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7th Regiment Artillery (Heavy), NY Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

A MEMBER OF THE ALBANY CO. REGIMENT
SENTENCED TO BE SHOT—SENTENCE Revoked.—Corporal Edward Carter, Co. A, 113th New York, tried for shooting at Capt. J. M. Murphy, at Fort Pennsylvania, D. C., was found guilty and sentenced to be shot. Sentence declared inoperative, as the officer who approved the sentence was not in command of a "separate brigade" within the meaning of the act approved December 24, 1861. Prisoner to be released from arrest and returned to duty.

THE SENTENCE OF DEATH ON A MEMBER OF THE 113TH (ALBANY) REGIMENT REVOKED.—In the last War Gazette we find the following:
Corporal Edward Carter, Co. A, 113th New York Volunteers, tried for shooting at Capt. J. M. Murphy, at Fort Pennsylvania, D. C. Found guilty and sentenced to be shot. Sentence declared inoperative, as the officer who approved the sentence was not in command of a "separate brigade" within the meaning of the act approved December 24, 1861. Prisoner to be released from arrest and returned to duty.

ALBANY COUNTY REGIMENT.—Corp. ____, of Company B, 113th Regiment N. Y. S. V. has opened a Recruiting Office at No. 66 State street, Albany. Company B is now doing garrison duty at Fort De Russey, near Washington. The Regiment has been changed to heavy Artillery. The bill now before Congress raises the pay of Privates from $18 to $25. This is by far the best opportunity offered to young men to enlist, as all promotions are made from the ranks. The highest bounty paid.

COLONEL SPRAGUE.—The selection of Major SPRAGUE as Colonel of the Regiment is not only approved, but it is approved with enthusiasm. His name is deemed a tower of strength, and will do more than any one thing, to hasten the enrollment of the Regiment. The Argus thus alludes to the selection:—

THE ALBANY REGIMENT.—If anything was needed to give an impetus to the recruiting for the Regiment to be raised in this Senatorial district, it is supplied by the appointment of Major SPRAGUE as the Colonel of the Regiment and his acceptance of the position. An officer of the regular army, of experience and approved courage, he is just the man to take command of a new regiment, to which his military knowledge and discipline will prove invaluable. The first thing necessary to make a good soldier is confidence in his commanding officer. Col. SPRAGUE will secure the respect of his men, who will rely implicitly upon his capacity and experience, and feel safe under his command. We may well congratulate the Albany Regiment upon securing a Colonel from the Regular Army, and especially an officer of the conceded ability and capacity of Major SPRAGUE. (JOUR. JULY 19, 1862)

ALBANY EVENING JOURNAL.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY 30.
THE COLONEL OF THE ALBANY REGIMENT.
The War Department having refused to relieve Major SPRAGUE from his duties of Mustering and Disbursing Officer for the State, he could not accept the position tendered him of Colonel of the Albany Regiment.
Thus deprived of the services of this officer, so eminently fitted for the command, other names have been canvassed. Among them that of Capt. LEWIS O. MORRIS, of the 1st U. S. Artillery, and son of the late Capt. MORRIS, who fell at the head of his Company in the War with Mexico. The present Capt. MORRIS inherits all the soldierly qualities of his distinguished father, and, at the siege of Fort Macon, under BURNSIDE, as well as elsewhere, exhibited the highest skill and gallantry. His conduct, as an Engineer, in erecting the Batteries, as an Artillerist, in working the guns, and as a brave Soldier in pushing the contest to a successful issue, secured for him the very highest commendations of his General. He is, withal a native of Albany—a Gentleman as well as a Soldier, of fifteen years' experience in the service, and identified, in all his associations and sympathies, with the good name and glory of the place of his birth.
We are happy to add, that his services are available. If selected as Commandant of the Regiment (as, from what we have heard of the sentiments of those entrusted with the selection, we presume he will be) he will immediately enter upon the duties of the position, and take the Regiment into the field in thirty days.

A DIFFICULTY ADJUSTED.—When recruiting for the Albany Regiment commenced, authorization papers to recruit were issued, embodying a commission to any one who should raise a specified number of men. Under this pledge, the First Ward demanded a commission for Mr. BALL. The demand could not be refused, as the conditions had all been complied with. Subsequently (and after the thirty positions had been assigned) a commission was asked for a 2d Lieutenancy in the Seventh Ward, for an excellently qualified young gentleman who had not been authorized to recruit. Although the request was reasonable (that Ward having raised a full company,) it was impossible to comply with it without throwing out Mr. BALL, who had raised his thirty men, for doing which he had been pledged a commission. The promotion of Capt. SPRINGSTEED, however, made a vacancy, which enabled an amicable adjustment of the difficulty, without doing injustice to any one.

THE ALBANY REGIMENT.—We learn that Capt. Springsteed, of the 6th Ward Company, has been appointed Major of this Regiment.
Charles W. Hobbs has been appointed Second Lieutenant of the 7th Ward Company in accordance with the desires of the War Committee and citizens of the ward.
We regret to learn that Capt. Wm. J. Thomas, of the 10th Ward Company, has withdrawn from the command of that company and from the Regiment. Capt. Thomas is universally regarded as one of the best officers in the regiment, and his retirement will be heard of with general regret. He has been for twenty years connected with military organization in this city, and he is an accomplished, efficient and popular commander. (Alb. Aug. 14, 1862)

(Aug. 21, 1862)
THE ALBANY REGIMENT ON ITS MARCH.
The 113th reached Jersey City yesterday about noon. They were immediately provided with Springfield muskets, (the best arm in use,) and, at 5 o'clock, transferred to camp, and moved off to Washington, where they have probably arrived ere this. This dispatch is highly creditable to all concerned.

ALBANY EVENING JOURNAL.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 20.
Until ten o'clock yesterday morning, it was supposed the Regiment would not leave before Wednesday, perhaps not until Thursday, afternoon. At that hour, however, orders were issued for the Regiment to move at six o'clock. With true soldierly alacrity, Col. MORRIS promulgated the order, and quietly gave his officers to understand that there must be no delinquency.
The Hendrick Hudson was telegraphed for to come down from Troy, and at three o'clock she was at the dock, with two barges, to transport the Regiment. At quarter before seven, the march began, and at twenty minutes past eight every man was on board.
The Governor communicated to Colonel Morris the thanks of the War Department (and his own) for the prompt manner in which he had responded to the order to march.
Ten thousand men and women lined the streets through which the Regiment passed. No equally intense enthusiasm has marked the departure of any Regiment since the war began; and no finer body of men ever went to the tented field in any country.
Major JAMES I. JOHNSON, of the Adjutant General's Department, had the pleasure of handing their Commissions to Colonel MORRIS and MAJOR SPRINGSTEED, while the Regiment was passing the Capitol. They will never be dishonored by either of them.
This Regiment has been really raised in thirty days; for although recruiting was authorized ten days previously, it was not until the 18th of July that the enrollment was fairly begun.
We cannot let this opportunity pass without complimenting the untiring zeal of the several Ward Committees, and our citizens generally. The Committees have not faltered a moment; but have vied with each other in their devotion to the arduous and patriotic work assigned them. Without them, Albany would have been disgraced. With them she is honored as the second district in the State to have sent her Regiment to the field.
And what these Committees have so nobly begun they will as nobly finish. Give them thirty days more, and every man called for from the County will be voluntarily enrolled in the grand army of the Union. If this time can be given it should be. A draft would mar the noble position which the loyal North now occupies in the eyes of Europe. A MILLION OF VOLUNTEERS in the field to defend the Old Flag and to preserve the Union, would be a spectacle more sublime than the world has ever yet witnessed.
The Regiment were to-day to be presented with an elegant Regimental Banner—ordered by the Governor—and furnished with the last Springfield muskets, in New York.
The following are the officers of the Regiment as far as named:—
Colonel—Lewis O. Morris.
Major—Edward A. Springsteed.
Adjutant—Frederick F. Tremain.
Quartermaster—Willard Smith.
Surgeon—Dr. Pomfret.
Assistant Surgeons—Drs. Blaisdell and ____.
Chaplain—Rev. Mr. Calder.
Sergeant Major—George Treadwell.
Quartermaster Sergeant—William Stevens.
Commissary Sergeant— ____ Scripture.
LINE OFFICERS.
Cos. Captains.               1st Lieuts.              2d Lieuts.
A......Murphy                 Sickles.                 Reed.
B......Jones.                    Kennedy.              Orr.
C...... Morris.                 Rogers.                 Bell.
D......McCulloch.           Schurr.                 Coulson.
E......Moore.                            Lockrow.              Mount.
F......Bell.                       Wright.                 Mullen.
G......Shannon.               O’Hara.                Ball.
H......Pruyn.                             McEwen.              Hobbs.
I......Maguire.                 Durhame.             Petit.
K......Anable.                 Barclay.                Crank.

FROM THE ALBANY REGIMENT.—The Albany County Regiment is located at Fort Pennsylvania, near Washington. The regiment met with some casualties on its way from this city. One man was run over by the cars, two were poisoned at Baltimore, and one died from the effects of heat and a long march.  [Statesman.
The 113th Regiment, immediately upon its arrival at Washington, was divided up and sent to garrison eight different fortifications, viz: Fort Pennsylvania, Fort De Russey, Fort Alexandria, Fort Franklin, Fort Ripley,
Fort Gaines, Battery Vermont and Battery Cameron. Col. Morris is in command at Fort Pennsylvania, with companies F, G, H; Major Springsteed in command of Forts Alexandria, Ripley and Franklin, with companies C, I, K; Capt. Jones' company is at Fort De Russey; Capt. Murphy's at Battery Vermont.; Co. E at Battery. Cameron, and Co. D at Fort Gaines. United States officers are engaged in drilling the men as heavy artillerists, and is it probable the regiment will be attached to that arm of the service in future. They are comfortably quartered, enjoying themselves finely, not a man being sick, and in a few days will be sufficiently posted in their duties to perform active service with their heavy guns if needed.
The statement that two of the 113th were poisoned must be erroneous. We heard of it before reaching the forts, and on enquiry we learned that it was incorrect. Two of the men were undoubtedly killed by falling from the cars, while on the way to Washington. Their names we could not ascertain.

SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 21, 1864.
The Seventh Artillery in Their First Battle.
On Thursday afternoon, the Rebels attempted to reach the rear of the right flank of GRANT'S army. They were met by Gen. TYLER, who had command of several of the heavy artillery regiments recently sent forward from Washington. Among them were the Second and Seventh New York. They opened the fight with great energy and prosecuted it with the utmost fearlessness and courage. They suffered heavily, and are awarded the credit of the victory.
We have not yet received a full list of the casualties. But Capt. JOHN MORRIS, of the Seventh, and Capt. O'BRIEN, of the Second, are reported killed. Capt. MORRIS was one of our best known young men, and was for many years engaged in our Bindery. Until more is known, we shall hope that the report is not correct. Capt. O'BRIEN, of the Second, was from New York, and was an accomplished officer. (Alb. Journal)

FROM THE SEVENTH REGIMENT ARTILLERY.
Letter from Major Springsteed.
CAMP NEAR SPOTTSYLVANIA, May 20th.
We left Washington Sunday and arrived at Belle Plain the same day. The next morning I was started with one battalion and about 800 prisoners, for the army; arrived next day. The rest of the Regiment came up that evening. Next morning we expected a battle, but it ended in a skirmish, in which we took no part. A few shells fell near, doing no damage.
We are in the Second Corps, (Gen. HANCOCK'S) and TYLER'S division. Col. MORRIS commands the brigade. The regiment is divided into two battalions, of which I command one and Lieut. Col. HASTINGS the other.
We were ordered out this afternoon, expecting to march about dark for some point at a considerable distance; but a little after four o'clock we were double-quicked to the right of the turnpike, where the enemy had attacked our line. We advanced through a piece of thick woods, and soon met the enemy. They made a hasty retreat before our advance, and we drove them nearly half a mile, when they turned on us and we had a sharp fight, in which I lost, in my battalion, Capts. MORRIS and MCCULLOCH, killed, and Capt. BELL wounded in the leg (which has since been amputated). I also lost a number of men. In Col. HASTINGS' battalion, Lieut. KRANK was wounded in the head. The loss of men and officers in my battalion was the greatest. Total loss, four officers and forty-three men killed and wounded.
As soon as this brush was over, we fell back about a quarter of a mile to the crest of another hill, and formed a line again--our brigade having the right and Col. TANNAT'S the left of our division line. My battalion was in a very strong position.
We had scarcely got in position before Col. TANNAT'S brigade was strongly attacked, and had a severe fight at very close range. Although my left joined his right, the Rebels did not attack us, except to drive in our skirmishers. We were relieved on this line about half-past ten, and went farther to the right, remaining until daylight. The First Maine lost fourteen officers and four hundred and sixty-one men. While I regret the loss of officers and men, I could not help feeling pleased to see how bravely our Regiment fought their first battle.

MORNING EXPRESS.
ALBANY, MONDAY, MAY 23, 1864.
The 7th Artillery (113th) Regiment Under Fire.
We announced a few days since that the 7th Heavy Artillery (113th) Regiment, which had been doing garrison duty in several of the fortifications in the vicinity of Washington, had been ordered to the front as infantry. They were assigned to General Tyler's division, as were all the artillery regiments about Washington, and on Thursday last had their first battle. The Rebels attempted to reach the rear of the right flank of Grant's army, when they were met by Gen. Tyler's forces, and after a severe fight, in which the Second and Seventh bore the most conspicuous part, the Reb's were repulsed and forced to abandon their bold attempt. The Second and Seventh, we are told, fought with the utmost fearlessness and courage.
Among the casualties in the Seventh the following are reported: Capt. John Morris, killed; Corp. N. Tracler, Corp. Wm. Sickles, Co. G; N. Hallenbeck, Co. F, and D. Ross, Co. A, wounded.
Capt. Morris was well and widely known in this city, having a very extended circle of acquaintance, of whom he was greatly respected. He was formerly in the employ of Weed, Parsons & Co., in their book-binding establishment. He has two younger brothers in the army, one a Lieutenant in the company he commanded, and the other a private in the 44th (Ellsworth) Regiment.

KILLED AND WOUNDED OF THE SEVENTH.
List of Killed and Wounded of the Seventh New York Artillery in the Fight of May 19th.
The following list is given in a letter from Lieut. Col. JOHN HASTINGS, of the Seventh:
BATTERY A.
Corporal Peter Lacey, wounded in the hip.
Priv. Chas. C. Myers, wounded in left shoulder.
Private James Roe, wounded in finger.
Private David Ross, wounded in foot.
Private John Van Wormer, wounded in hand.

BATTERY B.
Private James Clark, killed.
Corp. Narcisse Tazier, wounded in leg.
Private Alex. Hawie, wounded in hand.

BATTERY C.
Capt. John A. Morris, killed.
Private James Lang, lost a thumb.
Private Jacob L. Murden, wounded in thigh.

BATTERY D.
Captain Charles McCulloch, killed.
Private Geo. M. Davis, wounded in fingers.
Private S. Keenholts, wounded in shoulder.
Private Israel Mason, wounded in finger.
Private Chas. Reinheart, wounded in hand.
Private Adam Swab, killed.
Private F. Shepard, wounded in arm.
Private J. Wagoner, killed.
Private Wm. W. Wilber, wounded in left side.
Private Chris. Frixel, in throat and leg.

BATTERY E.
First Lieut. G. Krank, wounded in the scalp.

BATTERY F.
Captain R. H. Bell, wounded in left leg, (am'd.)
Serg't J. S. Rowland, in left leg, severely.
Serg't Jacob Kearns, wounded in the right leg.
Private W. Goodfellow, wounded, right hand.
Private Charles Sohlker, wounded, left hand.
Private Edwin Galucher, wounded, left hand.
Private Geo. Meyers, wounded, left hand.
Private John Monmunthaller, wounded.

BATTERY G.
Private Thomas Kearns, killed.
Corporal William Sickles, wounded in finger.
Corporal D. A. Flanchan, wounded, shoulder.
Private William Myer, wounded in foot.
Private Abram Boyce, wounded in hand.
Private Jacob Dutcher, wounded.
Private Alex. Kinsler, wounded.
Private Peter McCabe, wounded in left arm.
Private Peter See, wounded severely through chest.

BATTERY H.
Private Fred. Dorflinger, wounded in head, slightly.

BATTERY I.
Private Elem Weatherwax, wounded, shoulder.
Private Francis Layman, wounded in arm.
Private Samuel Taylor, wounded in hand.

BATTERY K.
Private Henry H. Brower, wounded in hand.
Private James Case, wounded in leg.
Private Joseph Fairbanks, wounded in arm.
Private William Martin, wounded.
Private Judson Laupaugh, wounded.
Private John Smith, lost two fingers.

BATTERY L.
Private Merritt Van Tyle, wounded in hand.
Private Lewis Flint, wounded in neck.
Private Hiram Williams, wounded in leg.

BATTERY M.
Private J. H. Ayers, wounded in both legs.
Private Alex. Brate, wounded in side.
Private Jas. Carey, wounded in face and arm.
Private J. B. Davis, wounded, face and hand.
Private J. S. Evans, wounded in shoulder.
Private John Ryan, wounded in hand,
Private Peter Schneider, run over.
Private W. R. Siver, wounded in hand.
Private Thomas Shutt, wounded in side.
Total, two officers and four men killed, and two officers and fifty-three men wounded.

MORNING EXPRESS.
ALBANY, TUESDAY, MAY 24, 1864.
COMPLETE LIST OP KILLED AND WOUNDED IN THE SEVENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.--Albany, like, many of her sister cities, is called upon to mourn the loss of a number of noble and gallant sons, whose lives were sacrificed in the recent battles. Among other regiments that has suffered greatly in the loss of men, is the 7th Heavy Artillery—better known as the 113th New York Volunteers—a regiment recruited in this city, and composed principally of Albanians. In the list of killed will be found the name of Captain Charles McCulloch. Capt. McC is a well known Albanian. Previous to going off with the 113th he kept a restaurant and fish market in Washington avenue. He raised the 9th Ward Company, of which he was made commandant. He was a gallant officer and a worthy citizen, and his loss will be lamented by a large circle of friends. It will also be seen that Captain Robert H. Bell (formerly foreman of Engine 8,) was wounded in the leg so badly as to necessitate amputation. Let us hope that his injuries may not prove fatal. The following is a complete list of the killed and wounded in each battery:
Battery A—Corp Peter Lacey, hip; Chas. C. Myers, left shoulder; Jas. Roe, finger; David Ross, right foot; John Van Wormer, hand.
Battery B—Jas. Clark, killed; Narcisse Taglier, leg; Alex Harvil, hand.
Battery C—Capt. J. A. Morris, killed; James Land, thumb; Jacob L Murden, thigh.
Battery D—Capt. Chas. McCulloch, killed; George M. Davis, finger; G. Keenholts, shoulder; Israel Mason, finger; Chas. E. Reihart,hand; Adam Swab, killed; F. Sheppard, arm; J Wagoner, killed; Wm. W. Wilbur, left side; Chas. Frizel, throat and leg.
Battery E—First Lieut. Geo. Frank, scalp.
Battery F—Capt. Robert H. Bell, left leg amputated; Sergt. J. G. Rowland, leg, severely; Jacob Kranss, right leg; Wm. Goodfellow, right hand; Chas. Gohlke, left hand; Edwin Galusha, hand; Geo. Meyer, hand; John Mummenthaler, wounded.
Battery G—Thos. Kearns, killed; Corp. Wm. Sickles, finger; Corp. D. A. Flandeau, shoulder; Wm Unge, foot; Abram Boyce, hand; Jacob Dutcher, wounded; Alex Kinsler, wounded; Peter McCape, left arm, severely; Peter See, severely, through the chest.
Battery H—Fred. Dorflinger, head, slight.
Battery I—Eben Weatherwax, shoulder; Francis Layman, arm; Samuel Taylor, hand.
Battery K—Henry H. Brower, hand; James Case, leg; Joseph Fairbanks, arm; Wm. Martin, arm: Judson Laupaugh. wounded; John Smith, lost two fingers.
Battery L—Merritt Van Tyle, hand; Lewis Flint, neck; Hiram Williams, leg.
Battery M—J. H. Ayres, both legs; Alex. Brate, side; James Cary, face and arm; J. B. Davis, hand; J S. Evans, shoulder; John Ryan, hand;  Peter Sneider, run over; H. R. Siver, hand; Thos. Smith, side.
Total Killed—Two officers and four men.
Total Wounded—Two officers and 53 men.

This Morning's Report.
FROM GRANT'S ARMY.
Fierce Battle Thursday Evening,
The Second and Seventh New York and First Maine Artillery in the Fight.
They Fight with Great Courage and Audacity. They Drive the Rebels Before Them. They are Awarded the Honor of the Victory. Capt. John Morris, of the 7th, and Capt. O'Brien, of 2d. Reported Killed.
The Rebels Suffer Very Heavily.
NEW YORK, May 21.
A Tribune special from Washington says: Lee occupies Spottsylvania Court House, and his camp is a perfect fortress, being fortified all around. Grant has made an almost entire circuit of the enemy's position, chiefly with the hope of forcing Lee out of his works, so that his army can be reached on a fair field. The roads are still in a terrible condition for the movement of artillery or even infantry. On this account the reinforcements which have been getting up have been greatly delayed. The army was never in better spirits or finer condition. Grant is greeted with the utmost enthusiasm everywhere.

THE FIGHT OF THURSDAY.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
FRIDAY, May 20.
My despatch of ten P. M. yesterday, if received, will have informed you of the attack made last evening (Thursday) upon the right wing of our line, and the handsome manner in which the Rebels were driven back. The purpose of the enemy's movement was doubtless to discover what we had on our right. It was made by the whole of Ewell's corps, Rhodes' division leading. The enemy left the vicinity of Spottsylvania Court House about one P. M. yesterday, made a detour by the west, crossed the Ny, and about five o'clock, struck the Fredericksburg road in the rear of our right flank, breaking out within three quarters of a mile of the headquarters of Gen. Meade and Grant. The only troops we had on the ground at that time, were a couple of regiments of Tyler's division of heavy artillery, which has lately been brought from Washington; and is composed of troops that were never before under fire. Tyler soon brought up the remainder of his force, and met the Rebel attack, driving the enemy back to the woods. Here the enemy had formed their line of battle in single line, with skirmishers in front.
Gen. Tyler felt rather apprehensive at the work before him, considering the rawness of his troops, and he experienced some difficulty in getting them into formation, but once fairly under fire, however, they showed the utmost bravery and audacity, surpassing even that of old veterans. In these murderous wood fights, our veterans have learned all the devices that are calculated to shelter them from fire, and will lie down and take advantage of trees, stumps, &c., but the heavy artillery braves, unused to this kind of craft, the moment they saw the enemy, blazed away and rushed on. In consequence of this, their loss was quite heavy, and probably reached 1,000 in killed and wounded. Perhaps it was also in consequence of our heavy artillerymen's proved courage, unused to this style of attack and not exactly understanding it, that the Rebels gave way in confusion, scattering through the woods. The honor of the repulse of the Rebels, whose boldly conceived movement might, under different circumstances, have produced most disastrous results, rests exclusively with Tyler's heavy artillery, though Birney's division of the Second Corps and Crawford's of the Fifth were afterwards sent and formed into line, enabling Tyler to withdraw after driving the enemy several miles. The confusion of the Rebels appears to have been very great, the major portion of Rhodes' division scattering in the woods. Three hundred and fifty of them were picked up and brought in. The division of raw troops feel immensely tickled at their success, and although their loss has been heavy, it is felt that the diminution of numbers is made up by the increase of morale.

