the rebels out of Pennsylvania. Yesterday, about noon, we reached here, in the midst of a fierce battle. Our corps fought Lee's whole army during the afternoon, and was driven back through the town in dire confusion about 5 P. M. Our loss is terrible. That of our regiment we can form no idea of. We went in with 420 muskets, and this morning have 78. Our loss however, cannot be as large as these figures show. We did splendidly. We broke the enemy by a well directed fire of some fifteen minutes duration, and then charged upon them across a field, carrying our colors within their lines, further than any others went. In that place we took many prisoners, and up to that time all went well. But, alas, they flanked us on both sides, getting us, as it were, in the centre of a horse-shoe, with only one way of exit.
Then sauve qui peut was the cry and out we went in inglorious confusion. To rally was impossible. On three sides of us a superior force hurled in a murderous volley. Back through the town we streamed, poor fellows dropping all about—many from fatigue; and many were taken prisoners. How I escaped is miraculous. Once a man's neck saved me. His blood spouted all over me. Twice, horses intervened between me and wounds or death. But, thank God, I came through untouched, and am ready to fight again to-day with good heart. I was in command of the Company, the Captain and First Lieutenant being absent. Col Root was stunned in the early part of the fight by the explosion of a shell under his horse, and was afterwards, I hear, wounded in the leg and taken prisoner. Capt. White was wounded in the foot; Lieut. Mesler in the knee; Ed. Williams' arm was broken; John Glaire is probably killed, and old Mike Donahue was left on the field, killed or wounded.
To-day we have immense reinforcements and I have high hopes. We are held in reserve. Of Company D, there is no one with the regiment this morning but Sergeants Crawford and Donohue, Corporal Ludlow, and Privates Conover, Chadderdon and Flanigan. The rest are scattered, and many must be prisoners. I saw George Bourne very nearly through the town. I think he is all right. I have lost every thing but the clothes on my back and my warlike equipments. Be as little anxious about me as possible. Do not think I am killed if you do not hear from me for some time, for I may be taken prisoner. W. T. C.

Buffalo Commercial Advertiser.
Monday Evening, June 1, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
Letter from Chaplain P. G. Cook.
THE 94TH N. Y. REGT. ORDERED TO AQUIA CREEK TO RELIEVE THE 8TH U. S. REGULARS—COL. A. R. ROOT IN COMMAND AT THAT POST—THE MEN SEND HOME $7,000 OF THEIR PAY.
WASHINGTON, D. C., May 28, 1863.
EDS. COM. ADV.: In a communication which I forwarded to you last week, I informed you of certain changes which had taken place in this portion of the army of the Potomac to which the 94th is attached, in the way of consolidation of brigades, and that one of the results of those changes was the relief of Col. Root from the command of the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, and his return to the command of his regiment. But when we welcomed our Colonel back to the 94th, as we did most cordially, we little thought what was next in store for us as a regiment.—Never were a battalion of soldiers more agreeably surprised than were the 94th boys last evening by an order read on dress parade by the Colonel. After expressing his gratification at the manner in which they were accustomed to perform the manual exercises, he remarked that he had long entertained the hope and cherished the belief that the 94th would arrive at perfection in the drill and all that pertained to the duties of the soldier, and be come equal to any regiment of Regulars in the United States service. He reminded them, also, that he had often told them that they would be called to occupy important positions as they became qualified for them. "Now," said the Colonel, "if I should succeed in securing a very important position for this regiment, can I be sure of the cooperation and best efforts of every one of you to perform faithfully all the duties growing out of the new relations we should sustain to the government? All who will do his vary best to sustain the honor of this regiment and to serve the government, say Aye. The vote was unanimous. Whereupon the Colonel pulled from his pocket and read an order from Gen. Hooker that the 94th Regt. N. Y. V. should immediately proceed to Aquia Creek and relieve the 8th U. S. Regulars. The position is a very responsible one, as it makes Col. Root the Commandant at that important post.
Both officers and men are greatly pleased with this unlooked for change in their prospects. One of the Buffalo boys said to me this morning that it seemed almost as good as going home.
It was perhaps an intimation that this movement was near at hand that prevented the Colonel from visiting Buffalo this week, as I intimated he might in my last.
The friends of the 94th will in future address their communications to "94th Regiment N. Y. V., Aquia Creek, via Washington, D.C."
The Paymaster having made us a visit this week, it became necessary for the Chaplain to visit Washington to send forward remittances from the soldiers to their friends at home. They have sent by me about seven thousand dollars. This sum will be very much increased by remittances in other ways. As they received this time but two months pay they have done well to send so much.
I hoped to get permission to extend my journey to Buffalo this time, but it was found impossible to get leave of absence at present for more than four or five days and but very few get that. P. G. C.

FROM THE 94TH.
GETTYSBURG, PA., July 15, 1863.
EDITORS JOURNAL:—Presuming that the numerous friends of the 94th Regt., N. Y. V., in Watertown and vicinity, will be interested in any facts bearing upon the fortunes of the Regiment in the late battles at this place, I herewith transmit a statement as far as known to me, of the casualties and operations of the regiment during that terrible struggle. The 1st Army Corps, with which the 94th is connected, as you have doubtless already learned from the papers, opened the battle on Wednesday, the 1st inst. The 1st Division went in about 10 o'clock, A. M. Gen Reynolds, the Commander of the Corps, was killed at the very outset. Up to about 12 o'clock the fortunes of the day seemed to be with us. The 2d Division arrived on the ground soon after 12 o'clock. The 94th, after a very few moments' rest, were ordered to advance to the field of strife.
Never shall I forget my emotions and the  expression on many countenances of the  boys as we exchanged words and glances  while they passed by me to encounter the  perils of the battle-field. I tried to say an encouraging word and cheer them on to their fearful work. In general they seemed cheer­ful and resolute. They had scarcely left the field where I parted with them, before the shells began to fall so near and fast that I deemed it prudent to move further to the rear. From the position sought, I could see the movements of a considerable portion of our Division. Moving to the right a few hundred yards along the skirt of a piece of woods, and then advancing an 1/8 or 1/4 of a mile through an open field and woods, they came in sight of the enemy. Here they lay down behind a fence from whence they sent forth their missives of death with terrible effect; the enemy fell by scores and after a short resistance began to retreat. Had our boys remained here or near that position longer, they say they should have held the enemy in cheek, and inflicted great damage upon him, with very small loss to themselves. But being ordered to charge across the open field they advanced from behind their breast work, but had not gone far before they found that a large force of the enemy were flanking them on the left. In fact they were soon between two fires, and were obliged to retreat to the lower side of the woods where they had first entered this part of the field. Here they again rally and form line of battle, and give the enemy volley after volley, with terrible effect—mowing them down, as they found on visiting the ground afterwards, by thousand. But though the brave fellows did all that was possible for skill, courage and determination to do, it was found impossible to hold their ground. The odds against them were too great, at least, three to one!
Not far from 3 o'clock the General Division ordered a retreat. At this time the 94th were in advance of nearly all their associates, and found themselves under the necessity of retreating between two lines of the enemy for nearly half a mile! It was while running this gauntlet that nearly all the casualties of the regiment occurred. Many a poor fellow was made to bite the dust while passing between these two lines of fire. The retreat was in the direction of the town, and, as many of the enemy reached the town from different directions sooner than our boys, they had no difficulty in capturing large numbers just before or soon after they entered the town. In fact the boys were too much exhausted to make good their escape. The army retreated to Cemetery Hill in rear of the town. The different flags were there soon raised and the men requested to "fall in" around their respective standards. On average, less than 1/4 of those who went into action three hours before, made their appearance now! How sad we felt when we saw who and how many were not present you can better imagine than I describe! Our Colonel, 5 Captains, 4 Lieutenants and 275 of our brave boys were among the missing. Of these there have since returned to the Regiment about 50; killed and wounded 45 or 50; prisoners 160, leaving a large balance missing.
Yet, notwithstanding these sad facts, we could not but meet each other with a smile and congratulations as we thought or spoke of hair-breadth escapes. I cannot tell how thankful I felt that my messmates and dear friends, Major Moffett and Adjutant Scoville, had been spared. How the latter laid his head against my horse as we met, and wept for joy, and many others with glistening eyes could only exclaim: "Oh! Chaplain, we are here, but it's a wonder that any of us are alive!" "These are joys that the stranger intermeddleth not with."
It was my purpose to give some account of the conflicts of Thursday and Friday. But for the want of time can only say with reference to them, that the 94th was under severe fire on both days; supported another Division on the second day where the contest was terrific, and lay under the most tremendous shelling that was ever witnessed several hours on the third day without flinching. In short I think the 94th officers and men, acquitted themselves like men, brave, faithful and patriotic, throughout the terrible conflicts of the 1st, 2d, and 3d of July at Gettysburg. Long may they live to enjoy the benefits accruing to their country from the signal victory achieved over the enemies of liberty, justice and humanity.
The Regiment left Gettysburg on the 6th inst. with the army of the Potomac to follow, and I hope, still further and more effectually chastise the enemy in his retreat. I felt it my duty to remain with the prisoner boys, and do what I could for their comfort while they may remain here. What disposition will be made of them it is not yet possible to say. They are very uneasy and anxious to have the matter decided. Until regularly exchanged they feel unwilling to take up arms against the Confederates. And yet well informed military men regard their parole as a nullity.

CONDITIONS OF PAROLE.
GETTYSBURG, PA., July 3, 1863.
Surgeon Hurd, Medical Director of the First Army Corps, United States Army, having applied for a detail of Federal prisoners for Hospital purposes, and for attending to the wounded and burying the dead, the following named prisoners of war, belonging to the Ninety-Fourth Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers, having declined to avail themselves of the ordinary parole, are hereby detailed for the above duties, the condition being that they will not attempt to escape nor take up arms against the Confederate States, nor give any information that may be prejudicial to the interests of the Confederate States until regularly exchanged and should the United States Government refuse to consider this parole as valid and binding, and refuse to exchange the following named prisoners, then they (the following named prisoners) are to remain prisoners of war to the Confederate States Government until regularly exchanged after returning within Confederate lines, and the detail of prisoners are to be subsisted by the Confederate States Government so long as they remain within its lines. Col. Adrian Root, 94th N. Y. V. (wounded) is permitted to take charge of the detail upon the above conditions.
List of members of the 94th Regt N. Y. V., who were taken prisoners in the battle of Gettysburg, Pa., on Wednesday, July 1, 1863; subsequently detailed for special duty in the Hospitals, and now on parole at Gettysburg:
WATERTOWN—Sergeants: C. W. Sloat, D. H. Mooney, Julins Augner, J. Smith, F. D. Carter, O. H. Ramsdell. Corporals H. Gouldthread, F. Miller, John C. Whiting A. Chiever, J. Ball, G. D. Wells, J. Laclare, L. Marrow, J. E. Fairbanks, T. Mooney, D. Carey, F. Baxter, John H. Davis. Privates: W. Salsbury, J. Premain, A. Stone, C. S. Fuller, C. Ravier, Geo. Babcock, L. Ely, W. Carpenter, C. Bradley, C. Guslin, M. McCambie, Abner Gould, L. Tripp, J. Deffert, E. Gailand, J. Thompson, J. Ol1ey, J. York, S. Wilson, J. Gouldsmith, F. Allen, W. Wilder, C. Parmerton, P. Carroll, J. D. Hawley, D. French, W. Derosia, J. VanBrocklin, J. S. King, Wm. Livingston, D. J. Maltby, N. Hildreth, Wm. C. Becker, Wm. Gillett, H. Franklin, Riley With, L. Mence, F. Jary, C. Ford, G. Tooker.
LEWIS Co.—G. Harter, G. Karshner.

