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126th Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

THE SURRENDER OF HARPER'S FERRY.
Report of the Investigating Commission.
STRANGE CONDUCT OF COL. MILES.
Disgraceful Behavior of the 126th New-York.
CENSURE OF MAJOR-GEN. WOOL.
General McClellan also Censured.
The Commission, consisting of Major-Gen. D. Hunter, U. S. A. of Vols., Pres.; Major-Gen. G. Cadwalsder, U. S. A. of Vols.; Brig.-Gen. C. C. Angur, U. S. A. of Vols.; Major Donn Piatt, A. A. G. of Vols.; Capt. F. Ball, A. D. C. of Vols.; Col. G. Holt, Judge-Advocate Gen., called by the Government to investigate the conduct of certain officers connected with, and the circumstances attending the abandonment of Maryland Hights and the surrender of Harper's Ferry, have the honor to report the following:
On the 3d of September, Gen. White entered Harper's Ferry with his force from Winchester. The next day he was ordered to Martinsburg, to take command of the forces there. On the 12th of September he again returned to Harper's Ferry, where he remained until the surrender, without assuming the command.
On the 7th of September, Gen. McClellan, the most of his forces having preceded him, left Washington under orders issued some days previously, to drive the enemy from Maryland. That night he established his headquarters at Rockville, from which place, on the 11th of September, he telegraphed to Gen. Halleck to have Col. Miles ordered to join him at once.
On the 5th of September Col. Thomas H. Ford, 32d Ohio, took command of the forces on Maryland Hights. Forces were placed at Solomon's Gap and at  Sandy Hook. Those at Sandy Hook, under Col. Maulaby, retired by Col. Miles's order to the eastern slope of Maryland Hights, two or three days previous to their evacuation by Col. Ford. On the 11th of September the force at Solomon's Gap were driven in by the enemy. Col. Ford called upon Col. Miles for reinforcements. The 126th New-York and the 39th New-York (Garribaldi Guards) were sent him on Friday, the 12th of September, and on the morning of the 13th he was further reenforced [sic] by the 115th New-York and a portion of a Maryland regiment under Lieut.-Col. Downey.
Col. Ford made requisition for axes and spades to enable him to construct defenses on the Hights, but obtained none, with 10 axes, belonging to some Maryland troops, hiring all that could be obtained, a slight breast-work of trees was constructed, on the 12th near the crest of the Hights, and a slashing of timber made for a short distance in front of the breast-work.
The forces under Col. Ford were stationed at various points on Maryland Hights, the principal force being on the crest of the hill near the breast-work and look-out. Skirmishing commenced on Friday, the 12th, on the crest of the hill.
Early on the morning of the 13th, the enemy made an attack on the crest of the hill, and after some time, the troops retired in some confusion to the breastwork, where they were rallied. About 9 o'clock, a second attack was made, which the troops behind the breastwork resisted for a short time, and until Col. Sherrill of the 126th New-York was wounded, and carried off the field, when the entire 126th Regiment, as some witnesses testify, all but two companies, Major Hewitt states, broke and fled in utter confusion. Men find most of the officers all fled together, no effort being made to rally the regiment, except by Col. Ford, Lieut. Barras, Acting-Adjutant, and some officers of other regiments, directed by Col. Miles, then on the Hights.
Soon after, the remaining forces at the breastwork fell back, under a supposed order from Maj. Hewitt, who himself says that he gave no such order; merely sent instructions to the captains of his own regiment that, if they were compelled to retire, to do so in good order. Orders were given by Col. Ford for the troops to return to their position. They advanced some distance up the Hights, but did not regain the breastwork.
That evening Col. Miles was on Maryland Hights for some hours, consulting with Col. Ford. He left between 11 and __ o'clock, without directly ordering Col. Ford to evacuate the Hights, but instructing him, in case he was compelled to do so, to spike his guns, and throw the heavy siege guns down the mountain.
