New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center - Unit History Project
     Unit History Project  
  Home
  About the Museum
  Contact Us
  Articles
  Armories & Arsenals
  Events
  Education
  Flags
  Forts
  Heraldry
  Links
  Pictures
  Press
  Research
  Unit History Project
    Conflict:
   - Revolution
   - Civil
   - Spanish American
   - Mex. Border, 1916
   - WWI
   - WWII
   - Korean
  Veteran's Oral History
  Search
   
  DMNA Homepage
  NYARNG
  NYANG
  NYG
  NY Naval Militia
  Friends

14th Regiment Artillery (Heavy), New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

AVOID THE DRAFT
AND ENLIST IN
THE OLD THIRTEENTH!
RE-ORGANIZED AS
HEAVY ARTILLERY!
CAPT. HARRY DUKE
is offering by a recent order of the War Department, to all old soldiers a Federal Bounty of
$402,
which, with a State Bounty of
$150
and one month's pay,
MAKES A GRAND TOTAL OF
$565 BOUNTY!
COME, OLD SOLDIERS!
Now is Your Time to Enlist at
No. 8 ARCADE.

THE OLD THIRTEENTH
REORGANIZED AS
HEAVY ARTILLERY!
Battles of the Old Thirteenth.
Blackburn Ford,
Bull Run,
Yorktown,
Siege of Yorktown,
Hanover,
Mechanicsville,
Turkey Bend,
Malvern Hill,
Manassas,
Antietam,
Shepardstown
Fredericksburg
Chickahominy.

VOLUNTEER WITH THE OLD OFFICERS AND VETERAN SOLDIERS.
$250 BOUNTY!
Avoid the Draft. A State Bounty of $150 paid to every soldier who re-enlists within 80 days after date of his discharge, of which $30 will be paid in advance, and the balance when the regiment is organized. New recruits will receive $75 State Bounty, of which $10 will be paid in advance, and the balance when the regiment is organized. In addition to the above, all who enlist will receive $100 United States Bounty, $25 of which will be paid when the regiment is organized, and the balance when they are discharged. One month's pay, $13, in advance. Rations Clothing, Lodging and Pay begins with enlistment.
Headquarters, 97 State street, opposite American Hotel.
Capt. Jerry A. Sullivan, Co. A, Rochester, N. Y.
Capt. H. R. Curtis. Co. B., Dansville, N. Y.
Capt. J. Elliott Williams, Co. C, Rochester.
Capt. John Weed, Co. D, Lockport, N. Y.
1st Lieut. A. W. Moulton, Co. C, Ogdensburg, N. Y.
1st Lieut. J. Stephenson, Co. D, Buffalo, N. Y.
1st Lieut. H. Foote, Co. E, Corning, N. Y.
2d Lieut. Alex. Durville, Co. E, Elmira.
E. G. MARSHALL, Col. 18th N. Y. Vols., commanding organization 13th New York Artillery.
All communications should be addressed to Job C. Hedges, Adjutant 14th New York Vol. Artillery, Rochester N. Y.

Col. Marshall's New Regiment,
13th Heavy Artillery!
$552 BOUNTY--TO VETERAN RECRUITS.
$175 BOUNTY TO NEW RECRUITS.
Capt. HENRY R. RANDALL, having been authorized to recruit a Company for this popular Regiment, has opened an office at No. 4 EXCHANGE PLACE, rear of Reynolds' Arcade.
Soldiers re-enlisting in this Regiment will receive a Bounty of $552.
Of which $30 will be paid in advance, and the balance in regular installments.
New recruits will receive $75 State Bounty; $10 in advance; and the balance when the Regiment is organized. Besides this, every recruit will receive $100 United States Bounty. Of which $25 will be paid on the organization of the Regiment, and the balance when discharged.
One month's pay, $13, in advance. Rations, Lodging and Clothing provided, and pay started at the date of enlistment.
Branch offices for the above Company have been opened by Lieut. KNICKERBOCKER at Albion and Medina, and another at Suspension Bridge, under Sergeant Gordon. Apply soon and avoid the draft. jy22

$250.00
BOUNTY.
The Old Thirteenth!
RE-ORGANIZED AS
Heavy Artillery!
Battles of the Old Thirteenth.
1. Blackburn Ford, July 18, 1861;
2. Bull Run, July 21, 1861;
3. York town, April 29, 1862;
4. Seige of Yorktown, ending May 4, 1862;
5. Hanover C. H., June 27, 1862;
6. Turkey Bend, June 30, 1862;
7. Mechanicsville, July 26, 1862;
8. G--des' Hill, July 27, 1862;
9. Malvern, August 3, 1862;
10. Manassas, August 1862;
11. Shepardstown;
12. Antietam, September, 1862;
13. Fredericksburgh, February, 1863.

13th N. Y. HEAVY ARTILLERY.
ESCAPE THE DRAFT!
A State Bounty of $150 paid to every soldier who re-enlists within thirty days after date of his discharge, of which $30 will be paid in advance, and the ballance [sic] when the Regiment is organized. New Recruits will receive $75 State Bounty, of which $10 will be paid in advance, and the ballance [sic] when the Regiment is organized. In addition to the above, all who enlist will receive $100 United States Bounty, $95 of which will be paid when the Regiment i s organized, and the ballance [sic] when they are discharged. One month's pay, $13, in advance. Rations, clothing, lodging and pay begins with enlistment.
This Regiment is to be commanded by
Col. E. G. Marshall, of the Old 13th.
Branch office in Stevens' Block, Main street, Dansville, N. Y.
H. R. CURTIS, Recruiting Officer.

14th HEAVY ARTILLERY.
The undersigned having been solicited to accept a Captaincy in the 14th N. Y. Heavy Artillery, and to take charge of the Recruiting Station at Watertown, has accepted the same, and will enter upon the duties assigned him on Monday, 2d of November, 1863. He will have associated with him, as Lieutenants, K. W. Brown and Alonzo Bause, of Stone Mills, Jeff. Co., N. Y., who will henceforth be assigned to localities in this or adjoining counties, to recruit for this Company.
This Company will be mounted as Light Artillery, and serve in that capacity. The benefit of ALL BOUNTIES, according to the late Proclamation of the President of the United States, will be enjoyed by men enlisting in this Company or Regiment.
Seven Companies of this Regiment are now doing garrison duty in forts about the harbor of New York. Young men of good moral character and sufficient abilites[sic], enlisting ten men, will be given Sergencies, and six men for Corporalcies.
This is the last opportunity afforded men (no doubt) to choose this superior branch of the service, in which the soldier does no picket duty, and carries no knapsack.
L. KIEFFER,
Late Major 1st N.Y. Artillery.

VOLUNTEER OR BE DRAFTED.
HURRAH FOR THE FOURTEENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY!
Col. E. G. Marshall.
Volunteer with the Old Officers and Men.
$250 BOUNTY.
AVOID THE DRAFT.
A State Bounty of $150 , paid to every soldier who re-enlists, of which $30 will be paid in advance, and the ballance [sic] when the regiment is organized. New Recruits will receive $75 State Bounty, of which $10 will be paid in advance, and the balance when the Regiment is organized. In addition to the above, all recruits will receive $100 United States Bounty, $25 of which will be paid when the Regiment is organized, and the balance when they are discharged. One months pay $13 in advance to all who enlist, and $2 premium. Rations, Clothing, Lodging, and pay begin with enlistment. No Marching, no Knapsacks to Shoulder. The best branch of the Military Service Fall in Men! Fall in!
Headquarters, Recruiting Station, Genesee St., Opposite Bagg's Hotel, Utica, N. Y Headquarters of Regiment, Rochester, N. Y.
E. G. Marshall, Colonel 18th N. Y. V., Commanding 14th N. Y. V. A.
W. H. Reynolds, Major, 14th N. Y. V. A , formerly of the 78th Regiment, N. Y. V. JOB C. HEDGES.
je25dtf Adjutant, 14th N. Y. V. A.

14th HEAVY ARTILLERY!
Capt. John Weed,
HAVING BEEN AUTHORIZED TO RECRUIT A Company for this popular Regiment, invites able-bodied young men to consider the inducements [sic] offered for immediate enlistment.
A State Bounty of $150
To Soldiers re-enlisting within 30 days after their discharge, of which $30 will be paid in advance, and the balance when the Regiment is organized.
New Recruits will receive $75 State Bounty; $10 in advance, and the balance when the Regiment is organized. Besides this, every recruit will receive $100 United States Bounty,
Of which $25 will be paid on the organization of the Regiment, and the balance when discharged.
One month's pay, $13 in advance. Rations, Lodging and Clothing provided, and pay started at the date of enlistment.
Apply at once, at the Tent, cor. State and Allen sts.
je27 JOHN WEED, Capt. 14th Heavy Artillery.

$552 BOUNTY!
FOURTEENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY
COL. E. G. MARSHALL,
To Garrison Forts.
VOLUNTEER WITH THE OLD OFFICERS AND
VETERAN SOLDIERS.
$552 BOUNTY!
AV0ID THE DRAFT!
United States Bounty, $402.
A State Bounty of $150 paid to every Soldier who Re-enlists, of which $80 will be paid in Advance, and the balance when the Regiment is organized. New Recruits will receive $75 State Bounty, of which $10 will be paid in advance, and the balance when the Regiment is organized. One month's pay, $18, in advance, to all who enlist, and $2 premium; Rations, Clothing, Lodging, and Pay begins with enlistment. No Marching. No Knapsacks to shoulder. The Best Branch of the Military Service.
Headquarters, Recruiting Station, Genesee street, opposite Bagg's Hotel, Utica.
E. G. MARSHALL, Col., 18th N. Y. Vols., Commanking [sic] 14th N. Y. Artillery.
C. H. CORNING, 6th Regular Infantry, Lieut. Col. 14th N. Y. Artillery.
W. H. REYNOLDS, Major.
Capt. GEORGE S. GREEN.
First Lieut. LOUIS FAASS jy88dtf

VOLUNTEER OR BE DRAFTED.—
HURRAH FOR THE FOURTEENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY!
Col. E. G. Marshall.
Volunteer with the Old Officers and Men.
$250 BOUNTY.
AVOID THE DRAFT.
A State Bounty of $150, paid to every soldier who Re-enlists, of which $30 will be paid in advance, and the ballance [sic] when the regiment is organized. New Recruits will receive $75 State Bounty, of which $10 will be paid in advance, and the balance when the Regiment is organized. In addition to the above, all recruits will receive $100 United States Bounty, $25 of which will be paid when the Regiment is organized, and the balance when they are discharged. One months pay $13 in advance to all who enlist, and $2 premium. Rations, Clothing, Lodging, and pay begin with enlistment. No Marching, no Knapsacks to Shoulder. The best branch of the Military Service Fall in Men! Fall in!
Headquarters, Recruiting Station, Genesee St., Opposite Bagg's Hotel, Utica, N. Y. Headquarters of Regiment, Rochester, N. Y.
E. G. Marshall, Colonel 18th N. Y. V., Commanding 14th N. Y. V. A.
W. H. Reynolds, Major, 14th N. Y. V. A., formerly of the 78th Regiment, N. Y. V. JOB C. HEDGES.
je25dtf Adjutant, 14th N. Y. V. A.

$552 BOUNTY!
FOURTEENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY
COL. E. G. MARSHALL,
To Garrison Forts.
VOLUNTEER WITH THE OLD OFFICERS AND
VETERAN SOLDIERS.
$552 BOUNTY!
AVOID THE DRAFT!
United States Bounty, $402.
A State Bounty of $150 paid to every Soldier who Re-enlists, of which $30 will be paid in Advance, and the balance when the Regiment is organized. New Recruits will receive $75 State Bounty, of which $10 will be paid in advance, and the balance when the Regiment is organized. One month's pay, $18, in advance, to all who enlist, and $2 premium. Rations, Clothing, Lodging, and Pay begins with enlistment. No Marching. No Knapsacks to shoulder. The Best Branch of the Military Service.
Headquarters, Recruiting Station, Genesee street, opposite Bagg's Hotel, Utica.
E. G. MARSHALL, Col. 18th N. Y. Vols., Commanking [sic] 14th N. Y. Artillery.
C. H. CORNING, 6th Regular Infantry, Lieut. Col. 14th N. Y. Artillery.
W. H. REYNOLDS, Major.
Capt. GEORGE S. GREEN.
First Lieut. LOUIS FAASS. jy33dtf

IMPORTANT - RECRUITING OFFICERS.
Col. Marshall is paying $150 to old soldiers, even after the expiration of the thirty days from muster-out.
By general orders just received from the War Department, the written consent of a parent or guardian of a recruit is not required when he is a minor, 18 years of age or over. Minors under 13 years of age, capable of bearing arms, will be received into the ranks with the consent of parent or guardian. These orders will give quite an impetus to the recruiting business.—The 14th Heavy Artillery Regiment is doing well and receiving daily accessions to its ranks. The enlisted men in the regiment are now located at the camp in the grove north of Deep Hollow. Adjutant hedges has gone east to superintend the recruiting for this regiment in that section of the State. The prospects are very fair for the early completion and organization of the 14th Heavy Artillery Regiment.

THE RE-ORGANIZATION OF 14TH N. Y. V.
ARTILLERY AT DANSVILLE.—The Dansville company for Col. Marshall's new regiment is now fairly started. Capt. Mark J. Bunnell, 1st Lieut. Henry R. Curtis, both old officers of the 13th, have both taken hold and they will succeed.—Capt. Bunnell was severely wounded Aug. 30th, at Manassas. Lieut. Curtis was formerly Adjutant of the regiment, and was succeeded in that position by Adj. Hedges. Both Capt. Bunnell and Lieut. Curtis are tried and exprienced [sic] officers. They have both met the enemy, and know the hardships as well as the pleasures of army life. We sincerely hope the people of Dansville and vicinity will extend to these gentlemen every assistance. They offer all the inducements in the way of bounties offered by others, and in addition, the privilege of serving under brave and gallant officers who have been tried and not found wanting.

