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100th Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry Civil War Newspaper Clippings

PERSONAL.—Capt. C. W. Rauert, 100th regiment N. Y. Vol., who was wounded in the assault upon Fort Wagner arrived here yesterday.
James G. Clark, the popular poet and vocalist, received a ticket for one of Uncle Sam's blue suits from the draft wheel at Dansville.
— Gen. E. A. Carr arrived in the city last evening and is stopping at the American.
Lieut. Charles C. Coleman, of the 100th Regiment, who has been South for some time slowly recovering from a dangerous wound in the face, is expected in the city to-morrow.
— We learn that Captain Geo. F. Needham, formerly of this city, has been appointed to a first-class clerkship in the Treasury department at Washington.—Commercial.
Captain Needham left this city after trying in vain to raise a company exclusively of religious material. We hope he has found in the Treasury Department what he failed to find in the army.

The 100th N. Y. Regiment from Buffalo, is actively engaged in the attack on Charleston.

DEATH OF LIEUT. CYRUS BROWN.—Lieut. Cyrus Brown, Co. E, 100th Regiment, died at Fort Schuyler, New York, on the 13th inst.
He was wounded in the right leg at the attack upon Fort Wagner and was taken prisoner by the rebels, who amputated his leg below the knee. After remaining in Charleston five days he was released and sent to Fort Schuyler, on board a transport, where he died of lock-jaw, resulting from his wounds.
Lieut. Brown resided at Darien, Genesee county, and is spoken of as a gallant and efficient officer.

OUR ONE HUNDREDTH.—It will be seen by our morning dispatch that the 100th regiment, of this city, is participating actively in the assaults on Morris.
CAPT. PAINE OF THE 100TH.—A letter from Charleston, dated July 30th, has it that "this week Captain Paine, One Hundredth New York, the best and most fortunate scout we have, succeeded in a manner unknown to myself or the enemy, in reaching the parapet of Wagner and inspecting, unmolested, the interior." We hope the brave Captain will soon be at his work again.

DEATH OF PRIVATE D. A. HUBBELL.—A letter was received yesterday by Mrs. D. A. Hubbcll, residing on Hickory street, announcing the death of her husband, who was a member of Company G, 100th Regiment N. Y. S. Y., in the late engagement at Fort Wagner.

Wounded.—Among the wounded and missing in the 100th N. Y. Regiment in the last attack on Fort Wagner, we notice the name of 1st Lieut. John McCann, of this city, formerly an employe [sic] at the Penitentiary. Also Corporal Dressing and privates Lawrence, Callahan, Viborn, Munaner, Mathews, and McGuire, of the same company—C. A number of men were recruited here by Lieut. McMann for the 100th, but whether any of these were among the number we cannot say.

DEATHS IN THE 100TH REGIMENT.—The dispatches of yesterday afternoon announce the death of the following members of the 100th Regiment in hospital at Beaufort, S. C.: Lewis A. Kilhover, Co. A; John Leonard, Co. G; Wm. Fetterling and H. G. Henshaw, Co. K; Peter Kress, Co. C.

WOUNDED.—Among the wounded in the desperate assault on Fort Wagner are Sergeant Paul Evertse, and private Fred. Luckman, of the 100th Regiment, both of whom went from Silver Creek.

MEMBERS OF THE 100TH REGIMENT PRISONERS IN RICHMOND.—Chaplain Lynn, of the 100th Regiment, furnishes our evening cotemporary with the following list of members of the 100th Regiment, now prisoners at Richmond, as given by one of their number, who reports himself and companions as “well.”
1st Sergt., Sharp Adams, Co. G.
Private Luther Clark,          "
   "       John Thuringer,      "
   "       Henry Baumier,      "
   "       Frederick Creasey,  "
   "       Wm. H Adams,   Co. C.
Corporal J. T. Hale, Co. I.
   "       Philip Mergan, Co. I.
   "       John Ragan,        "
Private Anderson,           "
   "       Blake,                  "
   "       Dumphrey,          "
   "       Betner,                "
   "       Murray,               "
   "       Maloney,             "
   "       Hoffman,             "
   "       Rider,                   "
   "       Sweeney,             "
   "       Gardiner,             "
   "       True,                    "
The Chaplain says: "These were among the missing of our regiment on t he 16th of May last, and are only a portion of those probably in the hands of the enemy who were missing at the time."

The One Hundredth Regiment.
LETTER FROM CHAPLAIN LINN.
CAMP 100TH N. Y. V., MORRIS ISLAND, S. C.,
August 1, 1863.
EDITORS COMMERCIAL: In the many newspaper accounts of the late engagements in this department, it does not seem to me that those regiments who have done most of the work on these islands, and also a larger part of the fighting, have received proper notice. Prominently among these stands our own Buffalo regiment, the 100th. Without going into the details of what has been required of us, and what we have accomplished, I will give you a brief view of our doings during the last four months.
That the 100th has worked, and only as true soldiers can work, no one who has been with the regiment since the 27th day of March last, the date of our landing on Coles Island, could doubt. Here it was that we were placed in a very important position, which required energy and persevering industry on the part of all, for we were alone on the island, cut off by water, from any retreat should the enemy attack us in force, and in the very midst of our foe. Here it was, under the sole direction of Col. Dandy, that the first work was done towards the advance upon Charleston. How well we accomplished this work, mid difficulties of every kind, is clearly shown from the fact that we were again selected by the General Commanding to lead the advance upon Folly Island, bringing us to the very front of the enemies strongholds. Soon after our landing upon and taking possession of this island, work was commenced of great magnitude, for this island was at once made the base of operations. Since being on this island, we were, at various times joined by other troops, most of whom shared with us the many toils we were there called upon to undergo. Our Colonel, who ever looks after the welfare of his men, seeing that we would necessarily remain here for a long time, selected so soon as he was able, a proper camping ground; already we had camped in four different places on the island, "orders" transferring us from one place to another, and he now being assured of our remaining at this camp during our sojourn on the island, made all preparations for permanency. A cool, pleasant grove was transformed from a dense thicket, tents properly pitched, company streets graded and policed, and ovens built, which added greatly to the comfort of both officers and men. Soon by this thorough system of order and police, our camp became not only pleasant and inviting, but a model of perfect cleanliness. The health of our regiment while on Folly Island bears witness to this fact. While other regiments had large and daily increasing sick lists, ours was meagre in comparison; others, too, lost many men while on the island, by sickness, while we lost not a man. This work about camp was also done while we were daily furnishing a long line of pickets, and heavy fatigue parties for building the numerous works upon the island. That an immense amount of work was accomplished on Folly Island no one can question, and this too by a very small body of men.—Capt. Payne of Co. D, and 40 of his company, were detailed soon after our occupying this is and, on special duty by the General commanding,—scouting, &c., in which duty Captain Payne has proved himself eminently useful. His services being so valuable, Gen. Gilmore has retained him for this purpose since our being on this island. And here let me say that a greater part of our success in taking Morris Island, was owing to the very valuable information which he was able to give the General commanding in regard to the position, force, &c., of the enemy. Col. Dandy was also detailed in charge of the works building at the north end of Folly Island, directly opposite the enemy's batteries on this island. For nearly three weeks was he kept busy both day and night, still retaining command of his regiment, which was some three or four miles from him. How well he, here, as well as Capt. Payne, performed their duties, can be seen by an extract from a report of Gen. Vogdes, who was in command of Folly Island at the time: "I am greatly indebted to Col. Dandy, who commanded during the construction of the works, for the efficient discipline and order which he preserved. I beg leave to commend Col. Dandy particularly to the favorable consideration of the General commanding. * * * During the period of my command, I have been greatly assisted by Capt. Payne, 100th N. Y. Vol's, in collecting very valuable information as to the enemy's position, &c. I take great pleasure in commending him to the favorable consideration of the General commanding."
Every night or two our regiment was sent up in front, either to support the batteries in case of an attack, or to aid in building the works. Here they displayed great coolness, for they were frequently exposed to a galling fire. Thus, night after night, were they deprived of their rest, mid one continual round of labor, and all without a murmur. The night before the final attack upon this island, they were sent up in front to support the batteries, with orders to cross upon Morris Island so soon as the guns of the enemy had been silenced. This we did, and we were the third regiment to cross the stream. It was soon ascertained that the enemy had retreated within the shelter of Fort Wagner, leaving their dead and wounded on the field. After standing in line-of-battle for a long time upon the beach, we took up a position according to order, across the island, which at this point was very narrow, and there remained until the second day, when at dark the regiment was ordered up to the front in the trenches, and there to do picket duty. Here behind the sand hills, almost burried [sic] beneath the hot burning sand, and most of the time under the heavy firing of Forts Wagner and Sumter, they remained two days and nights. During this time, five men of Co. I and one of Co. G, were wounded by the enemy's shells. After leaving the front, we took up a position about midway upon the Island, where we remained until the day preceding the fatal charge upon Fort Wagner, though in the meantime furnishing heavy details for fatigue, both in front and to the south end of the Island. It was about this time that Co. I, Capt. Brunck, was put on duty at the south end of the island, unleashing ordnance, etc., from the boats, and that day, Co. B, Lieut. Lynch, commanding, was also detailed for the same purpose. This accounts for these two companies not being in the engagement.—On Saturday, the 18th, came an order that our regiment should form in line of battle with our brigade the 2d on the beach at 9 A. M., for the purpose of a reserve for the 1st brigade, Gen. Strong, who were to make the charge upon Fort Wagner, should one be made. Here they stood in the broiling sun all day, while the navy were trying to silence the guns at Fort Wagner. Would that we might say, that they did accomplish something; but they did not even damage the works, leave alone silencing at least one gun; nor did they, as we have since learned, do any damage whatever within the Fort. Just before dark, our brigade moved towards the front. At dark the terrible charge was made. From some cause as yet unexplained, the 1st brigade broke—the 2d immediately pushed forward to their places with no orders but to advance. Our regiment passed directly through the ranks of the last regiment in the 1st brigade. The result you already know. Our regiment fought well and nobly, being gallantly led by our Colonel, who upon reaching the parapet, waved his sword and urged them on. There it was that our colors were planted upon the works, but at the expense of our brave color-sergeant's life, who fell mortally wounded in the attempt. They were borne off by corporal Spooner, who has been already rewarded for his gallantry by the Colonel, who has promoted him to a seargeantcy and also color bearer for the regiment. That our regiment was exposed to a most deadly fire, our loss bears witness. Troops that so bravely marched forward before such a murderous galling fire, have earned more than the praises of their commanding officers—more than the gratitude of their country, or the lavished pride of their companions in arms; they have earned a name that must live forever, dearly enshrined upon the hearts of friends at home, a name that will fondly cling around the fireside, when they are sleeping their last sleep, and have fought their last battle. In this engagement the 100th have lost many of their very best men. We have a large number of wounded, most of whom can never enter the service again—some of whom will soon slumber with those who fell where alone the brave sank to rest. The enemy have yet a number of wounded in their hands, and also a number of prisoners. Until we can learn who these are, we must account for them as missing in action. Among the missing is Lieut. Haddock, our Adjutant. We can get no tidings of him whatever; yet he may be in the hands of the enemy. His loss will be an irreparable one to the regiment, for he filled his arduous position most admirably. I might speak of many a noble and gallant spirit, whose bravery and daring was attested to by the wounded and dying, but time and space forbid. The dying groans and streaming blood of our brothers who then fell, and are now buried in sight of our camp, seems urging us on to victory; for oh, how sweet it will be to us, who pass unharmed through the coming conflicts, to know that they have not bled in vain. Fain would we linger around this spot now so dear to all of all of us, but our country's call must not be unheeded, and we fondly drop the silent tear of friendship upon their lonely graves. Since this engagement we have been kept busy, much as the regiment needs rest. Heavy batteries are now being planted, bearing directly upon Sumter. This taken, and Charleston will very soon be ours. How gladly shall we rejoice at its fall, and even forget the many toils and vexations we have been called upon to bear, in the merry welcome of our victory.
J. B. LINN,
Chaplain 100th Regiment, N. Y. V.

From Port Royal, S. C.
From the New South (Port Royal) August 8 we select the following items of interests:—
THE SIEGE OF FORT WAGNER.
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., July 29.
Since Saturday last, our lines have been advanced a considerable distance towards the rebel works. We have been shelled a good deal from Sumter, Battery Gregg, and the battery on James Island, near Fort Johnston; but our casualties have been very slight, thanks to the skill of our engineers, the judgment of our officers and the bad gunnery of the rebels.
This afternoon a shell from James island burst among some of the New York volunteer engineers. Lieut. James M. Baxter was severely, but it is hoped not dangerously wounded. Three others of the regiment were wounded, one seriously.
On the night of the 27th, Sergeant Mandeville, of Co. E, same regiment, was killed, and one or two wounded. The 4th N. H. have had 1 man killed—private Byron Howard, of Co. H—and private John Mullin, of Co. G, wounded. The 4th N. H. have been under fire a great deal of late, but have been very fortunate in regard to casualties. On the night of the 27th, private Geo. W. Thompson, of the 7th N. H., was killed—there have also been a few other casualties.
Fort Wagner has now been silent three days. Her embrasures have all been closed during the time, for some purpose or other.
Our lines have been steadily advanced under a hot fire from the enemy, with scarcely a casualty. Not one has been reported for two days. Our advance is now only about six hundred yards from Fort Wagner.
Our batteries and the fleet allow the enemy but very little rest. Occasionally there has been very sharp and continuous firing, and on one or two occasions the Wagnerites have responded vigorously for a few moments, as if enraged at the effect of our shells, but the principal shelling is from Sumter, Fort Johnson and its outworks, and Battery Gregg.
Col. James Montgomery, while commanding the trenches, Lieut. Col. Abbots and Major Henderson, of the 7th N.H., had a very narrow escape a day or two since, from a spherical shot, which burst directly over their heads; and there is scarcely an officer who has been at the front without a similar adventure. Major Henderson, of the 7th N. H., had a narrow escape one night in a trench, near the front. He was sitting in the trench, with several others, when an immense projectile from the rebel works, struck in the bank directly behind them, tipping over half a cart load of dirt upon them, and nearly burying them up. Major Henderson found himself firmly fixed in the sand, with the elongated 10-inch implement of destruction lying up against his shoulder. Supposing it to be a shell, unable to stir an inch, the major's sensations, from the time of discovering the projectile, until be became convinced that it was a solid shot, can be better imagined than described.
The troops do not seem to suffer at all from the climate. At Folly Island the water is disagreeable and unhealthy; here, the absence of all vegetation renders it clear and sweet.
In General Gilmore's marquee there are three elegant flags which have been captured on this island. Two belonged to the 21st South Carolina, one of the old and the other the new style. The old one has "Pocotaligo" inscribed on it, and was captured by Private Roper Counslow, Company D, 6th Connecticut, on the 10th ult., after shooting the Rebel color-bearer.

LIST OF DEATHS IN THE HOSPITALS FROM JULY 1st TO AUGUST 4TH.
Below we give a list of deaths of members of New York regiments, in the hospitals at Beaufort and here, as reported at the Medical Director's office, from July 1st to August 4th:
Lewis Tillhover, A, 100th, wounds; John Lonard, G, do, do; Wm. Fetterling, K, do, do; Corp. I. L. Abel, H, 115th, typhoid fever; Paul Brandon, G, do, do; Geo. Cassidy, D, do, do; Geo. Calony, C, do, do; L. McIntosh, G, do, do; H. S. Baker, B, do, consumption; C. M. Burbee, C, do, typhoid fever; Thos. Hart, B, 1st U. S. art., fever; John Gew, A, 115th; C. V. Style, H, 48th, wounds; Corp. H. C. Henshaw, 100th, do; Capt. J. O. Taxton, D, 48th, do; Peter Kress, B, 100th, do; Andrew Sylvester, G, 115th; F. Luckman, C, 100th, do; Patrick Mulligan, B, 3d artillery; Com. Sergt. H. C. Christy, 115th.

SAW MILL BURNED.
On Wednesday night, the government saw mill No. 2, at Drayton's plantation, three miles from here, was destroyed by fire, with some 12,000 or 15,000 feet of lumber.

HOW STRIKERS ARE SERVED.
The employes [sic] of the quartermaster's department have attempted a strike. Quartermaster Elwell thereupon issued the following circular:—
There must not be the least holding back or want of interest, or willingness to work all day, and all night too, when called on, or hesitation in obeying the order of the officer or chief man under whom you are placed. Any man who is thus guilty, shall be sent to work in the trenches and in the works in the very front at Morris Island.
I am determined to make short work of such worthless and wicked men as will not put forth every effort and show an interest in the public service at this important time. Any man that will "strike" for higher wages in this emergency should be shot.

Attack on Fort Wagner.
FROM "OUR OWN" CORRESPONDENT.
U. S. STEAMER COM. MCDONOUGH,
Light House Inlet, S. C., July 19, 1863.
At 6.30 last night, the troops formed in line to storm Fort Wagner, but by some means the force did not move until 7 1/2. The line was formed on the right and centre by the 6th Conn. and 100th N. Y., Col. Dana. They moved under a heavy fire from Sumter and Battery Bee, and crossed the moat or ditch. The 9th Maine reached the Fort, but broke, when the 100th N. Y. charged over them and planted their colors on the wall, of the Fort, but were driven off. The 6th Conn., 54th Mass. (colored,) and 2d S. C. (colored,) coming to their assistance, they rallied, and again reached the inside of the Fort, but after desperate fighting, they were obliged to give way. It is impossible to give the loss. Gen. Strong is wounded, Col. Chatfield, 6th Conn., Major ____, 100th N. Y., and many other officers; 500 to 800 men killed. Admiral Dahlgren sent in a flag of truce to Fort Sumter to bring off the dead and wounded, but they refused to receive it, and when the boat was returning they fired at her, but no one was injured. As soon as reinforcements arrive the attack will again be made on Fort Wagner. Two regiments came to day. Enclosed you will find a shin plaster given me by a prisoner who was taken last week. ROBT. SALMON.

A SOLDIER'S FUNERAL.—On Wednesday last the remains of Sergeant LYNCH, of the 100th N. Y. S. V., were interred in Batavia, having been brought from the hospital in New York, where he died on Sunday last from the effects of a wound in the left shoulder, received in the terrible assault on Fort Wagner, Morris Island, about a month ago. Deceased was an able soldier and much beloved in this regiment, and his death is sorely felt by his afflicted parents. He was 19 years of age, and had been in the service about two years.—Times.

EARNED THE TITLE OF HERO.—The correspondent of the New York World, writing from Morris Island, gives the following account of the gallantry and terrible wounding of Wm. C. Barthauer, son of Mr. Chas. H. Barthauer, of this city. Many a friend will join with us in the hope that he may recover and receive a fitting acknowledgment of his bravery and sufferings:
"Among the heroes of the 100th N. Y. Vols., who charged up to the parapet of Fort Wagner, on the 28th of July, and fell disabled at the threshold of victory, was a young soldier named Wm. C. Barthauer, of Buffalo, N. Y. In the midst of the battle, while kneeling momentarily for a better aim, his piece was knocked from his hand by a musket ball, which severed the thumb of his left hand. At almost the same instant a grape shot struck his right leg above the knee, and tearing a fearful wound through its whole upper length, passed out at the thigh. Fainting with hemorrhage, in terrible pain, and liable at any moment to be struck again, he managed to roll over into a ditch plowed by a cannon ball, where he lay for some moments weltering in blood. A shell suddenly exploded near by. One of the fragments striking the leg of the unfortunate soldier, ripped off the fleshy portion of the calf nearly to the knee.
"The retreat of our forces commenced soon afterward, but young Barthauer's condition was so critical that it was not deemed best to remove him. He lay alone with his agony till morning, when the enemy picked him up and carried him behind their works. Not until five days afterwards, when conveyed to the hospital at Charleston, did he receive surgical treatment. He was finally transferred to a United Stares hospital-ship, which sailed for New York about two weeks ago. He has lain at Fort Schuyler ever since, and though suffering from such a succession of injuries as rarely befal [sic] a soldier, he expresses himself not only willing but anxious to return to the field at the earliest practicable moment. When he does return we trust it may be as an officer among comrades whom he has nobly earned the privilege of commanding."

THE CAPTURE OF CAPTAIN PAINE.—A letter to the Washington Chronicle gives a detailed account of the capture of Captain Paine and his men of the 100th regiment. On the night of the 4th inst., the Captain with his detachment pulled in a boat up to the point on Morris Island, near the mouth of Lighthouse creek, and within a range of Forts Johnson, Sumter and Wagner Landing at a dock there, Captain Paine left his men in the boat and took a position near by. He was soon made aware of the enemy's presence by a sharp peremptory summons to surrender. Giving an evasive answer, the Captain ... to his boat. He gained it, escaping a ... musketry which was sent after him, but ... the boat could push off about seventy re... it within close fire. The men of the 100th .. an effective volley to the rebels, but it was no use, and Captain Paine, rather than have his men all slaughtered, surrendered. The affair was witnessed by one of our picket boats stationed near, which succeeded in eluding the enemy. The following are the names of the persons captured: Captain L. S. Paine, Sergeant Mitzinger, O. Towne, L. Allen, P. Miller, F. Slottman, J. Shoph, G. H. Snider, J. Goodman, Chas. Metzorff, all of Company D, One Hundredth New York Volunteers.

ASSAULT ON FORT WAGNER.
On the 18th, Gen. Gillmore, in co-operation with the Monitors and gunboats, opened a bombardment on Fort Wagner, Morris Island. After a terrific cannonade of eight hours, without the desired result, as assault at night was resolved upon, in which we were repulsed, with considerable loss. A correspondent of the Tribune gives a graphic and extended account of the fight, from which we make a few extracts:
Just as darkness began to close in upon the scene of the afternoon and the evening, Gen. Strong rode to the front and ordered his brigade, consisting of the 54th Mass., Col. Shaw (colored regiment), the 6th Conn., Col. Chatfield, the 48th N. Y., Col. Barton, the 3d N. H., Col. Jackson, the 76th Penn., and the 9th Maine, Col. Emery, to advance to the assault. At the instant, the line was seen slowly advancing in the dusk toward the fort, and before a double quick had been ordered, a tremendous fire from the barbette guns on Fort Sumter, from the batteries on Cummings' Point, and from all the guns of Fort Wagner, opened upon it. The guns from Wagner swept the beach, and those from Sumter and Cummings' Point enfiladed it in the left. In the midst of this terrible shower of shot and shell they pushed their way, reached the fort, portions of the 54th Mass., the 6th Conn., and the 48th N. Y. dashed through the ditches, gained the parapet, and engaged in a hand to hand fight with the enemy, and for nearly half an hour held their ground, and did not fall back until nearly every commissiond [sic] officer was shot down. As on the assault of the morning of the 11th inst., these brave men were exposed to a most galling fire of grape and canister, from howitzers, raking the ditches from the bastions of the fort, from hand grenades, and from almost every other modern implement of warfare. The rebels fought with the utmost desperation, and so did the largest portion of Gen. Strong's brigade, as long as there was an officer to command it.
It was now the turn of Col Putnam, commanding the 2d Brigade, composed of the 7th N. H., the 62d Ohio, Col. Steele, the 67th Ohio, Col. Vorhees, and the 100th N. Y. Col. Danely, to make the attempt. But alas! The task was too much for him. Through the same terrible fire he lead [sic] one-half of it, fighting every moment of that time with the utmost desperation, and, as with the 1st Brigade, it was not until he himself fell killed, and nearly all his officers wounded, and no reinforcements arriving, that his men fell back, and the Rebel shout and cheer of victory was heard above the roar of Sumter and the guns from Cummings' Point.
All that human power could do to carry this formidable earthwork seems to have been done. No one could have imagined in the morning that so fierce a cannonade from both the navy and the batteries on shore could fail to destroy every bomb-proof the rebels had erected. But the moment our men touched the parapett of the fort 1,300 strong streamed from their safe hiding place, where they had been concealed during the day, and fresh and strong, were prepared to drive us back. We then found to our sorrow that the 15-inch shot from the monitors, even when fired at the distance of but 1,080 yards, had not injured them in the least. Only the parapets of the fort had been knocked into sand heaps.

PROGRESS OF THE SIEGE OPERATIONS—NO IMPORTANT MOVEMENTS—THE REBEL WORKS—HEALTH OF THE TROOPS.
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., Saturday Aug. 8, 1863.
The siege of Port Wagner is still progressing, and thus far without any serious encounters between the opposing forces since the memorable 18th. The enemy sends his missiles at intervals during the day and night from Fort Sumter, Gregg and Johnson, but has succeeded in causing very little injury to the Union troops. If anything, the rebels appear to have tired of that sort of pastime within the past two or three days, as it is noticed they do not fire so often as they did a week ago. Probably they are suspicious that they have been wasting ammunition, and are now content to wait until the proper moment arrives. As a general thing, we do not respond.
Fort Wagner is already about non est. At any rate, it is impossible for that work to use its guns to any advantage, in consequence of the expertness of our sharpshooters, who are ready to pick off the first rebel that shows his head above the fortifications. By this means it may be safely said that Port Wagner is entirely at our mercy. When the Union forces first arrived on the island, the guns of Fort Wagner were trained on the beach, so as to sweep its entire length, and in fact it was rendered anything but an agreeable  promenade at that time. But now the soldiers can walk on the beach with impunity, to within a mile and a half of Fort Wagner, not fearing any trouble from the guns of that work.
Fort Gregg, otherwise known as the Cumming's Point Battery, is completely out of the question at present. The special points of interest are Forts Sumter, Johnson, and, as before intimated, Wagner. Let those forts be reduced, and the land forces will have achieved all that can be required of them in their present situation. The iron-clads must do the rest in the reduction of Charleston.—Moultrie occasionally throws a shell, but for what purpose it is difficult to conceive, as the projectile invariably falls in the water without causing the slightest damage to any Union material.
Of the health of the Union troops, it may be said that they are comparatively in good condition. The cases of sickness have been greatly reduced during the past ten days, and the probability is, that in the course of another week the sick list will be very small. Those who are sick have the best of treatment and attention, being immediately conveyed to Hilton Head, where accommodations have been provided for them. As yet there have been no signs of the yellow fever or any other epidemic, and such is not apprehended on the island this season. A few cases occurred last year at Hilton Head, but such sanitary measures have been taken as, it is believed, will prevent a return of that class of disease this summer. On Morris Island not a tree or a shrub is to be found. The only thing that approaches vegetation, even in its simplest form, is a kind of rank grass which is discovered in certain spots, like the oasis in the desert. This absence of vegetation is believed to have a salutary effect on the health of the soldiers. As would be naturally supposed, the climate here is excessively warm, especially in early morning. At about 10 or 11 A. M. we have a fresh sea breeze, which continues for the remainder of the day and long into the night. Within the past six days 400 men have been sent from the hospitals to their regiments. In fact, one or two hospitals have been broken up entirely.
It must not be supposed that Morris Island is a level plain of sand. There can be no doubt about the sand, but the island is by no means free from hills and low bluffs, especially on the lower or southern end. These bluffs extend about one and a half miles parallel with the island, or to the lookout tower. Beyond that point, the country is comparatively even, but abounds with marshes. From the peculiar shape of the Island and the contracted limits which can be occupied, it is impossible to concentrate upon it a very heavy number of men. Notwithstanding this, however, it is thought we have troops enough to accomplish the object intended.
It will not be a matter of news to state that work is being vigorously prosecuted on the trenches and parallels. The nature of the next conflict can be easily surmised. It will be, for the most part, an artillery duel.
Lighthouse Inlet has certainly become a famous harbor on the Carolina coast. The rebels, in looking from their observatory just below Fort Johnson, cannot be otherwise than astonished to witness the fleet of vessels of various kinds that are constantly anchored at that point. Perhaps they also witness with feelings of regret the wreck of the impudent "Ruby" which was driven on the beach by the blockaders while attempting to run the gauntlet with a contraband cargo, up Lighthouse Creek. Communication between Morris and Folly Islands is kept up by means of a small steamer which hourly plys back and forth. In addition to the steamer, a dozen or more row-boats are always on one or the other shore, so there is never a lack of transportation.
It is rather singular that while we are only within three days' easy transportation distance of New York, yet we have scarcely any vegetables for the troops. It would seem that the Government would comprehend the great importance of that species of diet at this particular time, and send, without delay, a sufficient quantity to supply the whole department. The plan of feeding fighting-men on fresh or salt beef and hard biscuit, simply has been effectually tried and found to be a failure. Thanks to the United States Sanitary Commission the needful subsistence has, in a measure, been supplied; but it cannot be expected this valuable institution —which was organized more especially for the benefit of the sick and wounded—can be able to furnish all the troops on the island with rations.
A flag of truce was sent to Fort Wagner yesterday, but no reply has been received up to the time of mailing this letter.
Captain Payne, with eleven men of the One Hundredth New York, were taken prisoners while making a reconnoisence last week.

..., SATURDAY, AUGUST ...
The First Attack on Battery Wagner—A Protest from the 76th Pennsylvania Regiment.
MORRIS ISLAND, July 29, 1863.
To the Editor of The Press:
SIR: In the Philadelphia Press of July 20th, received to-day, we notice an extract dated New York, July 18th, which says: "On the 12th inst. General Gilmore ordered the storming of Fort Wagner by the 7th Connecticut, 9th Maine, 47th and 48th New York Volunteers, and the two first-named regiments had actually reached the top of the parapets when a murderous fire drove them back. The 78th Pennsylvania, which was to support them, did not come up in time, and our troops had to withdraw." This report we beg to set right: On the morning of the 11th General Strong landed part of his brigade on Morris Island, which took possession of the south end, while the balance were coming across Lighthouse Inlet in small boats. The 7th Connecticut, 9th Maine, 3d New Hampshire, and 76th Pennsylvania advanced to within range of Forts Wagner and Sumpter [sic], when we were ordered from the beach, and told to form lines and protect ourselves behind the small sand hills. We lay here all day, in the scorching sun, and under a continual shower of shot and shell. In the evening Col. Strawbridge asked Gen. Strong to relieve his regiment, as the men were worn out, not having had any sleep the two nights previous, and nothing to eat for twenty-four hours. But the General refused, and we all silently submitted, having the utmost confidence in him as a brave and fearless leader, as well as a soldier and gentleman. Soon after dark we were ordered forward a short distance, and there slept on our arms, the field officers and Capt. Littell standing watch. At 2 o'clock in the morning the General rode up and said: "Colonel, form your line; ten minutes more work and we are done. I want you to support the skirmishers." We started, and in our march the 9th Maine got between us and the skirmishers, and when they were ordered to the left we could see no one in our front. Then the command, "double quick," was given, when every man sprang forward, and it was with difficulty that some of the officers could keep back the stronger in line with the weaker. On arriving at the edge of the moat they came to a sudden halt, finding it impossible to go further, commenced firing, and when we had fired from two to three rounds each, the order came from the left to fall back. We supposed it was from Gen. Strong, knowing he was in that vicinity. We all fell back, and, I am sorry to say, it was not in very good order. Many of the 7th Connecticut were in our ranks, and some ... in theirs, and many of the 9th Maine on the extreme right. The darkness prevented men from distinguishing their own regiments. When we had formed line, on the ground we had occupied the previous evening, the roll was called, and out of 357 that went into the fight 187 were missing, of which not one man has yet been found. A correspondent says: "I have seen many of the 9th Maine and 76th Pennsylvania on Morris and Folly Islands, either afraid or ashamed to join their regiments." This is not true. Another writer from James Island says "the 76th Pennsylvania refused to support the 6th Connecticut." They were never ordered to do so; and if so, the officers should be disgracefully dismissed the service, and the men sent to the Tortugas. We would think it no disgrace to be sent to Tortugas with our men, rather than be kept in a department where such things are recklessly written for publication. Such things have a tendency to demoralize and destroy the reputation of those accused for ever. May God forgive these friends of the army.
It is said by another writer that "Colonel Rodman was the only wounded officer brought from the front." Major Hicks was brought from the front, and Captain Littell was wounded and fell on the edge of the moat. Adjutant Miller was shot, and fell into the moat. Lieutenant Stumbaugh was last seen on the edge of the moat, trying to find a crossing place, and many of the men were seen falling into the water and mud. We have not a word of reproach to cast upon any officer or man engaged in the assault, believing every one tried, at least, under the circumstances, to do the best he could. But we do not believe that four companies of any regiment, with the ordinary support, could take any battery in South Carolina, for after Fort Wagner had been bombarded, more or less, for six days, by our iron-clads, monitors, the Ironsides, several wooden vessels, and our land batteries, it was again stormed by twelve or fourteen regiments, when all were repulsed, with a loss of 1,500 men. In this charge we lost but twenty-four men, killed, wounded, and missing. To-night we go on advance picket for twenty-four hours. Last night one-half of our force worked all night. The only complaint that can be heard is, "I don't like to risk my life and get no credit for it, but instead be called a coward." Yet we hope the day is not far distant when we will be allowed an investigation, and only the guilty made to suffer.
Lieutenant Colonel Campbell, it is necessary to say was with the regiment in the first charge, and was not sick in hospital, as reported. Colonel Strawbridge was also with the regiment, and only stayed back on account of a severe rupture, which prevented him from keeping up on a double quick. Respectfully yours, L. A., Battery No. 4,

The Siege of Charleston,
News by Mail to Monday, 10th Inst.
The correspondence of the New York Herald from Morris Island, of the 8th to the 10th instant, inclusive, has the following details of the bombardment of the forts in Charleston harbor:
To-day (the 8th,) the siege goes steadily on. In the sultry heat of the morning, the fierce glare of midday, and the cool, quiet hours of the night, our forces are constantly, hopefully and cheerfully laboring for the possession of the envied prize.
I never saw in any army such confidence as is felt by the soldiers of this corps in their leader, and in the result of the operations now in progress. From the humblest private up to the commanding general of division I have not seen a man who was not elated at the rich promise before us. Day after day and night after night, hauling big guns, digging in the trenches, standing on guard, under arms in readiness for an attack, the army of General Gillmore is more than contented—the men are more than gratified. Their enthusiasm is remarkable.
The task before us is one of no small magnitude. For a time rest contented with the intelligence that our guns are going forward, that our batteries are going up, and that the final preparations are steadily approaching completion. Be assured that as soon as the opportune moment arrives the blow will be struck, but that as yet we propose to move with care and certainty rather than with haste and recklessness.
The health of the command is excellent. The intense glare of the sun upon the fine white sand, however, has its effect upon the men, whose eyes are weakened and whose faces are scorched as if they had stood before an oven ever since their advent here. Night blindness—a peculiar malady which unfits a man for duty as the sun goes down—is noticeably prevalent, and is traceable to the glistening of both sea and shore in the fierce sunlight.
By a flag of trace to-day there came into our lines a singularly shaped parcel, addressed to General Gillmore. It contained various pocketbooks, purses, knives, pipes, pencils, &c., the personal effects of several of our men who have recently died while prisoners of war in the rebel hospitals at Charleston. In the advent of this packet, ...d with the trivial though cherished mementoes of ...lant men, who, with their life-blood, have se... their devotion to their country, we see some little evidence of a return of the celebrated Southern chivalry. The pockets of those who fell in the trenches, however, were rifled of their contents where their owners perished.
Among the articles thus sent in were the following belonging to New Hampshire men, the "N. H." on the soldiers' caps being interpreted by the rebels as meaning "New Haven".
Captain H. B. Leavitt, Co. G, 7th N. H., (dead) $38 80. Also a note for $200. W. B. Trimball, Co. E, 7th N. H., (dead) $22 95.
Lieut. J. H. Worcester, 7th N. H., (paroled) two pocketbooks tied together--one marked G. E. Marshall, $84 56.
Jas. Relation, Co. H, 7th N. H., (paroled) knife, silver watch and likeness.
Fred. Inkerson, Co. A, 7th N. H., (paroled) silver watch and pipe.
So far as we can ascertain, the rebels have not relaxed in their preparations to resist our approach toward Charleston. They are working like beavers on James Island, building batteries and mounting heavy guns with which to enfilade our position. With our glasses we can see the features of the men and the flashing of their spades in the light of the rising sun. They labor as if confident of checkmating us. Saturday night they hauled down a monstrous piece, requiring sixteen horses for its transportation. There was evidently a great jollification in honor of its arrival, for the shouts and huzzas of the secesh were wafted over toward us till a late hour.
Since the bombardment of Wagner no flag has waved it, and its parapet has remained, without repairs, an irregular heap of sand, hardly distinguishable from the hills and ridges which abound in its vicinity; but the fort is not the less serviceable on this account. Indeed, from its resemblance to the natural earthworks with which the island is covered, it may be considered more dangerous to approach than if its position were indicated by a lofty parapet or a defiant banner. We should be likely to stumble against it almost without knowing it, were it not for the vigilant enemy lurking there.
The firing upon our trenches is daily and nightly practiced by the enemy. The discharge of their artillery, though not rapid, is quite regular, and is frequent enough to show the determined nature of their resistance. For the past three or four days, however, they have failed to inflict any casualties upon us, with the exception of a single man wounded on Saturday night.
On Saturday night the pickets of the enemy were driven in about two hundred yards by our advance in front of Fort Wagner. The position thus secured was held in the face of the rebel sharpshooters throughout the following day, and last evening our trenches were advanced and our entire lines were moved forward a distance of one hundred and sixty yards.
For the past five days our losses have averaged only one per day. Nevertheless, our men are constantly under fire, and gradually lessening the distance between them and the rebel guns. As they become skilled in dodging the enemy's projectiles the number of injuries is diminished.
A member of the 24th Massachusetts Regiment was seated in the trenches a few days since, leaning against the earthwork, with his back toward Fort Wagner. A solid shot from one of the rebel guns struck the thick embankment behind him, and though no visible effect was produced upon the face of the parallel, the soldier was instantly paralyzed and rendered utterly helpless. He was removed to the hospital, and although there were no marks of injury about him, he lived only two days.
The soldiers find adequate shelter in the bomb-proofs from the bursting shells, and it is only through carelessness or neglect that any are injured. A private in the 9th Maine regiment was sitting securely in one of these diminutive rat-holes the other day, but in a moment of bravado he thrust out his legs. He had scarcely straightened himself when his left leg was taken off at the knee.
The weather is fine, but intensely hot. For four or five days the customary sea breeze has been withheld, and, in consequence, there is a vast amount of suffering. There is not a pound of ice upon the island, either for the sick or well, and it is understood that there is none in the department. Cannot the generous philanthropists of the North send us a schooner load at once? Certainly they could do the soldiers here no favor more acceptable than to provide them with an occasional sip of cool water.
A cargo of ice left Boston for Charleston on Friday forenoon, per the barque Growler, Capt. Morrill.
Speaking of the situation on the 10th, the correspondence says: Affairs have not materially changed. The same steady progress in our field operations is to be observed, and it looks as though the crisis cannot be far off. Our works have been pushed on toward completion without the slightest interruption, although the enemy have maintained a heavy fire of shells upon our approaches from Fort Johnson, their new works on James Island, Fort Sumter and batteries Gregg and Wagner. The loss on our side has been inconsiderable during the siege operations.
The engineers last night advanced our front lines to a point about two hundred yards nearer Fort Wagner, and before daylight had made themselves secure against attack. The enemy kept up a heavy fire during the evening, but did not prevent the success of our movement.
Our men did their work manfully, and with a perfect disregard of the dangers of their position. Our batteries kept the fire of Wagner down somewhat, and prevented any advance of the enemy to interfere with our fatigue parties in the front.

REBEL DESERTER'S REPORT.
A rebel deserter reports that the rebels have removed nearly all their heavy guns from both Wagner and Gregg, and are transporting them to their new batteries on James Island. It is also believed that they are in a measure dismantling Fort Sumter of its heaviest guns, and putting them in position in new batteries. Whether these batteries, which are exceedingly formidable, so far as the strength and position of the works themselves are concerned, are for offensive or defensive purposes, is a question. If for the former, it is doubted whether they will be a complete success. Probably, if for the latter, they will do better. At all events, the rebels are most active in pushing forward these batteries. We can see large fatigue parties daily at work on the different works on James Island.
Since a portion of our squadron has anchored inside the bar, and additional precautionary measures have been taken by Admiral Dahlgren to make the inside blockade more efficient, but one vessel has succeeded in eluding our watch and escaped into Charleston. A number of vessels, it is understood, have attempted to run in, but have given up the job as too risky, and have gone back to Nassau. Still the Anglo-rebel efforts to supply the rebels with munitions of war have by no means ceased. The navy have information of a large fleet of steamers at Nassau which intend to try their luck during the coming dark nights. Among them is one large new steamer, on her first trip, loaded with the heaviest rifled guns, of English manufacture, for the defense of Charleston and for the armament of the rebel iron-clads. She is now expected nightly. It is barely possible she may get in; but it is doubted for sufficient reasons. If it costs a half dozen vessels, she will be captured or sunk. The game is about up with blockade runners in this quarter.