Special to the New York Tribune.
HEADQUARTERS, Thursday Night, 9 o'clock.
Another evidence of the desperate condition of the enemy's supplies was given this evening--a bold and determined dash with cavalry, infantry and artillery upon our right flank an hour before sunset.
The turnpike road from Spottsylvania Court-House to Fredericksburg has been infested with guerrillas for several days, anxiously observing the movement of our supply trains. This evening an organized and resolute movement was made, which was completely foiled. During the day, through an opening cut through the woods, troops were seen passing way beyond our right flank. Evening developed their purpose.
Your correspondent passed along the road while the few first rattling picket shots indicated a cautious advance of the enemy. Our cavalry had been driven in under some excitement. They were dismounted and sent into the woods with their carbines, while a party remained to hold the horses. The teamsters pushed their mules along the road towards which the enemy were advancing, shouting to the animals like maniacs. Time was everything. Halt a mile and the angle of the roads would put the enemy, who was now before
them behind their backs.
The teams crowded onward, and the musketry began to rattle faster through the woods. The heavy artillery, armed as infantry, were presently put into position, and formed a line of battle, first in the roads, then in the woods towards the enemy, who soon engaged them.
Our heavy artillery are raw troops, unused to field service, and should not have been employed alone at such a time, but they were most convenient and available in such an emergency.
Our loss in killed and wounded can hardly fall short of 1,000. The enemy came in and took possession of the road and the wagons, but their prizes were small and their possession of them short. Our forces engaged were Tyler's new division of heavy artillery. Later Birney's division of the Second Corps was seen moving down, and was immediately put into position.
We soon recovered the road and the wagons, none of which had the enemy succeeded in carrying away or destroying. A few horses only of the train were killed. The enemy were driven reluctantly back, and at sunset the last gun had been fired, and the effort to turn our flank and capture our wagon train was over. The forces engaged proved to be those of Ewell's corps. A hundred of them were captured, who reported that the movement was made from the right of Spottsylvania Court House in the afternoon.
Among the killed we have at this hour heard of Major Roff, of the Fourteenth Massachusetts Heavy Artillery.
Major Chaddswell, of same regiment.
Captain O'Brien, 2d N. Y. Heavy Artillery.
Lieut. Knemm, 2d N. Y. Heavy Artillery.
Captain Morris, of the 7th N. Y. Heavy Ar.
Captain Stanton, of the 1st Maryland Veterans, was wounded.
Captain Campden, 1st Maryland Veterans, wounded.
Lieut. Stacey, Capt. Davis, Lieut. Chapin, Maj. Holt, Maj. Satchell, Lieut. Spofford, Lieut. Noyes, Smith, Davis, 1st Massachusetts, wounded.
Lieut. Garmhausen, 8th Md., wounded.
Capt. Martins, 1st Massachusetts, wounded.
Communications are opened as usual tonight, and supplies are still pouring in for us.
Guinness Station was captured last evening by General Talbot's Cavalry, and is now in our possession. From this point the Rebels had been bringing supplies.
Bowling Green had been their rail road station. It is now believed that the enemy will bring their supplies across from the Virginia Central rail road.

NEW YORK, May 21.
The Herald has the following:
Concerning the engagement of Thursday, 10 P. M., Tyler's Division was precipitated on the Rebel column as impetuously as the nature of the ground permitted, and, after a severe skirmish, the latter were driven from the ground with severe loss. The First Maine Artillery, eighteen hundred strong, fighting as infantry, charged on the Rebel line gallantly, and swept everything before them, after a sharp contest. This regiment appears to have suffered most.
A part of Hancock's Corps was marched back to Tyler's support, but the Rebels were not found in force. It was probably a dash of theirs to annoy us by cutting our communication with the possible hope of capturing a few wagon loads of stores.
An order was already given to abandon this road to Fredericksburg, and no teams ought to have been in transit over it Hereafter the roads to Massaponax Church and Childsburg, dirt roads, will be used as our line of communication till our location is changed.

FRIDAY—7 A. M.
The losses in the fight last evening are estimated between 500 and 600, and confined mainly to a few regiments.
The First Maryland veteran regiment were returning from their furlough home, and found themselves under fire before they suspected the presence of the enemy. The Colonel supposed the fire had come from some of our troops, who had mistaken the regiment for Rebels, and called frantically on them to stop firing. One or two vollies undeceived him, and revealed the character of the foe. The veterans were soon engaged with their old enemies, and assisted materially in breaking the Rebel line and clearing the woods.
A large number of the Eighth were slightly wounded, but the list of killed is comparatively small.
The Rebel loss is unknown in killed and wounded, but must be heavy in proportion to the number engaged.
Their disabled men lay quite thick on some parts of the line, and squads of prisoners came in during all night. This morning at daylight 200 more passed my tent. From 500 to 600 have already been brought in. There was no firing of consequence during the night, and none at all this morning.
The Rebels withdrew from our rear under cover of the night. Our old flank movement to the left was resumed again this morning, and no battle is expected before to-morrow or next day.
Lee is believed to be uneasy in his entrenched position, and may be tracking up a new one further to the southeast of the present one.

Special Despatch to the New York Times.
WASHINGTON, May 20.
A despatch to this Bureau from one of our correspondents at headquarters, dated 9 o'clock Friday morning, reports no change in the situation since Mr. Swinton's despatch of last night. No fighting had taken place up to this hour. Grant was sending back prisoners to Fredericksburg, and thence to Point Lookout.

NEW YORK, May 21.
The Times' headquarters special says the losses in the Fifth Corps since the battles began are as follows:—Killed, 1,240; wounded, 11,570; missing, 120. Total, 13,930. Less missing than in any other Corps. The stragglers are estimated at 12,000 in the whole army.
Another letter from Maj. WM. ARTHUR, of the 4th, under date of June 5th. "In the field, 7 miles from Richmond" says—
The mail has just arrived and brought me the CATARACT. Upon looking it over I find that the 2d and 7th N. Y. H. Artillery get a great deal of credit for the part they took in the fight of May 19th, while the 4th H. Artillery are not mentioned. I would not in the least detract from the honors won by the 2d and 7th, (and they fought bravely) but I will, in justice to the heroic boys that form my battalion, state that 3 companies (350 men) during the engagement referred to, had the front line and held it for over an hour, until the 2d and 7th N. Y. H. Artillery and 1st Mass. came up as reinforcements. You can judge of their fighting qualities, when I inform you that I lost from my command 12 killed, 55 wounded, 2 officers wounded, and only 9 missing, and two of them are known to have been taken prisoners. We did not belong to TYLER'S Division, but to Col. Kitching's Brigade, temporarily assigned there. We were placed on the line early in the morning, and did not leave until 9 o'clock P. M., when we were relieved. My Reg't are now all together again in the Artillery Brigade, 2d Army Corps. I saw JOHN HAY about 4 days ago—met him on the march.
There is not much news. Gen Grant has got a hard job to take Richmond, and our progress will be very slow, as Gen. LEE is strongly entrenched.
I have just returned from building a four gun battery within 75 yards of the enemy's line of sharp-shooters. You may imagine the deligtful [sic] sensation of hearing the whiz of a rebel bullet every time a man shows himself. My Adjutant and 3 men have been wounded while engaged on the work referred to."

Local Affairs.
Letters From the Seventh Artillery.
[Correspondence of the Albany Knickerbocker.]
CAMP NEAR CHICAHOMINY,
IN THE FIELD, June 5, 1864.
Mr. EDITOR: The Seventh New York Artillery has been three weeks in active campaigning. Assigning some limit to human endurance, I think I speak truth in saying that "rarely have the energies of fellow mortals been more severely taxed than have those of this regiment since we issued from the fortifications in defence of Washington. Our experience has been one succession of forced marches, severe fighting or rapid entrenching. The New York Times correspondent correctly states the case in saying, "Whatever may be the determination of the enemy, there will be no change or let up in the resolve of this army; of its commander, and of the head of all the armies of the United States. That resolve is to put the matter through, cost what it may. In doing this we shall add to the already appalling list of losses we have experienced in this unparalleled battle of eight days' duration, but we shall end by crushing them to powder." This being the policy to which we are reduced, of course it is entirely out of place to complain of any excess in amount of toil, privation and suffering to which we may be subjected. The war has now approached that culminating state when no sacrifice must be spared to ensure rapid success; it is the policy of arithmetical computation, and there is no doubt that the price of human blood and treasure at which the accomplishment of this national object is estimated, is of a most unstinted liberality. Therefore, appearing as we do, as actors in this bloody drama, at this, its approaching catastrophe, we must summon up all our fortitude and patriotic endurance to reconcile us to the unspeakable sacrifices that are daily demanded of us.
After having executed some brilliant flank movements, we seem now to have brought our wary foe to bay; our advanced lines are within a few feet of the enemy's position, and one continual skirmish firing is kept up night and day.
The Seventh has already won an honorable record for itself; it has taken part in the most hazardous enterprises since its incorporation into the fighting Second Corps. But we have lost severely. On leaving Washington on the 15th ult., our morning report showed an aggregate strength of 1,850 officers and men; to day we report 932 men present for duty. Our loss in officers has been equally severe. Yesterday we suffered an irreparable loss in the death of our beloved commander, Col. Lewis O. Morris. He had just commenced a letter to his lady, remarking as he sharpened his pencil, "I must write home, or my folks will have me killed.'' At this moment the division commander, Gen. Barlow, approached to inquire about the construction of a field work, and desired Col. Morris to accompany him to inspect it. He had not advanced many paces when he was struck by a rifle ball, which entered at the shoulder, passed through the lung and rested in the spine. He lingered for five hours in great agony, and then tranquilly died.
The command of the regiment devolves upon Lt. Col. John Hastings, an officer of undoubted courage and good military capacity. In his hands the reputation of the regiment is safe, while his care and consideration for the interests of his men form a prominent feature in his character.
I subjoin a list of casualties among the officers which you have not yet received:
Capt. S. E. Jones, contused shoulder.
Lieut. E. G. McCleary, missing.
Lieut. J. B. Read, severely wounded and missing.
Lieut. Charles Ducharme, wounded in heel.
Lieut. C. Swaine Evans, wounded in shoulder, serious.
Lieut. Michael J. Barckley, wounded in leg.
Lieut. Thos. S. McClure, killed.
The weather is lovely, and our stay here in the trenches affords needful rest to the men.
Yours, truly, Nemo.

The follwing extracts were taken from a letter written by Col. Hastings, dated Near Gains's Mills.
When I last wrote we halted from a forced march. We rested a day and was ordered forward. After marching two days, we halted and throwed up breastworks. These were scarcely completed ere we were ordered forward to capture the rebel works. Off the boys started out of the woods, through a corn field, and over the Tollopotomy River, (what we would call a creek) jumped into the stream, which was waist deep, climbed its steep banks under a severe fire, and reached the hill where the rebels entrenched. The first battalion, under my command, were the first to cross, and carried the enemy's works at the point of the bayonet, killing the rebels in their works and capturing several prisoners. Col. Brooks, commanding the brigade which we were in, sent an aid complimenting me for the handsome manner in which me men acted, and said, "It was the handsomest thing done during the present campaign." I appreciated the compliment. The prisoners captured belonged to Longstreet's corps and were from North Carolina. We held the position until daylight and then recrossed. Next night crossed over again, but not under fire, threw up breastworks and at daylight were prepared to resist any attack the enemy might make. Next night the whole Second Corps took up its line of march for its present position. On Friday morning we were ordered to fall in, as the enemy were about to attack us. The boys sprang in line and we moved off in line of battle. The enemy commenced to shell. We remained under cover until after dark and then moved forward again. Throwing up breast works was again the order. At daylight we were ordered to carry the enemy's works. The 7th was in the advance, and was to be strongly supported. We advanced and carried the works under a terrific fire, but no support came up. The second and third battalions gained but could not hold the works, and we were obliged to retire. The 1st battalion did not gain a foothold but suffered the most; out of 400 men which I took into action, I lost over one third in killed and wounded. I had four officers wounded and one missing out of twelve that went in. It was a terrific slaughter. So disastrous was the fire that the oldest veterans quailed before it and could not be urged forward. The color sergeant was shot dead, and the colors remained in the field two days before they could be brought off, and then only under cover of night. The rebel lines and our own are not over 20 feet apart in some places. As dangerous as this work is, the boys enjoy it. Last night some of the officers heard that the regiment was to be moved to the rear to rest, and they desired me to use my influence against any such attempt.
The death of Col. Morris is a severe blow to the regiment. The morning we made the advance, Col. Brooks was wounded. Out of six regiments in the brigade, there is but one colonel left. It will be seen by this that the 7th is in a fighting brigade. Every fight the regiment goes into, it would do some Albanians good to hear the old veterans cheer them in their glorious work.

From the Seventh Artillery.
In Field Near GAINES'S HILLS, Va., June 8th, 1864.
EDITOR KNICKERBOCKER: We had a lull in operations last evening for one hour. A flag of trace from both sides agreed to stop all firing from 7 to 8 o'clock, to bury the dead and bring in the wounded of the fight of last Friday morning, when we charged on the rebel works. The wounded were few, not more than one or two were brought inside of our lines. Of the dead, there were plenty. As I looked on them, they were the most sickening sight I have beheld since the war commenced. Many a good soldier was buried unrecognized. As I went over the field looking for Sergeant Mooney, of Co. M, who served with all the honors a brave man could, as Captain in the 18th Regiment, who led his men in many a charge in that gallant old regiment, and who fell in the terrible charge of Friday morning, I regret to say that I was unable to recognize him among the blackened and disfigured corpses of the men as they lay on the field. Private McCullough, of Co. D, 7th N. Y. V. Artillery, came in yesterday morning after laying between the lines for five days and nights. His sufferings while there was horrible, exposed to the firing of both sides, without food, water or shelter; and whenever he would expose the least part of his person, he would have a volley of musketry fired at him. In the same pit with him, were Lucius E. Ball and William A. Post, of Berne, both mortally wounded, and the day before McCullough reached our lines, they both died. On Tuesday afternoon the last one died, when McCullough attempted to crawl to the lines, but as he raised himself up, he was so weak with hunger that he fell over on his back, and thinks that he lay that way some five minutes, when he again had to crawl back to his pit and wait till night. His description of the sufferings of our wounded, as they lay on the field, calling on their comrades and their regiment, is terrible indeed. Could some of the men who were buried unrecognized, been got inside of the lines on the first day of the charge, many, he thinks, would have been saved. Water! water! was the cry from one end of the field to the other, and many a good and brave soldier sleeps his last sleep who would now be with us had he been able to get within the lines. The rebels had possession of all the prominent points on the field, and they could not be made to let go long enough to perform the errand of mercy. Among our dead there were some few rebels. Our dead were all collected together and buried in pits, hurriedly dug, and a few shovelfuls of earth is all that covers them. Some of them were so far decomposed that it was almost impossible to handle them. Out of all the missing in the 7th, the only way that some of them were recognized, was by some few trinkets or memoranda found on them. I hope that I shall not witness such another sight. Major Springsteed, of the 7th, received the flag of truce on our side, and Capt. Stanhope Posey, A. A. G. Harris, Miss. Brigade, with Capt. B. F. McClellan, 48th Miss. on the rebels. There are North Carolina and Mississippi troops in our front, and so anxious are the men in the rebel ranks to get away, that they embrace every opportunity that occurs. Even last evening, during the cessation, and while our men were returning to our lines, one rebel made his escape and came in with our boys; again the other day, the rebels attempted to charge on our boys, and some 60 or 70 of them slipped away from their officers into a piece of woods, and gave themselves up to our men. All who come within our lines wish that the war was over. They are the finest looking men that you wish to look on—large, robust and well built.
While the flag of truce was flying, the soldiers of both sides mingled together with each other, and exchanged such little notions as each had. Our men gave their coffee for the rebels' tobacco. The rebels complain that they never receive any coffee, and indeed it seemed quite a luxury. The officers mingled and drank each others health, as though they had been friends for years and had just met after a long absence.—The flag of truce was a benefit one way—it was the first quiet night's sleep the men had had in five nights. The same lull was kept up till 12 p. m., when the firing was again renewed on both sides. For the last five days the loss in the 7th Regiment in killed and wounded, has been quite heavy, more so than you have any idea of. Our men have been laying in the trenches for six days, and it is certain death to any man who shows himself. Their sufferings are great, but they behave like good and brave soldiers as they are. I must now close, as I have strung the account out much longer than I intended.          H.
The list of casualties of the regiment, which are too lengthy for publication in our present edition, will be published in Monday morning's issue.—[ED.

MORNING EXPRESS.
ALBANY, THURSDAY, JUNE 9, 1864.
Wounded in the 7th Artillery (113th) Regiment.
The following are reported among the wounded in the 7th Regiment—our 113th—Heavy Artillery in the recent battles:
Thos. Snyder, head; James O. White, shoulder; P. McCormick, thigh; A. A. Duck, arm; Sergt. J. A. Collins, back; H. C. Johnson, leg; John Conner, hip; C. E. Wood, thigh; S. W. Wright, head; J. S Ager, hip; J. J. Shock, leg; J. Noxee, leg; J Owens, neck; M. Smith, shoulder; H. P. Richard, hand; Thos. Canaven, foot; Lieut. Geo. B Smeallie, do; Lieut. I. Pitt, do; Lieut.  Treadwell, do; Lieut. James Kennedy, do.
MAY 31—Chas. Vose, in head—killed by sharpshooter; Jas Herring, mortally wounded; Quartermaster Scripture taken prisoner.
June 1st.—Lieut. Treadwell, Co. G., wounded in left arm.
JUNE 3d.—Lieut. C. W. Hobbs lost left hand and bruised in the leg; Sergt. Tingue lost leg and arm.

Seventh Artillery.
The following are the names of the killed, wounded and missing in the 7th N. Y. Artillery, since June 10, 1864:
Killed—Sherwood Ball, Battery B; Charles Chitsey, __; Wm Snyder, C; John Strong C; Peter Remson, C; Henry McGill, C; James Reid, C; Corp Geo. Parker, D; Orville Jefferds, E; G. S. Lawyer, E; Sergt. John Luchesi, F; Peter Funk, F; Thomas Carey, F; Peter Johnson, F; C. L. Yearsley, G; William Dennison, G; Geo Isham, H; Wm Porter, H; ____ McDonald, H; John Reynolds, H; James Dolan, I; Sergt. John Canoll, K; Corp. Wm. Lamoreaux, K; John Palmer, K; Orlando M. Plumb, L.

WOUNDED—MAJ. E. A. Springsteed; Lieut. Robt. Mullens, A; Henry Forman, A; Jacob Weidman, A; Alanson Olmstead, A; Fabian Vinette, B; Chas. Springer, B; Isaih Gott, C; Alanson Fisher, C; Arthur O Neil, C; Sanford W. Tulley, C; John O'Connor, C; Mich'l Hilton, D; Jas. D. O'Brien, D; Peter Magnus, D; Henry Irwin, D; Color Sergt. W. Bailey, D; Corp Chas. R. Babcock, D; Henry Sims, D; Morris Louis, D; Wm Ulman, D; Lieut. Robt. Beadin, E; Ed. Murphy, E; James K. Corknard, E; John Dark, E; S. A. Smith, E; Alex. Bradt, E; Jasper Craft, E; Corp. Sylvester Smith, E; Sergt. Henry Coughtry, E; W. Wainwright, E; N. Cardin, E; John Lynch, E; Levi Simmons, E; Sergt. W. N. Van Amburgh, F; Peter Johnson, F; Spencer Hoffman, F; Wm. Cain, F; A. S. Waters, F; Casper __eigand, F; James Porter, F; Lieut. C. L. Yearsley, G; Wm Dennison, G; I McLaughlin, G; Lewis W Cornwall, G; Thos. Corcoran, G; Corp Peter Middleton, G; Chas Littlebrant, G; braPat Blackwell, G; Ed. McDole, G; G Cronk, G; Chas. H. Van Buren, G; Timothy Donovan, G; Pat. McEniny, G; Ed. Gibson, G; James Burst, G; Joseph Lanery, G; Jas. I. Sherwood, G; Homer Perry, G; Michael Costello, G; Lieut. Morton Havens, H. Sergt. John Burke, H; B. Russell, H; John R Bennett, H; J. H. Forrester, H; J B Pierce, H; John Quinn, H; Jas. Clark, H; Geo. N. Bowers, H; John Connor, H; Philip P Pitts, H; Ed. McDermott, H; John DEgroot, I; Sergt. Wm. Roberts, I; Corp Geo. Texter, I; Jeremiah Daly, I; Mich'l Garrity, I; Joseph Mc- Lean, K; Wm Myers, K; Chas N. Griffin, K; Capt. S L Anable, K; Lieut. H. M. Knickerbocker, K; Corp. Van Benssoten, K; J Slater, K; Drummer John Whipple, K; Wesley Bullis, K; John G Heins, K; Chas F. Carey, K; Peter Koone, K; W Hevenor, K; L Brescia, K; A. Hoag, K; S. Taylor, K; Conrad Katt, K; Leonard McCrossen, L; Jas. McCormick, L; Thos. O'Connor, L; Capt. John Ryan, L; Corp Eli Prescott, L; Martin Ackerman, L; Samuel Coffee, L; Alanson Finch, L; Martin Vaughn, M; Chas Robinson, M; Mich'l Frodert, M; E. B. Robinson, M; Lorenzo Murphy, M; Stephen L. King, M; Corp John Prexell, M.