A CARD TO VOLUNTEERS.—Men enlisting under the Recruiting Agents of this County—Capt. E. Root, at Penn Yan, and Lieut. F. O. Chamberlain, at Rushville, will in all cases be allowed to select any of the old Regiments now in the field, or of the new Regiments, viz: 2d N. Y. Veteran Cavalry, 13th, 15th, 18th, and 21st N. Y. Volunteer Cavalry, 14th and 15th N. Y. Heavy Artillery, these new regiments mentioned being placed upon a footing, as to bounties, with old Regiments, and in no case will an enlisted man be put into any organization contrary to his wishes. Volunteers enlisting under these officers will have their choice of Regiment and service stated on their enlistment papers at time of enlistment, from which no deviation will be made. W. T. Remer,
Capt. and Provost Marshal, 25th District.

THE NEW COMPANY.—The Company to be raised here for the 14th Heavy Artillery is in rapid progress of organization. Capt. R. R. SOPER, 1st Lieut. GEORGE SLATER, and 2nd Lieut. WILLIAM STRAIT, are actively engaged in recruiting. $852 bounty to veterans and $777 to new recruits.
Here is a rare chance to enlist in a home Company, and under officers whom you know.
Young men, and brave, it is to you they call now is the hour; rush to the aid of your brave brothers in the field. "Why stand ye here all the day idle?"
" Strike till the last armed foe expires,
Strike for your altars and your fires,
Strike for the green graves of your sires,
God and your native land."
Remember the great inducements offered by these gentlemen .... the 14th heavy Artillery, and call on them at their office opposite the Brainard House on Water St,

NEW RECRUITING OFFICE.—Capt. W. W. Trowbridge of the 14th N. Y. Artillery has opened a recruiting office in his tent on the Public Spuare [sic], and is calling eloquently for volunteers. Capt. T. is just from Ogdensburgh, where, we learn, he had remarkable success,—recruiting over 250 men in the short space of three weeks, nearly two-thirds old soldiers who know which arm of the service to take for pleasure. The Captain will do well anywhere, as he understands his business. Those liable to be drafted should look well to these many opportunities and not be caught napping. Visit Captain Trowbridge and learn for yourselves the advantage his regiment affords.

The 14th Heavy Artillery a Veteran Regiment—$552 Bounty.
Lieut. J. E. Williams, of the 14th Heavy Artillery Regiment, came up this morning from Albany. He informs us that in view of the good behavior of the men belonging to that body, they have been granted the privilege of being called a Veteran Regiment, and are authorized to offer $552 bounty for recruits. This is as it should be.
Lieut. W. also states that the regiment are at the Arsenal, standing guard over, 17,000 stand of arms, sent up from New York, and that the soldierly conduct of the men is the theme of admiration at the hands of the Albanians.
Lieut. Cyrus D. Phillips, the highly popular and successful recruiting officer at this point for the 14th regiment heavy artillery, returned from Rochester yesterday, having taken a strong squad of fine recruits to that city. The Lieutenant has faithfully served his country in the field, and is now tendering excellent service in inducing others to follow his example. Through his efforts a regiment and a half of sturdy volunteers have been secured to Uncle Sam. Who can show a better record?

RECRUITING IN BUFFALO.—The Rochester papers mention the arrival of Lieut. Phillips there with a squad of men recruited in Buffalo, for the 14th Artillery. Regiments in all parts of the country have been drawing men from this city, who ought to be counted, in some way, to the credit of the city.

THE FOURTEENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY—
The valiant old 13th (Rochester) Regiment is to be reorganized as a Heavy Artillery Regiment, to be known as the Fourteenth. The new organization is to be commanded by Col. E. G. Marshal, who has already highly distinguished himself in the field, and will be made up in great part of true and tried officers and veteran soldiers. Lieut. Cyrus D. Phillips, one of the most successful and gentlemanly recruiting officers in this or any other State, has opened a recruiting office for the Fourteenth over 158 Main street, his old quarters when engaged in the work of obtaining volunteers for the Eleventh Heavy Artillery. Those desiring to join the service can rely upon his promises and will, by enlisting with him, obtain the handsome bounty of $250.

ANOTHER WAY TO AVOID THE DRAFT.
Almost every young man who is eligible to the honors of conscription, is devising measures whereby its burdens will be most easily sustained, but we can recommend no method superior to that of enlisting at once in some volunteer organization, and thus securing a bounty of $250 and a choice of officers under whom to serve. Veteran recruits can obtain a bounty of $552, by going into Capt. H. R. Randall's company of the 14th Heavy Artillery. He has recruiting offices at Rochester, Albion, Suspension Bridge and Palmyra. The latter was opened on Monday. The boys who were drafted there had better improve the opportunity of volunteering while they have a chance of going with an experienced officer, and making instead of paying a few hundreds.

FOURTEENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—The first battalion of the 14th Heavy Artillery, under command of Maj. W. H. Reynolds, left Rochester at eight o'clock this morning. There are five companies, numbering about five hundred men. They will pass here about 2.40 this P. M., having left Syracuse at 12.40. A large number of these men were raised in this city, and vicinity, and we suppose there will be a crowd of their friends at the Depot to bid them farewell. Their destination is New York.
On Monday next part of the second battalion, under command of Lieut. Col. Corning, will leave Rochester for New York.

THE DRAFT.—One hundred soldiers, of the 14th Heavy Artillery, in command of Capt. J. E. WILLIAMS, arrived in the city at 10 o'clock yesterday morning. They come as a guard precautionary to watch, with the squad of the Invalic Corps, over the good order of the city during the draft.
The orders for the draft are not yet received, and therefore the day of its commencement cannot be named. The low paper over the way, that on Wednesday heralded the draft as ordered, thinks it has discovered proof of its asertion [sic] in the fact that the precautionary guard of soldiers has arrived. Rather says it thinks so; for its blarney is of such sort, and has been so long-practised [sic], that it never knows what it thinks, but grinds out whatever happens to enter its prodigious wit-mill, unconscious of its quality, and not knowing or caring whether true or false.

FOR BUFFALO.—This morning one hundred picked men of Col. Marshall's 13th Heavy Artillery Regiment left this city for Buffalo to remain there during the draft, which, commences Wednesday.

DEPARTURE OF COL. MARSHALL'S REGIMENT.—Yesterday morning at 11 o'clock, about 150 of Col. Marshall's 13th Heavy Artillery Regiment, left this city for Buffalo to remain there during the draft, which is to commence on Wednesday. It is reported that a regiment from Elmira has been ordered to Buffalo for the same purpose. Col. Marshall's men were all armed with new Springfield rifles, and well provided with ammunition.

THE 13TH OR 14TH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—Col. Marshal's Regiment, now at Albany, has elicited much commendation from the citizens for its good appearance, and it deserves all the praise it has received. The men have been furnished with Springfield rifles, to be used in case of emergency. But the regiment is not full, and there is a fine chance to get in now. A bounty of $552 is paid to each man who enlists. Go in, boys, and get bounty enough to pay for a small farm.

PERSONAL—Major Trowbridge, of the 14th Heavy Artillery, is in town collecting the stragglers of that regiment. He proceeded to Elmira to-day to take about 200 men from that place who were recruited by recruiting agents and recently mustered in by Major Hedges.
Lieut. George Breck, of Reynolds' Battery, who has been spending a few days at home, left for Washington last evening.

.... CAMP MARSHALL.—Since .... of Col. Marshall's men from Albany, the camp of the 13th Heavy Artillery presents a busy and animated appearance. Col. Marshall has now over 500 men on his muster rolls. Yesterday 500 new Springfield rifles were received here for the use of these men. Every afternoon about 5 o'clock the Regiment is ordered out for dress parade, and the men present a fine appearance. This parade is now witnessed by numbers from the city, who can readily reach the camp by the Street Railway. Yesterday morning, Lieut. Col. Corning, who recently arrived here from Albany, took command of the camp. Previous to this time the camp has been in command of Adjutant Hedges, who selected and superintended the pitching of the tents. He has been indefatigable in his efforts to keep proper discipline at the camp, and have the men trained in the school of the soldier. Camp Marshall is now one of the objects of interest in this vicinity, and will well repay the trouble of a visit.

DAILY UNION & ADVERTISER.
THURSDAY EVENING, JULY 16, 1863.
LOCAL MATTERS.
The 54th Regt. N. Y. N. G. and 13th V. H. Art. Depart for New York.
About 9 o'clock last evening Brig.-Gen. Williams received a dispatch from Inspector General Miller, stating that his command would be ordered forward at once. Col. Marshall, of the 13th Heavy Artillery, which numbers some 300 men in camp on Lake Avenue, also received like orders. Subsequently Gen. Williams received another dispatch ordering the Soldiers to leave on the 12:30 train this morning. The prearranged signal on the City Hall for the men to assemble at the Armory was struck, and at once there was "hurrying to and fro" of armed men through the streets. Everything was ready but transportation and the men chafed somewhat at the delay. About 11 o'clock a dispatch was received from Supt. Vibbard of the Central Road, saying that cars for the regiments could not be furnished before this morning and ordering the train carrying the soldiers to follow the 7:25 Express train. At 6 o'clock the cars were ready and at 7 o'clock Col. Marshall's regiment, with about 200 men in line, were at the Depot. It was nearly 9 o'clock before the 54th Regt. made its appearance at the Depot, when the cars were speedily filled and the train started.
The 54th numbered 400, and with the Heavy Artillery made a force of 600 men, who have left for New York. Col. Marshal's men are without arms; they will be supplied with them at New York. The Grays, (artillery,) attached to the 54th, did not take their guns—they will be furnished with a battery in New York. This Company had, prior to the riot in the Metropolis, been ordered there to garrison the forts.—The company has been recruited nearly to the maximum number, going off this morning with 100 men. Col. Clark is in command of the 54th, and Gen. Williams accompanies them to New York. As the regiments passed through Exchange and State street to the Depot this morning they presented a fine appearance, and they will doubtless give a good account of themselves if called upon to quell the mob. The 13th Heavy Artillery is mainly composed of old members of the 13th N. Y. V., who were engaged in every battle in Virginia since the rebellion commenced up to Burnside's massacre at Fredericksbug [sic]. The New York mob will find them ugly customers to deal with.
We give below a list of the commissioned officers and the number of men in each company in the 54th Regiment:
REGIMENTAL OFFICERS.
Colonel—C. H. Clark.
Lieut. Colonel—Fred Miller.
Major—Nathaniel Thompson.
Adjutant—G. S. Stebbins.
Quartermaster—M. C. Mordoff.
Surgeon—Dr. Wm. H. Briggs.
UNION GRAYS.
Captain—W. M. Lewis.
1st Lieutenant—Thomas Barnes.
2d Lieutenant—M. R. Quinn.
3d Lieutenant—Wallace Darrow.
Ninety-one men.
DRAGOONS.
Captain—I. S. Hobbie,
1st Lieutenant—E. K. Warren.
2d Lieutenant—A. Rosenthal.
2d Lieutenant—Cyrus Beardsley.
Sixty men.
COMPANY B—GERMAN GRENADIERS.
Captain ____ —Spohr.
1st Lieutenant—Adam Young.
2d Lieutenant—John N. Weitzel.
Forty men.

COMPANY C—LIGHT GUARD.
Captain—Geo. G. Wanzer.
1st Lieutenant—J. Eichorn.
2d Lieutenant—Chas. L. Vredenburg.
This company has forty men and is commanded
by Lieut. Eichorn.
COMPANY D—UNION GUARDS.
Captain—L. Bellinger.
1st Lieutenant—John G. Betzel.
2d Lieutenant—M. Sellinger.
Thirty-five men.
COMPANY F.
Captain—Warner Wescott.
1st Lieutenant—A. Sawtell.
2d Lieutenant—Gershom Wilborn.
Forty men.
COMPANY G—FLOUR CITY CADETS.
1st Lieutenant—J. W. Wren.
2d Lieutenant—J. C. Smith.
Forty men.
COMPANY H.
Captain—W. T. Kennedy.
1st Lieutenant—Frank Hayden.
2d Lieutenant—Frank J. Amsden.
Thirty men.

BREAKING UP OF CAMP GENESEE—COMFORTABLE
BARRACKS FOR THE 14TH ARTILLERY.—The weather has become too cool for the men of Col. Marshall's Regiment to remain much longer in the tents at Camp Genesee, and they are about to leave that pleasant summer location for comfortable winter quarters. Col. M. has leased the building at West End known as Halstead Hall in later years, but in other days as Bull's Head Tavern. Here the recruits of the 14th will have comfortable apartments, and will be well provided for in all respects. The rooms are large, and as nice as any man will care to occupy. The tents at Camp Genesee will at once be stowed away for summer use, and the men will go to Bull's Head.
Major Hedges is in charge of the new barracks. The 14th has now about 900 men in the defences of New York city, and recruits are coming in freely every day. The recruits are being organized into companies as fast as they come in, and when the companies are full they will go into the New York forts. The seventh and eighth companies, completing the second battalion, are nearly full, and the ninth, tenth and eleventh companies are making good progress.
The news received from the companies in New York is very favorable. The men are delighted with their location and speak highly of their accommodations. Gen. Canby desires that the regiment be increased to 2,000 men. From present indications there will be no difficulty in accomplishing this.

A DESERTED CAMP.—The camp of the 18th Heavy Artillery Regiment in the grove near Deep Hollow at present, although nearly deserted, presents quite a picturesque appearance. The grove in which the camp is located is a splendid one, composed of chestnuts and maples, whose wide spreading foliage affords a dense and refreshing shade, and beneath whose branches is a luxuriant carpet of verdure. A better spot could not be selected in this vicinity for a camp. It is located not over three minutes' walk from the present terminus of the Street railway, and is, therefore, convenient of access. Previous to the departure of most of the men, the camp was being visited daily by numbers of citizens. There are 300 tents up, all of which are arranged in a square, with streets or avenues traversing the camp from east to west. The dining room and buildings for cooking have been constructed under the superintendence of Mr. Hurlburt, who has the contract for subsistence, and they are at once ample and convenient. There are now about fifty men in camp. The balance of the Regiment are expected to return in a few days.