About 2 o'clock, perhaps a little later, by the order of Col. Ford, the hights were abandoned, the guns being spiked according to instructions.
On Sunday, Col. D'Utassy sent over to the Maryland Hights four companies under Maj. Wood, who brought off, without opposition, four brass 12-pounders, two of which were imperfectly spiked, and a wagon load of ammunition.
Gen. White, on his return to Harper's Ferry on the 12th of September, suggested to Col. Miles the propriety of contracting his lines on Bolivar Hights so as to make a better defense, but Col. Miles adhered to his original line of defense, stating that he was determined to make his stand on Bolivar Hights. Gen. White also urged the importance of holding Maryland Hights, even should it require the taking the entire force over there from Harper's Ferry. Col. Miles, under his orders to hold Harper's Ferry to the last extremity, while admitting the importance of Maryland Hights, seemed to regard them as applying to the town of Harper's Ferry, and held that to leave Harper's Ferry even to go on Maryland Hights, would be disobeying his instructions.
Gen. McClellan established his headquarters at Frederick City on the morning of the 13th of September. On the night of the 13th, after the evacuation of Maryland Hights, Col. Miles directed Captain (now Major) Russell, of the Maryland cavalry, to take with him a few men and endeavor to get through the enemy's lines and reach some of our forces—Gen. McClellan if possible—and to report the condition of Harper's Ferry, that it could not hold out more than 48.hours, unless reinforced [sic], and to urge the sending of reinforcements [sic]. Capt. Russell reached Gen. McClellan's headquarters, at Frederick, at 9 a. m., on Sunday the 14th of September, and reported as directed by Col. Miles.
Immediately upon his arrival Gen. McClellan sent off a messenger, as Capt. Russell understood, to Gen. Franklin.
At 10 a. m., Capt. Russell left for Gen. Franklin's command, with a communication to Gen. Franklin from Gen. McClellan. He reached Gen. Franklin about 3 o'clock that afternoon, and found him en-gaged with the enemy at Crampton's Gap. The enemy were driven from the Gap, and the next morning, the 15th, Gen. Franklin passed through the Gap, advancing about a mile, and finding the enemy drawn up in line of battle in his front, drew his own forces up in line of battle. While thus situated, the cannonading in the direction of Harper's  Ferry, which had been heard very distinctly all the morning--Harper's Ferry being about seven miles distant—suddenly ceased, whereupon Gen. Franklin sent word to Gen. McClellan of the probable surrender of Harper's Ferry by Col. Miles, and did not deem it necessary to proceed further in that direction.
The battle of South Mountain was fought on Sunday, the 14th.
On the same day, Sunday, during the afternoon, the enemy at Harper's Ferry attacked the extreme left of the line on Bolivar Hights, but after some time were repulsed by the troops under command of Gen. White.
Sunday night the cavalry at Harper's Ferry made their escape, under Col. Davis of the 12th Illinois Cavalry, by permission of Col. Miles, and reached Greencastle, Pa., the next morning, capturing an ammunition train belonging to Gen. Longstreet, consisting of some 50 or 60 wagons. The Commission regard this escape of the cavalry, &c.
Several of the infantry officers desired permission to cut their way out, at the same time the cavalry made their escape, but Col. Miles refused upon the ground that he had never been ordered to hold Harper's Ferry to the last extremity.
On the morning of the 15th, the enemy opened their batteries from several points—seven to nine as estimated by different witnesses—directing their attack principally upon our batteries on the left of Bolivar Hights. The attack commenced at daybreak. About 7 o'clock Col. Miles represented to Gen. White that it would be necessary to surrender.
Gen. White suggested that the brigade commanders be called together, which was done. Col. Miles stated that the ammunition for the batteries was exhausted, and he had about made up his mind to surrender. That was agreed to by all present, and Gen. White was sent by Col. Miles to arrange terms. The white flag was raised by order of Col. Miles, but the enemy did not cease fire for some half or three-quarters of an hour after. Col. Miles was mortally wounded after the white flag was raised. The surrender was agreed upon about 8 a. m., on Monday, the 15th of September.