Missing--Corp Ed. Green, A; Ed. Carter, A; Avery Bullis, A; John W. Fay, A; Albert Johnson, A; John F. Murphy, A; John Platz, A; Lewis Roppersburger, A; Jacob Tutor, A; Capt S E Jones, B; Lieut. Franklin Pettit, B; 1st Sergt. John P. Henry, B; Geo Evertson, B; Albert Soase, B; Ed. Pe_nefeather, B; Chas. Barch, B; C Collins, B; H. Cook, B; Henry Foluer, B; John Butler, B; E Wade, B; Sergt. McCracken, B; John Castle, B; J. Riley, B; J. Armstrong, B; Wm. Armstrong, B; Robt. A. Wildes, B; Andrew Beher, C; Geo Clark, C; Roswell B Corliss, C; David M. Cook, C; Wm. Gilbert, C; John Hennessy, C; Wm Hazlett, C; Henry Mitche, C; Alex Robinson, C; Wm Rablie, C; Wm Talley, C; Lieut Christian Schurr, D; Peter B Mochin, D; Sergt. Wm H Prior, D; Corp A Hungerford, D; Corp John B Shu_lers, D; Corp Allen Jones, D; Wm D Pulver, D; G F Crounse, D; Wm M Bade, Geo Brightmeyer, D; Geo Carpenter, D; Hugh Esaley, D; Andrew Finley, D; Ed Haverly, D; Conrad Huber, D; Aaron Mason, D; Parker P Nichols, D; J W Oliver, D; J G Reinhart, D; Peter Springer, D; Wm Smith, D; Wm E Thomas, D; Thos. Tyrrell, D; Peter Vanderwerken, D; Bernhold Wrister, D; James Winn, Peter Yager, D; Capt N H Moore, E; 1st Sergt A B Hyatt, E; Sergt A Shoemaker, E; Corp C Van Allen, E; Peter Riley, E; Thos. Rogerson, E; Andrew White, E; Francois Lewis, E; Paul Missner, E; ____ Brower, E; ____ Lapham, E; Antonio Nicolini, E; Thos King, E; Jacob Ward, E; Jas Wallace, E; Jas Ledridge, E; Jacob Baker, E; Jas Nears, E; Joseph Spencer, E; Wm Mott, E; Wm Van Zand, E; Lafavotie Walsh, E; Stephen Smith, E; Jas Ebson, E; John B Craft, E; ____ Manoy, E; ____ Barrett, E; ____ Houghtaling, E; Geo Graves, E; Meyer Levy, E; Chas Murdock, E; John Wendell, E; Corp Chas Flacke, F; Corp Eugene Nichols, F; Geo Beadle, F; Wm Baldwin, F; Wm N Bates, F; Philip Jenkins, F; Geo Myer, F; Wm Osborne, F; Jas O'Meara, F; John H Rohan, F; Arthur Waterman, F; Martin Shimp, F; Andrew Varro, F; Richard Scapietor, G; Daniel D Taxter, G; Edliah B Gove, G; Mich'l Costello, G; John Mack, G; Geo Miller, G; Abijah Mashure, G; Homer Perry, G; Isaac L Purdy, G; Abram Storms, G; Jas Newman, G; Corp P N Van Ottendorf, H; Corp. Thos Folks, H; John Cusack, H; Wm C Chapman, H; Stephen Dwyer, H; John Flanagan, H; John Forester, H; Geo H Garfield, H; Isaac Gillett, H; David Hamill, H; Joseph Muset, H; Donald M Way, H; George Powell, H; John Quinn, H; Robert Rooney, H; Chas L Russell, H; Wesley Seblag, H; Geo H Smit, H; James Stone, H; John James, H; Jas Wilson, H; Wm J Yearsley, H; M M Findle, H; Norton Fist, H; Wm O'Brien, H; John H Dyer, H; John I Kent, H; Joseph Lefebre, H; Joseph Laferrier, H; Wm Mullen, H; Lieut James O'Hare, I; 1st Sergt This J Lyons, I; Sergt Geo E lefferts, I; Corp Jas Halpin, I; Corp Jonathan Russell, I; Geo M Drysdale, I; Francis Butt, I; Lawrence Brennan, I; Chas Brankman, I; _ F Brown, I; John Cochran, I; Jas Connelly, I; John D Groat, I; Mich'l Doyle, I; John Dolan, I; Freeman Gauthier, I; John Gilchrist, I; Jas Houghtaling, I; Geo W Hogdan, I; John H Hamilton, I; Wm Kehn, I; James Maney, I; Chas Mullen, I; Alex Nichols, I; Amos Rogers, I; Henry Smith, I; H Van Benthuysen, Ed Williams, I; Jacob Williman, I; Wm Smith, I; 1st Sergt J L _remple, K; Sergt. Ed Slater, K; Sergt Paul _usy, K; Corp E H Holmes, K; P Bird, K; _ Lamey, K; Geo Parks, K; I Westfall, K; ;_ Hart, K; M H Clark, K; M Shea, K; E Holmes, K; A Morrison, K; J Webb, K; H Wood, K; Hiram B Wood, K; J Udel, K; J Holmes, K; A Reinhart, K; P Stevens, K; _ Seros, K; J Sebilling, K; L Fish, K; J Myers, K; M Lang, K; M Cook, K; H Toedt, K; Joseph Saven, K; J Lucey, K; Martin Bird, K; D Willory, K; Maj Francis Pruyn; H T ___, K; Corp M Lockwood, K; F Carpenter, James Brothers, K; BGeo C Woolley, K; Levi Duell, K; Thos Stafford, K; Lieut F W Mathey, L; 1st Sergt John N Locke, L; Sergt Jas Shotliff, L; Corp R H Morris, L; Corp F Spalding, L; Corp R O Sanford, L; J L Duntz, L; Jas Edwards, L; Thoedore Goodrich, L; Samuel Kimble, L; John Cahill, L; Martin Thompson, L; Henry B_el, L; C E Jerpleman, L; ____ Oliver, L; W McNamara, L; John McNichols, L; Geo McDonough, L; Thos McKernon, L; David Portman, L; Geo Montross, L; Thomas Rourke, L; John Rverson, L; N P Smith, L; Ed Shutes, L; C D Snyder, L; Jonathan Slawton, L; R B Arnold, L; E W Brown, L; Alfred Connors, L; Otis Warren, L; Lieut E S Moss, M; Capt Wm Moss, M; Wesley Flagler, M; This Clark, M; Peter Feeney, M; Lyman Gregory, M; Smith Griggith, M; Wm Maloney, M; Werner Morgan, M; ____ Murphy, M; ____ Potter, M; Terrence Riley, M; Peter Warner, M; Patrick Cox, M; Geo Allen, M.

THE KILLED WOUNDED AND MISSING IN CO. C,
7th HEAVY ARTILLERY.—We yesterday received a letter from Corp. James Kesson, of Co. C, 7th Heavy Artillery dated June 13th, at Cold Harbor, giving a correct list of the killed, wounded and missing up to that date, which he desires us to publish, for the benefit of those having friends in the Company. Some of the names have been previously reported, but there are others who have not been noticed:
Capt J. A. Morris, killed.
Lieut J B. Reid, missing.
Searg't H. Lovell, Jr., missing.
Searg't A. D. Rice, wounded.
Searg't C C Palmer, wounded.
Searg't W. H. Vosburgh, wounded.
Corp E S Overton, killed.
Corp. T. Morton, killed.
Corp. Jas Stewart, killed.
Corp Geo Mavens, missing.
Corp. Robert Fisher, wounded.
Private W. Anderson, wounded.
Private F. Beardsley, wounded.
Private J Bartley, wounded.
Private Ell Benedict, wounded.
Private John Bowman, wounded.
Private C. Chitsey, killed
Private F Carpenter, killed.
Private J. T. Duffy, wounded.
Private S. Enos, missing.
Private John Francis wounded.
Private T. Flanigan, wounded.
Private F. Hebsacker, missing.
Private Jas Herring, killed
Private N Hickey, wounded.
Private C Jones, wounded.
Private J. Lang, wounded.
Private W. Michell, missing.
Private L. Morris, wounded.
Private J. L Murdon, wounded.
Private T. McAuley, wounded.
Private J. McCoduck, wounded.
Private W. Price, wounded.
Private G. Ronell, killed.
Private Jas. Risk killed.
Private W. Robinson, wounded.
Private John Reid, wounded.
Private T Renison, wounded.
Private E. J. Strong, misting.
Private P. Savage, lost arm.
Private J. R. Shea, wounded.
Private Martin Sheppard, wounded.
Private J H. VanZandt, wounded.
Private N. Williams, missing.
Private B. New, wounded.

MORNING EXPRESS
SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 1864.
HOW COL. MORRIS WAS KILLED.—We have been permitted to make the following extract from a letter written by Rev Dr. Brown, a member of the Christian Commission, relative to the death of Col. Morris:
"It was my privilege during the eighteen months past to be intimately acquainted with Col. Lewis O. Morris; the result was that I learned to love him as a brother; and I think he loved me. The fact that I was a minister of the Gospel was no barrier to the freedom of his visits to me.
"So matters stood when I went down to the Army of the Potomac, nearly four weeks since, as a member of the Christian Commission. Two days after Col. Morris and his command were ordered to the front. I saw him at Spottsylvania Court House when he joined the army. And as by the singularly kind providence of God, we were thrown the same Corps, Division and Brigade, I either saw him, or had news of him, every day until the last. From the first he was in the front of the continuous fighting going on; and won for himself and his men the commendation of all. Gen. Meade called them 'Veterans' in General Orders. They were said to 'fight like tigers.' I do not like the expression, but so soldiers speak.
"It was Col. Morris and his men of the Seventh, who at the battle of Cold Harbor, on Friday morning, June 3d, won the key of the Rebel position; captured several pieces of artillery, and took four hundred prisoners; but not being supported, they were compelled to abandon all but the prisoners. I know this to be so, for I was at the time close at hand, and heard the story from many of the actors and witnesses. This was Friday. Saturday morning early, Gen. Barlow called on Col. Morris, to make with him an examination of the position; he was then commanding the Brigade.
"Our breastworks and the enemy's were but fifty yards apart. No one dared show himself on either side. The sharpshooters fired quickly at sight of cap or head. The two started, General Barlow leading hiding behind the breastworks, and dodging from rifle-pit to rifle-pit. In passing from one rifle-pit to another, Colonel Morris, for a moment, was exposed, and received his wound. The ball struck him in the left shoulder, ranging downward across the body, touching the spine in its progress, and entering the right lung. He fell insensible. Dr. Pomfret and I soon heard of his wound, and ordered him brought to where we were. We could not go to him. He was brought in about 10 o'clock, insensible, moaning, and uttering incoherent sentences. Stimulants were administered, and the surgeons in attendance examined the wound. In about an hour consciousness came to him. He knew us both. But his system did not rally. His body below the wound was paralyzed. He had no pain, but suffered much from nervous distress and difficult in breathing. At one o’clock his spirit departed, and, as I cannot doubt, passed into the glory of the saints in light. When we undressed him we found his Testament in his pocket, and showing marks of use.

The Campaign—Facts and Incidents.
THE FIGHT ON THURSDAY—BRAVERY OF THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY.
Correspondents from the Army of the Potomac give particulars of the fight of Thursday, in which several of the new regiments were engaged, including the Seventh Artillery and Second Artillery of New York, both of which are made up of Albanians. These regiments, with several others, just arrived from Washington, occupied the Spottsylvania and Fredericksburg road, which is used to forward supplies to the army. This force was in Gen. Tyler's division, who was in command. Col. Morris had charge of the brigade, and Lieut. Col. Hastings had charge of the regiment. The movement of the enemy was under Ewell, who had two objects in view—first, to cut off our
means of communication with the army; and second, to learn what we had on our right. The rebels advanced in good force and partially succeeded in obtaining possession of the road. The New York Times's correspondent says Gen. Tyler felt rather apprehensive at the work beforce [sic] him, considering the rawness of his troops, and he experienced some difficulty in getting them into formation. When once fairly under fire, however, they showed the utmost bravery, and an audacity surpassing even that of old troops. Perhaps it was also in consequence of our heavy artillerymen's crude courage that the rebels, unused to this style of attack, and not exactly understanding it, gave way in confusion, scattering through the woods. The honors of the repulse of the rebels, whose boldly-conceived movement might, under different circumstances, have produced most disastrous results, rests exclusively with Tyler's heavy artillery division, though Birney's division of the Second Corps, and Crawford's of the Fifth, were afterward sent in support, and formed line, enabling Tyler to withdraw, after driving the enemy for several miles, and clearing the Valley of the Ny. The confusion of the rebels appears to have been very great, the major portion of Rhodes's division scattering in the woods. Three hundred and fifty of them were picked up in the woods during the night, and have just been brought into headquarters. The division of raw troops feel immensely tickled at their success. And although their loss has been heavy, it is felt that the diminution of numbers is fully made up by the increase of morale. Capt. John Morris is the only officer of the Seventh Artillery we find among the killed. The other regiments suffered more than the seventh. We have not, of course, the extent of the casualties in the Seventh. Undoubtedly many were killed and wounded of the rank and file which we will furnish as soon as we can ascertain the names
The Philadelphia Inquirer gives the name of Lieut. Nathaniel Wright, of the 7th, as being wounded.
The Sunday Herald gives the following additional names of the Seventh as wounded: Corporal N. Trader, Corporal Wm. Sickles, Co. G, Corporal N. Hallenbeck, Co. F, D. Ross, Co. A. We fear that later news may bring other names.

LETTER FROM MAJOR SPRINGSTEED.
HOW HE RECEIVED HIS WOUND—ITS NATURE—BRAVERY OF THE REGIMENT—THEY ARE ATTACKED FRONT AND REAR IN A CHARGE—A DEMAND TO SURRENDER—MAJOR SPRINGSTEED
REFUSES AND FIGHTS HIS WAY OUT—MAJOR MURPHY IN COMMAND—MAJOR PRUYN MISSING.
Camp near Petersburgh,
June 17, 1864.
I got a painful though slight wound in the small of the back. The ball came from my right side, and struck my belt, cutting my pistol off. This prevented it from striking me on the spine of the back, in which case I would not probably be able to write to you now. I am at the hospital now, and I think I will be able to leave it in a week at the longest. I was with my battalion for an hour after I was struck. I suppose you would like to hear of our movements for the past four days. After leaving Gains's Mills, we marched all night, and in the morning crossed the Chickahominy, and at 6 P. M. reached James River, at a point below Hain's Landing. We laid there all the next day, and crossed the river at night. At one o'clock the next day we marched again. I reached Petersburgh the day following. We formed line and advanced, under the enemy's works, under the fire of two batteries. No harm was done, however. We took our position about 1500 yards from the enemy's works; I remained there till 6 o'clock, when we were ordered to advance, and take their work We advanced to within fifty yards of their works, when we were compelled to halt in a ditch, which sheltered us from the enemy's fore. I was standing in the ditch, taking a view at enemy's works, when I was struck. At first I was amazed at being struck from the above point; but I soon found that the enemy were in our rear, and were firing at us. At this the enemy ordered me to surrender, but I held out for an hour, when the demand was again made by them, telling my men to throw down their arms and come in; that they would not fire at them. I ordered my men to remain in their place, but some of them broke loose, and did go in; the rest soon followed. I waited for some time, and not wishing to be a prisoner, made a dash through an opening left by the rebs. I succeeded in getting away, under a heavy fire. Col. Beaver, the Brigade Commander, was wounded, and the next commander killed. Col. Hastings is now in command of what is left of the Brigade, numbering 150 men and ten officers. Major Murphy is in command. Major Frank Pruyn is missing. I am not sure whether he is killed or wounded. It was a terrible day for our regiment. We lost very heavily in crossing the field, but the men behaved splendidly; and I have no doubt we would have taken the works, had it not been for stopping where we did, in consequence of some of the line giving way.

Casualties in the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery in the Engagements Before Petersburg June 16 and 17.
The following casualties (wounded) are reported in the Seventh Heavy Artillery in the engagements before Petersburg, June 16 and 17:
T. E. Prennette, Co. H; J D. O'Brien, D; R. Bradin, D; S. Smith, E; W. Oakley, I; I. Van Benchoten, K; W. Bullis, K; J. H. Forrester, H; W. Caddin, E; P Johnston, F; S. Hoffman, F; F. Vignette, B; L Murphy, M; A. Clumstark, A; J. Ryan, L; E. McDoll, G; A. A. Bratel, E; A. S. Natelman, F; J. Weaver, F, D. Gott, C; H. Gorman, A; I. Doran, I; E. Murphy, E; J. Whipple, K; P. Koon, K; Wm. Cain, F; T. C. Corcoran, G; E. B. Robinson, M; P. Magnus, D; J. G. Henis, K; G. N. Bowen, H; W. W. Dinwright, E; J. B. Pierce, H; J. Quinn, H; C. F. Cary, K; G. Crook, G; W. Heavender, K; H. Knickerbocker, K; P. Blackwell, G; T. Butcher, I; Lieut. M. Havens, H; C. Seletrant, G; E. Gibson, G; T. Donnovan, E; J. Croft, E; J. G. Cartwright, E; H. Felmley; N. A. Meeker, I; N. T. Frodish, M; U. H. Van Amburg; Maj. E. A. Springsteed, E; Prescott, L; J. Weidman, A; J. Clarke, H; H. Irwin, D; P. B. Middleton, G; G. Texter, I; _ Barker, H; S. A. Smith, E; P. Potter; P. Riley.
On Thursday detachments of the Seventh were sent forward as skirmishers, and while actually within certain portions of the enemy's works they were "gobbled up" by the Rebels. It is also stated that the flag of the Seventh was captured by the Rebels, but was recaptured on Friday by some of Burnside's men.
In connection with the casualties reported above, we append a note from Capt. James Kennedy, of Battery L, wounded and in this city, relative to the casualties in said battery previous to the advance on Petersburg:
ALBANY, June 20th, 1864.
Editor Morning Express:
In the list of killed and wounded in the 7th N. Y. Artillery, published in this morning's Knickerbocker, I find a number of errors in relation to the names of members of Battery L. Will you please copy our report from the corrected list I herewith send you.       JAMES KENNEDY,
Capt., Battery L, 7th N. Y. H. A.
BATTERY L.

KILLED.
Privates—Patrick O'Brien, Geo. Lee, Philip Amerdorn, Martin Blake, Stephen Lent, Chas. Taffee.

DIED OF WOUNDS.
Thos. Sexton, James McCormick, Jacob Englam.

WOUNDED.
Sergeant—William Sands.
Corporals—Joseph Gautier, Jas. E. Austin, Wm. P. Bulger, Wm. Jones.
Privates—C. P. Hayner, John Hougstine, F. W. Hover, J. Kelley, E. Leroy, J. Leonard, J. Letterack, Henry Strope, George Stacy, Chas. Hilton, Chas. Simmons, James Smith, John Carnwick, P. Cummings, Wm. Watson, Chas. Brown, Wm H. Kilfoil, Wm. Leroy, H C. Duryea, Wm. Cooper, Abram Quick, D. D. Hulbert, Allen McKinney, Chas. Yeomans, James Terry, Jas. J. McGovern, Benj. Terwilleger, Joseph Watson, John Ryerson, Chas. P. Richard, William Strope, John Thomas, Peter Back, John Lawler, John McNamarra, J. M. Bemis, J. K. Paddock, Chas. L. Seward, Samuel Kimble, Charles E. Davis, E. Pendergrast, J. W. Terwillear.

MISSING.
Sergeant—S. H. Bishop.
Privates—Robert Fredendall, Hiram Hoffman, C. F. Wait, J. K. McOmber.

HOME MATTERS.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE COUNTY.
LIST OF WOUNDED IN THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY.—The following is a list of casualties (wounded) in the Seventh New York Artillery in the battles before Petersburg on the 16th and 17th instant: J. D. O'Brien, Co. D; R. Bradin, D; S. Smith, E; W. Oakley, I; J. Van Benscoten, K; W. Bullis, K; W. Caddin, D; P. Johnston, F; S. Hoffman, F; F. Vignett, B; S. Murphy, M; A. Clumstark, A; J. Ryan, L; E. McDoll, F; A. Bratell, E; A. S. Nettiman, F; J. Weaver, F; D. Gott, C; H. Gorman, A; J. Dora, I; E. Murphy, E; J. Whipple, K; P. Koon, K; W. Kaia, F; T. C. Corcoran, G; E. B. Robinson, M; P. Magnus, D; J. G. Heins, K; G. M. Bowen, H; W. W. Deriwright, E; J. Pierce, H; J. Quinn, H; F. Gary, K; G. Crook, G; W. Heavender, K; T. Bacher, I; D. Delehant, G; E. Gibbson, G; P. Donavan, G; J. Craft, E; J. G. Cartwork, H. Felmley, N. A. Meecker, I; N. T. Frodisch, M; W. H. Van Amberg, Major E. A. Springsteed, E. Prescoli, I; J. Wedman, A; W. Hearsong, K; J. Clarke, H; H. Irwin, D; P. D. Middleton, G; G. Texter, I; J. Barker, H; S. A. Smith, E; J. Carroll, I. Hays, P. Potter, P. Riley.
The following is a correct list of the killed, wounded and missing in Battery L, as furnished us by Captain James Kennedy. These casualties occurred previous to the battles at Petersburg:
Killed.—Privates Patrick O'Brien, George Lee, Philip Amerdorn, Martin Blake, Stephen Lent, Charles Taffee.
Died of Wounds.—Thomas Sexton, James McCormick, Jacob Englam.
Wounded.—Sergeant Wm. Sands; Privates Charles P. Hayner, John Hongstine, F. W. Haver, J. Kelley, E. Leroy, J. Leonard, J. Letterack, Henry Strope, Geo. Stacy, Charles Hilton, Charles Simmons, James Smith, E. Pendergrast, J. W. Terwillegar, J. Carnwick, P. Cummings, Wm. Walson, Charles Brown, Wm. H. Killfoil, Wm. Leroy, H. C. Duryea, Wm. Cooper, Abram Quick, D. D. Hulbert, A. McKinney, Charles Yeomans, James Terry, James J. McGovern, Benjamin Terwillegar, Joseph Watson, John Ryerson, Chas. Richard, Wm. Strope, John Thomas, Peter Back, John Lawler, John McNamara, J. M. Bemis, J. K. Paddock, Charles L. Seward, Samuel Kimble,
Charles E. Davis.
Missing—Sergeant S. H. Bishop; Privates Robert Fredendall, Hiram Hoffman, C. F. Wait, J. K. McOmber.