Casualties of the 94th Reg't., N. Y. V., in the battle of Gettysburg, July 1, 1863:
DEATHS.
Company A.—Sergt, Jno. Stratton, died of wounds July 3d.
Company B—Private Albt. E. Dixon, killed on the field July 1st.
Comapny C—Sergt. J. C. Sandrs, died in hospital July 3d.
Company D—Privates: Jno. Glare, died in hospital July 3d. Michael Donahue, killed on the field July 1st. Jas. Mangan, killed on the field July 1st. Albt. A. K_roid, killed on field July 1st. Jno. Lineberger, killed on field July 1st. Christian Von Sneider, killed on field July 1st.
Company G—Private James Radigan, killed on the retreat. Sergt. Wm. McKendrie, died on the 4th.
Company F—Sergt. Hennesey, killed on battle field July 1st.
Company I—Sergt. McArthur.

WOUNDED.
Capt. H. G. White, slightly, prisoner, sent to Richmond. Capt. Byron Parsons, slightly, arm and leg. Lieut. O. F. Hawkins, slightly, prisoner, sent to Richmond, Lieut. C. F. Mesler, slightly, leg. Lieut. F. I. Massey, slightly, leg. Privates: Hitchcock, Co. A; Remo, Co, A; Phillips, Co. B; Dickerson, Co, C; Chevelly, Co. C; Conover, Co. D; Secor, Co. G; Close, Co F; Lake, Co. F; Miller, Co. F; Amy, Co. H.
P. S.—The above with others were sent forward to Baltimore on the 13th inst. There are in all about 40 wounded in the 94th Regiment, nearly all slightly.

OFFICERS PRISONERS AND SENT TO RICHMOND.
Capt. John C. Whiteside, Capt. H. G. White, Capt. Jno. McMann, Capt. C. C. Comee, Capt. A. F. Fields, Lieut. O. F. Hawkins, Lieut. E. Chas. Parker, Lieut. R. N. Joy, Lieut. D. C. Sears, Lieut. A. H. Locklin.
Very Respectfully Yours,
P. G. Cook, Chaplain 94th N. Y. V.

Letter from Colonel Root.
WASHINGTON, July 14th, 1863.
EDITORS COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER:
I must not neglect to avail myself of the opportunity of writing to you, which my present respite from active duty affords me, and remembering the interest you have always taken in my regiment, will endeavor to give you a connected account of its recent experiences. I last wrote you from Aquia, of which post and its defences I had been placed in command.
When the Army of the Potomac moved in pursuit of General Lee, General Hooker sent me three additional regiments of infantry, with orders to hold the post, and cover the embarkation of the sick of the Army and the immense quantity of supplies in depot at Aquia.
On the 17th of June the embarkation had been completed, without loss, and I received telegraphic orders to evacuate the post and proceed to the mouth of the Monocacy River, in Maryland. Taking transports to Washington, I marched thence overland, reaching the Monocacy on the 20th ult., guarded the Potomac from the Monocacy down to Edward's Ferry until the 26th ult., when Major-General Reynolds arrived and crossed the Potomac with his First Army Corps, and obtained permission for me and my regiment to accompany him. I reported to General Paul, commanding First Brigade, Second Division, at Middletown, on the 27th ult.; 28th, marched to Frederick; 29th, to Emmetsburg; 30th, marched nearly to Gettysburg, our Brigade arriving at about one o'clock P. M., and finding Wadsworth's Division engaged with a superior force of the enemy, and suffering severely, General Reynolds the Corps Commander having been killed early in the action. Our Division passed on to the left of Gettysburg, and advanced to Wadsworth's support, the First Brigade forming line of battle upon a wooded ridge, and, by direction of General Paul, throwing up hastily constructed breastworks of fence rails, &c. These were scarcely completed before we were ordered to move to the right, and having moved about five hundred yards, found ourselves under a heavy fire of musketry and artillery. In order to see the enemy, I advanced the 94th in line through the grove to a rail fence, towards which the enemy's line was advancing through a wheat field. My regiment opened a heavy fire upon the enemy's line, which soon wavered then broke and hastily retreated. I deemed the moment a proper one for advancing across the wheat field to another fence, whence I hoped to silence, and if possible, capture a battery which was vigorously shelling us from a wooded elevation beyond. At that moment an aid came up and informed me that I was in command of the Brigade, General Paul having been wounded. I hesitated no longer, but gave the order to the 94th to charge. The gallant fellows sprang over the fence with a cheer, charged across the field in the face of a heavy fire, and occupied the desired position, from which they opened a heavy fire upon the enemy's battery. I then went to General Robinson, reported my action, and asked for orders. General R. thought it hardly desirable to attempt to carry the enemy's position, and direrted me to recall my men to their original position. Riding to the front, I ordered the regiment back, and was turning my horse, when a shell exploded directly over me, and so near me as to completely stun me. One fragment tore my cap from my head, and my entire system was so shocked and prostrated that I was unable to keep my seat in the saddle. I accordingly rolled off, in a bewildered frame of mind—and my share in the battle had ended. Two of my men carried me to the rear and drenched me with water.
Meantime the enemy pressing the corps in superior force, succeeded in flanking it on both sides, and forced it to retreat in haste through Gettysburg, to a hill beyond. In passing through Gettysburg, the enemy headed off a portion of the corps, and captured a large number of prisoners, among whom were nearly two hundred of my own regiment. While all this was transpiring, I remained helpless and semi-conscious on the field, and was taken possession of by some exultant rebels. By a sort of retributive justice, my captors belonged to then 33d North Carolina regiment, the identical regiment captured by my brigade at the first battle of Fredericksburg, December 17th, 1862. When the rebels had occupied Gettysburg their pursuit ceased, and having some leisure they turned their attention to their prisoners, of whom they had taken about four thousand. The 33d North Carolina recognized me, shook hands vigorously, and escorted me to their Colonel, who anxiously inquired if "I'd take a drink," at the same time proffering a canteen of whiskey. Later in the evening my generous captors took me to the headquarters of Gen. A. P. Hill, who gave me a good supper, and offered to parole me at once, or to wait and exchange me after the Confederates had taken Baltimore. I preferred being exchanged at Baltimore, but subsequently I thought of the hundreds of our wounded men in the rebel lines, and asked permission to attend to their wants, and offering to be personally responsible for a detail of prisoners, if they could be given me. Gen. Hill at once gave me permission to attend to our wounded, and subsequently gave me a detail of one hundred and fifty men of the 94th N. Y. V. to assist me. I was required to sign an obligation to remain prisoner of war until duly exchanged. All the other prisoners were paroled and sent to Carlisle, but I declined the parole, as did my men also, and only accepted the provisional parole, in order to be enabled to relieve the sufferings of the wounded. That night I passed on the battle field, doing what little I could to relieve the misery around me. All I could do was to supply water and receive dying messages for home friends, and encourage the less severely wounded. I shall never forget that first night, no, nor any of those days and nights, until the long and fearful fight had ended.—But that first night was the most painful of all, for with the exception of one man, I was alone in endeavoring to assist the hundreds of wounded men around me, and meanwhile suffering inexpressible distress myself from very consciousness of my inability to materially relieve the misery which wrung with useless sympathy every chord of my nature.
But the next day, July 2d, my detail of 150 men of the 94th, came to my assistance, and while the fight raged furiously at the front, brave fellows labored assiduously under a constant fire of our own batteries, to collect our wounded men.
The poor fellows were placed in a barn, until one hundred and seventeen had been placed there, and there was no more room, and then the rest were laid in rows on the ground outside. We had no luncheons, but we had water, and the men worked faithfully in their labor of mercy, rendering me prouder of them than I had ever been before. That their labors were not entirely devoid of risk, may be inferred from the fact that several shot and shells passed into and through our improvised barn hospital. One of these shells exploded and tore the lower jaw from a Tennessee Major who had stopped to look at our wounded, and he died in a few moments. Of the great artillery fight of July 3d, and subsequently of the magnificent infantry charges of rebels, I was as you may suppose a most interested spectator, but I cannot now take the time to describe them. I will only say that after having been present at a number of important engagements, the battle of Gettysburg, in my opinion, exceeded all previous battles of the war in sublimity and grandeur, as well as in carnage and subsequent human misery. You will bear in mind that within the rebel lines, I was at perfect liberty to go where I chose. I was a witness to their losses as well as our own. There were numerous instances in which it seemed as though all possible human misery, had been concentrated. Can you imagine anything more appaling [sic] than human beings with shattered jaws, limbs, heads, helpless, speechless, yet conscious, and with the pleading eye eloquent with imploring agony. I saw many such, and could only leave them to perish slowly where they had fallen.
But I will not shock you with a detailed description of these horrors. During the night of the 4th inst., the rebels began their retreat, disappointed, but very far from being dispirited; their artillery intact, their cavalry splendidly mounted, their infantry in perfect discipline. The officers bade me good bye, saying as they shook hands, that they hoped to meet me again under pleasanter auspices.
By dawn of the 5th inst., the Confederates had entirely disappeared, leaving me and my detail with the wounded, and by noon our lines had extended out to our rudely improvised hospitals, and our wounded, for the first time since the action of the 1st inst, received medical attendance.
I should like very much to tell you of some of the strange incidents which occurred to me, during my involuntary sojourn with the rebels, but cannot do so now without violating the terms of my parole. You will doubtless be surprised to learn that I met several Buffalonians in the rebel army, (where wont you meet them?) On one occasion while walking over the field I met a mounted rebel officer, who after passing me, turned his horse, and overtaking me, asked if I was not Col. R. On my replying in the affirmative, he asked me if I knew him. I looked at him a moment, and replied. "Yes, you rascal, I know you very well, I used to see you licked every day at Fay’s School.”
Whereat the rebel laughed, and announced himself as the Quarter Master of the 8th Georgia regiment, and wanted to know if he could do anything for me. On my replying that I wanted nothing but Surgeons, which he could not supply, he began a review of the old school-boy days of the long past childhood, asking after many who had been long ago dead and buried, and finally, and with hesitation, inquiring about his father and mother. I remembered that his brother was lost at sea, and I expressed the opinion that poor "Gussy" had been the more fortunate of the brothers.—Whereupon the Confederate smiled gravely, and said that he must be going along, as he had been detailed to "borrow" some horses from the Pennsylvania farmers. Then with a request that I would send his love to his parents and family, my old schoolmate, Sammy Hall, rode away to negotiate his "loan" of some horses from the Pennsylvania farmers.
This letter is becoming too long for you to read with comfort, and I will finish it forthwith. My own physical condition is quite satisfactory, with the exception of an occasional twinge of pain in my cranium, consequent upon what the Surgeon declares to have been a "concussion of the brain." I regard his opinion with much satisfaction, in view of the fact that a friend of mine has frequently told me that I had no brains, or I would be at home behaving myself, instead of wasting my days as a three years' volunteer. I am now awaiting instructions as to the validity of my parole, which I consider valid and binding, and shall fulfill its conditions, to the extent of my abili­ty, my only object in assuming them having been to relieve the sufferings of our wounded men.
I cannot state definitely the losses in my reg­iment during the recent battles. About one hundred men only are now with the colors, but doubtless most of the "missing" were taken prisoners. I do not yet know the number of killed and wounded.
I remain yours very truly, A. R. R.