The following was the testimony respectively of the officers commanding batteries: At the time of the surrender Capt. Von Schlen had some  ammunition, could not tell what amount, but mostly shrapnel; had lost about 100 rounds on Saturday, the 13th, by the explosion of a limber caused by one of the enemy's shells. Capt. Rigby had expended, during the siege of Harper's Ferry, about 600 rounds, with the exception of canister; had nothing but canister left. Capt. Potts had expended about 1,000 rounds, with the exception of canister; had only canister left. Capt. Graham had but two guns of his battery under his immediate command on the morning of the surrender; had probably 100 rounds of all kinds, but no long-time fuses. Capt. Phillips had expended all his ammunition, except some forty rounds of cannister and some long-range shell too large for his guns. Capt. McGrath's battery had been spiked and left on Maryland Hights on Saturday.
It appears that during the siege, and shortly previous, Col. Miles paroled several Confederate prisoners, permitting them to pass through our lines. During the week previous to the evacuation of Maryland Hights, a Lieut. Rouse of the 12th Virginia Cavalry, who had been engaged in a raid upon a train from Harper's Ferry to Winchester a short time before, was captured and brought into Harper's Ferry. He escaped while on the way to the hospital to have his wounds dressed, but was retaken. He was paroled, but returned in command of some Rebel cavalry on the morning of the surrender.
The attention of Gen. A. P. Hill was called to the fact that Lieut. Rouse was a paroled prisoner, but no attention was paid to it. Lieut. Rouse, himself, on being spoken to about it, laughed at the idea of observing his parole. On Saturday, the day of the attack upon and evacuation of Maryland Hights, Col. Miles directed that sixteen Confederate prisoners be permitted to pass through our lines to rejoin the Rebel army at Winchester. Other cases are testified to, but those are the most important,

BRIG.-GEN. JULIUS WHITE AND COLONELS D'UTASSY AND TRIMBLE. 
Of the subordinate officers referred to in this case, the commission finds with the exception of Colonel Thomas H. Ford, nothing in their conduct that calls for censure. Gen, Julius White merits its approbation. He appears from the evidence to have acted with decided capability and courage.
In this connection the Commission calls attentions to the disgraceful behavior of the 126th New-York, Regiment Infantry, and recommends that Major Baird should for his bad conduct, as shown by this evidence, be dismissed the service. Some of the officers after the wounding of the gallant Colonel, such as Lieut. Barras, and others not known to the Commission, behaved with gallantry and should be commended.

COL. THOMAS FORD.
In the case of Col. Ford, charged with improper conduct in abandoning the Maryland Hights, the Commission, after a careful hearing of the evidence produced by the Government and that relied on by the defense, and a due consideration of the arguments offered by counsel, find:
That on the 5th of September, Col. Ford was placed in command of Maryland Hights by Col. Miles. That Col. Ford, finding the position unprepared by fortifications, earnestly urged Col. Miles to furnish him means by which the Hights could be made tenable for the small force under his command, should a heavy one be brought against him. That these reasonable demands were, from some cause unknown to the Commission, not responded to by the officer in command of Harper's Ferry. That subsequently, when the enemy appeared in heavy force, Col. Ford frequently and earnestly called upon Col. Miles for more troops, representing that he could not hold the Hights unless re-enforced, That these demands were feebly or not at all complied with. That as late as the morning of the 13th, Col. Ford sent two written demands to Col, Miles for re-enforcements, and saying that with the troops then under his command be could not hold the Hights, and unless relieved or otherwise ordered, he would have to abandon them. That as late as 11 o'clock a. m. of the 13th, a few hours previous to the abandonment of this position, Col. Miles said to Col. Ford that he (Col. Ford) could not have another man, and must do the best he could, and if unable to defend the place, he must spike the guns, throw them down the hill, and withdraw to Harper's Ferry in good order.