HOME MATTERS.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE COUNTY.
SEVENTH ARTILLERY.—A letter received here yesterday from the Seventh Heavy Artillery says that Captains Sickles and Annable, and Lieutenants Treadwell, Fisk, Mont and Coulson, are sick in the hospital at the White House. The same letter says that on the 4th inst. Lieut. McClure was killed, and Adjutant Charles W. Hobbs badly wounded in the left hand and slightly in the leg. Adjutant Hobbs was struck by two balls—one entering between the first and second fingers, passing up his hand, shattering the wrist and coming out four inches from the root of the little finger. The other ball entered between the second and third fingers, also passing through his hand lengthwise, and came out about two inches further up his arm. It looked as though he would lose his hand, but Dr. Pomfret, surgeon of the regiment, managed to save his thumb and first finger.
Captain James Kennedy is also in the hospital, suffering from a bad wound in the fleshy part of his right leg.
The writer says that the Seventh has been terribly cut up—losing about six hundred men, killed, wounded and missing.

LATER.
Capt. James Kennedy, one of the wounded in the battle of Friday at Cold Harbor, arrived home last night, accompanied by Lieuts. Wm. H. Courtney, Geo. B. Smeeley, B. J. Ashley, Stephen Treadwell and Pitt, all wounded in this engagement.
We obtain from Capt. Kennedy the following complete list of the killed and wounded officers of the Seventh:
Killed—Col. Morris and Lieut. Thomas J. McClure.
Wounded—Capt. Jones, slightly; Capt. J. Kennedy, flesh wound, thigh; Lieut. Wm. H. Courtney, through the ankle; Lieut. G. B. Smeeley, ankle; Lieut. B. J. Ashley, foot; Lieut. Treadwell, flesh wound, arm; Lieut. Pitt, flesh wound, thigh; Lieut. Charles Ducharin, foot; Lieut. Chas. Hobbs, lost three fingers.
The following were taken prisoners: Lieut. J. B. Reed, was seen to fall and not seen since; Lieut. Edward McClary.
Lieut. Sickles was not wounded, as reported.
The above list of commissioned officers is the total list of casualties.
Among the privates and non-commissioned officers killed are Sergeant Henry Finnegan, Sergeant Joseph Rogers, Privates Edward Lee, Blake, Pat. O'Brien, Amidon, Enghlam, P. Rorke. These are but a few of the privates.
Capt. Kennedy is of the opinion that there were 600 men killed, wounded and missing.
Friends of the regiment desiring further information may obtain it by calling on Capt. Kennedy, NO. 200 Swan street, or Lieut. Wm. Courtney, 20 Park street.

OUR DEAD AND WOUNDED.—Scarcely a day has passed from the opening of the month of May that we have not been called upon either to announce the death of a friend or to chronicle the wounding of beloved citizens in battle. It seems that the frequent receipt of such painful intelligence has blunted the feelings of community, and the announcement of the death of a beloved relative or friend is soon forgotten by the exciting and stirring events of the day. But we have a duty to perform --a task that is oftentimes sad and painful--yet it is one that is due to those who fall in  defence of our country as well as it is to their kindred and friends. Among the recent victims to this accursed and cruel war, are several prominent young men from this city, whose death will cast a gloom over many households.
Capt. Robert H. Bell, of the Seventh Artillery, died yesterday in the army hospital at Washington. He was wounded in battle on the 19th of May last and subsequently underwent the amputation of one of his limbs above the knee. From that moment he began to sink and yesterday death out an end to his suffering. Capt. Bell was one of the first to volunteer in defense of his country. When Washington was threatened, he enlisted in Company R (A. B.C.'s, Capt. Kingsley) 25th Regiment as a private, and remained with it until it returned to this city. He subsequently re-enlisted, and from merit and deeds of valor he steadily rose until he gained the position he occupied when he was shot down on the field of battle. We learn by a telegram that his body has been embalmed and will be forwarded to this city for interment.
Miles McDonald was shot down while battling with the enemies of his country, and is now numbered with the dead. When the Sixty-third Regiment was organized, in October, 1861, he enrolled his name on the muster of Capt. Branagan's Company, as a private. There was no truer man in the ranks of that regiment, nor one possessed of more ardor or enthusiasm, in devotion to his country. His many noble traits of character soon made him a universal favorite, and for his gallantry and heroic bravery at the battle of Antletam he was promoted to a Second Lieutenancy. His promotion exulted the most profound satisfaction among his comrades, who had learned to love him as a brother. At the first battle of Fredericksburg he was wounded, and soon after was promoted to a First Lieutenancy as a reward for meritorious conduct. Subsequently he was assigned to the Adjutancy of the regiment, and it was while acting in this capacity, before Petersburg, he was killed.
He was but twenty-four years of age, and yet he was a most skillful and accomplished officer; and had his life been spared, would probably have very soon been appointed Major of the regiment. When a boy he entered the service of the New York, Albany and Buffalo Telegraph Company as a messenger, and retained that position for several years, winning for himself the good opinion of the officers of the Company, and of the patrons of the line with whom he was brought in contact. After surrendering this situation he went to New York and accepted a clerkship, which he held until a short time previous to his enlistment in the Sixty-third regiment. Although he never enjoyed the advantages of a high school, education, he was possessed of fine natural talents, and his letters show him to have been gifted with more than ordinary ability.
We are indebted to Capt. William SHANNON for the Following list of killed, wounded and missing, in Battery I, 7th N. Y. V. Artillery:
KILLED—2d Lt. Charles S. Evans; 1st Serg't. Joseph L. Rogers; Serg't Simon O'Day; Corp'l Thomas Eastham; John W. Wands, James McDonald, James Casey, Josiah E. Farthing, Peter McGraw.

WOUNDED.—Serg't Samuel P. Eccles, Serg't D. L. Tuthill, Corp'l Alexander Swinton, Corp'l Michael Doyle (slightly), Geo. M. Stryker, Rob't Gormley, Chauncey M. Chase, Everett Davis, Wm. Bigate, Wm. A. Clark, Benjamin Layman, Wm. N. Williams, James W. Ablett, Zinah H. Cowles, Stephen V. R. Radcliffe, John M. Rheinhart, Elam Wetherwax, Luther Gunn, Amos J. Dow, Peter Hendrickson, Edward Tuthill, Francis Layman, Hiram Campbell, James Coulter, Richard Hurst, James Halpin, Thomas Leary, Marcus Leonard, Benjamin Layman, William H. Smith, Michael Shehan, Joseph Schofield, Samuel V. Taylor.

MISSING.—Corp'l John Westover, Jason W. _oslin, Wm. W. Wheeler, John Findley, Joseph Albion, Ezra B. Alger, Samuel Connelly, James McManus, Michael Mangurn, James Riley, John Megan, John Lawn, Gottfried Warmt.
The majority of the missing are supposed to have been killed.

HOME MATTERS.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE COUNTY.
FURTHER LIST OF CASUALTIES IN THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY.—Lieut. Chas. McLellan, at present commanding Battery "L," 7th N. Y. Artillery, sends to Capt. Kennedy (in a letter dated June 19th) the following additional list of casualties in said battery. These names were not included in the list published by us a few days since. We are indebted to Captain
Kennedy for a copy:—
Killed—Orlando M. Plumb, Jason K. McOmber.
Wounded—Corporal James E. Austin, A. T. Decker, Wm. Jones, Joseph Gautier, Wm. F. Bulger. Privates—Martin Ackerman, Daniel Gunnin, A. N. Roberts, Henry Beach, C. E. Jerolomon, John Ryan, Samuel Coffee, H. D. Kilmer, Daniel Shaunacy, Albert Cropsey, Leander McCrossen, James H Smith, James Edwards, Thomas O'Conner, Michael Stevenson, Lewis Flint, ____ Oliver, Merritt C. Van Tyle, Alanson Finch, Jerome Olmstead, Wm. H. Van Deusen, Richard Grant, Eli Prescott, H. H. Williams, Platt S. Westervelt.
Missing, and supposed to have been captured at Petersburg, June 16th—First Lieut. F. W. Mather, Sergeants Lock, Shotliff and James McFeatrich; Corporals Frazier Spaulding, R. H. Morris and R. O. Sandford; Privates R. B. Arnold, E. W. Brower, A. Connors, J. L. Duntz, T. Goodrich, Wm. McNamara, J. Mc- Nichols, George McDonough, Thomas McKernan, George Montross, David Penman, T. Rourk, Joseph Rothery, Charles Smith, N. P. Smith, Edward Shutes, C D Snyder, J. Slawson, M. Thompson, O. Warren.
Deserted—Charles P. Hayner, Robert Fredendall, Audrew Morris, Samuel Flack, Wm. H. Jackson.
The above list, together with the names published last week, shows a loss in this company, from the 19th of May to June 19th, of twelve killed, sixty-eight wounded and thirty-two prisoners.

Wounded in the 7th Artillery (113th) Regiment.
The following are reported among the wounded in the 7th Regiment—our 113th—Heavy Artillery in the recent battles:
Thos. Snyder, head; James O. White, shoulder; P. McCormick, thigh; A. A. Duck, arm; Sergt. J. A. Collins, back; H. C. Johnson, leg; John Conner, hip; C. E. Wood, thigh; S. W. Wright, head; J. S. Ager, hip; J. J. Shock, leg; J. Noxee, leg; J. Owens, neck; M. Smith, shoulder; H. P. Richard, hand; Thos. Canaven, foot; Lieut. Geo. B. Smeallie, do; Lieut. I. Pitt, do; Lieut. Treadwell, do; Lieut. James Kennedy, do.
MAY 31.—Chas. Vose, in head—killed by sharpshooter; Jas. Herring, mortally wounded; Quartermaster Scripture taken prisoner.
JUNE 1st.—Lieut. Treadwell, Co. G., wounded in left arm.
JUNE 3d.—Lieut. C. W. Hobbs, lost left hand and braised in the leg; Sergt. Tingue lost leg and arm.
ADDITIONAL WOUNDED IN THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY.—The following additional list of wounded appeared in the New York papers yesterday:—Corp. W. E. Hatch, B, right shoulder; John Weigor, F, leg; A. B. Waters, F, leg; Sergt. John Burke, H, foot; S. A. Smith, E, shoulder; C. H. Van Buren, G, head; Thomas King, E; J. Connor, H; J. Sear, M; Charles Springer, B; Sam. Caffee, L; J. Breshey, K; J. G. Hirnes, K; W. N. Bigby, F; Jacob Bauer, head; Peter Trogan, B, scalp; Joseph Fisher, B, leg; E. B. Robinson, elbow; James Taylor, K, leg; David Hind, K, scalp; J. Me- Laughlin, G, head; J. E. Cartnark, E, foot; J. Dowd, E, arm; Geo. Lester, I, ankle; Alex. Brandt, E, hand; John Clouse, A; J. Lynch, E; J. L. Gawen, and T. O'Connor, L; Arthur O'Nell, C; S. Talley, C; H. Perry, G; A. Fisher, C; M. Castello, G; Peter Koon, R, hand; Wm. Cain, F, ankle.
The following are the wounded in the 3d New York regiment: B. Owens, G, hand; B, Quigg, K, finger; James Riley, G, arm.

ADDITIONAL WOUNDED IN THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY.—The following additional list of casualties are reported as having occurred in the recent battle before Petersburgh:— Major E. A. Springsteed, Lieut. M. Havens, T. E. Premeier, J. D. O'Brian, R. Bradin, S. Smith, W. Oakley, J. Van Benscoten, W. Bullis, J. H. Forrester, W. Caddin, P. Johnson, S. Hoffman, T. Vignette, L. Murphy, A. Clungstark, J. Ryan, E. McDole, A. A. Bratel, A. S. Nattiman, J. Weaver, D. Gott, H. Gorman, J. Doran, E. Murphy, J. Whipple, P. Koon, Wm. Kane, D. C. Cochran, E. P. Robinson, P. Magnus, J. G. Heins, G. M. Bowen, W. W. Dinwright, A. B. Pierce, J. Quinn, C. F. Carey, G. Crook, W. Hevenor, H. Knickerbocker, P. Blackwell, T. Bratchel, C. Leiebrant, E. Gibson, D. Donahue, J. Croft, J. G. Cartwork, H. Felmley, M. A. Meeker,. M. T. Frodish, W. H. Van Amburgh, E. Prescall, J. Wedman, W. Hersor, J. Clark, H. Irwin, D. B. Middleton, G. Texter, J. Barker, S. A. Smith, D. Armick, P. Riley, P. Pitts, J. Olmsted, J. Calhoun, S. Perevis, C. Babcook, J. Carrold, I. Hayes, P. Potter, B. Delephant.

MORNING EXPRESS.
ALBANY, THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 1864.
THE KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING IN Co. C, 7TH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—We yesterday received a letter from Corp. James Kesson, of Co. C, 7th Heavy Artillery, dated June 13th, at Cold Harbor, giving a correct list of the killed, wounded and missing up to that date, which he desires us to publish, for the benefit of those having friends in the Company. Some of the names have been previously reported, but there are others who have been noticed:
Capt. J. A. Morris, killed.
Lieut J. B. Reid, missing.
Searg't H. Lovell, Jr., missing.
Searg't A. D. Rice, wounded.
Searg't C. C. Palmer, wounded.
Searg't W. H. Vosburgh, wounded.
Cpro. E. S. Overton, killed.
Corp. T. Morton, killed
Corp. Jas. Stewart, killed.
Corp. Geo. Navens, missing.
Corp. Robert Fisher, wounded.
Private W. Anderson, wounded.
Private F. Beardsley, wounded.
Provate J. Bartley, wounded.
Private Eli Benedict, wounded.
Private John Bowman, wounded.
Private C. Chitsey, killed.
Private F Carpenter, killed.
J. T. Duffy, wounded.
Private S. Enos, missing.
Private John Francis, wounded.
Private T, Flanigan, wounded.
Private F. Hebsacker, missing.
Private Jas. Herring, killed.
Private N. Hickey, wounded.
Private C. Jones, wounded.
Private J. Lang, wounded.
Private W. Mitchell, missing.
Private L. Morris, wounded.
Private J. L. Murdon, wounded.
Private T. McAuley, wounded.
Private J. McCoduck, wounded.
Private W. Price, wounded.
Private G. Ronell, killed.
Private Jas. Risk, killed.
Private W. Robinson, wounded.
Private John Reid, wounded.
Private T. Renison, wounded.
Private E. J. Strong, missing.
Private P. Savage, lost arm.
Private J. R. Shea, wounded.
Private Martin Sheppard, wounded.
Private J. H. Van Zandt, wounded.
Private N. Williams, missing.
Private B. New, wounded.

THE LATE MAJOR CHAS. E. PRUYN.—Recent letters from the army bring a sad corroboration of the death of Major Charles E. Pruyn, of the 118th New York. He was killed in the battle of the 15th, while in command of his regiment before Petersburg. A fragment of a shell struck him in the breast causing death in a few hours. The body has been embalmed and sent to Norfolk, and probably will reach Albany in a few days.
At the opening of the war Major Pruyn left Albany as a Lieutenant in the 90th Regiment, and distinguished himself by his courage and devotion to the cause of the nation. 1862 he was appointed by Gov. Seymour Adjutant of the 118th Regiment, and subsequently was promoted to be Major.
Although suffering from a wound received about ten days previous, Major Pruyn would not fall to the rear, but bravely persisted in leading his men. The staff officers had all been killed or wounded in previous engagements, and consequently the Major was in command. That he was faithful to his charge and gallantly clung to his regiment will surprise no one who knew by an intimate acquaintance the stuff of which he was made.
He has gone from among us forever. Our city has generously given the treasure of its bravest sons, and will know them no more save in affectionate remembrance. The name of Charles E. Pruyn is added to the long list of Albanians who have given their lives in the sacred cause of the country. They are dead, and shall come to us no more, but the record of their courage and brave death shall never die, nor shall the bright example left us be in vain.

MORNING EXPRESS.
ALBANY, MONDAY, JUNE 27, 1864.
A SAD STORY.—On the 1st day of May, the wife of a soldier named George Sanders, a Sergeant in Co. D, 7th New York Heavy Artillery, was compelled to move from her residence on Lydius street, in consequence of the house being sold, and she therefore leased rooms on the opposite side of the street. She left her room for the last time four weeks ago Thursday, to attend the funeral of the deceased child of a friend. The next day she was unable to leave her bed, and there she remained, in a semi-unconscious state, until about a week ago, when typhoid fever set in, which resulted in her death Friday evening.
In the meantime, her husband was wounded at the battle of Cold Harbor, from the effects of which he died on Saturday last. Although it was deemed best, in consequence of her low condition, to conceal this fact from her, yet all the week she has insisted that he was dead, that his body had been brought here, and that she must be dressed for the funeral. Two small children are thus thrown upon a cold world, to pass through the perils of childhood and youth without the guiding and staying hand of father or mother.
The funeral of both husband and wife took place yesterday afternoon from Dr. Magoon's church. It was a truly sad and impressive scene.

List of Wounded of the Seventh New York Artillery, in the Battles of May and June.
Dr. Pomfret, Surgeon of the Seventh Artillery, has very kindly furnished the Evening Journal with the following list of wounded, who have passed under his hands. Other names will be forwarded in a day or two:
BATTLE OF MAY 18, 1864.
C. Colgrove, Co. D, right hand, two fingers, flesh wound.
C. P. Colegrove, Co. K, right hand, flesh wound.

MAY 30. 1864.
W. Stodard, Co. H, breast.
Wilson Robinson, Co. C, stomach.
D. L. Tuthill, Sergeant, Co. I, left thigh.
M. G. Blake, Sergeant, Co. L, neck.
J. Craver, Sergeant, Co. F, left breast.
James Halpin, Co. I, hip.
C. Seabridge, head penetrated.
J. Deyermand, Co. H, little finger left hand, said to be shot by the enemy.
A. Nutting, Co. H, right shoulder.
C. E. Buckley, Sergeant, Co. G, scalp.
C. Vicker, Co. H, lung.
J. H. Huntington, Co. L, right leg.
Marcus Leonard, Co. L, right lung.
Lonis A. Killing, Co. G, foot.
W. Boughton, Co. K, arm.
Moses Wagner, Co. K, hand.
Pat. Cummins, Co. L, hand.
John March, Co. A, right thigh.
W. H. Kilfoile, Co. L, right thumb, lost in drawing rammer.
Wm. Watson, Co. D, right arm.
Jos. Ganther, Corporal, Co. L, right forearm.
Chas. Brown, Co. L, head.
John Kelly, Co. L, left arm.
John Lawe, Co. K, right arm.
Fred. Krepp, Co. D, left hand.
Victor Haines, Corporal, Co. K, right foot.
John Bowman, Co. C, left arm, fracture.
John Carney, Co. L, chin, fracture.
Jacob Ludwick, Co. L, leg, flesh wound.
Abram Tallmadge, Co. K, right arm, fracture.
John Leonard, Co. L, left leg, flesh wound.
Frank Hover, Co. L, left leg, flesh wound.
Jeremiah Reed, Co. F, right leg, fracture.
Nelson Hallenbeck, Co. F, left leg, flesh wound.
Amos J. Dow, Co. I, both thigs, flesh wound.
Peter O'Conner, Co. E, hip, flesh wound.
Francis Kelley, Co. H, breast penetrated, and
haEndd.. Le Roy, Co. L, first and second fingers, right hand, fracture.
Hen. E. Strope, Co. L, second finger left hand, fracture.
Isaac Simms, Corporal, Co. H, right arm and hip, flesh wound.
Stephen Radcliffe, Co. I, left shoulder, fracture.
Wm. Russett, Co. E, hip, flesh wound.
Reuben Hallenbeck, Co. F. ankle fracture.
Jno. Castle, First Sergeant, Co. G, struck with musket.
Geo. M. Slacy, Co. L, side penetrated.
Fred. Easman, Co. H, left foot, flesh wound.
Geo. Haines, Corporal, Co. K, left hip, fracture.
Peter Reily, Co. G, right leg, flesh wound.
Jacob Englem, Co. L, right side penetrated.
James Hemieg, Co. C, breast penetrated.
Everet Davis, Co. I, right leg, fracture.
J. Barker, Co. G, left arm, fracture.
W. H. Vosburgh, Sergeant, Co. C, right hip, flesh wound.
E. F. Beatly, Co. D, left hand, flesh wound.
Chas. Yeomans, Co. L, first finger, right hand, flesh wound.
Philip Amador, Co. E, bowels. Pat. O'Rorke, Co. L, left leg.
Ed. De Revere, Co. G, right ankle.
Samuel Pizer, Co. F, head.
Luther Gun, Co. I, thigh.
Jacob Brate, Co. F, head.
James Dutcher, Co. M, left foot.
Samuel Matthews, Co. A, face.
Relyan Johns, right hand.
One unknown, head.