Commercial Advertiser.
Saturday Evening, July 18, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
LETTER FROM CHAPLAIN COOK.—The following letter from Chaplain P. G. Cook, of the 94th, will be perused with interest by those having friends in the regiment.
GETTYSBURG, PA., July 14, 1863.
EDS. COM.—Knowing that you and your readers will be interested in learning whatever they can of the fortunes of those engaged in the recent conflicts between the Union and rebel armies at this place, I herewith enclose a list of those taken prisoners on the first inst., connected with the 94th Regiment, and also a paper setting forth the conditions on which said prisoners were paroled. The list embraces only those from Buffalo and vicinity. It should be stated that the primary object of the detail was to gather up the wounded and dead of the Division with which the 94th is connected. To this humane work Col. Root and a squad of 150 of his men devoted their energies for two days succeeding the battle, bringing in some 275 or 280 wounded men, many of whom would have perished on the field but for the forethought and energy of Col. Root and his associates. Although the parole is not in conformity with the latest order on this subject, Col. Root is confident that the Government will, under the circumstances, legalize what has been done and make the exchange called for. To effect this, the Col. went to Washington last week, and has not yet reported here.
In the meantime the "prisoner boys" are devoting themselves to the good work of caring for the wounded in the hospitals of this village, burying the dead, and whatever else of this kind may be required of them. In general, they submit with a becoming grace to their condition, though most of them are exceedingly anxious to know "what is to be done with them." They feel bound by their parole not to take up arms against the rebels again until regularly exchanged.
The regiment left here with the rest of the army last week Monday. The Col. and myself started at the same time for Washington. But after traveling a few miles in that direction, and having a conference with Gen. Patrick on the subject, I concluded to return to this place and devote my time and energies, for the present, to the welfare of these "prisoners," of whom there are one hundred and fifty, and to labor among the wounded in the hospitals. The work of caring for the multitude of sufferers from the terrific conflicts of the 1st, 2d and 3d inst., is, humanly speaking, endless. Though there are many from northern cities and villages, and the citizens here devoting themselves systematically and with great energy to personal labor, night and day, for the wounded and dying, and the supplies of necessaries for the comfort of the body and the consolation of the mind are absolutely beyond computation, yet there is room for more. There are ever and anon some—yea, too many—uncared for and suffering for the want of sympathy and nursing.
The Sanitary and Christian Commissions are doing a gigantic and blessed work, preventing an immense amount of suffering and causing the hearts of many to leap with joy in the midst of sorrow and anguish. They seem to be, and I doubt not are, working in perfect harmony, frequently exchanging or borrowing and lending each other's goods. Besides these blessed agencies, there are many others having the same object in view. The American Express Co. from Baltimore, and the Baltimore Fire Department, have considerable supplies on hand for the hospitals. Several of the wards of Philadelphia have representatives here laboring assiduously with others to promote the comfort of the sufferers of the 2d Army Corps, who were found in a fearful state of destitution. During the late heavy rain several of the poor fellows who were lying outside upon the ground, were carried off and drowned by the swollen stream near by.
The scenes of sorrow and anguish on the part of the friends of the wounded and dead who are constantly arriving in search of loved ones, are numerous and harrowing beyond description.
A lady sits near me who arrived from Elma day before yesterday in search of her son, who was wounded on the 2d day of the battle. Soon after her arrival a messenger came from the hospital—four miles distant—saying that the young man could survive but a short time. It was nearly 9 o'clock P. M. when the mother arrived at the tent where her son, with eight others, lies upon the bed of straw groaning out his precious life. He was indeed but too near the end of his pilgrimage. He expired at 5 o'clock in the morning. What were the emotions of that mother during the few hours of consciousness that remained to her child, who but a mother in similar circumstances can tell?
Yours, &c., P. G. C.

GETTYSBURG, Pa., July 3d, 1863.
Surgeon Heard, Military Director of the First Army Corps, United States Army, having applied for a detail of Federal prisoners for hospital purposes and for attending to the wounded and burying the dead, the following named prisoners of war belonging to the 94th Regiment of New York Volunteers, having decided to avail themselves of the ordinary parole, are hereby detailed for the above duties; the conditions being that they will not attempt to escape nor take up arms against the Confederate States, nor to give any information that may be prejudicial to the interests of the Confederate States, until regularly exchanged. Should the United States Government refuse to consider this parole valid and binding, and refuse to exchange the following named prisoners, then they—the following named prisoners—are to remain prisoners of war to the Confederate States Government until regularly exchanged after retiring within the Confederate lines, and this detail of prisoners are to be subsisted by the Confederate States so long as they remain within its lines. Col. Adrian R. Root, 94th N. Y. V., wounded, is permitted to take charge of the detail upon the above conditions.
List of members of the 94th Regt N. Y. V., taken prisoners in the battle of Gettysburg, Pa., Wednesday, July 1st, 1863, subsequently paroled:
Col. Adrian R. Root, Sergt. H. C. Hathaway, Corp. W. Williams, Corp. Geo. C. Daurnes, Corp. William Caythorn, Corp. Jessie Parker, privates Chas. E. Day, S. Chickcr, P. Rich, Ira F. Jarvis, Geo. W. Green, R. T. Baines, Geo. Harding, Wm. Baxter, Geo. Hall, Wm. Luck, J. G. Corcoran, J. Calivan, A. P. Gebbard; drummer Edward Snoop, Sergt. James H. Brooks, privates J. Grosscoph, Thos. Daugherty.
Lieut. E. Chas. Parker was also taken prisoner, but sent with eight officers (five Captains and three Lieutenants) to Richmond.
Edward Williams, wounded in arm—broken.

FROM THE 94TH.—The Northern New York Journal of the 21st, has the following:
List of members of the 94th Regt, N. Y. V., who were taken prisoners in the battle of Gettysburg, on Wednesday, July 1, 1863; subsequently detailed for special duty in the Hospitals, and now on parole at Gettysburg:
WATERTOWN—Sergeants; C. W. Sloat, D. H. Mooney, Julins Augner, J. Smith, F. D. Carter, O. H. Ramsdell. Corporals: H. Gouldthread, F. Miller, John C. Whiting, A. Chiever, J. Ball, G. D. Wells, J. Laclare, L. Marrow, J. E. Fairbanks, T. Mooney, D. Carey, F. Baxter, John H. Davis. Privates: W. Salsbury, J. Premain, A. Stone, C. S. Fuller, C. Ravier, Geo. Babcock, I. Ely, W. Carpenter, C. Bradley, C. Guslin, M. McCambie, Abner Gould, L. Tripp, J. Deffert, E. Gailand, J. Thompson, J. Olley, J. York, S. Wilson, J. Gouldsmith, F. Allen, W. Wilder, C. Parmerton, P. Carroll, J. D. Hawley, D. French, W. Derosia, J. VanBrocklin, J. S. King, Wm. Livingston, D. J. Maltby, N. Hildreth, Wm. C. Becker, Wm. Gillett, H. Franklin, Riley With, L. Mence, F. Jary, C. Ford, G. Tooker.
LEWIS Co.—G. Barter, G. Karshner.
Casualties of the 94th Regt., N. Y. V., in the battle of Gettysburg, July 1, 1863:

DEATHS.
Company A—Sergt. Jno. Stratton, died of wounds July 3d.
Company B—Private Albt. E. Dixon, killed on the field July 1st.
Company C—Sergt. J. C. Sanders, died in hospital July 3d.
Company D—Privates: Jno. Glare, died in hospital July 3d. Michael Donahue, killed on the field July 1st. Jas, Mangan, killed on the field July 1st. Albt. A. Kroid, killed on field July 1st. Jno. Lineberger, killed on field July 1st. Christian Von Sneider, killed on field July 1st.
Company G—Private James Radigan, killed on the retreat. Sergt. Wm. McKendrie, died on the 4th.
Company F—Sergt. Hennesey, killed on battle field July 1st.
Company I—Sergt. McArthur.

WOUNDED.
Capt. H. G. White, slightly, prisoner, sent to Richmond. Capt. Byron Parsons, slightly, arm and leg. Lieut. O. F. Hawkins, slightly, prisoner, sent to Richmond.  Lieut. C. F. Hosier, slightly, leg. Lieut. F. I. Massey, slightly, leg. Privates: Hitchcock, Co. A; Remo, Co. A; Phillips, Co. B; Dickerson, Co. C ; Chevelly, Co. C; Conover, Co. D, Secor, Co. G; Close, Co F; Lake, Co. F; Miller, Co, F; Amy, Co. H.
P. S.—The above with others were sent forward to Baltimore on the 13th inst. There are in all about 40 wounded in the 94th Regiment, nearly all slightly.

