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New York Units
At the Mexican Border, 1916-1917
NY State Unit History Project

The following was taken from the Apprendix of The story of the 27th division by John F. O'Ryan, (New York: Wynkoop Hallenbeck Crawford Co, c1921).

APPENDIX A

EXHIBIT 1

STATE OF NEW YORK
THE ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE
STATE ARSENAL, NEW YORK CITY
GENERAL ORDERS No. 18
June 19, 1916.
In accordance with a proclamation of the President of the United States dated June 18, 1916, calling out under the Constitution and laws of the United States a part of the organized militia to be employed in the service of the United States, the Commanding General, Division, will cause the organization of his command, less coast artillery troops, to assemble forthwith at their respective home stations in the equipment prescribed for field duty preparatory to their muster into the service of the United States.
BY COMMAND OF T H E GOVERNOR:
LOUIS W. STOTESBURY,
The Adjutant General.

STATE OF NEW YORK
THE ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE
Albany, June 21, 1916.
GENERAL ORDERS No. 19
I. The organizations of the National Guard of this state, less coast artillery troops, having been directed to be assembled forthwith at their respective home stations by General Orders No. 18, this office, dated June 19, 1916, pursuant to a call from the President of the United States, the following instructions relative to the mobilization of troops under said order are hereby published for the information and guidance of all concerned.
II. The Commanding General, Division, is authorized to detail for duty as camp staff officers such officers of the Adjutant General's Department, Quartermaster Corps and Medical Corps as may be required for administrative purposes.
III. Regimental and other separate organization commanders are charged with subsisting the enlisted men of the National Guard, reporting at their respective home stations, and for this purpose they will be limited to an allowance of seventy-five cents per day for each enlisted man actually present for duty as shown by the morning report. They are also charged with providing necessary fuel, bedding and forage, and for shoeing of authorized horses, pertaining to their respective organizations. The allowances authorized for such purposes are specified by Army Regulations (paragraphs 1044-1077). Purchases will be made covering periods of not more than five days at a time. Receipted vouchers will be obtained on Forms 330 and 335, War Department, and forwarded for settlement direct to the Adjutant General of the state, accompanied by consolidated ration returns.
IV. The Commanding General, Division, is authorized, while troops remain at their home stations and where armory facilities do not exist for sleeping, to allow organization commanders to permit such enlisted men of their respective commands as they may designate to sleep at home.
V. All officers and enlisted men will be examined by an officer of the Medical Department, prior to their leaving their company rendezvous, with a view to determining the presence of any infectious or contagious disease.
VI. Drill and instructions of all organizations will be commenced at once and carried out in accordance with the drill regulations of the arm of which the organization is a part. The Commanding General, Division, will issue necessary instructions in regard to the character and time to be devoted daily to drills while organizations are at their home stations.
VII. Commanding officers of organizations will cause them to be recruited to the maximum enlisted strength given below:

Company of infantry
150
Regiment of infantry
1,836
Troop of cavalry
100
Regiment of cavalry
1,236
Battery of light artillery
171
Regiment of field artillery
1,128
Company of engineers
164
Battalion of engineers
494
Company of signal troops
77
Field battalion of signal troops
163
Ambulance company
79
Field hospital
67