JUNE.
Jacob M. Dingham, Co. B, foot.
Charles Schoonmaker, Co. H, bowels.
Joel B. Pitts, right arm and left side.
Peter Flannigan, Co. C, hand.
John W. Turbridge, Co. L, right hand.
W. Lindsay, Color Corporal, Co. M, leg and arm.
Ferren Simmons, Co. B, left foot.
D. Evans, Co. E, right arm.
Eli Benedict, Co. C, left side.
Isaac Pitts, Lieut., Co. A, left hip.
W. G. Clarke, Co. I, right arm.
E. B. Echol, Sergeant, Co. I, left hip.
Hiram Campbell, Co. I, right hip.
Hiram W. Davis, Co. M, left thigh.
John H. Livingston, Co. E, right elbow.
C. W. Hobbs, Adjutant, right hand.
Hugh Reilly, Co. B, left shoulder.
Harvey Wilmer, Co. E, face.
Ed. Pendergrast, Co. I, left arm.
H. C. Duryea, Co. L, lower jaw.
T. Shone, Co. F, left arm.
J. D. Nutting, Sergeant, Co. F, right shoulder.
Will Steel, Co. H, abdomen.
D. Holbert, Co. F, right leg.
Chas. Lisk, Sergeant, Co. E, body penetrated.
Martin Brown, Co. H, thigh.
Con. Reisler, Co. B, foot and thigh.
W. Abblett, Co. I, left forearm.
G. Barnard, Co. G, left arm.
John Francis, Co. C, mouth.
John Glenn, Co. H, right arm.
Peter Hickman, Co. B, right shoulder.
R. Wilson, Corporal, Co. E, groin.
Thos. Larey, Co. I, left shoulder.
Thos. Seiton, Co. G, right thigh.
Ed. B. Wilder, Co. M, head.
John Tolley, Co. A, left breast.
Jas. H. Enson, Sergeant, Co. G, right leg.
Wm. Sands, Sergeant, right thigh.
G. Van Alstyne, Sergeant, Co. E, right thigh.
D. W. Fosdick, Sergeant, Co. D, left hand.
C. Telma, Co. F, right arm.
J. C. Canfield, Co. B, left shoulder.
Jos. Swang, Co. B, right arm.
Pat. Drummond, Co. G, right hip.
____ Dossar, Co. L, right hip.
Thos. M. Leakey, Sergeant, Co. A, right leg.
W. Chessnas, Co. M, right hand.
W. Gamber, Co. H, right leg.
Thos. McCaully, Co. C, right hip.
J. Toole, Co. F, right thigh.
Thos. White, Co. M, thorax.
J. D, Marshall, Co. D, right shoulder.
Ed. Dooley, Co. A, right forearm.
M. Goodfellow, Co. F, back.
John Sinards, Co. D, left hand.
G. S. Crawford, Co. M, right hand.
J. C. Coles, Corporal, Co. I, right and left arm.
S. Armstrong, Corporal, Co. B, right foot.
Alex. Biggs, Corporal, Co. E, left leg.
Peter Savage. Co. C, right arm.
John Nels, Co. F, right arm.
John Rudge, Co. A, right shoulder.
Fisher Gilbert, Co. K, left hand.
Charles Seaber, Co. H, abdomen.
Alex. Schelnaugh, Co. A, left ankle.
S. E. Jones, Captain, Co. B, right shoulder.
Thos. Canavon, Co. A, left foot.
Philip S. Carpenter, Co. D, right hand.
Wm. Garaher, Co. H, right leg.
Edward Patelle, Co. I, left hand,
Silas W. Wright, Co. D, right hand.
Jonah Simmons, Co. D, right hand.
John Laiken, Co. A, left thigh.
John McMaree, Co. L, left shoulder.
M. Seymour, Co. G. right breast.
Benj. Tellegar, Co. L, right hip.
Henry A. Ball, Co. D, left leg.
R. P. Bates, Co. E, right hand.
Wm. Price, Co. C, right thigh.
Chas. S. Evans, Lieut., Co. I, right shoulder.

Local Affairs.
Letter from the Seventh Artillery.
The following letter was received by Capt. Kennedy from Private Heaney of Battery L, 7th Regiment:
In the Woods, June 25, 1864.
I have been very ill for a week. I feel somewhat better to-day, and am in the rifle pits with the regiment. 'Tis hotter than a whiskey skin in dog-days; no water to be found for miles, except what is procured by digging. You know that I was as fat as a ramrod when you left. I now look like a lucifer match dressed in soldier clothes. Five hundred and thirty-one is the aggregate of the regiment, 287 for duty. Battery L has an aggregate of 26—11 men and 2 officers for duty. I think that is doing well for the time we have been in the scrimmage. As I do not like corn bread without salt, I got out as best I could, losing the heel of my "gunboat" in the attempt. On the 22d, the Division, while cooking coffee, were surrounded by the "Johnnys." Such a tossing of kettles and skedaddling you never saw. Capt. Maguire and Lieut. Dunning were gobbled. We are growing small by degrees and beautifully less. Captain, should anything happen to me, I hope you will direct my mother and sister how to procure my pay and clothing, the latter of which is stored in some government house in Washington. We have seen it rough since you left, and the boys one and all feel "played out." I had poor McClure's grave sodded before we left Cold Harbor. Col. Jack Hastings is commanding the Brigade, and Major Murphy the Regiment. It is rumored that we are to have some strange officer, for Colonel Hastings threatens to resign. Capt. Shannon and Lieut. Smith are going on a sick leave.
I remain yours, truly, HEANEY.

Letter from Capt. Terrell.
CAMP NEAR PETERSBURG, June 28.
Friend Hastings--Having a few leisure moments to spare this afternoon, I thought perhaps you would like to hear from your old comrades in arms. We are laying in the front line of rifle pits to the left of Petersburg, and for the last few days everything has been quiet. Several times the "rebs" have felt our lines, to find a weak spot, but they found it to their cost, that it was a bad job. There is a calm just now, but it is a prelude to the coming storm--a lull to the onward tramp of the Union boys. The men are getting rested and refreshed for the next tussle. It is surprising how cheerful and bouyant the noble fellows are after passing through the terrible ordeal that they have for the last two months. Gen. Grant's spirit has spread itself throughout the army, and under his guidance we look forward to victory. The army never was in better condition, and thanks to our General never was better fed. The noble band of sanitary brothers sent forth from our mother homes are carrying comfort and succor to thousands of our brave boys. The well and sick receive many blessings that cheer them on the way, and lighten their weary hearts. All day the air is filled with the booming of guns, sounding like a dozen thunders combined in one. At night both sides bang away at each other with a will until the ground trembles beneath our feet. This part of the country is but one mass of fortifications, interlaced like so many cobwebs, and to look on them, it seems impossible for men to take them, but one by one they are taken from the foe, by our unflinching braves. We can hear the church bells tolling in the city on Sunday. No doubt the sinners meet very often to pray for delivery from us "Yanks," But I do not think their prayers will be answered. A great many of our wounded men are coming back, and we now number about one hundred and fifty for duty.—Col. Visscher is in command, and has earned his silver leaf by hard fighting. May he win a star before this War is over. Captain Davidson is sick, and has been sent to Washington for treatment. Lieut. Russell got a punch in the ribs from a bullet, but it glanced off without doing much harm. All the officers unite with me in sending their best regards to you, and wish you would drop us a KNICK once in while. I remain, respectfully yours,
Capt. WM. H. TERREL,
43D N. Y. V.

(July 23, 1864)
LOCAL AFFAIRS.
Letter from Col. John Hastings.
HEADQUARTERS 4TH BRIGADE, 1ST Division, 2d ARMY CORPS,
Opposite Petersburg, July 18, 1864.
DEAR BROTHER—In my last letter I stated that we were about four miles above this place. On Wednesday last we fell back. The 2d corps is now in the reserve, on the right of the 6th and left of the 9th corps. On Saturday evening, when the 6th corps was ordered to Washington, the 2d corps had to extend its lines and fill up the vacancies which the departure of the 6th had made. This weakened our lines, and laid us open to attack at any moment. Deserters from the enemy reported Hill's corps moving for an attack. Orders were accordingly issued to repel the same. All breastworks in our front, over which much hard labor had been spent by the 6th corps in building, were destroyed. A cavalry force in our front, however, had destroyed a principal bridge, which prevented the advance of the enemy, and no fight took place.
Capt. Tremain, of Gen. Davis's staff, paid me a flying visit to day. He looked well and seemed to be enjoying good health.
Our position, and the army here now, are stronger than it was four weeks ago. We have got the heaviest kind of earthworks on our flank and front, which makes us almost impregnable there now. The soldiers are gaining in strength bodily and also in numbers every day. Till within the last few days the heat has been almost insufferable. Now we are enjoying a good cooling breeze every day. Since the army has laid here much improvement has been effected. The hundreds and thousands of men that had been separated from their commands by straggling or otherwise have been gathered up and returned to them. Regiments and brigades have been consolidated and re-assigned, and there is also much better feeling than when we first arrived here, both in men and officers.—When this army set down in front of this place it was about used up in numbers and exhaustion; but all this has been remedied, and everything now looks bright and cheerful. The Army of the Potomac has never fought more gallantly, nor labored more faithfully and energetically than in the battles and movements since the 4th of May. It is true a large, lamentably large, part of this brave and devoted body has been wasted away under the dire destruction of life and limb in half a dozen general actions and innumerable affairs and skirmishes. But its losses have all been made up by additions of old and new troops, and those in the North who are watching its fortunes with truly patriotic anxiety may rest assured that the host now stretching in long, deep intrenched [sic] lines in front of Petersburg, will, when occasion comes, battle again as valiantly as ever. According to the reports of deserters Longstreet's corps was to make an attack, last night or this morning on the right of the 5th corps or the left of the 9th. The consequence was the troops were under arms all night, waiting for the music to commence, and at half-past 4 the troops were dismissed and ordered to their different quarters. Probably the rebels thought better. Still it is best to be vigilant. To show you how the army is fed, I enclose you a copy of an order I received yesterday. No army in the world is fed like it:
While the army occupies its present position, Corps and other independent Commanders will cause their Commissaries to issue at least four (4) days fresh potatoes and three (3) days fresh onions per week to the troops of their commands. Green cabbages will be issued from two (2) to three (3) times per week, in lieu of the money value of some component part of the rations, and at the ratio of 1/4 lb. per man. Fresh beets, or fresh turnips, or fresh carrots, or whichever one of these articles that can be most readily furnished, will be issued from (2) two to three (3) times per week, in lieu of beans, peas, rice or hominy, and at the ratio prescribed by Regulations, viz: "thirty pounds per (100) hundred rations." If the articles above mentioned cannot be obtained from the Depots of Supplies, the Commanders aforesaid will require their Commissaries to present to them a statement signed by the officer in charge of the Depot, to the effect that the articles required by the Commissary, could not be furnished him for issue at that depot.
Truly yours, JOHN.

(Knickerbocker, Aug. 30, 1864)
LOCAL AFFAIRS.
MAJOR SPRINGSTEED AND CAPT. KENNEDY OF THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY AGAIN WOUNDED AND IN THE REBELS' HANDS.--A Letter was received in this city, last night, which brings sad intelligence to the families of Major Springsteed and Capt. James Kennedy, of the 7th Heavy Artillery. The letter is dated the 26th inst., and says that the most bloody battle of the campaign was fought on the 25th. The 7th was ordered to charge on the enemy, and most gallantly did they execute the command. During the action the boys of the 7th fought bravely, but all were repulsed. Major Sprinsteed and Capt. Kennedy were each wounded and are in the hands of the enemy. We did not learn the nature of Major Springsteed's wound. Capt. Kennedy was wounded in the hip. Sergt. Beaty, a well known Albany boy, attempted to carry Capt. Kennedy off the field, and lost his right arm close to the shoulder. He is supposed to be mortally wounded, and was in a dying condition when last seen by Arthur Kennedy. Notwithstanding his condition, he said he would have been willing to lose both arms if he could have brought his captain off the field. Lieut. Arthur Kennedy's company was nearly all slaughtered. He was in the charge, although he had just got out of the hospital himself, having been wounded in the shoulder a few days previous. The following is a list of the wounded in the 7th in the engagement at Ream's Station: Jas. Girling, Co. K, left arm and side; Solomon R. Gosha, W. Leisha, C. Wort, side; N. Helbold, hand; L. Durhysson, leg; Casper Smith, knee; Alex. Stewart, leg; A. Frisbee, scalp; E. Noel, arm; Thos. O'Connor, foot; Geo. W. Holt, mortal; James G. Keever, arm; F. Schmall, shoulder; Benj. Norris, arm; Serg. Geo. Beaty, arm; Louis Nester, neck.
A letter from Capt. Norman H. Moore, now a prisoner of war in Macon, Georgia, states that there are ten officers and thirty privates of the 7th Heavy Artillery, now prisoners, confined there with him. They are all in excellent health.

DAILY KNICKERBOCKER.
Price 12 1/2 Cents Per Week.
ALBANY.
SATURDAY MORNING, SEPT. 3, 1864.
FROM THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY.—We have received a letter from Major Murphy, of the 7th Artillery, which gives a detailed account of the fights it was engaged in from the 20th of August up to the 29th. In a fight on the 20th the regiment lost two killed and eight wounded. Relative to the fight of the 25th, at Ream's Station, he says: "Early Thursday morning our regiment opened the fight. Major Springsteed was ordered to take our regiment and the 145th New York and go to the extreme left to support the cavalry. Arriving at the point designated, we opened and had a lively   skirmish, losing one killed and three wounded. We were then ordered back to the pits, where we fought until night ended the conflict. The regiment acted nobly, officers and men. We had 200 men in line, and our loss was 96 enlisted men and 6 officers, killed, wounded and missing. Springsteed was, it is supposed, mortally wounded. We left "Old Navy" to care for him. He was gobbled with the Major. Capt. Kennedy is not badly wounded, but it was impossible to get him off the field, as he was wounded while the rebs were making their successful charge. Our friend Nat Wright was hit while standing by my side. He was shot through the body. I raised him up after he was hit. He stretched out his hand to me, and I grasped it and held it until he died, like a hero, without a murmur. Peace to his ashes. I am the only officer left with the regiment that belonged to the original organization. Joe Shaw and Dewey were killed."

From the 7th Heavy Artillery.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Sept. 11, 1864.
Editor Express—DEAR SIR:—Lieut. James H. Requa, 7th N. Y. Artillery, who was reported killed on the 26th ultimo, in the fight on the Weldon road near Petersburg, I am happy to state was not killed, but was captured by the enemy while gallantly doing his duty. He is supposed to be uninjured, as is also Lieut. H. N. Rodgers, of your city, who was captured with him. Please give this a place in your paper and oblige, Yours, very truly,
SAM. S. ANABLE, Capt. 7th N. Y. A.

(Knick., Sept. 12, 1864)
Local Affairs.
THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY.—The following letter from Sergt. Major Lockley, of the 7th Regiment, was received by Lieut. Col. Hastings, on Saturday. The letter tells the part the brave old regiment took in the battle of Ream's Station, on the 25th of August. No regiment in the army of the Potomac can show a brighter record, or one which has suffered equal to the 7th since it went to the front—always having the post of honor—such is the confidence reposed in it for its bravery:—
Before Petersburg, Va., Sept 7.
"LIEUT. COL. JOHN HASTINGS—Dear Sir: Your favor is just received. We are at our old work "campaigning," and you have had experience enough in the 2d corps to receive that expression in its full acceptation. Fighting, digging and marching are our only alternations of employment, only we now have the addition of bad weather. Lying on the wet grass with a rubber blanket over you—if you are fortunate enough to own one—and the rain peppering you all night, having now lost its novelty, may be received as agreeable or not, just as a man's taste leads him. Our boys are healthy, though, stand the tug well, and have now become tough, well tried soldiers. We are expecting a visitation from Gen. Early, and we are busy making preparations to give him a hospitable reception. The regiment is occupying a strong work just in the vicinity of where the 1st division hospital was placed on the 16th of June. Lieut. White's grave is within sight as I sit in the pit to write. This is a pleasant, open country. The weather having cleared of, the air is cool and fall-like. We do not pitch tents, as we are continually on the move, now a few yards to the left, then about face and a few yards to the right. Our regiment is slowly gaining strength from returned convalescents, twenty-five having joined us this week. We lost heavily at Ream's Station—6 officers and 96 men. I regret that I cannot furnish you the names at present, as the regimental records are in the Adjutant's desk in the wagons. I have suffered from sundry twinges of conscience in not having furnished you the list of casualties before, but I really have not had time. On our second return from Deep Bottom we destroyed eleven miles of the Weldon railroad, fought the battle at Ream's Station, and then went into camp, where we remained eight days. I then had the monthly return to make out, containing 634 names of absent, sick and wounded, besides the entire work, which kept me constantly employed. The six officers names lost at Ream's Station are as follows: Major Springsteed, left in the pit mortally wounded; Capt. Nathaniel Wright, killed; Capt. James Kennedy, wounded with a shell and captured; Lieut. D. J. O'Brien, wounded in wrist and body, captured; Lieut. Howard A. Rodgers, captured; Lieut. James Requa, battery K, captured. Major Springsteed was left in the care of Quartermaster Sergeant O'Brien, battery A, but on the fourth charge of the enemy our line was penetrated, and we were flanked out. The regiment held its ground till it came to clubbed muskets with the rebels, and when it was finally driven out our wounded had to be abandoned. Sergt. O'Brien was captured with the Major. During the action our regiment suffered very lightly, but the rebels gained so immensely in force during the day that on the last charge they seemed to swarm everywhere. A perfect shellfire was directed upon us, and it is feared that most of our missing men were wounded in their efforts to escape to the rear. Our regiment behaved splendidly. The number engaged was small, but all agree that it was the most desperate battle we have yet fought. The men stood and received the desperate charges of the rebels with the coolness of veterans, decimating and demolishing their ranks with the murderous discharges they poured into them as they advanced. We feel disappointed that the newspaper correspondents have not found some incident in the fighting of the "Seventh Heavy" worthy of mention. Miles's division figures prominently in their narrative, and as he is our division commander we will suppose that the eulogium is intended for our achievements in common with the division. Lieut. Knickerbocker has just joined us, looking flush and hearty. Lieut. Heaney has received notification of his commission as 1st Lieutenant. I am unable to learn anything about Private Edward McDermott, battery H, except that he was wounded at Coal Harbor and died in hospital in Washington. On our going into camp I will hasten to furnish you, the list of our casualties at Ream's Station. Col. Broade, our brigade commander, was wounded. Col. Glenny is now in command.
"I am, Colonel, very truly and obediently yours, FREDERICK E. LOCKLEY,
"Sergt. Major 7th N. Y. Artillery."

DAILY KNICKERBOCKER.
Price 12 1/2 Cents Per Week.
ALBANY.
MONDAY MORNING, SEPT. 12, 1864.
Local Affairs.
THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY.—The following letter from Sergt. Major Lockley, of the 7th Regiment, was received by Lieut. Col. Hastings on Saturday. The letter tells the part the brave old regiment took in the battle of Ream's Station on the 25th of August. No regiment in the army of the Potomac can show a brighter record, or one which has suffered equal to the 7th since it went to the front—always having the post of honor—such is the confidence reposed in it for its bravery:—
"BEFORE PETERSBURG, Va., Sept. 7.
"LIEUT. COL. JOHN HASTINGS—Dear Sir:
Your favor is just received. We are at our old work "campaigning," and you have had experience enough in the 2d corps to receive that expression in its full acceptation. Fighting, digging and marching are our only alternations of employment, only we now have the addition of bad weather. Lying on the wet grass with a rubber blanket over you—if you are fortunate enough to own one—and the rain peppering you all night, having now lost its novelty, may be received as agreeable or not, just as a man's taste leads him. Our boys are healthy, though, stand the tug well, and have now become tough, well tried soldiers. We are expecting a visitation from Gen. Early, and we are busy making preparations to give him a hospitable reception. The regiment is occupying a strong work just in the vicinity of where the 1st division hospital was placed on the 16th of June. Lieut. White's grave is within sight as I sit in the pit to write. This is a pleasant, open country. The weather having cleared of, the air is cool and fall-like. We do not pitch tents, as we are continually on the move, now a few yards to the left, then about face and a few yards to the right. Our regiment is slowly gaining strength from returned convalescents, twenty-five having joined us this week. We lost heavily at Ream's Station—6 officers and 96 men. I regret that I cannot furnish you the names at present, as the regimental records are in the Adjutant's desk in the wagons. I have suffered from sundry twinges of conscience in not having furnished you the list of casualties before, but I really have not had time. On our second return from Deep Bottom we destroyed eleven miles of the Weldon railroad, fought the battle at Ream's Station, and then went into camp, where we remained eight days. I then had the monthly return to make out, containing 634 names of absent, sick and wounded, besides the entire work, which kept me constantly employed. The six officers names lost at Ream's Station are as follows: Major Springsteed, left in the pit mortally wounded; Capt. Nathaniel Wright, killed; Capt. James Kennedy, wounded with a shell and captured; Lieut. D. J. O'Brien, wounded in wrist and body, captured; Lieut. Howard A. Rodgers, captured; Lieut. James Requa, battery K, captured. Major Springsteed was left in the care of Quartermaster Sergeant O'Brien, battery A, but on the fourth charge of the enemy our line was penetrated, and we were flanked out. The regiment held its ground till it came to clubbed muskets with the rebels, and when it was finally driven out our wounded had to be abandoned. Sergt. O'Brien was captured with the Major. During the action our regiment suffered very lightly, but the rebels gained so immensely in force during the day that on the last charge they seemed to swarm everywhere. A perfect hellfire was directed upon us, and it is feared that most of our missing men were wounded in their efforts to escape to the rear. Our regiment behaved splendidly. The number engaged was small, but all agree that it was the most desperate battle we have yet fought. The men stood and received the desperate charges of the rebels with the coolness of veterans, decimating and demolishing their ranks with the murderous discharges they poured into them as they advanced. We feel disappointed that the newspaper correspondents have not found some incident in the fighting of the "Seventh Heavy" worthy of mention. Miles's division figures prominently in their narrative, and as he is our division commander we will suppose that the eulogium is intended for our achievements in common with the division. Lieut. Knickerbocker has just joined us, looking flush and hearty. Lieut. Heaney has received notification of his commission as 1st Lieutenant. I am unable to learn anything about Private Edward McDermott, battery H, except that he was wounded at Coal Harbor and died in hospital in Washington. On our going into camp I will hasten to furnish you the list of our casualties at Ream's Station. Col. Broade, our brigade commander, was wounded. Col. Glenny is now in command.
I am, Colonel, very truly and obediently yours, FREDERICK E. LOCKLEY.