OFFICERS PRISONERS AND SENT TO RICHMOND.
Capt. John C. Whiteside, Capt. H. G. White, Capt. Jno. McMann, Capt. C. C. Comee, Capt. A. F. Fields, Lieut. O. F. Hawkins, Lieut. E. Chas. Parker, Lieut. R. N. Joy, Lieut. D. C. Sears, Lieut. A. H. Locklin.
Very Respectfully Yours,
P. G. COOK,
Chaplain 94th N. Y. V.

FROM THE 94.
GETTYSBURG, PA., July 15, 1863.
EDITORS JOURNAL:—Presuming that the numerous friends of the 94th Regt., N. Y. V., in Watertown and vicinity, will be interested in any facts bearing upon the fortunes of the Regiment in the late battles at this place, I herewith transmit a statement as far as known to me, of the casualties and operations of the regiment during that terrible struggle. The 1st Army Corps, with which the 94th is connected, as you have doubtless already learned from the papers, opened the battle on Wednesday, the 1st inst. The 1st Division went in about 10 o' clock, A. M. Gen Reynolds, the Commander of the Corps, was killed at the very outset. Up to about 12 o'clock the fortunes of the day seemed to be with us. The 2d Division arrived on the ground soon after 12 o'clock. The 94th, after a very few moments rest, were ordered to advance to the field of Strife.
Never shall I forget my emotions and the expression on many countenances of the boys as we exchanged words and glances while they passed by me to encounter the perils of the battle-field. I tried to say an encouraging word and cheer them on to their fearful work. In general they seemed cheerful and resolute. They had scarcely left the field where I parted with them, before the shells began to fall so near and fast that I deemed it prudent to move further to the rear. From the position sought, I could see the movements of a considerable portion of our Division. Moving to the right a few hundred yards along the skirt of a piece of woods, and then advancing an 1/8 or 1/4 of a mile through an open field and woods, they came in sight of the enemy. Here they lay down behind a fence from whence they sent forth their missives of death with terrible effect; the enemy fell by scores and after a short resistance began to retreat. Had our boys remained here or near that position longer, they say they should have held the enemy in cheek, and inflicted great damage upon him, with very small loss to themselves. But being ordered to charge across the open field they advanced from behind their breast work, but had not gone far before they found that a large force of the enemy were flanking them on the left. In fact they were soon between two fires, and were obliged to retreat to the lower side of the woods where they had first entered this part of the field. Here they again rally and form line of battle, and give the enemy volley after volley, with terrible effect—mowing them down, as they found on visiting the ground afterwards, by thousands. But though the brave fellows did all that was possible for skill, courage and determination to do, it was found impossible to hold their ground. The odds against them were too great, at least three to one!
Not far from 3 o'clock the General of Division ordered a retreat. At this, time the 94th were in advance of nearly all their associates, and found themselves under the necessity of retreating between two lines of the enemy for nearly half a mile! It was while running this gauntlet that nearly all the casualties of the regiment occurred. Many a poor fellow was made to bite the dust while passing between these two lines of fire. The retreat was in the direction of the town, and, as many of the enemy reached the town from different directions sooner than our boys, they had no difficulty in capturing large numbers just before or soon after they entered the town. In fact the boys were too much exhausted to make good their escape. The army retreated to Cemetery Hill in rear of the town. The different flags were there soon raised and the men requested to "fall in" around their respective standards. On average, less than 1/4 of those who went into action three hours before, made their appearance now! How sad we felt when we saw who and how many were not present you can better imagine than I describe! Our Colonel, 5 Captains, 4 Lieutenants and 275 of our brave boys were among the missing. Of these there have since returned to the Regiment about 50; killed and wounded 45 or 50; prisoners 160, leaving a large balance missing.
Yet, notwithstanding these sad facts, we could not but meet each other with a smile and congratulations as we thought or spoke of hair-breadth escapes. I cannot tell how thankful I felt that my messmates and dear friends, Major Moffett and Adjutant Scoville, had been spared. How the latter laid his head against my horse as we met, and wept for joy, and many others with glistening eyes could only exclaim: "Oh! Chaplain, we are here, but it's a wonder that any of us are alive!" "These are joys that the stranger  intermeddleth not with."
It was my purpose to give some account of the conflicts of Thursday and Friday. But for the want of time can only say with reference to them, that the 94th was under severe fire on both days; supported another Division on the second day where the contest was terrific, and lay under the most tremendous shelling that was ever witnessed several hours on the third day without flinching. In short I think the 94th, officers and men, acquitted themselves like men, brave, faithful and patriotic, throughout the terrible conflicts of the 1st, 2d, and 3d of July at Gettysburg. Long may they live to enjoy the benefits accruing to their country from the signal victory achieved over the enemies of liberty, justice and humanity.
The Regiment left Gettysburg on the 6th inst. with the army of the Potomac to follow, and, I hope, still further and more effectually chastise the enemy in his retreat. I felt it my duty to remain with the prisoner boys, and do what I could for their comfort while they may remain here. What disposition will be made of them it is not yet possible to say. They are very uneasy and anxious to have the matter decided. Until regularly exchanged they feel unwilling to take up arms against the Confederates. And yet well informed military men regard their parole as a nullity.

CONDITIONS OF PAROLE.
GETTYSBURG, PA., July 3, 1863.
Surgeon Hurd, Medical Director of the First Army Corps, United States Army, having applied for a detail of Federal prisoners for Hospital purposes, and for attending to the wounded and burying the dead, the following named prisoners of war, belonging to the Ninety-Fourth Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers, having declined to avail themselves of the ordinary parole, are hereby detailed for the above duties, the conditions being that they will not attempt to escape nor take up arms against the Confederate States, nor give any information that may be prejudicial to the interests of the Confederate States until regularly exchanged, and should the United States Government refuse to consider this parole as valid and binding, and refuse co exchange the following named prisoners, then they (the following named prisoners) are to remain prisoners of war to the Confederate States Government until regularly exchanged after returning within Confederate lines, and this detail of prisoners are to be subsisted by the Confederate States Government so long as they remain within its lines. Col. Adrian Root, 94th N. Y. V. (wounded) is permitted to take charge of the detail upon the above conditions.
List of members of the 9ith Regt. N. Y. V., who were taken prisoners in the battle of Gettysburg, Pa., on Wednesday, July 1, 1863; subsequently detailed for special duty in the Hospitals, and now on parole at Gettysburg:
WATERTOWN—Sergeants: C. W. Sloat, D. H. Mooney, Julins Augner, J. Smith, F. D. Carter. O. H. Ramsdell. Corporals: H. Gouldthread, F. Miller, John C. Whiting, A. Chiever, J. Ball, G. D. Wells, J. Laclare, L. Marrow, J. E. Fairbanks, T. Mooney, D. Carey, F. Baxter, John H. Davis. Privates: W. Salsbury, J. Premain, A. Stone, C. S. Fuller, C. Ravier, Geo. Babcock, I. Ely, W. Carpenter, C. Bradley, C. Guslin, M. McCambie, Abner Gould, L. Tripp, J. Deffert, E. Gailand, J. Thompson, J. Olley, J. York, S. Wilson, J. Gouldsmith, F. Allen, W. Wilder, C. Parmerton, P. Carroll, J. D. Hawley, D. French, W. Derosia, J. VanBrocklin, J. S. King, Wm. Livingston, D. J. Maltby, N. Hildreth, Wm. C. Becker, Wm. Gillett, H. Franklin, Riley With, L. Mence, F. Jary, C. Ford, G. Tooker.
LEWIS Co.—G. Harter, G. Karshner.
Casualties of the 94th Regt, N. Y. V., in the battle of Gettysburg, July 1, 1863:

DEATHS.
Company A—Sergt. Jno. Stratton, died of wounds July 3d.
Company B—Private Albt. E. Dixon, killed on the field July 1st.
Company C—Sergt. J. C. Sanders, died in hospital July 3d.
Company D—Privates: Jno. Glare, died in hospital, July 3d. Michael Donahue, killed on the field July 1st. Jas. Mangan, killed on the field July 1st Albt. A. Kroid, killed on field July 1st. Jno. Lineberger, killed on field July 1st. Christian Von Sneider, killed on field July 1st.
Company G—Private James Radigan, killed on the retreat. Sergt Wm. McKendrie, died on the 4th.
Company F—Sergt Hennesey, killed on battle field July 1st.
Company I—Sergt McArthur.

WOUNDED.
Capt H. G. White, slightly, prisoner, sent to Richmond. Capt. Byron Parsons, slightly, arm and leg. Lieut. O. F. Hawkins, slightly, prisoner, sent to Richmond. Lieut. C. F. Mesler, slightly, leg. Lieut. F. I. Massey, slightly, leg. Privates: Hitchcock, Co. A; Remo, Co. A; Phillips, Co. B; Dickerson, Co. G; Chevelly, Co. C; Conover, Co. D; Secor. Co. G; Close, Co F; Lake, Co. F; Miller, Co. F; Amy, Co. H.
P. S:—The above with others were sent forward to Baltimore on the 13th inst. There are in all about 40 wounded in the 94th Regiment, nearly all slightly.

OFFICERS PRISONERS AND SENT TO RICHMOND.
Capt; John C. Whiteside, Capt H. G. White, Capt Jno. McMann, Capt. C. C.
Comee, Capt. A. F. Fields, Lieut. O. F. Hawkins, Lieut. E. Chas. Parker, Lieut. R. N. Joy, Lieut. D. C. Sears, Lieut. A. H. Locklin.
Very Respectfully Yours,
P. G. COOK,
Chaplain 94th N. Y. V.