THE FOURTEENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—The New York Evening Post has the following notice of Colonel Marshall's new regiment, the 14th Heavy Artillery, which was recruited chiefly in Rochester and vicinity:
The Thirteenth New York Volunteer infantry regiment, which enlisted for two years and returned home at the end of that time, has reorganized for artillery service, and is ready to take the field again, having recruited an aggregate of eighteen hundred men. This result is highly creditable to the officers, most of whom have already distinguished themselves in the field. The new organization is known as the Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery regiment. It comprises three battalions of four companies each of which the average strength is one hundred and fifty men.
The regiment, which has moved by companies from the interior of the State—the headquarters were at Rochester—to this city and harbor, has been five or six months in preparing for the field. Captain Lorenzo I. Jones, of the fourth company, however, enlisted his command in two months. There were other similar instances of quick work. The recruits, who are from the rural districts, are hardy and intelligent; a majority of them are veterans; and it is understood that the Fourteenth has been reorganized as one of our veteran organizations.
The commander is Colonel Elisha G. Marshall, who was at the head of the old Thirteenth in the battles in which it participated—in all, thirteen.

NEW RECRUITING OFFICE.—Capt. H. R. Randall has received authority to recruit a company for the 13th Heavy Artillery, and has opened an office at No. 4 Exchange place.—Capt. Randall formerly held a commission in the 78th N. Y. V., and is an experienced and reliable officer. He pays the $552 bounty, and has already enrolled a goodly number of recruits.

Proposition to Grant Pecuniary Aid Towards the Filling up of Companies in Col. Marshall's Regiment.
An informal meeting of citizens was held at the Mayor's Office this forenoon the proceedings of which have been handed in as follows:
At a meeting held at the office of the mayor in Rochester, Aug. 10, 1863, His Honor the Mayor was called to the chair and Col. C. H. Clark appointed Secretary.
Ald. Buell called for explanation of discrepancies between Mr. Ely and Mr. Coann.
T. O. Montgomery, Esq., explained.
Mr. Attorney Miller further explained.
By Mr. Moore—Resolved, That the Chairman of the Committee telegraph to Mr. Ely to ascertain the result of his mission to Washington.
By Mr. Montgomery—Resolved, That this meeting recommend to the Common Council to raise sufficient money to secure the filling up of the following companies, viz: of Capt. J. E. Williams, Capt. Sullivan and Capt. Ward in the 13th artillery immediately, so that they can be mustered in before the term for drafted men to report for duty, provided the Common Council shall be satisfied that this city will have full local credit for all the men which have been and shall be furnished from the city up to the time the drafted men from the several wards are required to report.
Adopted.
By Mr. Darling—Resolved, That the Mayor be requested to telegraph to Provost Marshal General Fry giving him a copy of the resolution and ascertain whether the men raised under the last resolution will bee allowed and credited under the draft.
Adopted.
— The Mayor sent a dispatch to Col. Fry, in accordance with Ald. Darling's resolution, at one o'clock.

ROWDYISM AMONG NEW RECRUITS.—
On Thursday evening four soldiers of the 13th Heavy Artillery, while intoxicated, went into the grocery of Mr. Burke, on the corner of Allen and Ford streets, and called for some beer. While there they attacked and knocked down a man named Paradise, and also assaulted another man who was just entering the store. They were finally overpowered and put out of the store, when they commenced an assault upon the store by throwing stones through the windows, considerably demolishing them and doing other damage to the amount of $25 or $30. It luckily happened that none of the inmates were struck by the stones, some of which weighed from three to eight pounds, and would have inflicted serious injury. The affair was characterized as a most disgraceful row by those who witnessed it. The rowdies were finally arrested by officer Vanslyck and lodged in the Station-House. Their names are Thos. Smith, James Doulep, Daniel Barry and Jackson Monroe. They were examined before Justice Wegman yesterday morning and each fined $15 and sentenced to the Penitentiary for six months.

PROPOSED INCREASE OF BOUNTIES TO HEAVY ARTILLERY RECRUITS.—At a meeting held at the office of the Mayor in Rochester, Aug. 10, 1863, His Honor the Mayor was called to the Chair and Col. C. H. Clark appointed Secretary.
Ald. Buell called for explanation of discrepancies between Mr. Ely and Mr. Coann.
T. C. Montgomery explained.
Mr. Attorney Miller further explained.
By Mr. Moore—Resolved, That the Chairman of the Committee telegraph to Mr. Ely to ascertain the result of his mission to Washington.
By Mr. Montgomery—Resolved, That this meeting recommend to the Common Council to raise sufficient money to secure the filling up of the following companies, viz: of Capt. J. E. Williams, Capt. Sullivan and Capt. John Weed, in the 13th artillery immediately, so that they can be mustered in before the term for drafted men to report for duty, provided the Common Council shall be satisfied that this city will have full local credit for all the men which have been and shall be furnished from the city up to the time the drafted men from the several wards are required to report.
Adopted.
By Mr. Darling—Resolved, That the Mayor be requested to telegraph to Provost Marshal General Fry giving him a copy of the resolution and ascertain whether the men raised under the last resolution will be allowed and credited under the draft.
Adopted.
— We had no notice of the above meeting, and are consequently without any report of its discussions. Why a particular regiment should be selected to absorb the patronage of the city government, we are unable to see. Col. Taylor and other veteran officers, who belong in Rochester, are recruiting here, and it would seem but fair that volunteers should be permitted to elect for themselves, without any pecuniary lure, on the part of the city authorities, in behalf of "the forts in Now York Harbor." Rochester has sent one regiment there already. It is not quite right to discriminate against regiments intended for active service in the field at a time when they are so greatly needed there. Let the proposed bounties be equally distributed, or not at all.
We understand that the above resolutions have been telegraphed to Col. Fry, with the inquiry as to whether the recruits will be allowed on the quota under the draft.

Arrival of Col. Marshall.
Col. Marshall, late of the 13th Regiment, will arrive here from Albany at five p.m. this day, by the Central cars. This is his first visit home since he went to Washington some months since suffering severely from his wounds received at the first battle of Fredericksburg. He has been for some time on court martial duty, which has detained him at Washington. He comes now to assume his duties as government disbursing and mustering officer and Colonel of the new regiment of Heavy Artillery now organizing.
The men of the old 13th intend to give him a kind reception on his arrival. Capt. Hill's company, the Union Blues, will turn out as an escort, and Perkins' Band will afford the music. The soldiers of the 13th will be in procession, and escort the Colonel to City Hall, where there will be a reception.
The old soldiers of the 13th are requested to meet in front of City Hall at four p. m., preparatory to going to the Central Depot to receive the Colonel. Let everyone of them be there, ready to give the gallant Colonel such a welcome home as he deserves!

Reception of Colonel Marshall.
Yesterday at 5 o'clock in the afternoon, Col. Marshall arrived at the Central Depot, according to expectation. Newman's Band, the Union Blues and between seventy-five and a hundred officers and men of the "Old 13th," were present to receive him. A considerable number of our citizens also gathered to welcome the "fighting Colonel," as his men call; him. A barouche drawn by four splendid bays conveyed the Colonel, accompanied by Gen. Williams, Ex-Mayor Clark and Col. Amsden, City Treasurer, to the Court House, where he was received by the Common Council.
A short address was read by W. C. Rowley Esq., the Mayor himself being absent. We regret that we are not able to report Mr. Rowley's remarks in full. They referred briefly to the history of the 13th, the interest taken in the regiment, and the fact that by force of circumstances it had somehow been left to Colonel Marshall to develop, by instruction and discipline, the fighting qualities of our brave men. A high compliment was paid to the skill and gallantry of the Colonel, and the address closed with an earnest wish that he might succeed in his new undertaking of re-organizing his regiment, and promising every assistance. Colonel Marshall replied briefly, but to the point—being, as he said, much more of a fighting man than a public speaker.
Although not yet recovered entirely from the severe wounds he received at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13th, 1862, Colonel Marshall seeks to reorganize his men and return to active service. As a soldier in the field he has few equals, and it is his ambition once more to be at the head of a regiment. At the close of the reception yesterday, he shook each of his old men by the hand, and it was easy to see that he was their favorite commander. They cheered him repeatedly and also gave cheers for McClellan and the officers of the new regiment—the 14th N. Y. Volunteer Artillery. Colonel Marshall returned to Congress Hall, apparently well satified [sic] with the nature of his greeting in Rochester.

A CARD FROM COL. MARSHALL.—As may be seen by the following card from Col. Marshall, he has not been relieved as mustering and disbursing officer of this district, as has been reported here for several days:
U. S. MUSTERING AND DISBURSING OFFICE,
ROCHESTER, N. Y., Nov. 19, 1863.
To Editors Democrat:—Sirs—I noticed an article in this morning's paper, stating that I am relieved and ordered to join my regiment, 6th U. S. Infantry. As such an article is apt to cause dissatisfaction in my regiment, being now organized, I hope you will correct the error. There is no order in existence relieving me as mustering and disbursing officer and military commander. First Lieut. Cook, 16th U. S. Infantry, was sent me, by my request, as an assistant, and it is ordered that he return to his regiment in the field when he completes his duties. As soon as my regiment, 14th N. Y. V. Artillery, is full, which will be about the first of next month, and as early afterward as I can settle my business as mustering and disbursing officer, I shall request that 1st Lieut. Cook, 16th U. S. Infantry, relieve me of my duties of the Western and Northwestern District. I will be relieved upon my own application, and shall command my regiment, 14th N. Y. V. Artillery, six companies of which are now serving in New York harbor.
Very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,
E. G. MARSHALL,
Capt. 6th Infantry, U. S. A., Mustering and Disbursing Officer.

COL. MARSHALL NOT RELIEVED.—The announcement in the Democrat that Col. Marshall has been relieved from duty here and ordered to join his Regiment is untrue, as will be seen by the following note from that gentleman:
To EDITORS UNION & ADVERTISER:—Sirs—I notice an article in this morning's edition of the Democrat stating that I am relieved and ordered to join my Regiment, 6th U. S. Infantry. As such an article is apt to cause dissatisfaction in my Regiment now organized, I hope you will correct the error. There is no order in existence relieving me as Mustering and Disbursing Officer. First Lieut. Cook, 16th U. S. Inf. was sent me by my request as an assistant, and it is ordered that he return to his Regiment in the field when he completes his duties.
As soon as my Regiment, 14th N. Y. Vol. Artillery is full, which will be about the first of next month and as early afterward as I can settle my business as Mustering and Disbursing Officer and military commander, I shall request that Lieut. Cook, 16th U. S. Inf. relieve me of my duties of the Western and Northwestern Districts. I will be relieved upon my own application and shall command my Regiment, 14th N. Y. Vol. Artillery, six companies of which are now serving in New York harbor.
Very respectfully, your ob't serv't, E. G. MARSHALL, Capt. 6th Inf. U. S. A., Must'g and Disb'g Officer and Millitary Com'dr.
Rochester, Nov. 20th, 1863.

COLONEL MARSHALL—LIEUT COOK.—Colonel E. G. Marshall, of the 14th New York Artillery, and Captain in the 6th Regular Infantry, so long and so acceptably stationed here as Mustering and Disbursing Officer of the federal government, has upon his own application been relieved, and is succeeded by First Lieut. Henry C. Cook, 16th Regular Infantry. The third and last batallion [sic] of Colonel Marshall's new regiment is so nearly completed that his whole command will be in the field by New Year's Day, and it is with the view of taking position at its head that he thus relinquishes a station of comparative ease and quiet. While all will be pleased to see the government have the benefit in active service of such an experienced and accomplished officer, there are none who enjoy the Colonel's acquaintance here but will regret his departure from amongst us. Thoroughly understanding his business, thoroughly attending to his business, and thoroughly letting everybody else's business alone, he has while on duty here and while at the head of our Old Thirteenth in the field given proof that, whether employed on the staff or in the line of the army, he has been equal to all duties and all emergencies. The best wishes of the community will go with him and his gallant command.
Lieut. Cook, the new Mustering and Disbursing officer, is a young man of fine abilities, and while assisting Col. Marshall here during the past few weeks has made a most favorable impression. He was for a time the Mustering and Disbursing officer in Chicago, and was there regarded highly. We have no doubt he will find his stay in Rochester, whether long or short, an agreeable one.

FOURTEENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY—A GROUNDLESS RUMOR.—A report is said to be in circulation that the 14th Heavy Artillery is to be made an infantry regiment. Those who know, assert that there is not the least foundation for such a rumor. The men are enlisted for Heavy Artillery and cannot be transferred to any other branch of the service without their consent. Government would not dare to perpetrete [sic] an act of fraud such as a change of this kind would be. The recent transfer of men from that regiment to the Cavalry service, only extends to such as desire the change. There can be no compulsion in that act.
Col. Marshall is now in New York with a view to procure a location in this State for his regiment. The 14th has one full battalion mustered, another nearly full, and the third has been organized. The officers are mostly out on recruiting service, and are sending in men rapidly to fill up the regiment.

The Killed and Wounded.
The battles before Petersburg on the 16th and 17th were terrific and bloody. The reports begin to arrive and the list of casualties is large. A number of the Western New York regiments were engaged, and have suffered no doubt severely. The Fourteenth Heavy Artillery—fighting as infantry—has no doubt suffered more than any other regiment from this locality. It was engaged on the 16th and 17th in the 9th army corps, where the heaviest fighting was done.
Among the killed is Major Job C. Hedges.
Col. Marshall was wounded. The Herald's correspondent says a minie bullet struck a rock near by, flattened itself, and glancing off, struck him in the thigh, inflicting a severe contusion.
Among the casualties reported are the following:
Fourteenth N. Y. Artillery—Lt. M. Spencer, wounded in arm pit; Lt. A. W. De Graft; hip; C. Baker, J. Black, E. Storms, Jr., W. Kidd, J. Schramp, J. L. Paris, J. Story, J. Campbell, W. Bunyan, J. G. Herdenrich, H. Pierce, P. Collins, A. Hall, A. Briggs, P. Woods, W. Marvin, P. O'Brien, M. Carley; A. Carr, hand; R. Brown, hand; G. Chistnan, C. Worden, hand; S. Russell, W. Harness, J. Henly, C. H. Atkins, C. N. Smith, G. Evans, J. Howard, J. A. Cook, G. Lindsay, H. G. Palmer, G. H. Barley, M. Davis, hand; J. Palmer, R. Russell, hand; M. Dahfoul, hand; G. W. Richards, hand; J. S. Carr, hand; W. Carboe, hand; B. Potts, hand; D. H. Griffin, D. Hill, L. Van Wie, G. Ashby, C. H. Bostwick, L. D. Baker, M. C. Odwyer, T. Griffith, G. Mitchell, H. Meyers, R. Forburg, C. Depuyster. Died June 17th, the following; J. Fuller, C. Crabot, P. V. Carey, D. Parr, A. West.