MORNING EXPRESS.
Albany, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 1864.
SEVENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—The Seventh Heavy Artillery, composed principally of Albanians, and which has suffered so much during the present campaign, is yet doing good duty in front of Petersburgh. A letter from an officer of the regiment speaking of the battle of Ream's Station, in which the 7th lost heavily, says:—"Major Springsteed was left in the care of Quartermaster Sergeant O'Brien, battery A, but on the fourth charge of the enemy our line was penetrated, and we were flanked out. The regiment held its ground till it came to clubbed muskets with the Rebels, and when it was finally driven out our wounded had to be abandoned. Sergt. O'Brien was captured with the Major. During the action our regiment suffered very lightly, but the Rebels gained so immensely in force during the day that on the last charge they seemed to swarm everywhere. A perfect hell-fire was directed upon us, and it is feared that most of our missing men were wounded in their efforts to escape to the rear. Our regiment behaved splendidly. The number engaged was small, but all agree that it was the most desperate battle we have yet fought. The men stood and received the desperate charges of the Rebels with the coolness of veterans, decimating and demolishing their ranks with the murderous discharges they poured into them as they adventured. Lieut. Knickerbocker has just joined us, looking flush and hearty. Lieut. Heaney has received notification of his commission as 1st Lieutenant. I am unable to learn anything about private Edward McDermott, battery H, except that he was wounded at Coal Harbor and died in hospital in Washington,"

(Knick, Sept. 27, 1864)
LOCAL AFFAIRS.
Letter from the 7th N. Y. V. Artillery,
HEADQUARTERS 7TH N. Y. V. ARTILLERY,
NEAR PETERSBURG, Va., Sept. 19.
Lt. Col. John Hastings—My Dear Colonel: I unavoidably failed in my promise to furnish you with a list of casualties in our regiment occurring during the fight of Ream's Station, the list having been sent to the Albany press before I could find time to copy it. But I will make you the best reparation in my power—give you a little pleasant gossip about “matters and things" here. Although you are at present an unoccupied spectator, I know that your interest in the cause remains undiminished, and that your devotion to the "Old Seventh" is as abiding as ever.
We have been expecting a big fight here, but it does not come off. Lee's principal solicitude seems to be confined to procuring "daily bread" for his armed adherents. Through some culpable sleepiness somewhere (I have not heard that the matter has been investigated, so I know not what department is blameworthy), a rebel cavalry foraging party succeeded in driving off a herd of 2,500 cattle, which were pasturing away to the left of our lines, under a full guard; and now we learn of some suspicious movements which seem to threaten our base of supplies—City Point. A general fight, Lee seems sedulously to avoid; if he can maintain a guerrilla warfare until the Presidential election declares whether assistance is to reach him from the North by the election of the peace party candidate appears to be the policy he is desirous of pursuing.
We have heard from Lieut. Rodgers, who was captured at Ream's Station. He reports the death of Capt. Kennedy in Richmond, of typhoid fever, September 10th, and of Captain Maguire, July 4th. Lieut. Read, he can learn nothing about. Lieut. O'Brien was thrice wounded before captured, and it is feared he will lose a leg; both he and Lieut. McClary, who is recovering fro his wounds, were paroled, and are now probably in Alexandria, Va. You remember the occasion of Capt. Maguire's capture during the grand "skedaddle" of our division on June 22d, last. He was on General Marlow's staff, and not half an hour before our line was crowded by fugitives, I saw the Captain ride by. The affair was serious: we lost over two thousand men by the mishap; but we never allude to it in the regiment without a hearty laugh. Perhaps the present writer was one of the most astonished actors in the affair. You were in command of the Brigade at the time, and had established your headquarters under a gigantic pine tree. Our line of battle spread along the wood, everything was perfectly quiet; so I seated myself under the tree, and spreading out my papers, commenced preparing a tri-monthly field return. Suddenly a volley of musketry was fired just over our heads, which brought you instantaneously to your feet; then a rush of fugitives against our line, whom you sternly commanded to stand and face the foe. But the cause of the disorganization was too serious for your individual efforts to repel; our division had failed to connect with the 6th Corps, and Early, throwing himself into the opening, had demoralized the left of our line, which was in fragments, and chafing against the obstacle to their flight which your Brigade interposed. We were loosely spread through the pine forest without any protection at all, and as the rebel column advanced, our line necessarily crumbled up, until the confusion became general, and your Brigade was involved in the net. I sat in bewilderment for a few moments watching the rush of fugitives, until the confusion was communicated to our regiment, then I just gathered up my impedimenta: tent, haversack, knapsack, regimental papers, and took to my heels as stoutly as the best of them.
By jove! the bullets flew lively. Whiz! Past your ears, and whack! into a tree, with here and there a poor fellow falling in your path, struck by a stray shot. The firing seemed to be from all directions, and the fugitives seemed running every way. I could see no outlet to the wood, and I could form no idea which way to retreat. The soldiers call this "retreating:" but some folks might call it "running away." Venturing a glance over my right shoulder, I saw a line of rebels about forty paces to my rear, on the double quick after me, arms trailed, eyes glaring like panthers', and their shots whizzing past me in unpleasant proximity. Reaching a wagon road which intersected the wood, I came again upon you vainly endeavoring to rally the men to a stand. You afterwards learned how futile such a stand would have been. It was here that Capt. Maguire must have received his wound, and our rebel pursuers sweeping over the ground, gobbled him up, his fate remaining unknown to us until to-day. He was a gallant officer, accomplished in the profession, and would have risen to eminence had he been spared. This may be the first intimation of his death that reaches you, and I know that your regrets will mingle with ours in the loss of so deserving a man.
When we finally emerged from the woods, and reached our main line of works, manned with five miles of gleaming muskets, what a feeling of relief we experienced. We could turn our faces to the enemy now, and welcome their approach. But they prudently refrained from further pursuit, and we had time to recover our breath and recall our confidence. But not another such race for me, if you please!
Our regiment is gaining strength rapidly.—Yesterday we received thirty-five recruits and thirty-six convalescents. We report 397 men present. The 64th N. Y. of our Brigade, have gained 300 recruits. To-day our regiment has been out on fatigue, digging a covered way for the railroad which runs from City Point to Gen. Hancock's headquarters, at a place where the passing trains were exposed to the enemy's shells. The weather is lovely; the men continue healthy. The Richmond papers have been making great calculations on the September malaria prostrating the strength of their beseigers. The army never was in finer condition as regards health, spirits, and material.
Hoping this will find you in robust health and your customary flow of good spirits, I am, Colonel,
Very faithfully and ob'tly yours,
Frederick E. Lockley,
Serg't. Major, 7th N. Y. Art'y.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
From the Seventh Artillery.
Headquarters 7th N. Y. Artillery, near Petersburg, Va., Nov. 9, 1864.
Lieut. Col. John Hastings, Albany, N. Y.:
Dear Colonel--I fear you will think that I perform my promise of “writing to you occasionally" somewhat negligently. Your knowledge of the “exigencies of the service” will lead you to judge leniently of me, when I tell you that the regiment has been so actively engaged of late that my opportunities for correspondence have been of the most limited character. During the fight on the 27th of October our division held the centre of the line, and for ten days the 7th held the picket line. Here we saw service of the roughest kind. During a portion of the time the weather was bad, and our pits assumed quite an alluvial character; the firing on each side was close and unintermittent. A walk through the gap, leading from our reserve to the picket line, which for labyrinthine windings would beat the famed Cretan maze all to pieces, was one fuller of adventure than agremens. The way those "cussed" Johnnies did send their whining leaden pellets at every angle in that tortuous defile was a caution to weak nerves. When our regiment occupied the defences of Washington, and gathered in undiminished numbers for inspection or parade, there was an assemblage of armed men who filled the beholder's mind with some idea of the pomp, pride and circumstance of glorious war. But to see these poor war-worn soldiers floundering in the mire, sullied with mud from forage cap to government boottee, vigilant night and day, constantly exposed to the pelting rain or the more deadly missiles of the foe, had you been of a sentimental turn you would involuntarily have exclaimed, "How art thou fallen, Lucifer, son of the Morning!" Had you been more homely in your turn of thought, you would have declared that soldiering is not what it is cracked up to be. A Pennsylvania regiment (the 148th) in our brigade has been armed with open ___ rilfes, familiarly called seven-shooters. On the evening of the fight on the Boydton Plank road (the 27th ult.) a storming party of one hundred men from this regiment were detailed to assault and carry a redoubt just in front, about three hundred yards distant from our picket line. It looked like a dusty job, and the men prepared themselves for the worst. Each took leave of comrades and intrusted [sic] some final message of love to be sent to the dear ones at home. The advance was to be made over an open plain, affording a full sweep to the enemy's fire. They bounded lightly over our breastwork and formed in line of battle, led by Capt. H. D. Price, 116th Penn. Vols., as gallant a soul as ever led a forlorn hope. These noble fellows marched at a double quick step, with bayonets unfixed, without firing a shot. On reaching the enemy's cheveaux de frise they plied their axes, and effecting a breach, made a rush upon the redoubt. It was just growing dark, but we strained our eyes with intensest interest to watch the progress of these gallant fellows. Immediately we discovered their enthusiastic young leader upon the parapet summoning his followers to the rescue. They clambered up the steep side, mounted the parapet, and disappeared in the work. Instantly a shout rose proclaiming that the fort was captured, and an officer was dispatched in hot haste to bring forward a supporting force from the reserve. It was now dark and raining heavily. Pending the arrival of these reinforcements, Col. Mulholland, commanding the brigade, ordered Capt. Chas. M. Niles, of our regiment, in charge of the picket line, to gather up thirty or forty of our regiment and enter the fort and hold it till further orders. This was promptly performed. During this brief while, the enemy, who had been surprised by our advance upon their work and withheld their fire, supposing that the small party rushing across to their lines were a squad of deserters, had rallied, after their hasty evacuation, and meeting with a support outside, turned upon their victors, and after a spirited contest drove them back over the embankment. During the conflict Captain Price fell dead, perforated with six balls, and the assaulting party retired, leaving  twenty-three of their number behind, but bringing with them four officers (one a Colonel) and thirty-five prisoners. These occurrences were unknown to our little supporting party of thirty man, gathered up from the right of our picket line, and their leader, Capt. Niles, carried them forward to hold and occupy the fort. Immediately they bounded over our breastwork—the party were lost to view—and as we heard nothing of them for thirty long minutes, and the repulsed party had returned to our lines, the cry immediately arose that they were captured, and we sincerely grieved over the loss of an officer of great promise. The firing from both sides was now in continuous volleys, and the artillery along the line swelled the noise to the uproar of a good sized battle. By-and-bye we heard a noise on out right, and the officer left in charge stilled the firing in its vicinity to learn the nature of our visitant. Speedily our lost friend, Capt. Niles, crawled in, plastered with mud and drenched through to the skin. He presented so ludicrous a figure, crawling into our midst like a drowned rat, who half an hour since had rushed forward to take command of a captured post, that we could not forbear laughing. Naïve and irrepressible, the gallant young centurion, with a mixture of drollery and earnestness, had a perfectly thrilling adventure to relate. After leaving our lines the Captain encountered such a withering fire from all sides that he bade his command throw themselves down while he crawled forward to reconnoitre. His description of this tortoise-like advance, in which he was accompanied by one faithful sergeant (Michael Doyle, Battery I), was amusing. Bullets from friend and foe peppered him alike, while our own shells kept up a constant scattering of whizzing missiles. As he neared the enemy's cheveaux de frise he fell into a trench, and as this offered a little cover, he codcluded [sic] that the element of water was more endurable than that of fire. Here he lay, separated from his command, ignorant of what had transpired, and in dangerous proximity to five hundred hostile muskets. After maturely deliberating the matter he concluded he would return and gain some intelligence of the present position of affairs. His men all got back in safety. By the time the reserve came up the whole affair was over. We were very free in our comments upon what we considered the poor generalship of this movement. The locality of this unwise affair was within a gunshot of Cemetery Hill. Had there been but one division in compact form on hand to follow up the impression thus made upon the enemy's line, we saw nothing to prevent our marching straight into Petersburg. Whether we could have got out would have remained to be determined. Brig. Gen. Miles, our division commander, pronounced himself perfectly satisfied with the result, declaring the movement was merely intended for a reconnoissance. But we still hold to the belief that a suddenly developed opportunity for the capture of the enemy's city was lost by a vexatious "accident of flood and field." I am, sir, very faithfully yours,
F. E. L., 7th N. Y. Artillery.

WOUNDED.—James P. Brennan, of the N. Y. 7th Heavy Artillery, son of Dr. Brennan of West Troy, was wounded on the 3d of June. He was in Hancock's corps. His left hand was grasped about his musket when it was struck by a bullet which penetrating to the barrel of the piece glanced off and struck him in the eyebrow. He is now in the hospital in Washington.

7th Heavy Artillery.
FORMERLY ALBANY COUNTY REGIMENT.
Colonel Lewis O. Morris.
GARRISON DUTY.
Defences of Washington.
Recruits will be received for this Regiment until the completion of the Draft.
All the advantages of a permanent and healthy location, convenience to the city and comforts beyond which any soldier has any reason to expect, are to be found here. Persons desiring to enlist will do well to call early.
Lieut. N. WRIGHT, Recruiting Officer,
au26           44 State street, Albany, N. Y.

Old Soldiers, Attention.
$552 BOUNTY!—Enlist in the Heavy Artillery, the most popular branch of the service. One Hundred more Old Soldiers wanted, at 251 River st, Troy, for the Seventh N. Y. Heavy Artillery. This regiment does garrison duty only, and pays the bounty sooner than any other. Call at once, at 251 River st.
ISAAC PITT,
D. L. TUTHILL, Recruiting Officers.

TENTS FOR RECRUITING PURPOSES.—With the approach of warm weather Lieut. Col. Hastings, of the 7th Artillery (late 113th) Regiment, who has charge of the recruiting officers in this city, caused two large and beautiful tents to be raised in State street, yesterday—one east, and the other west of Green street. This regiment pays $175 bounty to each recruit—a far greater sum than was paid last summer, and the inducements are such that any young man out of employment cannot be restrained from joining their ranks. Hence it is that the recruiting officers are meeting with unprecedented success—enlisting several men daily. Now is the time to procure the bounty and avoid the draft.

VOLUNTEERS, ATTENTION!—Attention is called to a notice in another column, of those who intend entering the service again. The inducements offered to join the Seventh Artillery Regiment, are probably the best yet offered. As all "old soldiers" are aware the Heavy Artillery branch is one of the best in the service. No long marches, no heavy knapsacks to carry, or shelter tents to sleep in, but fine barracks for quarters. The bounty is the largest paid of any regiment in the field. A discharged soldier who enrolls his name to join this Regiment has the full parole of thirty days after being mustered out before he joins the Regiment. Boys, step down to the tents in State street and give the Sergeants your names. You will find the Seventh is stationed in one of the most delightful places around Washington. It is just the spot for a soldier who has traversed the Peninsula, Maryland, and back to Virginia again, to rest himself, and defend and protect the capital of the country.

FROM THE HEAVY ARTILLERY.
An extract from a private letter states that in the battle on the North Anna river there was a bridge to be crossed. The regulars tried to cross first, but were twice repulsed and fell back. Co. H, Seventh Heavy Artillery, Capt. Charles Maguire, of West Troy, next went at it and over it, and were the first to plant the American colors on the other side. All the regiment crossed at the same time. Lieut. Ducharme, of the same company, had three balls through his clothing, but was not injured. This regiment left Washington only about three weeks ago, and was acting as infantry. Their gallant conduct elicited the commendation of General Grant, who complimented them upon their bravery.

A DETACHMENT OF THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY WITH THEIR COLORS CAPTURED.—On Thursday evening last the whole skirmish line in front of a part of Barlow's position, and consisting of detachments from the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery Regiment, which is now acting as infantry, were captured, together with their colors. They were at the time in the rebel works to which the skirmish line advanced. Barlow lost several hundred men prisoners. The ranks of the 7th must be pretty well thinned out from its original number.

ALBANY AND THE WAR.—The Schenectady Star Wednesday evening, in speaking of the death of the lamented Col. L. O. Morris, 7th Artillery, draws the following picture of this city:
There is no city in the North which has more cause for mourning, and at the same time more cause for ____ than Albany. There has hardly been a battle once the war began which has not added to Albany's ____ "up above" her representatives, there being, moreover the noblest from among her living people. From Jackson to Morris—"we have not space" for all the names—there is a ladder of glory reaching to Heaven, every round of gold. The last victim, Colonel Morris, was not a poorer representative of Albany's valor than those who went before him; a gentleman and a soldier—the fact makes his epithph here and his "pass" from our lines to those of the good army of all the world.

The Seventh Artillery.
From reading the various despatches from the army in front of Petersburg to the New York papers, we see that the Seventh Artillery (Albany regiment), is having a hard time of it.—No regiment has done more hard fighting since it entered the service than the Seventh, It lost some eight hundred men in two fights. It must have lost nearly half that number before Petersburg. There can hardly he more than five or six hundred men left for duty. Major Springsteed, we regret to learn, was wounded in the fight of Thursday. It seems, from the correspondent of the Herald, that the rebels gobbled up a portion of the regiment on Thursday night:
Last evening the whole skirmish line in front of Barlow's position, and consisting of detachments from the Seventh New York heavy artillery regiment, which is now acting as infantry, were captured, together with their colors.—They were at the time in the rebel works, to which the skirmish line advanced. Barlow lost several hundred men prisoners.
The two flags taken by the enemy last night were retaken by Gen. Burnside in his assault this morning.

MORTALLY Wounded—George S. Lawyer, son of widow John I. Lawyer of this village, was mortally wounded in the battle of Friday the 16th inst, and died in a few hours after. He belonged to the 7th N. Y. Heavy Artillery.
We also learn that Daniel Swart, a young man of about 18 years, who was for several years a typo in the office of the Schoharie Patriot, was mortally wounded in battle near Petersburgh [sic]. Thus have three Schoharie printers fallen in defense of their country's cause.

WOUNDED OFFICERS OF THE 7TH REG'T HEAVY ARTILLERY IN WASHINGTON.—Among the wounded officers who arrived from City Point, at Washington, Wednesday, were the following, belonging to the 7th Reg't Heavy Artillery:
Lieut. M. Haums, Co. H; Lieut. H. Knickerbocker, Co. K; Lieut. Robt. Mullins; Maj. E. A. Springsteed; Capt. S. S. Anable.

DIED.
This morning at 5 1/2 o'clock, WILLIAM B. GOURLAY, in the 49th year of his age.
On the 21st of June, near Petersburg, Va., THOMAS CAREY, of this city, ages 43 years, 7 months and 15 days—member of Battery F, Seventh New York Heavy Artillery.
M. CAREY was shot through the head, his death being instantaneous. In the note informing his afflicted widow of the ad bereavement, his officer writes that his loss is very deeply regretted by the company as that of a good soldier, brave and true, whose life was given in defence  [sic] of his country. His youngest son, of the Berdan sharpshooters, it will be remembered, was killed by a similar wound in July last. One son yet remains, who has long been faithfully serving his country in the Forty-fourth Regiment New York Volunteers.
COMPLETE LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED IN THE SEVENTH HEAVY ARTILLERY.—Albany, like many of her sister cities, is called upon to mourn the loss of a number of noble and gallant sons, whose lives were sacrificed in the recent battles. Among other regiments that has suffered greatly in the loss of men, is the 7th Heavy Artillery—better known as the 113th New York Volunteers—a regiment recruited in this city, and composed principally of Albanians. In the list of killed will be found the name of Captain Charles McCulloch. Capt. McC is a well known Albanian. Previous to going off with the 113th he kept a restaurant and fish market in Washington avenue. He raised the 9th Ward Company, of which he was made commandant. He was a gallant officer and a worthy citizen, and his loss will be lamented by a large circle of friends. It will also be seen that Captain Robert H. Bell (formerly foreman of Engine 8,) was wounded in the leg so badly as to necessitate amputation. Let us hope that his injuries may not prove fatal.

ANOTHER ALBANY SOLDIER GONE.—Among the many wounded at Cold Harbor, was Henry C. Leslie, a member of the 7th Artillery—a native of Albany, and at one time employed in this office. He received a wound across the hips, but it was not thought to be serious, and it was expected that he would be able to return to his Regiment in a few weeks. Sent to Washington, with his wounded comrades, he was walking about the streets, almost as well as ever, but one evening last week, on his return to the Hospital, the wound began to bleed profusely, when, for the first time, it was discovered that the ball had grazed a main artery, which now burst. All efforts to check the hemorrhage proved unavailing, and he sank gradually until the third day, when he died of exhaustion.

LIEUT. JOHN A. Heany.—We have received a letter from Lieut. John A. Heany, of Battery L, 7th Artillery, who says the regiment has improved in health and spirits during their late resting spell. He also says, "My last letter as printed, having been curtailed, reads thus: 'As I do not like corn bread without salt, I got out as best I could, losing the heel of my gunboat in the attempt.' This having no connection with the preceding paragraph, I would lead many to wonder what I got out of. I would state for the benefit of such, that when our regiment charged on the rebel works, June 10th, I, among other officers and men, was invited to t a k e Richmond, and hold Libby, but for the reason stated above, I respectfully declined.'"

PRESENTATION.—Lieut. George Krank, of Co. K, 7th N. Y. V. Artillery, was recently presented with a beautiful sword and shoulder straps by the members of his company. Adjutant Tremain made the presentation address. The Lieutenant was taken completely by surprise. It was a deserved testimonial, and is a gratifying evidence of the regard of his men for him.

KILLED IN BATTLE.—Among those killed in battle on the 3d of June, in Hancock's corps, was Lieut. Thos. McClure, of the New York 7th Heavy Artillery. He lived in West Troy, and was but recently married. He was a brave and gallant officer. A son of officer Brown of West Troy, a private in the same regiment, was also wounded in one leg, and also in the other leg in the same battle—all flesh wounds, no bones being broken.

REPORTED DEAD.—It was rumored in this city yesterday that W. F Bulger, a member of the 7th Artillery, who was wounded in the hand during the battle before Petersburg, and who has since been confined in Hospital at Washington, has died of his wounds. Mr. Bulger was formerly a prominent member of the Fire Department.

CASALTIES.—Lieut. Thos. McClure, of the Seventh heavy artillery, was killed in the battle of June 3d, and a son of officer Brown was wounded. It is reported that Lieut. Chas. Ducharme, of the same regiment, was wounded in both feet. They are all West Trojans.—Jas. P. Brennan, son of Coroner Brennan, was also wounded. His left hand was grasped about his musket when it was struck by a bullet, which penetrating to the barrel of the piece glanced off and struck him in the eyebrow. He is now in the hospital at Washington. Coroner Brennan now makes Troy in part his home—having taken an office at No. 124 North Second street.—A letter from Sergeant Thaddens Hyde, Co. D, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth regiment, written at Gordonsville, Va., May 9th, and received by his mother last Wednesday, says that he is a prisoner of war, on his way to Richmond or some other post, in company with Sergeant Myer, Corporal Madigan and James Moon. Hyde takes his fate philosophically—requesting that his comrades in the regiment be informed of his hard luck.

COL. JOHN HASTINGS IN COMMAND OF A BRIGADE.—From a letter received from Lieut. O. J. O'Brien, of the 7th Artillery, we are places in possession of the following information. The letter is dated "Headquarters 4th Brigade, 2d Army Corps, near Petersburgh [sic], June 17, 1864, and says: "Col. Hastings and Maj. Murphy have escaped safe thus far, and are in good health. We charged the enemy's works last evening, and suffered great loss in killed, wounded and captured. Col. Hastings is now in command of the Brigade, which only numbered 300 this morning, out of 1500." Lieut. O'Brien is the Acting Assistant Adjutadt [sic] General to Col. Hastings, while in command of the Brigade.

Arrested for Desertion.
Matthew W. Face, who enlisted from the town of Cobleskill, in the 7th N. Y. Heavy Artillery last fall, was arrested in Middleburgh, by Captain H. D. Cook, on Tuesday of last week, for desertion. He was taken to Albany, and arranged before Captain Parsons on Wednesday.
He denied the charge and said that he obtained a furlough from Col. Morris, which he had lost. It appears that he had enlisted in Albany on the 23d of September. He has subsequedtly [sic] taken sick, but on the 24 of February he had regained his health and was seen in Albany. He then said that he was going on to join his regiment, but did not. The returns at Headquarterers [sic] show him to be a deserter, and he was accordingly held.