FROM THE 94TH REGIMENT.
(CONCLUDED FROM LAST WEEK.)
CAMP 94TH N. Y. S. V.,
Rappahannock Station, Va.,
August 13th, 1863.
This day's march was more leisurely, less fatiguing, and pleasanter than the preceding. The roads were better and the heat not so oppressive as on previous days. We arrived at Warrenton before five—affording time to locate the Camp and prepare supper before dark.
The boys seem quite familiar with all the localities in and about this Warrenton—it being the fourth time the regiment has been here.
The village occupies a beautiful site, and has a large number of fine looking dwellings, many of them built of brick and more in northern style of architecture than we have generally seen in Virginia. The inhabitants appear to be strongly secesh—the Union portion having been obliged either to leave or professedly join the Confederates.
When our advance guard entered the village some of the people manifested a disposition to oppose our entrance. A considerable quantity of fire arms was found concealed in the houses.
After a rest of two nights and a day we had marching orders again, and were soon under way for "Warrenton Junction," some 8 miles distant. On arriving at this place—not having any idea how long we should remain, we pitched tents and prepared to make ourselves confortable [sic]. Here the order came for the officers and men who had been detailed some days previously to go northward for our quota of Conscripts to get ready to leave in the evening train for Elmira, via Alexandria and Washington. In due time our energetic and amiable Adjutant Scoville and his squad of six men reported at Head Quarters, received their orders, and were off on their important and agreeable mission. They will be more expeditious and fortunate than we anticipate, if they return with their recruits before the middle of September.
The Adjutant thought they should be with us much sooner. We shall see. Very shortly after these friends left us the bugle sounded the imperative—"strike tents"—"pack up!"
It was near dark when we got started for "Bealton Station," and though the distance. was but 5 or 6 miles, our progress was so much impeded by ditches, ravines, "runs," and last, though not least, by the darkness and a tremendous storm attended with thunder and lightning—that it was near  midnight when we were halted and ordered to pitch tents in another field of tall wet grass. But wet, or dry, wood, or no wood, late or early, the soldier must sleep and have a fire to boil his coffee.
The prospect in this instance was poor enough for either. We were drenched to the skin by the rain—tents and blankets all wet—the ground of course ditto. And as, to wood there seemed to be none to be had within less than half a mile. And yet, in less than 20 minutes fires were burning briskly, and dispensing their good cheer throughout the encampment—the coffee was soon boiling—tents were spread, and ere the small hours had arrived, hundreds of our soldier boys were prepared to lie down to rest. Yes, and despite wet clothes, and wet grass, they did rest sweetly, and arose on the following beautiful Sabbath morning, as much refreshed and cheerful as the majority of their friends at home. To this there were of course exceptions.
This day, Sabbath 26th, was very hot, and little was done, but to move Camp a short distance, and make ourselves as comfortable as possible. At 6 1/2 o'clock p. m., we had religious services which the 1st Brigade were invited to attend. The several Chaplains of the Brigade took part in the exercises.
As we were about to retire to rest for the night, the bugle warned us to "strike tents," and "pack up" again. We could hardly believe our ears, and would not, until we had sent out a messenger to inquire whether it was a fact that we were to make another night march. Being assured that it was even so, we set about making the necessary preparations for our departure, whither we knew not. But when the morning dawned upon us we found ourselves at Rappahannock Station—a locality well known to the boys of the 94th. It was here they had a four days fight with the Rebels last year about this time—during which there was some of the severest artillery fighting of the war.
For the first 24 hours after our arrival the troops were kept under arms as if momentarily expecting an attack. After this tents were put up and matters put into better shape for the comfort of the men—with orders to be ready to move on short notice. We remained thus until Saturday morning when all hands were early on the move Soon after daylight, a small body of sharp-
shooters crossed this Rubicon in boats and   drove off the few Rebels who were watch­ing our movements from that side. In a few hours a pontoon bridge was ready for our accommodation. A considerable force of cavalry followed by our Division of infantry passed over, without opposition. A Division of Beaufords cavalry, as you have been informed by the papers, drove the Rebel cavalry that day nearly to Culpepper, but were obliged to fall back towards night. This fact caused no small stir among us. At 10 o'clock we were ordered to commence throwing up breast works and be prepared for an attack from the enemy at any moment. Other Divisions of infantry and artillery were soon in position near us, and prepared to give the "Johnny Rebels" a warm reception if they came. But with the exception of two or three false alarms, we have not been disturbed up to this time.
Just one week from the day our Brigade crossed over, they returned to this, the north side of the river, where we have a very pleasant encampment within a few hundred yards of the river.
The regular routine of Camp duties has been adopted. Morning and afternoon drills for the men, dress parades, guard mountings, &c., &c., are occupying t h e attention of both officers and men as much of the time as is deemed profitable during the "hot season." Company and field officers are improving their "leisure moments" in bringing up their books, adjusting accounts and straightening up matters generally with the various departments of the service.
On the two Sabbaths we have been here the Chaplains of this Brigade have deemed it best to have united religious services in the afternoon—the Chaplains taking their turn in addressing the audience. These exercises have been pleasant and, we trust, profitable to all concerned—though the attendance has not been as large as we could desire and hope to see in future. To-morrow at 10 o'clock, the Chaplains propose to have a meeting at Bealton for consultation as to the most efficient measures for the prosecution of their work.
I am happy to be able to report that the Sanitary condition of our regiment and the troops generally is unusually good. There is no prevailing epidemic and very little sickness of any kind in this portion of the army of the Potomac. Major S. A. MOFFETT of your place is in command of the Regiment, a position he has occupied with much credit to himself and satisfaction to the Regiment since the battle of Gettysburg.
Conscripts are beginning to arrive in considerable numbers for this Division of the army of the Potomac, though none have come for this regiment.
The Paymaster has just arrived—producing of course great excitement and much joy in the regiment. Rumors are afloat that we are to move soon.
Yours, &c., R. G. C.

FROM THE 94TH REGIMENT.
CAMP 94TH N. Y. S. V.,
Rappahannock Station, Va.,
August 13th, 1863.
PUBLISHERS NORTHERN N. Y. JOURNAL: Having promised to report the "94th" occasionally to your Journal, I feel bound without further delay to give you some account of our movements since the battle of Gettysburg. The army, as you are aware started in pursuit of the enemy on the 6th of July. Having remained behind with the paroled prisoners and the wounded, until the 16th, I am unable to give any particulars of the march to the Potomac, or the preparations made for that other battle, which was not fought. I need hardly say that, when I joined the regiment on the 17th, I found them feeling sad and chagrined, that the arch-rebel Lee and his cohorts had been allowed to escape. The fact is the boys never felt more eager for a fight, nor more confident of their ability, if well handled, to drive the enemy to the wall, and give him such a thrashing as would obviate the necessity of chasing him all over Virginia again, than they did when drawn up in line of battle before the Confederate Army, near Williamsport, July 12th. Had they been permitted to charge the enemie's [sic] works on that, or the following day, they would undoubtedly have achieved a victory that would have done much toward "conquering a peace;" at least so it seems now, I believe, to those best qualified to judge.
But when it was ascertained that the golden opportunity had passed, the  prize was gone, the troops submitted to the decision and direction of the "Powers that be," with a promptness and cheerfulness worthy of all praise. Having stood by the bridge at Edwards Ferry, three weeks before, and witnessed the joy manifested by the troops as they passed out of Virginia into Maryland, I expected to hear maledictions and curses many, when they were required to return to that hated soil. Nevertheless, I heard almost nothing of the kind. But on the contrary, as the feet of the men fell upon the pontoons at Berlin, on the morning of the 18th July, the merry laugh, shout, and song were heard along the lines as though it were a triumphal procession—homeward bound. Such is the soldier. Though his heart may be heavy and sad, he is bound to make the best of every thing, and if possible find merriment in the most untoward events of the day. It was on Saturday that we passed over into Virginia. Our march that day lay through a pleasant portion of Loudon county. Many of the inhabitants, being loyal, greeted us with cheers, and gladly furnished whatever they had for our comfort. Indeed the people in this part of the State seemed quite as loyal, and in many cases, treated us more kindly than did the people in some portions of Maryland and Pennsylvania.
On Sabbath morning we passed through the very pleasant and thoroughly loyal village of Waterford, 11 miles from Berlin. The inhabitants were out in their best, and with flags, smiles and kind words, bid us God-speed.
It being an exceedingly warm day the men were much delighted when they were halted about 10 o'clock, A. M., in a pleasant grove and ordered to pitch tents and make themselves comfortable for the balance of the day, and the following night.
In the cool of the day, about sunset, the Chaplain made a brief report in reference to the casualties of the regiment in the late battles—adding a few remarks, arid offering prayer and thanksgiving for the loving-kindness and mercies of our Heavenly Father during the exposures and severe trials of the previous three weeks.
How much we were refreshed by the quiet and rest of the Sabbath, none can know but those who enjoyed it. Not having papers or tracts to distribute, the Chaplain furnished each man who would agree to write a letter to his parents, wife, sister, or friend, with a sheet of paper and envelope. A large number of them improved this first opportunity since the battle to write to their friends.
It was scarcely daylight, on Monday, when we were ordered to "fall in" and commence our march for Middleberg. The surface of the region through which we passed was uneven and hilly—the road, crooked and rough; the day was excessively hot, and much of the way the men were hurried along at a rapid rate. On the whole it was a very hard march. Many of the men in other regiments fell out; ours kept up about as usual. Some of the stragglers, it is said, got picked up by guerrillas who were prowling around us most of the day. Two officers, Lieut. Col. Sanderson and Capt. Russel, Assistant Adjutant General on General Newton's Staff, venturing some miles in advance of the troops were "gobbled up" by a party of Cavalry and compelled to go at a double quick through Middleberg, a short time before we arrived there. Indeed it is said that some of our Orderlies were entering one side of the town while this party with their prisoners were leaving the other, and that they (the Orderlies) might have overtaken the advance party had they not stopped to converse with some secesh ladies who doubtless came out to detain them in this way that their friends might escape.
In passing through Middleberg we had a remarkable exhibition of the secesh spirit of the people, the doors and window blinds of stores and private dwellings were nearly all closed and scarcely a face appeared at windows, doors, or in the streets, excepting those of the colored population, and that, notwithstanding our drummers and fifers gave them one of their liveliest and best, as we passed through the principal street.
Our boys were both amused and provoked at this marked contempt for the Union army. Some of them improved the first opportunity of paying their respects to the gardens, chickens and turkeys of these sympathisers [sic] with the rebellion. The Quarter Master's Department also took measures to put in force the confiscation law to a considerable extent during the two days that we were encamped in the neighborhood of this wicked village.
After a rest of 48 hours the bugle sounded "strike tents," "pack up," and at sundown we were under way again for the next (village, "White Plains," 10 miles distant. This was the most wearisome march of the campaign. Being rear guard of the wagon train—for the first 3 hours we could advance but a few rods at a time—and during the last 3 or 4 hours we were put through at a double quick. It was 3 1/2 o'clock, A. M., when we filed into a field of tall wet grass and were told that we could have till 6 ½ o'clock "for refreshments"—sleep, and breakfast included. In less time than one at home would disrobe for bed the whole brigade were reclining upon the bosom of mother earth, some rolled in blankets, some in overcoats, and some, not a few, with nothing over, or between them and the grass saturated with the falling dew, were soon so soundly sleeping that they did not wake till long after sunrise, thereby abridging more than was desirable the time for the morning meal. But when the order comes, the "poor soldiers" fed, or unfed, must "fall in" and be marching along.
(To be continued next Week.)