The maximum enlisted strength of sanitary troops attached to organizations is given in General Orders No. 3, A. G. O., 1916.
VIII. No recruit will be accepted in any organization until he has been given a thorough physical examination by a medical officer and has been found to conform to the physical standard prescribed for the Regular Army. Such physical standard is given in Circular 5, D. M. A., 1916. IX. The National Defense Act, approved by the President of the United States, June 3, 1916, contemplates the transition of the present organized militia into National Guard upon fulfillment of the requirements prescribed in Sections 70 and 73 of the Act cited relative to enlistment contracts and oaths. The form of new oath to be taken by officers and the form of new oath and enlisted contract to be subscribed and sworn to by enlisted men must conform to the requirements of the Act. Form of oath and contract will be sent to each organization for use as soon as possible. The oath for officers and contract and oath for enlisted men will be subscribed and sworn to before a recognized officer of the National Guard. To be qualified for this duty, the officer must have subscribed to the oath for commissioned officers of the National Guard before a notary public or an officer of the Regular Army; that is to say, no officer of the National Guard is authorized to administer the oath until he has himself qualified under the provisions of the Act. Three copies of each form should be made in the case of each commissioned officer and organization (company, troop, battery, etc.), one to be retained by the organization for record and two to be forwarded direct to the Adjutant General of the state.
X. The accountable officers in each organization are designated as the representatives of the Governor to act with the designated mustering officers of the United States to inventory and inspect all property of the United States and the state taken by the National Guard into the Federal service. Preparatory to the transfer, every officer accountable for public property will immediately take or cause to be taken an inventory of the same. The inventory, which will be made by actual count, should include all the property issued by the state to, or purchased with the military funds or allowances of the organizations, whether on hand in the storeroom or lockers, so as to show all property now in the possession of the organization. All property not to be taken into the service of the United States will be promptly invoiced, turned over and receipted for by the commanding officer of the depot unit. All property to be taken into the service of the United States will, as soon as a regiment or other separate organization has been mustered into the service of the United States, be invoiced by the proper officer of the regiment of separate organization as follows:
(a) Clothing, camp and garrison equipage, subsistence and quartermaster supplies to the quartermaster.
(b) Property pertaining to medical department to the senior medical officer.
(c) Property pertaining to the corps of engineers, ordnance department and signal corps to an accountable officer detailed by the regimental or other commander of a separate organization from his staff.
Property pertaining to each department will be invoiced separately.
Transfers of property will be accomplished on Form No. 25, which will be supplied for the purpose by this office without requisition.
Receipts will be obtained in triplicate, one copy to be retained by the accountable officer and two copies to be forwarded direct to the Adjutant General of the state. When the property is transferred in accordance with the foregoing authority, the accountable officers, upon invoicing the same and obtaining the prescribed receipts therefor, are relieved of further accountability for the property so transferred.
XI. Regimental and other commanders of separate organizations will forward direct to the Adjutant General of the State, State Arsenal, 463 Seventh Avenue, New York City, requisitions for clothing, equipment and supplies necessary to care for their organizations at the enlisted strength stated in paragraph VII of this order. XII. Commanding officers of regiments not heretofore authorized to organize machine-gun companies and troops and the detailed portion of headquarters companies and troops and of supply companies are hereby authorized to form such units.
XIII. When the organizations have completed their inventories and have made suitable arrangements for caring for the property to be left at their home stations, the Commanding General, Division, will issue the necessary orders to move the organizations of his command, assembled pursuant to G. O. No. 18, A. G. O., 1916, to the mobilization camp, now established and owned by the state at Green Haven, Town of Beekman, Dutchess County, N. Y.
XIV. In order to carry out the provisions of M. L. 120, depot units will be at once organized for each regiment or other unit assembled for service. A depot company will be formed for each separate company, troop or battery and a depot battalion for all other organizations. A depot battalion may consist of any number of companies not exceeding twelve. The enlisted personnel of depot units will be divided into two classes designated respectively Class A and Class B. Class A will consist of men available to fill vacancies in the organizations of the National Guard in the service of the United States. Class B will consist of all other enlisted men of such organizations.
XV. Muster in rolls will be prepared upon the blank forms supplied for that purpose, and in accordance with models and detailed instructions accompanying the same. Commanding officers should be directed to personally see that these rolls contain all information that might in any way affect pay, or which it might be necessary to consider in the settlement of claims for pensions. The muster into the service of the United States will be carried out in accordance with the detailed regulations therefor prescribed by the Secretary of War.
XVI. The pay of the National Guard called into the service of the United States begins from the day on which it appears at the place of company rendezvous. It is essential that the date on which each member reports at the rendezvous, or joins his organization, be accurately noted on muster in and pay rolls, in order that men may receive proper pay and that all prescribed records be accurately and fully kept, in order that the state may be reimbursed for the actual expense incurred in mobilization.
XVII. The Commanding General, Division, will direct the Chief Quartermaster to furnish the transportation necessary for the execution of this order.
XVIII. General Orders No. 14, A. G. O., 1916, will be deemed superseded by G. O. 18 and G. O. 19, A . G. O., 1916.
BY COMMAND OF T H E GOVERNOR:
LOUIS W. STOTESBURY,
The Adjutant General.