THE CAPTURE OF CAPTAIN PAINE.—A letter to the Washington Chronicle gives a detailed account of the capture of Captain Paine and his men of the 100th regiment. On the night of the 4th inst., the Captain with his detachment pulled in a boat up to the point on Morris Island, near the mouth of Lighthouse creek, and within easy range of Forts Johnson, Sumter and Wagner. Landing at a dock there, Captain Paine left his men in the boat and took a position near by. He was soon made aware of the enemy's presence by a sharp peremptory summons to surrender. Giving an evasive answer, the Captain dashed to his boat. He gained it, escaping a fire of musketry which was sent after him, but before the boat could push off about seventy rebels had it within close fire. The men of the 100th gave an effective volley to the rebels, but it was no use, and Captain Paine, rather than have his men all slaughtered, surrendered. The affair was witnessed by one of our picket boats stationed near, which succeeded in eluding the enemy. The following are the names of the persons captured: Captain L. S. Paine, Sergeant Mitzinger, O. Towne, L. Allen, P. Miller, F. Slottman J. Shoph, G. R. Snider, J. Goodman, Chas. Metzorff, all of Company D, One Hundredth New York Volunteers.

CAPTAIN PAINE TAKEN PRISONER.—The telegraphic news received yesterday, of the capture of Capt. Paine and nine men of the 100th regiment, will be read with eager interest by the many friends of that gallant officer in this county. Captain Paine and his company are from Tonawanda, and since the arrival of the 100th at Charleston, he has made himself famous by his skill, courage and success in scouting. Some of the most daring feats of the war will hereafter be credited to the Tonawanda Captain. We trust his exchange and release will be speedy.

LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED of New York regiments, in the attack on Fort Wagner, in Charleston Harbor:
Dead.— 100th N. Y. A. Iseman, Co. F, shot in thigh; Lewis Bilhauer, Co. A.
Wounded.—48th N. Y. Col. W. B. Barton, hip; Capt. N. Eleving, Co. B, leg; Capt. S. M. Swartwout, Co. F, head; Lieut. Charles E. Fox, Co. A, hip, arm and head—a paroled prisoner from Charleston; Lieut. J. Taylor, Co. E, a paroled prisoner from Charleston, side; Lieut. A. F. Miller, Co. K, leg and thigh; Lieut. J. A. Barrett, Co. B, thigh; Josiah Sturges, Co. C; John Morton, Co. H; Corporal B. Leonard, Co. K; Wm. Hess, Co. K; Corp. Wm. D. Howard, Co. F; C. Roberts, Co. B ; Samuel Roberts, Co. F ; Wm. B. Smith, Co. B; James Larkin, Co. A; Charles N. Cole, Co. D; Charles Mills, Co. H; Corp. A. Ellison, Co. K; F. Konklin, Co. K; Corp. James Hyatt, Co. F; Jas. H. Silvers, Co. B; Jas. McGurney, Co. H; John Lee, Co. H; John ____, Co. C; W. H. Foley, Co. F; C. Smith, Co. _; Robert Douglass, Co. E ; M. B. Konkli__, Co. _; W. J. Omers, Co. B , John Burton, Co. _; Capt. Fred Hurst, Co. K; C. Messenger, Co. E; Charles Robersey, Co. B; Cornelius Cadmus, Co. A.

100th New York —Major D. D. Nash, left thigh; Lieut. Cyrus Brown, Co. E, leg amputated; Second Lieut. Lewis Brown, Co. E ; W. C. Barltin, Co. F; M. McGuire, Co. C; Jas. S. Ehlegher, Co. F; Wm. Carr, Co. C; Corporal Thos. J. Barker, Co. K; Corporal Augustus Herley, Co. K; B. Kerr, Co. K; Olander Moore, Co. K; Meritt Weeks, Co. K; Wm. Fettsburg, Co. K; Fred Mann, Co. F; John Kleberg, Co. F ; Henry Roach. Co. H.

Our dead in Rebel hands.—48th New York. Amos M. Haven, Co. H, July 20; Thos. Kelly, Co. K, July 20; Geo. W. Nichols, Co. H, July 21; Jas. McPherson, Co. K, July 21; C. Ward, (doubtful) Co. K, July 21.

100th New York.—Geo. Flanders, Co. A, July 23; Howard Rebschardt, Co. K, July 22; C. P. Frank, Co. E, July 20; Julius G. Skinner, Co. E, July 22; Mailer Caldwell, Co. K, July 19; William Kerr, Co. H, July 19; Christie Malley, Co. C, July 19; Geo. Kilven, Co. C, July 22; Christopher Shetal, Co. A, July 22; Peter Daniells, Co. G, July 22.

FULL PARTICULARS OF CAPTAIN PAINE'S
CAPTURE.—We have already published the account given by the correspondent of one of the New York journals of the capture of Capt, Paine, of the 100th Regiment, and the squad accompanying him. The New South gives a somewhat different version of the affair, and we are inclined to believe the most correct one. A list of the killed and wounded is also furnished. The article is dated, Morris Island, Aug. 13th, and says:
On Wednesday night last, while on an important scout, Capt. Paine, together with the detachment with him, was taken prisoner by the rebels, who caught him, it seems, in a tight place. The facts involved in the affair, according to the best version, are substantially as follows: He started out in a small boat, with a sergeant and eight men, to go to the old wharf on Light House Creek, where the enemy had attempted to erect a battery, when we first came on the Island, and where the steamboat was disabled by Myrick's battery, and afterwards burned by Captain Paine himself. A picket boat manned by a detachment from the 97th Pennsylvania accompanied Capt. Paine, to guard the water approaches to the wharf, from the rebel lines.
Capt. Paine reached the wharf in safety, and leaving his boat and crew at the end of the pier, he alone took a position on the dock, where he could observe the movement of the enemy and signal to our batteries, in case any rebel steamer attempted to communicate with Cumming's Point. He had been there quietly enough for nearly an hour, when he was summoned to surrender by a voice on the dock. To gain time he asked "what is that?" and started for his boat. The rebels, for so they proved to be, fired a volley at him, but not hitting him, and instantly a large party started in pursuit. Captain Paine jumped into his boat, and his men poured in a fire upon the advancing enemy. One or two of them was hit, and the pursuit for the moment checked; but only for a moment, and they were then on Capt. Paine and his little party, before the latter could load their pieces. They fired at close range upon the boat and it was immediately surrendered. It is reported that Capt. Paine was shot down. The report is not incredible, but the authority upon which it was based, makes it proper to say that the evidence is not strong, that he did fall. He and his party were taken prisoners. That fact is unfortunate, unquestionable. The picket lying near fired upon the rebels, and received a fire in return that instantly killed two privates in the boat. The boat then escaped and came in to report the facts. The enemy had retired before supports could be sent out to flog them, and rescue the prisoners.
The following is a correct list of those lost in Capt. Paine's boat:—Capt. L. S. Paine, Sergent [sic] Metzinger, and Privates O. Towns, L. Allen, P. Miller, F. Slattmman, J. Shoph, G. B. Snyder, J. Goodman, Charles Metzoff, all of Co. D, 100th New York, Col Dandy. Killed in the 97th Penn., in the picket boat:—Joseph Russell and Joseph L. Eyre, Co. D.
The loss of Captain Paine, at any time would be a serious one, but at this juncture it is greatly to be regretted. He was a brave, skillful and shrewd officer, and the very best scout in the Department.

THE ATTACK UPON CHARLESTON.
Incidents of the Fight at Fort Wagner.
The New York Evening Post says:—
Authentic intelligence from Morris Island to the 21st instant, received in this city through private letters, shows, as the result of General Gilmore's operations, that he now possesses three-fourths of the Island, and that although the assault upon Fort Wagner failed, he has succeeded in planting his heavy batteries in a position which commands Fort Sumter. The General is not at all discouraged by his failure at Wagner.
We find in the correspondence of the Philadelphia Inquirer the following incidents of the attack upon the Rebel Fort:—

BARBABOUS TREATMENT OF A BLACK SOLDIER BY THE REBELS.
One of the colored soldiers, who had faithfully stood at his post, and refused to fall back when the Rebels drove in our pickets, was afterwards brought into our lines. The Rebels, not content with having murdered him, had cut both his ears off and scalped him. As his comrades looked upon this hideous sight they grit their teeth and swore never to take another prisoner; and I can assure you that the Rebels will find that the Fifty-fourth will retaliate in this case without waiting for special or general orders.

A NEGRO SOLDIER CATCHES A REBEL.
One laughable incident connected with this engagement is as follows:—After the Rebels had retreated, a colored sergeant belonging to the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, and very stunted, was seen coming in with a Secesh prisoner. The Rebel was one of those tall specimens of the chivalry who seem to have been originally intended for astronomical observations, while his captor was a stunted negro who could with ease have walked between the legs of his prize. It was a ludicrous sight—the little contraband, with expanding eyes, large mouth, ivory glistening, lugging his own arms and those of his prisoner, and beside him was a long-haired, sunken-jawed, sallow-faced specimen of Southern vegetation, humbly following his enterprising colored brother.

WHAT THE DESERTERS SAY OF WAGNER.
The deserters who came into our lines were examined separately, and from them the following facts were elicited: The number of men in Wagner at the time of our last assault was fifteen hundred. They had been brought up from Savannah the day previous, and landed upon Cumming's Point that night. All day Saturday, while the bombardment was in progress, these troops were not in Wagner, but concealed and protected by a high sand ridge which runs from Wagner, along the course of the beach, to Cumming's Point; and as soon as our forces marched up the beach to the assault these troops were placed in the fort, and in readiness to receive us. About an hour after we had retreated the fort was again reinforced by two battalions from Charleston. General Palmer, of Mississippi, is in command of Wager, and the armament of the fort is as follows: A mortar and two siege guns facing this way; and a mortar, two 30 pound Parrotts, and a 10 inch rifled gun, bearing seaward. The fort is built in the most perfect manner, both as regards strength and the protection afforded to the gunners. In the bombardment the ironclads dismounted two of her guns, and the Ironsides was the terror of the garrison, especially her broadsides.
Notwithstanding the fierceness of the bombardment, we only killed and wounded fifty of the garrison, so well protected are they by bomb-proofs. The troops from Savannah have all been brought to Charleston, and in the latter city great consternation prevails, so much so that the inhabitants have already commenced to move their valuables to Savannah. Troops are being sent down from Richmond to the defence of Charleston, among whom are regiments of "Stonewall" Jackson's old corps. Wagner has one bomb-proof capable of holding two thousand men. Such is the substance of these deserters' information, compared and sifted out. They were dressed in the fearfully dirty "grey," and expressed themselves as "sick of this war." They were all foreigners and "substitutes," or conscripts in the Rebel army, and were certainly anything but in love with the chivalry. Upon being told that they would be well taken care of, and have plenty to eat, their eyes glistened as they beheld afar visions of Yankee provender.

THE PRESENT SITUATION OF AFFAIRS.
Monday afternoon we discovered that the Rebels were erecting a battery on James Island, with the idea of giving us a flanking fire. The McDonough immediately moved up Light House creek and shelled the position for some time. We heard nothing more from this new idea until yesterday morning, when this battery opened and threw shells clear across the lower end of Morris Island, exploding them upon the beach and in the channel. But nothing serious resulted from this fire, and if the Rebels depend upon this battery for our worriment, they are vastly mistaken. In the morning our iron-clads opened for a short season upon Wagner and Gregg, and then retired. In the afternoon a 30-pound Parrott was sighted at Sumter by the officer in command of our battery on the right, and the gun fired by a Sergeant of the First artillery, who was in Sumter at the time of its surrender under Anderson, and the shell burst right upon the parapet of Sumter, being the first shot which has been fired into Sumter since the present expedition.
This reminder drew out the fire of Sumter, Wagner, Gregg, Vinegar Hill, Fort Johnson and the new battery on James Island. All the batteries except Sumter directed their fire upon the iron-clad and mortar fleet, while Sumter especially noticed our batteries. This bombardment, without decisive results, continued till late in the afternoon, when it gradually ceased. To-day the same programme has been carried out, and the future will decide our success. The Rebels may try to drive us from our position, but they will receive a nice warming in case they attempt it. Gen. Gilmore has set out to take Charleston, and I believe, with good reason, that he will do it. It may be days or weeks before I read the Inquirer in the Mills House at Charleston, but I have no more doubt of doing it than I have of eating hard tack to-morrow morning for breakfast. Entire nous, Charleston is no less ours than Vicksburg. Tempus fugit, also the Rebels.

Anecdote of General Grant.
We find the following in the Detroit Free Press:—
"A gentleman of this city, who was an early friend of General Grant, furnishes the following reminiscences of the brave general who has so inseparably linked his name with the victories of the Western armies:—
"General Grant is of a Methodist family of Ohio, and married the daughter of a Methodist local preacher, and the granddaughter of the pioneer of Methodism in Western Pennsylvania, of the name of Wrenshall. When not much over twelve years of age he was at school, and had as a schoolfellow his own natural cousin, whose parents were British subjects of Canada. Young Grant was taught to forgive injuries, as a divine precept, and to do good and not evil to others, and his father had impressed his mind with love of country and reverence for the name of Washington. The Canadian had been otherwise educated, and believed Washington a rebel. On one occasion a discussion arose between the boys as to love of country and duty to a king, when John said: 'U. S., (Grant had been nicknamed U. S.) your Washington was a rebel, and fought against his king.
"Grant replied: 'Jack, you must stop that or I'll flog you. I can forgive you for abusing me, but if you abuse our Washington I'll off coat and fight, though you are cousin Jack, and mother may lick me for not forgiving.' The boys fought. Jack got the worst of it, but 'U. S.' was about being whipped at home for fighting, when his father interposed and saved him, saying, 'The boy who will fight for Washington will prove himself a man and a Christian, if God spares him for twenty years.
"Some years ago the boys, now men-grown, met in Canada, and recurred to school days. Jack said: "U. S., do you remember the licking you gave me for calling Washington a Rebel?"
"Yes, I do, and Jack, I'll do it again under like provocation. Washington is my idol, and to me it is more insulting to speak disrespectfully of Washington or my country, than to denounce myself. Mother's maxim does very well in private quarrels, but it don't apply where one's country is denounced, or its gods. Washington is first in the American pantheon, and I couldn't rest easy if I permitted any abuse of his name.'
"Such was and is 'Unconditional Surrender Grant.' "

The cashier of one of the Broadway banks, New York, a few evenings ago, had occasion to enter the double-doored vault, just previous to the porter's time of going his rounds and turning the keys. The doors of the vault were closed, and the suffocating tenant, knowing it, was the man's custom to immediately leave the building, at once set up a cry of terror—sounding, without, like the stifled tones of a ventriloquist—which, however, would have been unavailing, had not a clerk been accidentally detained at his desk. A faint call—"Let me out," was heard, and finally traced to the vault. The doors were opened, and the horror stricken cashier, nearly helpless, pale and weak from fear, exertion and want of air, tottered forth. The five minutes' incarceration, and the terrible thought that he was left to die a lingering death, so changed him that the clerk could hardly recognize him. He now shudders at the sight of the vault, and has not recovered from the effects of his fright. He says the five minutes seemed days to him. It reminds one of Hoffman's story of "The Man in the Reservoir," or one of Poe's terrible tales—" The Cask of Amontillado," for instance.

THE ATTACK ON FORT WAGNER.
Description by a Participant in the Fight --Gallant Conduct of the Forty-Eighth, Brooklyn, Regiment.
HILTON HEAD, July 29, 1863.
To the Editor of the Brooklyn City News:
MY DEAR SIR:—I have for some weeks kept silent, because I had nothing special to say. On the 4th day of July we left St. Helena Island for Folly Island. The weather was hot, and the marching and fatigue work on Folly Island was hard indeed for the Regiment. On the nights of the 7th and 8th we were out in line, spending part of the night in the woods by dim moonlight, and part in scouting and marching. On the morning of the 9th the Regiment approached Morris Island, giving us a fine chance to witness the cannon duel between the Secesh and our batteries, opening on the Rebs at 6 o'clock with artillery. About 8 o'clock a Monitor drew near, and opened on the Morris Island Fort; not long after, our men appeared, landing in flat-boats on the Island, off to the left; then howitzer shots were made by them at the battery, keeping up a brisk fire, the shells whizzing over our heads, and causing us to dodge. One ball struck at the rear of me, within a few paces of man who was coming over to the Regiment. He walked on, not seeming to notice it. Now three Monitors are engaging the batteries, signal flags in all directions, and the frigate Ironsides, still out to sea, has not fired a gun. A shell has just burst over our heads, coming from some distance toward Charleston, and still another. Our men lie in ambush behind sand-hills, palmetto trees, &c. Ten o'clock—the ball goes on; we can see the four companies of the 48th drawing near—double-quick at intervals,—preparatory to a charge, and the Rebs shelling our small boat howitzers. Gen. Strong's Brigade is the storming party. The 48th belong to him. Cos. I and G only, are left behind him at Pulaski. We learn that Gen. Terry has made a landing on James Island. Fort Sumter is just ahead in plain view, which makes our men feel like fighting. The cannon duel continues; our four companies, with sharp-shooters, draw near the battery, picking off the gunners. Now for our order to go: It comes, and the other four companies start, double-quick, through and out of our battery or fort, down to the water, under fire from the Secesh battery; we cross in boats, the solid cannon shot striking all around us, and soon landing on the other side, on Morris Island, (joining the other four companies which came up through the marsh from the left,) charge on the fort. The Rebs surrender. Other Regiments are landing in force, but the 48th follow up towards Charleston, and take two more batteries, turning some of the guns on the enemy, who are retreating between the sand-hills to Fort Wagner. The Monitors are at work all around the Island. Shell and solid shot fly all around us, and the troops are much exposed.
July 11th—In the early morn the 6th Connecticut Regiment charge a battery of great strength, and mount the parapet. The Ninth Maine break in their support, and lose to us the battery, with a destruction of many men. The 48th lost, the first day, seven killed and thirty-nine wounded. Brave Capt. Lent fell gallantly leading his Company. Six Rebel sharp shooters were posted to kill him, as they thought him a general.—The Forty-Eighth were called up in line, and slept last night on our arms. To-day the ironclads are at work at Sumter, while the wooden gunboats are engaging Fort Wagner and the rebel batteries. Our reinforcements are coming up, the dead and wounded are attended to, and rations are coming over. Heavy loads of ordinance, guns, artillery and siege pieces are arriving, shells flying from the guns, and death is all around us. Near the rebel batteries we gained whole camps—tents and cooking utensils all falling into our hands, as well as pigs, chickens, corn meal, flour, &c, too numerous to mention—letters to be sent, and that had come here, from secesh towns and villages.—For the present we notice only something to eat, having slung away our haversacks containing three days' rations, in order that we might make a better fight.
Evening—Troops continue to come over. Telegraph wires are being laid to follow our troops. Monitors are opening on James's Island batteries. Gen. Gilmore and staff are just over, and I notice a fatigue party of three hundred men drawing up heavy cannon towards the secesh batteries near the other side of the Island.
Six o'clock—Sharp firing on James Island from both sides; at tattoo we are in camp, in line of battle, the 48th sleeping on the ground without blankets, all armed and equipped.
July 12th—The rebel gun-boat is off James's Island, in the creek. Slow firing this morning.—The rebs are landing troops (under Sumter's guns) on this Island. A light battery goes forward, drives off the gun-boat, and sinks a Charleston steamer. A rain storm in the night, and very dark. Two rebel spies, it is supposed, have been in pour camp.
July 13th—Our troops have been under shell fire all day and part of the night, from Sumter. One of our men was killed by a shell. Our regiment in great danger all day. Hills covered with men—mortars and seige [sic] pieces brought forward.
Evening—The 48th advance in the entrenchments. Men tired and exhausted—heavy fatigue work continually. In the night our pickets were driven in, also Co. C, which had just relieved Co. B. It was dark, but we soon understood the matter, and pitched into the rebels, driving them back and taking a number of their men prisoners, and thus preserving a battery of Gen. Gilmore's then nearly completed, Company B (Capt. Elefwing) occupying the advance picket ditch, near Wagner, which the Company had held for some time during the night.
All the next day sharpshooters busy on both sides—at one time four bullets struck quite near me at the same time almost. It was an ugly picket fight, watching for heads. The camp was severely shelled from Sumter until about noon. Their favorite pieces taken from the Keokuck burst, they having overcharged them, and I watched the shell whizzing over our camp through the air, reaching near Folly Island, a distance of about five miles.—The previous shells had burst almost in the tent of Gen. Strong and the 48th, which regiment he liked and preferred to keep near his quarters. Fortunately no one was even hurt by these threatening fragments of destruction which fell all around.—We hear that the men in Fort Moultrie mutined [sic] and turned their guns upon Fort Sumter, and that ten men were hung in Charleston.
July 14th—All day annoyed by sharpshooters in the intrenchments.
July 15th—Firing on both sides while batteries were being built or finished—sharp cannonading on James' Island with our gunboats—men still in the intrenchments.
July 16th—Work of mounting guns progressing—expect to be completed to-night—our camp shelled for a good part of the day—gunboats reply at intervals.
Midnight—Thunder, lightening, wind, rain, and grease light, down in a hole with fleas, reptiles and wet sand, by the side of a knoll, in a beautiful spot of that lovely and attractive place spoken of so often during the rebellion, I am writing with a lead pencil, in an old secesh, mouldy, ugly, and torn tent.
July 17th, night—Thunder, lightening, and rain. We are working by companies and regiments, conveying ammunition, shell and shot under the guns of secesh, very laborious work. The sea is lined with marines in small boats, sounding, and watching the Rebel Forts.
July 18th—This morning the 48th Regiment came into camp, wet through, and completely used up after all these days and nights of excitement and hard work. They have had one ration of whiskey—and received a few hours sleep, when the regiment were ordered to move to the front, in line of battle, The batteries and Navy had already [sic] opened and were directing their fire on Fort Wagner, when suddenly Fort Sumter and other well-known rebel strongholds were all speaking by the cannon's loud voice.
It was a grand sight for us to witness. About 5 o [sic] 6 o'clock P. M. we received a ration of whiskey, having had but little to eat during the day; all around us as far as the eye could see was one swarm of shells flying and exploding. As evening grew near the breeze of the sea fanned us a little, when we started double quick up the beach for Fort Wagner, cheers were given the 48th by other regiments, Gen. Strong riding along without hat or cap—noticing us as if it might be for the last time—but it was a brave and honest expression of hope for victory. We heartily cheered the General, and on we went, under a severe shelling from Sumter, from which place we could be seen and our motive understood. When within a few yards of Fort Wagner, volley followed volley, and the Minie balls took down our men, while we in turn aimed at the heads of Secesh. A steady battle was now the work, the shades of night, overtook us, and the fight grew more desperate, our men falling, but steadily gaining, crossing the moat over the first ditch, and on  the parapet with our colors. Colonel Barton was wounded, Lieut. Col. Green (of Troy, N. Y.) killed while driving his knife into a Secesh gun; Gen, Strong wounded—but on they come to the slaughter! Our men are in close action, and two bayonets were run through a rebel colonel who boldly came out in the night endeavoring to rally his men to "Glory," as he remarked. Private Burnett, of Co. K, took the rebel's sword and brought it from the battle-ground. Now was the "tug of war." The Ninth Maine played on us the same trick that they had previously done on the same ground with the 76th Pennsylvania. It seems hard to go back on any regiment that has anything to do in this war, but so very important to us was the capture of Fort Wagner—so plainly was it to be seen that it involved nothing less than the fall of Charleston—that any regiment which failed to support a storming party already grasping the prize, should receive the worst of censure. Our men were being taken prisoners, and in turn we were taking them. It was a hand-to-hand fight. I was taken prisoner and escaped the same night. On my way back, a shell from Sumter exploded, probably within two or three feet of my face, and from that instant I have not been able to write until to-day (July 29th)—not knowing anything until the next day, about eleven o'clock, when I was brought off the battleground by two privates of another regiment, who, in the excitement of the hour, took me to be a rebel. The One Hundredth New York, by some mistake, fired into our regiment, doing much injury to the 48th. Glass bottles, nails, hand grenades, grape and canister, explosive bullets, buckshot and small pigeon shot, were used against us; and it can be proved that chain-shot was used—a piece being brought off by our men. South Carolina will break the law of nations, and break her own neck.
In closing, I must add that but few of the old 48th (Perry) Volunteers are now left. It was a short work of death. But the Rebels say the 48th did not fight like men but like tigers, and also that no short contest since the war has equaled [sic] the desperate charge on the night of the 18th of July at Fort Wagner. We found that the fort was arched, also caves, and holes in the earth, entrenchments and ditches all filled with the enemy waiting for us. There were sand heaps of great thickness, Palmetto logs, cotton bales, iron, and being regularly casemated will take much, very much of navy power to reduce it. Could the regiments but have had light to see, and working harmoniously, the fort would have been ours, but so strong a place as it is, and dark as was the night, it is no wonder that so large a number were killen [sic] and wounded. By this time you probably have a list of the killed and wounded. I have not time to send them here, but that our Brooklyn frends [sic] may know something of the twelve day's work, with three fights put in for variety I would be glad to have this noticed in your valuable daily.
WILL WATKINS.

WOUNDED.—Among the wounded and missing in the 100th N. Y. Regiment in the last attack on Fort Wagner, we notice the name of 1st Lieut. John McMann, of this city, formerly an employe [sic] at the Penitentiary. Also Corporal Dressing and privates Lawrence, Callahan, Viborn, Munaner, Mathews, and McGuire, of the same company—C. A number of men were recruited here by Lieut. McMann for the 100th, but whether any of these were among the number we cannot say.

FROM CHARLESTON.
The Second Attack on Fort Wagner.
A BLOODY NIGHT ASSAULT.
Repulse of the Federal Column.
Tribune Correspondence
Morris Island, S. C., July 19, 1863.
Again Fort Wagner has been assaulted, and again we have been repulsed, and with, I regret to say, a much more formidable loss in killed, wounded and missing, then in the first attempt.
Since the engagement of the 11th, Gen. Gillmore has strained every nerve to strengthen his position on Morris Island, and so far as human foresight can discern, has made his lines of defense impregnable before advancing to the attack.
Gen. Gillmore designed to commence the bombardment of the fort at daylight yesterday morning, but on account of a terrific thunder-storm, which commenced, early in the evening and continued until morning, delaying the work of the engineers and dampening the ammunition, the action did not open until half-past 12. At that hour Admiral Dahlgren signaled [sic] that he was ready, and in a few moments the Montauk (his flagship), the Ironsides, the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Weekawken and the Patapsco moved into line in the order in which I have named them, and commenced hurling their heaviest shot and shell around, upon and within the fort, and, with intervals of but a very few minutes, continued this terrible fire until one hour after the sun had gone down. During all the afternoon the iron fleet lay about one mile off from the fort, but just at the close of the engagement, and but a few moments before the first assault was made by Gen. Strong, the Admiral ran the Montauk directly under the guns of Fort Wagner and within 280 yards, fired round after round from his 15-inch gun, sending, as every shot struck, vast clouds of sand, mud and timber high up into the air, making one huge sand-heap of that portion of the fort facing the sea, and discounting two of the heaviest guns.
Deserters and prisoners tell us that Fort Wager mounts thirteen rifled guns of heavy caliber, but during all this furious bombardment by land and sea, she condescended to reply with but two; one upon the whole fleet of iron-clads and one upon the entire line of land batteries. She may possibly have fired one shot to our one hundred, but I think even that number is a large estimate. There were no casualties on the Monitors and Ironsides, and but one man killed and one slightly wounded within the batteries. The firing was almost entirely from our own side. With the most powerful glass, but, very few men could be seen in the fort. At half-past two, a shot from one of our guns on the left, cut the halyards on the flagstaff and brought the rebel flag fluttering to the ground.
In a moment, almost before we had begun to ask ourselves whether they had really lowered their flag, and were upon the point of surrendering or not, the old red battle flag, which the Army of the Potomac has so often and defiantly shaken in its face, was run up about ten feet above the parapet, a little cluster of men rallied around it, cheered, waved their hats, and then disappeared, and were not again seen during the day. Fort Sumter, the moment the rebel flag came to the ground, sent a shot over our heads to assure us that it had been lowered by accident and not by design. In this shot she also desired us to distinctly understand that before Fort Wagner surrendered, she herself would have to be consulted. With the exception of this little episode almost profound silence, so far as the rebel garrison themselves could maintain it, prevailed within the fort. A heavy cloud of smoke and sand, occasioned by our constantly exploding shell, hung over the fort all the afternoon, and it was only when the wind drifted it away that we were able to see the amount of damage we had done. In a few hours what had been the smooth regular lines of the engineer, and the beautiful sodded [sic] embankments, became rugged and irregular heaps of sand with great gaps and chasms in all sides of the fort exposed to our fire. From my point of observation, a wooden look-out, fifty feet high, erected for Gen. Gilmore and staff upon a sand hill of about the same height, and situated a short distance back of the batteries, it seemed as if no human being could live beneath so terrible a fire whether protected by bomb-proofs or not, and in this opinion I was fully sustained by nearly every person around me. There seemed to be but one opinion, and that was that we had silenced nearly every gun, that the 15-inch shells had driven the rebels from the bomb-proofs, and that if there had been a strong infantry force in the rear of the fort we had made it impossible for them to remain there and had slaughtered them by hundreds. But there were a few later developments that proved their opinion was the correct one, who said this profound silence on the rebel side was significant, not of defeat and disaster, but of ultimate success in repulsing our assault.
For eight hours the monitors and the iron sides have kept up a continuous fire, and Fort Wagner has not yet surrendered. For eight hours fifty-four guns from the land batteries have hurled their shot and shell within her walls, and still she flaunts the red battle flag in our face.
In a few moments signals are made from the top of the lookout, and soon generals and colonels commanding divisions and brigades were seen galloping to the headquarters of the commanding general. A few words in consultation and Gens. Seymour, Strong, Stevenson, and Cols. Putnam and Montgomery are seen hastening back to their respective commands. Officers shout, bugles sound, the word of command is given, and soon the soldiers around, upon and under the sand hills of Morris Island spring from their hiding places, fall into line, march to the beach, are organized into new brigades, and in solid column stand ready to move to the deadly assault.
Not in widely extended battle line, with cavalry and artillery at supporting distances, but in solid regimental column, on the hard ocean beach, for half a mile before reaching the fort, in plain sight of the enemy, did these three brigades move to their appointed work.
Gen. Strong, who has so frequently since his arrival in this Department, braved death in its many forms of attack, was assigned to the command of the 1st Brigade. Colonel Putnam, of the 7th New Hampshire, who, although of the regular army, and considered one of the best officers in the department, had never led his men into battle nor been under fire, took command of the 2d, and Gen. Stevenson the 3d, constituting the reserve. The 54th Massachusetts (colored regiment), Col. Shaw, was the advanced regiment in the 1st Brigade, and the 2d South Carolina (negro), Col. Montgomery, was the last regiment of the reserve. The selection of the 54th Massachusetts to lead the charge was undoubtedly made on account of the  good fighting qualities it had displayed a few days before on James Island, an account count of which you have in my letter of the 17th.
Just as darkness began to close in upon the scene of the afternoon and the evening, General Strong rode to the front and ordered his ... (colored regiment), the 6th Conn., Col. Chat-field, the 48th N. Y., Col. Barton, the 3d N. H., Col. Jackson, the 76th Penn., and the 9th Maine, Col. Emery, to advance to the assault. At the instant, the line was seen slowly advancing in the dusk toward the fort, and before a double-quick had been ordered, a tremendous fire from the barbette guns on Fort Sumter, from the batteries on Cummings Point, and from all the guns on Fort Wagner, opened upon it. The guns from Wagner swept the beach, and those from Sumter and Cummings Point enfiladed on the left. In the midst of this terrible shower of shot and shell they pushed their way, reached the fort, portions of the 54th Mass., the 6th Conn., and the 48th N. Y., dashed through the ditches, gained the parapet, and engaged in a hand-to-hand fight with the enemy, and for nearly half an hour held their ground, and did not tall back until nearly every commissioned officer was shot down.
As on the morning of the assault of the 11th instant, these brave men were exposed to a most galling fire of grape and canister, from howitzers, raking the ditches from the bastions of fort, from hand grenades, and from almost every other modern implement of warfare. The rebels fought with the utmost desperation, and so did the larger portion of Gen. Strong's brigade, as long as there was an officer to command it.
When the brigade made the assault Gen. Strong gallantly rode at its head. When it fell back, broken, torn and bleeding Major Plimpton, of the 3d New Hampshire was the highest commissioned officer to command it. Gen. Strong, Col. Shaw, Col. Chatfield, Col. Barton, Col. Green, Col. Jackson, all had fallen.
The 54th Massachusetts, (negro,) whom Copperhead officers would have called cowardly if they had stormed and carried the gates of hell, went boldly into battle, for the second time, commanded by their brave Colonel, but came out of it led by no higher officer than the boy, Lieut. Higginson.
The 1st Brigade, under the lead of Gen. Strong, failed to take the fort. It was now the turn of Col. Putnam, commanding the 2d Brigade, composed of the 7th New Hampshire, the 32d Ohio, Col. Steele, the 67th Ohio, Col, Vorhees, and the 100th New York, Col. Danely, to make the attempt. But alas! the task was too much for him. Through the same terrible fire he led his men to, over and into the fort, and for an hour held one-half of it, fighting every moment of that time with the utmost desperation, and, as with the 1st Brigade, it was not until he himself fell killed, and nearly all his officers wounded, and no re-inforcements [sic] coming, that his men fell back, and the rebel shout and cheer of victory was heard above the roar of Sumter and guns from Cumming's Point.
In this second assault by Colonel Putnam's brigade, Colonel Turner of General Gillmore's staff, stood at the side of Colonel Putnam when he fell, and with his voice and sword, urged on the thinned ranks to the final charge. But it was too late. The 3d brigade, Gen. Stevenson's, was not on hand. It was madness for the 2d to remain longer under so deadly a fire, and the thought of surrendering in a body to the enemy could not for a moment be entertained. To fight their way back to the intrenchments was all that could be done, and in this retreat many a poor fellow fell, never to rise again.
Without a doubt, many of our men fell from our own fire. The darkness was so intense, the ... loud, the flight of grape and ... rapid and destructive, that it was absolutely impossible to preserve order In the ranks of individual companies, to say nothing of the regiments.
More than half the time that we were in the fort, the fight was simply a hand to hand one, as the wounds received by many clearly indicate. Some have sword-thrusts, some are hacked on the head, some are stabbed with bayonets, and a few were knocked down with the butt-end of muskets, but recovered in time to get away with swollen heads. There was terrible fighting to get into the fort, and terrible fighting to get out of it. The cowardly stood no better chance for their lives than the fearless. Even if they surrendered, the shell of Sumter were thickly falling around them in the darkness, and, as prisoners, they could not he safe, until victory, decisive and unquestioned, rested with one or the other belligerent.
In this night assault, and from its commencement to its close, General Gilmore, his staff, and his volunteer aids, consisting of Col. Littlefield, of the 4th S. C., and Majors Bannister and Stryker, of the Paymaster's Department, were constantly under lire and doing all in their power to sustain the courage of the troops and urge reinforcements. All that human power could do to carry this formidable earthwork seems to have been done. No one would have imagined in the morning that so fierce a cannonade from both the navy and the batteries on shore could fail to destroy every bomb-proof the rebels had erected. But the moment our men touched the parapets of the fort, 1,300 strong streamed from their safe hiding place, where they had been concealed during the day, and fresh and strong, were prepared to drive us back. We then found to our sorrow that the 15-inch shot from the monitors, even when fired at a distance of but 1,080 yards, had not injured them in the least. Only the parapets of the fort had been knocked into sand heaps.

American and Gazette.
Correspondence of North American and U. S. Gazette.
The Combats at Charleston.
FOLLY ISLAND, S. C., July 13, 1863.
General Gillmore was sent into this department to take Fort Sumter. Being an engineer officer of great reputation in the regular army, and having proved his abilities in the capture of Pulaski, none better than he could have been selected for the herculean task. From the very day of his arrival he set to work planning the reduction of the rebel stronghold. Morris and James Islands—the latter the scene of our defeat in June of last year—were both in the possession of the enemy, and only Folly and Cove Islands were held by us. James Island was almost encircled with formidable rifle pits, while Morris Island, with its Cummings Point battery, Fort Wagner, and heavy earthworks commanding the north end of Folly, presented an almost insuperable barrier to any approach toward the coveted fortress. Nevertheless, over Morris Island it was determined to pass. Light-House creek, a little stream about two hundred yards wide, alone separated us from the batteries on this island. Folly Island, at its extreme north point, has a natural sand bluff some twelve feet high, behind which, since June 16th, our boys, by night, have been erecting mortars and heavy rifled guns, until about fifty pieces were in position. Without the slightest ... not a rattle of a chain, not the creak of a wheel ... the enemy lying in wait so near of our de...
At another point on Folly Island a small rifle-pit had been made which com... the little village of Secessionville, about ... miles distant. The General himself sighted a few days ago one of the guns mounted thereon, and it sent a shell into their midst, visibly causing a great scattering of the rebels. Under cover of the darkness, for two weeks past all the artillery and infantry in the department have been hurried forward with great rapidity, and landed on the south end of Folly. Regiments on Folly and Edisto Islands were placed on transports in daylight and sent to sea. At midnight they returned and landed again on Folly Island. The northern press of the 7th inst. intimated that all the troops were to be sent to reinforce Banks, and to carry ... this impression and deceive the rebel leaders these movements were executed. The monitors having been thoroughly repaired, lay off the bar awaiting orders to co-operate with the land forces. On the morning of the 9th inst. the 6th Connecticut, Colonel Chatfield, made a secret reconnoissance, and reported all well. About the same time a rebel lieutenant, who had been promised a "leave of absence" if he would ascertain the number of troops on Cove Island, was taken by our pickets, and his "leave" from daily duty at Charleston was granted by order of General Gillmore. From his conversation and that of deserters from their lines, we all thought, and truly, too, that the rebels were not apprised of our intended advance. All day Thursday Gens. Gillmore, Terry, Seymour and Strong could be seen intent on preparations for the coming contest. Surf boats, batteaux, scows and rafts, in fact, anything that would carry men, were hastily collected and secreted in the bushes. Secret expeditions up the numerous creeks were fitted out and dispatched. The most formidable of these, embracing three brigades, and commanded by General Terry, was ordered to proceed up Stono river and attack "Old Battery," on James Island, effect a landing and skirmish over the country between the fort and Secessionville. By this movement it was hoped to direct the attention of the rebels from Folly Island. At 6 o'clock the division started, the Pawnee taking the lead, followed successively by the Nantucket, McDonald, a mortar schooner and fifteen transports. As Gen. Gillmore, in his flagship, Mary Benton, steamed through the fleet, a more animated and glorious military display never was witnessed. The soldiers and sailors, in jubilant spirits, cheered lustily. The rain which had been falling at intervals all day ceased, and a most beautiful rainbow spanned the heavens. We accepted it as a sign of success, and kept up good hope and courage. At 7 o'clock evening, only one hour from the starting of the expedition, the Pawnee fired the first gun and opened the scene, the closing act of which shall be the capture of Charleston. The ruse succeeded well; rebel troops from the forts in the harbor, and especially from Morris Island, were sent in all haste to repel invaders. At midnight the expedition in boats started from headquarters, under command of General Strong. It consisted of the 6th and 7th Connecticut, 3d New Hampshire, 76th Pennsylvania, 48th New York, and Enfans Perdus, of New York regiments. Silently they embarked in the launches, and lay off the point of Folly Island until daybreak. At a quarter to five on the morning of the following day, the 10th inst., the concealed batteries on the northern point of Folly Island opened a terrific cannonade with forty-eight pieces, and woke the rebel sleepers on the opposite shore. The monitors having crossed the bar, joined in the cannonade. For three hours the firing was continued with great rapidity on both sides. General Gillmore, from the lookout and signal station, witnessed the entire bombardment, and the earnest workings of his countenance betrayed at the same time the excitement under which he labored and his certainty of ultimate success. At a few moments before eight he descended with "Its all right, boys," and to horse his entire staff went and galloped rapidly up the beach to the batteries, as the rebels were just sending their farewell messages across the channel. General Strong's division, heretofore secreted, then rowed to the opposite, and with a double quick leaped the rebel sand-batteries, as the graybacks were making tracks up the beach towards Fort Wagner. They left their entire camp equipage and valuables to the advancing forces. Our men took possession of the earthworks, and pushed on rapidly up the shore, driving them out of all the cordon of batteries up to the very ditch which surrounds Fort Wagner. We took at this point over one hundred prisoners, including three captains, three surgeons, and four lieutenants, one badly wounded. As they arrived under guard to the quarters of the Provost Marshal, and saw the old flag waving over the "White House," they cheered it with apparent loyal feeling. They all belonged either to the 1st South Carolina Artillery, a conscript regiment, or the 22d South Carolina Volunteers. A number of deserters into our lines for six months past have belonged to this artillery, and being mostly Irish and Germans, they had no heart in the work to which they were forced. All day we took prisoners, finding many secreting themselves in the bushes until the arrival of our forces. The dead and dying lay in heaps in the trenches, a ghastly spectacle. We had but few casualties. One man was killed and two severely wounded by the premature discharge of a gun in our rifle-pits. Several were wounded by the fire of their sharpshooters as we scaled their works. With such an important point taken, it seems singular that we suffered so little. But their guns were manned by three companies of South Carolina artillery, the infantry and a portion of the artillerists having been sent to James Island to attack Gen. Terry. Through all the heat, and it was intense, every man fought and labored with all the energy he possessed. On Saturday morning a force pushed forward and drew the fire of Fort Wagner. An attempt was made to scale the earthworks, but the force not being sufficiently strong, we withdrew with some loss. All day the monitors fired, but without effect, save the preventing of attempted reinforcing of Wagner. On Sunday the navy continued the target practice, and up to this hour they have yet, to redeem the promise made of taking the stronghold. Had we this, Sumter must yield in a few hours. The troops are in high spirits, and another week will bring down the rebel banners which flaunt so defiantly at us from every side of the memorable fort. U. S. A.

MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., July 22, 1863.
At twp o'clock on the morning of the 15th inst., we were all aroused by an attack upon our advance picket post. The 12th Georgia Battalion led in the attack, with the intention of feeling the works which we have for some days been constructing. They were unable, however, to reach the position, and were driven back with loss. We took three prisoners, all of whom were strongly "secesh." During the afternoon the Ironsides passed successfully over the bar, and took a position in the attacking fleet. At four o'clock on Thursday morning we were again aroused by heavy firing on James Island. The rebels, reinforced by the 6th and 24th Georgia regiments, parts of Jackson's old corps, made an attempt to out-flank General Terry's Division. The Pawnee, on Stono river, a mortar schooner, and the McDonald, on Lighthouse Inlet, came up to the fight, and by the brave fighting of Terry's men, the enemy were totally routed. The Pawnee received forty-eight shots, but they did not damage her iron-plating. The rebels were driven from their batteries, and the little town of Secessionville was abandoned. We lost but few men, and these mostly of the 54th Mass., a negro regiment, which behaved in the most soldierlike manner, in this their first fight with the enemy. The rebels must have been punished heavily, as our fire was very accurate and rapid. Throughout the entire day the monitors and mortar vessels kept up a continual shelling, the former always making richoche shots, which went directly into battery Wagner. The fort did not reply to them, but, as on last Monday, they continued shelling the camps of the generals and their staffs. The sea-face of Sumter is now well covered with cotton bales, to resist the fire of our artillery. The most terrible of southern storms raged during the night, and the expected attack on Wagner had to be postponed until the next day, On Friday the first contrabands began to come within our lines, reporting the rebels as engaged in erecting additional earthworks on forts Wagner and Johnson; that Beauregard had returned to Charleston with troops; that starvation was raging in that city and the army was on half rations. During last night Terry's division returned to Folly Island to take part in the expected attack on Wagner. About an hour before sunset our batteries opened fire on the fort to obtain the range. An hour later the island was quiet, and not a sound aroused us until daybreak. At that hour the booming of the heavy guns awoke us, our earth-works had been exposed, and the whizzing shot and shell called us "to the front." A steady firing continued until 12 1/2 o'clock, when the monitors took positon [sic], the Montauk, with the pennant of the Admiral at her foremast, in the lead. Directly behind her the Ironsides lay in all her massive proportions. The Catskill, Nantucket, Weehawken and Nahant followed successively. A booming shot from the Montauk opened the grand attack, and it was answered from the shore by a salvo of the wide-mouthed war-dogs of the army. The Ironsides fired rapidly and with great execution. The parapets fell here and there, leaving wide gorges which failed to protect the rebel foe. Sweeping across the pavement of the fort, it produced a like result on the embankments on the opposite side. The number and calibre of our ordnance we are not at liberty to state, but sufficient it was to keep shell bursting the whole afternoon within the battery. Timbers flew and guns were dismounted by the heavy artillery of the land and naval forces. Wagner replied but little. On the side opening on the beach the guns could not be used, as a company of our sharpshooters put a bullet into every man who attempted to fire the same. At 2 1/2 P. M. the flagstaff of Wagner was carried away by a shot from the Montauk, and the rebel emblem fell in the dust. It was soon raised again on a stick, and planted on the parapet, the South Carolina battle-flag being placed alongside of it. Occasionally Sumter would open her heavy guns, especially the one they took from the sunken Keokuk, and fire at our batteries, but without doing any material damage. A little after three the flag was lowered on Sumter, for some reason I know not, but after fifteen minutes was again raised to its place. The barbette guns, as usual, were the only ones fired from the fort. It is doubtful if they have casemate guns in position. The fire was continued on our part with great fury until sunset, but elicited only an occasional reply from Wagner. About 7 o'clock a storming party was organized and under arms on the beach directly in the rear of our earthworks. It consisted of the 54th Massachusetts (negro) regiment, 6th Connecticut, 48th New York, 3d New Hampshire, 62d and 67th Ohio, 100th New York and 7th New Hampshire volunteers. The attacking column was under command of General Strong, and the supporting column under General Seymour. A heavy reserve force, the numbers of which we will forbear to mention, were all in position to support the advance. As the General commanding and his staff rode along the line, the shot and shell burst furiously on all sides. The long leaps of flame, as they shot forth in the darkness from the guns of the Ironsides, was grand beyond comparison. The order was given to advance. and the negroes, with a courage unsurpassed, ran quickly toward the battery. Just then a thousand muskets from hidden marksmen shot murderous lead over the parapet, and killed file after file of the foremost assailants. Battery Wagner, Fort Gregg, known as Cumming's Point Battery, and the double mortar battery between Wagner and Fort Gregg, with Sumter, opened their shot, shell, grape and canister upon our advancing forces. Steadily, however, they pushed on in the darkness, alike unknowing friend or foe. Down into the muddy ditch and up the parapet the troops rushed. The standard of the 54th Massachusets [sic] was seized by three rebels, but the color-sergeant killed one, and hastily pulling the colors from the pole, he bore them on in triumph. The 100th New York planted their flag amid the dying on the top of the parapet. It was a fearful scene. In the darkness of night, thousands battles with thousands, and the loss on both sides was terrible. None who saw or participated in the bloody assault will ever forget that midnight hand to hand conflict. The configuration of the battery was peculiar. A fort with flanking angles, one towards the beach, and a ravelin or additional projection on the land side. Between this ravelin, which we held for some time, and the battery proper, a high parapet and ditch extended, covered by guns belching forth grape upon our men. A concentric fire was thus made through which no living man could pass. The southern flanking angle we also took and for an hour and a half retained in our possession. This position, like other, was seemingly disconnected with the fort, for the only mode of transit was a bomb proof under ground. Down these hidden passages secesh had kept themselves concealed from harm all day. We could go no farther. But three hundred men were able to enter the position, no reinforcements could withstand the terrible cross fire from the double shotted guns, and slowly and in good order we abandoned our ground and fell back to the advance pickets. The ignorance of the position, power, &c., of the battery, the concealment of their force in rat holes all day, and only exposing it when necessary, and above all, the terrible darkness of the  night, robbed us of success. Our loss was heavy, and the enemy no doubt suffered greatly. Generals Strong and Seymour and Chatfield were wounded, Colonels Green and ... killed. ... contributed to our failure. Our leaders were gone, the master mind to direct the mighty force was wanting in the darkness. The horrors of that night none can depict. The scenes in the hospital who would care to describe. It was a dismal night for all, and glad were we to see the Sabbath morning light. It was ... a day of rest. Nothing but what the se... demanded was required of any soldier. In the afternoon gangs of negroes could be seen throwing up sand on the battered parapets of Wagner. At 10 o'clock in the evening an attack was made upon our pickets, but the rebels were driven back with loss, and our lines were advanced some one hundred yards. A blockade runner attempted to get into the city, but a shot from the Ironsides fired her, and she was entirely consumed. On Monday, the 20th, we could distinctly see batteries being erected on James Island by the rebels, which will command our position. The gunboats and mortar schooners kept up the attack all day with but little intermission. On Tuesday the rebels sent up a little balloon to observe our movements. It remained up about a half hour and descended into Fort Johnson. Future movements of our troops cannot be foreseen. We will be in Sumter before many days. U.S.A.

THE 100TH REGIMENT AND COL. DANDY.—A correspondent of the Express with the 100th, has the following in regard to the gallant conduct of the regiment. We are pleased also to publish so warm an encomium of its Colonel, concerning whom in the past not good words altogether have been spoken:—
It (the battle of the 18th,) was a most disastrous affair, but I am glad to say that Buffalo has again reason to be proud of her sons in the 100th. The men behaved admirably; in the face of the most galling fire they advanced in line of battle on double quick, crossing ditches and fences, and up the walls of the fort, but it is no wonder they done so. How can men behave otherwise who have got a leader like Colonel Dandy? He was one of the first on the top of the walls, cheering on the regiment, and he stood there side of the only flag that was fetched up so far—the Buffalo Board of Trade flag—until all the rest of the regiments gave wav when we had to fall back. Every man in the 100th used the expression: "Col. Dandy is a brick."
The 100th has again covered itself with glory, but this time, as at Fair Oaks, its laurels have been dearly bought. We trust its ranks will speedily be filled up again, by conscription or otherwise, and that it may be made, notwithstanding its terrible losses, to outlast the war in which if has played so glorious a part.

RESTORED TO RANK.—Captain Charles E. Morse of the 100th Regiment, after months of vexatious delay, has been restored to his rank by the War Department, it having been proven to the entire satisfaction of the Judge Advocate General and the Secretary of War, that the charges upon which his dismissal was based, were groundless. His many friends will be pleased to learn that his reputation as an officer has thus far been completely vindicated. Captain Morse is now engaged in recruiting a company for the Sprague Light Cavalry.
Capt. Morse was formerly connected with the Buffalo Press. He is a ready writer and has many fine qualities as a soldier and a gentleman. We are pleased to record his restoration to his former rank.

ARMY CORRESPONDENCE—FROM THE 100th REGIMENT.
FOLLY ISLAND, June 25, 1863.
DEAR EXPRESS:—We have had a change of Generals—of course you know it—and now we have got a real old worker. He is stirring things up tremendously. That "something" which was "going to be did" all the spring, and was finally deferred on account of the hot weather coming on, is at last a definite thing, a tangible "something."
To use the words of an officer of Engineers, high in authority, "before two weeks are over, Morris Island will be paved with shot and shell."
Old fogy Generals have been playing off here long enough. Their day has been and gone, and if the prospects of this week are realized, events will culminate that will startle those who have so long considered that inactivity was doomed to reign forever in this department. The General formerly in charge of the Island had erected earth-works and planted his heaviest guns at the south end of the Island, and pointing towards the ocean. Gillmore came and inspected. He opened his mouth and passed judgment, thus: "You have got a splendid plan of fortifications here, General. I suppose," hesitating and looking dubiously, "I suppose you have got the Island on a pivot, so that when Johnny Reb uses up one end you can turn this round onto them!"
The answer of the Gen. deponent knoweth not. Gen. Gillmore immediately set men to work on morter pits, earthworks and battlements for siege guns. Nine hundred men are working nightly within five hundred yards of the rebel batteries on Morris Island.
You needn't be afraid to publish this, as they will be unmasked before this reaches you.
A company of rebs came over on the island last night. They scouted round a little, and came within a stone's throw of our fatigue men, who paid no attention to them, but kept on working silently, carefully watching them, though, in the meanwhile. Every man might have been captured, but the game was too small to expose ourselves for.
We were shelled occasionally last week, and a few men of the Ohio regiments were killed and wounded. One officer, negro, had his head shot clean off.
Deserters from Secessionville come into our lines daily. They are obliged to swim two rivers, ford creeks, and work through salt marshes the whole distance. The most of the marshes are of such depth and consistency, that it was impossible to move except by laying down and pulling themselves forward by grasping ahead the swamp grass. The boys gave them soft bread, coffee and butter, the first they had eaten in fifteen months. They seemed surprised at the kindness, and were overpowered with emotions of joy. The tears rolled down their cheeks, and with choked utterance said: "Could the rebel army be assured of such treatment, one-half would desert at the first opportunity." Two of the first lot were avowed Unionists from Tennessee. They laid four months in jail in a cell next to Parson Brrownlow.  Thumbscrews were applied four hours a day, to cure them of loyal proclivities and to force them to enlist, which they at first refused to do.
They one and all tell the same story: That when we landed on Cole's Island fifteen hundred men might have marched directly, and without opposition, into Charleston.
They assert positively, that at the bombardment, Sumter was on the eve of surrender. She was already signalled [sic] to do so, and could not hold out thirty minutes longer. Breaches were made in its walls large enough to drive a cart through, and it is so racked that it is now feared it cannot stand the concussion from its own guns.
During the last hour of the bombardment the inhabitants were notified to leave the city. They were deserting it like rats from a sinking ship. They affirm the astonishment of the Charlestonians as unbounded when they saw our monitors leaving the harbor.
The rebel soldiers are deluded and buoyed up with false reports and lies of the most unmitigated character. They were gravely told that the Yankees were cleared out of Folly Island and sixty of them taken prisoners. Two of the deserters actually got passes to Charleston for the purpose of seeing them, there learning that we still held possession, they resolved to "come into the Union." They declared that the whole company would follow, but are "too chicken hearted " to brave the march.
Capt. Paine is earning an enviable reputation as the Yankee scout. He is doing invaluable aid to the service.
Lieut. Col. Otis, the loved "father of the regiment," has offered his resignation and been accepted. God knows every line officer and man in the command will miss him. The time may come when many things will be righted. Till then,
Yours, truly, Co. H.

Re-Appointed.—Enrico Fardella, who commanded the 101st regiment, when it first went into service, was last week appointed Colonel of the 85th N. Y. Volunteers.
DELIA S. AUSTIN, Asst. Sec'y.

DEATH OF LIEUTENANT SMITH.—Lieut. Rodney B. Smith, of Company H, 100th regiment, New York Volunteers, who fell on the 29th day of June 1862, during the seven days' fight before Richmond, was the fifth son of E. B. Smith, of Smith's Mills Chatauqua county, N. Y. Lieut. Smith early took a deep interest in the support of the government, and under the second call of the President for volunteers his noble spirit prompted him to respond to the call and to offer his services to his country, and he accordingly enlisted in the month of October, 1861, as a private in the 9th Cavalry, a regiment then being formed in his native county.
He at once became a great favorite with both officers and men, and was appointed Orderly Sergent [sic] of a company, which position he filled with great credit up to the time of his promotion as First Lieutenant in company H, 100th regiment N. Y. S. V., with commission bearing date October 29, 1861.
Lieut. Smith joined his company at the rendezvous of the regiment at Camp Morgan, Buffalo, N. Y., Nov. 10th following, and remained on duty with his regiment up to the time of his death.
He was a fine officer, generous and brave and a great favorite with all who knew him. He took part in all the affairs, skirmishes and battles in which his regiment was engaged on the Peninsula up to the 29th of June, 1862—among which may be mentioned—siege of Yorktown, battle of Lee's Mills, Williamsburg, Bottom's Bridge and Fair Oaks, where he fought with great coolness and bravery, leading the left of his company in a bayonet charge. In this battle May 31, 1862, he most miraculously escaped, receiving a severe bruise from a 12 pound solid shot which carried away the heel and sole of his boot.
On the 29th day of June he sealed his devotion to his country in offering up his life in its defense. Lieut. Rodney B. Smith, Jr., was born in Smith's Mills, Chautauqua County, N. Y., on the 29th day of October, 1839, and fell before Richmond on the 29th day of June, 1862, at the age of 22 years. His father, R. B. Smith, was a soldier in the war of 1812.

FROM CHARLESTON.
The Attack Still Going On.
GENERAL GILMORE'S SIEGE GUNS WITHIN ONE THOUSAND YARDS OF FORT WAGNER.
By the arrival of the United States gunboat Paul Jones, and the hospital steamer Cosmopolitan, at New York, we have news from Charleston harbor to the 26th instant, five days later than previous accounts.
The Paul Jones, under command of Lieut. John S. Barnes, left our naval and military forces still engaged in the siege of Fort Wagner. Everything was going on favorably. Gen. Gilmore had succeeded in erecting a battery of heavy siege guns, each weighing twenty tons, within one thousand yards of Port Wagner.
Fort Sumter and Fort Johnston, on James Island, kept up a continual fire on the Federal forces on Morris Island, but with little effect, our casualties averaging only about six a day.
We also hear by the arrival of the steamer George C. Collins, Capt. Lunt, which vessel passed Charleston harbor at ten o'clock on Saturday night (25th), that at that time the heavy bombardment could be plainly seen and
heard.
The army under Gen. Gilmore was full of confidence, and expected the early capture of Fort Wagner.

THE SIEGE TRAIN.
Gen. Gilmore has been busily engaged in training several heavy guns on Fort Sumter. This is no pastime, as the enemy are constantly shelling the engineers and soldiers. He had succeeded in making a disturbance on one of the parapets; showing what he could do when he was ready. So far he has only had 30-pounders; but he has received several Parrott guns, of 203 pounds, which will enable him to make a demonstration for which the Rebels are not looking. Reinforcements have also arrived.

THE REBEL PRISONERS.
The Rebel prisoners have little heart in the matter. They complain of bad fare. "We have to subsist," said they, "on corn bread and water, and we cannot fight on that. But our officers live well enough." Our soldiers find this to be correct. They found, when they first occupied Morris Island, quantity of chickens and other delicacies which had been reserved for the use of the officers; showing that if they were not Sybarites in their luxury, they were certainly epicures.
The Rebel officers were excessively exasperated at being attacked by the Massachusetts Fifty-fourth. "We are gentlemen," said they, "and here you are sending against us your niggers to pollute our soil." On being asked for the body of Colonel Shaw, the reply was that "he had been buried along with his niggers." It appears probable that they will fail of being conciliated; for Gen. Gilmore means to use the colored soldiers to the utmost advantage.
Offensive operations are now actively prosecuted. Charleston must be reduced, and every energy is to be strained to that end.

LATER.
NEW YORK July 30.
From passengers from the Cosmopolitan, it is learned that the principal guns of Fort Wagner have been silenced, leaving only howitzers for the Rebels to use.
Reinforcements are said to have reached Gen. Gilmore, besides several two and three hundred pounder Parrotts.
Offensive operations by Gen. Gilmore are being actively prosecuted.
Brig. Gen. Strong died this morning from wounds received at Fort Wagner.
The Tribune's Morris Island correspondence says:—Our loss in the late assault on Fort Wagner, according to the official report, is 1,517. The Rebels claim to have buried 650. This extraordinary proportion of killed would have only been reached by the indiscriminate slaughter of our wounded.
One hundred and eight of our wounded are still at Charleston and Columbia.
The officers and men of the 54th Massachusetts (colored) will not be given up to us, and unofficial reports say the negroes have been sold into slavery, and the officers treated with unmeasured abuse. In fact, all our wounded at Charleston have been treated most barbarously. Opportunities to amputate were eagerly seized upon by the Rebel surgeons, and it was performed in cases of the slightest gunshot wounds.
On the left, our batteries were advanced six hundred yards nearer Sumter on the 25th, and six 200-pounders placed in position.

ARRIVAL OF WOUNDED AT NEW YORK.
NEW YORK, July 30.
The steamer Cosmopolitan, from Beaufort 25th, arrived here this noon with 185 wounded from Gen. Gilmore's army. Several deaths occurred on the passage, including F. Iseman, of the 100th New York.
Among the passengers are Col. Vores, Lieut. Col. Commager, Capt. Crane, Lieuts. Steven, S. Whitmore and Parsons of the 67th Ohio, Col. Steele and Capt. West of the 23d Ohio, Col. Barton, Captains Elwing, Swartwout and Lockwood, Lieutenants Fox, Taylor, Miller and Barrett 48th New York; Maj. Nash and Lieut. Brown of the 100th New York, and others.
Eight hospitals had been established at Beaufort and the inhabitants are very attentive to the wounded.

REBEL ACCOUNTS.
The Charleston Courier says that the body of Col. Shaw, of the negro 54th Massachusetts regiment, was sent for during Sunday, 19th, but he had been buried in a pit, under a layer or two of his own dead negroes.

HEADQUARTERS DEP. S. C., GA. AND FLA.,
CHARLESTON, S. C., July 18, 1863.
While the Commanding General regrets that the enemy have succeeded in effecting a landing upon Morris Island, he acknowledges with satisfaction the conduct of the troops in their brave and prolonged resistance against a force largely their superior in number, and he is especially gratified by the spirit and success with which the garrison of Battery Wagner and the troops under Colonel Graham repelled the assaults on that fortification, as it gives the assurance that he can rely upon the conduct and courage of both officers and men to check the progress of the enemy.
By command of Gen. BEAUREGARD.
THOMAS JORDAN, Chief of Staff.

Additional from Charleston.
Correspondence of the Herald of July 24th.
A FLAG OF TRUCE BOAT.
Early this morning the hospital steamer Cosmopolitan, under charge of Surgeon R. H. Bontecon, left Hilton Head, with thirty-nine wounded Rebel prisoners and five surgeons, to take them into Charleston harbor for exchange, according to an agreement made by Surgeon Craven and Lieutenant Colonel Hall on our part, and Gen. Heygood on the part of the enemy.
The expedition was in charge of Lieutenant Colonel James F. Hall, Provost Marshal General and Dr. J. J. Craven, chief medical officer. Lieutenant Colonel Hall went aboard from Morris Island, and at ten o'clock the Cosmopolitan went into Charleston harbor.

APPEARANCE OF THE REBELS WITH A BLOCKADE RUNNER.
As the Cosmopolitan steamed in, with a white flag at her fore and a yellow one at her main—all the guns on both sides having ceased firing—the Rebels were descried approaching the point of meeting in the steamer Alice. She proved to be a blockade runner which had run in through our fleet with another steamer within a week, escaping the fate of another English steamer, which was sunk less than a week ago by our Ironsides.
The Alice is Clyde built, a propeller, with two smokestacks, and is a fine steamer, commanded by an English captain. Her cargo was still on board, and fresh bananas were ostentatiously displayed on her deck, with portions of her freight.

THE MEETING.
The Rebel steamer came down past Fort Sumter to a point near Fort Wagner and anchored. The Cosmopolitan dropped alongside and a plank was thrown across, when Dr. Craven stated the object of the visit in formal terms. Col. Anderson acceded to the proposition for an immediate transfer, and it was at once made.

CARE OF OUR WOUNDED.
Bishop Lynch, of Charleston—he of the Bishop Hughes controversy ... on the Alice, and all our wounded speak ... the highest terms of his kindness to them ...also of the attentions of the Sisters of Mercy.

FIREMEN'S STRETCHER CORPS.
A delegation from the Charleston Fire Department, headed by Chief Engineer Mathews, had charge of the removal of the wounded, and did their duty well.

THE COSMOPOLITAN
left at about two o'clock for Hilton Head, and the Rebel steamer went up the harbor. Just before leaving Dr. Craven threw a large piece of ice on the deck of the Alice, throwing the Rebels into ecstacies of joy, and causing looks of satisfaction even on the faces of the dignified Rebel officers.

THE REBEL HOSPITAL ARRANGEMENTS.
I believe it is generally admitted that the Rebels took as good care of our wounded as of their own at Charleston; but they are sadly deficient in surgeons, if that is the case. Many limbs of our soldiers were amputated without the slightest necessity, and in a most awkward way, clumsy enough to do discredit to an ordinary carpenter. Many have died from operations whose original wounds, unattended, would hardly have caused death. The Rebels admit that they are very short of competent surgeons and of hospital stores and medicine. Glad enough were our wounded ones on the Cosmopolitan to get back here.

The Siege of Charleston.
A Second Assault on Fort Wagner on the l8th.
Repulse of Gillmore's Forces.
Desperate Bravery of the Assaulting Party.
THE INTERIOR OF THE FORT GAINED, BUT NOT HELD.
Our Loss About 1,500 Killed, Wounded and Missing.
The United States steam transport Arago, Henry A. Gadsden, commanding, from Port Royal, S. C., at 10.30 A. M., and Charleston Bar at 5 P. M., on Thursday, July 23, arrived at New York Sunday.
The intelligence by the Arago confirms the telegrams already published from rebel sources, respecting the second assault upon Fort Wagner, on Morris Island, by Gen. Gilmore's forces and the monitors, mortar schooners and gunboats under Admiral Dahlgren.
After the first unsuccessful assault on the 10th instant, Gen. Gilmore lost no time in throwing up batteries on Morris Island, within 800 yards of Fort Wagner, in order to reduce it by siege. On the morning of the 18th, twelve or fifteen heavy guns were in position, beside eight or ten mortars. Gen. Gilmore, therefore, determined to commence the attack, which was opened at 11 o'clock A. M.
The bombardment was conducted in a spirited manner, Gilmore's batteries initiating the work, and Admiral Dahlgren's five monitors, the Ironsides, two mortar schooners and three wooden gunboats, quickly joining in the engagement.
 The enemy replied briskly from Fort Wagner and Battery Bee, just beyond the Cumming's Point, while Fort Sumter kept up a sharp fire from the guns of her southwestern face, among which were two rifled pieces of heavy calibre. Most of the fire of the rebels was directed upon the monitors and other naval vessels, only an occasional shell being sent towards the batteries. Although the iron-clads were repeatedly struck, they suffered very little real damage, and the only losses in the batteries were a Lieutenant of the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania regiment, who was killed by a chance shot, and the wounding of six of the gunners.
Soon after 4 o'clock the firing from Fort Wagner ceased. It was then known that our brave fellows had succeeded in dismounting one gun, and it was also pretty well ascertained that another of the rebel pieces had burst. These facts led to the supposition that the enemy had evacuated the work, and it was determined to attempt its occupation. For this purpose two brigades, consisting of the Seventh Connecticut regiment, the Third New Hampshire, the Ninth Maine, the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, and the Forty-eighth New York, under Brig. Gen. Strong, and the Seventh New Hampshire, Sixth Connecticut, Sixty-second Ohio, One Hundredth New York and Fifty-fourth
Massachusetts, colored, under Col. Putnam, who had been under arms all day, screened from the enemy behind a range of sand hills, in the rear of our works, were ordered forward.
This was at dusk, and both brigades were formed into line on the beach, the regiments being disposed in columns, excepting the colored regiment, which for some reason was given the post of extreme honor and of danger in the advance, and was drawn up in line of battle, exposing its full front to the enemy. This movement of the troops was observed by Sumter, and fire was at once opened upon them, happily without doing injury, as the shells went over the heads of the men.
Gen. Strong's brigade under this fire moved along the beach at slow time for about three-quarters of a mile, when the men were ordered to lie down. In this position they remained half an hour, Sumter meanwhile being joined in the cannonade by the rebels in Battery Bee, but without effect upon our troops. It was now quite dark, and the order was given for both brigades to advance, Gen. Strong's leading and Col. Putnam's within supporting distance. The troops went forward at quick time and in deep silence, until the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, led by its gallant Col. Shaw, was within two hundred yards of the work, when the men gave a fierce yell and rushed up the glacis, closely followed by the other regiments of the brigade.
The enemy, hitherto silent as the grave, while our men were swarming over the glacis, opened upon them furiously with grape, cannister, and a continuous fusilade of small arms.
The gallant negroes, however, plunged on regardless of this murderous reception, and many of them crossed the ditch, although it contained four feet of water, gaining the parapet. They were dislodged, however, in a few minutes, with hand grenades; and retired helter skelter, leaving more than one-half of their number, including their brave colonel, dead upon the field. The Sixth Connecticut Regiment, under Lieut. Col. Rodman, was next in support of the Fifty-fourth, and they also suffered terribly, being compelled to retire after a stubborn contest. The Ninth Maine, which was next in line, was broken up by the passage of the remnant of the repulsed colored regiment through its lines, and retired in confusion, excepting three companies, which nobly stood their ground.
It now devolved upon the Third New Hampshire regiment to push forward, and led by Gen. Strong and Col. Jackson in person, the gallant fellows dashed up against the Fort. Three companies actually gained the ditch, and wading through the water found shelter against the embankment. Here was the critical point of the assault, and the Second brigade, which should have been up and ready to support their comrades of the First, were unaccountably delayed. Gen. Strong then gave the order to fall back and lie down on the glacis, which was obeyed without confusion.
It was while waiting here, exposed to the heavy fire, that Gen. Strong was wounded. A fragment of shell entered his thigh, passing entirely through the fleshy part and making a serious wound, although the bone escaped fracture.
The breast of Col. Jackson's coat was torn off at the same time by a piece of shell, slightly wounding him. Neither of these brave men would lie down to escape the rain of metal, but stood unflinchingly throughout, eliciting the unbounded admiration of their men. Finding that the supports did not come, Gen. Strong gave the order for his brigade to retire, and the men left the field in perfect order.
A little while afterwards the other brigades came up, and made up for their apparent tardiness by glorious deeds of valor. Rushing impetuously up the glacis, undeterred by the fury of the enemy, whose fire was not remitted for a second, several of the regiments succeeded in crossing the ditch, scaling the parapet and descending into the fort. Here a hand-to-hand conflict ensued. Our men fought with desperation, and were able to drive the enemy from one side of the work to seek shelter between the traverses, while they held possession for something more than an hour. This unparalleled piece of gallantry was unfortunately of no advantage. The enemy rallied, and, having received large reinforcements, made a charge on the band of heroes, and expelled them from their nobly-won position by sheer force of numbers. One of the regiments engaged in this brilliant dash was the Forty-eighth New York, Col. Barton, and it came out almost decimated. The most distressing part of its disastrous treatment is that the enemy did not inflict the damage. It was the result of a mistake on the part of one of our own regiments. The Forty-eighth was among the first to enter the fort, and was fired upon by a regiment that gained the parapet some minutes later, under the supposition that it was the enemy.
About midnight the order was given to retire, and our men fell back to the rifle-pits outside of our own works, having engaged in as hotly contested a battle as has ever been fought.
Our casualties, as may reasonably be expected, were very large. 'The list of killed, wounded and missing foots up fifteen hundred and thirty.
Among the killed are Col. Putnam, of the Seventh New-Hampshire; Col. Shaw, of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts; Lieut.-Col. Green, of the Forty-eighth New-York; Adjutant Libby, of the Third New-Hampshire.
Gen. Seymour was wounded in the foot, while directing movements in the field.
Col. Barton, of the Forty-eighth New-York, was wounded in the thigh by a ball, which flattened against the bone.
Lieut.-Col. Rodman, of the Sixth Connecticut, was seriously wounded.
Lieut.-Col. Bedell, of the Third New-Hampshire, was taken prisoner.
The day after the fight, the steamers Cosmopolitan and Mary Benton were dispatched to Hilton Head with the wounded, and every house in Beaufort is now occupied as a hospital.
Our dead were buried on Monday, at least that portion of them that were on the field within the limits that our burying party was allowed to approach the rebel works. Those who fell on the glacis and the ditch were interred by the enemy.
Individual instances of heroism during contest were numerous. Among others mentioned that the color-bearer of the fourth Massachusetts stood nobly upon the ... with his flag, endeavoring to rally the men, and finding the task useless, he walked to the rear, still holding the flag aloft with remarkable deliberation, regardless altogether of the fearful fire.
The siege has hot been suspended. Operations are still in progress, which Gen. Gillmore is sanguine will result in success.

From Morris Island.
From yesterday's N. Y. Tribune.
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., Aug. 1, 1863.
Since the assault of the 18th but little has been done of any special interest to a public craving battles and bloody encounters, the demolition of the most formidable fortress on the Atlantic coast, and the capture of the most accursed of all the cities in the Rebel Confederacy.
But although no battles have been fought and no assaults made, with long and harrowing lists of killed and wounded to scan and scrutinize, the 10th and 18th Army Corps have not been idle, but by day and night, through the hot hours of mid-day and the still watches of night, have been working with unabated energy and determination, and have flagged and faltered only when utter physical exhaustion and disability compelled them to leave the field.
I venture to say that the troops in this department have performed more severe labor under great difficulties since Gen. Gilmore assumed command than those of any other department in the country. Of the kind and the amount of labor, it would not be proper for me, at this stage, to speak. But results within a few weeks will show for themselves, and then we may enter upon details without the least fear of jeopardizing the success of the campaign. For public encouragement it will not be improper to say that the position we now hold upon this island has been made so strong by skillful engineering that no force the Rebels can possibly bring against it can weaken, impair, or by prolonged and obstinate fighting, drive us from. Fifty thousand men might possibly overwhelm us, if they could find room to stand upon; but the strip of territory now held by the rebels on the island is so contracted that not one-tenth of that number could be concentrated upon it, and not one-twentieth could be massed for an assault upon the only natural line of approach still left to them.
While standing upon the defensive, therefore, our position may be considered impregnable. When ready again to assume the offensive nothing will be able to resist us, and the fall of Wagner, Sumter and Charleston, in turn, may be, as I have in another letter remarked, considered simply questions of time. But if we are active, and are working by day and night with almost superhuman energy, the rebels in full sight, under the blaze of the same hot sun, and beneath the light of the same night moon, are throwing up entrenchment after entrenchment upon James Island, strengthening the gorge wall of Fort Sumter and the small tanks of Fort Gregg, and in every conceivable way endeavoring to make their own position impregnable.
Capt. Paine, of the New York Vol. Engineers, (Capt. L. S. Payne of the 100th regiment,) made, alone, a night reconnossance of the works upon James Island, and reports embrasures for twelve guns already erected, with one gun mounted. This one gun has already been brought to bear upon our batteries on the left, but has, thus far, inflicted no further injury than the frightening of several horses engaged in drawing ammunition. It should be understood, however, that all this ceaseless activity on both sides is under fire more or less hot and dangerous. Yesterday a puff of smoke rose from the one gun on James Island, the soldiers at work in our own battery on the left unfortunately it struck directly behind the embankment and covered the whole party five feet deep in the sand. They were all dug out in a few moments, uninjured, so far as their bones were concerned, but considerably in want of breath and fresh air.
This shot from the rebel gun having proved so good a one, one of our own artillerists, seeing a soldier standing upon the earthwork of the same rebel battery, wheeled up a small Wiard gun into position, took aim, and in an instant sent his body flying twenty feet into the air. Better firing could not have been made by the most practical sharpshooter.
As many false reports with regard to the conduct of the 54th Massachusetts, (negro) Col. Shaw, are being made by the Copperhead officers who, to serve the rebels, have obtained commissions in our own army, which will appear, if they have not already, in the Copperhead journals of the North. I trust a further allusion to the action of this regiment in the assault of the 18th, will not be out of place or inopportune.
It will be remembered the 54th held the right in the storming column, led by General Strong, commanding the 1st brigade. The regiment went into action six hundred and fifty strong, and came out with a loss of two hundred and eighty privates and officers, being over one-third of the whole number.—Among the officers the proportion is much larger. Of twenty-three who went into action but eight came out uninjured. The regiment marched up in column by wings; the first was under command of Col. Shaw in person, the second under Major Halliwell. When about one thousand yards from the fort the enemy opened upon them with shot, shell, and cannister, which kept flying through their ranks incessantly, and wounding many of their best officers. But still they pressed on through this storm of shot and shell, and faltered not, but cheered and shouted as they advanced.
When about 100 yards from the fort the rebel musketry opened with such terrible effect that for an instant the first battalion hesitated—but only for an instant, for Col. Shaw, springing to the front and waving his sword, shouted, "Forward, my brave boys!" and with another cheer and a shout they rushed through the ditch, gained the parapet on the right, and were soon engaged in a hand to hand conflict with the enemy. Colonel Shaw was one of the first to scale the walls. He stood erect to urge forward his men, and while shouting to them to press on, and fell dead into the fort. His body was found with twenty of his men lying dead around him, two lying on his own body. In the morning they were all buried together in the same pit. The first battalion, after losing nearly all their officers, were compelled to fall back, and the second came forward and took its place, and held the position until it, too,  lost all its officers, Major Halliwell falling severely wounded.
Capt. Appleton then attempted to rally all that was left of both battalions, but was compelled to give way.
Sergeant-Major Lewis H. Douglass, a son of Fred. Douglass, by both white and negro troops is said to have displayed great courage and calmness, was one of the first to mount the parapet, and with his powerful voice shouted: "Come on, boys, and fight for God and Gov. Andrew," and with this battle-cry led them into the fort.
But above all, the color-bearer deserves more than a passing notice. Sergt. John Wall of Co. G. carried the flag in the first battalion, and when near the fort he fell into a deep ditch, and called upon his guard to help him out.—They could not stop for that, but Sergt. William H. Carney of Co. C caught the colors, carried them foreward [sic], and was the first man to plant the Stars and Stripes upon Fort Wagner. As he saw the men falling back, himself severely wounded in the breast, he brought the colors off, creeping on his knees, pressing his wound with one hand and with the other holding up the emblem of freedom. The moment he was seen crawling into the hospital with the flag still in his possession, his wounded companions, both black and white, rose from the straw upon which they were lying and cheered him until exhausted they could shout no longer. In response to this reception the brave and wounded standard-bearer said: "Boys, I but did my duty: the dear old flag never touched the ground."
After the main body of the regiment had been killed, wounded, or driven back, Capt. Amelio, together with Lieuts. Green, Dexter and Tucker, rallied one hundred men and held a position near the fort until 1 o'clock in the morning, when they were relieved by the 10th Connecticut, by order of Gen. Stimson. But even then they did not retire to the rear, but remained in the front and brought off a great number of wounded, who would otherwise have fallen into the hands of the enemy.
The Ironsides and Monitors are still over the bar, and lying abreast of Fort Wagner. Shots are fired at intervals of half an hour every day, but beyond throwing clouds of sand into the air, but little damage is done to formidable earthwork.
The iron-clad fleet is slowly increasing. We shall soon outnumber the original one with which Dupont attacked Sumter.
Admiral Dahlgren seems inclined to pursue a more cautious policy than his predecessors, but whether he will gain anything by it, time alone will determine.
He has already consumed an enormous amount of ammunition at a very long range, but with what benefit to the national cause we, upon the land, are at a loss to know. Fewer shots at shorter distances would be much more effective. It is true that at a distance of from one and a half to two miles there is but little danger of the Monitors being hit; but it is also true that Forts Wagner and Sumter are almost in as little danger from destruction. Close fighting by land or by sea, with a strong probability that both vessels and men will be more or less smashed and tattered, will alone reduce these strongholds.
Admiral Du Pont made the bravest naval fight on record, and if he had prolonged it for two or three hours, would undoubtedly have reduced the fort. But he withdrew too soon. Du Pont damaged his monitors, and also damaged Sumter, if we can believe rebel accounts. Dahlgren has not damaged his monitors, and I have yet to learn that he has damaged anything else.
In addition to soldiers and negroes at work in the trenches, we have to-day been re-enforced by a small army of sutlers, whom our watchful Provost-Marshal-General, Lieut.-Col. Hall, discovered could be more profitably employed under fire, with spade and pickax in hand, than in dispensing poisonous liquors to the troops, in defiance of very rigid general orders to the contrary. Several of these enterprising gentlemen are working sixteen hours a day, and alternately relieving white and negro soldiers in the most fatiguing labors of the campaign.
Col. Hall deserves the thanks of all lovers of good order and discipline, for thus summarily punishing these army pests. The sutlers in this department as a class are above the average of those in the Northern armies, and generally honest men, and are of value to the army; but a few scoundrels have crept in, and the trenches, with shot and shell from Sumter and Wagner bursting around them, is the best place to teach them to reflect upon their evil deeds.

RESTORED TO RANK.—Captain Charles E. Morse of the 100 Regiment, after months of vexatious delay, has been restored to his rank by the War Department, it having been proven to the entire satisfaction of the Judge Advocate General and the Secretary of War, that the charges upon which his dismissal was based were groundless. His many friends will be pleased to learn that his reputation as an officer has thus been completely vindicated. Captain Morse is now engaged in recruiting a company for the Syracuse Light Cavalry.

THE OFFICERS OF THE GALLANT 100TH.—The Charleston correspondence of our New York exchanges come to us fraught with most gratifying accounts of the gallant conduct of the officers of our 100th regiment in the attack on Fort Wagner. The correspondent of the Tribune says: "Major Nash, of the 100th New York, was shot through the thigh with a Minie ball on the night of the 18th. His colors were planted on Fort Wagner. There were 425 men in the regiment at the time of the assault; about 200 of them were killed, wounded and missing. Out of 18 officers, 10 were killed and wounded. After lying under fire for awhile, Major Nash limped off the field, using his sword as a cane.
Col. George B. Dandy, of the same regiment, seems to bear a charmed life, for he passed through that fearful storm of fire and iron hail, waved his sword on the parapet, and urged his men into the works, until the forces fell back, when he collected his men and marched back uninjured."
The World's correspondent writes: "It is not improper now to mention the distinguished services of one of the most skillful scouts our army affords—Capt. L. S. Paine, of the 100th New York. He scouted all around Morris Island before we took it, and landed in several places. He seems to have a faculty of knowing just where all pickets and troops are, and his life is evidently charmed, for he has been fired on many times, at very short range. He has command of all our picket lines."