FROM THE 94TH REGIMENT.
CAMP 94TH N. Y. S. V.,
Near Thoroughfare Gap, Va.,
October 21, 1863.
EDITORS NORTHERN N. Y. JOURNAL:
Inasmuch as the Army of the Potomac is in motion again, I propose to give you a few hasty "notes by the way," which might, with some propriety, be regarded as written " i n the saddle;" and yet, at this present writing, the headquarters and staff of the 94th are comfortably ensconsced in their wall tents, which have arrived from the rear, and been put up within the past two hours, but may be down and returned to the wagons again before the morning light dawns upon us. About as often as every other night, and sometimes oftener, for the last twelve days, we have pulled up and marched during the night.
After a stay of seven weeks at Rappahannock Station, on the 16th September we received orders to advance to near Culpepper, where we tarried one week, and then moved down nearer the Rapidan. During the following two weeks we must have changed camps on an average as once in two days, and did our full share of picket duty along the river fords near us—our pickets being often within conversation distance of the rebels.
On Friday, the 9th inst., we received orders to "get the men up at 12 1/2 o'clock, and be ready to move at 1 1/2 A. M.," and also to issue five days rations to the men—making a supply of eight days to each man. This, of course, caused no small stir among the boys, and gave rise to all sorts of speculations as to the design of such a move; but none were found wise enough to throw any light upon the subject.
At the appointed hour the troops left one of the pleasantest camps they have occupied during the campaign, and marched into the dense forest along that portion of the Rapidan, over the roughest road, and on one of the darkest nights of the season. Our course lay along the Rapidan, in the direction of one of the fords, leading many to believe that we were to cross the river. In the morning we were halted in the woods near the ford, where we spent the day under the impression that, before another morning dawned upon us, we should be on the other side of the Rapidan driving the rebels. But when night came, and the bugle blast warned us to "pack up" and be ready " t o fall in," the head of the column moved away from the river and took the direction of Culpepper.
In the morning we found ourselves only some two miles north of that town. It was the holy Sabbath, and the 1st Brigade were bivouacked compactly upon a pleasant place, and, for aught the Chaplains knew, might remain there for several hours at least, and perhaps during the day, hence they determined to give notice of religious services at 10 1/2 o'clock, A. M. At this hour a hymn was sung, a short prayer offered, and a chapter—the 103d Psalm—read. At this point came an order to "pack up." Of course, our services were discontinued, and preparations made to march. Up to this time we had not ascertained our destination whether it was North or South—an advance or a retreat. But when the troops moved off it was in the direction of the Rappahannock instead of the Rapidan. An advance, as some would have it, "by the rear"—" another skeddadle for Washington," said the boys.
We had not proceeded far before we heard the report, and saw the smoke of the guns of our cavalry battling and keeping back the enemy, who had been crossing the river all night, and showed a strong inclination to capture our trains. This produced just enough excitement among the troops to cause them to march with a sort of spring and elasticity that had the effect of lightening their burdens and increasing their speed so much, that General Newton felt obliged to send on one of his aids to the officers in commands of Regiments to order their men to march more leisurely. It was near sun down when we arrived on the banks of the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford. For some reason, the 2d Division were required to ford the stream, though there was a pontoon bridge a short distance below. Many of the men disliked very much to venture the exposure of health involved, but as there seemed to be no discharge in this war with the elements, they pushed forward shouting, singing, laughing, and cursing, some with all their clothes on; others with out shoes, stockings, or pants; some upon old horses, and others upon the shoulders of their more athletic companions.
The Assistant Surgeons and the Chaplain carried over several of the more sickly ones upon their horses. As the Chaplain was making his fifth trip, with a heavy man behind him, his horse stumbled and relieved himself of his extra burden by throwing both his riders headlong into three feet of water, causing some laughter on the part of the boys, and a little discomfort to the Chaplain, who, in the absence of his baggage, was obliged to wear wet garments till they could be dried upon his person.
Our facetious Surgeon thought fit to record this event in his "notes by the way," somewhat as follows:

"When the horse in the water did fall,
Down came the chaplain, soldier and all."

Our corps remained at the ford until 2 o'clock on Tuesday, the 13th, when we left Warrenton Junction. It was a cold night, but the roads were excellent, and we all enjoyed the march exceedingly. The scene which burst upon the vision as we emerged from the woods upon high ground, at dawn of day, beggars description. The whole country, as far as the eyes could distinguish objects, seemed literally filled with moving masses of men, horses, wagons, ambulances, artillery, cavalry, &c., &c. All was order and system—evidently under the direction of a presiding genius—and yet there was manifested everywhere a desire to push forward with the greatest speed consistent with system, and a prudent regard to the powers of endurance of man and beast. Such an array of wagon trains one has rarely an opportunity to look upon. Every road— and there were four or five—was filled with these apparently endless columns moving in parallel lines northward.
It would seem that the whole army left the banks of the Rapidan at the same time; but the greater portion—all except one corps—had been more or less engaged with the enemy during Sunday and Monday. On our arrival at Warrenton Junction—about 9 a. m.—things very soon assumed a fight­ing aspect. Batteries were placed in posi­tion; infantry drawn up in line of battle, and everything made ready for an attack from the enemy. But no enemy made his appearance. In the meantime we partook of refreshments; had a nap, and were ready to continue our march, by one o'clock, to Bristow. The 1st, 2d, 3d, 5th, and 6th corps were on the march for this place at the same time—their several trains and artillery hurrying forward as best they could. Our Corps seemed to arrive and leave the place in the advance. At any rate we were off early in the morning, and pushed on as rapidly as possible to Centreville, which we reached in due time—no enemy appearing to molest or make us afraid for ourselves or our trains. But it was not thus with the balance of the army. They were more or less harrassed [sic] by the pursuing and hungry squads of rebels during the whole day. It was while we were marching quietly along, and were safely ensconsced in the strong fortifications of Centerville, that the Second Corps had a most severe and protracted contest with the enemy near Bristow. This battle we could distinctly hear from our position at fort.
During the heat of the contest, we were ordered out two or three miles to defend an important bridge, and do picket duty along the line west of Centreville. The Second Corps repulsed the enemy; took 450 prisoners; 5 splendid guns, and thereby saved the train from the clutch of the greedy foe.
Our Division was pretty severely taxed for picket duty during the balance of the week. The 94th were out on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, having a line of two miles to look after. Along most of this line were the log shanties occupied by the rebels in the winter of 1861-2. Many of them are still in good condition, and afforded our boys a comfortable shelter during the cool nights they were out.
In one I saw Lieuts. Joy, Sloat, Fish Colton, and Surgeon Brown, cheered and made comfortable by a large fire in an old fashioned fire-place, reminding one of the days of big back-logs, large fire dogs, hard cider, &c. No doubt, many an amusing incident and racy anecdote were related that night.
On Monday we followed the retreating enemy westward to Hay market, and the following day and night passed to and through Thoroughfare Gap, and camped a short distance from it, upon a very commanding position, in the midst of some of the most beautiful scenery we have found during the campaign. The region over which we have just passed is familiar ground with the old members of this Regiment. All along the route they have been reminded of stirring incidents of former days. "Here they made the famous charge." "There they threw off their knapsacks and pursued the enemy into the Gap" "In that field the Colonel was wounded." "Up in those woods they were flanked and handled roughly by the enemy." "Over yonder our boys were so hardly pressed, that they were obliged to run or be taken prisoners."
It was a melancholy commentary upon passed along. Several human skulls were picked up by the boys and passed around among the officers and men.
The "94th," as you are aware, is under the command of Major S. A. Moffett. Adjutant Scoville is still absent on duty at Riker's Island. Lieut. Hulbert sits near me—having just come in from duty as officer of patrol—good-natured, and cheerful as ever. The officers and men from and about Watertown are generally enjoying good health and spirits.
What or when our next move will be, it is impossible to predict.
We hope that our marching and countermarching—our sleepless nights and wearisome days—our exposures to the damps and cold of these autumnal days and nights, will not be without service to the country and well being of humanity. Let our friends remember us in their supplications to Him whose favor and blessing we so much need. "Help us together with your prayers."
Those who have friends in this or any other regiment would do well to be regular and frequent in their communications. Letters do much to keep up the spirits of the men. The time and expense of writing one weekly could hardly be better employed.
P. G. C.

Letter from Chaplain Cook.
Alexandria, Va., May 18, 1864.
EDITORS COMMERCIAL:—Four months ago the 94th Regiment, N. Y. V., were ordered from the front of the Army of the Potomac to Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md., for the purpose of doing "guard duty, recruitment and reorganization." The first of these duties has been faithfully performed, and to the entire satisfaction, I believe, of all concerned. The other two have been attended to as far as circumstances would permit. In the meantime the men have enjoyed advantages for intellectual culture and religious worship —the former in connection with classes organized in the common branches of education, and the latter in religious services regularly held and conducted in a commodious and pleasant Chapel, not only on the Sabbath, but for several weeks every evening. Our religious services have been largely attended and often deeply interesting. One of the results has been the organization of an association for the promotion of their own and their fellow soldiers' moral and religious interests. God bless the "Young Men's Religious Association of the 94th Regiment." Pray for it, you who have to pray for the soldier.
While we have felt it a privilege, after the rough times we have had in two years campaigning in "Old Virginia," to enjoy this respite from the severer service of the field, regarding the position at Camp Parole as a comparatively "soft thing," we have nevertheless held ourselves ready and desirous to return to the field whenever the government should need our services more elsewhere. As an evidence of this feeling on the part of our commanding officer, Colonel Adrian R. Root, I may mention that when the Burnside Expedition was organizing near us as we supposed for some service South, the Colonel waited on General Burnside and signified his willingness to lead his regiment into the field again. The General expressed
a strong desire to secure his services and tendered him the command of a Brigade, provided the War Department would consent to the transfer. But when Gen. Burnside applied to Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck for the release of Col. Root from his present position they promptly refused to comply, saying that the Colonel was "the right man in the right place," and could not be spared from Annapolis. On this being made known in the regiment it was naturally supposed that we should be retained in the Camp during the summer. But in this, it seems, we were mistaken, for while the government have not receded from their position as to Col. Root, they have ordered the regiment to report to Brig. Gen. Lockwood, and rendezvous at Alexandria. This order came on Monday, we arrived here this evening, and found most excellent accommodations for the night at the Soldiers' Rest—one of the very best institutions of the kind in the country. The regiment is under the immediate command of Lt. Col. S. A. Moffatt. It is understood that we are to be brigaded with the 3d Delaware, the Purnelle Legion and others whose names I have not learned, under the command of Brig. Gen. Lockwood. Our destination is of course not known to us, but probably we are to join the army of the Potomac. We shall esteem it a privilege and an honor to participate with them or any other portion of the army in the present mighty, and we trust to be successful struggle to put down the rebellion and end this "cruel war. God help us."
Yours, &c., P. G. Cook,
Chaplain 94th N. Y. V.
P. S.—Propose to keep you informed of our movements as far as practicable and consistent with propriety.