EXHIBIT 2

 

 
STRENGTH
ORGANIZATION OFFICERS MEN
Headquarters, Division 20 0
Headquarters, First Brigade 9 2
Headquarters, Second Brigade 6 2
Headquarters, Third Brigade 9 2
Headquarters, Fourth Brigade 10 2
Quartermaster Corps 13 7
First Battalion, Signal Corps 9 149
Twenty-Second Engineers 30 562
First Cavalry 55 904
Squadron A 13 206
Machine Gun Troop, Cavalry 2 63
First Field Artillery 35 755
Second Field Artillery 38 627
Third Field Artillery 39 646
First Armored Motor Battery 4 78
First Infantry 53 951
Second Infantry 55 1,197
Third Infantry 51 986
Seventh Infantry 52 869
Tenth Infantry 54 891
Twelfth Infantry 37 673
Fourteenth Infantry 43 646
Twenty-Third Infantry 39 661
Forty-Seventh Infantry 47 560
Sixty-Ninth Infantry 45 872
Seventy-First Infantry 47 884
Seventy-Fourth Infantry 45 649
First Field Hospital 5 62
Second Field Hospita 3 56
Third Field Hospital 1 67
First Ambulance Company 4 79
Second Ambulance Company 4 63
Third Ambulance Company 4 76
Fourth Ambulance Company 2 72
Field Bakery 1 6
TOTAL 884 14,405
GRAND TOTAL
15,289

EXHIBIT 3

DATES OF ENTRAINMENT OF UNITS OF T H E NEW YORK DIVISION FOR THE MEXICAN BORDER, AND ARRIVAL THEREAT AND RETURN THEREFROM.

ORGANIZATION Date of Leaving
for Border (1916)
Date of Arrival
at Border (1916)
Date of Return
from Border (1916-17)
Headquarters, New York Division July 1 July 6 Dec. 14, 1916
Headquarters, 1st Brigade July 7 July 15 Feb. 26, 1917
Headquarters, 2d Brigade June 29 July 2 Sept. 6, 1916
Headquarters, 3d Brigade July 5 July 10 Dec. 15, 1916
1st Battalion, Signal Corps July 5 July 10 Dec. 13, 1916
22d Engineers:      
  1st Battalion July 12 July 128 Oct. 14, 1916
  2d Battalion July 14 July 22 Dec. 16, 1916
1st Cavalry:      
  1st Squadron June 29 July 5 Mar. 5, 1917
  3d Squadron July 1 July 7 Mar. 5, 1917
  Headquarters and 2d Squadron July 6 July 12 Mar. 5, 1917
Squadron A, Cavalry July 6 July 12 Dec. 15, 1916
Machine Gun Troop, Cavalry July 6 July 12 Dec. 15, 1916
1st Field Artillery:      
  2d Battalion June 29 July 5 (Hdqrts.) Oct. 27, 1916
  Headquarters and 1st Battalion
(less Batteries A and C)
July 3 July 11(less) Oct. 19, 1916
  Batteries A and C July 9 July 16 (Hdqrts.) Oct. 19, 1916
2d Field Artillery:      
  2d Battalion July 8 July 15 Dec. 30, 1916
  Headquarters and 1st Battalion July 9 July 16 Dec. 30, 1916
3d Field Artillery Oct. 3 Oct. 9 (1st Sect.)
Oct. 10 (Remndr.)
Mar. 6, 1917
2d Infantry July 7 July 15 Sept. 23, 1916
3d Infantry July 13 July 15 Sept. 8, 1916
7th Infantry June 27 July 2 Nov. 22, 1916
12th Infantry June 29 July 5 Feb. 26, 1917
14th Infantry June 27 July 3 Sept. 8, 1916
23d Infantry July 4 July 11 Jan. 2, 1917
69th Infantry July 11 July 18 Feb. 25, 1917
71st Infantry June 27 July 2 Sept. 6, 1916
74th Infantry July 5 July 10 Feb. 14, 1917
1st Field Hospital June 28 July 5 Oct. 13, 1916
2d Field Hospital July 15 July 21 Dec. 14, 1916
3d Field Hospital Oct. 13 Oct. 17 Jan. 5, 1917
4th Field Hospital Nov. 10 Nov. 15 Mar. 12, 1917
1st Ambulance Company July 10 July 10 Oct. 13, 1916
2d Ambulance Company July 10 July 17 Dec. 15, 1916
3d Ambulance Company June 28 July 5 Dec. 28, 1916
4th Ambulance Company July 15 July 21 Feb. 19, 1917
Supply Train Oct. 17 Oct. 24 Mar. 9, 1917
Field Bakery Detachment July 9 July 16 Feb. 19, 1917
Two Bakery Units July 12 July 18 Feb. 19, 1917