The Charge of the Fourteenth Heavy Artillery.
Lt. Cleary of the 14th Heavy Artillery writes to his brother as follows respecting the charge in which his regiment participated and lost so many of its gallant officers and men:
HEADQUARTERS 14TH N. Y. ARTILLERY,
ON THE BATTLEFIELD NEAR PETERSBURG, VA.
June 18th, 1864
It is with regret that I have to announce the death of Major Job C. Hedges, who was shot while gallantly leading his battalion in a charge on the enemy's breastworks. Our division was drawn up in line, and the order was passed along to fix bayonets. The 1st brigade was to lead the charge—our regiment the second line and 2d Pennsylvania the third line. The order was not to fire a shot until we took the enemy's breastworks at the point of the bayonet, which we did in a splendid manner. The 1st brigade fell back, and our regiment charged over them a distance of two thousand yards, and took the enemy's breastworks at the point of the bayonet.
Our regiment behaved splendidly, and went into the fight 930 strong and came out 649 men. We took the rebel pits, a battle flag and 250 prisoners; also a rebel General prisoner. We held the enemy's breastworks two hours until our ammunition gave out, when the rebels charged in two lines of battle on the breastworks, which we were forced to give up after a desperate hand to hand fight.
In this attack Major W. H. Reynolds was taken prisoner, also Capt. Snyder. I was with Major Reynolds when the rebels ordered us to surrender, on which the Major tried to get away, but was taken; but I got away from them after some trouble. Major Reynolds was in command of the regiment and I was acting Adjutant. I was with him when he was taken. Here our regiment suffered severely; but this morning our men charged again and took the enemy's line.
Our regiment is lying in the breastworks today resting until called for. Our men are advanced within one mile of Petersburg.
Your friend Capt. Underhill got wounded in the temple, but is doing duty. He commands the 3d battalion. He behaved nobly.
Capt. L. J. Jones is in command of our regiment. He is the senior officer left. The officers behaved well.
The rebels ordered Sergeant Spears to surrender the colors. He drew back his flag and charged the rebels with it, and then brought it off; but when we fell back our regiment got scattered, and Sergeant Spears went back—supposing our men had formed—and it seems that he was either shot or taken prisoner with his flag.
All the officers and men regret the death of their beloved commander, Major Job C. Hedges, who was an old member of the 13th N. Y. V. He was a noble officer and died nobly leading his battalion.
Col. E. G. Marshal got wounded. He is to leave to-day for Rochester.
J. P. CLEARY,
1st Lt. and Adjt. 14th Heavy Art. N. Y. V.

A LETTER FROM THE 14TH HEAVY ARTILLERY.
We are requested to lay before our readers the following letter from a regiment, which has fought so nobly, and of which , containing as it does, so many Rochester boys, we may all be justly proud. The letter is written by J. P. Cleary, 1st Lieutenant and Adjutant, to a brother in this city, and is dated "Headquarters 14th New York Artillery, On the Battle-field near Petersburg, Va., June 18th, 1864:"
It is with regret that I have to announce the death of Major Job C. Hedges, who was shot while gallantly leading his battalion in a charge on the enemy's breastworks. Our division was drawn up in line, and the order was passed along to fix bayonets. The 1st Brigade was to lead the charge—our regiment the second line, and the 2d Pennsylvania the third line. The order was not to fire a shot until we took the enemy's breastworks at the point of the bayonet, which we did in a splendid manner. The 1st Brigade fell back, and our regiment charged over them, a distance of two thousand yards, and took the enemy's breastworks at the point of the bayonet.
Our regiment behaved splendidly, and went into the fight 930 strong and came out 649 men. We took the rebel pits, a battle flag and 250 prisoners; also a rebel General prisoner.—We held the enemy's breastworks two hours until our ammunition gave out, when the rebels charged in two lines of battle on the breastworks, which we were forced to give up after a desperate hand to hand fight.
In this attack Major W. H. Reynolds was taken prisoner, also Capt. Snyder. I was with Major Reynolds when the rebels ordered us to surrender, on which the Major tried to get away, but was taken; but I got away from them after some trouble. Major Reynolds was in command of the regiment and I was acting Adjutant. I was with him when he was taken. Here our regiment suffered severely; but this morning our men charged again and took the enemy's line.
Our regiment is lying in the breastworks today resting until called for. Our men are advanced within one mile of Petersburg.
Your friend Capt. Underhill got wounded in the temple, but is doing duty. He commands the third battalion. He behaved nobly.
Capt. L. J. Jones is in command of our regiment. He is the senior officer left. The officers behaved well.
The rebels ordered Sergt. Spears to surrender the colors. He drew back his flag and charged the rebels with it, and then brought it off; but when we fell back our regiment got scattered, and Sergt. Spears went back—supposing our men had formed—and it seems that he was either shot, or taken prisoner with his flag.
All the officers and men regret the death of their beloved commander, Maj. Job C. Hedges, who was an old member of the 13th N. Y. V. He was a noble officer and died nobly leading his battalion.
Col. E. G. Marshal got wounded. He is to leave to-day for Rochester.

The Heavy Artillery in the Fight of Last Friday.
The army correspondent of the World, dated Sunday, has the following reference to the part taken in Friday's fight by Col. Marshall's regiment. He reports the death of Major Hedges and the surrounding and capture of Lieut. Col. Reynolds:
Friday and yesterday haveen [sic] days of severe trial to the Army of the Potomac. After the success of Burnside's corps, early Friday morn – very little ground was gained on any part of the line until near dark, when Ledlie's division was ordered to advance and take a line of works running along the edge of a piece of woods on the left of the second corps. At six o'clock Gen. Ledlie got his division in line, advanced them
through a ravine under cover of his batteries.— He addressed a few words to his men, telling them he desired them to take the works.
With a shout in response to the order to charge, the men rushed madly across the field—a distance of two hundred and fifty yards, under an enfilading fire from batteries each side, and never halted until the position was gained and the rebels driven to another line, some two hundred yards further back. Several attempts were made by them to retake the ground lost, but they were received with such volleys from our men behind the works taken, as to drive them back in confusion each time, and with heavy loss. Their dead and wounded this morning lay in piles in the ditch, and on the ground over which they had retreated. About three hundred prisoners were taken at this point. Our loss was about twelve hundred in the division, while that of the enemy was full as many, if not more.
Major Hedges, of the Fourteenth New York artillery, was killed while leading his men in the charge. The Colonel and Major of the One Hundred and Seventy-ninth New York, were wounded also. Col. Reynolds, of the Fourteenth New York artillery, wounded and taken prisoner. Col. Marshall, commanding 3d brigade, was wounded by the concussion of a shell. Lieut. McKibben, of Gen. Ledlie's staff, was wounded in neck, while delivering orders. The position thus gained was such an advantageous one as to cause the enemy to evacuate the rest of his line this morning and occupy a new one, which they had strengthened during the night.
The loss in this division was at least one thousand, including a large number of officers. The losses in the other two divisions will not be quite as heavy as in the Third.
On the right Gen. Martindale's division advanced its line somewhat, capturing a few prisoners, its losses being slight. Gen. Warren on the left also advanced his line, and his left now reaches the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad. His loss has not been heavy.

Fourteenth Heavy Artillery.—The following losses are reported in the assault on Petersburg on Saturday last:
Killed—Lieut. Hartley, serg't Sprague, company G; serg't Trohler, H.
Wounded—Michael Hasey, company E, arm; serg't Michael Maher, G, head; Lieut. E. T. Hartley, died; Lieut. H. H. Sevoice, neck; John Call, I, scalp! Joe. Spohn, L, foot; Curtis F. Sheldon, M, foot; John Bardo, K, haud; James Hyatt, H, face; George Bosworth, D, arm: A. Brotherton, C, arm; Jacob Halftown, D, hip; John McEvoy, B, shoulder; John N. Burke, G, abdomen; John W. Rodgers, E, arm; Moses O'Leary, G, arm; Marcellus Denov, A, arm; Chas. Nobens, H, scalp; Geo. Christman, I , arm; Harvey Fairman, L, eye; Eugene Hopkins, H, arm; Rody Loody, M, leg; Royal Cory, F, back; Joseph Sharp, E, knee; John Edwards, M, back; H. W. Severance, E, hand; Geo. H. Murphy, T, shoulder; Robert E. Brown, I, shoulder; John Appleyard, thigh; Chas. Branch, M. foot; Chas. E. Howe, C, mortally; Phillip Hoffman D, chest; James McKelvey, A, back; Herbert E. Freeman, M, thigh; Benjamin Chapman, L, thigh; Robert Danford, C, thigh; Simeon Johnson, C, arm; Cornelius Phillips, arm; George L. Williamson, E, arm; J. H. Soden, B, thigh; Wm. Weaver, K, foot; Thomas McCab, B, mortally; Chas. E. Payne, A; thigh; Mason Lang, G, face; Thomas Brown, C, side and arm.
Prisoner—Col. Marshall, commanding brigade.
Henry Lloyd, of this city, a private in the regiment, was killed. The color sergeant was wounded in the advance on the rebel works, and LLOYD, who was near him, grasped the colors and planted them on the works, when he was shot through the neck, and lived but a few minutes.

Losses in the Assault on Petersburg.
We find in the New York Herald of yesterday the following list of losses in the 14th N. Y. Heavy Artillery, most of which are in addition to those published yesterday:
KILLED.—Sergeant Sprague, G; Sergeant Trohler, H.
Wounded.—Macellus Denvo, A; Michael Hasey, E, arm; Serg't Michael Maher, G, head; Lieut H H Service, neck; John Call, I, scalp; John Spohn, L, foot; James Hyatt, H, face; F Miller, D, 179th, hand; Jacob Halltown, D, hip; John McEvoy, B, shoulder; Harvey Fairman, L, eye; Geo Morphy, I, shoulder; Robert E Brown, I, shoulder; Herbert E Freeman, M, thigh; Simeon Johnson, C, arm; Thomas McCab, B, mortally; Mason Lang, G; Charles E Payne, thigh; Thos Brown, C, side and arm.
21TH N. Y. CAVALRY.
Chas Cassin, A, arm; John McCall, B, hand; Jerome Ellsworth, A, thorax.
3D N. Y., 10TH CORPS.
Lt A D Lunerger, A, shoulder; Lt Jas Lang, I, foot.

FROM THE 14TH N. Y. ARTILLERY.—We have been furnished a letter, written by Frank Thompson of Lafargeville, under date of June 19th, to his parents, from before Petersburg, from which we make the following extract, as indicative of the perils undergone and the bravery exhibited by our gallant soldiers:
Night before last we had one of the severest fights that this regiment has been engaged in. We charged on a line of rebel rifle pits and took them; we lost about 800 men in the 14th—every field officer that we had and several line officers. (He does not say whether they were killed, wounded or taken prisoners.) We took one stand of colors and 800 prisoners; we held the place until we were out of ammunition; the rebels then charged on us, and we fell back some 20 rods where there was a line of battle that checked them. It was the warmest pace I was ever in, it being a perfect shower of canister, shells and bullets. The most of our loss was in prisoners; the rebels took them when they charged us. There was no one lost you would know if I should name them. Of officers absent, there are Col E G Marshall, wounded slightly, gone home; Lt Col Corning, wounded; Maj Reynolds, prisoner; Maj Job Hedges, killed; Capts D Jones, H Pemberton and Snyder, and 1st Lt Cayto, J H Thompson, W H Norton and Pifard are prisoners.
Lieut. Thompson first enlisted in the 10th and for his good behavior and soldierly qualities was recommended for promotion by Col. Biddlecom, and was appointed to a 2d Lieutenancy of Co B in the 14th; he has been through the entire campaign from the Rapidan to Petersburg, bravely participating in every fight of Burnside's corps, during this eventful struggle.

COL. MARSHALL TAKEN PRISONER.—Our townsman Col. E. G. Marshall is a prisoner in the hands of the Rebels. Mrs. Marshall received a dispatch this morning from General Burnside, stating that her husband was captured on Saturday when the assault was made upon the Rebel works before Petersburg. The dispatch further states that the Colonel was not wounded.
Col. Marshall went out as commander of the 14th Heavy Artillery, but he has lately been in command of the Second Brigade of the 1st Division of the 9th Army Corps, his regiment being in that brigade. We have no particulars of his capture beyond the fact, but we can easily conjecture that it occurred in consequence of his leading his men to the charge and venturing too far into the face of the enemy. He would be just as likely to do that as any other officer, for in battle he knows no such thing as fear. Nor does he lose his presence of mind in such a way as to lead to recklessness. One thing may safely be said and will he endorsed by all who know the Colonel, that he was never captured in the act of skulking.
We fear that it will be shown that his brigade has suffered largely in this action, and the 14th had many hundred men in that brigade.

LOSSES OF THE FOURTEENTH ARTILLERY.
The New York Herald has reports of the losses in the recent assault on the rebel works at Petersburg. The 14th Heavy Artillery has probably suffered most, as it led in the charge and stood its ground bravely, Col. Marshall being taken prisoner, with some of his men, after the negroes had fled in disorder and the white soldiers sent to support had been slaughtered or forced back.
The killed of the Fourteenth are: Lieut. Hartly, Co. G; Sergt. Sprague, Co. G; Sergt. Trohler, Co. H.
Wounded—Michael Hasey, Co. E, arm; Sergt. Charles Maher, head; Lieut. E. T. Hartley, (dead); Lieut. H. H. Servoice, neck; John Call, Co. I, scapl; Joseph Spohn, Co. L, foot; Curtis E. Sheldon, Co. M, foot; John Bardo, Co. K, hand; James Hyatt, Co. H, face; George Bosworth, Co. D, arm; A. Brotherton, Co. C, arm; Jacob Halftown, Co. D, hip; John McEvoy, Co. E, shoulder; John N. Burke, Co. G, abdomen; John W. Rodgers, Co. E, arm; Moses O'Leary, Co. G, arm; Marcellus Denvo, Co. A, arm; Charles Nobens, Co. H, scalp; George Christman, Co. I, arm; Harvey Fairman, Co. L, eye; Eugene Hopkins, Co. H, arm; Rody Looby, Co. M, leg; Royal Cory, Co. F, back; Joseph Sharp, Co. E, knee; John Edwards, Co. M, back; H. W. Severance, Co. E, hand; George H. Murphy, Co. I, shoulder; Robert E, Brown, Co. I, shoulder; John Appleyard, Co. I, thigh; Charles Branch, Co. M, foot; Charles E. Howe, Co. C, mortally; Philip Hoffman, Co. D, cheek; James McKelvey, Co. A, back; Herbert E. Freeman, Co. M, thigh; Benjamin Chapman, Co. L, thigh; Robert Danford, Co. C, thigh; Simeon Johnson, Co. C, arm; Cornelius Philips, Co. H, arm; George L. Williamson, Co. E, arm; J. H. Sopen, Co. B, thigh; Wm. Weaver, Co. K, foot; Thomas McCab, Co. B, mortally; Charles E. Payne, Co. A, thigh; Mason Lang, Co. G, face; Thomas Brown, Co. C, side and arm.