WOUNDED FROM THE 100TH REGIMENT ARRIVED AT NEW YORK.—We find in the N. Y. Tribune the following list of the wounded from the 100th regiment, on board of U. S. hospital ship Cosmopolitan, which arrived at New York Friday morning. The only member of the regiment who died during the passage from Hilton Head was T. Iseman, Co. F, shot in thigh.
Maj. Nash, left thigh; Lt. Cyrus Brown, E, leg amputated; 2d Lt. L. Brown, E, right leg; M. McGuire, C, right arm and thigh; M. Weeks, K, right arm; J. Klenberg, F, leg; C. Wolenvent, K, ankle; Corp. T. J. Buff_m, K, right leg; W. C. Barthran, F, thumb; F. Mains, F, left foot; J. L. Scoleagel, F, breast; Wm. Fetterling, K, left arm; Corp. August Hurley, F, left thigh; F. Fiseman, F; Corp. W. H. Lacey, K; P. Retsirt, K; Corp. E. N. Hay, C; Serg. P. Lynch, E; M. Sheahan, H; T. F. Hoover, C; G. O. Lodgel, G; J. Klemberg, F; J. Leonard, G; D. Welty, D; A. F. White, K; Corp. A. Ruchhausen, C; W, J. Bromber, F.
Major Nash did not die from the effects of his wounds, as reported. He arrived in the city Saturday, on his way to Springville, where his family resides.

THE 100TH REGIMENT.—Captain ___ is in receipt of a letter from the 100th Regiment, from which we are permitted to make the following extracts:
"We have almost all of Morris Island. We have made three charges upon Fort Wagner, and have failed each time. It is bomb proof all round. That taken and Charleston is ours. Our regiment went in with parts of seven companies, and were terribly cut up. Col. Dandy, unhurt; Maj. Nash, wounded in leg; Adjt. Hadduck, one leg off and not expected to live;
Lieut. Cyrus Brown, both legs off—since dead; Lieut. Cavanaugh, one leg off—since dead; Capt. Granger, wounded in four places and sent to Hilton Head; Lieut. Runcle, Co. H, one leg off—since dead. Only 12 men of Co. H went in—the rest on fatigue duty. Orderly Geo. N. Clark, killed; McMann, wounded. Capt. Evarts and Lieut. Howell were all of the line that came out unhurt. Now if the government want Charleston ...

THE 100TH REGIMENT IN THE SEIGE OF FORT WAGNER—LETTER FROM A SOLDIER.
MORRIS ISLAND, July 21st, 1863.
MY DEAR FATHER:—I suppose you will have heard, ere this reaches you, that we have had an engagement, and no doubt the papers will state that I am slightly wounded in the knee. Nevertheless, I will write a few lines to let you know that I am well, with the exception … and drawers, but not breaking the skin or drawing blood.
Could you have seen the 100th Regiment a week ago and then looked at its ranks last Sunday, you would not wonder at the sorrow now depicted on the countenances of both officers and men. I take a few extracts from my diary. I told you in my last that we should certainly have a fight in forty-eight hours. Sure enough, it came.
July 10th.—Our batteries on the head of Foley Island opened a brisk fire at 4:45 A. M. The monitors commenced running in and soon engaged Cummings Point. We rapidly gained advantage over the Rebs, and about 8 o'clock our troops commenced crossing. We soon drove them from their works and took some prisoners with very little loss on our side. We advanced about half way up the Island, where we lay during the day, the monitors still playing on Fort Wagner. We turned one of the Reb's guns on to them until we used up all the ammunition they left. All quiet during the night. The next morning 6th Connecticut got repulsed in a charge on Fort Wagner, owing to the cowardice of the 9th Maine, which was to support them. The latter broke and skedaddled, leaving the 6th boys to get out as well they could.
I will skip the intervening time from the 10th to the 18th. Suffice it to say of this period that we picketed, skirmished and fortified under a continual shelling from the Rebs, which was replied to by the gunboats. On the 18th some five or six men were wounded by a bursting shell while on picket.
Now comes tug of war. July 18th, at daylight we fell back from the picket line to the rifle pits. The Rebs commenced shelling as soon as they could see. Our gunboats answered pretty fast. About the middle of the forenoon our batteries opened and the ironclads commenced moving up, and at 11:55 the first shot was fired from the iron fleet. The wooden blockaders kept up a smart fire at long range.
Fort Moultrie kept almost perfect silence through the day. The bombardment continued from land and water until about 5 o'clock, when the fort appeared to have been silenced. Then the column commenced to move up to storm the fort. Sumter shelled the troops as they advanced until we got within close range of Wagner, when the rebs poured in a murderous fire of grape, cannister and musketry, besides throwing hand grenades. Regiment after regiment charged on the fort, each one retreating in good order in their turn, except the 9th Maine which broke and run in a confused mass through the lines of the 6th Connecticut, the 4th New Hampshire and 100th New York. The 54th Massachussetts [sic] (colored) led the charge and did well, with the exception of a few panic-stricken-fellows. Not more than half of any regiment in the charge came out unhurt. We had about 4000 in the open field with no artillery, against 1500 behind breastworks and in pits. Darkness also was in their favor, it being dark when the fight commenced. It lasted about three hours.
Our retreating, battle-worn and wounded troops were fired into and cut down by our own drunken artillery, the 1st U. S. and 3d Rhode Island, who answered to the groans of the wounded with, "Go to the front, you cowardly dogs, or we will blow your brains out!" Our Regiment went in with about 500 enlisted men and 15 officers. The next Sunday morning, the assembly was beat to ascertain our loss. All we could muster was 225 men and five officers. Co. C. lost 31 men and two officers, one of which has since turned up. The only one in our company you would be likely to hear an enquiry for, is Wm. Matthew. He was clerk in Millington Brother's store. He has not been heard of since the fight, and is undoubtedly dead. Tell H. G. White, if he has not heard about Bob Kink, of Co. G., that he was shot through the lungs, and died next morning.—We expect another fight in a few days.
W. H. MASON.

WOUNDED AT FORT WAGNER.—The following from the New York World of Saturday will be read with interest in our city. The young hero referred to is a son of Mr. Chas. H. Barthauer, of this city, and is extensively known to our citizens: "Among the heroes of the 100th N. Y. Vols., who charged up to the parapet of Fort Wagner, on the 28th of July, and fell disabled at the threshold of victory, was a young soldier named Wm. C. ____ of Buffalo, N. Y. ...

… for a better aim, his piece was knocked from his hand by a musket ball, which severed the thumb of his left hand. At almost the same instant a grape shot struck his right leg above the knee, and tearing a fearful wound through its whole upper length and passed out at the thigh. Fainting with hemorrhage, in terrible pain, and liable at any moment to be struck again, he managed to roll over into a ditch plowed by a cannon ball, where he lay for some moments weltering in blood. A shell suddenly exploded near by. One of the fragments striking the leg of the unfortunate soldier, ripped off the fleshy portion of the calf nearly to the knee.
"The retreat of our forces commenced soon afterward, but young Barthauer's condition was so critical that it was not deemed best to remove him. He lay alone with his agony till morning, when the enemy picked him up and carried him behind their works. Not until five days afterward, when conveyed to the hospital at Charleston, did he receive surgical treatment. He was finally transferred to a United States hospital-ship, which sailed for New York about two weeks ago. He has lain at Fort Schuyler ever since, and though suffering from such a succession of injuries as rarely befal [sic] a soldier, he expresses himself not only willing but anxious to return to the field at the earliest practicable moment. When he does return we trust it may be as an officer among comrades whom he has nobly earned the privilege of commanding."

LIEUT. MCMANN AND HIS MEN.—A letter from Col. Dandy, of the 100th N. Y., to G. S. Hazard, Esq., of Buffalo, gives a full list of killed, wounded and missing in that regiment in the assault on Fort Wagner on the night of July 18th. The following is the list in Co. C. Lieut. McMann and several of the soldiers in that company are from Rochester and vicinity. The Lieutenant has been reported wounded and missing heretofore, but we infer that he must have been brought in:
1st Lieut. John McMann, wounded, face, severely; 2d Lieut. Michael Friday, head, slightly; 1st Sergt. B. F. Hughson, thigh, severely; Corps. Irving Sirbold, neck, severely; Ezra N. Hoag, leg, severely; Charles Reardon, hand, slightly; Donald McKay, slightly; Henry Dressing, missing; privates Michael McGuire, wounded; Geo Kilborne, died of wounds; L.Callahan, missing; Wm. Matthews, missing; Pat. Corcoran, thigh, severely; Jas. Langmeynr, thigh, severely; George W. Izdell, arm, severely; Fred. Luckman, died of wounds; James McKeever, head, slightly; Aug. Ranchansen, ankle, slightly; Wm. L. Walls, arm, slightly; Geo. J. Webb, left ear, slightly; John W. Whafles, head, badly; ____ Campbell, head, slightly; Richard ____, ...., slightly; Henry Maithe, thigh, slightly; ___, slightly; Andrew Alorey, head, ...; ___, hand, slightly; Conrad Litt, killed; ___, head, slightly.

COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER.
Saturday Evening, August 1, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
LETTER FROM THE 100TH.—The following letter was written by the Chaplain of the 100th. We omit the list of killed and wounded, as it is the same as that heretofore published by us:
CAMP 100TH REGIMENT, N. Y. V.,
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., July 21, 1863.
Enclosed please find a list of the killed, wounded and missing of our regiment in the charge made by our forces, on the evening of the 18th, upon Fort Wager. You will see how badly we have suffered. There has been no engagement during the war in which troops have been subjected to as heavy a fire as our men at that time. The result was that we were repelled and most terribly slaughtered. But the 100th did most nobly, planting their colors upon the rebel ramparts. The Color-bearer was killed in the attempt, as also the Corporal of the Color Guard. The colors were borne off by Corporal Spooner, of the Color Guard, who deserves great credit in so doing. The Adjutant … parts. The last order given him by the Colonel was to take care of the colors, and he doubtless did his duty. Five of our officers are missing, two of whom fell mortally wounded. Four, including the Major, were brought from the field slightly wounded. Our loss was heavy from the number of men who went into action, as Co. I, Capt. Brunck; the greater part of Co. D, Capt. Payne; and Co. I, Lieut. Lynch, were not engaged, they being on detailed service at the south end of the Island. It is almost impossible to get a correct list of our loss, as the rebels had possession of the field and would not allow us to come on to look for our dead and wounded. Many of those reported missing are doubtless killed and others missing.
Our wounded have all been sent to Hilton Head and Beaufort. I am today going there to look after them, and shall probably find among them some of those reported missing.
I have no time to write more—shall give you further particulars tomorrow. Some regiments lost almost every officer they had. We had only three unharmed of those who went into action.
The following is a recapitulation of our casualties:
JULY 18TH, AT THE CHARGE ON FORT WAGNER.
Killed.             7
Wounded.   101
Missing        67
                   175
JULY 12TH, IN RIFLE PIT.
Wounded       6
Total loss   181

From Charleston,
NEW YORK, July 30.
The steamer Cosmopolitan from Beaufort, July 25th, arrived here this noon with 185 wounded from Gen. Gilmore's army. Several deaths occurred on the passage, including F. Iseman of the 100th N. Y.

WOUNDED OF THE 100TH COME NORTH.—The following wounded men of the 100th came to New York by the steamer Cosmopolitan on Thursday:—M. McGuire, Co. C, right arm and thigh; M. Weeks, Co. K, right arm; J. Klenberg, Co. F, leg; C. Wolenvent, Co. K, ankle; Corp. T. J. Buffem, Co. K, right leg; W. C. Barthauer Co. F, thumb; F. Mains, Co. F, left foot; J. L. Scoleagel, Co. F. breast; William Fetterling, Co. K, left arm; Corp. August Hurley, Co. F, left thight [sic]; F. Eisman, Co. F, died on passage home; Lieut. Brown, Co. E, right leg; Corporal W. H. Lacey, Co. K; W. J. Bromber, Co. F; T. F. Hoover, Co. C; G. O. Lodgel, Co. G; J. Leonard, Co. G; D. Welty, Co. D; A. F. White, Co. K; Corp. A. Ruchhausen, Co. C; P. Retsirt, Co. K; Corp. E. N. Hay, Co. C; Sergeant P. Lynch, Co. F; M. Sheahan, Co. H.

[Next article in German]

THE 100th REGIMENT AT THE SIEGE OF FORT WAGNER.—The correspondent of the New York Herald furnishes the following list of casualties in the 100th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers, at the siege of Fort Wagner, Morris Island:

KILLED.
Sergeant Charles L. Handers, Co. A.
Private Conrad Site, Co. E.
Corporal Charles Dayton, Co. E.
Private Frederick Sheffer, Co. F.
Sergeant John L. Hegel, Co. F.
Private Victor Reeksih, Co. F.
Sergeant Robert Kuk, Co. G.

WOUNDED.
Major D. D. Nash, wounded in left leg, slightly.
COMPANY A—First Sergeant Byron Ruston, severely in three places;  Sergeant James L. Gaylard, left arm, slightly; Corporal Nicholas Shutt; privates S. L. Arnold, slightly in hand; John Beauchupt, John T. Teger, Peter Kelly, Wallace Starkweather.
Corporal William Gerrick, severely, in jaw; private Abram L. Wood, slightly, in hand; musician Meush, slightly, in arm.
Company C—Second Lieut. Michael Friday, slightly, in hand; first Sergeant Benj. F. Hugson, severely, in thigh; Corporal Quincy A. Lebord, severely, in larnyx; Ezra N. Hoag, severely, in leg; Chas. Reaidon, slightly, in hand; Geo. W. Isdell, severely, in arm; Geo. Longsmere, severely, in thigh; Fred Luckman, James McKeever, slightly, in hand; August Roehowen, severely, in ankle; Minane L. Waur, slightly, in arm; George J. Webb, slightly, in left ear; John W. Whaples, badly, in head; Daniel Campbell, slightly, in head; Richard Hughes, slightly, in foot; Henry Mathey, slightly, in thigh; Wm. H. Masey, slightly, in knee; Andrew Morey, slightly, in head: Richard Welch, slightly, in hand; John H. Williams, slightly, in head.
Company D—Corporal Wallace A. Tousley, severely, in side; privates W. E. Bates, slightly, in leg; Isaac T. Mussey and Henry Slidell, slightly; Hiram Ellis, severely, in shoulder.
Company E—Sergeant Pat Lynch, right shoulder, severely; Corporal W. H. Corey, left do; privates W. A. Austin and Luke Cassidy, slightly; Jonas Charleston; Lester Severey, slightly, in hand; Gilbert S. Pater and Ernest Phillips, slightly; Julius F. Skinner, Andrew Miller, severely.
Company F—Captain Charles H. Rauert, slightly, in right arm; Sergeant Grebler; Corporal Chas. Mangold, finger shot off; privates Wm. C. Barthave; John H. Brownley, August Fryer, H. C. Ellsworth, severely, in foot; John D. Garnin, C. Clummerliver, John L. Kleeberg, George Long, Charles Laly, Fred F. Main, C. Miller, C. Richarmer, Lewis Vanderlip, Robt. Younglove.
Company G—Sergeant George Morgan, severely, in shoulder; Corporal Lewis A. Whitney; privates Michael Baker, James P. Bailey, Andrew Ball, W. E. Brown, finger shot off; Ernest H. Freeman, Frank Hausted, Barney Hoister, John Savory, John Leonard, in arm; Alfred P. Willard, in leg.
Company H—Sergeant Paul Everts, Sergeant O. J. Emery, slightly in left leg; privates John Allen (Auen), left leg, badly; B. H. Dougherty, A. Garrosite, R. Henderson, M. Shehan, J. Smurphet, Thomas Wharton, F. Melvin.
Company K—Captain Warren Granger, slightly in neck; Sergeant Pratt, slightly, in arm; Frank Davy, severely, in body; Corporal Wm. H. Stacey, leg shot off; Henry H. Henslow; privates Robt. Abramhams, severely, in leg; James Allen, arm; Luther Daawson, John B. Handfast, Henry Kranser, Geo. Newland, Fred Noller, Philip Retzerl.

MISSING.
Adjutant H. H. Haddock, wounded.
Company A—Corporals Clark Dickerman and Justin Semur; private C. Sheeball.
Company B—Privates John Peresly and John Stintinann.
Company C—1st Lieutenant Jno. McMann, wounded; Corporal Henry Dressing; privates Lawrence Callohan, George Vilborn, Munaner, Matthews, Michael McGuire.
Company E—2d Lieutenant Cyrus Brown, wounded and supposed to be dead; Sergeant Chas. Pettis; privates Daniel Bryce, M. Brice.

HOW CAPT. PAINE OF THE 100TH REGIMENT WAS CAPTURED BY THE REBELS.
LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED.
The New South contains the following account of the capture of Captain Paine, of Tonawanda:
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., Aug. 13.
On Wednesday night last, while on an important scout, Capt. Paine, together with the detachment with him, was taken prisoner by the rebels, who caught him, it seems, in a tight place. The facts involved in the affair, according to the best version, are substantially as follows: He started out in a small boat, with a sergeant and eight men to go to the old wharf on Light House Greek, where the enemy had attempted to erect a battery, when we first came on the Island, and where the steamboat was disabled by Myrick's battery and afterwards burned by Captain Paine himself. A picket boat manned by a detachment from the 97th Pennsylvania accompanied Capt. Paine, to guard the water approaches to the wharf, from the rebel lines.
Capt. Paine reached the wharf in safety, and leaving his boat and crew at the end of the pier, he alone took a position on the dock, where he could observe the movement of the enemy and signal to our batteries, in case any rebel steamer attempted to communicate with Cumming's Point. He had been there quietly enough for nearly an hour, when he was summoned to surrender by a voice on the dock. To gain time he asked "what is that?" and started for his boat. The rebels, for so they proved to be, fired a volley at him, but not hitting him, and instantly a large party started in pursuit. Captain Paine jumped into his boat, and his men poured in a fire upon the advancing enemy.—One or two of them was hit, and the pursuit for the moment checked; but only for a moment, and they were then on Capt. Paine and his little party, before the latter could load their pieces. They fired at close range upon the boat and it was immediately surrendered. It is reported that Capt. Paine was shot down. The report is not incredible, but the authority upon which it was based, makes it proper to say that the evidence is not strong, that he did fall. He and his party were taken prisoners. That fact is unfortunate, unquestionable. The picket lying near fired upon the rebels, and received a fire in return that instantly killed two privates in the boat. The boat then escaped and came in to report the facts. The enemy had retired before supports could be sent out to flog them, and rescue the prisoners.
The following is a correct list of those lost in Capt. Paine's boat:—Capt. L. S. Paine, Sergt. Metzinger, and Privates O. Towns, L. Allen, P. Miller, F. Slattman, J. Shoph, G. B. Snyder, J. Goodman, Chas. Metzoff, all of Co. D, 100th N. Y., Col. Dandy. Killed in the 97th Penn., in the picket boat:—Joseph Russell and Joseph L. Eyre, Co. D.
The loss of Capt. Paine, at any time would be a serious one, but at this juncture it is greatly to be regretted. He was a brave, skillful and shrewd officer, and the very best scout in the Department.

LATER THROUGH REBEL SOURCES,
Washington, July 27.—The following extracts are from the Richmond DISPATCH of this morning:
Charleston, July 24—9 P. M.—The bombardment was renewed early this morning with rapid and continuous firing, until a flag of trace went down at nine o'clock.
The attack ... this evening, the enemy occasionally firing at Cumming's Point, and Sumter replying heavily. The firing is still going on. We sent down to the fleet to-day 105 caroled prisoners and received 40.
A physician just from Hilton Head says that 64 of our regulars took the oath of allegiance last Wednesday.
The casualties this morning were three killed and six wounded. Those which occurred this evening have not been heard from.

SECOND DISPATCH.
Charleston, July 25.—Regular firing from Fort Sumter and Battery Wagner at the Yankees on Morris Island was kept up all night, and continued all of to-day. The Yankees occasionally responded from their batteries on Morris Island. The Monitors and the Ironsides, lying outside, took no part. The Yankees have two batteries on Morris Island and have strengthened their position. No casualties are reported to-day. Another Monitor arrived to-day, making six in all.

THE CASUALTIES.
List of killed, wounded and missing in the 48th and 100th New York Regiments, at the attack on Morris Island, Charleston Harbor; alphabetically arranged:
48TH REGIMENT.
J. Amos, Co. A, wounded; F. Atwood, B; ... Abbott, Sergt., D, wd.; W. Andrews, Bugler, ...; R. Anderson, E, misg.; J. Allen, H, missg,; ... H, missg; A. S. Ackerly, K, wd. and missg.; ...
W. B. Barton, Colonel, wounded hip severely; P. Brady, A, missg.; J. Brady, A, wd.; Wm. Brown, B, wd.; Becker, C, missg.; L. Bond, C, wd.; Bondy, C,
wd.; Betts, C, wd.; D. Bassworth, D, missg.; J. B. Betchel, wd.; A. Bates, Capt., E, missg.; J. Burton, E, missg.; J. Brown, E, missg.; M. Bower, P. wd.; W. Burns, F, missg.; J. A. Barret, Lieut. H, wd. thigh; Brown, H, wd.; J. Brower, K, wd. and missg.; Bouton, K, wd, and missg.
T. B. Carman, Sergt., A, missg.; B. M. Cann, A, missg.; C. Cadmus, A, missg.; G. Carman, A, missg.; M. Coffee, A, missg.; John Coffee, A, missg.; John Curtis, A, missg.; M. Carrol, C, wd.; E. H. Croasdall, D, wd.; Cranner, Sergt., D, missg.; L. O. Churchill, D, missg.; D. Clifton, D, missg.; C. W. Cole, D, missg.; Geo. Cardner, E, missg.; Capt. Caswell, E, missg,; Ed. Coler, Sergt., H, wd.; Curtis, H, wd.; Clayton, Sergt,, H, missg.; Colwell, H, missg.; Church, H, missg.; Clarkson, H, missg.; M. B.Conckhn, K, missg. G. F. Concklin, K, missg.; F. Concklin, K, missg.
P. Dunegan, A, missing; J. R. Depen, Serg't, B, missg.: Daniel Dyckman, B, missg.; J. Donaghy, B, missg.; Dempsey, C, wd.; J. Dunn, E, color guard, wd.; Geo. Degameo, E, wd.; Dolan, E, missg.; Robt. Douglas, E, missg.; J. H. Deacon, F, wd.; H, Dlngee, wd. and missg.
R. L. Edwards, Lieut. C, killed; N. A. Ellfering, Capt., B, wd. leg; D.Emmons, D, wd.; A. Evans, E, wd.; A. Ellison, K, wd. and missg.
Chas. E. Fox, Lieut., A, missg.; Jas. Farrel, Capt. C, killed; Fenwick, C, missg,; F. Frankensburgh, sergt., wd. sevy.; J. F. Fosday, F, killed; W. H. Foley, F, killed; W. Farniss, F, wd.; Freeman, H, wd.; Ford, H, missg.
J. M. Green, Lieut.-Col., killed; J. Gardner, A, missg.; Gorman, C, wd.; J. Graham, D, wd.; F. Gillmore, E, missg.; Grooves, H, wd.; C. J. Gooney, K, wd. and missg.
J. Hall, A, wd.; J. Holahen, A, wd.; Alex. Hyes, B, missg.; Halton, B., wd.; Hisben, bugler, C, missg.; Chas. Harlinson, D, wd.; W. J. Howell, D, wd.; J. Hanna, E, wd.; Chas Haines, E, missg.; Wm. Hawkius, E, missg.; Hutchinson, 1st Sergt. F, wd.; J. A. Hyatt, F, missg.; W. B. Howard. F, missg.; A. Havuris, H, wd.; Hall, H, wd.: Hoff, H, missg.; Fred. Hurst, Capt. K, killed; A. Hillicker, K, wd. And missg.
T. Jones, D, wd,; Ed. Johnson, wd.; Johnson, K, sarg't, wd. and miss., Wm. Ilens, K, wd. and missg.; J. J. Johnson, K, wd. and missg.; H. Jewett, K, wd. L. Ketchum, A, miss.; Sam'l Kane, C, killed, King, C, missg., H. W. Kellog, F, miss.
H. Lienberg, A, miss.; J. Larkin, A, miss., J. Lewis, A, miss., Lord, C, miss., Levy, C, miss., Larkin, C, miss., A. Lippencott, D, sarg't., wd., J. D. Lodge, D, miss., L. E. Lyon, F, wd., M. Liemage, F, miss., W. S. Lockwood, H, Capt., wd., arm and shoulder, severely, W. W. Lyvester, H, wd., Chas. Lansing, H, wd., Lynch, H, wd., Laxy, H, wd., Lee, H, miss., J. Suniney, H, miss., T. Lowery, F, miss.
McCormick, A, miss., McKellan, A, serg't, wd., S. McCarty, A, wd., L. J. Mason, B, miss., Daniel Madden, B, miss., J. Milday, B, miss., T. McGarrey, B. wd., Wm. McCloud, B, wd., Rob't. Maxwell, B, wd., Marshall, C, miss., Wm. Mason, C, wd., T. Moore, D, wd., C. W. Mannuer, D, miss., A. Mason, D, miss., Geo. Morton, E, 1st Lieut., wd., W. T. Major, E, wd., W. J. Manly, E, wd., Chas. Messenger, E, wd., R. McNally, E, miss., J. Motteshed, E, wd., D. McMannus, F, wd., McFarland, F, wd., _. Murphy, F, miss., McLurcham, F, miss., McKay, H, wd., Miller, H, wd., Morton, H, miss., A. F. Miller, K, Lieut. wd. leg, Chas. Mills, K, wd. and miss., Jas. McPherson, K, wd. and miss., J. L. McKee, K, wd. and missing.
D. Nelson, A, missg.; P. Nolan, A, wd.; J. Nolan, A, wd.; Nesbit, A, missg.; M. Nolan, F, wd.; Nichols, H. missing.
Wm. J. Owen, B, missg.; J. O'Brien, C, wd.; Osbourne, C, wd.; Onderkirk, F, wd.; P. Ostrander, K, wd. and missing.
Jas. Paxton, D, Capt. wd. dang.; Peterson, 1st Sgt. wd.; L. Prim, D, wd.; A. Palmer, D, missg.; Fred. Post, E, wd.; Powers, H, wd.; Pease, H, missg.; Payne, H, missg.; Price, H, missg.
Carl Robricht, B, missg.; Ryan, C, wd.; D. B. Rumsey, E, wd.; J. B. Raynor, E, wd.; J. Ryan, F, wd.; Robins, F, missg.; Luke Rose, K, wd. and missg.
J. Smith. A, missg.; W. Smith, A, missg.; F. Summerford, A, wd.; P. Smith, A, wd.; J. H. Seilvers, B, missg,; Daniel B. Smith, B, missg.; J. Silcocks, B, missg.; P. W. Smith, B, Sergt. wd.; Chas. Scott, B, wd.; J. A. Smith, C, missg.; Sturges, C, missg.; Schultz, C, Sergt. wd.; J. Smith, C, wd.; M. Sullivan, C, wd.; J. Spear, D, wd.; E. Sonder, D, wd.; B. Stites, D, wd.; H. Smith, D, missg.; J. Sweeney, E, Sergt. wd.; C. Small, E, wd.; P. Smith, E, missg.; C. Smith, E, missg.; S. Swartirauk, F, killed; E. Sherridan, F, wd.; Sparks, Sergt, H, wd.; Stebings, H, missg.; St__gler, H, missg.; J. Smith, K, wd. and missg.; Benj. Seward, K, wd. and missg.; Wm. S. Scudder, K, wd. and miss.
Geo. Tuesdal, B, missing; Chas. Travis, B, wd.; J. Taylor, E, Lieut., killed in fort; F. Taylor, E, wd.; W. B. Tayior, E, miss.; W. Tuttle, F, wd.
Umbleboy, N, wd. badly.
Vredenling, A, miss.; J. Vauness, B, miss.; Thos. Vantassel, B, wd.; A. Viland, E, wd.; T. Vesey, E, miss.; J. Vaganek, K, miss.; Thos. Veiley, K, wd. And miss.; L. Wooheef, K, wd.; Wm, Vance, K, wd. And miss.; M. Vauerken, wd. and miss.
D. White, A, wd.; Wadhamalid, B, miss.; A. Weisart, B. wd.; Warner, B, wd.; S. White, D, wd.; Thos. Walters, E, wd.; E. Wakefield, E, wd.; R. C. Williams, F, miss.; H. Walling, H, wd.; Walling, H, miss.; Wilson, H, miss.; Witherspoon, K, wd. And missing.
J. Zerwick, D, wd.; J. Zerks, H, wd.: J. Zoraskey, H, missing.

100TH REGIMENT.
W. A. Austin, E, wd. slightly; J. Allen, H, wd. left leg badly; Robt. Abrams, K, wd. left leg severely; J, Allen, K, wd. left arm.
J. Beauchupt, A, wd.; W. E. Bates, D, wd. Leg slightly; Wm. C. Barthaven, F, wd. foot severely ; J. H. Brownly, F, wd. foot severely; Mich. P. Baker, G, finger shot off; J. P. Bailey, G, finger shot off; And. Ball, G, finger shot off; W. E. Brown, G, wd.: C. Brown, E, 2d Lieut., missing; Dan'l Byrce, E, miss.; M. Brice, E, missing.
D. Campbell, wd. head slightly; W. H. Corey, E, wd. left shoulder; L. Cassidy, wd. slightly; C. Clunninerliver, F, wd.; Clark, A, missg.; Callahan, C, wd. and missg.
Chas. Dayton, E, killed; B. J. Dougherty, H, wd.; F. Davy, K, wd. body severely; L. Dawson, K, wd.; Dickenson, A, missg.; H. Dressing, C, wd. and missg.
H. Ellis, D, wd., shoulder severely; H. C. Ellsworth, F, wd. foot sev.; P. Everts, H, Sargt., wd. leg; J. A. Emery, H, wd.
M. Friday, C, Lieut., wd. hand slightly; Aug. Tryer, F, wd. foot sev.; E. Freemen, G, wd. leg.
L. Gaylard, A, Sargt., wd. arm slightly; Wm. Gerrick, B, wd. jaw; Greiber, F, Sargt., finger shot off; J. D. Garneire, F, wd.; A. Samosite, H, wd.; W. Granger, K, Capt., wd. neck slightly.
Chas. Handis, A, Sargt., killed; J. L. Heyer, Sargt., F, killed; Benj. Heyson, C, wd thigh, sev; E. N. Hoag, C, wd. leg severely; R.Hughes, C, wd.; F. Haustead, G, wd. leg; B. Hoister, wd. leg; Henderson, H, wd.; H. Heresian, K, wd.; J. B. Handfast, K, wd.; H. H. Haddock, Adj., wd. and missg.
Isdell, C, wd. sev.; Justin, A, missg.
R. Rush, Sargt., G, killed; Pet. Kelly, A, wd; H. Kranan, K, wd.; Kleeburgh, F, wd.
A. Lebord, C, wd. sevy.; Longsmere, C, wd., thigh sevy.; Fred. Luckmun, C, wd head slightly; P. Lynch, E, wd, right shoulder sev.; Geo. Long, F, wd.; J. Leonard, G, wd., arm; P. Lawrence, wd. and missg.
Mensh, musician, wd. arm, severely; J. McKeever, C, wd. head, slightly; H. Mathey, C, wd. thigh; Wm. Massey, C, wd. knee, slightly; Andrew Morey, C, wd. head, slightly; J. T. Mussey, D, wd.; A. Miller, wd.; Chas. Mangold, F, Sergt., finger shot off; F. F. Main, F, wd.; C. Miller, F, wd.: Geo. Morgan, G. Sargt., wd. shoulder; Thos. Martin, H, wd,; F. Melvin, wd.; McMann, C, Lieut., wd.; Mussaner, C, wd. and missing; Mathews, C, wd. and missing; M. McGuire, wd. and missing.
D. D. Nash, Major, wd. leg, slightly; Geo. Newland, K, wd.; Fred. Nolan, K, wd.
G. S. Pater, E, wd. slightly; E. Philiphs, wd.; Pratt, Sargt., K, wd. arm, slightly; J. Peresly, B, missing; Chas. Pettis, E, Sargt., missing.
Quincy, C, wd.
Reekshish, K, killed; B. Ruston, A, Sargt., wd. 3 places, severely; Chas. Riedon, C, wd. slightly; Aug. Rochoron, C, wd. ankle, slightly; Chas. Renert, E, Capt., wd. right arm, slightly; C. Richerman, F, wd.; P. Rertzerl, K, wd.
C. Stiles, E, killed; Scheffer, F, killed; N. Shutt, A. wounded slightly; W, Starkweather, A, wounded slightly; J. C. L. Levery, E, wounded; J. S. Skinner, E, wounded severely; M. Shephan, H, wounded; Smanwhit, H, wounded; Wm. H. Stacy, K, leg shot off; Sheebul, A, missing; J. Stinman, B, missing.
J. G. Tiger, A, wounded; W. A. Tousley, D, wounded, side, severely.
V. L. Venderlip, F, wounded; Geo. Wilborn, C, wounded and missing.
Geo. Webb, C, wounded, left ear, slightly; Whapples, wounded, hand, badly; Richard Welch, C, wounded, hand, slightly; J. H. Williams, C, wounded, head, slightly; L. A. Whitney, G, finger shot off; A. Willard, wounded, leg.
Robt. P. Younglove, F, wounded.
The following are the names of the wounded officers of the 48th N. Y. Regiment, who having been granted a leave of absence for 20 days, came on with this mail: Captains M. A. Elfring, W. L. Lockwood, Simeon Swartwout, W. B. Barret, 2d Lieut. J. F. ____.

THE ATTACK ON FORT WAGNER—THE KILLED AND WOUNDED IN THE 100th REGIMENT.
The New York Herald, of Monday, contains a detailed account of the recent engagements before Charleston, in which the One Hundredth Regiment has suffered severely. In the engagement on James Island, the following members of the 100th are reported wounded:
COMPANY I.
Private George Blake, seriously, in the head.
Privates James Hoffman and James Bowen in the head, and Lawrence Philips and Wm. Maylon in the hip.
COMPANY G.
Corporal John Laverty, in the hand, slightly [sic], on the 13th.
The assault upon Fort Wagner was commenced on the 22nd, the storming force being under the command of Gen. Strong. His regiments were the 54th Massachusetts, the Sixth Connecticut, John L. Chatfield; Ninth Maine, Colonel Sabine Emory; the remnant of the Seventh Connecticut battalion, Captain Sylvester S. Gray (not with the storming party;) Forty-eighth New York, Colonel William B. Barton; Seventy sixth Pennsylvania, commanded by Captain John Littell, and the Third New Hampshire Colonel J. H. Jackson.
Col. H. S. Putnam with his brigade was ordered to advance to the rear of Gen. Strong's. His brigade consisted of the Seventh New Hampshire, Lieutenant Colonel J. C. Abbott in command; One Hundredth New York, Colonel Dandy; Sixty-seventh Ohio, Colonel A. _. Voris, and the Sixty-second Ohio, Col. Howell.
We copy from the Herald the following description of the
ADVANCE OF PUTNAM'S BRIGADE.
Colonel Putnam was one of the first to reach the parapet, surrounded by his brave New Hampshire Seventh boys, and inspiring his whole brigade by his fearless, gallant conduct. In approaching the ditch the retreating men of the first charge were met, and some portions of the brigade were detained for a moment, but not permanently demoralized. Col. Putnam sent Lt.-Col. Abbott, of the Seventh, and Major Henderson, his Adjutant General, to intercept stragglers, rally those who halted and hurry forward all troops. They did this under a very hot fire, which was as terrible a short distance from the fort as in it. The rear division of the Seventh and a portion of the One Hundredth New York were massed together, crossed the ditch and essayed to get a foothold inside from one point, while the Sixty-second and Sixty-seventh Ohio went to another. Every regiment behaved nobly, and all have a fearful roll of casualties to attest the persistency and energy of their effort to obtain and hold the fort. One corner of the fort only was ours and that was swept by grape and canister and exposed to musketry. The troops looked back, saw they were alone, and began to falter.
General Strong had been up and cheered and rallied his quondam classmate and ever friend, Colonel Putnam, and returned to try and bring up reinforcements. Colonel Putnam implored, entreated, commanded his troops to hold on but a moment longer, and then another minute, and then a moment again, but no help came. He had sent a messenger to ask for reinforcements. He did not know that Generals Strong and Seymour had both been carried from the field wounded. The messenger learned the fact, and went to tell General Gillmore. The latter, anxious, but still cool and clear-headed, told him the reserve, a fresh brigade, had been ordered forward as soon as it was known a foothold had been gained in the rebel work. Before this messenger had left another arrived to say that Colonel Putnam was killed, and that our troops had retired from the fort entirely. That was the result, briefly told.
Gen. Stevenson's brigade was being conducted by Col. Turner; of Gen. Gillmore's staff, to reinforce Col. Putnam, when the news of his death and the retirement of his troops reached them in season to prevent the whole rebel fire taking effect on them. Sadly and disappointed they turned back, and the battle-field was left to the enemy, and our dead and wounded. The rebel fire ceased, the ambulances met the stretchers at the edge of danger, and the groans of the wounded, the chirps of the crickets and the beating of the surf were soon all the sounds we could hear, for the fire on both sides had ceased. The rebels, too, had dead to bury and wounded to care for, and peace was to reign for a night at least.
Our fresh troops fell back to the intrenchments in good order, occupying all our old positions; and the shattered regiments rallied around their torn, burned and smoked standards, to go into camp and call the names of the absent forever.
The following is a complete list of the casualties in the 100th Regiment as reported officially:

WOUNDED.
Sergeant Charles L. Handers, Co. A.
Private Codrad Site, Co. E.
Corporal Charles Dayton, Co. E.
Private Frederick Sheffer, Co. F.
Sergeant John L. Hegel, Co. F.
Private Victor Reeksie, Co. F.
Sergeant Robert Kuk, Co. G.

WOUNDED.
Major D. D. Nash, wounded in left leg slightly.

COMPANY A.
First Sergt. Byron Ruston, severely in three places.
Sergt. James L. Gaylrod, left arm, slightly.
Corp. Nicholas Shutt.
Privates F. L. Arnold, slightly in hand; John Beauchupt, John G. Teger, Peter Kelly, Wallace Starkweather.

COMPANY B.
Corp. William Gerrick, severely, in jaw.
Private Abram L. Wood, slightly in hand.
Musician Mensh, slightly in arm.

COMPANY C.
2d Lieut. Michael Friday, slightly in the hand.
1st Sergt, Benj F Hugson, severely in the thigh.
Corporal Quiney A Lebord, severely in larnyx.
Ezra N Hoag, severely in leg.
Chas Reaidon, slightly in hand.
Geo W Isdell, severely in arm.
Geo Longsmere,  "           thigh.
Fred Luckman, James McKeever, slightly in head.
August Roehowen, severely in ankle.
____ L Waur, slightly in arm.
Geo J Webb,        "          left ear.
John W Whaples, badly in head.
Daniel Campbell, slightly    "
Richard Hughes,      "    in foot
Henry Mathew,        "     " thigh.
Wm H Mason,         "     " knee.
Andrew Morey,       "     " head.
Richard Welch,        "     " hand.
John H Williams,     "     " head.

COMPANY D.
Coporal [sic] Wallace A Tousley, severely in side.
Privates W E Bates, slightly in leg.
    "        Isaac T Mussey and Henry Slidell, slightly.
    "        Hiram Ellis, severely in shoulder.

COMPANY E.
Sergeant Pat Lynch, right shoulder, severely.
Corporal W H Corey, left do.
Privates W A Austin and Luke Cassidy, slightly.
    "        Jonas Charleston, Lester Severey, slightly in hand.
Privates Gilbert S Pater and Ernest Phillips, slightly.
    "        Julius F Skinner, Andrew Miller, severely.

COMPANY F.
Capt. Charles H. Rauert, slightly, in right arm.
Sergeant Grebler.
Corporal Charles Mangold, finger shot off.
Privates Wm. C. Barthauer,
    "        John H. Brownley,
    "        August Fryer,
    "        H. C. Ellsworth, severely in feet.
    "        John D. Garnin,
    "        C. Clummerliver,
    "        John L. Kleeberg,
    "        George Long,
    "        Charles Laly.
    "        Fred F. Main,
    "        C. Miller,
    "        C. Richarmer,
    "        Lewis Venderlip,
    "        Robert Younglove.

COMPANY G.
Sergeant George Morgan, severely, in shoulder.
Corporal Lewis A. Whitney,
Privates Michael Baker,
    "        James P. Bailey,
    "        Andrew Ball,
    "        W. E. Brown, finger shot off;
    "        Ernst H. Freeman,
    "        Frank Hanstead,
    "        Barney Hoister,
    "        John Savory,
    "        John Leonard, in arm;
    "        Alfred P. Willard, in leg.

COMPANY H.
Sergeant Paul Everts,
    "         O. J. Emery, slightly, in left leg;
Privates  John Allen (Alien), in left leg, badly;
    "         B. J. Dougherty,
    "         A. Garrosite,
    "         B. Henderson,
    "         M. Shephan,
    "         J. Smauphet,
    "        Thos. Martin,
    "        F. Melvin.

COMPANY K.
Capt. Warren Granger, slightly, in neck.
Sergeant Pratt, slightly in arm.
Frank Davy, severely, in body.
Corporal Win. H. Stacey, leg shot off.
Henry H. Henslow,
Privates—Robert Abrahams, severely, in leg.
    "           James Allen, arm.
    "           Luther Dawson.
    "           John B. Hund, foot.
    "           Henry Kranser.
    "           Geo. Newland.
    "           Fred. Noller.
    "           Phillip Retzerl.