EXHIBIT 4

HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK DIVISION
McAllen, Texas, July 16, 1916.
GENERAL ORDERS No. 7
EXTRACT
III. Officers and enlisted men of this division are directed not to use alcoholic drink in any form during their service on the border, except on prescription of a medical officer given in the line of duty.
IV. Soldiers are prohibited entering houses of prostitution and saloons where liquor is sold, except under orders for the performance of duty.
V. A copy of this order will be read to each company and posted for ten days on company bulletin boards.
BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL O'RYAN:
EDWARD OLMSTED,
Major, Assistant Chief of Staff.
OFFICIAL:
MAJOR, ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF ,
in the absence of the Division Adjutant.

HEADQUARTERS, SIXTH DIVISION
McAllen, Texas, October 30, 1916.
GENERAL ORDERS No. 44
EXTRACT
1. Par. III, G . O. No. 7, New York Division, is amended to read as follows: Officers and enlisted men of this division are directed not to use, or have in their possession, alcoholic drink in any form during their service on the border, except on prescription of a medical officer given in the line of duty.
BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL O'RYAN:
H. H. BANDHOLTZ,
Colonel, Chief of Staff.
OFFICIAL:
FRANK E . BAMFORD,
Major, 28th U. S. Inf., Acting Adjutant.

EXHIBIT 5

SICK RATE AND VENEREAL RECORD OF THE NEW YORK DIVISION FROM
JULY 19 TO NOVEMBER 30, 1916

MONTH
PERCENTAGE SICK
VENEREAL RATE
July
.0145
.00294
August
.0139
.00165
September
.0248
.000336
October
.0266
.00062
November
.0283
.00167

The rate of admissions to sick report for alcoholism during these months has been
practically nil.

DEATHS
From injury: 8
From disease: 16
TOTAL: 24

Any sick rate below 3 per cent, is excellent.
Two cases of typhoid fever; neither had been inoculated.
Venereal rate negligible.

EXHIBIT 6

HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK DIVISION
McAllen, Texas, August 2, 1916.
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 109
1. Squadron A and Machine Gun Troop, New York Cavalry with one radio platoon pack, New York Signal Corps, and one motor ambulance, 1st New York Field Artillery, will proceed on the morning of 3d August, 1916, on a practice march as follows;
McAllen to Sterling's Ranch to Gloria Ranch to Sterling's Ranch to McAllen.
2. Equipment A, the necessary rations and forage and the necessary wagon transportation will be taken, less combat wagons (G. O. 66, W. D. 1911).
3. During the march every opportunity will be taken advantage of for tactical instruction appropriate to the terrain.
4. Arrival at each camp will be reported, and such other communication as may be desirable for instruction will be sent to these headquarters by radio.
5. Route sketches will be prepared and any information of military value will be reported to these headquarters on return of the detachment.
6. The march will be so regulated that the detachment will arrive at its present camp by noon either the 7th instant or the 8th instant.
BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL O'RYAN:
H. H. BANDHOLTZ,
Colonel, Chief of Staff.
OFFICIAL:
(Signed) ALLAN L. REAGAN,
Adjutant.