The 14th Heavy Artillery.
The Herald has the following list of officers and men belonging to the Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery captured by the rebels during a charge upon the enemy's breastworks at Petersburg. The list was furnished by Lieutenant Tiffard:
Major Reynold, Captain David Jones, Co H; Lieut Thompson, Jr, Co G: Lieut W H Norton, Capt John Snyder, Co G; Capt Pemberton, Co F; Lieut D H Tiffard, Co D; Lieut T Coglar, Co I; Private P Shafer; Seargeants L Dykius, C Beckwith, W Robinson, D Ritter, all of Company D.
The above have all been sent to Andersonville, Georgia.

Col. Marshall a Prisoner.—We learn that Mrs. E. G. Marshall received a dispatch from Gen. Burnside this morning, stating that her husband, Col. Marshall, was taken prisoner at Petersburg on Saturday, but was not wounded. He was in command of the 1st brigade, 2d division, 9th corps, and led the assault upon the rebel works, after the explosion of the mine.—The brave Colonel will chafe under imprisonment, but we rejoice that he is unhurt, and hope that he will soon be restored to liberty and duty. The Fourteenth Heavy Artillery, being in the advance, is said to have suffered severely. This will be sad news, to cloud the glory of our victory; and we sympathize deeply with our friends who may be called to mourn for heroes slain.

The 14th Heavy Artillery--List of Wounded.
We have no further particulars of the charge made by the 14th Heavy Artillery on the works at Petersburg, in which Col. Marshall was captured. As stated yesterday, they were placed in a bad position, and suffered seriously. A correspondent of the Democrat sends the following list of casualties, which were telegraphed from Washington:
Lieut E T Hartley, left lung, since died.
Lieut H H Survice, face.
Corp John Edwards, M, severe.
H W Severance, E, hand.
Corp Cornelius Phillips, H, foot.
Geo L Williamson, E, arm.
Corp J H Loden, B, thigh.
Wm Weaver, K, foot.
Corp A D Page, A, thigh.
Sergt Geo Bosworth, D, arm.
A Brotherton, C, arm.
John McEveratt, B, shoulder.
John W Burke, G, abdomen.
Chas Nolens, H, scalp.
Corp Geo Christman, I, arm.
Harvey Severice, A, very severe.
Eugene Hopkins, H, arm.
Rody Tooby, M, leg.
Augustus Dafers, A, scalp.
Royal Corry, F, back.
Joseph Sharp, E, knee.
Sergt J W Rodgers, E, arm.
Moses E Larry, G, arm.
John Call, I, scalp.
Joseph St John, L, foot.
Curtis S Sheldon, F, foot.
John F Bards, K, hand.
Sergt Jas McCalvey, A, back.
Benj Chapman, I, thigh.
Robert Danford, C, arm.
Sergt Robert Brown. I, shoulder.
John Appleyard, I, thigh.
Chas Branch, M, foot.
Sergt Chas Howe, C, abdomen.
Corp R Hoffman, D, severe.
Geo H Murphy, I, shoulder.

From Petersburg.
FROM PETERSBURG.
IN THE ENTRENCHMENTS,
Near Petersburg, July 5, 1864.
Editors Express: In looking over the mail for our regiment this morning, I found among other documents sent to me from Western New York, a copy of the Express and you cannot concieve [sic] the emotions of pleasure I experienced in looking over its columns, especially the local. Your paper has always been a welcome visitor, and to meet with a copy of it here seems more like a visit from a near and dear friend then anything else. Pent up here in a little seven by nine hole dug in a side hill within easy musket range of the rebel rifle pits, with the burning sun beating down upon us and the bullets from the rebel sharpshooters whistling about our ears day and night, is no pleasant thing to contemplate, much less to experience. We have been in this situation for two weeks, and during this time our loss in killed and wounded will average six men per day. The most of them are hit while walking about in the rear of the breastworks. Three-fourths of those who are severely wounded, never recover, and those who receive slight wounds suffer a great deal from the extreme heat, and are often obliged to lose a hand or an arm from a slight flesh wound. Still the work of death goes on, and those who are not killed outright are taken to the hospitals to undergo the pain and dangers of amputation or exhaustion and mortification from the killing heat. But the wounded men are not the only ones that suffer. There are others who from long marches, hard labor, short rations and constant exposure, have become debilitated and broken in health—they too are obliged to withstand the bewildering heat of the day, and the cold dewy nights, with the earth for a bed and the sky for a spread.
No wonder that the list of mortality in a great army like this should be large and appalling; there are innumerable and substantial reasons for it, it could not be otherwise. But much of the suffering in the army is greatly mitigated at present by the generous donations of the Sanitary and Christian Commissions. They are doing God's service. Through the thunder storms of the battle and over the fields of the slain comes the angel like bands of the commissions ministering to the wounded and the dying soldier, and making bright and cheerful those dark and gloomy hours, which drag so slowly by the sick man's couch. Hundreds of men who will return to their homes and friends after the war is over will owe their life and their health to the kind and generous ministrations of the Sanitary and Christian Commissions.
In the engagement of the 17th of last June our regiment made a bayonet charge on the rebel lines and drove them from their works. We had possession of them about two minutes when the enemy charged back on us and recovered their lost ground. A second charge by our men rolled them back again with great slaughter, and the works retaken were held. In this brief and sanguinary conflict we lost over two hundred men and about fourteen commissioned officers. We have no field officers left since the last fight, and a a captain is now in command. The colonel of our regiment (E. G. Marshall, was acting Brigadier General, and was wounded early in the day. Our Lieut. Colonel, (C. H. Corning), a most excellent and obliging officer, was wounded at Cold Harbor, and consequently was not with us on this occasion. The commanding General gave the regiment a high compliment for the bravery and courage displayed under such trying circumstances.
All that we want here now is the undivided support of the people at home, and we will soon put quietus on the rebellion. If reinforcements are necessary, send them. If supplies are necessary send them; and this great struggle which has been considered problematical will be speedily consummated, and peace once more restored to the land.
Yours, truly,
E. M. DUNLAP,
1st Lieut. 14th N. Y. Artillery.

HOME AGAIN.—The 100 men of the 14th Heavy Artillery detailed at Buffalo for drafting service, arrived home last night. The Buffalo papers speak highly of their conduct.

RETURNED.—The detachments of men from the 14th Heavy Artillery, sent to Utica, Syracuse and Lockport, for draft purposes have returned and are now in camp.

DEATH OF A SOLDIER.—A man named John Folly, a member of the 14th Heavy Artillery, died at camp this morning. His death was superinduced by excessive drinking.

The men of the Old Thirteenth and other regiments who were at any time prisoners of war, can draw pay for commutation of rations by making application at my office. Also men who have been on furlough.
Office at Court House. A. G. MUDGE.

ARTILLERY.—Capt. Geo. S. Green, of the 14th Artillery, has now on his roll one hundred and thirty-five men, needing but a few more to have his company complete. 2d Lieut. Andrew Gosson (of the old 14th Infantry) has been very successful, in Malone, Franklin Co., in recruiting for Capt. Green's company, having secured in five days, last week, twenty-seven men.

Died—In Washington hospitals, are reported in the 19th: FRANK SIGOURNEY, Co. G, CORNELIUS BABCOCK, Co. F, 14th heavy artillery. (June 1864)

ARRIVED IN BUFFALO.—The Buffalo papers announce that a detachment of the 14th Heavy Artillery arrived in that city on Monday afternoon. The Courier says: "They carried muskets and numbered about 125 men. Upon reaching the Office of Provost Marshal Scroggs they were brought to a halt, and afterwards took up their line of march for Fort Porter, where they remain as Provost Guard during the draft. They looked well, and Rochester should be proud of them." The Express says: "They are a resolute looking set of fellows, and a number of them were formerly members of the veteran 13th Infantry regiment. Some fifty of them were enlisted in this city by Lieut. Cyrus D. Phillips."

Deserved Promotion—PETER PICHLER, who served two years in the 14th regiment, and was wounded at Gaines's mill, has since served as a corporal in company L, 2d artillery. He is now home on leave, suffering from a wound. Through the instrumentality of his old commander, Colonel McQuade, he was this morning handed a commission from Governor SEYMOUR, as 2d Lieutenant in his company. He deserved it. (1864)

Fourteenth Artillery.—The following dispatch comes to us in the report for the Associated Press: (1864)
NEW YORK, Friday, July 29.
Major W. W. Trowbridge, of the 14th N. Y. heavy artillery, has been dishonorably dismissed on account of fraud.
There must be some mistake about this, which we hope soon to see rectified. Maj. TROWBRIDGE is too well known in this city, and his reputation as an honorable gentleman too well established, to admit of a doubt that some error has occurred by which he unjustly suffers.

Burials of Soldiers.—Among the late burials from army hospitals we notice the following: (1864)
Wm. Rose, I, 14th New York heavy artillery; Clark Harris, K, 14th New York heavy artillery; Joseph Damars, M, 24th New York cavalry; Patrick O'Neill, F, 14th New York heavy artillery.
Information in relation to them can be obtained from Capt. J. M. Moore, A. Q. M. U. S. A., 134 F street, Washington.

—Major REYNOLDS, of the 14th artillery, was at Rock House prison, Petersburg, on the 18th. He was to be removed to Andersonville, Georgia. (1864)

Heavy Artillery Service.
The attention of our readers is called to the notice in our paper of recruiting for the Heavy Artillery. Capt. Trowbridge has had capital success since he came here, in getting recruits. He has "pitched his tent" upon Hasbrouck's Block in Ford street, and had his headquarters in the Stilwell building on State street, opposite the Seymour House. The inducements to enter this arm of the service are many. There is no marching no carrying of knapsacks. The officers of this regiment have all had experience in the field. We trust Capt. Trowbridge will continue to receive applications for enlistment as numerously as he has done since opening his office here.

Personal.—GEORGE S. GREEN, of the 14th Heavy Artillery, and a resident of this city, has been appointed First Lieutenant of his company. (1864)

14th N. Y. Artillery.—The Richmond Examine mentions the arrival at Libby prison of Lieutenant H. E. WENTWORTH, of the 14th N. Y. artillery.

Among the deaths reported in Washington hospitals is the name of FRANCIS LONG, company C, 14th N. Y. artillery.

FUNERAL OF MAJOR HEDGES.—The body of Major Job C. Hedges will arrive at Dansville today and the funeral will take place at four this afternoon.
The Herald's correspondent, alluding to the fall of Major H., says: " I n the charge of Friday we lost a most gallant officer in Major Hedges, of the 14th New York Heavy Artillery. A grapeshot perforated his breast near the heart, while other portions of his body were wounded by Minie balls. He was literally riddled with bullets."

Deceased Soldiers.—The following soldiers have died recently at field hospitals at City Point:
Captain N. Underhill, 14th heavy artillery, June 30th; George Rose, N. Y. heavy artillery, July 1st; Ira Tunnel, 14th N. Y. heavy artillery, June 30th; William Stilwell, 14th N. Y. heavy artillery, July 1st.

The 14th N. Y. Heavy Artillery.
The 14th Regiment, N. Y. Heavy Artillery, 1800 strong, which has been garrisoning the forts in New York Harbor since last fall, have been ordered to the front, and left New York for Washington on the 22d. We presume this Regiment will take the field as Infantry, as other Heavy Artillery Regiments have already been compelled to do.

PASSAGE OF MILITARY.—On Friday evening last, two companies of the 14th Heavy Artillery, numbering 300 men, left Rochester, for New York. They were greeted on their departure with a feu de joi of Roman candles, cheers, &c. They passed through this city in the night.

Burials of Soldiers.—Among the late burials from army hospitals we notice the following:
Wm. Rose, I, 14th New York heavy artillery; Clark Harris, K, 14th New York heavy artillery; Joseph Darnars, M. 24th New York cavalry; Patrick O'Neill, F, 14th New York heavy artillery.
Information in relation to them can be obtained from Capt. J. M. MOORE, A. Q. M. U. S. A., 134 Front street, Washington.

Capt. Robbins.—A N. Y. Herald letter yesterday contained an account of a gallant achievement by Capt ROBBINS, of Whitestown, formerly a member of Company A, 14th regiment who was transferred before his term of service had expired to the 1st New Jersey cavalry, in which he has done duty since. In one of the recent battles a furious charge was made upon our rear guard, breaking clear through the 6th Ohio. The 1st New Jersey, was sent to its aid. Capt. ROBBINS WAS at one time completely cut off from the ballance [sic] of his command; but placing himself at the head of his squadron, he gallantly cut his way through, bringing in several prisoners.

DEATH OF MAJOR HEDGES.—By a telegraph received at Rochester last evening, we noticed that Maj. Job C. Hedges of the 14th Heavy Artillery, was killed in a charge in one of the hard battles near Richmond. Major Hedges entered the service as a First Lieutenant, and was Adjt. of the "old Thirteenth" at the time of the expiration of its time of service. Upon the re-organization of the 14th Heavy Artillery, he re-entered the service and took a deep interest in recruiting for it in which he was very successful. The Regiment has lost in his death an accomplished and valuable officer, and the cause of Freedom a tried and faithful supporter. A host of friends in Livingston County and elsewhere will sympathize most deeply with his afflicted family in his bereavement.

THE 14TH ARTILLERY. —The 14th regiment of Heavy Artillery is now full and has a surplus of one or two hundred men. Major Hedges arrived from Elmira on Wednesday evening, having mustered the 12th company for this regiment, which completes its organization. Two hundred men are to leave the West End Barracks this evening for New York. The balance of the battalion will soon follow.