The Court is then satisfied that Col. Ford was given a discretionary power to abandon the Hights, as his better judgment might dictate; and it believes from the evidence, circumstantial and direct, that the result did not to any great extent surprise nor in any way displease the officer in command at Harper's Ferry.
But this conclusion, so much relied upon by the defense, forces the commission to a consideration of the fact—did Col. Ford, under the discretionary power thus vested in him, make a proper defense of the Hights, and hold them, as he should have done, until driven off by the enemy.
The evidence shows conclusively that the force upon the Hights was not well-managed; that the point most pressed was weakly defended as to numbers, and, after the wounding of the Colonel of the 126th Regiment New-York Infantry, it was left without a competent officer in command, Col. Ford himself not appearing, nor designating any one who might have restored order and encouraged the men; that the abandonment of the Hights was premature is clearly proved. Our forces were not driven from the hill, as full time was given to spike the guns and throw the heavier ones down the cliff, and retreat in good order to Harper's Ferry. The next day a force returning to the Hights found them unoccupied, and brought away unmolested four abandoned guns and a quantity of ammunition.
In so grave a case as this, with such disgraceful consequences, the Court cannot permit an officer to shield himself behind the fact that he did as well as he could, if in so doing he exhibits a lack of military capacity. It is clear to the Commission that Col. Ford should not have been placed in command on Maryland Hights; that he conducted the defense without ability, and abandoned his position without sufficient cause, and has shown throughout such a lack of military capacity as to disqualify him, in the opinion of the Commission, for a command in the service.

COL. D. S. MILES.
The Commission has approached a consideration of this officer's conduct in connection with the surrender of Harper's Ferry with extreme reluctance. An officer who cannot appear before any earthly tribunal to answer or explain charges gravely affecting his character; who has met his death at the hands of the enemy, even upon the spot he disgracefully surrenders, is entitled to the tenderest care and most careful investigation. This the Commission has accorded Col. Miles, and in giving a decision only repeats what runs through our 900 pages of testimony strangely unanimous upon the fact, that Col. Miles's incapacity, amounting to almost imbecility, led to the shameful surrender of this important post.
Early as the 15th of August he disobeys the orders of Major-Gen. Wool to fortify Maryland Hights. When it is surrounded and attacked by the enemy, its naturally strong positions are unimproved, and from his criminal neglect, to use the mildest term, the large force of the enemy is almost upon an equality with the small force under his command.
He seems to have understood, and admitted to his officers, that Maryland Hights is the key to the position, and yet he places Col. Ford in command, with a feeble force—makes no effort to strengthen them by fortifications, although between the 5th and 14th of September there was ample time to do so—and to Col. Ford's repeated demands for means to intrench [sic] and additional reenforcements [sic] he makes either an inadequate return, or no response at all. He gives Col. Ford a discretionary power as to when he shall abandon the Hights—the fact of abandonment having, it seems, been concluded on in his own mind. For, when this unhappy event really occurs, his only exclamation was to the effect that he feared Col. Ford had given up too soon—although he must have known that the abandonment of Maryland Hights was the surrender of Harper's Ferry. This leaving the key of the position to the keeping of Col. Ford, with discretionary power, after the arrival of that capable and courageous officer who had waived his rank to serve wherever ordered, is one of the more striking facts illustrating the incapacity of Col. Miles.
Immediately previous to, and pending the siege of Harper's Ferry, he paroles Rebel prisoners and permits, indeed, sends them to the enemy's headquarters. This, too, when he should have known that the lack of ammunition [sic], the bad conduct of some of our troops, the entire absence of fortifications, and the abandonment of Maryland Hights, were important facts they could, and undoubtedly did, communicate to the enemy. Sixteen of these prisoners were paroled on the 13th, and a pass given them in the handwriting of Col. Miles, while a Rebel officer by the name of Rouse, after an escape, is retaken, and subsequently has a private interview with Col, Miles, is paroled, and after the surrenders appears at the head of his men among the first to enter Harper's Ferry.