RECEIVED THEIR COMMISSIONS.—PRESENTATIONS.—Recruiting Sergeants Morris and Dunning, of the 7th Artillery, received their commissions as Second Lieutenants in said Regiment, yesterday. Last evening the hackmen of the city presented Lieut. Dunning with a beautiful sword, sash and belt. The presentation took place at the Marble Pillar, and was a very interesting ceremony. The citizens of the Tenth Ward, of which Lieut. Morris is a resident, propose to present him with a set of equipments also. This will take place in a few days. We are glad of this, for Lieut. Morris is a worthy young man.

A DESERTER FROM THE SEVENTH ARTILLERY.—John Van Wormer, a private in the Seventh Artillery, N. Y. V., was on Saturday, arrested at Esperance, Schoharie county, by Van Tuyl and Weatherwax, and yesterday morning brought to this city. It appears that in December last he enlisted in this city and left with the regiment. On the 20th of May he was sent to the hospital at Washington and thence to Philadelphia. On the 16th of June he left the latter place, on a furlough, which expired on the 16th of July last. He was wounded in the hand, but that had healed, when he was taken with erysipelas. Dr. Leonard, of Esperence, endeavored to get his furlough extended, but had not succeeded. He will be forwarded to his regiment.

Death of a Gallant Officer.—We regret to learn that Lieut. Charles E. White, whose sickness we noticed on Saturday, has since died. Lieut. White was a brave officer. He went off as a private in Co. B, 7th Artillery, Captain Jones, and by his daring and gallantry in the field, won the promotion of Lieutenant. He experienced the fatigue and dangers surrounding the campaign against Petersburg and Richmond, under Grant, and became totally used up therefrom. He was sent to hospital, for rest and nourishment, but despite the efforts of all, he was obliged to succumb to the will of an all wise Providence. His death is deeply regretted by every officer and member of the regiment. Lieut. White was a resident of this city, where he was well known and highly esteemed.

FUNERAL OF LIEUT. WM. ORR.—The funeral of the late Lieut. Wm. Orr, of the Seventh Artillery, took place yesterday afternoon from the residence of his father, No. 37 North Pearl street. It was attended by Co A, Zouave Cadets, Capt. Lennox, of which company he was a member previous to his enlistment. The Cadets furnished eight bearers and turned out thirty-three men and two officers, in full uniform, preceded by Schreiber's Band. A large concourse of citizens were also in attendance. Appropriate religious services were performed at the house. The remains were conveyed to the Cemetery, where military honors were paid to the deceased by the Zouaves.

DEATH OF LIEUTENANT WILLIAM E. ORR.—We are deeply pained to be obliged to annouce [sic] the death of Lieutenant William E. Orr, of the Seventh Artillery, aged 22, from a severe wound received in the shoulder on Tuesday of last week. He was shot by a Rebel sharpshooter, while the regiment was moving to the south bank of the North Anna river. Although severe, it was not believed that the wound would prove fatal. He was moved from the front to Washington several days since, and his parents were present with him from the time of his arrival. They were so hopeful of his recovery that a letter sent home Wednesday pronounced him out of danger. They expected to bring him home to nurse in a very few days. But it was otherwise ordered, and only his remains are coming.
The Journal says:—We have known Willie from his early boyhood, and we never knew a more gentle or amiable boy, or one giving brighter promise of a useful manhood. He joined the Seventh on its organization, and was as popular with his associates in the regiment as he was beloved by all who knew him at home. A great many hearts will be saddened by the intelligence of his early death.

DEATH OF LIEUT. WM. E. ORR—We are pained to announce the death of Lieut. Wm. E. Orr, of the Seventh Artillery, aged 22, from a severe wound received in the right shoulder on Tuesday of last week. He was shot a rebel sharpshooter while the regiment was moving to the south bank of the North Anna river. Although severe, it was not believed that the wound would prove fatal. He was moved from the front to Washington several days since, and his parents were present with him from the time of his arrival. They were so hopeful of his recovery that a letter sent home Wednesday pronounced him out of danger. They expected to bring him home to nurse in a very few days. But it was otherwise ordered, and only his remains are coming.

Lieut. Orr of the Seventh Artillery—The Wounded.
[Extract from a Private Letter.]
WASHINGTON, May 29.
The battle-fields about Fredericksburgh [sic] are not yet cleared out of the wounded, and they are pouring in from the fields about the North Anna. Twelve hundred came in, on a transport, this morning, and among them young Lieut. Orr wounded in the shoulder, severely, but not dangerously. I heard the number of wounded in and about the hospitals of Washington estimated some days ago at 50,000.—There have been 10,000 come in since, and the cry is "still they come." It is the living only that are brought in; the dead are, of course, left behind. The loss in killed, wounded and missing is then not less than 80,000.
I heard an officer in Gen. Sigel's command say that Sigel had 30,000 men, and Breckinridge, with 11,000, beat him! Sigel, Banks, Butler!—what a trio!

DEATH OF LIEUTENANT WILLIAM ORR—We are deeply pained to be obliged to announce the death of Lieutenant William Orr, of the Seventh Artillery, aged 22, from a severe wound received in the shoulder on Tuesday of last week. He was shot by a Rebel sharpshooter, while the regiment was moving to the south bank of the North Anna river. Although severe, it was not believed that the wound would prove fatal. He was moved from the front to Washington several days since, and his parents were present with him from the time of his arrival. They were so hopeful of his recovery that a letter sent home yesterday pronounced him out of danger. They expected to bring him home to nurse in a very few days. But it was otherwise ordered, and only his remains are coming.
We have known WILLIE from his early boyhood, and we never knew a more gentle or amiable boy, or one giving brighter promise of a useful manhood. He joined the Seventh on its organization, and was as popular with his associates in the regiment as he was beloved by all who knew him at home. A great many hearts will be saddened by the intelligence of his early death.

A MERITORIOUS PROMOTION.—I learn that our young townsman, Charles Hobbs, who left this city as Second Lieut. in the 7th Artillery, has, for meritorious conduct, been promoted to a Captaincy in the same regiment; to date back to May 19th, 1864. Captain Hobbs was in all the battles from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor, receiving at the latter place three, balls in the leg and arm, thus rendering him unfit for duty. He was carried off the field of battle and sent to Washington, where he received, at the hands of friends, the utmost care and attention. As soon as he was able to be removed he was brought up to this city, where he soon regained his health and strength. Upon the restoration of his health, he rejoined his regiment and has been in most of the recent demonstrations before Richmond and Petersburg. Before leaving this city he called upon the Adjutant General, when he asked for the promotion as a matter of justice, and his application was immediately granted. Yesterday his father, Geo. W. Hobbs, called upon the Adjutant General and received the commission for his son, who, for a long time, has been the Acting Adjutant of the regiment. Mr. Hobbs has sent two sons to the war, and both are now captains—George W. Hobbs, Jr., being a captain in the Ninety-first regiment.

The late Frank Carpenter.
Capt. W. H. SEYMOUR communicates to the Republican the following just tribute to the memory of the late Frank Carpenter, who was killed at the battle of Cold Harbor, Va., on the 3d of June:
Your notice of the death of FRANK CARPENTER has opened afresh to me the scenes of the past, and I desire to add my testimony to his qualities, as one of the noblest of the many young citizen soldiers who, at the echo of the first gun from the accursed traitors, sprang to arms, and regardless of life, friends or pecuniary inducements, left all for the sole purpose of aiding to crush out as causeless a rebellion.
Frank Carpenter was one of the first to join my Company in April, 1861, and a more faithful adherent to our fortunes I could not have. No dangers were too great; no privations could discourage; no long, fatiguing marches could exhaust his indomitable spirit, through scorching heat, thirst and dust, thro' Winter's cold and storm he was always there. Quiet and unassuming, he was always ready to do his duty. In battle no hand was steadier, no eye clearer, no heart braver. While we were undergoing the "rotting process" on the Chickahominy, two years ago, Frank was one that was suffering with the McClellan Fever, and when the memorable seven days' movement commenced was under the Surgeon's care, and reported unfit for duty. But he would not see his Company march to the battle field without him, and he made his appearance among us, asking for his rifle. I told him he was not fit to go. His reply was: "I am bound to go where the Company goes!" He went to Mechanicsville and fought bravely there; and two years ago to-day he followed us to the bloody field of Gaines' Hill, (Cold Harbor.) Before the battle commenced I urged him to go to the rear, knowing that the excitement alone sustained him. But nothing would induce him to leave us. The battle commenced soon after—the struggle was desperate; we held our position two hours; then lost it and regained it, but lost our Lieutenant Colonel Commanding, who fell but a few feet before us while, heroically cheering us on. At that critical juncture, Stonewall Jackson's fresh troops marched in and formed a line of solid columns in our front, and forced us reluctantly to give way.
It was then that the heroic Frank Carpenter fell severely wounded, with seven others of our company. It is well known that he was permitted to come home, where he suffered much from his wound and disease. But his anxiety to return would not permit him to wait the slow process of recovery—and he started for his Reg't. But his strength could not keep pace with his spirit, and he was compelled to into a Hospital before reaching his Regiment. After his return I tendered him a promotion but he did not desire it. He was satisfied with being a Soldier. May God grant us thousands more of equally brave ones.
In March last, Frank came to me to re-enlist, and fearing that his old wound might trouble him on long marches, he enlisted in the 7th Reg't Heavy Artillery. All have heard of the bravery of that Reg't. Two days at the Battle of the 3d of June at Cold Harbor (Gaines Hill) the body of Frank Carpenter was found on the field, it being very nearly the same ground where two years ago he was wounded. His parents, and his country may well be proud of such a son. Rank and Station find many eloquent tributes to their brave deeds, but oh, how many a hero in the ranks has fallen to sleep the sleep of death. "Unwept and unsung." Let us not talk of our sacrifices until we can emulate his example, and never rest until "Treason shall go down."

OUR DEAD AND WOUNDED.—Scarcely a day has passed from the opening of the month of May that we have not been called upon either to announce the death of a friend or to chronicle the wounding of beloved citizens in battle. It seems that the frequent receipt of such painful intelligence has blunted the feelings of community, and the announcement of the death of a beloved relative or friend is soon forgotten by the exciting and stirring events of the day. But we have a duty to perform —a task that is oftentimes sad and painful—yet it is one that is due to those who fall in defence [sic] of our country as well as it is to their kindred and friends. Among the recent victims to this accursed and cruel war, are several prominent young men from this city, whose death will cast a gloom over many households.
Capt. Robert H. Bell, of the Seventh Artillery, died yesterday in the army hospital at Washington. He was wounded in battle on the 19h of May last and subsequently underwent the amputation of one of his limbs above the knee. From that moment he began to sink and yesterday death out an end to his suffering. Capt. Bell was one of the first to volunteer in defense of his country. When Washington was threatened, he enlisted in Company B (A. B. C.'s, Capt. Kingsley) 25th Regiment as a private, and remained with it until it returned to this city. He subsequently re-enlisted, and from merit and deeds of valor he steadily rose until he gained the position he occupied when he was shot down on the field of battle. We learn by a telegram that his body has been embalmed and will be forwarded to this city for interment.
Miles McDonald was shot down while battling with the enemies of his country, and is now numbered with the dead. When the Sixty-third Regiment was organized, in October, 1861, he enrolled his name on the muster of Capt. Branegan's Company, as a private. There was no truer man in the ranks of that regiment, nor one possessed of more ardor or enthusiasm, in devotion to his country. His many noble traits of character soon made him a universal favorite, and for his gallantry and heroic bravery at the battle of Antietam he was promoted to a Second Lieutenancy. His promotion excited the most profound satisfaction among his comrades, who had learned to love him as a brother. At the first battle of Fredericksburg he was wounded, and soon after was promoted to a First Lieutenancy as a reward for meritorious conduct. Subsequently he was assigned to the Adjutancy of the regiment, and it was, while acting in this capacity, before Petersburg, he was killed.
He was but twenty-four years of age, and yet he was a most skillful and accomplished officer; and had his life been spared, would probably have very soon been appointed Major of the regiment. When a boy he entered the service of the New York, Albany and Buffalo Telegraph Company as a messenger, and retained that position for seven years, winning for himself the good opinion of the officers of the Company, and of the patrons of the line with whom he was brought in contact. After surrendering this situation he went to New York and accepted a clerkship, which he held until a short time previous to his enlistment in the Sixty-third regiment. Although he never enjoyed the advantages of a high school education, he was possessed of fine natural talents, and his letters show him to have been gifted with more than ordinary ability.
Maj. E. A. Springstead and Lieut. M. Havens of this city, of the 7th Artillery, are reported as wounded. We have no particulars as to the severity of their wounds, but we hope that they are not dangerous. The Major was identified with the organization of the regiment, and has been with it through all the bloody engagements in which it has participated--some of the bravest of the brave." In common with their many friends, we pray for their ___ recovery.

Capts. Morris and McCulloch, of the Seventh, Killed.
A letter from Lieut. Col. HASTINGS, of the Seventh Artillery, not only confirms the death of Capt. JOHN MORRIS, but also communicates the additional sad intelligence that Capt. McCULLOCH is also killed, and Capt. BELL so badly wounded as to render the amputation of his leg necessary.
Capts. MORRIS and MCCULLOCH were both young men of most exemplary character, widely known and universally respected. Their early deaths will make sad a large circle of relatives and friends—whose only consolation it is that they both died for their country, while driving the enemies of the old Flag before them. They were both killed by Rebel sharpshooters.
Capt. BELL will deeply regret that his wound is of such a character as to unfit him for service, for his whole heart is in this war to put down the rebellion. We are glad to hear that the amputation was promptly and successfully made, and that he is doing well.
Col. HASTINGS speaks in the highest terms of the gallantry of his men—and he knows from experience in a score of battles, what gallantry is. The brave boys deserve the compliment which Gen. MEADE has paid them.

THE LATE CAPTAIN MORRIS.—A letter has been received in this city, which says that Captain A. Morris, of the Seventh Heavy Artillery, was killed on the evening of the 19th of May, while leading his company in action. He was shot through the heart by a rebel sharpshooter. His body was recovered and buried the following day by two brothers of deceased—one of whom is a lieutenant in the Seventh, and the other is a private in the Forty-fourth. The members of the company take it very hard at the loss of their commandant, as Captain Morris was always a great favorite with them.
It seems strange that the bodies of Captains Morris and McCulloch have not been sent on to this city. They have been expected ever since the sad intelligence of their demise reached here, and arrangements have been made to receive them. The delay in sending the bodies needs explanation.

At a meeting of Protection Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1, held at the Truck House on Monday evening, May 23d, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:—
Whereas, we have received the sad intelligence of the death of our esteemed fellow-member, Captain JOHN A. MORRIS, of the Seventh New York Artillery, while bravely leading his command into action in the engagement near Spottsylvania Court House, on Thursday last. Though we feel assured that he willingly offered up his life on the altar of his country, and died where his gallant nature prompted him, at the post of duty facing the enemies of his country, and in the hour of victory, yet the pride we. feel in his devoted patriotism is mingled with sadness for the loss of a comrade whose genial nature, social virtues, and manly character endeared him to all.
Resolved, that in the death of Captain JOHN A. MORRIS, the country loses a devoted patriot and a brave and faithful soldier, and this company one of its most active and useful members, who since its organization had been foremost in everything that contributed to advance its interests; that while we view with admiration the noble example he has left us, we deeply deplore his early death.
Resolved, That we tender our heartfelt sympathies to his family and friends in the great sorrow which this event has caused them, and trust that their grief may be tempered with the consoling thought that he acted a noble, manly part in life, and leaves a fragrant memory behind him.
Resolved, That a copy of there resolutions be transmitted to the family of the deceased, and that they be entered on the minutes and published in the daily papers.
M. HIGGINS, President.
R. T. BRIGHTMAN, Secretary.       my25 1t

Presentation of a Sword, &c., to Colonel Lewis O. Morris, of the 7th N. Y. V. Artillery.
On the Fourth of July, the non-commissioned officers and privates of the 7th New York Volunteer Artillery formerly 113th—Albany County—Regiment) presented their commanding officer, Col. LEWIS O. MORRIS, with a very elegant sword, sash and belt. The Colonel was taken completely by surprise by the magnificent gift. The regiment was formed in hallow [sic] square at Fort Reno, for the reading of the Declaration of Independence, when the presentation took place. Secretary SEWARD was present; also Col. WELLING and staff, of the 9th N. Y. Artillery, with the splendid band of that regiment; and Col. CHAPLAIN and staff, of the 1st Maine Artillery. After repeated cheers had been given for Col. MORRIS and Secretary SEWARD, the Colonel proceeded to the Fort, to fire a national salute for the Defences [sic] of Washington—which duty had been especially assigned to him.
The presentation speech was made by Private GEO. CAMERON, of Company C, as follows:
COLONEL—In behalf of my fellow soldiers and comrades, I have the honor and pleasure on this, the Fourth of July, 1863, to present you with a testimonial of our esteem and regard. This is a day commemorative of our National Independence. Eighty-seven years ago our forefathers gave forth to the World the first fruits of our great and free institutions; and under the guidance of a kind Providence, we have grown to be a great Nation. But the fratricidal hand of treason and disunion has been raised to overthrow and destroy our free and liberal Government; and we are now fighting to maintain it, and the great principles which cost our sires so much blood and treasure to establish; and, if we prove true to ourselves and the great principles of Freedom, we must succeed in restoring our common country to its former unity, greatness and prosperity. We know and feel, that in you we have a commander every way capable of leading us on to do our share in this great battle for Union and Right. When you assumed command of this regiment, you were to most of us a comparative stranger; but your name and reputation had preceded you. We knew that in you were all the elements of an officer and soldier. We have read with pleasure of your long and honorable connection with our army—the part you have already taken in this great Rebellion—your bravery at Fort Macon—its capture, and your subsequent command of it; and, since you assumed command over us, most nobly have you sustained your reputation. We have been in the service less than a year, yet, in that short time, you have endeared yourself to us all. We knew little, if anything, of the duties of a soldier; but, by your military skill, patience and kindness, you have brought us to the standard of a disciplined regiment. You have also been untiring in your efforts to make us comfortable and happy. I, therefore, as a token of our high appreciation and regard for you as our Colonel, and for your many noble qualities as a man, tender you this Sword, Sash and Belt; and may God, in His infinite mercy, lead you, and the members of our regiment, safely through the vicissitudes and uncertainties of this unhappy war. May our now distracted country soon be happily restored, and may we long live to remember our happy relations with you.

COL. MORRIS'S REPLY.
SOLDIERS OF THE 7TH N EW YORK ARTILLERY.—You have taken me completely by surprise—more completely by surprise than I ever expected the enemy to do—by this beautiful gift, as unexpected as it is deeply gratifying, I am simply a soldier. Arms is my profession—a profession in which actions speak louder than words. I know nothing of speech making; and I feel that I would rather lead a forlorn hope than make a speech. Yet, in a few simple words, I may be permitted to express to you, that this is one of the proudest moments of my life—feeling and knowing, as I do, that this splendid sword is a free will offering from the men of my own Regiment, as a token of their appreciation of my efforts for their welfare and happiness, and of my labors for their instruction in their duties as soldiers. Yours is a glorious profession. Soldiers strong by discipline—obedient to authority—firm and collected in danger—able to endure privations and weary marches without murmur and without complaint—strong and courageous in battle, and merciful in the hour of victory—are soldiers on whom our common country can lean in her hour of trial, and find she is not leaning on a broken reed. Soldiers of the 7th New York Artillery, proud am I to testify this day that our labors have not been thrown away; for I confidently believe that your ranks will be as firm and steady in the face of the enemy as they have been this day on parade. I accept this beautiful sword with feelings of pleasure and pride, as a proof of your affection and of your confidence. I accept this beautiful sword as a proof, and as a pledge, that your strong arms, and your willing hearts, will uphold it in the day of battle, and that you will follow where it shall lead. But most proudly do I accept it as a proof of your devotion to the cause in which it is drawn—the cause of our beloved country and its free institutions—the cause of Human Freedom and Human Progress—to bequeath which, unimpaired, a sacred legacy to your children, you each and all of you will pledge your lives, your fortunes, and your sacred honor.
The following is a description of the sword:
The scabbard is of massive solid silver—the hilt representing a female Indian, armed with bow and arrow, in the attitude of defence [sic].
The top of the hilt is surmounted with the American Eagle, with wings extended, and holding in its beak a wreath of laurels (emblem of victory.) The wreath is of solid gold, green enamelled. The guard is of antique style, of elaborate workmanship; the centre of the hilt corded and richly ornamented with garnets. The mountings of the scabbard (which are also of massive solid silver) are richly gilt, and beautifully chased and engraved. The upper band represents, in high relief, Fort Macon, at which place the recipient so nobly distinguished himself; the centre mounting, emblems of the Artillery Corps; and the tip of arabesque, in harmony with the above. Between the upper mountings is engraved:—

PRESENTED TO COL. LEWIS O. MORRIS,
Commanding Seventh N. Y. V. Artillery,
By the non-commissioned officers and privates of his regiment.
FORT RENO, C. C., July 4, 1863.

The blade is of the finest steel, beautifully ornamented with armorial devices, and richly gilt—on one side having a correct view of Fort Macon; and on the reverse, the above dedication, surrounded with ornamental engraving.
Accompanying the sword, was an elegant sash—finely enamelled belt, stitched in white, with solid silver plate; the whole enclosed in a solid rosewood case, silver-mounted, and lined with fine velvet and satin. The articles were manufactured by SCHUYLER, HARTLEY & GRAHAM, New York, for R. P. Lathrop of this city, and will be on exhibition at his store for a few days. The entire cost was about $700.
Col. MORRIS is an old Albanian— a regular army officer; and may well be proud of his splendid regiment and this manifestation of their high regard for him.