MISSING.
Adjutant H. H. Haddock, wounded.
COMPANY A.
Corporals—Clark Dickerman.
    "              Justin Semur.
Private—C. Sheeball.
COMPANY B.
Privates—John Peresly.
    "           John Stintinann.
COMPANY C.
First Lieutenant John McMann, wounded.
Corporal Henry Dressing.
Privates—Lawrence.
    "           Callahan.
    "           Geo. Vilborn.
    "           Munaner.
    "           Mathews.
    "           Michael McGuire.
COMPANY E.
Second Lieutenant Cyrus Brown, wounded and supposed to be dead.
Sergeant Chas. Pettis.
Privates—Daniel Bryce
    "           M. Brice.

THE 100TH AT CHARLESTON.—The correspondent of the New York Tribune alludes to the gallant conduct of the 100th Regiment in the assault upon Fort Wagner, as follows:—
The 1st Brigade, under the lead of Gen. Strong, failed to take the fort. It was now the turn of Colonel Putnam, commanding the 2d Brigade, composed of the 7th New Hampshire, the 62d Ohio, Col. Steele, the 67th Ohio, Col. Vorhees, and the 100th New York, Colonel Dandy, to make the attempt. But alas! the task was too much for him. Through the same terrible fire he led his men to, over and into the fort, and for an hour held one-half of it, fighting every moment of that time with the utmost desperation, and, as with the 1st Brigade, it was not until he himself fell killed, and nearly all his officers wounded, and no reinforcements arriving, that his men fell back, and the rebel shout and cheer of victory was heard above the roar of Sumter and the guns from Cumming's Point.
WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Letter From Col. Dandy---His Official Report of the Killed and Wounded in the 100th Regiment.
We are permitted to publish the following letter from Col. D. B. Dandy, of the 100th Regiment, to Geo. S. Hazard, Esq., President of the Board of Trades, and an official statement which accompanies it, of the casualties of the Regiment in the assault upon Fort Wagner. The manner in which the Colonel speaks of the heroic courage of his men, will fill the breast of every friend of the 100th with emotions of admiration and pride.
HEADQUARTERS 100TH REGIMENT, N. Y. V.
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., July 25, 1863.
My DEAR SIR.—You have doubtless heard of the attack upon Fort Wagner on the night of the 18th inst., and that our regiment was engaged. Our loss in valuable officers and men was so great in that engagement, that, until now I have been unable to send to Buffalo a reliable statement of the killed, wounded and missing. I enclose herewith a report, which, as far as it goes, is mainly correct. Many of those reported missing are doubtless dead, but we cannot so report them until returns are received from the rebel authorities; these returns are expected soon, and when received an exact statement will be forwarded at once.
I cannot forbear expressing my admiration of the gallant conduct of the officers and soldiers of the 100th. Under the most galling fire sustained by any troops since the commencement of this war, regiment marched unflinchingly in line of battle right onto the works of the enemy. I did not see a case of misconduct. All was done there that brave men could do, and if we did not succeed in taking the place, it was because, under the circumstances of the attack, the condition of the enemy, and the strength of the place, it was impossible for brave men to take it.
The colors presented to the regiment by the Board of Trade were planted on the Fort by Sergeant Flanders of Co. A, who was killed in defending them.
Corporal Spooner, of Co. A, brought off the colors after the Sergeant was killed; and, although much soiled and torn, they are now with the regiment.
The dead and wounded heroes, whose names I send you, have unostentatiously offered themselves as a sacrifice on the altar of their country's greatness and glory. While I here offer my heartfelt sympathies to their bereaved families and friends, I think I can perceive in the dim distance that light which is the forerunner to our nation's returning greatness. Such unselfish patriotism, such tremendous sacrifices, so much blood shed, so much suffering, will not be in rain. Very respectfully, your ob't serv't,
G. B. DANDY, Col. 100th N. Y. V.

To Geo. S. HAZARD, ESQ., President Board of Trade, Buffalo, N. Y.
List of killed wounded and missing of the 100th N. Y. Vols., July 18th, 1883, at the charge upon Fort Wagner, Morris Island, S. C.

FIELD AND STAFF.
Major D. D. Nash, wounded, left leg, slightly; Adjutant H. H. Haddock, wounded and missing; Serg't Major Chas. McBean, dead.

COMPANY A.
First Serg't Byron Bristol, wounded, shoulder, severely; serg't James L. Gaylord, wounded, left arm, slightiy; corp'l C. Dickerman, missing; corp'l Nicholas Strutt, wounded; privates Christ Schiball, died of wounds; F. L. Arnold, wounded, hand, slightly; Jno. Beauchupt, wounded; John G. Tega, wounded, slightly; Peter Kelly, wounded; Wm. Starkweather, wounded; serg't Chas. H. Flanders, died of wounds; corp'l Justin F. Simons, missing.

COMPANY B.
Corp'l Wm. Garreck, wounded, jaw. severely; privates John Stintman, killed; A. L. Wood, wounded, head, slightly; Wm. Mencu, wounded, arm, slightly; John Presbrey, missing.

COMPANY C.
First Lieut. John McMann, wounded, face, severely, 2d Lieut. Michael Friday, wounded, head slightly; 1st serg't B. F. Hughson, thigh, severely; corp'ls Irving Sirbold, neck, severely; Ezra N Hoag, leg, severely; Chas. Reardon, hand, slightly; Donald McKay, slightly; Henry Dressing, missing; privates Michael McGuire, wounded; Geo. Kilborne, died of wounds; L. Callahan, missing; Wm. Matthews, missing; Pat Corcoran, thigh, severely; James Langmeyer, thigh, severely; Geo. W. Isdell, arm, severely; Fred.  Luckman, died of wounds; James McKeever, head, slightly; Aug. Ranchansen, ankle, slightly; Wm. L. Walls, arm, slightly; Geo. J. Webb, left ear, slightly; John W. Whatles, head, badly; Daniel Campbell, head, slightl; Richard Hughes, foot, slightly; Henry Ma_the, thigh, slightly; Wm. H. Mason, knee, slightly; Andrew Alorey, head, slightly; Richard Welch, hand, slightly; Conrad Lilt, killed; John H. Williams, head, slightly.

COMPANY D.
Corpl Wallace A. Tousley, side, severely; privates, Peter Daniels, died of wounds: W. C. Bates, leg, slightly; Isaac Mossip, leg, slightly; Henry Hidell, leg, slightly; Hiram Ellis, jaw, severely.

COMPANY E.
2d Lieut. Cyrus Brown, leg, badly; sergts. Pat Lynch, right arm, severely; Chas. Pettis. missing; corp'l W. H, Conry, left arm, severely; privates, C. P. Frank, died of wounds; Julius F. Skinner, died of wounds; corp'l Chas. Dayton, killed; privates, W. A. Austin, leg, slightly; Luke Cassidy, slightly; Jonas Charleson, slightly; Lester Lenersey, hand, slightly; Gilbert S. Pater, slightly; Ernst Phillips, slightly; Andrew Winter, severely; Dan Brice, missing; Neil Brice, missing; Paul Honald, missing; Wm. Mitchell, missing: Barnard Smith, missing; W. H. Hicks, missing; Andrew Snyder, missing.

COMPANY F.
Capt. Chas. H. Rauert, left arm, slightly, privates Fred. Shaffer, killed; Louis Riter, died of wounds; Felix Eisman, died of wounds; Victor Roeksch, killed; sergts., August Giebler, wounded; J, F. Schligel, slightly; corp'l Jno. Mangold, finger shot off; Aug. Hoile, wounded; privates,Wm. Barthauer, severely; Jno, W. Brownly, wounded; Aug. Dryer, wounded; H. C Ellsworth, foot severely; Jno. D. Garvin, wounded; Christ Kimerling, arm, severely; Jno. L. Kleehery, shin, severely; Geo. Long, side, slightly; Chas. Lotz; wounded; F. F. Main. leg, amputated; Christ Miller, wounded; Christ Richkeimer, wounded; Louis Vandelip, wounded; Robt. Younglove, wounded; Chas. Getz, missing; Jno. Riger, missing; Louis Landter, missing; Max Ganchenseim, missing; J. G. Block, slightly.

COMPANY G.
1st Lt. James Kavanagh, wounded and missing; Sergt. Geo. Morgan, shoulder, severely; sergt. Robert Kirk, Killed; corp'l Louis A. Whitney, wounded; corp'l John Saxour, missing; privates Michael Baker, wounded; James P. Bailey, wounded; Andrew Ball, wounded; W. E. Brown, finger shot off; E. H. Freeman, wounded; Frank Hallstead, wounded; Barney Holster, wounded; Jno, Lavery, wounded; Jno Leonard, arm, severely; Alfred H. Willard, leg; James Williamson, wrist, slightly; Wm. Eggert, missing; J. G. Barnum, missing; Dennis A. Hubbell, missing; Jno. P. Weimer, missing.

COMPANY H.
2d Lt. Chas. H. Runckle, wounded and missing; 1st sergt. Geo. N. Clark, missing; sergt. Paul Evertse, foot, slightly; sergt. Curtis J. Emery, left leg, slightly; privates Henry Roast, slightly; Wm. Carr, right leg, slightly; Wm. Manley, died of wounds; John Allen, left leg, badly: B. G. Dougherty, wounded; Ami Ganchet, wounded; Robert Henderson, slightly; M. Sheehan, leg, badly; John Smurphet, wounded; Thomas Wharton, left side, severely; L. S. Melvin, hand, slightly; Fred. L. Carter, missing; Job Kimble, missing; S. Patterson, missing; D. H. Wyndham, missing; Chas. Hunt, missing; Newton Piper, missing; Ed. Townsend, missing.

COMPANY K.
Capt. Warren Granger, neck, slightly; sergt. Pratt, arm, slightly; sergt. Frank Davy, body, severely; corp'l T. J. Buffum, leg, amputated; W. H. Stacey, leg, severely; corp'l H. C. Henshaw, side, severely; privates Valentine Karl, leg, slightly; O. T. Moore, wounded; William Tatterlane, wounded; Merritt Weeks, leg, amputated; Louis Billhoffer, leg, amputated; Robert Abrahams, leg, slightly; James Allen, slightly; L. Damon, wounded; John B. Handfist, missing; A. C. Baker, missing; Jno. H. Gibson, missing; A. Kiersch, missing; Paul Siebert, missing; E. N. White, missing; Reuben Moore, missing; Geo. Buss, missing; Ernst Wurl, missing; Jacob Wilhelm, missing; James Morrison, missing; Henry Krause, wounded, slightly; George Newland, wounded; Fred. Noeler, wounded; Philip Ritzert, wounded.

Wounded in the trenches since the attack upon Fort Wagner:
COMPANY F.
Sergt. Schlichtman, head, slightly; privates John Bauer, leg amputated; Philip Heilbrum, shoulder and face, severely.

COMPANY B.
Corp. Chester B. Smith, face, since dead; privates Valentine Webber, arm, slightly; Matthias Winkle, hip, slightly.

THE ATTACK ON FORT WAGNER.
A correspondent of the New York Times gives the following account of the second unsuccessful effort to capture Fort Wagner, Charleston Harbor:
After the unsuccessful assault on the 10th inst., Gen. Gillmore lost no time in throwing up batteries on Morris Island, within 800 yards of Fort Wagner, in order to reduce it by siege.—On the morning of the 18th, twelve or fifteen heavy guns were in position, besides eight or ten mortars. Gen. Gillmore, therefore, determined to commence the attack, which was opened at 11 o'clock A. M.
The bombardment was conducted in a spirited manner, Gillmore's batteries initiating the work, and Admiral Dahlgren's five monitors, the Ironsides, two mortar schooners and three wooden gunboats, quickly joining in the engagement.
The enemy replied briskly from Fort Wagner and Battery Bee, just beyond the Cumming's Point, while Fort Sumpter [sic] kept up a sharp fire from the guns of her Southwestern face, among which were two rifled pieces of heavy calibre. Most of the fire of the rebels was directed upon the monitors and other naval vessels, only an occasional shell being sent towards the batteries. Although the iron-clads were repeatedly struck, they suffered very little real damage, and the only losses in the batteries were a Lieutenant of the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania regiment, who was killed by a chance shot, and the wounding of six of the gunners.
Soon after 3 o'clock the firing from Fort Wagner ceased. It was then known that our brave-fellows had succeeded in dismounting one gun, and it was also pretty well ascertained that another of the rebel pieces had burst. These facts led to the supposition that the enemy had evacuated the work, and it was determined to attempt its occupation. For this purpose two brigades, consisting of the Seventh Connecticut regiment, the Third New Hamphire [sic], the Ninth Maine, the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, and the Forty-eight New York, under Brig. Gen. Strong, and the Seventh New Hampshire, Sixth Connecticut, Sixty-second Ohio, One Hundreth [sic] New York and Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, colored, under Col. Putnam, who had been under arms all day, screened from the enemy behind a range of sand hills, in the rear of our works, were ordered forward.
This was at dusk, and both brigades were formed in line on the beach, the regiment being disposed in columns, excepting the colored regiment which for some reason was given the post of extreme honor and of danger in the advance, and was drawn up in line of battle, exposing its full front to the enemy. This movement of the troops was observed by Sumpter [sic], and fire was at once opened upon them, happily without doing injury, as the shells went over the heads of the men.
Gen. Strong's brigade tinder this fire moved along the beach at slow time for about three-quarters of a mile, when the men were ordered to lie down.—In this position they remained half an hour, Sumpter [sic] being joined in the cannonade by the rebels in Battery Bee, not without effect upon troops. It was now quite dark, and the order was given for both brigades to advance, Gen. Strong's leading and Col. Putnam's within supporting distance. The troops went forward at quick time and in deep silence, until the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, led by its gallant Col. Shaw, was within two hundred yards of the work, when the men gave a fierce yell and rushed up the glacis, closely followed by the other regiments of the brigade. The enemy, hitherto silent as the grave, while our men were swarming over the glacis, opened upon them furiously with grape, cannister, and a continuous fusilade [sic] of small arms. The gallant negroes, however, plunged on regardless of the murderous reception, and many of them crossed the ditch, although it contained four feet of water, gaining the parapet. They were dislodged, however, in a few minutes with hand grenades and retired helter skelter, leaving more than on half of their number, including their brave colonel, dead upon the field.
The Sixth Connecticut regiment, under Lieut. Col. Rodman, was next in support of the Fifty-fourth, and they also suffered terribly, being compelled to retire after a stubborn contest.—The Ninth Maine, which was next in line, was broken up by the passage of the remnant of the repulsed colored regiment through its lines, and retired in confusion, excepting three companies, which nobly stood their ground.
It now devolved upon the Third New Hampshire regiment to push forward, and led by Gen. Strong and Col. Jackson in person the gallant fellows dashed up against the fort.—Three companies actually gained the ditch, and wading through the water found shelter against the embankment. Here was the critical point of the assault, and the Second brigade, which should have been up and ready to support their comrades of the First, were unaccountably delayed. Gen. Strong then gave the order to fall back, and lie down on the glacis, which was obeyed, without confusion.
It was while waiting here, exposed to the heavy fire, that Gen. Strong was wounded. A fragment of shell entered his thigh, passing entirely through the fleshy part and making a serious wound, although the bone escaped fracture. The breast of Gen. Jackson's coat was torn off at the same time by a piece of shell, slightly wounding him. Neither of these brave men would lie down to escape the metal, but stood unflinchingly throughout, eliciting the unbounded admiration of their men. Finding the supports did not come, Gen. Strong gave the order for his brigade to retire, and the men left the field in perfect order.
A little while afterwards the other brigades came up, and made up for their apparent tardiness by glorious deeds of valor. Rushing impetuously up the glacis, undeterred by the fury of the enemy, whose fires were not termitted for a second, several of the regiments succeeded in crossing the ditch, scaling the parapet and descending into the fort. Here a hand-to-hand conflict ensued. Our men fought with desperation, and were able to drive the enemy from one side of the work to seek shelter between the traverses, while they held possession for something more than an hour. This unparalled [sic] piece of gallantry was unfortunately of no advantage. The enemy rallied, and, having received large reinforcements, made a charge upon the band of heroes, and expelled them from their nobly won position by the shear force of numbers. One of the regiments engaged in this brilliant dash was the Forty-eight New York, Col. Barton, and it came out almost decimated. The most distressing part of its disastrous treatment is, that the enemy did not inflict the damage. It was the result of a mistake on the part of one of our own regiments. The Forty-eight was among the first to enter the fort, and was fired upon by a regiment that gained the parapet some minutes later, under the supposition that it was the enemy.
About midnight the order was given to retire, and our men fell back to the rifle-pits outside of our own works, having engaged in as hotly contested a battle as has ever been fought.
Our casualties, as may reasonably be expected, were very large. The list of killed, wounded and missing foots up fifteen hundred and thirty.

ONE HUNDREDTH NEW YORK.
Killed.
Sergt. Charles L. Handers,        Frederick Sheffer, Co. F.
Co. A.                                      Sergt. John L. Hegel, Co. F.
Conrad Site, Co. E.                  Victor Beeksih, Co. F.
Corp. Chas. Dayton. Co. E.      Sergt, Robert Kuk, Co. G.

Wounded.
Maj. D. D. Nash—in left leg slightly.

COMPANY A.
First Sergt. Byron Ruston—      F. L. Arnold—hand, slight.
severely, in three places.            John Beauchupt.
Sergt. James L. Gaylard—        John G. Teger.
left arm, slightly.                       Peter Kelly.
Corp. Nicholas Shutt.               Wallace Starkweather.

COMPANY B.
Corp. Wm. Gerrick—severe-    Musician Meush—slightly, in
ly, in jaw.                                  arm.
Abram L. Wood—slightly, in
hand.

COMPANY C.
2d Lieut. Michael Friday—        Fred. Luckman.
slightly in hand.                         Geo. J. Webb, slightly in left
1st Sergt. Benj. F. Hugson—     ear.
severely in thigh.                       John W. Whaples—badly in
Corp. Quiney A. Lebord—se-   head.
verely in larynx.                         Daniel Campbell—slightly
Ezra N. Hoag—severely in        in head.
leg.                                           Richard Hughes—slightly
Chas. Realdon—slightly in        in foot.
hand.                                        Henry Mathey—slightly in
Geo. W. Isdell—severely in       thigh.
arm.                                         Wm. H. Masey—slightly in
Geo. Longsmere—severely in    knee.
thigh.                                        Andrew Morey—slightly in
James McKeever—slightly        head.
in head.                                    Richard Welch—slightly in
August Roehowen—severe-      hand.
ly in ankle.                                John H. Williams—slightly
Minane L. Waur—slightly          in head.
in arm.

COMPANY D.
Corp. Wallace A. Tousley—     Henry Slidell—slightly.
severely in side.                        Hiram Ellis—severely in
W. E. Bates—slightly in leg.      shoulder.
Isaac T. Mussep—slightly.

COMPANY E.
Sergt. Pat. Lynch—right            Jonas Charleston.
shoulder, severely.                    Lester Severey—hand, sl'tly.
Corp. W. H. Corey—left                    Gilbert S. Pater—slightly.
shoulder.                                  Ernest Phillips—slightly.
W. A. Austin—slightly.             Julius F. Skinner.
Luke Cassidy—slightly.            Andrew Miller—severely.

COMPANY F.
Capt. Charles H. Renert            _ D. Garnin.
right arm, slightly.                     C. Clummerliver.
Sergt. Grebler.                          John L. Kleeberg.
Corp. Chas. Mangold—finger   George Long.
shot off.                                   Charles Lely.
Wm. C. Barthaver.                    Fred. F. Main.
John H. Brownley.                    C. Miller.
August Fryer.                           C. Richarmer.
H. C. Ellsworth—foot, se-        Lewis Venderlip.
verely.                                      Robert Younglove.

COMPANY G.
Sergt. George Morgan—se-      Ernest H. Freeman.
verely, in shoulder.                    Frank Harnsted.
Corp. Lewis A. Whitney.          Barney Holster.
Michael Baker.                          John Savory.
James P. Bailey.                        John Leonard—arm.
Andrew Ball.                             Alfred P. Willard—leg.
W. E. Brown.

COMPANY H.
Sergt. Paul Everts.                              A. Garrosite.
Sergt. O. J. Emery—left            R. Henderson.
leg, slightly.                     M. Shepan.
John Allen, (Anen,)—left           J. Smanphet.
leg, badly.                                 Thos. Martin.
B. J. Dougherty.                        F. Meivin.

COMPANY K.
Capt. Warren Granger—           Robt. Abrahams—leg, se-
neck slightly.                             verely.
Sergt. Pratt—arm, slightly.        Luther Dawson.
Frank Davy—body, severe.       John B. Handfast.
Corp. Wm. H. Stacy—leg         Henry Kranser.
shot off.                                   Geo. Newland.
Henry H. Henslow.                   Fred. Noller.
James Allen—arm.                    Phillip Retzert.

Missing.
Adjutant H. H. Haddock, wounded.
COMPANY A.
Corp. Clark Dickerman.            C. Sheeball.
Corp. Justin Semur.

COMPANY B.
John Peresly.                            John Stintina.

COMPANY C.
1st Lieut. John McMann—        George Vilborn.
wounded.                                 ____ Munaner.
Corp. Henry Dressing.              ____ Mathews.
____ Lawrence.                        Michael McGuire.
____ Callohan.

COMPANY E.
2d Lt. C. Brown—wounded,     Daniel Brice.
and supposed to be dead.                   M. Brice.
Sergt. Charles Pettis.

EVENING EXPRESS.
MONDAY EVENING, JULY 27, 1863.
"ONE COUNTRY—ONE CONSTITUTION—OUR DESTINY.
THE WAR.
IMPORTANT FROM CHARLESTON.
Second Bombardment of Fort Wagner.
Our Attack Repulsed with Heavy Loss.
Full and Graphic Description of the Scene.
NAMES OF THE KILLED AND WOUNDED.

MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., July 19, 1863.
Again Fort Wagner has been assaulted and again we have been repulsed, and with, I regret to say, a much more formidable loss in killed, wounded and missing, than in the first attempt.
The first assault failed, as I stated, before, on account of the tardiness of the 76th Pennsylvania and the 9th Maine to properly support the successful assault of the 7th Connecticut, who were left alone on the parapet and within the ditches of the fort to battle with the whole rebel garrison.
In the assault of 11th inst., but one brigade, and that a very small one, under the command of Gen. Strong, were engaged; in that of last evening a whole division, consisting of three full brigades, were drawn out in line to take part in the action, but on account of some misunderstanding of orders but two actually participated in the fight.
Gen. Gilmore designed to commence the bombardment of the fort at daylight yesterday morning, but on account of a terrific thunder storm, which commenced early in the evening, and continued until morning, delaying the work of the engineers and dampening the ammunition, the action did not open until half-past 12. At that hour Admiral Dahlgren signalled [sic] that he was ready, and in a few moments the Montauk, (his flagship), the Ironsides, the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Weshawken and the Patapsco, moved into line, and commenced hurling their heaviest shot and shell around, upon and within the fort, and, with intervals of but a very few minutes, continued this terrible fire until one hour after the sun had gone down. During all the afternoon the iron fleet lay about one mile off from the fort, but just at the close of the engagement, and but a few moments before the first assault was made by Gen. Strong, the Admiral ran the Montauk directly under the guns of Fort Wagner, and within 280 yards, fired round after round from his 15 inch-gun, sending, as every shot struck, vast clouds of sand, mud and timber high up in the air, making one huge sand heap of that portion of the fort facing the sea, and dismounting two of the heaviest guns.
Deserters and prisoners tell us that Fort Wagner mounts thirteen rifled guns of heavy calibre, but during all this furious bombardment by land and sea, she condescended to reply with but two; one upon the whole fleet of iron- clads, and one upon the entire line of land batteries. She may possibly have fired one shot to our one hundred, and I think even that is a large estimate. There were no casualties on the monitors or Ironsides, and but one man killed and one slightly wounded within the batteries. The firing was almost entirely from our own side. With the most powerful glass, but very few men could be seen in the forts. At half past two, a shot from one of our guns on the left cut the halyards on the flagstaff and brought the rebel flag fluttering to the ground.
In a moment, almost before we had begun to ask ourselves whether they had really lowered their flag, and were upon the point of surrendering or not, the old red battle flag, which the Army of the Potomac has so often had defiantly shaken in its face, was ran up about ten feet around it cheered, waved their hats, and then disappeared, and were not again seen during the day. Fort Sumter, the moment the rebel flag came to the ground, sent a shot over our heads to assure us that it had been lowered by accident and not by design. In this shot she also desired us to distinctly understand that before Fort Wagner surrendered she herself would have to be consulted. With the exception of this little episode almost profound silence, so far as the rebel garrison themselves could maintain it, prevailed within the fort. A heavy cloud of smoke and sand, occasioned by our constantly exploding shell, hung over the fort all the afternoon, and it was only when the wind drifted it away that we were able to see the amount of damage that we had done. In a few hours what had been the smooth regular lines of the engineer, and the beautiful sodded embankments, became rugged and irregular heaps of sand, with great gaps and chasms in all sides of the fort exposed to our fire. From my point of observation, a wooden look-out, fifty feet high, erected for General Gilmore and staff upon a small hill of about the same height, and situated a short distance back of the batteries, it seemed as if no human being could live beneath so terrible a fire whether protected by bomb-proofs or not, and in this opinion I was fully sustained by nearly every person around me. There seemed to be but one opinion, and that was that we had silenced nearly every gun, that the 15-inch shells had driven the rebels from the bombproofs, and that if there had been a strong infantry force in the rear of the fort we had made it impossible for them to remain there and had slaughtered them by hundreds. But there were a few later developments that proved their opinion was the correct one, who said this profound silence on the rebel side was significant, not of defeat and disaster, but of ultimate success in repulsing our assault; that they were keeping themselves under cover until they could look into the eyes of our men and send bullets through their heads, and would then swarm by thousands, with every conceivable deadly missile in their hands, and drive us in confusion and with terrible slaughter back to our intrenchments.
The afternoon passed, and the heavy roar of the big guns on land and sea gradually ceased. Slowly and sullenly the monitors, with the exception of the Montauk, moved back to the anchorage ground of the morning.
For eight hours the monitors and the Ironsides have kept up a continuous fire, and Fort Wagner has not yet surrendered. For eight hours fifty-four guns from the land batteries have hurled their shot and shell within her walls, and still she flaunts the red battle flag in our face.
"Something must be done, and that too, quickly, or in a few days we shall have the whole army in Virginia upon us," said an officer high in command. "We must storm the fort to-night and carry it at the point of the bayonet!"
In a few moments signals are made from the top of the lookout, and soon generals and colonels commanding divisions and brigades were seen galloping to the headquarters of the commanding general. A few words in consultation and Gens. Seymour, Strong, Stevenson, and Cols. Putnam and Montgomery are seen hastening back to their respective commands. Officers shout, bugles sound, the word of command is given, and soon the soldiers around, upon and under the sand hills of Morris Island spring from their hiding places, fall into line, march to the beach, are organized into new brigades, and in solid column stand ready to move to the deadly assault.
Not in widely extended battle line, with cavalry and artillery at supporting distances, but in solid regimental column, on the hard ocean beach, for half a mile before reaching the fort, in plain sight of the enemy, did these three brigades move to their appointed work.
Gen. Strong was assigned to the command of the 1st Brigade. Col. Putnam, of the 7th New Hampshire, who, although of the regular army, and considered one of the best officers in the Department, had never led his men into battle, nor been under fire, took command of the 2d, and Gen. Stevenson the 3d, constituting the reserve. The 54th Massachusetts, (colored) Col. Shaw, was the advanced regiment in the First Brigade, and the 2d South Carolina, (negro) Col. Montgomery, was the last regiment of the reserve.
These brigades, as I have remarked before were formed for this express duty. Many of the regiments had never seen their brigade commanders  before; some of them had never been under fire, and, with the exception of three regiments in the First Brigade, none of them had ever been engaged in this form of attack. All had fresh in their memories the severe repulse we had met on the morning of the 11th inst. For two years the Department of the South had been in existence, and until the storming of the batteries on the south end of Morris Island the army had won no victory fairly  acknowledged by the enemy.
Just as darkness began to close in upon the scene of the afternoon and evening Gen. Strong rode to the front and ordered his brigade, consisting of the 54th Mass, Col. Shaw (colored regiment) the 6th Conn., Col. Chatfield, the 48th N. Y., Col. Barton, the 3d N. H., Col. Jackson, the 76th Penn., and 9th Maine, Col. Emery, to advance to the assault. At the instant, the line was seen slowly advancing in the dusk toward the fort, and before a double quick had been ordered, a tremendous fire from the barbette guns on Fort Sumter, from the batteries on Cummings' Point, and all the guns on Fort Wagner opened upon it. The guns from Wagner swept the beach, and those from Sumter and Cummings' Point enfiladed it on the left. In the midst of this terrible shower of shot and shell they pushed their way, reached the fort, portions of the 54th Mass., the 7th Connecticut, and the 48th New York, dashed through the ditches, gained the parapet, and engaged in a hand to hand fight with the enemy, and for nearly half an hour held their ground, and did not fall back until nearly every commissioned officer was shot down. As on the morning of the assault of the 11th inst. these men were exposed to a galling fire of grape and canister, from howitzer, raking the ditches from the bastions of the fort, from hand grenades, and from almost every other mode of warfare. The rebels fought with desperation, and so did the larger portion of Gen. Strong's brigade, as long as there was an officer to command it.
When the brigade made the assault General Strong gallantly rode at its head. When it fell back, broken, torn, and bleeding, Major Plimpton, of the 3d N. H., was the highest commissioned officer to command it. Gen. Strong, Col. Shaw, Col. Chatfield, Col. Barton, Col. Green, Col. Jackson all had fallen; and the list I send you will tell how many other brave officers fell with them.
The 1st Brigade, under the lead of General Strong, failed to take the fort. It was now the turn of Col. Putnam, commanding the 2d Brigade, composed of the 7th N. H., the 62d Ohio, Col. Steele, the 67th Ohio, Col. Vorhees, and the 100th N. Y., Col. Danely, to make the attempt. But alas! the task was too much for him. Through the same terrible fire he led his men to, over and into the fort, and for an hour held one-half of it, fighting every moment of that time with the utmost desperation, and, as with the 1st Brigade, it was not until he himself fell killed, and nearly all his officers wounded, and no reinforcements arriving, that his men fell back, and the rebel shout and cheer of victory were heard above the roar of Sumter and the guns from Cumming’s Point.
In this second assault by Col. Putnam's brigade, Col. Turner of Gen. Gilmore's staff stood at the side of Col. Putnam when he fell, and with his voice and sword urged on the thinned ranks to the final charge. But it was too late. The 3d brigade, Gen. Stevenson, was not on hand. It was madness for the 2d to remain longer under so deadly a fire, and the thought of surrendering in a body to the enemy could not for a moment be entertained. To fight their way back to the entrenchments was all that could be done, and in this retreat many a poor fellow fell, never to rise again.
Without a doubt, many of our men fell from our own fire. The darkness was so intense, the roar of artillery so loud, the flight of grape and canister shot so rapid and destructive, that it was absolutely impossible to preserve order in the ranks of individual companies, to say nothing of the regiments. More than half the time we were in the fort, the fight was simply a hand to hand one, as the wounds received by many clearly indicate. Some have sword thrusts, some are hacked on the head some are stabbed with bayonets, and a few were knocked down with the butt end of muskets, but recovered in time to get away with swollen heads. There was terrible fighting to get into the fort, and terrible fighting to get out of it. The cowardly stood to better chance for their lives than the fearless. Even if they surrendered the shell of Sumter were thickly falling around them in the darkness, and, as prisoners, they could not be safe, until victory, decisive and unquestioned, rested with one or the other belligerent.
The battle is over; it is midnight; the ocean beach is crowded with the dead, the dying and the wounded. It is with difficulty you can urge your horse through to Lighthouse Inlet. Faint lights are glimmering in the sand holes and rifle pits to the right, as you pass down the beach. In these holes many a poor wounded and bleeding soldier has laid down to his last sleep. Friends are bending over them to staunch their wounds, or bind up their shattered limbs, but the deathly glare from sunken eyes tells that their kind services are all in vain.
In the night assault, and from its commencement to its close, General Gilmore, his staff and his volunteer aids, consisting of Colonel Littlefield, of the 4th S. C., and Majors Bannister and Stryker, of the Paymaster's Department, were constantly under fire, and doing all in their power to sustain the courage of the troops and urge on reinforcements. All that human power could do to carry this formidable earthwork seems to have been done. No one would have imagined in the morning that so fierce a cannonade from both the navy and the batteries on shore could fail to destroy every bomb-proof the rebels had erected. But the moment our men touched the parapets of the fort, 1,300 strong streamed from their safe hiding place, where they had been concealed during the day, and fresh and strong, were prepared to drive us back. We then found to our sorrow that the 15 inch shot from the monitors, even when fired at a distance of but 1,080 yards, had not injured them in the least. Only the parapets of the fort had been knocked into sand heaps.
In their proper places I forgot to mention that the gunboats Wissahickon, Capt. Davis, the Chippews, Capt. Harris, the Paul Jones, Capt. Hager, and the Ottawa, were also engaged in the bombardment at long range, and that during every day of the week, from the 10th to the 17th, had been more or less engaged with the work.
The amount of shell thrown at Fort Wagner would almost build another Ironsides.

A Visit to the Hospitals.
I left the battle field last Monday to visit the hospitals in Beaufort and at Hilton Head, where nearly all the wounded have been brought.
The large old mansions are nearly all full, and for wounded and dying no better accommodations, so far as the main buildings are concerned, could be found. But in other respects, I regret to say, the medical department were not prepared for so large a demand upon their time and skill. Soldiers are still lying in their cots who have not yet had their wounds dressed or the bullets extracted from their bodies. By far the most efficient persons I have seen about the hospitals are, with perhaps two or three exceptions, a few ladies who are indefatigable in their exertions, and who are more successful in relieving distress than many of the distinguished graduates from French academies, who seem to have nothing else to do than to wear a major's uniform, and criticise [sic] each other's skill, or rather want of it.
It is an outrage that in a department where so much time has been at the disposal of these medical officers, everything necessary for the comfort of at least 1,000 wounded should not have been immediately on hand. I have spent the morning in a hospital where there are 75 men who have not yet had their wounds attended to. One surgeon is in attendance, and a faithful one, too; but what can he do with so large a number?
The large mansion formerly occupied as the headquarters of Gen. Brennan, is now filled with officers. Gen. Strong, Cols. Chatfield, Stabe, Rodman, and nearly all on the inclosed list are here, but, if their wounds will admit, will go North on the Arago to-morrow. These officers have received every attention, for their friends are many, and no complaints can be heard from them, but the poor privates for days had nothing but newspapers to cover their nakedness although the stores at Hilton Head were full of sheets and blankets.
We thought late last evening that we were upon the point of changing the battle ground from Morris to Port Royal Island. The rebels were reported in force opposite Port Royal Ferry, and a dash upon our pickets, and a raid, with cavalry and artillery, up the shell road to Beaufort anticipated.
We were prepared for them. If they are disposed to try the same experiment, we have ourselves been entertained with at Fort Wagner, and attempt an assault upon Fort Stevens, they will meet with quite as stubborn and successful a repulse. This morning we hear that the six pickets were captured from us, and the main body of the rebels are not in sight.
The monitors are still daily at work upon Fort Wagner, but seem to effect nothing beyond preventing the rebels from repairing the work.
From an officer on board the Ironsides I learn that in the attack of last Saturday, seven hundred shots were fired from that vessel, and about the same number from the monitors.
Lieut. Col. Hall, Provost Marshal General for the Department of the South, met the commander at Fort Wagner under flag of truce on Sunday morning, in order to arrange in regard to the burial of our dead. The rebel officer would not treat with him but told him that the dead would be buried and the wounded cared for as well as their own.
P. S.—By the Cosmopolitan, just in from Morris Island, I learn that an exchange of prisoners is to take place to-morrow. Our wounded are to be brought to this city. Col. Putnam is reported not dead, but severely wounded.—[Cor. Tribune.

List of Officers Wounded.
Gen Stron, severe.                              Capt. Appleton, 54 Mass
Gen Seymoyr, slight                  Capt Paxton, 48 NY
Col Vorhies, 67 Ohio                Capt West, 62 Ohio
Col Chalfold, 6 Ct                              Capt Jones, 54 Mass
Col Steele, 62 Ohio                   Capt Granger, 100 NY
Col Amory, 9 Me                      Capt Brooks, 9 Me
Col Barton, 48 NY                    Capt Welland, 54 Mass
Col Shaw, 54 Mass                   Lt Parsons, 67 Ohio
Lt Col Comminger, 67 O           Lt James, 54 Mass
Lt Col Rodman, 7 Ct                Lt Hazelton, 62 Ohio
Lt Col Green, 48 NY, kil'd        Lt Miller, 48 NY
Maj Hallowell, 54 Mass             Lt Potter, 6 Ct
Maj Hicks, 76 Pa                      Lt McIntosh, 100 NY
Maj Nash, 100 NY                    Lt Writman, 67 Ohio
Capt Pope, 54 Mass                 Lt Foote, 62 Ohio
Capt Lockwood, 48 NY            Lt Blaney, 62 Ohio
Capt Swartout, 48 NY               Lt Hermans, 54 Mass
Capt Epiring, 48 NY                 Lt Stearns, 65 Ohio
Capt Knurr, 76 Pa                     Lt Emerson, 9 Me
Capt Hudson, 6 Ct                             Lt Barret, 48 NY

List of Privates Wounded Belonging to New York and New England Regiments, not Including the 54th Mass. Negro Regiment.
W Wheples, K, 100 NY            M Bixbee, A, 7 NH
G J Webb, C, 100 NY              R Henderson, H, 100 NY
Sgt C J Emery, 100 NY             Wm Sullivan, B, 6 Conn
J R Ellis, I, 8 NH                       Capt A Jones, D, 54 Mass
Wm Gigney, B, 100 NY            B F Huyson, C, 100 NY
Ed Pratt, K, 100 NY                  F L Arnold, A, 100 NY
Cor H Herkben, K, 100 NY       J Buckhardt, A, 100 NY
G W Onderdonk, F, 48 NY       C H Orday, H, 7 NH
Wm Manich, B, 100 NY            T D Knight, I, 1 Mass cav
G W Isbell, C, 100 NY             Sgt G P Paterson, 48 NY
Sgt W Onderdonk, F, 48 NY    Cor J N Perkins, H, 7 NH
Sgt Hutchinson, F, 48 NY         Jos D Narcross, I, 9 Me
N Strick, A, 100 NY                 D Atherton, G, 48 NY
Peter Ostrander, K, 48 NY        H W Dringe, K, 48 NY
Wm Andrews, K, 48 NY                    E L Squires, B, 6 Ct
Mathew Sneiger, C, 6 Ct           John Felber, C, 6 Ct
John Turner, A, 24 Mass                    W H Huntriss, A, 3 NH
Francis White, F, 6th O             Thos McGany, B, 48 NY
Rodney Houdley, K, 7 NH        Wal A Tousey, D, 100 NY
Lewis Prim, D, 48 NY               J A Rand, F, 7 NH
A Lippincott, D, 48th NY          F Whipple, K, 7 NH
Corp Hy C Shaw, 100 NY        Freeman Atwood, B, 48 NY
J Williams, G, 100 NY              W A Austin, E, 100 NY
Sergt B R Pratt, B, 7 NH                    Sergt G F McCabe, K, 7 NH
C J Traverse, B, 48 NY             G A Shaw, A, 5 NH
L M Strickfield, D, 9 Me           R Abram, K, 81 NY
Wm Dugal, E, 6 Conn               C V Style, H, 48 NY
Corp H M Coney, E, 100 NY    J Altmon, H, 6 Conn
J R Manchester, K, 9 Me           E B Hodgeman, I, 7 NH
G W Dudley, F, 7 NH               J S Colforth, G, 7 NH
D Davy, C, 48 NY                    A L Wood, B, 6 Conn
W C Bates, D, 100 NY             W Tilley, G, 9 Me
Wm Stacey, H, 100 NY            Frank Halstead, G, 100 NY
C R Richerman, F, 100 NY       Robert Anderson, E, 48 NY
John G Black, H, 100 NY          George P Doeg, D, 3 NH
A__ Gunshed, H, 100 NY         Chas H Westcott, E, 8 NH
E A Bunce, C, 7 NH                 John Fitepatrick, 9 Me
John Smusphet, H, 100 NY       Paul Ernest, 56 NY
Geo Long, F, 56 NY                 Branard Cumings, A, 7 NH
Sergt J G Abbott, D, 48 NY      Sergt H Grant, A, 6 Conn
John DeCamp, D, 48 NY          Wm Ehrsam, B, 6 Conn
Adam Wolcott, B, 48 NY          F J Atwater, B, 6 Conn
Abbett Peck, E, 6 Conn            Frank Moorse, A, 6 Conn
Corp I D Johns, B, 6 Conn       Jas Morrison, K, 100 NY
M Sheehan, B, 100 NY             Fred Luckman, C, 100 NY
Corp L Whitney, G, 100 NY     Chas T Beeman, A, 7 NH
Sergt P Lynch, E, 100 NY         A Wall, H, 7 NH
Corp S K Duffes, D, 48 NY      Chas H Clark, H, 9 Me
Corp A J Welling, H,                Hugh Monroe, G, 9 Me
48 NY                                      _ Wolf, B, NY Vol Eng
P Fitzard, K, 100 NY                Sgt Davy, K, 100 NY
Corp Seibold, C, do                 I S Muosop, D, do
B Bowen, I, do                         J Allen, C, do
S Smith, D, 9 Me                      J Berry, A, 9 Me
C A C___man, E, 9 Me            W Dunbar, F, 9 Me
A Stanhope, A, 9 Me                W Fenel, A, 9 Me
B Gammett, K, 7 NH                G Gillman, C, 7 NH
I Thibbets, K, 3 NH                  N W Pease, H, 48 NY
T Jones, D, 48 NY                    J Yeeks, H, 48 NY
J Freeman, H, 48 NY                J Hinson, C, 48 NY
A Milian, F, 3 NH                     A Dyer, F, 100 NY
I S Taylor, I, 6 Conn                 F Cummerford, A, 48 NY
1st Lt Cain, I, 7 NH                  C Stanhope, A, 9 Me
Sgt Morgan, G, 100 NY            M Bow, F, 48 NY
G Smith, H, 6 Conn                  Corp McBrien, H, 6 Conn
Corp McGee, D, 6 Conn                    J C jones, A, 48 NY
P Larkin, C, 48 NY                   Sst Sgt West, G, 7 NH
F Tarr, E, 9 Me                         W Lewis, H, 7 NH
Lt Kell, USA.                           J Mayer, C, 6 Conn
B Holster, G, 100 NY               L Page, F, 9 Me
T Lowery, F, 48 NY                 W Kippling, E, 3 US Art
R Andrews, G, 9 Me                 D N Farvey, M, 3 RI
A T Williams, K, 9 Me              J Holton, B, 48 NY
Sgt Peel, E, 7 NH                      T Morton, H, 100 NY
Corp Bryan, C, 48 NY              Corp Sweeney, H, 9 Me
Corp Gardiner, E, 48 NY          Corp Perkins, F, 7 NH
J Smith, C, 48 NY                     Corp Cochrane, C, 100 NY
J E Cushman, E, 9 Me               W Howell, D, 48 NY
E Beverly, A, 9 Me                   J Harris, C, 3 RI
J Spear, B, 48 NY                     C Silhom, E, 3 Reg Art
Christian Kimberly, F, 100         T Thompson, Artificer,
NY                                           C, NY Vol Eng
Hiram Ellis, F, 100 NY              W J Brownlow, F, 100 NY
Lt Palmer, 10 Conn

The 48th N. Y. Regiment lost in all, about 450 men, and only three of its officers escaped unharmed.