CAPT. GEO. TREADWELL.—A letter was received here yesterday, by the parents of this young officer, which furnished glad information to not only his relatives, but his friends generally. He was not captured or wounded, as was reported. From the great fatigues and exposures during the campaign, Capt. Treadwell was completely exhausted and used up, and the Regimental Surgeon recommended that he go to the hospital, and recruit. He is now in hospital, under treatment, and hopes soon to be able to join his Regiment. Capt. Treadwell reports the number of the Regiment at 292, on the day following the battle of the 18th. He regrets that Major Pruyn is a prisoner, and thinks, as a great many do, that he might better be dead than subjected to the tortures and outrages of the "Libby Prison."

Personal.—Capt. George S. Green, of the 14th Heavy Artillery, writes to request us to say that any business to be transacted in settling up recruiting accounts, must be done immediately. He is at Sandy Hook, New York Harbor, where he can be addressed.
— Mrs. Col. Marshall has just been the recipient of an elegant piano—the gift of the officers of the 14th artillery—the regiment her husband commands. This splendid instrument, one of the best made, arrived at Rochester Tuesday, and was delivered to Mrs. Marshall with the compliments of the officers of the 14th, as a testimonial of their esteem.—
Several of the officers from this city contributed.
Capt. John Weed, formerly of the 13th Infantry, and more recently of the 14th Artillery, started for the gold mines of Idaho last evening.

The Heavy Artillery Regiments.—
Geo. Dawson, who is now in Washington, writes as follows about the Heavy Artillery Regiment, some of which, the 14th, 8th, 4th and 9th were recruited in this vicinity, and in which our readers are interested:
There is an impression that all the Heavy Artillery Regiments (or what remains of them) will be ordered back to the Forts around Washington. It would, probably, have been quite as well had they remained there.
The recent rebel demonstration against Washington has proved the necessity of maintaining a considerable force around the city, and this being so it is nothing more than proper that the force so employed should be the one recruited especially for that purpose. Our Heavy Artillery Regiments, especially the 8th New York, have suffered most terribly in the recent campaigns. We do not suppose they would object to similar service at the front, if a similar emergency again required it; but if any large force is to be sent for the especial defence of Washington, they may very properly claim the right to constitute a part of it. Mr. Dawson's son was an officer in the 7th Heavy Artillery, and was severely wounded several weeks since; and Mr. Dawson is probably aware of some proposition of the kind indicated in his paragraph.

Personal.—Major Job C. Hedges, of the 14th N. Y. Artillery, returned to Rochester yesterday on official service. The regiment is still on garrison duty in New-York harbor.

AN ELEGANT PRESENT.—Mrs. Col. Marshall has just been the recipient of an elegant piano—the gift of the officers of the 14th artillery—the regiment her husband commands. This splendid instrument, one, of the best made, arrived here from New York yesterday and was delivered to Mrs. Marshall with the compliments of the officers of the 14th as a testimonial of their esteem.
Lieut. Col. Corning and Adjutant Hedges, of the 14th Heavy Artillery, arrived from New York last evening, where they have been on business connected with the regiment.

Promoted.
We are gratified to here that Sergeant Alonzo C. DeGraff has been made 2d
Lieut. in Co. G, 14th. Reg't N. Y. Heavy Artillery.— [Recorder.

THE 14TH ARTILLERY.—The first battalion of the 14th Artillery will leave for New York tomorrow at 8 a.m., by the Central R. R., in a special train. The battalion comprises four companies, and about 500 men under command of Major W. H. Reynolds.
On Monday next a part of the second battalion will leave under Lieut. Col. Corning for the same destination.

CASUALTIES.—Major REYNOLDS of the 14th Heavy Artillery reports that his cousin AUGUSTUS REYNOLDS, of this city, is among the killed.
BERNARD DOHERTY, of Utica, Sergeant of the Second Regiment, was killed a few days ago while commanding his company.
JAMES HANDWRIGHT, of this city, first Sergeant in the 146th Regiment, has been reported killed, but a letter to his sister says he is wounded and a prisoner.
PATRICK HEHIR, of this city, and a member of the 12th U. S. Infantry, is among the killed.
Lieut. George Brennan has enlisted seventy-five men for an Artillery Company, in the 14th Regiment, forty of whom are from the town of Milo. He has been very successful, indeed, in getting recruits. His men are all mustered into the service, and will soon be engaged in active military operations.
ANOTHER SOLDIER GONE.—John C. St. John, son of Mr. Ludim St. John, of Milo Center, who belongs to the 14th Heavy Artillery, N. Y. S. Volunteers, died of diphtheria [sic], in the Military Hospital, at Alexandria, Va., on the 24th inst. His remains reached here by yesterday morning's train. The funeral will be attended at the house of his father, this afternoon, at 2 o'clock, and at the second Baptist Church, in Milo, at 3 P. M.
Since writing the above, we learn that, on opening the coffin, it was found that there had been a mistake, and that another corpse was sent, instead of that of Mr. St. John. The friends are using the telegraph and other means to get the proper body, and, until then, the funeral will be deferred.

D. A. HURLBERT, of the 14th heavy artillery, formerly a compositor in the Black River Herald office, is home on a furlough. He was wounded at Petersburg.

The Fourteenth Artillery.— A correspondent of the Boonville Herald, writing from Cold Harbor, June 11th, says that the regiment has suffered considerably; 300 will about cover their loss. He says "the regiment has been guilty of a p... and one or two skedaddles, but it always has been placed in the most trying places and, with few honorable exceptions, the regiment has been cowardly led."

FOURTEENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—MAJOR Reynolds a Prisoner.—Mr. R. Reynolds, of this city, has received a line from Rev. D. G. Corey, stating that his son, Major Reynolds, of the Fourteenth Heavy Artillery, is wounded and a prisoner. How badly he was wounded could not be ascertained at the time of writing, but Dr. Corey expected to leave immediately for the front, and would learn particulars if possible.
The following letter to the Rev. T. D. COOK, from his son, Lieut. Theo. Cook, we are permitted to copy. It confirms the statement that Major Reynolds is a prisoner; but Lieut. Cook does not think he is wounded. The Fourteenth has been doing some hot gallant work:
Camp near Petersburg, June 19.
Dear Father.—on the night of the 17th, the 14th made one of the most desperate charges of the present war.
We took a line of rebel rifle pits, situated upon a rise of ground, and commanding a terrible fire upon us as we advanced upon the slope. Our division was formed in three lines of battle. The 14th was in the extreme front, when we reached the enemy. They had a battery on our left, pouring in grape and cannister; also, a flank fire on our right; spite of all this, we stormed the line and took it. We held it four hours; captured 250 prisoners; then our ammunition giving out, we were forced to retire. Our loss was very heavy. Major Reynolds was taken prisoner. I think he was not wounded. He won the admiration of all by his cool bravery.
Major Hodges was shot dead early in the conflict.—Col. Marshall had been wounded earlier in the day—not seriously. Col. Corning was not here, having been badly wounded some time ago. We have none of the field officers left. We have lost in killed, wounded and missing about 250. I escaped without a scratch. I am Adjutant of the 1st Battalion. Capt. David Jones commanded the battalion. He was captured, I think.
My courier is going. Must close. Fuller particulars hereafter. Love to all.
Affectionately, Theo. P. Cooke.

A LIEUTENANT PLAYING THE ROWDY.—Last night a man named Chas. A. Vedder, a Lieutenant in the 4th Heavy Artillery, and who hails from Niagara Falls, was locked up in the Police Station, to answer a charge of disorderly conduct. He was brought before the Police Magistrate this morning and examined. It appeared by the testimony that on Monday evening he entered a street car to go to Camp Genesee, drunk and smoking, or attempting to smoke. He threw himself upon one of the seats at full length as if to sleep off his debauch. There were ladies in the car and more coming from Corinthian Hall, where a lecture had just closed. The conductor told Vedder that he must set up in the car and must not smoke. The fellow replied with a filthy remark and made a motion as if to draw a revolver. The conductor ejected him from the car. Finding himself in the street, he approached a young man standing on the sidewalk, who was in no way concerned in the affair, and charged him with putting him out of the car, at the same time using a vile epithet. The young man gave him a blow that sent him whirling to the middle of the street. About this time the driver of the car relieved Vedder of his revolver lest he might do mischief, and there the matter ended for a time.
Last night Vedder, as if not satisfied with the punishment he had received, appeared beside the same car, near the Railway Stables in State street, and demanded his pistol of the driver. The driver was not standing on the car at the time. From some cause not precisely known, the horses took fright and ran away, throwing the car against the curb stone. Vedder had gone about far enough, and was locked up for the night by Policeman Holleran. He came in by counsel this morning, and sought to show that he was not drunk on Monday night; a great mistake, for if he was not drunk, and used such language in the presence of ladies as was sworn to by respectable witnesses, he ought to go to the Penitentiary for six months.—Drunkenness might have been a partial excuse for such conduct, and so the Magistrate told him in passing sentence. He was fined $10 for being drunk and required to give bail to keep the peace.
The sentence was a mild one. The street cars are the resort of ladies and children as well as men, and a man who enters them to use obscene language or act the loafer offends the whole public.
The conductors on the Lake View Route say that the officers and soldiers of Camp Genesee are civil in their deportment on the cars. This man Vedder has been the only exception, and this is not the first time that he has violated the rules of the company and of good society.

DANSVILLE ADVERTISER.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1865.
HISTORY OF THE SERVICES
OF THE
14th Heavy Artillery.
The recruiting for this regiment began as early as June 1863, with Headquarters at Rochester, N. Y., and was raised principally from the counties of Yates, St. Lawrence, Jefferson and Monroe, though every part of the State was represented. The organization was completed January 4th, 1864, with the following officers Field and Staff:
Col. E. G. Marshall. Surgeon, I. V. Mullen.
Lt. Col. C. H. Corning. A. Surg. Luther Phillips.
Maj. W. H. Reynolds. A. Surg. Jas. M. Oliver.
Maj. Job C. Hedges. Q. M. Adolph Shubert.
Maj. W. W. Trowbridge. Adjt. C. H. Van Brakle.
The regiment was employed in garrisoning the Harbor of New York at the following posts: Fort Richmond, being the headquarters of the Regiment, Sandy Hook, Fort Schuyler, Willet's Point and Fort Hamilton. It remained here until April 23d, 1864, when it was ordered to the defences of Washington. On arriving there it was assigned to the 9th Corps, Gen. Burnside commanding, and joined the Corps at Warrenton Junction, Va. Here it was made part of the "Provisional Brigade," under command of Col. Marshall. On the 2nd of May it marched for the Rapidan and after halting at Brandy Station till the last trains were sent over that road to Alexandria, it pushed forward and crossed the Rapidan about 2 o'clock, A. M., on the 6th of May and was assigned to the duty of holding the Ford. About noon of that day it was sent forward and arrived at the battle ground of "the Wilderness" early in the afternoon. Line of battle was formed and advanced to a suitable position for entrenching. Left this position on the night of the 7th and arrived at the river Ny on the 11th. Took an active part in the fight and in the battle of Spottsylvania C. H., on the 14th 15th, 16th and 17th.
Marched to the left with the army and forded the North Anna river on the 24th inst., and threw up works just in season to check the enemy after they had succeeded in driving Gen. Ledlie's Brigade.
Occupied an advanced position at Tolopotamy Creek and on June 2d formed the rear guard of the army as it swung away to Cold Harbor; were attacked in the rear about 6 P. M. and wheeled into position at the edge of the woods; a brigade giving way on its left exposed it to a severe enfilading fire of both musketry and artillery; three times was it driven out only to rally and re-take its position, and only when the darkness of night concealed every movement did it give up its advanced, unsupported position and join the rest of the army.
In this fight the regiment lost heavily. Lieut. Bentley was mortally wounded and died that evening. Lieut. Tallman was wounded. Capt. Kieffer was killed and Lieuts. Lemmon and Wentworth were taken prisoners. Supported the 5th Massachusetts Battery at Bethesda Church, June 3d; and held the flank of the army at Cold harbor, June 5th, 6th and 7th, where Lt. Col. Corning was accidentally shot by his servant.
Crossed the James River early in the morning of June 15th and about 5 P. M.
of June 17th charged the enemy's works in front of Petersburg and after meeting with a stubborn resistance captured the works, but ammunition failing were driven out with great loss. Maj. Job C. Hedges, than whom no more brave and gallant officer ever lived, was instantly killed while leading his battalion in the charge. Col. Marshall, Capt. Underhill, Lieut. Russell and Lieut. Spencer were wounded. Major Reynolds, Capt. Pemberton and Jones, Lieuts. J. H. Thompson, Coglan, Piffard, Snyder and Norton taken prisoners, and a loss of enlisted men of 113.
After this the regiment lay in the trenches before Petersburg continually under a heavy fire from sharpshooters and artillery till July 30th, when the regiment had the honor to lead in the assault on the "crater"—being the first regiment to plant their colors on the enemy's works, capturing one stand of rebel colors. Here Col. Marshall, Lt. Faass and Lt. Wing were taken prisoners. Lt. Hartley killed. Lts. Curtis and Service wounded, and a loss of 37 enlisted men. Capt. Underhill was killed June 29th. Lts. Pigot and Morrow were wounded July 29th.
Major Geo. M. Randall assumed command of the regiment August 18. On the 15th it moved to the left and occupied the line in front of Fort Hell. On the 19th it moved to the Weldon R. R. and took an active part in the engagements of that day and the 2lst. Major Randall, Capt. L. I. Jones, Lts. Shubert and Jewett were wounded. In the engagement on the 19th the colors fell five times, the bearers being shot, and each time were promptly seized and carried forward. Loss in enlisted men 45. Threw up intrenchments and remained till September 30th, when it took part in the battle of Poplar Grove Church, where Lts. Backus and Eddy were wounded and 20 enlisted men lost.
Were engaged in the battle of Pegram Farm, October 2d. Took part in the reconnoissance [sic] of October 8th, on the Boynton plank-road, returning to camp on the night of October 9th; where it remained until October 26th, when it moved forward in line of battle as far as Hatcher’s Run, and supported Crawford’s division of the 5th Army Corps. In this engagement the regiment sustained no loss.
The object of the movement having been accomplished the regiment fell back with the army to the position occupied previous to the movement. Remained here until December 2d, when the Corps relieved the 2nd Corps on the Petersburg front, the regiment occupying Forts Steadman and Haskell, where it remained until March 25th, 1865, subject meanwhile to daily losses from the enemy's sharpshooters and artillery.
The day of March 25th had not yet dawned when the enemy having massed heavily broke through the lines to the right and left of Fort Steadman, and when discovered had already passed the line.—Beset on all sides and hemmed in, the regiment fought desperately an enemy whose whereabouts could be determined by the flash of the muskets. In less than an hour the fort was completely surrounded and the enemy came swarming in at every possible inlet and over the breastworks; still the gallant band yielded not, but from one bombproof to the other contested hotly every inch of ground. At this time it was still so dark that in the fort it was impossible to distinguish features, and to the calls for officers and comrades the enemy answered, and while it fairly hailed musket balls, and in the hand to hand fight the butt of the musket and the bayonet were freely used, still the regiment flinched not; only when completely overpowered and success was impossible, did the remnant of the garrison cut their way through and rejoin the remainder of the regiment in Fort Haskell. Again and again did the enemy's infantry attempt to capture this fort but each time were repulsed with heavy loss. At length after having been there engaged for over live hours, the regiment supported by the 67th Mass. and 3d Md., charged down the works captured by the enemy driving them out of battery 10 and 11 and recaptured Fort Steadman with many prisoners, also taking the colors of the 26th South Carolina regiment. Capt. Houghton and Lt. Piggot were wounded. Capt. Foote, Asst. Surg. Morse, Lts. McCall, Lockbruner, M. Backus, White and Kelsey were taken prisoners. Loss in enlisted men 229.
Remained in the works until April 3d, when the regiment moved forward at 5 A. M., and occupied the city of Petersburg, crossed the Appotomax [sic] and encamped.—Broke camp April 5th, recrossed the Appomattox river, marched through the city of Petersburg and encamped two miles from the city. Broke camp April 7th and marched to Wilson's Station on the S. S. R. R., and remained there till about April 22d, when it marched to City Point and embarked for Alexandria, and soon after arriving there were ordered to Tennallytown, Md.
June 17th were detached from the 9th Corps and ordered to the defences of Washington, occupying Forts Reno, Kearny, De Russey, Bayard, Simmons, Mansfield and Sumner.
August 16th received the orders for muster out.
The regiment had connected with it between 2,700 and 2,800 men and returns with about 600.
The following are the casualties in Commissioned officers. Killed in action:
Major Job C. Hedges; Capts. Kieffer and Underhill, Lts. Hartley, Gossin and Bentley. Died—Capt. Wilkie, Lieut. J. H. Thompson, died in Andersonville.—Wounded—Col. E. G. Marshall, Capt. L. I. Jones, Lts. Service, Cleary, Curtis, Pigott, Tallman, Russell, Eddy, Backus, M. Shubert, Spencer, Morrow and Lemmon.
Dismissed—Major W. W. Trowbridge, fraud; Capt. Geo. A. Reynolds, cowardice; Capt. Wm. Treadwell, cowardice; Capt. Geo. Greene, mutinous conduct; Lt. J. L. Lucas, cowardice; Lt. M. E. Dunlap, cowardice; Lt. Judson Knickerbocker, cowardice; Lt. J. G. Jewett, absent without leave.
The following is the present Roster of Field and Staff:
Col. and Brevet Brig. Gen. E. G. Marshall.
Lieut. Col. and Brevet Col. Geo. M. Randall.
Major H. V. Pemberton, Surg. I. V. Mullen,
Major J. P. Cleary, Asst. Surg. L. Phillips,
Major Albion Howe, Q. M. Adolph Shubert,
Acting Adjutant, M. Madigan.
The following is the present Roster of Line Officers of the 14th N. Y. heavy Artillery:
CAPTAINS.
Jerome B. Proctor,
Thomas Coglan,
Seth N. Hedges,
John Snyder,
Lewis Faas,
Robert F. Tallman,
Charles H. Houghton,
George Brennan.
1ST LIEUTENANTS.
Abraham Verplank,
Theo. P. Cook,
Frank M. Thompson,
William Waring,
Martin Shubert,
Frank W. Call,
Henry M. Backus,
Wm. H. Van Buskirk,
D. H. Piffard,
A. H. De Graff,
Stephen B. Russell,
W. W. McCall,
Wm. H. Norton.
2d LIEUTENANTS.
James M. Archer,
Peter Campbell,
Harmon E. Wentworth,
William Piggott,
Byron Cuppernull,
Winslow N. Olin,
James H. Lynde,
John C. Trolan,
Nelson L. Trussell,
John F. Ward,
Charles A. O'Brien,
Robert B. Claxton,
Schuyler Gardner,
John Grierson,
William Attridge.