It is not necessary to accumulate evidence from the mass that throughout scarcely affords one fact in contradiction to what each one establishes, that Col. Miles was incapable of conducting a defense so important as was this of Harper's Ferry. The Commission would not have dwelled upon this painful subject were it not for the fact that the officer who placed this incapable in command should share in the responsibility, and in the opinion of the Commission Major-General Wool is guilty to this extent of a grave disaster and should be censured for his conduct.
The Commission has remarked freely on Col. Miles, an old officer who has been killed in the service of his country, and it cannot, from any motives of delicacy, refrain from censuring those in high command, when it thinks such censure deserved. The General-in-Chief has testified that Gen. McClellan, after having received orders to repel the enemy invading the State of Maryland, marched only six miles per day, on an average, when pursuing this invading enemy. The General-in-Chief also testifies, that in his opinion Gen. McClellan could and should have relieved and protected Harper's Ferry, and in this opinion the Commission fully concur.
The evidence thus introduced confirms the Commission in the opinion that Harper's Ferry, as well as Maryland Hights, was prematurely surrendered. The garrison should have been satisfied that relief however long delayed, would come at last, and that a thousand men killed in Harper's Ferry would have made a small loss had the post been saved, and probably saved two thousand at Antietam. How important was this defense we can now appreciate. Of the 97,000 men composing at that time the whole of Lee's army, more than one-third were attacking Harper's Ferry. And of this, the main body was in Virginia. By reference to the evidence, it will be seen that at the very moment Col. Ford abandoned Maryland Hights his little army was in reality relieved by Gens. Franklin and Sumner's corps at Crampton's Gap, within seven miles of his position; and that after the surrender of Harper's Ferry no time was given to parole prisoners before 20,000 troops were hurried from Virginia, and the entire force went off on the double quick to relieve Lee, who was being attacked at Antietam. Had the garrison been slower to surrender, or the Army of the Potomac swifter to march, the enemy would have been forced to raise the siege, or would have been taken in detail, with the Potomac dividing hiss forces.

Hospital Life.
UNITED STATES GENERAL HOSPITAL,
FORT SCHUYLER, N. Y.,
August 28, 1863.
MR. EDITOR:—Once more, through your widely circulated paper, I will give you a little sketch of hospital life at this place, and at the same time communicate to the friends of the 126th and 108th Regiments such information that will be of the most benefit and importance to them in regard to the condition of their wounded. Those who are here as patients from these commands are now all doing well, and some of them will be, in a short time, ready to join their companies again; others will be unfit for some time yet to come, and some will never be capable of performing military duty. The number of patients in this hospital at the present time is about 2,000, and the only thing that now prevents the most of them from, improving as fast as they might is a species of mortification called gangrene. It is now found mostly in two wards, and great caution is used to keep it from spreading. As yet none of it has made its appearance in this ward, and we think it is owing to the extra care and caution of Dr. Sanders and the nurses who have charge of this part of the hospital. Dr. Sanders is a surgeon of great skill, and, besides that, a gentleman, who looks well to all soldiers placed under his immediate care. In looks and appearance he reminds one of Dr. Benham of Honeoye Falls in your county. The boys of Ontario and Monroe counties here can attribute in a great measure their now convalescent condition to the skill of Dr. Sanders, and the kind attention of Jerome Moore, his chief nurse. We have but little reason to complain of medical and surgical attention. But patients here have reason to complain of their rations, which are classed as extra, full and low diet. They are good in quality, but very slim in quantity. And the good people of West-Chester and vicinity bring in all kinds of vegetables, fruits, cra... and many other eatables, which are given free, besides that furnished by the government. But it must all be sent to headquarters, and so pass through the ladies' kitchen, and then a part sent round to each man; but that part is a small one for keen appetites.