Accounts from the Enemy.
The Richmond papers of the 23d publish the following dispatched from Gen. Beauregard:
Charleston, July 18—6 P. M.
General S. Cooper:
The Ironsides, five monitors, four gun and mortar boats, two land batteries (five guns), have fired furiously all day on Battery Wagner. Four killed, fourteen wounded, and one gun carriage disabled.
G. T. BEAUREGARD.

CHARLESTON, JULY 19—3:40 A. M.
General S. Cooper:
After a furious bombardment of eleven hours from the ships and shore, throwing many thousands of shot and shell, the enemy assaulted Battery Wagner desperately and repeatedly, commencing at dark. Our people fought worthily, and repulsed the attacks with great slaughter. A number of prisoners were captured. Our loss is relatively small. It includes, however, valuable lives. Brigadier General Tallaferro commands on our side. Pickets now well in advance.
Charleston, July 23—The enemy recommenced shelling again yesterday, with but few casualties on our part. We had, in the battle of the 18th instant, about one hundred and fifty killed and wounded. The enemy's loss, including prisoners, was about two thousand. Nearly eight hundred were buried under a flag of truce. Colonel Putnam, acting brigadier general, and Colonel Shaw, commanding the negro regiments, were killed.
G. T. BEAUREGARD, General.

Rebel Account of the Previous Repulse.
[From the Charleston Mercury, July 19.]
Before the papers of our last issue had reached the eyes of our readers, another bloody and important action had taken place upon Morris Island.
The enemy evidently did not at first feel secure, in his newly gained position. During Thursday night (according to the statements of prisoners), the Yankee troops were drawn up in line of battle. At daybreak, finding that the expected night attack would not be made, it was determined among the Yankee leaders themselves to attempt an onset upon Battery Wagner. Gen. Strong, with a force of about 2,000 picked men, at once made preparations for the assault. His command consisted of four companies of the 7th Connecticut, Lieut. Col. Rodman commanding, with the 76th Pennsylvania, Col. Strawbridge; the 9th Maine, Col. Emery, the 48th and 100th New York, with the "Lost Children," and independent regiment.
Forming his men into two lines, soon after drawn on Saturday, he advanced at the double quick toward our works. Col. Graham, who was in command  of Battery Wagner, suffered the enemy to get within about forty yards, when he gave the word to "Fire!" and down went the foremost rank of the assailants. Yet on they came with spirit and resolutions, some of them even gaining the interior of the work. But they paid dearly for their temerity. Everywhere they were met with coolness and determination by our men, who maintained their fire steadily; and, after a short contest of fifteen minutes, the enemy’s first line gave way and fled in confusion. The second line retired without any serious attempts to retrieve the fortunes of the first.
The day was won. In the melee we had taken 130 prisoners and 95 of the enemy's dead lay strewn immediately in front of our works.
The prisoners were brought to the city and marched to jail. Their bearing was very impertinent. They admitted the severe character of their losses, and stated that Gen. Strong, with Lieut. Col. Rodman, of the 7th Connecticut, had been badly wounded. It appears from their statement that their regiments are very far from being full, many of their companies having dwindled down to a mere handful. Brig. Gen. Seymour is on Morris Island, and Major General Gilmore, who now succeeds Hunter in the command of the Department, had his headquarters for the present on Folly Island. The following are the names of the Yankee commissioned officers who were taken in the fight:—Capt. David H. Hogeland, 76th Pa.; Capt. Jerome Tourtellotte, wounded; Capt. V. B. Chamberlain, Lieut. W. E. Phillips, 7th Conn.; Lieut. E. W. Ware, 9th Me.; Lieut. E. C. Jordan, 7th Conn.

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.
We have from semi-official (Washington) sources some intimation of what has been done by the Army of the Potomac during the past week. Our troops have kept up a close scrutiny of Lee's movements, and have succeeded, by rapid marches, in baffling several attempts made by him to pass through the gaps of the Blue Ridge. He tried successively Snicker's, Ashby's and Manassas Gaps, but found a strong National force at each, and at the last two was driven back with loss. It is believed that he is now moving rapidly toward Staunton, up the Shenandoah Valley. Our cavalry have, as usual, been very active. At Chester Gap they recaptured 1,100 of the cattle stolen by the enemy, and several hundred sheep, and a large number of horses have also been recaptured.
A despatch from headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, Front Royal dated Saturday, announces an engagement with the enemy's rear guard on the day previous, and the disappearance of the whole rebel army on Saturday morning—supposed on route to Culpepper and Orange Court house.

END OF THE REBEL RAID THROUGH INDIANA AND OHIO—CATURE OF MORGAN AND HIS COMMAND.
General John Morgan and his entire remaining band, numbering about 600 men, were captured by General Shackleford yesterday morning near New Lisbon, Ohio. The following brief despatch tells the whole story:
HEADQUARTERS IN THE FIELD.
THREE MILES SOUTH OF NEW LISBON,
OHIO, July 26.
To Col. Lewis Richmond, A. A. G.:
By the blessing of Almighty God, I have succeeded in capturing Gen. John H. Morgan, Col. Clarke, and the balance of the command, amounting to about 400 prisoners. I will start with Morgan and Staff on the first train for Cincinnati, and await the General's order for transportation for the balance.
(Signed) J. M. SHACKLEFORD.
Colonel Commanding.

NORTH CAROLINA.
General Foster sends an official report of the late successful cavalry raid on the Weldon and Wilmington Railroad in North Carolina some of the particulars of which we have before given.

MISSISSIPPI.
It is reported by persons who arrived at Cairo from Vicksburg, yesterday, that Jackson, Miss. has been burned by our forces, and that the pursuit of Joe Johnston has been given over for the present.

MORNING EXPRESS.
Local, Literary and Miscellaneous.
BUFFALO, WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 1863.
The 100th Regiment in the Assault upon Fort Wagner.
LIST OF THE KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING.
We have awaited with painful anxiety for the particulars of the recent disastrous attack on Fort Wagner, as we believed one of our bravest Regiments—the 100th—had been assigned a position of dangerous distinction from which it could scarcely escape without serious loss. The accompanying letters, which we are permitted to publish and the list of killed and wounded, are a sad confirmation of our fears, and will fill the breasts of hundreds of our citizens with conflicting emotions of grateful pride and bitter sorrow. Although the casualties are numerous, the number of killed and seriously wounded is surprisingly small, and permit the indulgence of a well founded hope that most of the gallant fellows will speedily recover.
The following account of the assault is taken from a letter written by W. H. Mason of Company C., to his parents in this city.
* * * * Now comes the tug of war. July 18th at day light we fell back from the picket line to the rifle pits. The Rebs commenced shelling us as soon as they could see, our gunboats answering quite rapidly. About the middle of the forenoon our batteries opened, and the iron clads commenced moving up, and at 11:55 the first shot was fired from the iron fleet, the wooden blockaders keeping up a smart fire at long range. Moultrie kept almost perfect silence during the day. The bombardment continued from land and water till about five o'clock, when the fort appeared to have been silenced. The columns then commenced moving up to take it by storm. Fort Sumter shelled our troops as they advanced until we got within close range of Fort Wagner, when the rebs poured in a murderous fire of grape, canister and musketry, besides throwing hand grenades. Regiment after regiment charged on the fort, each one retreating in good order in their turn, except the 9th Maine, which broke and ran in a confused mass through the lines of the 6th Conn., 4th N. H., and the 100th N. Y. The 54th Mass., (colored) led the charge, and did well with the exception of a few panic stricken ebonies.
Not more than half of any regiment in the charge came out unhurt. We had about 4,000 in the field, with no artillery, against 1,500 behind breastworks, in pits and bomb-proofs, besides having the darkness in their favor; it being dark when the fight commenced, which lasted about three hours. Our retreating, battle worn and wounded troops were fired into and cut down by our own drunken artillery, the 1st U. S. and 5th R. I., who answered the groans of the wounded with, "Go to the front, you cowardly dogs, or we will blow your brains out."
Our Regiment went in with about 500 enlisted men and 15 officers. The next morning (Sunday) the Assembly was beat to ascertain our loss. All we could muster was 225 men and 5 officers. Company C. lost 31 men and 2 officers, one of which has since turned up. William Mathews, formerly a clerk in Milling ton's umbrella store, has not been heard of since the fight and is undoubtedly dead. Bob Kirk, of Company C, was shot through the lungs, and died next morning."
An officer in the regiment gives a more particular account of its noble conduct. It will be seen that his estimate of the number of men which went into action, is smaller than Mr. Mason's, and appears to be the most reliable. We particularly recommend his closing remarks to the consideration of those who sympathize with the disgraceful spirit of opposition to the efforts of the Government to send her warrior sons succor, and secure for their arms a glorious and speedy triumph over treason, that they may know with what utter disgust and contempt they are regarded by the very men who are suffering most from the hardships of which the opponents to the draft complain.

HEADQUARTERS 100TH N. Y. V.,
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., July 20.
DEAR FRIEND—Another disastrous battle the 100th has been in. On the evening of the 18th inst. we were ordered to storm Fort Wagner on the near end of this island. Our regiment had 3 companies out away on other duty, so we only had 7 companies, numbering about 450 men with 13 officers. Together with several other regiments we charged on the fort, planted our colors on the top of the breastworks, but after a loss of 174 men we were forced to retire, which we did in good order, this time bringing the flag with us. Two color bearers were killed, but singular to say, not a hole was made in the flag, probably because the Rebs fired very low.
Of the 13 officers only 4 came out unhurt. Those are Colonel Dandy, Capt. Bailey, Lieut. Howell and myself.
Major Nash, Capts. Rauert and Granger, and Lieut. Friday, my 2d Lieutenant, are wounded, but will all in a few months I think be fit for duty. Adjutant Haddock, Lieuts. McMann (my 1st Lieutenant), Kavanaugh, Runckell and Cyrus Brown are all severely wounded and supposed to be dead and buried.
It was a most disastrous affair, but I am glad to say that Buffalo has agian [sic] reason to be proud of her sons in the 100th. The men behaved admirably; in the face of the most galling fire they advanced in line of battle on a double quick, crossing ditches and fences, and up the walls of the fort, but it is no wonder they done so. How can men behave otherwise who have got a leader like Colonel Dandy. He was one of the first on the top of the wails, cheering on the regiment, and he stood there side of the only flag that was fetched up so far—the Buffalo Board of Trade flag—until all the rest of the regiments gave way, when we had to fall back. Every man in the 100th used the expression, ''Colonel Dandy is a brick."
Charleston must fall, sooner or later; it is only a matter of time; but what in h—l are you fellows doing up North—rioting and resisting the draft, when hundreds, nay, thousands of your sons and brothers are down here giving  their last drop of blood in defence of our country. Oh! fie, shame upon such traitors and cowards. Is that the way you encourage your soldiers who have abandoned their homes and are fighting for you? Oh! I wish I had them all on one rope and could string them up as I would a snake. They are worse than the rebels. I heard yesterday a rebel Lieut. Colonel, whom we took prisoner, speak about the proceedings in New York. Ah, I wish those fellows could have heard him. He denounced the Copperheads in the most contemptuous terms, calling them worse than negroes."
Below is a list of the casualties in the 100th, as reported officially. Speaking of the general report in which it was embodied, the correspondent of the N. Y. Herald, states that when the report was made, every adjutant was positive that at least from his regiment there was not a single straggler, and at all the regiments he had since visited they were positive that not a single straggler had returned; yet he ascertained from brigade and department headquarters had nearly every regiment had reported a list of "gained from missing," the number in one regiment numbering forty eight. Among the really missing are many killed and wounded. Numerous wounded ones have not been off duty at all, or have returned to duty ere this. So the list must be taken with some qualification, but it is the only official one made or to be made, and, with the exception of the excess of missing, will be found accurate:—

KILLED.
Sergeant Charles L. Handers, Co. A.
Private Conrad Site, Co. E
Corporal Charles Dayton, Co. E.
Private Frederick Sueffer, Co. F.
Sergeant John L Hegel, do
Private Victor Recksih, do
Sergeant Robert Kuk, Co. G.

WOUNDED.
Major D. D. Nash, wounded in the left leg slightly.
Company A.—First Sergeant Byron Ruston, severely in three places; Sergeant James L. Gaylard, left arm, slightly; Corporal Nicholas Shutt, Privates F. L. Arnold, slightly in hand; John Beauchupt, John G. Teger, Peter Kelly, Wallace Starkweather.
Company B—Corporal William Gerrick, severely, in jaw; Private Abram L. Wood, slightly in hand; Musician Mensh, slightly in arm.         
Company C—2d Lieut. M. Friday, slightly in the hand; 1st Sergt. Benj. F. Hugson, severely in thigh; Corp. Quincy A Lenord, severely in Larnyx; Ezra N Hoag, severely in leg; Chas Reardon, slightly in hand; Geo W Isdell, severely in arm; Geo Longsmere, severely in thigh; Fred Luckman, James McKeever, Minane L Waur, slightly in the arm; Geo J Webb, slightly in left ear; John W Whaples, badly in head; Daniel Campbel, slightly in head; Richard Hughes, slightly in foot; Henry Mathey, slightly in thigh; Wm. H. Massy, slightly in knee; Andrew Morey, slightly in head; Richard Welch, slightly in hand; John H. Williams, slightly in head.
Company D—Corporal Wallace A Tousley, severely in side; Privates W E Bates, slightly in leg; Ossac T. Messep, and Henry Slidell, slightly; Hiram Ellis, severely in shoulder.
Company E—Sergeant Pat Lynch, right shoulder, severely; Corp. W H Corey, left do; Privates W A Austin and Luke Cassidy, slightly; Jonas Charleston; Lester Severey, slightly in hand; Gilbert S Pater and Ernest Phillips, slightly; Julius F Skinner, Andrew Miller, severely.
Company F.—Capt Chas. H Renert, slightly, in right arm; Sergs. GrebIer, Corp. Mangold, finger shot off; Privates Wm. Barthave, Jonn H Brownley, August Fryer, H C Ellsworth, severely in foot; John D Garnin, C Clummerliver, John L Kleeberg, Geo Long, Charles Laly, Fred F Mann, C Miller, C Richarmer, Lewis Venderlip, Robert Younglove.
Company G—Sergeant George Morgan, severely in shoulder; Corporal Lewis A. Whitney; Privates Michael Baker, James P Bailey, Andrew Ball, W. E, Brown, finger shot off; Ernest H Freeman, Frank Hansted, Barney Hoister, John Savory, John Leonard, in arm; Alfred P. Willard, in leg.
Company H—Sergeant Paul Everts, Sergeant O. J. Emery, slightly in left leg; Privates John Allen, (Anen),left leg, badly; B H Dougherty, A Garrosite, R. Henderson, M. Shenan, J. Smauphet, Thomas Mharton, F. Melvin.
Company K—Captain Warren Granger, slightly, in neck; Sergeant Pratt, slightly, in arm; Frank Davy, severely, in body; Corporal Wm H Stacy, leg shot off; Henry H Henslow; Privates Robert Abrahams, John B. Handfast, Henry Kranser, Geo. Newland, Fred. Noller, Philip Retzell.

MISSING.
Adjutant H. H. Haddock wounded.
Company A—Corporal Clark Dickerman and Justin Semur; Private C. Sheehall.
Company B—Privates John Peresly and John Stintinaun.
Company C—1st Lieutenant John McMann, wounded;
Corporal Henry Dressing; Privates Lawrence, Callohan, George Vilborn, Munaner, Matthews, Michael McGuire.
Company E—2d Lieutenant Cyrus Brown, wounded and supposed to be dead; Sergeant Charles Pettis; Privates Daniel Bryce, M. Brice.

HANDSOMELY ACKNOWLEDGED.—The teachers of Buffalo sent Lieut. Stowits a costume becomeing [sic] his position in the 100th Regt, to which he thus hanesomely [sic] replies:
POST HOSPITAL, FOLLY ISLAND, S. C.,
July 31, 1863.
To the Teachers of the City of Buffalo:
Your gifts are in my hands. Each article is fitted and adapted to its proper use. These garments shall be worn, not as an evidence of military vanity, but as a means of military distinction. The sword shall only be drawn in the discharge of duty and for the good of my country. Words are inadequate to express a proper return for your generous liberality and unwavering patriotism.
As an unworthy representative of the fraternity of teachers of the "Queen City," I will simply say, that as a private soldier and non-commissioned officer, my duty was always both willingly and faithfully performed. How well, let one of your number attest, who so recently left us, and whose memory as an officer and companion, is still fresh in our thoughts. As a commissioned officer, I hope still to add to my success. Though for weeks I have been prostrate with fever, still I hope soon to return to duty, and I pray that I may be preserved to witness the surrender of Charleston, which would only be marred by the thought that so many noble hearts of the 100th regiment that lie buried beneath the sands of Morris Island, could not be present.
May the blessings of peace attend all the teachers of Buffalo, and may they have wisdom and strength to guide aright the youth under their care, for whose benefit our beloved land is being re-baptized in the font of loved land is being re-baptized in the font of Liberty, by the process of life and blood.
Again, permit me to heartily thank you for your valuable and precious gifts,
Most respectfully, I remain as ever, your co-laborer, for Right, Liberty and Country.
GEO. H. STOWITS,
2d Lieut. 100th Regt. N. Y. V.

THE SIEGE OF CHARLESTON.
We extract the following paragraphs from the correspondence of the Providence Journal, written from on board the Monitor Montauk:
Wednesday morning again we moved alone up to Wagner, and engaged it at 1,100 yards for two hours. They replied to us from Wagner at first, but during the last hour not more than one or two guns were fired at us. The ball, however, was taken up by Fort Gregg, and many of the shot from there passed over and beyond the iron-clads, yet there has been some excellent firing from Fort Gregg, and the fortifications around Charleston do not lack for exact gunners.
Thursday we had a day's rest, and well enjoyed and appreciated it. Participants today, we become willing spectators and ___ the next.
The iron-clads consume the morning with their work and practice, and the gunboats take it up in the afternoon. The Paul Jones, Seneca, Wissahicon, Conemaugh and Ottawa, have made some excellent practice, throwing 150- pound rifled shell finely into both Wagner and Fort Gregg. With the army on shore and the iron-clads and gunboats afloat, Wagner and Fort Gregg do not lack attention.
Friday morning, the 24th, was another fine, clear, mild morning. At half-past three o'clock all hands were called and immediately we were under way. The attack was to be more general than usual, and the day's work was early commenced.
In the following order we proceeded up the channel: Weehawken, Ironsides, Montauk, Nantucket, Patapsco and Catskill. At 5:32 A. M. the Montauk opened the engagement with an 11-inch shell, which fell on the extreme right of the fort. At the same time the batteries on shore opened fire, and soon the engagement became general. The Montauk was lying not more than 900 yards from Wagner, the Ironsides about 1,000 yards, and the other iron-clads about 1,200 or 1,300 yards distant. At six o'clock a new feature in the fighting here took place, being nothing less than a shot from Moultrie. Old Moultrie has been silent since we appeared off Charleston till now. But I presume the fealty to secession could not be restrained, and the occupants of Moultrie were anxious to show their desire to contribute their ___ toward driving away the Yankees. But ___ not fell half a mile short, and they only ___ it once more, Sumter, however, always ___ ...ve us some excellent shots, and contin... until the affair was over.
Hardly a repetition of the fight of the 13th, yet it was a hotly contested engagement and a magnificent sight. But Wagner fired only once and then during the remainder of the day was silent. We could not see a soul in the works, and it seemed almost deserted. But from Sumter and Gregg the shots came thick and fast. The firing from the land batteries of General Gilmore and the iron-clads was excellent, and the big shells which tore their way through parapet and casemate and burst inside, threw up such great masses of dust and sand and earth that it seemed as though a volcano must be belching forth the black contents of its subterranean recesses.
The great hull of the Ironsides lay a splendid mark for their guns, but its sides were not scathed by a single shell.
The firing from the Ironsides is beautiful, as it always has been. The report of the guns of its powerful broadside rent the air; the shot one after another tore through the sides of Wagner, while the thick blue veil of smoke which rose and floated away over the vessel, almost enveloping the black hull from view, formed a picture, the magnificence of which one could not help estimating and appreciating, even in the midst of battle.

THE STRENGTH OF THE EARTHWORKS.
The land batteries are daily continuing their practice upon Wagner, and it is almost impossible to tell of the result. Doubtless not much beyond harassing the enemy is accomplished, for the great sides of Wagner can receive many 30-pounders and even 11-inch and 15-inch shot and shell without being rendered useless. This war has developed one fact which cannot fail to be of infinite importance hereafter. It is the effectiveness of earth and land batteries. A well-constructed earthwork, with proper and sufficient ordnance, and well manned, can scarcely be taken. It seems, in fact, that the shot and shell thrown into it serve only to make it stronger, and if the fire be not incessant, at night the men can repair the damage of the day, and such a work may hold out almost any time. I do not think there is a permanent fortification in the world which could have stood the fire to which Wagner was subjected on the 18th of July.

GILMORE PUSHING ON.
Certainly General Gilmore is a persevering and industrious man. The fortifications which he is throwing up in his advanced position are already extensive, and assume indeed a formidable appearance; even now they rival Wagner, and although not consisting of such a mass of earth as Wagner, yet I do not doubt they are equally strong, or at least nearly so. The morning shows the increase which the night has brought. His men are placing guns in position, and all the work necessary to make the fortifications strong and offensive or defensive is rapidly going on. A few days more must witness a bombardment from these works, which are now silent.

A VIEW FROM A MONITOR'S TURRET.
On our right is the deserted summer resort, the Moultrie House. Close by it Fort Moultrie, with the two blockade running wrecks, the Isaac P. Smith and the Minho, ashore on the beach before it. A little farther to the left is quiet Moultrieville, a little beyond it, toward the city, the beautiful green parapet and traverses of Battery. Sumter now blocks the view. Above its frowning wall the "stars and bars" have given way to the new flag. On the eastern face the line of the new mason work from parapet to base, and which was repaired after the injury from the iron-clads in April last, is distinctly marked. The middle line of ports into which we looked and saw them load and fire, is now filled up, and the lower tier of ports only is used. The line of cotton bales which last week hung over its walls is gone. The flash of their own guns set them on fire, and they were cut down. Most of the cotton was saved, and is piled up behind Sumter, while some of it came floating down by us. The rear of the fort has been to an extent protected by masses of stone and brick work on each corner. As you look, almost close to Sumter and under it, is Fort Gregg.
Nearer to us and immediately in front is Wagner, with its sides, though bearing some appearance of shape, yet torn and ragged. Over the low land of Morris Island, and on James Island beyond, are the two batteries which the hands of treason have so recently builded [sic]. A little farther beyond and to the right is Fort Johnson, and to the right of that opens the harbor and city. The yellow walls of Castle Pinckney form a prominent object over the smooth surface of the water. A little to the left of Pinckney is the iron-clad middle-ground battery, Fort Ripley, and I imagine it is not more comfortable below than the rebel prize Atlanta, for I see upon the top of it the white tents in which the officers and men probably live.
A little beyond and to the left is the city. The green trees upon the battery look beautiful and inviting, and from under their sheltering foliage many of the fair residents of Charleston looked out upon that April fight, praying in their hearts--anxious and palpitating hearts, let us hope that the contemptible Yankees and their iron ships might never survive the terrible storm of shot and shell which rained so mercilessly upon them.
The streets, the houses, the churches and spires of the city are in plain view. Near to and al-most in range of Christ Church spire, a tall tower and lookout is rapidly going up. The blockade runners are lying quietly at the wharves. We can see neither of the iron-clads, and undoubtedly they are trying to make a move in another direction to divert our attention from the fortifications. Away to the left on Morris Island busy hands are at work making strong the defences of Union, loyalty and good government. It is an interesting picture. Hardly a spot within the line of vision but what is already familiar to our eyes, and yet destined to become in the swiftly advancing days more memorable. The foot of the Government is firmly planted on this "sacred soil." Only a few steps forward and the birth-place of treason is under its heel. The steps may be taken slowly, perhaps, but surely. We may witness repulses at first, but they shall be turned into successes. The contest will be fierce, but will end in victory at last. Let us watch without criticizing [sic], wait without murmuring. The stake is too great to admit a false move, the prize is too dear to fall from our grasp. With the fall of Charleston we may surely look, and soon, for the last expiring breath of the rebellion. North Carolina, crushed between South Carolina and Virginia, shall be lifted into liberty, and with Louisiana lead the march back, not into the old Union, but a new one, redeemed, purified, regenerated. The events here may speedily lead to that "consummation devoutly to be wished."
The words of Gen. Gilmore shall be our promise and hope. "Everything is going well."

THE ATTACK ON FORT WAGNER—THE KILLED AND WOUNDED IN THE 100TH REGIMENT.
The New York Herald, of Monday, contains a detailed account of the recent engagements before Charleston, in which the One Hundredth Regiment has suffered severely. In the engagement on James Island, the following members of the 100th are reported wounded:

COMPANY I.
Private George Blake, seriously, in the head.
Privates James Hoffman and James Bowen in the head, and Lawrence Philips and Wm. Maylon in the hip.

COMPANY G.
Corporal John Laverty, in the hand, sightly [sic], on the 13th.

The assault upon Fort Wagner was commenced on the 22nd, the storming force being under the command of Gen. Strong. His regiments were the 54th Massachusetts, the Sixth Connecticut, John L. Chatfield; Ninth Maine, Colonel Sabine Emory; the remnant of the Seventh Connecticut battalion, Captain Sylvester S. Gray, (not with the storming party;) Forty-eighth New York, Colonel William B. Barton; Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, commanded by Captain John Littell, and the Third New Hampshire, Colonel J. H. Jackson.
Col. H. S. Putnam with his brigade was ordered to advance to the rear of Gen. Strong's.—His brigade consisted of the Seventh New Hampshire, Lieutenant Colonel J. C. Abbott in command; One Hundredth New York, Colonel Dandy; Sixty-seventh Ohio, Colonel A. C Voris, and the Sixty-second Ohio, Col. Howell.
We copy from the Herald the following description of the
ADVANCE OF PUTNAM'S BRIGADE.
Colonel Putnam was one of the first to reach the parapet, surrounded by his brave New Hampshire Seventh boys, and inspiring his whole brigade by his fearless, gallant conduct. In approaching the ditch the retreating men of the first charge were met, and some portions of the brigade were detained for a moment, but not permanently demoralized. Col. Putnam sent Lt. Col. Abbott, of the Seventh, and Major Henderson, his Adjutant General, to intercept stragglers, rally those who halted and hurry forward all troops. They did this under a very hot fire, which was as terrible a short distance from the fort as in it. The rear division of the Seventh and a portion of the One Hundredth New York were massed together, crossed the ditch and essayed to get a foothold inside from one point, while the Sixty-second and Sixty-seventh Ohio went to another. Every regiment behaved nobly, and all have a fearful roll of casualties to attest the persistency and energy of their effort to obtain and hold the fort. One corner of the fort only was ours and that was swept by grape and canister and exposed to musketry. The troops looked back, saw they were alone, and began to falter.
General Strong had been up and cheered and rallied his quondan classmate and ever friend, Colonel Putnam, and returned to try and bring up reinforcements. Colonel Putnam implored, entreated, commanded his troops to hold on but a moment longer, and then another minute, and then a moment again, but no help came. He had sent a messenger to ask for reinforcements. He did not know that Generals Strong and Seymour had both been carried from the field wounded. The messenger learned the fact, and went to tell General Gillmore. The latter, anxious, but still cool and clear-headed, told him the reserve, a fresh brigade, had been ordered forward as soon as it was known a foothold had been gained in the rebel work. Before this messenger had left another arrived to say that Colonel Putnam was killed, and that our troops had retired from the fort entirely. That was the result, briefly told.
Gen. Stevenson's brigade was being conducted by Col. Turner, of Gen. Gillmore's staff, to reinforce Col. Putnam, when the news of his death and the retirement of his troops reached them in season to prevent the whole rebel fire taking effect on them. Sadly and disappointed they turned back, and the battle-field was left to the enemy, and our dead and wounded. The rebel fire ceased, the ambulances met the stretchers at the edge of danger, and the groans of the wounded, the chirps of the crickets and the beating of the surf were soon all the sounds we could hear, for the fire on both sides had ceased. The rebels, too, had dead to bury and wounded to care for, and peace was to reign for a night at least.
Our fresh troops fell back to the intrenchments in good order, occupying all our old positions; and the shattered regiments rallied around their torn, burned and smoked standards, to go into camp and call the names of the absent forever.
The following is a complete list of the casualties in the 100th Regiment as reported officially:
WOUNDED.
Sergeant Charles L. Handers, Co. A.
Private Codrad Site, Co. E.
Corporal Charles Dayton, Co. E.
Private Frederick Sheffer, Co. F.
Sergeant John L. Hegel, Co. F.
Private Victor Reeksie, Co. F.
Sergeant Robert Kuk, Co. G.

WOUNDED.
Major D. D. Nash, wounded in left leg slightly.

COMPANY A.
First Sergt. Byron Ruston, severely in three places.
Sergt. James L. Gaylrod, left arm, slightly.
Corp. Nicholas Shutt.
Privates F. L. Arnold, slightly in hand; John Beauchupt, John G. Teger, Peter Kelly, Wallace Starkweather.

COMPANY B.
Corp. William Gerrick, severely, in jaw.
Private Abram L. Wood, slightly in hand.
Musician Mensh, slightly in arm.

COMPANY C.
2d Lieut. Michael Friday, slightly in the hand.
1st Sergt, Benj F Hugson, severely in the thigh.
Corporal Quiney A Lebord, severely in larnyx.
Ezra N Hoag, severely in leg.
Chas Reaidon, slightly in hand.
Geo W Isdell, severely in arm.
Geo Longsmere, " thigh.
Fred Luckman, James McKeever, slightly in head.
August Roehowen, severely in ankle.
____ L Waur, slightly in arm.
Geo J Webb, " left ear.
John W Whaples, badly in head.
DanielCampbell, slightly "
Richard Hughes, " in foot
Henry Mathew, " " thigh.
Wm H Mason, " " knee.
Andrew Morey, " " head.
Richard Welch, " " hand.
John H Williams, " " head,

COMPANY D.
Coporal Wallace A Tousley,
Privates W E Bates, slightly in ...
" Isaac T Mussey and H ...ell, slightly.
" Hiram Ellis, severely in shoulder.

COMPANY E.
Sergeant Pat Lynch, right shoulder, severely.
Corporal W H Corey, left do.
Privates W A Austin and Luke Cassidy, slightly.
" Jonas Charleston, Lester Severey, slightly in hand.
Privates Gilbert S Pater and Ernest Phillips, slightly.
"      Julius F Skinner, Andrew Mill..., severely.

COMPANY F.
Capt. Charles H. Rauert, slightly, in ... arm.
Sergeant Grebler.
Corporal Charles Mangold, finger shot off.
Privates Wm. C. Barthauer,
" John H. Brownley,
" August Fryer,
" H. C. Ellsworth, severely in feet,
" John D. Garnin,
" C. Clummerliver,
" John L. Kleeberg,
" George Long,
" Charles Laly,
" Fred F. Main,
" C. Miller,
" C. Richarmer,
“  Lewis Venderlip.
“  Robert Younglove.

COMPANY G.
Sergeant George Morgan, severely, in shoulder.
Corporal Lewis A. Whitney.
Privates Michael Baker,
" James P. Bailey,
" Andrew Ball,
" W. E. Brown, finger shot off;
" Ernst H. Freeman,
" Frank Haustead,
" Barney Hoister,
" John Savory,
" John Leonard, in arm;
" Alfred P. Willard, in leg.

COMPANY H.
Sergeant Paul Everts,
" O. J. Emery, slightly, in left leg;
Privates John Allen (Anen), in left leg, badly;
" B. J. Dougherty,
" A. Garrosite,
" B. Henderson,
" M. Shephan,
" J. Smauphet,
" Thos. Martin,
" F. Melvin.

COMPANY K.
Capt. Warren Granger, slightly, in neck.
Sergeant Pratt, slightly in arm.
Frank Davy, severely, in body.
Corporal Wm. H. Stacey, leg shot off.
Henry H. Henslow.
Privates—Robert Abrahams, severely, in leg.
" James Allen, arm.
" Luther Dawson.
" John B. Hand, foot.
" Henry Kranser.
" Geo. Newland.
" Fred. Noller.
" Phillip Retzerl.
MISSING.
Adjutant H. H. Haddock, wounded.

COMPANY A.
Corporals—Clark Dickerman.
" Justin Semur.
Private—C. Sheeball.

COMPANY B.
Privates—John Peresly.
" John Stintinann.

COMPANY C.
First Lieutenant John McMann, wounded.
Corporal Henry Dressing.
Privates—Lawrence.
" Callahan.
" Geo. Vilborn.
" Munaner.
" Mathews.
" Michael McGuire.

COMPANY E.
Second Lieutenant Cyrus Brown, wounded and supposed to be dead.
Sergeant Chas. Pettis.
Privates—Daniel Bryce.
" M. Brice.

THE 100TH AT CHARLESTON.—The correspondent of the New York Tribune alludes to the gallant conduct of the 100th Regiment in the assault upon Fort Wagner, as follows:—
The 1st Brigade, under the lead of Gen. Strong, failed to take the fort. It was now the turn of Colonel Putnam, commanding the 2d Brigade, composed of the 7th New Hampshire, the 62d Ohio, Col. Steele, the 67th Ohio, Col. Vorhees, and the 100th New York, Colonel Dandy, to make the attempt. But alas! the task was too much for him. Through the same terrible fire he led his men to, over and into the fort, and for an hour held one-half of it, fighting every moment of that time with the utmost desperation, and, as with the 1st Brigade, it was not until he himself fell killed, and nearly all his officers wounded, and no reinforcements arriving, that his men fell back, and the rebel shout and cheer of victory was heard above the roar of Sumter and the guns from Cumming's Point.

THE 100TH REGIMENT IN THE SEIGE OF FORT WAGNER—LETTER FROM A SOLDIER.
MORRIS ISLAND, July 21st, 1863.
MY DEAR FATHER:—I suppose you will have heard, ere this reaches you, that we have had an engagement and no doubt the papers will state that I am slightly wounded in the knee. Nevertheless, I will write a few lines to let you know that I am well, with the exception of a slight bruise on the left knee. It was done by a grape which brushed past me, tearing my pants and drawers, but not breaking the skin or drawing blood.
Could you have seen the 100th Regiment a week ago and then looked at its ranks last Sunday, you would not wonder at the sorrow now depicted on the countenances of both officers and men. I take a few extracts from my diary. I told you in my last that we should certainly have a fight in forty-eight hours. Sure enough, it came.
July 10th. Our batteries on the head of Foley Island opened a brisk fire at 4:45 A. M. The monitors commenced running in and soon engaged Cummings Point. We rapidly gained advantage over the Rebs, and about 8 o'clock our troops commenced crossing. We soon drove them from their works and took some prisoners with very little loss on our side. We advanced about half way up the Island, where we lay during the day, the monitors still playing on Fort Wagner. We turned one of the Reb's guns on to them until we used up all the ammunition they left. All quiet during the night. The next morning the 6th Connecticut got repulsed in a charge on Fort Wagner, owing to the cowardice of the 9th Maine, which was to support them. The latter broke and skedaddled, leaving the 6th boys to get out as well they could.
I will skip the intervening time from the 10th to the 18th. Suffice it to say of this period that we picketed, skirmished and fortified under a continual shelling from the Rebs, which was replied to by the gunboats. On the 13th some five or six men were wounded by a bursting shell while on picket.
Now comes the tug of war. July 18th, at daylight we fell back from the picket line to the rifle pits. The Rebs commenced shelling as soon as they could see. Our gunboats answered pretty fast. About the middle of the forenoon our batteries opened and the ironclads commenced moving up, and at 11:55 the first shot was fired from the iron fleet. The wooden blockaders kept up a smart fire at long range.
Fort Moultrie kept almost perfect silence through the day. The bombardment continued from land and water until about 5 o'clock, when the fort appeared to have been silenced. Then the column commenced to move up to storm the fort. Sumter shelled the troops as they advanced until we got within close range of Wagner, when the rebs poured in a murderous fire of grape, cannister and musketry, besides throwing hand grenades. Regiment after regiment charged on the fort, each one retreating in good order in their turn, except the 9th Maine which broke and run in a confused mass through the lines of the 6th Connecticut, the 4th New Hampshire and 100th New York. The 54th Massachussetts [sic] (colored) led the charge and did well, with the exception of a few panic-stricken fellows. Not more than half of any regiment in the charge came out unhurt. We had about 4000 in the open field with no artillery, against 1500 behind breastworks and in pits. Darkness also was in their favor, it being dark when the fight commenced. It lasted about three hours.
Our retreating, battle-worn and wounded troops were fired into and cut down by our own drunken artillery, the 1st U. S. and 3d Rhode Island, who answered to the groans of the wounded with, "Go to the front, you cowardly dogs, or we will blow your brains out!" Our Regiment went in with about 500 enlisted men and 15 officers. The next Sunday morning, the assembly was beat to ascertain our loss. All we could muster was 225 men and five officers. Co. C. lost 31 men and two officers, one of which has since turned up. The only one in our company you would be likely to hear an enquiry for, is Wm. Matthew. He was clerk in Millington Brother's store. He has not been heard of since the fight, and is undoubtedly dead. Tell H. G. White, if he has not heard about Bob Kink, of Co. G., that he was shot through the lungs, and died next morning.—We expect another fight in a few days.
W. H. MASON.

THE 100TH REGIMENT.--This is the number given to the last Regiment of Gen. SCROGG'S brigade--the roll of which has just been filed in the Adjutant-General's Office.