... MALONE, FRANKLIN COUNTY, N. Y.
THURSDAY,OCTOBER 19, 186_
" Now reigns full-orbed the moon," and we sit upon the deck, and drink in the beauty of a scene, which is indeed supassingly [sic] beautiful.—Over the mirror-like surface of the Lake, the moon sheds its mellow light, while the wake of the steamer, as we glide swiftly along, seems like a line of frosted silver. The little islands stand out dark and silent as we pass them, while the distant mountains loom up grand and mighty against the sky. This is the witching time--the time when, in al, ages, Cupid’s darts fly swift and sure; and our "Young Couple" seem disposed to make the most of it. Half reclining on the seat which surrounds the deck, hand clasped in hand, "soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again." Oh! such glances.—They carried us back to certain other moon-light nights, when—but pshaw! what's the use of old folks being sentimental? So goes the world—and so, till time shall end, will tender glances do their fatal work, 'neath Luna's silvery beams.
Meantime the "Happy Family" are chatting like so many caged monkeys, Pater Familias, a smooth, meek, bald-headed man, is trying seemingly in vain, to answer the questions of his two blooming daughters. No. 1 is chiefly remarkable for a great deal of seaside hat, and has a kind of drenched, shivering appearance, as if, having lately had a souse, she had not entirely recovered from the shock. Her conversation, too, is rather rambling and disconnected, consisting principally in short ejaculatory sentences like the following: "Oh pa! Dont now! My! Hush! now, do!" all of which seemed highly to amuse or entertain pa.
No.2 was really amazing, when you consider the water-fall. Niagara, look well to your laurels! with glass beads sparkling, your rival appears. The only wonder was that one small head could support it all. Now the jargon recommences: "Pa, didn’t I catch a trout?" "What route do we take, pa?" I broke my hook, didn’t I pa?" Fourteen miles by stage—oh dear.” “At the Union, pa?” Won’t that be lovely?" Poor pa nods his little bald head, and answers,”yes, dear," "no dear," hither and thither promiscuously, and finally in despair, rushes down to smoke.
Oh! glorious night, thou wert not made for slumber, and yet, "Tired nature's sweet restor, balmy sleep" is wooing with sweetest tone; and visions of a comfortable berth rise before me. Bright scene of beauty, farewell! You shall live long in memory, "a thing of beauty," which shall be to me indeed, a "joy forever."
New York, Sept. 11th, 1865. GRACE.

From the Rochester Union.
History of the 14th Heavy Artillery.
The following is the history of the 14th Heavy Artillery.
The recruiting for this regiment, begun as early as June 18634, with headquarters at Rochester, N. Y., and was raised principally from the counties of Yates, St. Lawrence, Jefferson and Monroe, though every part of the State was represented. The organization was completed January 4th with the following officers, field and staff:
Col. E. G. Marshall.
Lieut. Col. C. H. Corning.
Major W. H. Reynolds.
Major W. W. Trowbridge.
Surgeon I. V. Muller.
Asst. Surg. Luther Philips.
Asst. Surg. Jas. M. Oliver.
R. Q. M. Adolph Shuber.
Adjt. C. H. Van Brackle.
The Regiment was employed in garrisoning the harbor of New York, at the following posts; Fort Richmond, being the headquarters of the regiment, Sandy Hook, Fort Schuyler, Willett's Point and Fort Hamilton. It remained here until April 23d, 1864, when it was ordered to the defences of Washington. On arriving there it was assigned to the 9th corbs [sic], Gen. Burnside commanding, and joined the corps at Warrenton Junction, Va. Here it was made part of the "Provisional Brigade," under command of Col. Marshall. On the 2d day of May it marched for the Rapidan and after ....
it remained until October 26th, when it moved forward in line of battle as far as Hatcher's Run and supported Crawford's Division of the 5th army corps. In this engagement the regiment sustained no loss.
The object of the movement having been accomplished the regiment fell back with the army to the position occupied previous to the movement. It remained here until December 3d, when the corps relieved the 2d corps on the Petersburg front, the regiment occupying Fort Steadman and Fort Haskell, where it remained until March 25th, 1865, subject meanwhile to daily losses from the enemy's sharpshooters and artillery.
The day of March 20th had not yet dawned when the enemy having massed heavily broke through the lines to the right and left of Fort Steadman, and when discovered had already passed the line. Beset on all sides and hemmed in, the regiment fought desperately an enemy whose whereabouts could only be determined by the flashes of their muskets. In less than an hour the fort was completely surrounded, and the enemy came swarming in at every possible inlet and over the breastworks, still the gallant band yielded not, but from one bomb proof to another contested hotly every inch of ground. At this time it was still so dark that in the fort it was impossible to distinguish features, and to the calls for officers and comrades the enemy answered, and while it fairly hailed musket balls, and in the hand to hand fight, the butt of the musket and the bayonet, were freely used, still the regiment flinched not; only when completely overpowered and success was impossible, did the remnant of the garrison cut their way through and rejoined the remainder of the regiment, then in Fort Haskell.
Again and again did the enemy's infantry attempt to capture this Fort, but each time were repulsed with heavy loss. At length, having been there engaged for over five hours, the regiment, supported by the 57th Massachusetts and 3d Maryland, charged down upon the works captured by the enemy, driving them out of Batteries Ten and Eleven, and RECAPTURING Fort Steadman, with many prisoners; also taking the colors of the 26th South Carolina regiment. Capt. Houghton and Lieut. Pigott were wounded. Capt. Foote, Asst-Surgeon Morse, Lieuts. McCall, Lockbruner, M. Backus, White and Kelsey were taken prisoners. Loss in enlisted men two hundred and twenty-nine.
Remained in the works until April 3d, when the regiment moved forward at 5 A.M., and occupied the city of Petersburgh [sic], crossed the Appomattox and encamped. Broke camp April 5th, recrossed the Appomattox River, marched through the city of Petersburgh [sic] and encamped two miles from the city. Broke camp April 7th, and marched to Wilson's Station, on the Southside Railroad, and remained there until about April 22, when it marched to City Point and embarked for Alexandria, and soon after arriving there were ordered to Tenallytown, Maryland.
June 17th, were detached from the Ninth Corps and ordered to the defences of Washington, occupying Forts Reno, Kearney, DeRussey, Bayard, Simmons, Mansfield and Sumner.
August 16, received orders to be mustered out.
The Regiment had connected with it between 2,700 and 2,800 men, and returns with about 600.
The following are the casualties in commissioned officers:
Killed in action—Major Job C. Hedges; Captains Kieffer and Underhill, Lieutenants Hartley, Gossin and Bentley.
Died—Captain Wilkie, Lieutenant J. H. Thompson, died in Andersonville.
Wounded—Col. E. G. Marshall, Captains L. I. Jones, C. H. Houghton, Lieutenants Service, Cleary, Curtis, Pigott, Tallman, Russell, Eddy, Backus, M. Shubert, Spencer, Morrow, Lemmon and Snyder.
Dismissed.
Major W. W. Trowbridge, fraud.

Col. Marshall. On the 2d day of May it marched for the Rapidan, and after halting at Brandy Station till the last trains were sent over that road to Alexandria, it pushed forward and crossed the Rapidan about 2 o'clock A. M., on the 6th of May, and was assigned to the duty of holding the Ford. About noon of that day it was sent forward and arrived at the battle ground of the "Wilderness" early in the afternoon. Line of battle was formed and advanced to a suitable position for entrenching. Left this position on the night of the 7th and arrived at Ny River on the 11th. Took an active part in that fight and in the battle of Spottsylvania C. H. on the 14th, 15th, 16th and 17th.
Marched to the left with the army and forded the North Anna River on the 24th inst., and threw up works just in season to check the enemy after they had succeeded in driving in Gen. Ledlie's brigade.
Oocupied [sic] an advanced position at Tolopotamy Creek, and on June 2d formed the rear guard of the army as it swung away to Cold Harbor; were attacked in the rear about 5 P. M., and wheeled into position at the edge of the woods; a brigade giving way on its left exposed it to a severe enfilading fire of both musketry and artillery; three times was it driven out only to rally and retake its position, and only when the darkness of the night concealed every movement, did it give up its advanced, unsupported position and join the rest of the army.
In this fight the regiment lost heavily. Lieut. Bentley was mortally wounded and died that evening. Lieut. Tallman was wounded. Capt. Kieffer was killed and Lieut. Lemmon and Worth were taken prisoners. Supported the 5th Massachusetts Battery at Bethsaida Church, June 3d; and held the flank of the army at Cold Harbor, June 5th, 6th and 7th, where Lieut.-Col. Corning was accidentally shot by his servant.
Crossed the James River early in the morning of June 15th, and about 5 P. M. of June 17th charged the enemy's works in front of Petersburg, and after meeting with a stubborn resistance, captured the works; but ammunition failing, were driven out with great loss. Major Job C. Hedges, than whom no more brave and gallant officer ever lived, was instantly killed while leading his battalion in the charge. Col. Marshall, Capt. Underhill, Lieut. Russell and Lieut. Spencer were wounded. Major Reynolds, Capts. Pemberton and Jones, Lieuts. J. H. Thompson, Coglan, Piffard, Snyder and Norton taken prisoners, and a loss of enlisted men of 113.
After this the regiment lay in the trenches before Petersburgh [sic], continually under a heavy fire from sharpshooters and artillery till July 30th, when the regiment had the honor to lead in the assault on the "Crater"—being the first regiment to plant their colors on the enemy's works, capturing one stand of rebel colors. Here Col. Marshall, Lieut. Faass aud Lieut. Wing were taken prisoners. Lieut. Hartley killed. Lieuts. Curtis and Service wounded, and a loss of 37 enlisted men. Capt. Underhill was killed June 20th. Lieuts Pigott and Morrow were wounded July 29.
Major Geo. M. Randall, assumed command of the regiment August 18th. On the 15th it moved to the left and occupied the line in front of Fort Hell. On the 19th it moved to the Weldon R. R., and took an active part in the engagements of that day and the 21st. Major Randall, Capt. L. I. Jones, Lieuts. Shubert and Jewett were wounded. In the engagement on the 19th the colors fell five times, the bearers being shot, and each time were promptly seized and carried forward. Loss in enlisted men 45. Threw up entrenchments and remained till September 30th, when he took part in the battle of Poplar Grove Church, where Lts. Backus and Eddy were wounded and 20 enlisted men lost.
Were engaged in the battle of Pegram farm Oct. 2d. Took part in the reconnoisance [sic] of October 8th, on the Boynton plank road, returning to camp on the night of October 9th, where …