Death of Colonel Lewis O. Morris.
Our citizens were startled yesterday morning at the announcement of the death of Colonel Lewis O. Morris, of the Seventh Heavy Artillery, our own 113th Regiment, N. Y. S. V. Dr. S. O. Vanderpoel, his brother-in-law, received a telegram announcing his death, and that his body had arrived in Washington. The manner of his death is thus stated by one of the correspondents of the N. Y. Herald:
Colonel Morris, commanding the Seventh New York heavy artillery, was killed this (Sunday) morning. He was walking inside of our line of   earthworks in conversation with General Barlow, when a bullet struck him in the shoulder, passing through his heart. He was a brave man, and an active and efficient officer, and his loss is deeply regretted by every one, but more especially by his own regiment, with which he was very popular.
The Journal, speaking of the gallant dead, says:
Col. Morris was a soldier not only by education but by instinct. He embraced the profession with all the ardor of an enthusiast, and made it the ambition of his life to excel in it. He was born in the field; for his father was a soldier before him, and his mother accompanied her husband in nearly all his campaigns. The former having been killed at the siege of Monterey, young Morris received a commission in the Regular army, although he was not graduated at Wept Point. He was at Vera Cruz during the Mexican war, and we believe saw something of active service in the memorable campaign under Scott and Taylor. Since then he has been almost continually in the field. At the outbreak of the rebellion, he was in Texas, and his company was the only one, if we remember rightly, that did not surrender to the Rebels. He was actively engaged during the earlier period of the rebellion; and the estimation in which he was held by the military authorities was shown in the fact he was designated to direct the operations against Fort Macon, North Carolina, which he captured and afterwards commanded. It was a place of great strength, and its reduction was justly regarded as one of the most brilliant achievements of the war.
His health becoming somewhat impaired, he came home on leave of absence, in the Summer of 1862. After remaining here a few weeks he was made Colonel of the One Hundred and Thirteenth New York Regiment, (infantry.) raised in this city, and immediately left for the seat of war. His regiment was the first one from this State to arrive in Washington, at a moment when the city was menaced by a Rebel army. The War Department expressed its grateful appreciation of the service its timely arrival rendered the country by converting it into a regiment of heavy artillery. It was stationed at Fort Reno, where it remained until a few weeks ago.
But this was not the place where Colonel Morris wished to be. He chafed under in his inaction, when his brother officers were periling their lives in the field, and made repeated requests to be sent into the field. At last the desire of his heart was gratified. The order to advance came, and he joined our army at Spottsylvania. In the subsequent engagements—and he participated in nearly all of them—he commanded a brigade, consisting of the First Maine and the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery.

ALBANY EVENING JOURNAL.
TUESDAY EVENING, JUNE 7, 1864.
Death of Col. Lewis O. Morris.
Our worst forebodings have proved true. The Col. Morris reported killed in the battle of Friday, was the gallant commander of the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery. Dr. VANDERPOEL received a telegram this morning not only announcing his death but stating that his body had arrived in Washington. This sad intelligence was the more startling and unexpected from the repeated statements of telegrams and letters that the person referred to as having lost his life was the Colonel of an Infantry Regiment (the 66th New York.)
Col. Morris was a soldier not only by education but by instinct. He embraced the profession with all the ardor of an enthusiast, and made it the ambition of his life to excel in it. He was born in the field: for his father was a soldier before him, and his mother accompanied her husband in nearly all his campaigns. The former having been killed at the siege of Monterey, young MORRIS received a commission in the Regular army, although he was not graduated at West Point. He was at Vera Cruz during the Mexican war, and we believe saw something of active service in the memorable campaign under SCOTT and TAYLOR. Since then he has been almost continually in the field. At the outbreak of the Rebellion, he was in Texas, and his company was the only one, if we remember rightly, that did not surrender to the Rebels. He was, actively engaged during the earlier period of the Rebellion; and the estimation in which he was held by the military authorities was shown in the fact that he was designated to direct the operations against Fort Macon, North Carolina, which he captured and afterwards commanded. It was a place of great strength, and its reduction was justly regarded as one of the most brilliant achievements of the war.
His health becoming somewhat impaired, he come home on leave of absence, in the Summer of 1862. After remaining here a few weeks he was made Colonel of the One Hundred and Thirteenth New York Regiment, (Infantry,) raised in this city, and immediately left for the seat of war. His Regiment was the first one from this State to arrive in Washington, at a moment when the city was menaced by a Rebel army. The War Department expressed its grateful appreciation of the service its timely arrival rendered the country by converting it into a Regiment of Heavy Artillery. It was stationed at Fort Reno, where it remained until a few weeks ago.
But this was not the place where Colonel MORRIS wished to be. He chafed under his inaction, when his brother officers were periling their lives in the field, and made repeated requests to be sent into the field. At last the desire of his heart was gratified. The order to advance came, and he joined our army at Spottsylvania. In the subsequent engagements—and he participated in nearly all of them—he commanded a brigade, consisting of the First Maine and the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery.

COL. MORRIS was no ordinary man. His mind naturally vigorous, was strengthened by hard study and enriched by liberal culture. Strong in will, yet winning in manners, he at once commanded the respect and affection of those under his command. Although a strict disciplinarian, he was idolized by his men. Cool in the hour of danger, self-possessed when the storm of battle raged fiercest, he inspired, by his example, the courageous, encouraged the timid, and rebuked the cowardly. He was a stranger to fear, and died gloriously in the field and in the face of the Rebel foe.—He was an ardent patriot, loved the old Flag more than he did life, and went into the war for its defence [sic] with his whole heart. In the bright roll of martyr-heroes which History will exhibit to the admiration of coming ages few names will shine out with a serener splendor than that of Colonel LEWIS O. MORRIS.

Death of Col. Lewis O. Morris.
The Col. Morris reported killed in the battle of Friday, turns out to have been the gallant commander of the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery, and not the Colonel of the 66th as reported. Dr. Vanderpoel, of this city, his brother-in-law, received a telegram yesterday morning not only announcing his death but stating that his body had arrived at Washington.
Such tidings cease to surprise, however much they may pain us. There is not one of the precious lives, exposed on the battle-field, to which we are not accustomed to look with daily anxiety.
Col. MORRIS was a soldier by birth. His father's monument in our Cemetery records his death at Monterey leading his command, after an honorable career in the regular army. In consideration of the services of the father the son was immediately commissioned by President POLK, in the regular army. He acquired position there; and when the 113th Regiment was raised in this city, was offered the Colonelship. His regiment was among the reinforcements ordered to GRANT, after the battles of the Wilderness, and he was acting Brigadier General when he fell. The Journal pays a feeling tribute to his personal character.
Col. MORRIS was no ordinary man. His mind naturally vigorous was strengthened by hard study and enriched by liberal culture. Strong in will, yet winning in manners, he at once commanded the respect and affection of those under his command. Although a strict disciplinarian, he was idolized by his men. Cool in the hour of danger, self-possessed when the storm of battle raged fiercest, he inspired, by his example, the courageous, encouraged the timid and rebuked the cowardly. He was a stranger to fear, and died gloriously in the field and in the face of the Rebel foe. He was an ardent patriot, loved the old Flag more than he did life, and went into the war for its defence [sic] with his whole heart. In the bright roll of martyr-heroes which History will exhibit to the admiration of coming ages, few names will shine out with a serener splendor than that of Col. …

How Col. Morris was Killed.
We have been permitted to make the following extract from a letter written by Rev. Dr. BROWN, a member of the Christian Commission, relative to the death of Col. MORRIS:—
"It was my privilege during the eighteen months past to be intimately acquainted with Col. Lewis O. Morris; the result was that I learned to love him as a brother; and I think he loved me. The fact that I was a minister of the Gospel was no barrier to the freedom of his visits to me.
So matters stood when I went down to the Army of the Potomac, nearly four weeks since, as a member of the Christian Commission. Two days after Col. MORRIS and his command were ordered to the front. I saw him at Spottsylvania Court House when he joined the army. And as by the singularly kind providence of God, we were thrown into the same Corps, Division and Brigade, I either saw him, or had news of him, every day until the last. From the first he was in the front of the continuous fighting going on; and won for himself and his men the commendation of all. Gen. MEADE called them 'Veterans' in General Orders. They were said to 'fight like tigers.' I do not like the expression, but so soldiers speak.
"It was Col. MORRIS and his men of the Seventh, who at the battle of Cold Harbor, on Friday morning, June 3d, won the key of the Rebel position: Captured several pieces of artillery, and took four hundred prisoners; but not being supported, they were compelled to abandon all but the prisoners. I know this to be so, for I was at the time close at hand, and heard the story from many of the actors and witnesses. This was Friday.—Saturday morning early, Gen. BARLOW called on Col. MORRIS, to make with him an examination of the position; he was then commanding the Brigade.
"Our breastworks and the enemy's were but fifty yards apart. No one dared show himself on either side. The sharpshooters fired quickly at sight of cap or head. The two started, General BARLOW leading, hiding behind the breastworks, and dodging from rifle-pit to rifle-pit. In passing from one rifle pit to another, Colonel MORRIS, for a moment, was exposed, and received his wound. The ball struck him in the left shoulder, ranging downward across the body, touching the spine in its progress, and entering the right lung. He fell insensible. Dr. POMFRET and I soon heard of his wound, and ordered him brought to where we were. We could not go to him. He was brought in about 10 o'clock, insensible, moaning, and uttering incoherent sentences. Stimulants were administered, and the surgeons in attendance examined the wound. In about an hour consciousness came to him. He knew us both. But his system did not rally. His body below the wound was paralyzed. He had no pain, but suffered much from nervous distress and difficulty in breathing.
* * * At one o'clock his spirit departed, and, as I cannot doubt, passed into the glory of the saints in light. When we undressed him we found his Testament in his pocket, and showing marks of use.

Funeral of Col. Morris.—The funeral ceremonies of Col. MORRIS will take place at the North Dutch Church to-morrow (Saturday) at 3 o'clock, instead of at No. 53 North Pearl street, as before announced.

Local Affairs.
Funeral of Col. Lewis O. Morris.—The remains of this gallant young officer were on Saturday afternoon conveyed from the residence of his brother-in-law, Dr. Vanderpoel, to the North Dutch Church, where the funeral exercises took place. They were conducted by the pastor, the Rev. Dr. Rufus W. Clark. Among those present in the Church were Capt. Kennedy, Lieut. Courtney and Lieut. Krank, of the 7th Artillery, recently wounded in the battles before Richmond. The funeral services at the Church being performed, the body was brought out and received with military honors by the 25th Regiment, Col. Church. The coffin was covered with the stars and stripes and wreaths of white roses. The bearers were Generals Rathbone and Vanderpoel, and Colonels Baker, Ainsworth, Young and Harcourt, flanked by a detachment of the 25th Regiment, and followed by the horse of the deceased, led by his groom. The coffin was placed upon a catafalque drawn by six gray horses beautifully plumed, and conveyed to the Cemetery under the escort of the 25th Regiment, followed by Gov. Seymour and staff, Mayor and Common Council, and a large number of mourners in carriages.

FUNERAL OF COL. MORRIS —The remains of this gallant young officer were on Saturday afternoon conveyed from the residence of his brother-in-law, Dr. Vanderpoel, to the North Dutch Church, where the funeral exercises took place. They were conducted by the pastor, the Rev. Dr. Rufus W. Clark, and were solemn and impressive. Among those in attendance at the church were a few members of the Seventh artillery, who were wounded in the recent campaign in Virginia, and who can now walk by the aid of crutches. At the conclusion of the services in the church, the remains were brought out and received with military honors by the Twenty-fifth regiment, under command of Col. Church. The remains of Col. Morris were then conveyed to the Cemetery.
The funeral escort consisted of the Twenty-fifth regiment, preceded by Schreiber's band. Then followed the funeral car, drawn by six grey horses plumed. The coffin was covered by the flag for which he lost his life, and adorned with white roses. The bearers were Generals Rathbone and Vanderpoel, and Colonels Baker, Ainsworth, Young and Harcourt, flanked by a detachment of the Twenty-fifth regiment, and followed by the horse of the deceased, led by his groom. The mourners were followed by officers and soldiers of the army, who came hither to pay the last tribute of respect to the brave and lamented dead. The Committee of Arrangements and the Mayor and Common Council followed in carriages. The streets through which the funeral cortege passed were crowded with spectators, and grief was depicted in almost every countenance.

MAJOR SPRINGSTEED WOUNDED.—We learn from advices received yesterday that Major E. A. Springsteed, of the Seventh Artillery, is wounded. We have no particulars as to the severity of his wounds, but we hope that they are not dangerous. The Major was identified with the organization of the regiment, and has been with it through all the bloody engagements in which it has participated—"one of the bravest of the brave." In common with his many friends, we pray for his speedy recovery.

THE LATE CAPTAIN BELL.—The remains of the late Captain Robert H. Bell, of the Seventh Heavy Artillery, who died of wounds received in battle, reached this city yesterday afternoon, and were taken to the house of Engine 8, in Bleecker street, where they will remain in state until the time of the funeral, which, it is said, will take place on Sunday next.

Death of Capt. Robt. Bell.—It is with feelings of deep regret that we announce the death of Capt. Robert Bell of the 7th Artillery. He died in hospital at Washington, on Monday. It will be remembered that Capt. Bell was wounded in the fight of May 19th, and was subjected to an amputation of one of his legs above the knee. From the time the operation was performed until Monday, he sank gradually until death relieved him. Capt. Bell was a true patriot, and a good and gallant officer. He was one of those noble fellows who filled the ranks of the Burgesses Corps, under Capt. Kingsley, when that Company went off with the 25th Regiment. On that occasion he received his first experience in real service. It suited him so well that when the Albany County Regiment was formed he raised a company for it, and went off. He died as all patriots love to die, in defence [sic] of his country. His body has been embalmed, and will be sent here for interment.

FUNERAL OF THE LATE CAPTAIN BELL.—The funeral of the late Captain Robert H. Bell, 7th Artillery, took place at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon from the house of Engine 8, in Bleecker street, and was a very imposing affair. The Fire Department attended in citizens dress, wearing badges of the respective companies. Schreiber's Band preceded the procession. The coffin rested upon a raised dias carried upon an open catafalque drawn by four grey horses, plumed, and was flanked by representatives of the masonic fraternity and members of the Fire Department. From each corner of the catafalque sprang an arch of evergreens, from the centre of which was suspended a figure "s" composed of immortelle. The coffin was shrouded with that glorious old flag, the emblem of liberty, in defending which the hero met his death. The funeral cortege passed through Lydius, Pearl and State streets to the Albany receiving vault where appropriate Masonic services were held previous to the body being deposited in its last resting place.

HOME MATTERS.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE COUNTY.
THE LATE CAPT. ROBT. H. BELL.—The intelligence of the unexpected death of this gallant soldier reached his friends in this city on Tuesday evening. Up to the night of Sunday last, he had, to all appearances, rapidly improved in his condition, and the few faithful friends who were with him through all his intense sufferings, were confident of his ultimate recovery. Anxious friends at home prayed that he might be spared to his country and to them, for in the short time that he had been in the field, his acts demonstrated to them, as well as those with whom he was more closely associated, that he was earnest in his protestations of love for his country, and determined in his efforts to aid in the suppression of this unholy rebellion.
In the early part of the war, Capt. Bell was in service under Capt. Kingsley, in the Twenty-fifth Regiment. The inactive duties of a three-months service did not satisfy him, and shortly after the return of that regiment he expressed a determination to serve his Government to the end. In the formation of the Albany County Regiment, the War Committee of the Second Ward selected him for the command of their company. Gratified at so unexpected an honor, for he was ready to serve in any capacity, he readily accepted the position, and worked unceasingly with the Committee in perfecting his command. The zeal he displayed in the organization of his Company attracted the notice of our citizens, and unlimited means were at once tendered him.—How well he appreciated and merited their confidence—how well he fulfilled his trust—is known to all who have watched his military career. He fell at the battle of Spottsylvania Court House, bravely and heroically leading his command, who loved him as a brother.
Capt. Bell was, previous to the breaking out of the war, an active member of our Fire Department, and, at the time of his departure with his regiment, Foreman of Engine 8. He was remarkable for his attention to his duties, and was regarded by the entire Department as an honor to the organization. The good of the Department, as well as of his immediate command, was ever uppermost in his mind. He often expressed a desire to be buried by his former companions, and that melancholy duty will be performed on Sunday next.

THE 7TH REGIMENT HEAVY ARTILLERY AGAIN IN ACTION.—THEY SUFFER SEVERELY.—Letters received last evening convey to us very unpleasant information. Our 7th Regiment, Heavy Artillery, suffered very severely in the fight of Thursday. Among the casualties reported are the following:—Capt. James Kennedy, while gallantly leading his Company in a charge was severely wounded, and left on the field. Whether his wound was fatal was not known, as he fell into the hands of the enemy. After he was struck he called out to his men to go forward and not mind him, but to fight it our bravely. Sergt. Beatty, in attempting to remove Capt. K. from the field was struck in the arm, close to the shoulder sustaining a very serious wound. He, however, succeeded in effecting his escape. During the skirmishing of two or three days previous to the fight of Thursday, Capt. Kennedy was twice wounded slightly, but he would not relinquish his command. His fate is all uncertainty at present, but we hope and prey that his wound will not prove fatal, and that he may be spared to return to his friends again.
The Seventh New-York Heavy Artillery Regiment arrived on Thursday, and proceeded to Albany for final payment. The regiment numbered 306 men, under the command of Major JOHN F. MOUNT, and was organized in Albany in August, 1862, by Col. LEWIS O. MORRIS, (who was Colonel of this regiment until the time of his death, which he met at Cold Harbor, as the One Hundred and Thirteenth New-York Infantry, but was afterward changed by order of the war Department to the Seventh New-York Artillery. The regiment was stationed around Washington until May, 1864, when it was assigned to the Second Army Corps. Its members have participated in all the engagements from Spottsylvania to Petersburgh [sic], distinguishing themselves at Cold Harbor, where they were the first to enter the works, and had the honor of capturing the rebel colors. Out of twelve companies organized in 1862 only four return, members of the twelve being consolidated into the four. They were mustered out on Aug. 1, 1865.
The following are the battles of the Seventh:
1864—Wilderness, May 5; Spottsylvania, May 7-8; Tolopotomy, North Anna, Cold Harbor, June 1; Bethesda Church; Siege of Petersburgh [sic]; Weldon Railroad, Va., Aug. 21; Peeble's Farm, Va., Sept. 29-30; First Boydton Plank Road, Oct. 27; Second Hatcher's Run, Dec. 6.
1865—Third Hatcher's Run, Feb. 4; assault upon the enemy's works, (usually known as Fort Fisher,) March 25; grand assault upon Petersburgh [sic], April 2; pursuit of LEE; Amelia Court-house, April 6; surrender of Lee, April 9.

Arrival of the Seventh.
The brave heroes of the Seventh Heavy Artillery, whose terms of enlistment will expire before the 1st of October, arrived on the Norwich, about five o'clock this morning. Their arrival was announced by the gun squad of Captain Bowden. But a few minutes elapsed after the first boom of welcome, before the Steamboat landing swarmed with the friends of the Regiment. The Citizens' Committee were promptly on hand to care for their wants. Some of the boys, as soon as they landed, started for their homes; but the most remained, were formed into line, and marched up Broadway to State street, through State, Pearl and Columbia streets to Broadway again, and down Broadway to Stanwix Hall. During the march, the sidewalks and streets were thronged with a dense mass of citizens. Arrived in front of the Stanwix, the men were informed that those who wished to go to their homes, might do so, and several gladly availed themselves of the privilege. The remainder marched to the Burgesses Armory, where they stacked their arms, and then proceeded to partake of the hearty meal spread for them at the Stanwix, Merchants and Exchange, after which they dispersed until this afternoon.
The Regiment was organized in this city in the summer of 1862, as an infantry regiment, and was numbered the One Hundred and Thirteenth N. Y. S. V. Through the active and energetic exertions of the different Ward Committees, the ranks of the regiment were speedily filled. It went out under command of Colonel Lewis O. Morris, with Frederick L. Tremain as its Adjutant, both of whom fell bravely combatting for the Union. It was mustered into the United States service August 18th, 1862, and the next day left, under orders to report at Washington. On reaching Washington, at the repuest [sic] of General Haskell, who was then in command of the defences [sic] of that city, the regiment was ordered to Fort Pennsylvania, which was afterwards changed to Fort Reno, in honor of the gallant General Reno, who fell at the battle of Antietam. On the 17th of December, 1862, by order of the War Department, the regiment was changed from infantry to heavy artillery, and designated as the Seventh Regiment Heavy Artillery. The regiment remained garrisoning Forts Reno, Kearney, De Russy, Gaines, Bayard, Batteries Smead and Reno. During this time it had raised recruits sufficient to bring the regimental muster to eighteen hundred men. The men were soon perfect in their new branch of the service, and received marked compliments from several distinguished officers.
On the 15th of May it left Washington, under orders to join the 2d Division of the 2d Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, by way of Acquia Creek, the army then being at Spottsylvania. It arrived on the battle field on the 18th, and on the 19th fought its first engagement, covering itself with glory, and losing a very large number of men. Although it was the first fight in which the boys had taken part, they acted like veterans, and were specially commended. From that time up to the latter part of February last, it participated in all the battles and marches of the Army of the Potomac, as follows: Spottsylvania Court House, Wilderness, Milford Station, North Anna River, Tolopotomy Creek, Cold Harbor, Petersburgh [sic] the 16th, 17th and 22d, and during the whole siege; Deep Bottom, two engagements in July and August, and at Reams' Station. The regiment was recalled from the front on the 22d of February, and has been doing garrison duty at Forts McHenry and Federal Hill, in consequence of the reduced number of men.
The following are the officers who return with the battalion:—
Major—Samuel Anable, commanding.
Surgeon—George H. Newcomb.
Captains—(in the order of their seniority)—
William Sherman, Company I; C. M. Niles, Company L; H. M. Knickerbocker, Company M; R. S. Norton, Company K. First Lieutenants—C. McClellan, Company H; F. E. Lockley, Company F; F. Kreps, Company A; E. G. McCleary, Company B; James A. Harris, Company C.
Second Lieutenants—J. D. M. Lobdell, Company K; James R. Duncan, Company M.
The Regiment returns with 381 officers and man, and leaves 322 behind. Some of the officers whose terms have not expired, return with the Regiment on leave.
At 5 o'clock this afternoon, the Regiment will reassemble, and will be escorted through our principal streets by the Tenth Regiment, Lieut.-Col. David M. Woodhall, commanding. The line will halt in front of the Governor's mansion, where His Excellency will address the heroes, after which the line of march will be again resumed towards Tweddle Hall, to partake of a banquet prepared under the supervision of Wm. Race, of the Tweddle Hall Lunch Room. At the banquet, the Regiment will be received on behalf of the citizens of Albany, in an address by Hon. Clark B. Cochrane.
The regiment will form in front of Bleeker Hall, and move from there up Broadway, through Clinton avenue, down Pearl and Lydius, up Broadway, State, Eagle, and Washington avenue, through Swan and down State to the Executive mansion, where they will be formed in mass. Then, after the address, to the Tweddle Hall.
(Alb. Journal, June 20, 1865)

 

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