PRESENTATION OF A NEW STAND OF COLORS BY THE BOARD OF TRADE TO THE 100TH REGIMENT.—
CAMP 100TH N. Y. VOLS.,
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., Jan. 11, 1863.
MESSRS. EDITORS:—Knowing that our many friends in Buffalo take an interest in every thing pertaining to our welfare, I send you an account of a pleasing incident that took place on our parade ground yesterday forenoon, viz: the presentation of the beautiful Stand of Colors sent us by our patrons,
The Board of Trade of the City of Buffalo.
After the regiment had been formed in a hollow square, facing inwards, with the Major commanding in the centre, the Chaplain, followed by the colors to be presented, took a position a few paces to the left of the Major, and made the following presentation speech:
"Major:—A little more than 14 months since, I was deputed by the Board of Trade of Buffalo, to present to our regiment, in their name, our present flag. At that time, you will remember, our Colonel promised that 'should this regiment ever take this Flag into battle we should endeavor to bring it out again.' How faithfully this promise has been fulfilled, the event's that have since transpired, and the Flag itself will bear witness.
"To reward us for our gallantry, to assure us of their continued confidence and esteem, they have again sent us a gracious remembrance. Allow me, sir, again to represent our most worthy patrons, and present this beautiful and appropriate stand of colors. May they not only arouse us to increased patriotism and exertion for our country, but also assure us, that, while enduring the toils and privations incident to a soldier's life, we have the unbounded sympathy and co-operation of our friends at home. This it is that will give us renewed strength and ambition in treading the weary, bloodstained paths of war. And while with pride and vigor we rally around these new colors, let us not forget our old Flag, now so clear to each and every one of us, for the many hallowed associations that must forever be connected with it; for around if were wont to rally so many of our brothers who have shed their blood in its defence, some of whom have fought their last battle, some of whom are sleeping their last sleep in cold and silent graves, in very sight of our camp.
"Take, then, these colors, with an earnest pledge to return them in due time unblemished, save by the scars and stains of victory, of glory and success."
The Major replied as follows:
"Through you, Chaplain, from our friends and patrons, the Buffalo Board of Trade, in the name of the officers and men of this regiment, I receive these gratifying tokens of their continued favor and esteem, emblems of our State and National glory. In their name, I promise that these beautiful colors,  while reminding us as they do of their past privations and dangers, as well as our victories and success, shall incite us to new strength and courage in winning new honors and fresh laurels; that they shall never be dishonored or trailed in the dust. The 100th N. Y., the soldiers of their adoption, tender the Board of Trade of the city of Buffalo, their heartfelt thanks and gratitude."
Upon the color bearers receiving the flags, three hearty cheers were proposed for the Board of Trade and the new stand of colors. I need hard say that this proposal met with a vociferous response. The Brigade Band then played "The Star Spangled Banner," after which the regiment was formed for Dress Parade.
As this stand of Colors has not been seen in Buffalo, I will give you somewhat of a description of them. The first, the National color, the Stars and Stripes, is of rich silk, with a heavy yellow fringe, the number of the regiment embroidered in silver on the centre stripe. The names of the battles in which the regiment has been engaged embroidered in gold floss on the alternate white stripes. The stars are also embroidered in white floss on a dark blue field. The staff, of oak, mounted with brass, with a chased gill spear at the top, from which hangs two heavy gold bullion tassels with cord.
The other Flag is of rich blue silk, with a fringe of yellow, the arms of the State em­broidered in floss on the centre, the number of the regiment embroidered in a scroll un­derneath. The staff and tassels the same as the other, except in the place of the spear is a gilt eagle. This banner is said to be the richest thing of the kind that has ever been made for any regiment.
In addition to these, were four "Camp Colors," of dark blue silk, with a yellow fringe, the number of the regiment embroidered in white floss on the centre, the pikes, of oak, with gib points, and the colors at cached to these by red, white and blue knots.
The Stand of Colors are indeed very beautiful, and have aroused no little pride among ourselves. We shall endeavor to prove ourselves worthy of them, and of our gracious benefactors. L.

KILLED AND WOUNDED IN THE 100TH REGMENT.—
The Times Charleston correspondent gives the following list of casualties in the 100th Regiment, from August 29th to September 2d:—
Jacob Siebert, Co. E—foot, amputated.
M. Stives, Co. H—foot.
Lieut. E. S. Peck, Co. B—wounded.
Fred. Sneller, Co. I—side, dead.
Casper Berle, Co. B—back.
Nicholas Schmidt, Co. F—killed.
James Wood, Co. A—missing.
Augustus Schaffer, Co. F—head.
Geo. W. Allen, Co. C—arm and hip, dead.
The same writer relates this incident of the siege:—
A somewhat singular circumstance occurred on picket three or four nights ago. During the night a man named Henry Grund, Company E, One  Hundredth New York, was killed while in discharge of his duty, and his body lay between the lines. Capt. Ayres, of the Third Rhode Island, shortly after the event had been made known, leaped upon the top of the last parallel and shouted to a rebel picket, "Here, you; we have a man killed out there and want to bring his body in." "Well," replied the rebel, "three of you may come over for it." Whereupon Captain Ayres started with three men, making, including himself, four altogether. The rebel observing four men approaching him cried before they proceeded far, "Halt." The command having been complied with, the rebel thus: "I said but three might come over; one must go back." Capt. Ayers then returned and was followed soon after by the three men bearing the dead body of their comrade. The rebel was certainly very obliging, and what motive prompted him to extend such a privilege cannot be easily accounted for. Evidence daily accumulates of increasing dissatisfaction among the rebels, and doubtless that had something to do with the conduct of the picket.

THE VETERANS OF THE ONE HUNDREDTH.—By a telegram received by Col. Dandy, this morning, we are informed that the veterans of the 100th N. Y. V. leave New York at 5 P. M. today, by the N. Y. & Rrie [sic] R. R., and will probably arrive here about 11 A M. tomorrow. We are informed that although nearly all who are entitled to re-enlist as veterans after two years' service, so much has the regiment been depleted by battles and other causes, but about 60 will arrive. We suggest that this gallant little band, who left us two years ago, and who have braved everything for their country's honor, receive at the hands of the citizens of Buffalo such a cordial welcome as their history proves them entitled to.
Will the Christian Commission take it upon themselves to see that the above suggestion is carried into effect?

COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER.
Wednesday Evening, January 6, 1864.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
THE ADDRESS OF COL. DANDY.—The following is the address of Col. Dandy before the Board of Trade, yesterday. We think that those who read it attentively will be inclined to differ with the gallant Colonel in estimating his ability as a speaker. The eloquent and glowing terms in which he spoke of the regiment and the deeds of the brave soldiers and officers who have made it what it is, are not, by any means, such as might have been expected from one whose "education had not been such as to adapt him for that business.'' He spoke as follows:
Gentlemen of the Board of Trade:—In accordance with a wish expressed by some of the members of your honorable body, I am here today to give you a short history of your regiment, the 100th New York Volunteers. And in doing so, you will bear with me if you find me wanting in those graces of diction or that facility of expression known only to long practiced speakers, knowing as you do that my education has not adapted me for that business, and that the practice of my life has been of a different sort.
Last March, a year ago, McClellan's army commenced its long and tiresome march up the Peninsula, with the design of occupying Richmond. It was a mighty army, strong in numbers, complete in its appointments. In the ranks of that army was a division of raw troops, raised before the march, for whose instruction and discipline the exigencies of the service permitted neither time nor opportunity. Of this division the 100th formed a part.
All of you are familiar with the history of that Peninsular campaign, and I need not, therefore, remind you of the toil, sufferings and dangers which called into action the fortitude and heroism of our noble soldiers. Day after day, through the soft mud, the pelting, pitiless rain; weakened by hunger, almost tortured with thirst, did our regiment, with their devoted comrades of that division, march on.
At last we find them before the field of the Seven Pines, or Fair Oaks. Much has been written about that field, and I shall not attempt to describe it. I was not with the regiment at that time. When I say that it was there that the regiment first won its laurels; that it was there our brave 100th stubbornly contested with the enemy the ground for hours and held him in check until our lines could be formed; that it was there they lost their gallant leader and a host of noble comrades, I will have but repeated a portion of the history of that "red field of strife" with which you are well acquainted. Passing by the disastrous battle of Gaines' Mills, we find the 100th regiment again under the fire of the enemy at White Oak Swamps. It was the rear of our army in retreat endeavoring to escape across a deep marsh and an impassable bridge. The fire of the enemy's artillery was terrific; its effects discernable everywhere among the heaps of wounded and slain. Yet there they kept green the laurels gathered at Fair Oaks. The pursuit was checked, and the rear of the army saved.
At Harrison's Landing, too, during that terrible season of suffering caused by intense heat, an atmosphere filled with malaria, and the excessive labor required of the troops, the 100th regiment still maintained its reputation. Midst disease and death, its ranks rapidly thinning until reduced o one-fourth of its original number, the courage of the men never faltered, and their steps still kept time to the music of the Union. No wonder, however, considering the loss of their, the depletion of their ranks, the privations to which they were exposed, the deadly nature of the climate, and the want of success of the army in the enterprise in which they had embarked with such high hope, that our brave men should look with longing for the termination of their service and a return to their loved ones at home. In fact the men were somewhat dispirited, speculation was rife as to who was to be the next commander of the regiment, many officers in the regiment were not without their ambition, and it may be that partisan feeling did not tend to promote discipline. It was at this stage of its history that Governor Morgan, on the nomination of your Board, appointed me to the command. And here commences an interesting period both to you and to me. Interesting to you because you had stretched forth your hands in aid of our distressed country, and nobly contributed your means to fill our depleted armies during the darkest period of its history. Would to God other organizations throughout the country had generally followed your example! What defeats might not have been prevented, what disastrous routs, what toilsome marches, what disgraceful retreats!
You found the regiment a skeleton; you gave it heart and lungs and blood and brain and muscle. You gave into my charge the training of this unorganized body, and proud to accept that charge. I lost no time in joining the regiment. Readers of history have not failed to observe in the perusal of that portion relating to "those great wars which make ambition virtue" that discipline is a prerequisite to the efficiency of armies. Without it an army is a mob, and more dangerous to itself than to the enemy. Absolute and prompt obedience, respect to superiors and to authority, conformity to the laws of war, abstinence from pillage and straggling, fidelity on duty, vigilence [sic] in the field; these are as absolutely essential as a knowledge of the use of arms. "The discipline of armies is the safeguard of states," and none understood the, value of this maxim better than those two great captains of their age, Napoleon and the Iron Duke.
Entertaining those views I determined that the 100th regiment should in discipline be in no manner behind that of any regiment in the service. When I joined it at Gloucester Point in September, 1862, I found that through your exertions it had received nearly its compliment of men; other regiments came on and soon the Board of Trade regiment was the largest in the department of Virginia. 1 proceeded to make it the best. Much was to be done. A new camp was to be constructed: autumn was approaching and the men were living in miserable hovels covered with old shelter tents that could not keep out the rain. The men had not learned to police their camps properly and personal cleanliness was not always considered a virtue.
Mess cooking was generally neglected and the company streets were a series of cooking ranges, composed or scattered fires, upon which, on a tin plate, each man would fry whatever he chanced to get in the way of food. A proper hospital had to be found. Under this state of affairs it is not surprising that irregularities of all kinds should occur. Men would be late or absent from drill; roll calls were much neglected; in fact, if the regiment was wanted for duty it was uncertain how soon it could be turned out. All these things had to be, and were corrected. A comfortable camp of Sibley tents with stores, was constructed.—The house of a spiteful secessionist living near was seized for a hospital; cooking, cleanliness and police were attended to, and regularity commenced. A marked improvement was the result of all this, and when, in December, I was ordered on a reconnoissance in Gloucester county, a distance of some thirty-five miles from camp, I had the satisfaction to observe on the occasion of a night attack by the enemy's cavalry, that the regiment was prompt to form, and would stand fire.
In January, 1863, we were ordered to the Department of North Carolina, and the commanding General on the occasion of our departure expressed his regrets that he was losing the best regiment in his command. From North Carolina the regiment proceeded to St. Helena Island, S. C, and on the 22d of March I was ordered to proceed with it and seize Coles Island, preliminary to the recent operations before Charleston.
Here we remained 11 days without support, and in sight of the enemies' pickets, and it is appropriate that at this time I should mention the valuable services of Capt. Payne, who at great risk went out daily with a few of his men, and always brought back valuable information of the nature of the country and the position and force of the enemy's outposts. I was by this means enabled to add to the charts furnished us by the navy, and to give valuable information to the General who came up with reinforcements and succeeded me in command. From Cole's the regiment was ordered to Folly Island, and remained there in camp until the batteries at Little Folly, intended for the reduction of the works on the south end of Morris Island, were commenced. I was then ordered to the command of Little Folly, and a large portion of the labor of erecting those batteries was performed by the 100th Regiment. This labor was excessively fatiguing, as it was necessary that most of it should be done at night. For 20 nights I saw no bed, and for at least half that time the men belonging to the regiment were deprived of their natural rest.
On the 10th of July the attack on Morris Island was made; with what results you know. The 100th crossed Light House Inlet under fire of the enemy's artillery, behaved with great coolness, and were highly complimented by Gen. Hodges, commanding the brigade, for their conduct on that occasion. And now we come to the memorable assault on Fort Wagner. It will be remembered that on the 11th of July a force consisting of two regiments and a battalion of four companies, under command of Gen. Strong, advanced at daybreak to assault Fort Wagner. That assault was repulsed with great loss. Our regiment was not engaged on this occasion—it was reposing after the toils of the previous night.
Our regiment, belonging to the 2d Brigade, Col. Putnam, was formed for the attack at 9 in the morning. We remained on the beach, in the broiling sun, until 3 in the afternoon, when we were ordered to advance. This we did until we reached a point in the island under the fire of Forts Johnston, Sumter, Gregg and Wagner. It was here, while drawn up in line, that a round shot from Sumter took three men from my ranks, and it was with pleasure I observed that the order to close up to fill the gap thus made was promptly obeyed.
It gave me great confidence in the courage and discipline of the men, many of whom had not served on the Peninsula. But we advance again, and as the shades of evening draw around us, many a brave man looks his last upon the setting sun. Now the grape shot and cannister tear through the ranks; shells explode among our devoted men; the heavy, dull thug of the grape shot as it reaches its victim, is relieved by the demoniac whistling and screaming of the terrible projectile, the schrapnel. At last death is before us; behind us; on each side of us—blood, blood, everywhere. To add to the terors [sic] of this occasion, the routed first brigade comes screaming back and breaks through our lines. We press on; the deadly minie bullet lends its aid, and the parapet of Wagner is one fierce glare as of lightning. We have immense gaps in our ranks, but no pausing. "Onward" is the cry, and onward we go to meet death in a new form; to gasp amid all the horrors of suffocation in a bottomless ditch; or, when a footing could be obtained, to be raked anew by grape and cannister. Many of the brave men of the 100th gained that parapet, but only to die there; their bodies moulder at the bottom of the slimy ditch. It was on the paraget that the colorbearer of the regiment, the gallant Sergt. Flanders, was killed, and a hand to hand fight for the colors between the rebels and our color guard ensued. He was at last borne off by Corporal Ebenezer Spooner, who is now a First Lieutenant in the regiment.
Here fell Lieutenants Cyrus Brown, Rnuckle, Kavanagh, and my Adjutant, Haddock, with a host of noble men.
Honor to the dead of that field. They were buried in a shallow pit, and the encroachments of the ocean have left many of their bones to whiten on the banks of the neighboring islands. The winds sing their requium [sic] as they hurry thither from our north-eastern waters.—Peace to their ashes.

"They have fought their last fight.
They have seen their last battle,
No sound shall awake them
To glory again."

In the fight our regiment behaved like veterans, and our officers like heroes. Let the names of Nash and Bailey and Rauert, of Ernst and Granger, of McMann and Howell and Friday and Spooner, who still live, be put on the record that they may be known for their brave deeds when the history of the regiment shall become part of the history of the nation, and they themselves have passed away. And in fact we are all making history; you as certainly by the aid and support you give to the cause at home, as we, who are called upon to share the toils, labors, and dangers of the field. In this engagement I took 465 enlisted men and 13 officers into action, and lost in killed, wounded and missing, 176 enlisted men and nine officers. When you consider that the engagement lasted not longer than two hours, from its commencement to our final repulse, you will say that the assault on Fort Wagner was perhaps the most deadly conflict of the war.
The repulse at Wagner was followed by its siege. Here again the 100th Regiment was selected for the front—the post of honor. Laboring at night and guarding the trenches by day, our soldiers were allowed no respite from incessant toil. Continually under the fire of the enemy from all his works, our casualties were numerous, and after twenty-four hours duty in the trenches, there were always sad rites to be performed when we returned to camp. When the work was considerably advanced and the enemy's sharpshooters became active, we were selected as advanced guard, and our pickets were often engaged with those of the enemy with deadly effect. It was in one of these engagements that the brave First Sergeant of Company E, E. J. Van Buren, was killed, and many others met their fate from the rifles of the enemy's concealed pickets, and breathed their last sigh upon the foetid [sic] marshes of desolate Morris Island.
I think my losses in the siege of Wagner will sum up at least one hundred men in killed, wounded and missing. The body of every man has been decently buried and his gave marked with his name. And now, having glanced at the past of the regiment, permit me to say a few words of its present. My rolls showed, when I left Morris Island, 827 enlisted men belonging to the regiment, of which nearly one hundred are absent, sick and wounded in hospitals. Our regiment has always been the most, healthy organization in every Department in which we have served. We drill very respectably. Our men are well clothed, camped and fed, and unanimity now prevails in the councils of our officers. Our men arc contented, and those who have the right to do so—about 200—will, I think, very generally re-enlist as veterans.
I have labored hard to perfect this regiment, not without opposition, not perhaps without calumniation. And in my object I have been well assisted by your body. Had you failed me, the regiment would not now exist to which I can refer with pride as one of the very very best in the service. I am here now to fill that regiment up to its maximum standard.—Whether I am successful or not I shall carry away with me from your ceautiful [sic]  city a lasting remembrance of your hospitality and kindness.
The days of this rebellion are numbered, and the traitorous government is being hemmed in on al sides. One more united effort, and we shall again be a free, prosperous and united people. To you, who contribute your means to send our armies in the field, will belong the glory of our success equally with those who have grasped the shield and drawn the sword. Gold is the sinew of war. Let us who recruit to take the field again sec some of it. Fill up our armies this winter, and the next summer's campaign will be the last. So will your country bear your name in proud remembrance; the army will bless you; the country will bless you; posterity will bless you; but to him who opposes the government, and refuses, either by word or action, to do anything for the restoration of our country, I have no word except of indignation. Like the tory of the revolution, his name will go down.
"To the vile dust from whence he sprung,
Unwept, unhonored, and unsung."

FROM THE 100TH REGIMENT—LIST OF CASUALTIES,—An interesting letter from Col. Dandy was read before the Board of Trade yesterday, giving a detailed account of the part taken by the 100th Regiment in the battle of the 7th inst. He specially compliments Major D. D. Nash, Capt. Timothy Lynch (commanding Color Co.), Lieuts. Adriance, Richardson, Sandrock, Peck (Acting Adjutants, Nichols, McMann, Evans and Howell. These officers were under his immediate supervision, and are therefore particularly mentioned, although he believes, from the account given, that the others bore themselves with great galantry [sic].
The Chaplain of the 100th sends us the following letter and list of casualties:
CAMP 100TH N. Y. VOLS.,
BERMUDA HUNDREDTHS, May 8th, 1864.
MESSRS. EDITORS:—The 100th left Gloucester Point with the 10th and 18th corps on the 4th inst., and landed about a mile above City Point, on the James river, on the morning of the 6th. After a march of nine or ten miles into the country, we bivouaced [sic] for the night, Yesterday morning our brigade joined a force taken from both corps, to push forward and cut off the railroad and telegraphic communication between Richmond and Petersburg. After a brisk engagement with the enemy, who were prepared to meet us, this object was successfully accomplished. The 100th was selected as one of the regiments to lead the advance. This they not only did, but they gallantly accomplished what was expected from the whole brigade. After gaining the Richmond turnpike, about midway between Richmond and Petersburg, and
destroying the telegraph running along this road, the Colonel boldly advanced about a quarter of a mile up to the railroad, charged upon the rifle pits along the road, drove the enemy, tore up the rails, set fire to a small bridge, destroyed the telegraph lines, and advanced up the hill on the opposite side of the road. Here they needed supports, but, through some mismanagement, none were sent them. After maintaining their position long enough to enable them to do all the damage in their power, they fell back with the other forces engaged, after a loss of 27 in killed, wounded and missing. Thus the 100th have again covered themselves with glory, gaining the praise and admiration of all about them. Below I send you a correct list of our loss, which was small when the heavy raking fire to which they were for some time exposed is considered.
J. B. LINN,
Chaplain 100th N. Y. Vols.

List of killed, wounded and missing of the 100th N. Y. Volunteers, in a skirmish on Richmond and Petersburg Railroad, Virginia, May 7th, 1864:
KILLED.—Corpl. Philip Shuler, Co. F., Private Frank Leonard, Co. D.
WOUNDED.—1st Lt. Wm. Richardson, commanding Co. G., in shoulder. 1st Lt. C. B. Adriance, commanding Co. A. in right leg.
Private James McGuire, Co. A, in hand.
Corpl. Barney Grouney, Co. B, in breast.
Private Francis Downing, Co. B, in head.
Private Peter Roth, Co. B, in leg.
Private Geo. Swinderman, Co. B. mouth, severely.
Corpl. Bargrouth, Co. D.
Private Wm, Hood, Co. D.
Private E. V. Williams, Co. D.
Private J. Kinsold, Co. D, left side.
Musician. John A. Castle, Co. D, groin, probably mortally.
Private John Groneller, Co. F , knee, severely.
Private Frederick Bens, Co, E, hand.
Private Wm. Smith, Co. E, mouth.
Private Wm. Linske, Co. F, mouth.
Corp. Geo. Ball, Co. G, leg.
Private Byron Ketchum, Co. F, hand.
Private Martin N. Hunt, Co. F, hand.
MISSING,—Private James Wood, Co. A; Private Henry Budd, Co. A; Private Jno. G. Black, Co, F ; Private Joseph Whitman, Co. K; Corpl. Geo. Prager, Co. K; Private John Donahue, Co. E, left on the field sick.
Total, 27.

INFORMATION FROM AN IMPRISONED OFFICER OF THE 100TH.— The Le Roy Gazette publishes the following with reference to an officer of the 100th Regiment in Libby Prison, and those captured with him:
During the severe fighting of Butler's army on the 16th of May last, the 100th N. Y. V., was in the deadliest current of battle, and fought with a bravery that won the acknowledgments of the commanding General. Among the missing on that day was Lieut. Myron P. Pierson, who was captured and taken to Richmond. The painful suspense and anxiety of his friends here is now relieved by the receipt of two letters by his father, Philo L. Pierson, announcing his capture and imprisonment in Libby Prison. His first letter is dated "Libby Prison, May 20, 1864," and in brief announces that he was taken May 16th, with 16 of Co. B's men, and that he is well—received no wound or other injury, and anxiously inquires "how many of Co. B. were killed and wounded and missing in the battle." He names those of his Company who were captured with him:—
Serg't M. L. Olmsted, Corporals P. Geise, G. G. Fincke, J. Whitbeck; privates J. Gleason, J. Goldtwait, J. Burbark, J. Hiermens, R. Judson, Ed. Moore, C. V. Moore, C. Smith, A. P. Weller, C. Rule, J. Hendricks, and D. D. Lynch.
He adds: "Lieut. J. H. French, of Buffalo, died to-day—May 22d—of wound in leg." He requests his father to write to Serg't Wm. Thompson or E. A. Dix, for an inventory of the remains of his company, &c., &c.

From the One Hundredth Regiment.
Correspondence Commercial Advertiser.
CAMP OF THE 100th N. Y. Vols.
BERMUDA HUNDREDS, VA., May 20, 1864.
MESSRS. EDITORS: A brief account of the doings of the 100th from the 12th to the 16th, cannot but be interesting to our friends at home.
On the morning of the 12th we received orders to join the advancing column of the 10th and 18th corps. We left camp about 8 A. M. with 573 officers and men. After a slow march of about 4 miles, we halted, finally bivouacked for the night in the midst of a heavy rain storm. At seven A. M. on the morning of the 13th we moved on, reaching Clover Hill Junction on the Richmond and Petersburg railroad at 10 1/2 A. M. After a short rest we again moved on towards Chester, driving in and capturing the enemy's pickets. Our corps then moved on towards Chesterfield Court House, the advance being led by our regiment, and soon came across a formidable earthwork stretching from the west of the railroad across to the river, well constructed. but only a small force to oppose us. This work was soon flanked on the right by our division. The enemy made a sharp resistance, came over the slope of the parapet and fought from the outside. Meanwhile Ame's division advanced, occupied the line, and the enemy fled to the rear. Our regiment then deployed, a few skirmishers being thrown out under Lt. Hoyt, towards the second line of the enemy's defences—and soon advancing in line of battle, and by the aid of artillery drove the enemy within them. Our regiment was engaged until near midnight, losing in this engagement 20 men in killed and wounded. Perfectly confident of our success, we bivouacked for the night on a hill just in front of the enemy. Our communication with the 18th corps during this time had been temporarily cut off. At daylight on the 14th, however, the two corps were again united, and at once a united advance was made upon the enemy. Our regiment were soon moving across an open field, driving the enemy within their line of defences. The regiment during the whole day was under a heavy fire both from artillery and infantry, a good part of the time being deployed as skirmishers, the skirmish line being Co. I, commanded by Capt. Brunek, supported at various times by some one of the other companies. Just at dark as the Colonel was relieving the line of skirmishers, the enemy made a bold charge upon our lines, but were gallantly repelled and driven within their entrenchments. The conduct of the regiment generally during the whole day was highly commended by the General-Commanding, and did much towards the success of our arms at this time. Our loss during the day was one officer killed, Lieut. Hoyt of Co. I, and three wounded, five enlisted men killed, and thirty wounded. Lieut. Hoyt fell, while urging the left of the line of skirmishers, thus nobly doing his duty, with an entire forgetfulness of self. His brave and noble bearing as an officer of the 100th will ever be remembered by all.
About midnight we bivouacked in a thicket close by; occasionally a shell from the enemy would drop among us, giving us to understand they were close at hand. On the 15th we lay under fire all day, having but two men wounded during the time.
On the morning of the 16th during a heavy fog, the right of our line having been turned by the enemy, and having been largely reinforced during the night, they charged upon one portion of the line with an overwhelming force. The 100th was at once placed in an advanced position, and gallantly bore their part in repelling the heavy and repeated charges made upon them by the enemy. The Colonel received no orders for his regiment to retreat—but observing the regiments on his right and left falling back, and a heavy force of the enemy closing in upon him, he gave the order to the regiment himself, when they retreated closely followed by the enemy who kept up a steady galling fire upon them. By this time the retreat became so hasty, that it was impossible to bring the wounded off the field, consequently most of them fell into the hands of the enemy. Our loss during the day was one officer wounded, Lieut. Howell, and five missing: Forty-seven men wounded, and one hundred and thirty-nine missing. Many of the above of course must have been killed, and among those reported missing were the wounded. No facts can be ascertained until we can get a list of the prisoners in the hands of the enemy. After falling back about a half a mile, the Colonel rallied the regiment around the colors, and marched back to our camp with the rest of our forces. Our sadly depleted ranks told of our work—but we were not disheartened. After reaching camp the regiment formed upon the color line, in the rear of which were a few of our wounded who had been brought from the field on stretchers by their comrades, and in Company I street lay the body of Lieut. Hoyt, which had also been brought in by some of his company—and, with the many vacancies in the line, a mournful picture was presented. But the 100th still lives, with hearts as brave and true as ever, and again ready to meet the enemy whenever ordered to do so.
We have now fallen behind our entrenchments, the enemy occasionally annoying us by charging upon our pickets, and throwing an occasional shell into camp. Today while our regiment was on picket, the enemy made an assault upon the line killing two of our men, George Zinck, Co. I, and Martin Huber, Co. F, and wounding slightly J. Clark, of Co. C. During the time that we have been before the enemy, the gallantry and bravery of both officers and men of the 100th has excited universal praise.
J. B. LINN, Chaplain 100th N. Y. V.

Accompanying the above letter, we have received the following order, issued by Colonel Dandy on Monday last, together with the official list of casualties in the regiment during the late battles:

HEADQUARTERS 100TH NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS,
BERMUDA HUNDRED, Va., May 23d, 1864.
Special Order No. 58.
The Colonel commanding takes this, the first, opportunity afforded him since the landing of our forces at Bermuda Hundred, to congratulate the officers and enlisted men of this regiment on the part they have taken in the recent operations against the enemy in this department.
I. On the 7th instant you marched against the enemy strongly posted on the Richmond and Petersburgh [sic] Railroad, drove him from his advanced position and kept him at bay while a large portion of the railroad was destroyed. In this engagement you lost two commissioned officers wounded, two enlisted men killed, thirteen wounded and six prisoners. From what can be gleaned from rebel sources, a much heavier loss was suffered by the enemy. General Brooks, commanding the expedition, speaks highly of your conduct on that occasion, and the commanding officer of the brigade in his official report mentions you as having done all the fighting of the brigade that day.
II. On the 13th you were selected to lead the advance in the flanking movement on the outer line of fortifications covering Drury's Bluff. You subsequently covered the rear of our column, when threatened by the enemy's cavalry, and were afterwards brought to the front in time to participate in the battle which won for us the outer line of the enemy's works on the railroad, and cause him to fall back on his second line of entrenchments. In this engagement you lost twenty enlisted men wounded, many of them so seriously that no hope can be entertained that they will ever rejoin the regiment.
III. On the 14th you were advanced against the second line of the enemy's entrenchments, operating mostly as skirmishers during the day. You drove the enemy within his defences, repelled several charges made to dislodge you, took several prisoners, and held the ground until relieved, having been under fire of artillery and infantry from eight in the morning until near midnight. In this engagement you had one commissioned officer (Lt. Hoyt, of Co. I) killed and three wounded, and of the enlisted men five killed and thirty wounded.
IV. On the 15th you lay in camp under fire and lost two enlisted men wounded.
V. On the 16th you were again ordered forward to co-operate in a general assault on the enemy's works. The right of our line having been driven back, it became necessary for the left to fall back also, but receiving no orders you maintained your position until every regiment on both flanks had retreated. You were left as a forlorn hope to guard the rear, and only retreated to avoid capture. In this engagement you lost one commissioned officer wounded and four taken prisoners, and of the enlisted men two killed and one hundred and eighty-seven wounded and missing. Of this last number many must have been killed, and it is known that many wounded were left on the field, the enemy being in too large force for you to attempt their removal.
The Colonel commanding is gratified with your conduct as a regiment in all these engagements, and he has the further gratification of knowing that your services are appreciated by the commanders of your corps and division.
There were a few cases of misconduct, and these will be properly attended to. Neither at home or in the archives of the army, or in history, shall their names be suffered to mingle in honorable mention with the names of those gallant men who have done their duty—some of whom have laid down their lives.
By order of
COL. G. B. DANDY.
E. S. PECK, 1st Lieut. and Acting Adjutant.

OFFICIAL LIST OF KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING IN THE 100TH REGIMENT, NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS, IN THE RECENT ENGAGEMENTS.
MAY 7TH.
Co. A—1st Lieut. C. B. Adriance, wounded in leg; Private James McGuire, wounded in hand; Private James Wood, missing.
Co. B—Corp'l Barney Growney, wounded in breast; Privates F. Downing, wounded in hand, Peter Roth, wounded in leg, George Swinderman, wounded in face.
Co. D—Private Leonard, killed; Private William Hood, missing; Musician John Castle, wounded severely in groin, since dead; Private E. V. Williams, missing; Private J. Unsold, wounded.
Co. E—Privates Bentz, J. Groweller, wounded.
Co. F—Corporal Philip Schiller, killed; Private Wm Linske, wounded; Private John G. Block, missing.
Co. G—1st Lieut. Wm. Richardson, wounded slightly in shoulder; Act. Prin. Musician Geo. Ball, wounded in leg.
Co. H—Privates M. N. Hunt, B Ketchum, wounded.
Co. K—Corporal Geo. Pragar, missing; Private Geo. Wightman, missing.

MAY 13th.
Co. A—Private Hugh Quinn, wounded.
Co. B—Privates D. McIntyre, wounded in leg, P. V. L. Ostrander, wounded in leg, R. Slack, wounded in leg, E. W. Smith, wounded in arm, F. Monroe wounded in hand.
Co. C—Privates P. Lafountaine, P. Mitchell, wounded slightly.
Co. E—Privates G Diehl, wounded in hand, F. Little, wounded in hand, P. Welsh, wounded in leg.
Co. G—Privates F. Evans, wounded in foot, Charles Jones, wounded in groin, Edward Tills, wounded in groin.
Co H—Corporal William Goff, wounded slightly in breast; Privates G. Avery, wounded in thigh, severely, H. W. Clark, wounded in both feet, amputated, Rob't Mitchell, wounded in foot slightly.
Co. K—Corporal J. Billington, wounded in head; Private M. B. Aykroid, wounded in hand, slightly.

MAY 14TH.
Co. B—Privates Geo. Slenker, wounded in arm, amputated, T. O. Geer,  wounded in hand, C. Williams, wounded in arm, M. Winkle, wounded in leg, D. Swats, wound in hand, slightly.
Co. C—Private James Redshaw, wounded, slightly.
Co. D—Privates M. Becker, wounded in left arm, G. Cross, wounded in shoulder, J. Gillie, wounded in back, slightly, J. Pendergrass, wounded in thigh, Wm. Smith, wounded in leg.
Co. E—Private A. F. Smith, killed; Private J. Wilson, wounded in hand; Capt. Timothy Lynch, wounded, slightly.
Co. F—Privates: Otto Tuirk, wounded in thigh; Isaac S. Bowen, killed.
Co. G—Privates: A Willard, killed; J. Carey, woun­ded in arm; J. Myers, wounded in shoulder; A. Ball, wounded in leg.
Co. H—Privates: G. B. Goodwin, wounded in chest; Elam Dunn, wounded slightly; Geo. Eighme, wounded in finger.
Co. I—First Lieut. Wayne Vogdes, wounded in leg slightly; Second Lieut. A. H. Hoyt, killed; Corporal Thos. Cannon, wounded in head; privates: William Sheldon, wounded severely in leg; M. Gutternut, killed; L. Phillips, wounded; George Washington, wounded.
Co. K—Second Lieut. Edward Pratt, wounded in foot; privates C. Turner, wounded in arm; C. Peters, wounded in hand; R. Pelo, wounded in groin; E. Millroy, wounded in leg; D. Kirsch, wounded in finger; H. Schaub, wounded in knee; B. Farley, wound in thigh, amputated; J. C. Wolcott, killed.

MAY 16TH.
Sergeant-Major H. I. Jones, missing.
Co. A—Corporals: John D. Starks, wounded in arm and body; W. N. Sill, wounded and missing; privates: W. G.Brown, wounded in leg; C, Robillard, wounded in arm; E. Wilder, wounded slightly in leg; James Farrell, wounded in left leg, amputated; J. Allen, M. C. Larkin, Hiram Wood, John E. Fergar, S. Quackenbush, S. Huntington, N. Halfinger, U. T. Hill, Geo. Hennet, M. Kelly, F. Lang, G. Martin F. Smith, J. Bauchaupt, Geo. Britting, Geo. Bower, A. Pratt, J. Rastoford, missing.
Co. B—First Lieut. Myron P. Pierson, missing; Ser­geant M. L. Olmsted, wounded in leg, amputated;
Corporals: Wm. Boss, wounded ill breast and arm; Philip Geise, Gustus Finckie, J. Whitbeck, missing; privates: J. Urban, wounded in arm; A. Chaselette, wounded in breast; C. V. Moore, wounded; H. C. Bolton, J. Burbank, C. Berle, A. I. Driggs, Wm. Gerecks, Geo. Gooden, J. Gleason, J. Goldthwaite, J. Heimans, J. Hendricks, Rufus Judson, M. Kroner, D. D. Lynch, E. C. Moore, C. R. Moody, C. Smith, A. P. Weller, W. G. Seeley, missing.
Co. C—Color-Sergeant Donald McKay, wounded in leg; Corporals: Alex. Housell, wounded and missing; Wm. Adams, Ezra N. Hoag, missing; privates: Daniel Lalor, wounded in head; James Markey, wounded in bowels; John Williams, wounded in leg; H. S. Herman, wounded in thigh; William Walls, wounded and missing; James McKeever, George Kaufman, missing.
Co. D.—1st Sergeant wounded in arm; Corporal C. Shellbeck, wounded; Private Chas. Leonard, wounded in hand; Privates Fredk. Reifstick, L. Daniels, H. Schlar, J. Phalegraff, wounded; Corporals M. Enright, A. Ruth, W. M. Taylor, missing; Privates E. Bostwick, Geo. A. Winnie, J. Coleman, J. Ranch, J. Lightmire, Wm. Smith, J. H. Wolfe, L. Tone, Wm. Hathaway, Wm. McCafferty, missing.
Co. E.—2d Lieutenant Seth W. Babbitt, wounded in thigh and missing; Sergeat [sic] W. D. Smith, wounded in leg] Sergeant Barney Smith, missing; Corporals L. Smith, F. Clement, Wm. Enos, missing; Private A. Anderson, missing; Private L. Astram, wounded; Privates J. Barnes, Carroll, P. Warner, ___ Fitzpatrick, ___ Hulbert, M. Hogan, Peter Killean, ___ McGeever, A, Smith, J. Smith, R. Smith, missing; Private Wm. Smith, wounded; Private Clausen Tunis, missing; Private Spencer Rose, wounded.
Co. F.—2d Lieutenant William Evans, wounded and missing; Corporal C. A. Gamin, wounded in thigh; Private J. L. Stevens, wounded in arm; Private L. Vanderlip, wounded in thumb; Private J. Ragine, wounded in body; Private A. Lang, wounded in arm; Private John Putnam, wounded in leg; Private G. W. Cadwall, wounded in shoulder; Privates A. Gattie, H. Yox, G. Kcoff, Thos. Sellele, H. Ryer, L. Pettes, P. Volk, J. Haag, Chas. L. Otto, Henry Hayes, missing.
Co. G—Privates E. Bennett, Wm. Foster, wounded; William Bain, wounded in head; George King, wounded; 1st Sergeant Sharp Adams, missing; Privates H Berghagger, H. Brumler, L. Clark, L. Casey, F. G. Greasey, P. O'Halloran, A. Haines, John M Thuringer, missing.
Co. H—1st Lieutenant L. D. Howell, wounded in arm and breast; 1st Sergeant P. E LaFort, wounded in arm; Corporal L. S. Melvin, wounded in leg; Privates G. W. David, S. Canfield, A. Hyland, A. Sharp, wounded; 2d Lieutenant James H. French, wounded and missing; Corporals C. R. Moss, and T. Russell, missing; Privates Wm. Bishop, A. P. Cushman, W. E. Chappell, C. Fone, F. Harnes, A. Lyth, James A. Pixley, W. M. Phillips, F. Reynolds, G. Sohm, M. Stiles, A. Tombers, missing.
Co. I—1st Sergeant P. Farrell, missing; Corporals J. F. Hale, P. Morgan, missing; Corporal John Ittle, wounded in arm; Corporal John Ragan, missing; Privates A. Anderson, Geo. Blake, missing; Matthew Betz, wounded in leg; P. Beolliet, wounded in leg slightly; Justus Bentner, James H. Gardiner, A Lattin, H. Miller, G. Martin, J. Maloney, missing; P. Riter, wounded in leg; G. N. Riker, Wm. Swartz, Owen Sweeney, Ransom B. True, D. Dumphrey, missing.
Co. K—Sergeants L. Buffum, B. Weeson, missing; Corp'l John Pearson, missing; Corp'l Robert Abrams, wounded in abdomen, (mortally); Privates John Boyd, L. Blanchard, L. Duncan, J. B. Handfist, P. McGragh, L. Noeller, Pius Schumaker, missing; C. Schaffer, wounded; C. Staley, wounded in arm; P. Ulrich, missing.

RECAPITULATION.
Com. officers killed, wounded and missing….. 11
Enlisted men killed ……………………………..9
Enlisted men wounded .................................... 111
Enlisted men wounded and missing.................... 3
Enlisted men missing........................................143
Total…………………………………………..277

FROM THE 100th REGIMENT—We make the following extracts from a letter written by a soldier in the 100th Regiment:—
DEEP BOTTOM, Va., July 12th, 1864.
Since I last wrote you, we have changed our base, whether for any good purpose or not remains to be seen. At any rate this is a better place for the regiment, and we have not half the duty to do that we had at Bermuda. At the latter place the regiment was under arms every night; here we go on picket every fourth night, and once in a while, on fatigue, and, in the meantime, the boys have nothing to do but lay on their backs and sweat.
Our position is very strong, as our fortifications are on the bluffs of the river, and our flanks are protected by the gunboats.
What is your opinion about this campaign? Mine is that it is a dead failure. If Gen. Grant intends fight any more this summer, he had better be about it, and get a few hundred thousand more men in addition to those he now has before Petersburg. I do not swear by Gen. Grant, not but what I believe he is a very good man; but not quite a "Napoleon." I believe and always shall that Gen. McClellan is the smartest military man in the country, and that he has been abused and slandered worse than any man in the country, and for nothing more or less than because he was and is a smarter man than his defamers. They knew it and were afraid that if he continued to be at the head of the army, they could not shirk the responsibility of furnishing him men, and, if they had done so, he would most certainly have ended this war. In that case his popularity would have so far exceeded their own and others of Abraham's "Pet Lambs," that he would have been elected President next November. This was a contingency they were not prepared for. Hence his removal and past and present defamation. But he will yet show the world who and what he is, and these men who have cried "wolf," when there was none, will be the first to cringe before him.
Butler, the "Beast," the chief marplot of the army, still flourishes in all his glory. What a pity that such a man—in size—should have such a constituted mind. He seems to have but two purposes in view. First to drink all the whisky in the Department, and, second, to make Americans believe that a negro is as good if not a little better than they are.
We receive Buffalo papers occasionally, but the Courier seldom comes to hand, though I know it is regularly sent. Let me tell you how to get it here, without fail: Tear the Express in two, and wrap the Courier inside of it, and then it will come all right.