But having changed surgeons in charge of late, we are now under Dr. James S. Smith, and he says the men shall all have enough to eat if it is here. Some of the boys of the 126th who were here as patients have gone home on furlough, and the rest are anxiously waiting for their turn; and that is the state of those of the 108th, viz: Seeley Meeker, M. Dokey, John Nelson and Robert McVety. Those confined here from wounds or sickness are always pleased to hear or see anything from home; but much more so for a chance to visit the place of their former residence.
There are various ways for the patients to amuse themselves here as fast as they become able. We have a good billiard table, a large library and reading room, a fine church and a sailboat, all for the benefit of the soldiers,—besides many other things for recreation for those who are unfit for duty. But we understand the government will move the hospital in a few months, in order to enlarge the Fort, to a point somewhere between New York and Albany on the Hudson river. The New York morning papers bring in good news from Charleston, Sumter and vicinity. The wounded soldiers watch the papers closely for the downfall of Charleston, and with that the final downfall of this now pending rebellion. And this we hope will be the case. But we are mindful of the grit and fighting qualities of the Southern men. Most of the soldiers now have confidence in most of our commanding generals, but Little Mac is their idol still, and with a large number ever will be.
A funeral is an occurrence which takes place almost every day, and for the occasion we have quite often instead of only one from two to five corpses for burial. Earnestly hoping that this war will soon cease and the American people will profit by the fruits and misery it has caused, we are contented as far as circumstances will permit, looking patiently forward to the time when the day of this tumult will dawn with peace, no more to be broken by the booming of cannon and the whizzing of rebel or federal bullets, which are everything but pleasant to people with large ears. And we also look forward to the time when our daily rations may be dealt out in the usual way at the usual time by those best calculated for the purpose—woman. Friends of soldiers arrive here almost daily in search of some one, and in many cases find them all prepared for the grave. This to them seems hard, and almost too much to bear when they came here with the expectation of seeing them only slightly wounded. Such as these are not rare but common cases. And when the casualties of this war are finally recorded and history tells the story in a true and impartial detail, then and then only will the people of this once proud republic be brought to realize the extent and magnitude of the present struggle between the North and South. W. R. C.
Co. D., 126th N. Y. V.

The 126th in Battle!
HEROIC VALOR AND ITS FEARFUL COST!
The Colonel, Three Captains, and One Lieutenant Killed!
Three other Captains and Five Lieutenants Wounded.
THREE HUNDRED OF THE RANK AND FILE KILLED & WOUNDED!
The great conflict of the war on northern soil, begun on the first, virtually ended on the 3d of July, and has been already heralded to the world as resulting in a glorious triumph to the army of the Union. It is indeed a victory; and simultaneously with its announcement came also the tidings of the final triumph of Grant's army in the Southwest in the capitulation of Vicksburgh [sic]. Two events like these would naturally lead to every form of rejoicing—with cannon, and music, and bonfires, and orations. But alas! with the tidings of victory come also tidings of nearest and dearest friends slain! The cup of joy is transformed to one of bitterness and sorrow, and the accents of rejoicing die on the lip, succeeded by lamentations and weeping o'er the sacrifices at which victory has been achieved. Fearful is the aceldama of Gettysburgh [sic], with its bleeding and mangled forms of the best and bravest of our own neighbors! As yet, we know only of two of our citizens slain, but it needs not imagination to picture that other forms of those we know and cherish, lie cold in death on that fatal battle-field. "Three hundred killed and wounded of the 126th," is the tenor of messages which reach us; and when we consider that of the five or six hundred who composed the phalanx that under the banner of the regiment engaged in the conflict, upwards of one hundred are our own immediate kinsmen and neighbors, we can infer the extent of our losses and bereavements. Who else have been stricken down? With beating hearts and quivering lips, and eyes almost blinded with tears, the parents, the wives, the brothers and sisters of soldiers in that regiment scan the long columns of killed and wounded in the daily journals. The familiar name, thank God, is not there! But the suspense is still prolonged--not relieved, nor displaced by sad reality.