NEW YORK DIVISION
McAllen, Texas, August 5, 1916.
SPECIAL ORDERS NO. 122
1. 1st New York Cavalry, less two squadrons, will proceed on the morning of 6th August, 1916, on a practice march as follows:
McAllen to Sterling's Ranch to Gloria Ranch to Sterling's Ranch to Young's Ranch to Sterling's Ranch to McAllen.
2. Equipment A, the necessary rations and forage, and the necessary wagon transportation will be taken, less combat wagons (G. O. 66, W. D. 1911).
3. During the march every opportunity will be taken advantage of for tactical instruction appropriate to the terrain.
4. Route sketches will be prepared, and any information of military value will be reported to these headquarters on return of the detachment.
5. The march will be so regulated that the detachment will arrive at its present camp by noon either the 10th or 11th instant.
6. Another squadron to be designated by the Commanding Officer, 1st New York Cavalry, will proceed on the morning 7th August, 1916, on a practice march identical with above, returning to present camp by noon either the 11th instant or the 12th instant.
7. The remaining squadron, 1st New York Cavalry, will proceed on a practice march on the morning of 8th August, 1916, identical with above, returning to present camp by noon either the 12th instant or 13th instant.
8. Commanding Officer, 3d Ambulance Company, will furnish one ambulance for his command to accompany each of the above three detachments.
BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL O'RYAN:
H. H. BANDHOLTZ,
Colonel, Chief of Staff.
OFFICIAL:
(Signed) ALLAN L. REAGAN,
Adjutant.

HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK DIVISION
McAllen, Texas, August 14, 1916.
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 155
1. Squadron A, Cavalry (less one troop) and Machine Gun Troop with one motor ambulance will proceed on the morning of August 15, 1916, for a practice march.
2. Route followed will be:
Sam Fordyce, Ojo de Agua, Hidalgo, Donna Pump, Mercedes, McAllen.
3. Equipment A, forage, rations and necessary transportation will be taken, less combat wagons ( G . O. 66, W. D. 1911).
4. During the march every opportunity will be utilized for tactical exercises appropriate to the terrain.
5. Route sketches and all information of military value will be reported to these headquarters on return of the detachment.
6. The march will be so conducted that the detachment will return to its present camp by noon of August 20, 1916.
BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL O'RYAN:
H. H. BANDHOLTZ,
Colonel, Chief of Staff.
OFFICIAL:
(Signed) ALLAN L. REAGAN,
Major, Adjutant.

HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK DIVISION
McAllen, Texas, August 14, 1916.
SPECIAL ORDERS
No. 156
1. The infantry commands of the division will proceed on practice marches on the mornings of the dates indicated, as follows:
August 16th - 1st Brigade (less 2d and 69th Infantry)
August 16th - 2d Brigade (less 7th and 12th Infantry)
August 17th - 3d Brigade (less 23d and 74th Infantry)
August 22d - 2d Infantry
August 22d - 7th Infantry
August 22d - 23d Infantry
August 26th - 69th Infantry
August 28th - 12th Infantry
August 28th - 74th Infantry
2. The regiments of the 2d Brigade will proceed from McAllen to Mission. The regiments of the 3d Brigade will proceed from Pharr via McAllen to Mission.
All regiments will proceed from Mission via:
Alton, Sterling's Ranch, La Gloria, Sterling's Ranch, Laguna Seca, Young's Ranch, Laguna Seca, Sterling's Ranch, Edinburg.
The regiments of the 1st Brigade will proceed from Edinburg via McAllen to Mission.
The regiments of the 2d Brigade will proceed from Edinburg to McAllen.
The regiments of the 3d Brigade will proceed from Edinburg to Pharr.
All regiments will halt and camp for one night at each place in the above sequence and as indicated in the attached march tables.
3. From the initial points field rations and forage will be carried as follows:
Regiments of the 1st Brigade - 2 days
Regiments of the 2d Brigade - 3 days
Regiments of the 3d Brigade - 4 days
After their first arrival at Sterling's Ranch all regiments will draw, from the refilling point at Monte Cristo, sufficient rations and forage to supply themselves until their next return to Sterling's Ranch. On their final departure from Sterling's Ranch they will supply themselves for a return to their original camps.
One day's reserve rations will be carried in the haversack from the first day until utilized for practical instruction in individual cooking as required in paragraph 1205, Army Regulations, which instruction will be given during the march on such day as the regimental commander may select.
4. During the entire practice march advantage will be taken by each organization of every opportunity to give instruction required by paragraph 109, F. S. R. Security measures, appropriate to the terrain and exercise, will always be taken and outposts will be established every night.
War diaries will be kept as required by paragraph 35, F. S. R., and will be forwarded through intermediate channels to division headquarters.
Daily field orders will be issued covering the march and any maneuvers connected therewith.
Route sketches will be made and with all information of military value will be forwarded to division headquarters within twenty-four hours after the conclusion of the last day's march.
Full field equipment will be worn during all marches and exercises.
No ammunition will be carried on the person.
After leaving in their camps such transportation as may be required for policing and other necessary purposes, all available transportation will be taken by each regiment on the march.
Combat wagons, with their appropriate loads only, will be taken by each regiment.
5. Field Hospital Company, No. 2, will proceed by the most practicable route, so as to arrive and establish at Sterling's Ranch not later than the afternoon of August 17th, and will remain there until further orders.
6. The Division Surgeon will arrange to send one ambulance to report to the surgeon of each infantry regiment not later than 3.00 P. M. of the day before the regiment starts on its march, and for two ambulances to report to and proceed with Field Hospital Company, No. 2, to Sterling's Ranch, and will remain there until further orders.
7. The Commanding Officer, Signal Battalion, will establish one radio section at Sterling's Ranch not later than August 17th, and one radio section at Young's Ranch not later than August 20th, which will remain at the places mentioned until further orders.
8. The Division Quartermaster will establish a refilling point at Monte Cristo not later than August 12th, which will be prepared to supply all the troops mentioned herein and will be maintained until further orders. He will arrange for the possible necessity of adding to the water supply at Alton by the use of motor-truck transportation.
9. Troop C, 1st Cavalry, will take station at Monte Cristo not later than August 12th as guard and on duty at the refilling point under the exclusive orders of the Division Quartermaster.
10. Equipment A is prescribed for all organizations.
BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL O'RYAN:
OFFICIAL:
(Signed) ALLAN L. REAGAN,
Major Adjutant.
H. H. BANDHOLTZ,
Colonel, Chief of Staff.