CASUALTIES IN THE 100TH AT DEEP BOTTOM:
DEEP BOTTOM, Va., July 27.
Editors Express—I have only time to give you the names of casualties in the
100th Regiment, N Y. Vol., occurring today in skirmish with the enemy, at this place. Hancock's corps and Sheridan's cavalry crossed here last night and this morning, and are driving the enemy towards Chaffin's Bluff. Hancock's corps captured a battery of four 20-pound Parrot, this morning. It is the same battery that was captured from us near Drury's Bluff, on May 16th, and has been annoying our transportation along the river for some time. Yours,
Respectfully,
NEMO.

List of casualties in the 100th Regiment,
N. Y. Vol., July 27th, 1864:
WOUNDED.
Private—Valentine Webber, "B" arm, severely.
Private, George H. Wayhan, "E," foot, severely.
Private, P. Kane, "E," side, slightly.
   "        Jno. Brown, "K," knee, severely.

THE 100TH REGIMENT AT DEEP BOTTOM.—
CAMP 100TH N. Y. VOLS,
NEAR SPRING HILL, Aug, 15th.
Messrs. A. M. CLAPP & Co.:
Gents:—The Brigade of which the 100th forms a part, is again on the move. Night before last two Divisions of the 10th Corps and part of the 2nd Corps crossed on the pontoons, on both sides of Four Mile Creek, at Deep Bottom. Yesterday this brigade crossed on the Upper side of the Creek, and the 2nd Corps with the cavalry, on the lower side. Our brigade with the 100th N. Y., and 11th Maine in advance (they being outpicket), pushed the rebel  skirmishers back into their rifle pits, when the 24th Massachusetts was ordered to charge and drive them out of that position, which they did in gallant style, capturing some 70 or 80 prisoners. Skirmishing continued all day until night, when we drove the rebels into their main line of works.
At about 4 o'clock, Col. Dandy received orders to take a battery situated a short distance above Four Mile Creek, and about two miles from the river. The 100th was to charge, supported by the 6th Conn. Col. Dandy moved his regiment forward cautiously until he got on the enemy's flank, when he gave the order to charge and the 100th carried the battery alone, (the 6th Conn. not being called out), capturing four eight-inch sea-coast howitzers and some prisoners. Three of the guns were brought off the field, but the other one being unmanageable was left there. Our loss was small, not exceeding 30. The boys are in good spirits and are proud of their success.
Col. Dandy led the regiment in gallant style, and we all think he ought to get his star now, for a braver or a more capable officer is not to be found in the service. Wherever he goes the men will follow, and all he asks of them is to follow.
I cannot at present send you a complete list of the casualties, but will do so in a few days. The following are some of them:
Capt. John McMann, co. B, wounded in the head slightly.
1st Sergeant S. Eley, co. K, slight.
Sergeant P. Adams, co. K, slight.
Sergeant Pettis, co. E, slight.
Private Geo. Hull, co. G, killed.
The above are all that I can learn at present. Is the Board of Trade going to fill up the regiment again?
I suppose you have heard that Captain Richardson is reported killed on the 27th ult. A rebel officer, captured the next day, stated that he was, and fell into their hands.
The battery captured by the 100th had annoyed our camps and gunboats the day before, wounding a whole gun's crew on board the "Agawam," but the little "Hunchback" coming up soon silenced them.
Col. Dandy is now in charge of a very important part of our line, having command of the 100th N. Y., 6th Conn., and a brigade of the 2d Corps. That he may continue to command them is the wish of Your obedient servant,
"R," Co. I.

CASUALTIES IN THE 100TH REGIMENT.—A correspondent writing to the Express furnishes the following list of. casualties in the 100th New York Volunteers, near Four Mile Creek, August 14th and 16th:
COMPANY A.
Sergeant—Kuhn, killed.
Corporal—P Kelley, wounded.
Private—Wright, killed.
    "          J Lee, wounded.
    "          J Wilson, wounded.
    "          G Mason, wounded.
    "          J Jackson, wounded.
    "         H Budd, wounded.
    "         J Friedman, missing.

COMPANY B.
Captain John McMann, wounded.
Corporal B Growney, missing.
    "         W Cooper, missing.
Private S Houghtailing, wounded.
    "      S Hetchler, wounded.
    "      H Robinson, wounded.

COMPANY C.
Captain—L Evert, sunstroke.
First Sergeant—Connolly, wounded.
Sergeant—Gage, missing.
Private—Coulter, wounded.
    "         Mitchell, wounded.
    "         D Mowatt, wounded.
    "         Willmott, wounded.
    "         Brooks, missing.
    "         Wineguard, missing.
    "         Redshaw, missing.
    "         Finn, missing.
    "        Higgins, missing.
    "        Campbell, missing.
    "        Casey, missing.
    "        Clingman, missing.
    "        Noble, missing.

COMPANY D.
Sergeant—G H Storms, wounded.
Corporal—W Striker, missing.
Private—R Crandall, wounded.
    "         M Ryan, wounded.
    "         L Brown, missing.

COMPANY E.
Sergeant—Phillips, killed.
    "            Disbrow, missing.
    "            Pettis, missing.
Corporal—Shurlson, wounded.
Private—Kane, killed.
    "         Fitzgerald, missing.
    "         Pilott, missing.
    "         Ronald, missing.
    "         Brice, missing.

COMPANY F.
Corporal—C Yensen, wounded,
    "            H Shank, wounded.
    "            B Fishbach, wounded.
    "            R Clinch, wounded.
Privates—A Goetz, wounded.
    "           D A Stoax, wounded.
    "           C Parkhurst, wounded.
    "           B Stupa, wounded.
    "           A Fierkie, wounded.
    "           J Sheckl, wounded.
    "           W Baker, wounded.

COMPANY G.
Corporal—George Hull, killed.
Private—Summers, wounded.

COMPANY H.
Sergeant—D White, wounded.
Corporal—F Casey, wounded.
Privates—S Haller, wounded.
    "           E Morris, wounded.
    "           J Hand, (or Rand, wounded.
    "           C C Gage, wounded.

COMPANY I.
Chas Waite, bruised in arm by a piece of shell.

COMPANY K.
Captain Warren Granger, missing, supposed to be killed.
1st Sergeant Samuel Ely wounded.
Sergeant Peter Adams, slightly wounded, had wound dressed and rejoined company.
Privates—Meyers, missing.
    "           C Eddy, do.
    "           Shepherd, do.
    "           Coons, do.
    "           Baker, do.

THE 100TH REGIMENT.—A correspondent of the Express, writing from the 100th Regiment, the 15th instant, gives an account of a brilliant affair in which the regiment was engaged the day previous. He says:
At about 4 o'clock Col Dandy received orders to take a battery situated a short distance above Four Mile Creek, and about two miles from the river. The 100th was to charge, supported by the 6th Connecticut. Col. Dandy moved his regiment forward cautiously until he got on the enemy's flank, when he gave the order to charge and the 100th carried the battery alone, (the 6th Connecticut not being called out,) capturing four 8-inch sea-coast howitzers and some prisoners. Three of the guns were brought off the field, but the other one being unmanagable [sic] was left there. Our loss was small, not exceeding 30. The boys are in good spirits and are proud of their success.
Col. Dandy led the regiment in gallant style, and we all think he ought to get his star now, for a braver or more capable officer is not to be found in the service. Wherever he goes the men will follow, and all he asks of them is to follow.
Among the casualties were Private Geo. E. Hull, killed; Capt. John McMann, Co B, wounded, slightly; Sergeants S. Eley, and S. P. Adams, Co K, wounded slightly; Sergeant Pettis, Co. E, wounded slightly. Col. Dandy is now in charge of a very important part of the Union line near Deep Bottom, and has command of the 100th N. Y., the 6th Conn. and a brigade of the 2d corps.

IN THE FIELD, VIRGINIA,
August 18th, 1864.
Messrs. A. M. CLAPP & Co.:
 Gents—Enclosed please find a complete list of casualties in 100th N. Y. Vols., from 14th to 16th August. The regiment is now on the reserve line, behind intrenchments, but are still under fire, as it is only about 150 yards in rear of the skirmish line. The casualties were about one in five, which is the average of the brigade. The men are in good spirits. Everybody speaks of Foster's brigade doing so well. They have done most of the fighting during the past five days. Gen. Foster is a great favorite with his command. He led them on foot on the 16th, when they carried the enemy's works. You will have seen the account of the fighting before this reaches you, so I will say nothing about it. Very respectfully,
R., Co. "I."

List of casualties in the 100th New York Volunteers, near Four Mile Creek, August 14th and 16th:
Co A—Sergeant Kuhn, killed; Corporal P Kelly, wounded; Privates Wright, killed; J Lee, wounded; J Wilson, do; G Mason do; J Jackson, do; H Budd, do; J Friedman, missing.
Co B—Captain John McMann, wounded; Corporals B Growney, missing; W Cooper, do; Privates S Houghtailing, wounded; S Hetchler, do; H Robinson, do.
Co C—Captain L Evert, sunstroke; 1st Sergeant Connolly, wounded; Sergt Gage, missing; Privates Coulter, wounded; Mitchell, do; D Mowatt, do; Willmott, do; Brooks, missing; Wineguard, do; Redshaw, do; Finn, do; Higgins, do; Campbell, do; Casey, do; Clingman, do; Noble, do.
Co D—Sergeant G H Storms, wounded; Corporal W Striker, missing; Privates R Crandall, wounded; M Ryan, do; L Brown, missing.
Co E—Sergeants Phillips, killed; Disbrow, missing; Pettis, do; Corporal Shurlson, wounded; Privates Kane, killed; Fitzgerald, missing; Pilott, do; Ronald, do; Brice, do.
Co F—Corporals C Yensen, wounded; H Shank, do: B Fishbach, do; R Clinch, do; Privates A Goetz, wounded; D A Stoax, do; C Parkhurst, do; B Stupa, do: A Fierkie, do; J Sheckl, do; W Baker, do.
Co G—Corporal George Hull, killed; Private Summers, wounded.
Co. H—Sergt D White, wounded; Corpl F Casey, do; Privates, S Haller, E Morris, J Hand, or Rand, C C Gage, wounded. Co I—Chas Waite, bruised in arm by a piece of shell.
Co K—Capt Warren Granger, missing, supposed killed; 1st Sergt Saml Ely, slightly wounded; Sergt Peter Adams, slightly wounded, had wound dressed and rejoined company; Privates, Meyers, missing; C Eddy, do; Shepherd, do; Coons, do; Baker, do.
Some of the missing will most likely turn up as "stragglers."

Commercial Advertiser.
Tuesday Evening, September 27, 1864.
Col. Dandy before the Board of Trade—He gives an Account of the 100th Regiment.
In compliance with a request from the gentlemen of the Board of Trade, Col. Geo. B. Dandy, the gallant commander of the 100th N. Y. Regiment, appeared before them this morning, and after 'Change hour, spoke briefly of the service performed by his command since April last. We shall not attempt to give the remarks of the Colonel entire, as the facilities for reporting were extremely limited.
He alluded to the cutting of the Petersburg Railroad on the 11th of May, on which occasion the regiment alone accomplished the work of a brigade; to the actions of the 13th, 14th and 16th of May, in which the 100th fought most gallantly, losing 230 men, and were highly complimented by the General commanding; to the action at Deep Bottom, Aug. 14th, at which place they charged the rebels, drove them from their rifle pits, and captured a four-gun battery before the regiment detailed to support them arrived on the ground, for which they were again complimented by Generals Grant and Butler. He spoke of the lights at Deep Run, Aug. 16th and 18th, of the death of Capt. Richardson and the capture of Capt. Granger, and afterwards alluded to the removal of the regiment to the front of Petersburg, where it had constantly been exposed to the enemy's fire, resulting in the wounding or death of many men.
He stated that he took from the city 830 men, and that when he left a few days since but 330 remained.
It will be understood that Col. Dandy is not here for the purpose of recapitulating the service rendered by himself and his command but that his business is to procure, if possible, the force to fill his ranks which have been sadly thinned in numerous bloody conflicts with the enemy, and that he only appeared on the stand at the solicitation of a body of our most influential citizens, desirous of hearing from the men whom they were instrumental in sending to the field.
The speaker concluded by an appeal for more men. He said that the rebel armies were about exhausted, and that our armies, largely reinforced, would be enabled to finish the rebellion before this time next year. With Sherman holding Atlanta, Grant with his cordon half enclosing the rebel capital, Sheridan on his way to Lynchburg, we wanted only men enough to completely shut up Lee in his capital, there to surrender or to starve.
A peace obtained upon this basis was the only enduring peace, and that we re sure to get if we kept at it. Then the Union would be established upon a foundation so secure that the storms of fanaticism and treason might in vain surge against it—it would be founded upon a rock enduring as the world.
At the conclusion of Col. Dandy's remarks the following resolutions, offered by A. Sherwood, Esq., were unanimously adopted:
Resolved, That we, the members of the Board of Trade, have every reason to feel proud of the services that our regiment—the 100th N. Y.—has rendered to the government since the commencement of this rebellion, and more especially since we adopted the regiment in 1862.
Resolved, That during that year, the regiment having, in the Peninsular campaign, been reduced to less than four hundred men, was filled to its maximum standard through the efforts of this Board, and that since the regiment was thus filled it has again, through our exertions, received additional recruits, numbering over two hundred and fifty men.
Resolved, That we still continue to feel a deep interest in the welfare and prosperity of the 100th Regiment, and desire to see it again filled to its maximum standard; that since its organization it has always been in the field and at the front, and has been sadly reduced in numbers by the casualties of numerous battles in which it has always behaved nobly and invariably won the approval of the general officers in whose commands it has served.
Resolved, That we have every confidence in the patriotism, courage, ability and fidelity to the Government of its commanding officer, Col. George B. Dandy, who has led the regiment in every battle in which it has been engaged since we adopted it in 1862.
Resolved, That in view of the difficulty of obtaining volunteers at this time, and of the necessity of prompt reinforcements to the army in which we are all deeply interested, we earnestly desire to have a sufficient number of unattached volunteers or drafted men sent to its ranks to enable it again to take the field in good condition, where we are sure it will again, as hereto fore, strike home for the preservation 'of the institutions bequeathed to us by our fathers, now assailed by wicked men.
Resolved, That as a body we desire in every way possible to unite our efforts in support of the General Government for the complete suppression of this unnatural and wicked rebellion; and it is our conviction that the speediest and best way to accomplish this result is "to fight it out on this line," until the rebels lay down their arms and sue for peace.

FROM THE 100TH REGIMENT.—The following letter from Chaplain Lynn, of the 100th, giving an account of the services of the regiment during the 15th and 16th instants, will be read with much interest by our citizens generally. The list of casualties which accompanied the letter has already been published:
100TH REGIMENT N. Y. V., IN THE FIELD,
NEAR SYKES, NEW MARKET ROAD, Aug. 91, '64.
EDITORS BUFFALO COM.:—While on picket duty in front of our rifle pits, on the morning of the 15th, the order came for us to be withdrawn and join the advancing column. After a slow march of three or four miles we halted. During the afternoon our artillery was engaged with the enemy, driving him from his advanced position. At night our regiment was sent on picket in front of our Brigade. Soon after daylight on the morning of the 16th, the pickets were called in, and we moved about a mile in advance, where lines of battle were formed, with various regiments deployed as skirmishers, our regiment being one of the latter. We soon came upon the enemy's picket line, and drove him within his line of rifle pits. The command was given to our Brigade to charge upon those in front of our Brigade, and in a very few minutes the enemy were driven from them (leaving their dead and wounded in the pits), to his first line of main works. In this duty our Brigade lost but very few. After a short rest an attempt was made to take this line of works, but was unsuccessful, not only from the strong position they occupied, but from the strong force which the enemy now had against us. Our Brigade made two charges against this work and were repulsed each time with heavy loss. Between us and this work was a very deep ravine. On the top of the opposite slope were the works, and it was impossible for a man ever to have reached them. While many got to the bottom of this ravine unharmed, it was almost sure death to have attempted leaving it.
During the night we threw up temporary rifle pits, which were afterwards strengthened in front of our lines. During the morning of the 17th, a brisk firing was kept up along the picket line; in the afternoon a flag of truce prevailed for two hours, that we might bury our dead. During the evening the enemy again attempted to break our lines, but were repulsed. On the morning of the 18th an order came to be ready to move, but we lay behind our works all day. In the evening another order came for us to be ready to fall back; the enemy must have suspected this, for they very soon made an attempt and several unsuccessful charges upon oar whole line. Two batteries of our Corps, in position on our left, opened, as they supposed, upon the enemy's lines, but unfortunately they got a complete range of our lines, and before a change could be made they had killed and wounded many of our men.
It was during this time that Sergt. Winfield Scott commanding company D, in the absence of Lt. Sandrock, was instantly killed by a piece of shell striking him in the head, wounding three others at the same time. Sergt. Scott was one of our most efficient noncommissioned officers, and his loss is generally regretted. After removing our dead and wounded, our whole line fell back, leaving a strong picket line in our rear, the pickets being commanded by Lt. Stowits. They maintained their position as long as necessary, and then fell back and rejoined their regiments. We have halted on the New Market road near the junction of this road with the Charles City Road. What will be our next move no one as yet can tell. I enclose herewith a correct list of the casualties in the 100th.
J. B LINN, Chaplain 100th N. Y. V.
P. S.—The four guns (8 inch howitzers) spoken of, in my last letter as being captured by our regiment, are the same ones spoken of in the New York papers of the 17th, as being captured by the 10th Army Corps.
J. B. LINN.

PERSONAL.—W. B. Murray, late Assistant Surgeon of the 100th Regiment, and recently promoted to the Surgeoncy of the 161st N. Y. V., is in the city on a short leave of absence. Surgeon Murray has been with the 100th since its organization; has been on every battle field in which the Regiment has fought, and by his skill as a Surgeon, and his large heartedness as a man, has won for himself an enviable popularity among the men with whom he had to deal. The 100th Regiment loses one of its best friends by the promotion of Surgeon Murray.

CAPT. GRANGER MISSING.—We are pained to learn that a letter was received yesterday b y Warren Granger Esq., announcing that his son, Capt. Granger, of the 100th, is missing—either killed or a prisoner, it is unknown which. The letter is confused, and makes it impossible either to judge the probabilities of his fate, or to certainly determine in what engagement he disappeared. We sincerely hope that clearer intelligence will allow us to conclude him a prisoner.

WOUNDED IN BUFFALO REGIMENTS.—The N. Y. Times gives the following list of the members of the 100th Regiment, N. Y. V., who were wounded in the engagement on the 7th inst., while cutting the railroad between Richmond and Petersburgh [sic]. They were sent to the McClellan General Hospital from City Point on the 8th inst.:
Lieutenant Adriance, G. Swindeman, G. Gromney, O. Sullivan, Wm. Leuske, J. A. Castle, G. H. Hall, F. A. Downing, F. Beno, P. Roth, E. Ketchum, Jas. Guger, J. Unsolde.
We have the following additional names of those in the 49th Regiment reported wounded:
Corporal E. Miller, W. H. Lewis, J. M. Jones, Jr., and Chas. Wresen.

THE 100TH REGIMENT.—The 100th Regiment is now with Gen. Fosters expedition on the north of the James River. A. Herald correspondent, whose letter dates "eleven miles from Richmond, June 23d," has the following:
During the 21st General Foster drove in the rebel pickets twice, the One Hundredth regiment New York Volunteers, Colonel Dandy, making two most gallant charges, upon which he was heartily congratulated by General J. B. Howell, commanding the First brigade, First division. Captain Grange, Company K of the One Hundredth, charged fully up to Mrs. Grover's, driving the enemy from that point, they being there in force.

COL. DANDY AND THE 100TH REGIMENT.—We learn that Col. Dandy, having some time since applied for orders, will leave this city for the seat of war this evening. The detachment now here will follow in a few days, and the 100th will shortly be once more under its old commander, its numbers so largely increased that it will be second to hardly any regiment in the service. Col. Dandy, during his brief stay here, has won hosts of friends who admire and respect him as a gentleman and a soldier. His career will be watched from Buffalo with the most lively interest.

ARRIVAL OF THE WOUNDED SOLDIERS.
Twenty-nine wounded soldiers from the 100th and other regiments, arrived here on Saturday, and are quartered at the General Hospital. A list of their names was prepared for us but we failed to get it in time for publication this morning.

DESERTED PROMOTION.—The many friends of 1st Lieut. Frank C. Brunck, of this city, will be pleased to learn that this faithful and efficient young officer has been promoted to the Captaincy of Co. I, 100th Regiment vice Capt. Chas. R. Morse. A better deserved promotion has not been made by Gov. Morgan since the war. Lieut. Brunck has had the command of his company during almost the entire Peninsular campaign, and by his strict  attention to duty, his care and solicitude for his men, his general efficiency and bravery in action, has merited and won the esteem and confidence of all about him. It is a pleasure to find such men receiving the preferment to which they are entitled. His rank dates from the 13th instant.

RESIGNED—Capt. Chas. H. Rauert, the senior Captain of the 100th Regiment N. Y. Volunteers, has resigned his commission and returned home. Shortly after the assault on Fort Wagner he was appointed to take charge of the conscripts on Rikers Island. This duty, although distasteful to him, he performed faithfully for some months. He has made frequent applications to be relieved and allowed to join his Regiment in the field. Finding that there was no prospect of his being permitted to rejoin his old companions he tendered his resignation stating his reasons for so doing. It was finally accepted, and the Captain retires honorably to private life after having served his country bravely and well. His brother officers part from him with regret.

ANOTHER TEACHER KILLED.--We Learn, says the Lockport Journal, from a private letter from Capt. (Prof.) G. H. Sowitts, of the 100th New York regiment, dated "Bermuda Hundreds, May 22d," that J. H. French, formerly teacher in Rochester, and more recently in Buffalo, was killed in the fight with Beauregard near that place. The Captain says "he lost in killed, wounded and missing, from his company, 27 men. He says the rebel soldiery are miserable to look upon, and a shame it is to fight them. Their leaders all want hanging. There must be an end soon. The unburied dead are before us at all times. The country is bare of men, only women and children are seen. Day before yesterday we wounded and took the rebel General Walker. He fought like a tiger, and fell, covered with wounds."

RECRUITING FOR THE 100TH REGIMENT.—Col. Dandy, of the 100th Regiment, informs us that his recruiting office and headquarters for the present are established on Main street, in the Express buildings, up stairs. We do not deem it necessary to recite the advantages which accrue to the recruit from enlisting in such a veteran organization as the gallant 100th. Suffice it that, if he be a Buffalo man, he will go at once among friends, and be placed under officers who have been tried often and never found wanting.
With to-day expires the time appointed in which the extra government bounty, according to law, can be paid to enlisting men. There is every likelihood, however, that this time will be extended by Congress immediately on re-assembling after the holidays, and that all who enlist now will receive the benefit of the amendatory enactment. In the meantime all the bounties, Government, State and County, with the exception of the $200 extra sum, allotted by Congress, are payable to recruits. We trust that the war-worn standard of the 100th will not wave in our streets in vain. Let our young men see to it if they can escape the draft in any more creditable and comfortable manner than by enlisting in its ranks, and let our citizens generally do what in them lies, to fill up a regiment which has already brought so much honor to the city it represents. Col. Dandy is desirous of obtaining about 150 men, which number will fill up the regiment to its maximum standard. He must not be allowed to appeal for this reinforcement in vain.

THE TESTIMONY OF A BUFFALO PRISONER.—We were shown yesterday a letter from J. P. Wymer, of the 100th Regiment, who has recently been paroled, after having been in the hands of the merciful and high-toned Southern chivalry for eight months, three of which were spent in the dungeon at Columbia, S. C., and the balance on Belle Isle. His account of the fiendish treatment to which our poor soldiers are subjected corroborates the statements made by others. During last winter his only food was corn bread wet up with water, and rarely a small quantity of soup, so abominably vile that had the alternative not been starvation the soldiers could not have swallowed it. For three months he had neither shoes nor blanket, and his only protection from the bleak winter storms was a ragged tent.
He states that he has seen man after man drop down and die—starved to death. The bodies were frequently left exposed a week at a time, and the remains of many a heroic patriot found burial in the bellies of hogs. Of the three who occupied his tent he alone escaped alive. Can any one, save a foredoomed Copperhead, doubt that a cause sustained by such means as these Southern devils incarnate employ, must fall, crushed by the weight of its own eternal infamy.

SOLDIERS IN THE GENERAL HOSPITAL.—U. S. Surgeon Crispell furnishes the following list of men transferred from U. S. Hospital, Rochester, to U. S. General Hospital, Buffalo, June 25, 1864,
James Brownell, Corporal, Co. A, 2d Mounted Rifles
George Schwendmar, private, Co. B, 100th N. Y. V.
Frank Day, Sergeant, Co. K, 100th "
Alvis D. Hemitt, private, Co. B, 151st "
Philip Pelter, Jr., do Co. I, 100th "
John Allen, do Co. H, 100th "
Wm. P. Hayden, do Co. K, 100th "
John H. Vandenack, do Co. A, 112th "
Geo. M. Holt, do Co. I, 112th "
Wm. S. Carpenter, do Co. D, 112th "
Jacob M. Smith, do Co. K, 155th "
Harrison Nichols, do Co. K, 147th "
Henry Ellsworth, do Co. F, 100th "
Robert Henderson, do Co. H, 100th "
Geo. Bacon, do Co. G, 146th "
Geo. Willford, do Co. K, 151st "
Walter Russell, do Co. A, 112th "
Michael Riley, do Co. E, 47th "
Richard Jones, do Co. C, 164th "
David Peck, do Co. C, 112th "
Frederick Otto, do Co. A, 43d do
Theodore Walters, private Co. I, 9th N Y. Car.
Uriah Chapman, private, Co. C, 112th N. Y. V.
Hiram C. Agan, Sergeant, Co. C, 122d N. Y. V.
Goodley Puff, Sergeant, Co. F, 4th Heavy Artillery.
John K. Giddings, private, Co. C, 44th N. Y. V.
Marvin Day, private, Co. D, 154th N. Y. V.
Menry Campen, Corporal, Co. H, 1st. Dragoons.
Willard Clark, Corporal, Co. H, 100th N. Y. V.

SICK AND WOUNDED SOLDIERS ARRIVED AT NEW YORK.—The United States hospital and transport ship Cosmopolitan arrived at New York from Charleston on Sunday last, bringing 222 sick and wounded, among whom were the following:
J. Austin, Co. B, 100th N. Y.
M. A. Loizier, Co. B,   "
H. L. Moore, Co. K,     "
V. Hale, Co. K,            "
H. Shaw, Co. H,           "

CASUALTIES IN THE 100TH.—The Morris Island correspondent of the N. Y. Y. Times gives the following among the list of casualties since the 24th ult.:
Col. G. B. Dandy, 100th—contusion left leg.
Lieut. C. Adriance, Co. G. 100th—knee, slightly.
S. Frank Thurber, Co. K, 100th—breast, died.
John Kurtzart, Co. A, 100th—killed.
Robert Mass, Co. B. 100th—killed.
Wm. Wheeler, Co. B, 100th—severely.
M. Nagle, Co. B, 100th—slightly.
Sergt. Jas. McPherson, Co. B, 100th—slightly.
Jacob Weber, Co. F, 100th—killed.
Lieut. C. H. Richmond, 100th—contusion of shoulder.

Arrival of Wounded Soldiers.—Twenty-nine wounded soldiers from the 100th and other regiments, arrived here on Saturday, and are quartered at the General Hospital. A list of their names was prepared for us but we failed to get it in time for publication this morning.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS IN ROCHESTER.—The Rochester Democrat of Wednesday speaks of the arrival in that city on the day previous, of three hundred and seventy-five sick and wounded soldiers, under the charge of Dr. Azel Backus.—
Among the names published we find the following:
Joseph H Truax, Co G, 49th N. Y.
James Huttley, Co A, " "
John Allen, Co H, 100th "
James Maguire, Co A, " "
Ritter Philip, jr, Co I, " "
Nicholas Zangraw, Co I. " "
Henry C Ellsworth, Co F, " "
Alfred H Palmer, Co G, " "
George Schewendeman, Co B," "
Barney Corbarry, Co I, 49th "
George C Fals, Co B, 100th "
George C Davis " "
Daniel Hartwell, Co F, 155th "
John Trans, Co B, 164th "
Jacob M Smith, Co K, 155th "
Edward Delany, Co K, " "
Those who were badly wounded were sent to the Rochester City and St. Mary's Hospital.—About sixty of those whose wounds were the slightest were furloughed by Dr. Backus, and will return to their homes, where they will be permitted to remain until sufficiently recovered to return to their regiments.

CASUALTIES IN THE 100TH REGIMENT.—The N. Y. Herald gives the following list of casualties in our 100th Regiment. It would seem that this gallant body must have been where the shot fell thickest, to have suffered thus severely:
KILLED—2d Lieut. A. H. Hoyt, Co. I; A. Willard, C; J. C. Wilcox, H; Corp. Richard Hughes, C; Rayahan Row, C; A. F. Smith, E.
WOUNDED—Capt. T. Lynch, E. slightly; 1st Lieut. W Vodges, I, in the leg, slightly; 1st Lieut. L. D. Howell, H, in the arm and breast; 2d Lieut. Edward Pratt, K, in foot; S. W. Babbitt, E, in the thigh and missing; Wm. Evans, F, wounded and missing; J. H. French, H, wounded and missing; Hugh Quinn, A; Donald McIntyre, B, in leg; P. V. L. Ostrander, in leg; R. Stack, C, in leg; E. W. Smith, B, in arm; F. Monroe, R, in hand.
Company A—Wounded—Corp. John D. Storks, in arm and body; Walter G. Brown, in leg; Chas. Robbillrad, in leg; Ebenczer Wilder, in leg, slightly; Wm. Bass, in arm, severely. Missing—Sergt. Major Jones, Joseph Allen, Major O. Larkin, Hiram Wood, John G. Fegar, Spencer Quackenbush, Corp. W. H. Sill, Samuel Huntington. Nicholas Hal finger, Uriah T. Hill, George Hennett, James Farrel, Michael Kelly, Fred Lang, Gideon Martin, FrankSmith, John Beauchamp, George Britting, George Bower, Alonzo Pratt, John Rastoford.
Company B—Wounded—G. Schlenker, in arm; T. O. Gur, in arm; C. Williams, in hand; M. Winkle, in hand; D. Swarts, in head, slightly; C. V. Moon, slightly; 1st Lieut. M. P. Pierson. Missing—Sergt. M. L. Olmsted, Corporals Phillip Guise, G. Fincke and J. Whitlock, K. C. Boulton, ___ Burbeck, C. Berle, A. Chasbilter, A. T. Driggs, Wm. Gencke, Geo. Gordon, John Gleason, J. Goldthwort, Joseph Hemans, J. Berbeck, R. Jutson, M. Keroner, D. D. Lynch, E. C. Moore, C. R. Moody, A. P. Weller, W. G. Serly.
Company C—Wounded—P. La Fountaine, slightly; P. Mitchell, slightly; J. Redshaw, slightly; Sergt. D. McKay, leg; Daniel Lalor, head and body; James Masky, bowels; John Williams, leg; Henry S. Herman, thigh; Corp. Alex. Honsell, wounded and missing; Wm. Walls, wounded and missing; Phillip Ritter, leg. Missing—Corps. Ezra N. Hoag, William Adams, James McKerser, Geo. Kaufman.
Company D—Wounded—M. Becker, G. Cuss, J. Gillie, J. Pendergrass, Wm. Smith, severely; 1st Sergt. Wm. Dixon, Corp. Casper Shelbeck, Feifstick, Louis Daniels, Herman Sinclair, Jacob Phalegraff. Missing—Corp. Michael Enright, Anthony Ruth, William M. Taylor. Felmer Bostwick, Geo. A. Winner, Jno. Coleman, Jos. Roach, Jacob Lightman, Wm. Smith, John H. Wolf, L. Townsey, William Hatchaway, W. McCallerty.
Company E—Wounded—G. Diehl, in head; T. Little, in head; P. Welch, in leg, seriously; Sergt, Willard D. Smith, in leg; Louis Astram, Wm. Smith. Missing—Sergt. Brainard Smith; Corporals Louis Smith, Francis Clement and Wm. Enos; Andrew Anderson, John Barnes, Patrick Carrol, Robt. Warner, ___ Fitzpatrick. ___ Hurlbut, Hagan, Killian, McGreagor, Albert Smith, Richard Smith, Tunis.
Company F—Wounded—Corporal Charles A. Gavin, in thigh; John L. Stevens, in arm; Louis Wenderlip, in thumb; Joseph Reagan, in body; Andrew Young, in arm; John Putnam, in leg; George W. Caldwell, by a shell. Missing—Andrew Galtie, Hartman Fox, George Keoff, Thomas Selldie, Henry Lorenzo Pettis, Peter Volk, Joseph Hoag, Charles L. Otto, Henry Howe.
Company G—Wounded—F. Evans, in foot; Chas. Jones, in groin; Ed. Tills, in groin; J. Wilson, in hand; J. Carey, in hand; J. Meyers, in shoulder; A. Ball, in leg; E. Bennett, Wm. Foster, Wm. Bain, Geo. Keing, Chas. Leonard. Missing—First Sergt. Sharp Adams, Henry Berghagger, H. Bumler, Luther Clark, Joseph Cory, F. T. Criacus, Patrick O'Halloran.
Company H—Wounded—W. Goff, slightly; G. Arney, severely; H. W. Clark, severely; R. Mitchell, slightly; G. B. Goodwin, badly; Elin Dunn, slightly;  G. Eighman, slightly; First Sergt. P. C. La Fort, in arm and breast; Corp. L. S. Melvin, in arm; G. W. David, S. Canfield, A. Hyland, A. Sharp. Missing—Allen Haines, Thuringer, Corp. C. R. Moss, Corp. S. Russell, Wm. Bishop, A. P. Cushman, W. E. Chappell, C. Foue, F. Haines, A. Syth, G. A. Bixley, W. M. Phillips, F. Reynolds, G. John, M. Stirrs, A. Tombers.
Company I—Wounded—Corp. J. Cannon, William Sheldon, severely, in leg; Lorenzo Phillips, George Washington, Corp. John Ittell, in leg; Matthew Bitz, in arm; Philip Beollet, in arm. Missing—Sergt. Patrick Farrell, Corp. James F. Hale. Philip Morgan, James Ragon, Andrew Anderson, George Blake, Justus Richlen, James H. Gardner, Anson Latliny, Henry Miller, J. Martin, John Maloney, Wm. Swartz, George N. Ricker, Owen Sweeney, Cansom B. True, Dennis Dumphrey.
Company K—Wounded—C. Turner, in arm; C. Peter, in head; R. Pete, in body; E. Millery, in leg; D. Keirsch, in finger; H. Schaub, in knee; B. Farley, in leg; Carl Schaeller, Christopher Staley. Missing—Sergeants Lewis Buffum and Barnard Nasen; Corporals John Pearson and Robert Abramms; John Boyd, Luther Blanchard, Luther Duncan, John B. Handfast, Peter McGragh, Lawrence Noeller, Piero Schumaker, Philip Utrick.

THE ONE HUNDREDTH NEW-YORK arrived yesterday afternoon from Richmond, via Baltimore, and stopped at the Battery Barracks for dinner and rations. The regiment numbered over 400 men and officers, under command of Lieut.-Col. Geo. B, DANDY, and left for Albany during the evening.
The One Hundredth New-York was raised in Erie Co., N. Y., in January, 1862. Col. Jas. H. Brown, its first Colonel, was killed at the battle of Fair Oaks, and was succeeded by Col. George B. Dandy, a Captain in the regular army. This officer has commanded the regiment or the brigade to which the regiment belongs, since the 28th of August, 1862. The ranks of the regiment having become greatly depleted after Gen. McClellan's Peninsula campaign, were again filled in August, 1862, by the efforts and contributions of the Board of Trade of Buffalo, N. Y.
In March, 1863, Col. Dandy was sent with his regiment to take possession of Cole's Island, at the mouth of the Stono River, South Carolina, preparatory to the siege of Charleston. This was successfully accomplished, and the island held for twelve days, until reinforcements arrived.
The One Hundredth Regiment participated in the capture of Morris Island, the assault upon Fort Wagner and in the regular approaches afterward made upon that work, resulting in its capture. Here the regiment lost one-half its number, and was again recruited from Buffalo in the Winter of 1863-4. In the Spring and Summer of 1864 it served with Gen. Butler's command at Bermuda Hundred, Drewry's Bluff and Deep Bottom, taking part in all the engagements of that campaign. In October, 1864, it was again recruited, and in March, 1865, under the command of Major JAMES H. Dandy, a brother of the Colonel, it entered upon the grand closing campaign of the war. At this tine the One Hundredth Regiment formed part of Dandy’s Brigade, of Foster’s Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps, Army of the James. In this last campaign the regiment fought at Hatcher's Run for three days, participated in the assault on Fort Gregg, near Petersburgh [sic], and was engaged in the closing battle of the war at Appomattox Court-house, the scene of Gen. LEE'S surrender,
For special gallantry in the assault on Fort Gregg, Petersburgh [sic], Va., April 2, 1865, where the Major commanding was killed on the parapet of the work, the colors of the regiment were presented with a splendid eagle in bronze, by Maj.-Gen. JOHN GIBBON, commanding Twenty-fourth Corps.
In July, 1865, the remnants of the One Hundred and Forty-eighth and One Hundred and Fifty-eighth New-York Volunteers were consolidated with this regiment, bringing it again to the maximum standard of 980 enlisted men. At the date of its muster out it had an aggregate of 745.
The following are the names of the officers:
Field and Staff.—Colonel and Brevet Brigadier- General, George B. Dandy; Lieutenant-Colonel, Warren Granger; Major, Fred. A. Sawyer; Surgeon, Norris M. Carter; Assistant Surgeon, Edwin Schoneld; First Lieutenant and Regimental Quartermaster, Geo. G. Barnum.
Line Officers.—Company A—First Lieutenant, Henry Heintz; Second Lieutenant, Peter Kelly. Company B—Captain, Jonathan E. Head; First Lieutenant, Joseph Pratt. Company C—Captain, Edwin Nichols; First Lieutenant, Wayne Vogdes. Company D—Captain, Samuel Eley. Company E—Captain, Edward Pratt. Company F—Captain, Edward L. Cook, Acting Adjutant; First Lieutenant, Henry I. Jones. Company G—Captain, Jacob S. Kittle; First Lieutenant, John S. Manning. Company H—Captain, Henry W. Conry; First Lieutenant, John Gordon. Company I—Captain, Patrick Connolly. Company K—First Lieutenant, Charles H. Waite.
The following is their battle-record:
1862.—Siege of Yorktown, April; battle of Williamsburgh[sic], May 5; reconnoissance to Seven Pines, May 23; battle of Fair Oaks, May 31; Bottom's Bridge, June 29; White Oak Swamp, June 30; Malvern Hill, July 1; Wood's Cross Roads, Dec. 12.
1863.—Cole's Island, March 31; Folly Island, June __; Morris Island, July 10; assault on Fort Wagner, July 18; siege of Fort Wagner, July, August and September.
1864.—Port Walthall Junction, May 7; Drewry's Bluff, May 13, 14 and 16; Bermuda Hundred, June __; Grover House, June 21; Deep Bottom, July 27; Deep Run, Aug. 14; Fusselles Mills, Aug. 18; siege of Petersburgh [sic], Sept. __; Darbytown Road, Oct. 7; Charles City Cross Roads, Oct. 27.
1865.—Hatcher's Run, March 30, 31 and April 1; Fort Gregg, April 2; Appomattox Court-house, April 9.

Arrival of Sick and Wounded Soldiers.—We are indebted to Surgeon Crispell for the following list of sick and wounded soldiers of the 100th Regiment, who arrived in the city yesterday and are quartered at the
Hospital of the Sisters of Charity:
Serg't Wm Dixon, Co. D, 100th N. Y. V.
Marvin Beeker,       "   D,         "
Corp'l W Gaff,        "   H,         "
Geo H Eighme        "   H,         "
Lawrens Phillips,    "   G,         "
Serg't Donl'd D McKay, " C,   "
Geo Washington,   "   G,          "
Harmon Slayer,     "    D,         "
Elijah Bennett       "    G,         "
Albert Sharp,        "    H,         "
Chas A Gammon  "    F,          "
Shelton Canfield   "   H,          "
Casper Shelbeek   "   D,          "
Q Von Deslip       "    F,          "
George Diehl        "   E,          "

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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