The regiment has fought nobly, heroically. The survivors will bear that HONOR with them so long as the record of this battle shall live in history. "Harper's Ferry" and whatever of disgrace may have attached to this regiment in connection with the battle and surrender of that place, will fade away and be forgotten--paled in the blaze of valorous light which encircles them as THE HEROES OF GETTYSBURGH.
The particulars in regard to the part taken by the 126th in the battle, are yet quite meagre. We know only that the following officers and men are killed and wounded:
KILLED.
Col. E. Sherrill, of Geneva.
Capt. Isaac Shimer, Co. F. Geneva.
Capt. Wheeler, Co. K. Canandaigua.
Capt. O. J. Herendeen, Co. H. Manchester.
Lt. Rufus Holmes, Co. G. Phelps.
WOUNDED.
Capt. J. H. Brough, Co. E. Rushville.
Capt. C. A. Richardson, Co. D.
Lt. Lawrence, Co. B. Yates.
Lt. Brown, Co. C. Seneca Co.
Lt. Jacob Sherman, Co. E. Geneva.
Lt. Owen, Co. H. Ontario Co.
Lt. Huntoon, Co. H.  "        "
Lt. Seaman, Co. K.   "        "
Serg. E. Jessop, (unknown.)
Mordin Older, Co. K., East Bloomfield.
Bernard Logan, Co. K. Richmond.
C. S. Gilbert, Co. H. Phelps.
Leonard Seitz, Co. E. Geneva.
Judge Folger of the relief party, en-route for Gettysburgh [sic], ascertained and sends us from Elmira the following facts and incidents relative to the 126th:
"Capt. Brough has arrived home, (at Rushville, we believe—ED.) He was wounded in the wrist in Thursday's fight, but bound it up and went on lighting, and fought all day Friday. Said a man was a coward who would give out from such a wound. He went into the battle with forty-seven men, and on Saturday mustered but fourteen.
"Capt. Brough states that Col. SHERRILL lead a charge of the brigade mounted on a white horse, against the entreaties of all his officers. He was shot through the body and lived three hours, dying in hospital, with none of his men near him.
"Co. A, Morris Brown, captured a flag from the rebels having on it "Harper's Ferry"—Gen. Hayes rode along the line, saying—"Boys, do you see that name? Now, ____ ____ them, FORWARD ON THE CHARGE!" And FORWARD they went, and such a charge was never made before.
"Capt. Richardson is wounded in the heel, Lt. Lawrence through the knee. Two hundred and eleven are wounded, says Adjt. Brown in a letter to his father. Coleman, ranking Captain, is in command of the regiment.—Phil... at Washington." Capts. Shime... ... _erendeen fell within the rebel lines, and their bodies had not yet been found when Capt. Brough left.
Information has since been received showing that the bodies of all the officers killed of this regiment were recovered and interred on the battle-field, and so marked that the friends in quest of the same can readily find them. They will doubtless all be brought to  their respective homes for re-interment.
P. S. The Ovid Bee announces the following casualties in Co. C, (from Seneca Co.)
KILLED—Chas. Harris, Sam'l Blew, Joshua Purcell, and Cornelius Basley. E. D. Vaughn and Wash. Conn, mortally wounded—(since dead.) Wilmen Stuart severely, and James Harris, slightly wounded.

Casualties in the 126th Reg't N. Y. V.
We print a complete list of the casualties in the 126th Regiment, in the battle of Gettysburg, which was furnished to the Dundee Record by Rev. T. Spencer Harrison, Chaplain of the Regiment. The list will be of interest to many in the adjoining counties east.
Col. K. Sherrill, killed.
COMPANY A.—Killed, Sergeant David Goff, private Robert Pool; wounded, Sergeants Smith Stebbins, James Henderson, privates Levi Cole, S P Brizee, John Frost, Alexander Mosher, Wm Axle, Frank Poole.