1ST BRIGADE
14
2
69
Regiment
Dates
From To Miles
16 22 26 Mission Alton 7
17 23 27 Alton Sterling's 6
18 24 28 Sterling's La Gloria 3
19 25 29 La Gloria Sterling's 3
20 26 30 Sterling's Laguna Seca 10
21 27 31 Laguna Seca Young's 6
22 28 1 Young's Laguna Seca 6
23 29 2 Laguna Seca Sterling's 10
24 30 3 Sterling's Edinburg 14
25 31 4 Edinburg McAllen 11
26 1 5 McAllen Mission 6

 

2D BRIGADE
71
7
12
Regiment
Dates
From To Miles
16 22 28 McAllen Mission 6
17 23 29 Mission Alton 7
18 24 30 Alton Sterling's 6
19 25 31 Sterling's La Gloria 3
20 26 1 La Gloria Sterling's 3
21 27 2 Sterling's Laguna Seca 10
22 28 3 Laguna Seca Young's 6
23 29 4 Young's Laguna Seca 6
24 30 5 Laguna Seca Sterling's 10
25 31 6 Sterling's Edinburg 14
26 1 7 Edinburg McAllen 11

 

3D BRIGADE
3
23
74
Regiment
Dates
From To Miles
17 22 28 Pharr McAllen 3
18 23 29 McAllen Mission 6
19 24 30 Mission Alton 7
20 25 31 Alton Sterling's 6
21 26 1 Sterling's La Gloria 3
22 27 2 La Gloria Sterling's 3
23 28 3 Sterling's Laguna Seca 10
24 29 4 Laguna Seca Young's 6
25 30 5 Young's Laguna Seca 6
26 31 6 Laguna Seca Sterling's 10
27 1 7 Sterling's Edinburg 14
28 2 8 Edinburg Pharr 8

 

HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK DIVISION
McAllen, Texas, August 14, 1916.
MEMORANDUM TO A L L REGIMENTAL AND BATTALION
COMMANDERS OF INFANTRY
The Division Commander desires that particular attention be paid to the following and that all of the recommendations and requirements be carefully observed:
1. The people of Sterling's Ranch and Young's Ranch are most hospitably inclined, but owing to the large number of troops that will be located at or near those places during the coming practice march regimental commanders will station guards at both Sterling's Ranch and Young's Ranch, with instructions to notify all officers and enlisted men that they are not to enter the house or premises during the march.
2. Instructions will be given and every precaution taken to prevent damage of any kind to personal or public property.
3. Officers and enlisted men will be instructed not to trespass on private property.
4. Officers and enlisted men are to be warned that the appropriation of any articles, small or large, as souvenirs may work a hardship on the owners, and such conduct is prohibited.
5. The most careful sanitary precautions will be adopted on the march, during halts and in camps. Regimental commanders will charge their regimental surgeons with seeing that every care is exercised in maintaining the health of the command.
6. Whenever a camp is vacated the ground will be thoroughly policed, and policing means leaving it in such a condition that practically no evidence will be visible to the casual observer that the site had been occupied by troops.
7. Recruits are usually inclined to drink up all the water in their canteens during the first stages of the march or at the first halt, and then refill them at the first opportunity regardless of the kind of water. The contemplated marches are all so short that during very few of them will it be necessary to drink any water whatever; in any event, all company commanders will be instructed to see that the canteens of all of the men in their command are filled with good potable water before starting, and that there is no waste of same during the march.
8. As it may be difficult at some of the camp sites to supply large quantities of water, all commanding officers are charged with seeing that the men are economical in the use of water for any purpose.
9. All officers before starting on the march should carefully read over those paragraphs of Field Service Regulations and Infantry Drill Regulations which pertain to marches and should instruct their men to do the same.
10. It is seldom practicable to establish a typical camp as indicated in the Field Service Regulations. The location and arrangement of regimental, battalion and company camps will be such as to preserve the health of the command, and to interfere as little as possible with the comfort of the men.
11. Commanding officers are cautioned to see that the men in pitching their shelter tents have the closed ends towards the prevailing wind.
12. Just before starting on all marches, maneuvers or military exercises all troops will be inspected for ball ammunition.
13. Company commanders are charged with seeing that the men's equipment are properly adjusted.
14. Regimental commanders will require that all their animals be taken from the picket line at the same time and watered together. This to avoid the possibility of any animal being overlooked.
15. Regimental, battalion and company commanders will, from time to time, march at the rear of their organizations to see that the march is being properly conducted.
16. Company commanders will see that sufficient oil and cleaning material for the arms is carried on the march, and that all arms are oiled and cleaned as many times each day as may be necessary to keep them in proper condition.
17. The old established armory custom of "grounding arms" is prohibited. The men under no circumstances will lay their guns upon the ground, either collectively or individually. Ordinarily slings may be loosened so as to sling the piece over the shoulder and in any ordinary emergency requiring freedom of movement, and if a large detachment or company is required for any purpose, it will be moved to a suitable place and arms stacked.
18. It has been noted that mounted orderlies and others are inclined to slouch in the saddle. All officers are charged with observing mounted enlisted men and requiring them to sit squarely and properly in the saddle.
19. The different regiments will be observed and inspected at various places along the line of march by officers especially detailed for that purpose, and the efficiency of the commands will be judged by the number of stragglers, extent to which the commands are closed up, the general appearance of the men, etc.
20. Each regimental commander will have full charge of the selection of his own camp site, and the making of all arrangements connected with the camp.
21. Company commanders are particularly enjoined to keep the feet of the men in good condition.
22. Only field and staff officers will be mounted.
23. A guard of one squad with belts filled with ball ammunition will accompany and guard each combat wagon. This detail will be changed daily, and will also be charged with guarding any prisoners. This guard will not participate in maneuvers and exercises. Battalion commanders will make suitable arrangements for promptly supplying their command with ball ammunition in case of emergency.
BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL O'RYAN:
H. H. BANDHOLTZ,
Colonel, Chief of Staff.
OFFICIAL:
ALLAN L. REAGAN,
Major Adjutant.