From the Ninety-Fourth Regiment.
ON THE MARCH FOR RICHMOND,
BOWLING GREEN, VA., May 25th, 1864.
MESSRS. EDITORS: I informed you a few days since that the 94th N. Y. was ordered to join the army of the Potomac. We left Alexandria on Saturday, and spent the following Sabbath at Belle Plain, left the latter place on Monday afternoon at 3 1/2 o'clock; bivouacked that night opposite to Fredericksburg; crossed the Rappahannock on pontoons the following—yesterday—morning; passed through the city without stopping, and were soon upon the Bowling Green road. We continued our march to Caroline Church, some ten miles, where it was found expedient to remain all night, on account of the great number of men who had suffered severely from the effects of the heat. Having only one ambulance and no transportation wagons. It is something rather novel to see five regiments on the march, and that through an enemy's country, without any transportation for baggage or invalids. It was found impossible to obtain teams at Belle Plain, and our General felt bound to leave when he did, without waiting to receive them from Washington. This was rather hard on officers; many left, and will probably lose, most of their baggage. We arrived here at 11 o'clock, having made a fine march with very little straggling.
It seems almost incredible that five small regiments of Union troops should be able to march from Fredericksburg to Bowling Green without seeing or hearing of a single squad of the enemy. Not a dog barked at us; indeed we scarcely saw a live man, and very few women or children. One very fine dwelling near where we stayed was visited by our boys. They found it splendidly furnished, but no living being to smile or frown upon them. The Bowling Green people, it is said, were very much frightened by our arrival, but I presume they will not be much harmed by our boys.
We move on immediately, and hope to overtake the army tonight or tomorrow, though Gen. Grant seems to be driving the rebels about as fast as we can march. It is supposed that there will be a hard fight at Hanover Court House, and no more after that till we arrive before the defences of Richmond. Officers and men are in good spirits.
As I write, long trains of wagons and ambulances filled with the wounded are passing, bound to Port Royal. Yours, &c.,
P. G. COOK,
Chaplain 94th N. Y. V.

Ninety-Fourth.
A considerable number of casualties have occurred in this regiment. These up to June 4th sum up as follows:
June 1st, Frank Perry, Co. B, mortally wounded and died; June 2, Owen Williams, Co. C, wounded in head, slight; Sergt. Bournes, Co. D, wounded, slight; June 3, Matthew Coughlin, Co. H, wounded in leg, severely, amputation necessary; Wales Salisbury, Co. A, wounded in leg, slightly; Jas. Burns, Co. H, wounded, slightly; Wm. H. Davis, Co. I, wounded, slightly; Zim. Merriam, Co. E, missing; Sergt. O. P. Clark, Co. B, missing; Chas. Parmeter, Co. E, missing; Michael Caffey, Co. H, missing, and it is feared killed.
Those missing are supposed to be prisoners in the hands of the enemy.
Lieut. Col. Moffett, Adjt. Hulbert, and the officers and men generally, though very much worn by severe drafts upon energies and little opportunity for sleep or rest, are in good health and spirits.

The Ninety-Fourth Regiment.
LETTER FROM CHAPLAIN COOK.
HEADQUARTERS 94TH N. Y. V.,
In the Field, near Bottom's Bridge, Va.,
Saturday, June 11, 1864.
Eds. Commercial: While my horse is baiting upon the fine clover around me, and our man "Ike" prepares a lunch for our mess, let me talk to you a little of past and passing events.
It is now nearly two weeks since the 94th united its fortunes with the 5th corps of the Army of the Potomac. Our first face to face stand with the enemy was made on the 30th—the day the rebels attacked Warren's left so fiercely. We repelled and gave them the worst of it, of course. The 94th spent the whole week in constructing and laying behind breastworks. Though they were not engaged in any of the numerous battles of the week except as skirmishers, in this sort of warfare the had some severe work, and lost a considerable number of men.
On Sunday, the 5th, we held a religious service near the breastworks. We closed the services with the National Hymn, "My country, 'tis of thee," &c. While these services were progressing, cannonading and musketry were heard, not only in the distance, but very near us. Some rebel skirmishers or sharpshooters every now and sent a ball whizzing over our heads, reminding us but too forcibly that we were by no means out of their reach. A service amid such scenes and sounds could hardly fail to be interesting and impressive. It was nearly dark when we were through. Before the chaplain left for the nook where he had lodged for two or three days, an officer came to inform us that the troops must prepare to retire immediately from their intrenchments [sic] and take up the line of march for another potion further south. So the chaplain hastens to his tent to pack up and join the regiment as they were moving out to the road. Before he is halfway across the field, an uproarious cannonading and rapid musketry fire, commences all along the lines. It grows louder and approaches nearer; seems but a few rods distant, and as though the balls would fall and the shells might burst too near for safety. We quicken our pace, and are soon, with others, packing and loading our goods upon our horses. The bang-whang of the cannon and the whizzing of the "minnies" above and around us cause unpleasant sensations and make one somewhat nervous. While things are thus with the non-combatants, they are still more exciting with those in the breastworks. The rebels, ascertaining that we were about to change position, attack our skirmishers fiercely and drive them back so near the breastworks that the bullets come thick and fast  among the boys just as they are leaving. By way of letting the gentlemen know they had not left, they gave them a volley, and then quietly marched out of their works and joined the rest of the division in their march for Cold Harbor.
The cannonading and musketry continued for a considerable time and occasionally seemed quite near, and as though the "Johnnies" might be after us.
From the 6th to the 11th inst. we were in camp on Gains' Farm, not far from Gains' Mills. This comparative cessation from active operations seemed essential to the welfare and efficiency of man and beast—both having been overworked and worn down by the incessant fatigues of marching, fighting and watching during the last thirty days.
The opportunity offered by this stay in camp for religious services, was gladly improved by the Chaplain and brethren in the regiment. On four successive evenings, meetings were held in the open air, attended by large numbers and with very great interest. The brethren seemed wide awake—ready to speak and pray with a promptness and unction which were refreshing and encouraging to the Chaplain. Many of those who took part in these meetings were young converts.
June 13.—We passed over the Chickahominy last night, and that without opposition from the enemy, though we were not allowed to proceed very far towards Richmond without finding him posted to dispute our progress, there has been considerable skirmishing and quite a number of casualties, but no general engagement.
The 94th, as usual, have been placed in the hottest portion of the field, as skirmishers, and suffered severely. Ten men have been wound­ed—two fatally. Sad tidings for loving ones far away.
The enemy have a fort near Bottom's Bridge commanding the bridge and an important road leading to Richmond and the James river. Whether our generals will deem it worth fight­ing for, or turn away upon some other more circuitous and less fortified route, remains to be seen—probably the latter course will be adopted. During the last two weeks, the 94th has lost in killed, wounded and missing some forty-five men Of these twenty were taken prisoners last Sunday night on the skirmish line.
The men are generally in good spirits and hopeful as to success, though the "Vets" have seen too many rebuffs and been too often disappointed to "throw up their hats till after election." The more we see of this war the more are we impressed with its magnitude, difficulties and the far-reaching consequences of success or failure. It is a "cruel war."—The sufferings of the wounded and the dead—bodily and mental—can never be appreciated or known by any but the omniscient.
What worlds of thought—what emotions—longings and regrets occupy the minds and move the hearts of those who are daily and hourly jeopardizing their precious lives and all they hold dear in life. The anxiety and uneasiness one experiences while approaching or passing through a battle in indescribable. It is impossible not to ask yourself the question—or at least to indulge the thought, "What if the battle should go against us? What if we are driven back? What, if taken prisoners—wounded and left to die on the battle-field?" And then when one is wounded seriously, who can imagine the thoughts which run to and fro in reference to home, friends, death, eternity, &c. May God prosper the right and take the glory to himself.
Yours, &c., P. G. Cook,
Chaplain 94th N. Y. V.

We give below a private letter from a soldier in the 94th (formerly the l05th) to a friend in this place. As illustrating the fact that if the matter were left to the soldiers of both armies, this war would have a speedy ending, it possesses some interest.—The writer is a re-enlisted veteran:
CAMP NEAR PETERSBURG, VA.,
July 3d, 1864.
FRIEND A.:—I arrived here yesterday pretty well tired out, after marching through the dust. The weather is much warmer here than with you. There has been no rain in months, of any consequence. One of my comrades fell dead on the road yesterday. I stayed and buried him.
We are laying here now in rifle-pits, about ten rods from the rebels. I could throw a stone from where I am writing to them. We made a bargain with them yesterday that we would not fire at them if they would not fire at us; and there has not been one shot fired since. The agreement was, if they had orders to advance, the first volley should be fired in the air, and after that every man should look out for himself; we are to do the same.
We have lots of fun with them. They throw plugs of tobacco to us and we throw coffee back. They told us yesterday to throw down our arms and they would do same, and we would all go to Richmond and have a spree on the 4th of July, and they would foot the bill.
I might write all day, and then could not tell you one half the proceedings. They say they are sick of fighting, and we say the same. They say they will kill Jeff. if we will kill Old Abe.
Well, to-morrow is the 4th, and I expect we will have some hot work before it is over. We are under arms all the time. It must come off soon. There has been some firing on our right this morning, but I cannot tell you anything about it. The line of battle is about fifteen or twenty miles long, so you know more about the army movements than I can tell you.
I must close. Give my best wishes to all. Asa Williams is a prisoner.
Yours,    J. S.