Major W. W. Trowbridge, fraud.
Capt. Geo. A. Reynolds, cowardice.
Capt. Wm. Treadwell, cowardice.
Capt. George Greene, mutinous conduct.
Lieut. J. L. Lucas, cowardice.
Lieut. M. E. Dunlap, cowardice.
Lieut Judson Kickerbocker, cowardice.
Lieut. J. G. Jewett, absent without leave.
The following is the present Roster of Field and Staff:
Colonel and Brevet Brigadier General E. G. Marshall.
Lieutenant-Colonel and Brevet Colonel George M. Randall.
Major H. V. Pemberton.
Major J. P. Cleary.
Major Albion Howe.
Surgeon I. V. Mullen.
Assistant-Surgeon Luther Phillips.
R. Q. M. Adolph Shubert.
Acting Adjutant M. Madigan.
The following is the present Rosier of line officers:
Captains—Jerome B. Proctor, Thomas Coglan, Seth N. Hedges, John Snyder, Louis Faass, Robert F. Tallman, Charles H. Houghton, Geo.
Brennan. First Lieutenants—Abraham Verplank, Theodore P. Cook, Frank M. Thompson, William Waring, Martin Shubert, Frank W. Call, Henry M. Backus, W. H. Van Buskirk, D. H. Piffard, A. H. De Graff, Stephen B. Russell, W. W. McCall.
Second Lieutenants—James M. Archer, Peter Campbell, Harmon E. Wentworth, William Pigott, Byron Cuppernull, Winslow N. Olin, James H. Lynde, John C. Trolan, Nelson L. Trussell, John F. Ward, Charles A. O'Brien, Robert B. Claxton, Schuyler Gardner, John Grierson, William Attridge.

A Spicy View of Life.
The Postmaster at Philadelphia, some time ago, addressed Benjamin Butterworth a note, stating that a letter was in the post office which was detained for postage. In response he received the following spicy reply:
POSTMASTER—DEAR SIR:—Enclosed please find one three cent stamp, together with a note sent me by you.
I am exceedingly grateful to you for giving me notice of the letter. I think it is from my oldest son, who is or was a boy of virtuous instinct, but whose want of ability to detect any material difference, between his property and other people's caused him to make several mistakes in the selection of goods. The result was, that the authorities, out of consideration for his manly qualities, gave him a permanent situation in an admirably conducted institution, located no great distance from Girard College, and like that institution, it affords excellent opportunities for learning.
The officers of the institution became so attached to my son that he finds it difficult to leave. A ball and chain have also become very much attached to him; in fact, they are together constantly.
I am the father of fifteen children, mostly boys and girls. I am from Ireland, from which delectable turf I emigrated years since, stopping a few years in Australia, which I did at the suggestion of the King's Bench. Permit me to say in conclusion that I love you. Give my love to your numerous wife and progeny.

THE 14TH ARTILLERY.
This, one of the conspicious [sic] regiments of the war, arrived in Rochester Aug. 30, and was paid off and discharged Sept. 6th. As a large number of men were recruited in Lewis County, for this regiment a brief resume of its history, taken from the Rochester Express of Aug. 31, is given below:
The recruting [sic] for this regiment began as early as June, 1863, with headquarters at Rochester, N. Y., and was raised principally from the counties of Yates, St. Lawrence, Jefferson, Lewis, and Monroe, though every part of the State was represented. The organization was completed January 4th, 1864, with the following officers, field and staff:
Col. E. G. Marshall.
Lt. Col. C. H. Corning.
Major W. W. Trowbridge.
Surgeon I. V. Mullen.
Asst. Surg. Luther Phillips.
Asst. Surg. Jas. M. Oliver.
R. Q. M. Adolph Shubert.
Adjt. C. H. Van Brakle.
The Regiment was employed in garrisoning the harbor of New York, at the following posts: Fort Richmond, being the headquarters of the regiment, Sandy Hook, Fort Schuyler, Wiliett's Point and Fort Hamilton. It remained here until April 23d, 1864, when it was ordered to the defences of Washington. On arriving there it was assigned to the 9th corps, General Burnside commanding, and joined the corps at Warrenton Junction, Va. Here it was made part of the "Provisional Brigade," under command of Col. Marshall. On the second day of May it marched for the Rapidan, and after halting at Brandy Station till the last trains were sent over that road to Alexandria, it pushed forward and crossed the Rapidan about 2 o'clock A. M., ON THE 6TH of May, and was assigned to the duty of holding the Ford. About noon of that day it was sent forward and arrived at the battle ground of the "Wilderness" early in the afternoon. Line of battle was formed and advanced to a suitable position for entrenching. Left this position on the night of the 7th and arrived at Ny River on the 11th. Took an active part in that fight and in the battle of Spottsylvania C. H., on the 14th, 15th 16th and 17th.
Marched to the left with the army and forded the North Anna River on 24th inst., and threw up works just in season to check the enemy after they had succeeded in driving in General Leslie's Brigade.
Occupied an advanced position at Tolopotamy Creek and on June 2d formed
the rear guard of the army as it swung away to Cold Harbor, were attacked in the rear about 5 P. M., and wheeled into position at the edge of the woods; a brigade giving way on its left exposed it to a severe enfilading fire of both musketry and artillery; three times was it driven out only to rally and re-take its position, and only when the darkness of night concealed every movement did it give up its advanced, unsupported position, and join the rest of the army.
In this fight the regiment lost heavily. Lieut. Bentley was mortally wounded and died that evening. Lieut Tallman was wounded. Capt. Kieffer was killed and Lieut. Lemmon and Wentworth were taken prisoners. Supported the 5th Massachusetts Battery at Bethesda Church, June 3d; and held the flank of the Army at Cold Harbor, June 5th, 6th and 7th, where Lt. Col. Corning was accidentally shot by his servant.
Crossed the James River early in the morning of June 15th and about 5 P. M.
of June 17th charged the enemy's works in front of Petersburg, and, after meeting with a stubborn resistance, captured the works; but with ammunition failing, were driven out with great loss. Major Job C. Hedges, than whom no more brave and gallant officer ever lived ....

relieved the 2d corps on the Petersburg front, the regiment occupying Fort Steadman and Fort Haskell, where it remained until March 25th, 1865, subject meanwhile to daily losses from the enemy's sharpshooters and artillery.
The day of March 26th had not yet dawned when the enemy having massed heavily broke through the lines to the right and left of Fort Steadman, and when discovered had already passed the line. Beset on all sides and hemmed in, the regiment fought desperately an enemy whose whereabouts could only be determined by the flash of their muskets. In less than an hour the fort was completely surrounded and the enemy came swarming in at every possible inlet and over the breastworks; still the gallant band yielded not, but from one bomb-proof to the other contested hotly every inch of ground. At this time it was still so dark that in the fort it was impossible to distinguish features, and to the calls for officers and comrades the enemy answered, and while it fairly hailed musket balls, and in the hand to hand fight the butt of the musket and the bayonet were freely used, still the regiment flinched not; only when completely overpowered and success was impossible, did the remnant of the garrison cut their way through and rejoin the remainder of the regiment then in Fort Haskell. Again and again did the enemy's infantry attempt to capture this Fort but each time were repulsed with heavy loss. At length after having been there engaged for over five hours, the regiment, supported by the 57th Mass. and 3d Md., charged down upon the works captured by the enemy, driving them out of battery 10 and 11 and recaptured Fort Steadman, with many prisoners; also, taking the colors of the 26th South Carolina regiment. Capt. Houghton and Lieut. Pigott were wounded. Capt. Foote, Asst. Surgeon Morse, Lts. McCall, Lockburner, M. Backus, White and Kelsey were taken prisoners. Loss in enlisted men two hundred and twenty-nine.
Remained in the works until April 3d, when the regiment moved forward at 5 A. M., and occupied the city of Petersburg, crossed the Appomattox and encamped. Broke camp April 5th, recrossed the Appomattox River, marched through the city of Petersburg and encamped two miles from the city. Broke camp April 7th and marched to Wilson's Station, on the South-side Railroad, and remained there until about April 22d, when it marched to City Point and embarked for Alexandria, and soon after arriving there were ordered to Tennalytown Maryland.
June 17th were detached from the 9th Corps and ordered to the defences of Washington, occupying Forts Reno, Kearny, DeRussey, Bayard, Simmons, Mansfield and Sumner.
August 16th, received orders to be mustered out.
The regiment had connected with it between 2,700 and 2,800 man, and returns with about 600.
The following are the casualties in Commissioned Officers:
Killed in action— Major Job C. Hedges; Captains Kieffer and Underhill, Lts. Hartley, Gossin and Bently.
Died—Captain Wilkie, Lieut. J. H. Tompson, died in Andersonville.
Wounded—Col. E. G. Marshall, Capt. L. I. Jones, C. H Houghton, Lts. Service, Cleary, Curtis, Pigott, Tallman, Russell, Eddy, Backus, M. Shubert,
Spencer, Morrow, Lemmon, Snyder.

…. and arrived at Ny River on the 11th. Took an active part in that fight and in the battle of Spottsylvania C. H., on the 14th, 15th, 16th and 17th.
Marched to the left with the army and forded the North Anna River on 24th inst., and threw up works just in season to check the enemy after they had succeeded in driving in General Leslie's Brigade.
Occupied an advanced position at Tolopolamy Creek and on June 2d formed the rear guard of the army as it swung away to Cold Harbor, were attacked in the rear about 5 P. M., and wheeled into position at the edge of the woods; a brigade giving way on its left exposed it to a severe enfilading fire of both musketry and artillery; three times was it driven out only to rally and re-take its position, and only when the darkness of night concealed every movement did it give up its advanced, unsupported position, and join the rest of the army.
In this fight the regiment lost heavily. Lieut. Bentley was mortally wounded and died that evening. Lieut. Tallman was wounded. Capt. Kieffer was killed and Lieut. Lemmon and Wentworth were taken prisoners. Supported the 5th Massachusetts Battery at Bethesda Church, June 3d; and held the flank of the Army at Cold Harbor, June 5th, 6th and 7th, where Lt. Col. Corning was accidentally shot by his servant.
Crossed the James River early in the morning of June 15th and about 5 p. m. of June 17th charged the enemy's works in front of Petersburg, and, after meeting with a stubborn resistance, captured the works; but ammunition failing, were driven out with great loss. Major Job C. Hedges, than whom no more brave and gallant officer ever lived, was instantly killed while leading his battalion in the charge. Col. Marshall, Capt. Underhill, Lieut. Russell and Lieut. Spencer were wounded. Maj. Reynolds, Capts. Pemberton and Jones, Lts. J. H. Thompson, Coglan, Piffard, Snyder and Norton taken prisoners, and a loss of enlisted men of 113.
After this the regiment lay in the trenches before Petersburg, continually under a heavy fire from the enemy's sharpshooters and artillery till July 30th, when the regiment had the honor to lead in the assualt [sic] on the "Crater"—being the first regiments to plant their colors on the enemy's works, capturing one stand of rebel colors. Here Col. Marshall, Lt. Faass and Lieut. Wing were taken prisoners. Lieut. Hartley killed. Lts. Curtis and Service wounded, and a loss of 37 enlisted men. Capt. Underhill was killed June 20th. Lts. Pigott and Morrow were wounded July 29. Major Geo. M. Randall assumed command of the regiment August 18th. On the 15th it moved to the left and occupied the line in front of Fort Hell. On the 19th it moved to the Weldon R. R., and took an active part in the engagements of that day and the 21st Major Randall, Capt. L. I. Jones, Lts. Shubert and Jewett were wounded. In the engagement on the 19th the colors fell five times, the bearers being shot, and each time were promptly seized and carried forward. Loss in enlisted men 45. Threw up entrenchments and remained till September 30th, when it took part in the battle of Poplar Grove Church, where Lts. Backus and Eddy were wounded and 20 enlisted men lost.
Were engaged in the battle of Pegram farm, October 2d. Took part in the reconnaissance of October 8th, on the Boynton plank road, returning to camp on the night of October 9th, where it remained until October 26th, when it moved forward in line of battle as far as Hatcher's Run and supported Crawford's division of the 5th army corps.. In this engagement the regiment sustained no loss.
The object of the movement having been accomplished the regiment fell back with the army to the position occupied previous to the movement. Remained here until December 2d, when the corps broke camp April 6th, recrossed the Appomattox River, marched through the city of Petersburg and encamped two miles from the city. Broke camp April 7th and marched to Wilson's Station, on the South-side Railroad, and remained there until about April 22d, when it marched to City Point and embarked for Alexandria, and soon after arriving there were ordered to Tennalytown Maryland.
June 17th were detached from the 9th Corps and ordered to the defences of Washington, occupying Forts Reno, Kearney, DeRussey, Bayard, Simmons, Mansfield and Sumner.
August 16th, received orders to be mustered out.
The regiment had connected with it between 2,700 and 2,800o men, and returns with about 600.
The following are the casualties in Commissioned Officers:
Killed in action—Major Job C. Hedges; Captains Kieffer and Underhill, Lts. Hartley, Gossin and Bently.
Died—Captain Wilkie, Lieut J. H. Tompson, died in Andersonville.
Wounded—Col. E G. Marshall, Capt. L. I. Jones, C. H. Houghton, Lts. Service, Cleary, Curtis, Pigott, Tallman, Russell, Eddy, Backus, M. Shubert,
Spencer, Morrow, Lemmon, Snyder.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: January 15, 2008
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/artillery/14thArtHvy/14thArtHvyCWN.htm

Valid HTML 4.01!

 
Home | Contact Us | Language Access