EXHIBIT 7

" THE RIO GRANDE RATTLER "
Hidalgo County, Texas, November 15, 1916.
COMBAT FIRING INTERESTS I N F A N T R Y BRIGADE
LA GLORIA FIELD RANGE COURSE BOTH INSTRUCTIVE AND ENJOYABLE
MAJOR CHANDLER, Range Officer
With the completion of the combat firing problem at La Gloria by the 1st and 2d Brigades of Infantry, a record has been established of which the whole New York Division should be proud. Never before in this country has a combat problem of the size of this one been accomplished either in respect to the number of men who have shot over the range (about 5,000) or the amount of ammunition used, totaling approximately 20,000 rounds.
The rifle range was designed by Major Fred M. Waterbury, Division Ordnance Officer, and was built by the 22d New York Engineers. The range officer is Major George F. Chandler, Adjutant of the 1st Brigade, and Lieutenant Percy E. Barbour, of the 22d Engineers, is assistant range officer.
The 1st and 2d Brigades of Infantry have fired the problem, each man using forty rounds of ammunition. The troops which are going from Canada to Europe have only forty-five rounds per man shooting before going into action on the big battle line.
All the troops concede that the La Gloria problem is one of the most interesting yet given to the guard in the border service.
The problem as worked out by the range officer simulates an advance guard action. A company is taken to the foot of the range in advance guard formation and is suddenly fired on by the point of the enemy. They are actually fired on by blank ammunition. The point advances and, using service ammunition, ball cartridges, fires at the prone targets showing, of which there are four.
Having driven these back and having been reinforced, an advance is made against sixteen targets that have appeared farther along the range. After having subdued these, advance is made against twenty targets coming up farther back representing the support.
Each company commander handles his company as he chooses, except that he is not allowed to advance unless, or until, he has fire superiority.
After this last set of targets, 100 yards of chaparral is cautiously passed through, and the line deployed on its edge to encounter the main body of the enemy seen in a line of sixty-four targets at the end of a clearing about 280 yards long.
All ranges are unknown, and the targets are operated from pits and governed by telephone from a big switchboard at the end of the range.
After the firing the company is taken up to the last row of targets to observe results, and then some very interesting visibility stunts are worked out by the range officers. One platoon at each end of the last cleared range kneels, lies down in the firing position, and then, removing hats and laying down rifles, hugs the ground and literally melts into the landscape. This always brings a gasp of surprise from the observers; the surprise at the unexpected and almost total cover afforded by a flat, open field.
Then a demonstration of a patrol crossing a road brings further surprises. A man rolls slowly across and almost always accomplishes the trip without detection; whereas the patrol dashing across is alway detected. Then the observing company is informed by the range officer that it is being watched by an observer in plain sight on the edge of the chaparral, and they are asked to spot him. But his absolute immobility makes him very hard to find, and it is generally not until he moves, on signal, that his position is detected.
The range is run by a detachment from E Company, 22d Engineers, in command of Lieutenant Percy E . Barbour. A detail of the 1st Battalion Signal Corps attends to the telephone and buzzer communications, and is a very efficient unit. Lieutenant Willis Linn of the 2d Ambulance Corps is in command of a detail assigned to the range, and has a dressing station to attend to any casualties, which fortunately have not yet happened, and he is also sanitary inspector of the camp and range.
A battalion of infantry arrives early in the morning, shoots that day and the next, and departs the second evening. Despite rainy weather, or any other vicissitude, these troops have been moving on this schedule for nearly two months without hitch; arriving, shooting and departing on regular schedule.
An interesting and, it is to be hoped, valuable test of the comparative merits of point blank and battle sight has been made by the range officers. All the problem firing is being done using point blank sight, but one company of every battalion has also fired the course using battle sight. Almost without exception (and that only to the extent of a decimal figure) the battle sight has fallen down compared to point blank sight. This supports the contention of Major Chandler, and many other expert riflemen, that for battle conditions as they are to be in the future the old battle sight must give way to a better one, which is not at all difficult to devise.
A formula was evolved to cover the problem at La Gloria in which dispersion of fire is an effective factor, and the work done by each company is similarly computed and will be published after the shooting is completed.
Up to the last battalion of the last brigade the 7th Regiment was leading with a high score, but the 3d Tennessee shot a tie score, followed by the 74th, 23d, 69th and 12th Regiments in the order named. The 1st Cavalry is now shooting, and from present indications will make an excellent figure.

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New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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