Returning Regiment.
THE NINETY-FOURTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VETERAN VOLUNTEERS, under the command of Lieut. Col. Samuel A. Moffitt, arrived in this city at one o'clock this morning.
The Ninety-fourth N. Y. V. was organized at Sackets Harbor, N. Y. in the fall of 1861, and was mustered in March 10th, 1862, and left for the seat of war under the command of Col. Henry K. Viele, and was attached to the Army of the Potomac. On the trip from Albany to New York city the cars ran off the track into the river, resulting in a loss of five men killed and twenty wounded. May 2d Col. Viele resigned and was succeeded by Col. Adrian R. Root, Lieut. Col. Twenty-first N. Y. On the 10th of March, 1863, the One Hundred and Fifth N. Y. V. V. was consolidated with the Ninety-Fourth N. Y. V.
The Ninety-fourth has participated in twenty-five engagements, and its tattered colors evince their severity. It has contained during its service over 3,000 men, and now numbers 599 men. Its Colonel has been twice brevetted for faithful and meritorious service.
The following is a roster of the 94th N. Y. Veteran Volunteers:
Colonel—Adrian R. Root, Brevet Major General.
Lieutenant Colonel—Samuel A. Moffitt.
Major—Byron Parsons.
Adjutant— Charles H. Spague.
Quartermaster—Jere. S. Reed.
Chaplain—P. G. Cook.
Captains—Orlo J. Mason, Dexter C. Sears, Chauncey W. Kilbern, Joseph Mallison, E. Chas. Parker, Augustus Fields, Walter T. Chester, Chas. F. Scoville, Charles V. Mesler, Michael Leonard.
1st Lieutenants—James P. Thomas, J. D. Holley, Russell B. Merriam, John P. Cole, George Mather, James C. Phillips, Samuel C. DeMarse,
2d Lieutenants—Myron M. Ludlow, Daniel Whalen, Hayden Strong, Henry H. Pheles.
A despatch was received last evening announcing the embarking of the regiment, but was not placed in the hands of the Citizens' Committee until this morning. The consequence was that the regiment waited until it got tired, and then marched to the Barracks. As soon as he received the despatch, the Chairman of the Committee proceeded to the Barracks, arrangements were made by the Committee for breakfast, and the regiment returned to the city to partake of it.

NINETY-FOURTH NEW-YORK.
This regiment arrived late on Saturday night, and was erroneously reported as having left for Troy. The command departed by rail to Albany yesterday afternoon, where it will be mustered out. The regiment was under the command of Brevet Brig.-Gen. A. R. Root, and numbered 328 men.
The Ninety-fourth was raised in 1862 in Jefferson county, and on the 10th of March of that year, the regiment entered the service of the United States. During the Summer of 1862 it was incorporated into the First Corps, then under the command of Gen. McDowell. During POPE'S Virginia Valley campaign, in the Summer of 1862, it participated in the battles of Cedar Mountain and Mannassas Plains, and subsequently entering with its corps into the Army of the Potomac, fought in every battle seen by that army. Just previous to the overland campaign by Gen. Grant, in 1864, the First Corps was broken up and merged into the Fifth Army Corps, and in that corps fought all the way through from the Wilderness to the surrender of LEE. At the time of its leaving the field, the Ninety-fourth was serving in Gen. Crawford's (Third) Division of the Fifth Corps. The following is the Ninety-fourth battle's record: 1862—Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug. 9; Mannasses Plains, Va., Aug. 30; Antietam, Md., Sept. 17; Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13.
1863—Chancellorsville, Va., May 1-5; Gettysburgh [sic], Penn., July 1-5; Williamsport, Md., July 18; Rappahannock Station, Va., Oct. 21; Mine Run, Va., Nov. 26—Dec. 1.
1864—Wilderness, Va., May 5-6; Laurel Hill, Va., May 7; Spottsylvania, Va., May 8-9; Totopotomy Creek, Va., May 20; North Anna, Va., May 22; Cold Harbor, Va., June 1; Bethesda Church, Va., June 7; Siege of Petersburg, Va., Cemetery Hill, Va., July 30; Weldon Railroad, Va., Aug. 21; Poplar Grove Church, Va., Sept. 29-30; First Hatcher's Run, Va., Oct. 27; Warren's raid against the Weldon Railroad, Dec 6-12.
1865—Siege of Petersburgh [sic], Va., January to April; Second Hatcher's Run, Feb. 4; assault upon the enemy's works, March 25; White Oak Road, Va., March 29; Five Forks, Va., March 30—April 1; Appomattox Court-house, Va., April 8-9; Surrender of LEE'S army, (Appomattox Hollow, Va.,) April 9.

THE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-THIRD NEW-YORK.
This regiment arrived at an early hour yesterday morning, and is now quartered at the State Agency rooms, over Centre Market. The One Hundred and Forty-third number 320 men, under command of Brevet Brig.-Gen. HORACE BOWTAN, and will proceed to Hart's Island to-day.
The One Hundred and Forty-third New-York was raised in Sullivan County, entering the service Oct. 8, 1862. On reaching Washington it was assigned to the Defences of Washington, remaining in that department until April, 1863, when it was transferred to Suffolk. In this latter department the One Hundred and Forty-third entered the Fourth Corps, under Gen. Dix, and on July 12, 1863, the regiment was transfered [sic] to the Eleventh Corps. When the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps joined SHERMAN'S army the one Hundred and Forty-third went with them, and has seen all the glories and shared all the fatigues and perils of those extraordinary campaigns. The following is a list of the battles of this regiment:
1863—Fort Dix, Va., April 27; Nansemond, Va., May 8; Bottom's Bridge, Va., June 22; Lookout Mountain, Tenn., Oct. 28-9; Mission Ridge, Nov. 23-5; Relief of Knoxville, Nov.— and Dec.—.
1864—Rosaca, Ga., May 14-15; Cassville, Ga., May 25; New Hope Church, Ga., May 27; Kulp's Farm, Ga., June 22; Pearl Tree Creek, July 20; Atlanta, July 22; Siege of Atlanta, August to September; March to the Sea, Nov. 15—Dec. 10; Siege of Savannah, Dec. 10-21.
1865—Robertsville, S. C., Jan. 29; Lawtonville, S. C., Feb. 2; Averysboro, N. C., March 16; Bentonville, N. C., March 19; Surrender of Gen.  JOHNSTON, Hart's Island to-day.

The 94th.
This regiment, which has seen so much campaigning and hard fighting, after enjoying a month's furlough at home, has returned to its quarters at Annapolis.
Capt. Comee, of this regiment, was taken prisoner at Gettysburgh [sic] and lately released from the Richmond prisons, has also been home on a visit among his friends.
The Herald publishes a list of six hundred Union prisoners now under our fire at Charleston. Among the names we find those of Lieut. W. E. Roach, of the 49th N. Y.; Captains J. C. Whiteside and H. G. White, of the 94th N. Y., and Capt. Charles McK. Leoser, of the 2d U. S. Cavalry.
We are pleased to be able to inform our readers, that our pressman, Mr. J. D. NEWMAN, to whom the JOURNAL has been indebted so many years for its tidy appearance, has just received notice that his pension claim of $8 per month is allowed, and has been forwarded to his Attorney, BRADLEY
WINSLOW. MR. NEWMAN was wounded at the first battle of Fredericksburg while a member of the 94th regiment.

A soldier by the name of DUTE a private of the 94th N. Y. V. was decoyed from C. & I. THRO'S Saloon, opposite the depot, across the Railroad bridge on Friday night, and there as he alleges, by the discharge of a revolver in his face by one miscreant and a prostrating blow over the head by an accomplice, he was made senseless. Upon coming to himself he found he had been robbed of $165 in greenbacks, his watch, discharge and furlough papers. Active endeavors have been made since to identify and arrest the villains [sic], but as yet, the police are without a clue.

PERSONAL.—Major-General Howard, the hero of Gettysburg, was in the town Sunday, stopping at the American, on his way West.
Walter T. Chester, of the 94th regiment, arrived home Sunday, on detached service, which ensures him a month's furlough. The following paragraph, from the Albany Journal, explains the errand on which he came
North:
One hundred and twenty members of the Ninety-fourth Regiment New York State Volunteers, re-enlisted and home on a furlough, arrived in this city this morning. After receiving their State Bounty here, they will leave for the West—the greater part of them going to Jefferson county. The regiment is at Camp Parole. The requisite three-fourths number have re-enlisted; but only the present detachment could be spared from duty just now. It is under charge of Lieuts. Doolittle and Chester.
The gallant Lieutenant may be sure of the warmest welcome from his Buffalo friends.

Wounded.—In the fight of Crawford's Division, Fifth Corps, June 13th Henry Neuner, Co. G, 94th N. Y. V. was wounded. Company G is composed of men from this city.

PERSONAL.—We had the pleasure, yesterday, of receiving a call from Capt. E. Chas. Parker, of the 94th N. Y. V., who arrived home on Saturday last, from Richmond, after an eight months' experience of Libby Prison. His story of the captivity is deeply interesting, and we should be glad to be able to publish even the half of what our conversation with Capt. Parker has added to our knowledge of the infernality of this rebellion, and the utter and absolute soullessness of the men engaged in it.

CAPTAIN WALTER CHESTER WOUNDED.
Captain Walter T. Chester, 94th Regiment, was wounded on the 11th inst. by a shell, which entered above the top of the right ear, and came out of the outer corner of the right eye, not seeming to fracture the bone nor to make any external wound, except at the points of entrance and exit. Captain Chester, when a private, was wounded at the second battle of Bull Run. During his service he has conducted himself bravely, and we sincerely hope that the rebel shells and shot will spare him in future.
Private Ackroyd, of the 94th, is reported killed.

Presentation of a Sword to Major John McMahon by the City Government.
The sword and equipments purchased, by order of the Common Council, for Major John McMahon, of the 94th N. Y. Volunteers, to replace the weapon broken by him when he was about to fall into the hands of the rebels, at the battle of Gettysburg was presented last evening at the Common Council Chamber in the presence of the Aldermen and a number of citizens, among whom we noticed a number of ladies.
Ald. Bromley, President of the Board, took the chair and called the meeting to order, after which Major McMahon, accompanied by His Honor the Mayor and the Committee appointed to carry the resolution of the Board into effect, entered the room, and advanced to the open space in front of the Clerk's desk. The Mayor then addressed Major McMahon in a speech of considerable length, abounding in patriotic sentiment and rhetorical ornament, in the course of which he paid a glowing tribute to the Major's gallantry at Gettysburg, and alluded in moving language to the horrible imprisonment in Richmond which succeeded. He closed by placing in the Major's hands the sword, belt, and sash procured for the occasion.
The gallant recepient [sic] of this handsome testimonial was much embarrassed. His modesty forbade him to accept without protest the lavish praises bestowed upon him by the Mayor, and he was apparently abashed by the publicity given to the affair. He commenced his reply by saying that if his wishes had been consulted the matter would have assumed another form, for he would have declined to accept an honor so distinguished. He was but one of many who had gone forth from Rochester to fight the battles of the country, and there were others far more deserving. No special credit should be awarded to him. As far as his ability went he had endeavoured to do his duty, and that was the sum total of his merit, as he understood it. He accepted the elegant gift of the Common Council with heartfelt thanks, and would endeavor to keep it from all tarnish of dishonor.
After the presentation ceremonies, the Board adjourned, and the ladies present were introduced to the Major. At a later period the company experienced the hospitalities of the Mayor in his private office.
The sword and accoutrements presented to Major McMahon are very elegant. They were procured by Mr. John T. Fox, from the Common Council Committee, and cost over one hundred dollars. They will be on exhibition at Darrow's book store for a few days.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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