Co. B.—Lieut M H Lawrence, wounded; killed, Serg't Major H P Cook, Serg't Erasmus Bassett, Corporal Elias A Norris, privates Wm Hobart, Chas Gaylord; wounded, Melvin Bunce, Serg't Edwin Jessup, Corporals Geo Chapman, Thos T McCarrick, provates John Finger, C M Hyatt, Moses Booth, David J Wilkins, Chas C Kicks, Wm Cassian, Wm Raymond, Reuben Bullock, John Blancett, Chas H Dunning, Nathan D Baden, Mortimer Garrison, Peter M Norman, Stephen C Purdy, Amos J Potter, Orrin Bates, Orrin Edgett, Luther Weaver, Edwin Coryell, Wm H Thomas, Franklin S Pettingill, James K P Huson, dead.
Co. C.—Lieut Sidney Brown, wounded; killed, Serg't C T Harris, Corporal C L Bailey, privates E D Vaughn, J Purcell, Geo Kelly, J L Grant; wounded, Serg't Benj Swarthout, Madison Covert, Corporals Wm Herrington, Henry Peterson, privates John M Chambers. Henry H Rumsey, Spencer J Colvin, Richard Lockhart, Geo W Comer, Richard C Dimmick, Eugene K Holton, J F Harris, F M Parker, Sam'l Bleu, dead, Geo C King, leg amputated, Edgar H McQuigg, Peter W Rappleye, Thomas M Woodworth, James H Stull, John Bond, M Harriel, J C Scott, Wilmer Stuart.
Co. D.—Killed, Serg't Edwin W Tyler, Corporal Hiram B Wood, privates Henry W Wilson, Truman B Comstock, Chas C Crandall; wounded, Capt Chas A Richardson, Corporals J Z Sabine, Henry Mattoon, privates Wm R Chambers, Sylvester Oatman, Barber Elbridge, Geo B Johnson, Wm Snyder, John Goodrich, Jr, Arnold J Yeckly, Mark Dunham, Wesley D Robinson, Edgar Oatman, John Chloecy, Frederick Ebert, Robert T Porter, Hosea Lewis, dead, O C Lyon, Thos Barnett, John D Rivers, sunstroke; missing, A J Wilson, Decatur A Hedges, Wm B Brondo, John Brondie.
Co E.—Killed, Harvey Wilson, Joshua Brink, John W Thompson; wounded, Capt John E Brough, Lieut Jacob Sherman, Orderly Serg't Edwin Barnes, privates Jonathan Creed, Tyler Brink, Henry Becker, Geo W Hafling, James Boyd, dead; G W Larkham, John Gallivan, B W Scott, James B Reynols, Lorenzo Phillips, Leonard Seits, John Saulspaugh, dead, John Sloat, Ambrose Bedell; missing, Geo W Turner.
Co. F.—Capt Shiner, M Cunningham, John Phillips, John Snelling, killed; wounded, Chas Terbush, T G Wilson, Geo Carr, O M Leland, C W Nill, Oliver Perry, John Torrence, J M Wilson, E Craft, A J Davenport, Samuel Jacort, Robert Jeffrey, A N Ficro, James Camp, Van Buren Wheat, Orderly Serg't Ephraim Dubois, Edward A Young, Samuel Clark, John W Bishop, Chas F Keetz.
Co. G.—Lieut Rufus Holmes, killed; wounded, Frederick Seicer, Chas Farnsworth, James Harper, Thos Yeo, Clinton Pasco, Wm Long, John Morgan, leg amputated, Daniel Day, Geo Hoffman, G W Bailey, John  Duffy, Serg't Snyder, dead, James Place.
Co. H.—Capt O J Merendeen, Robert Burns, killed; missing, John L Bullis, Edward T Swan, C L Gilbert; wounded, Corporal Chas L Clapp, David Phipps, Ame Camp, James A Young, Serg't Anson E Howard, N J Briggs, H S Dickens, Theo F Stacey, James Sodon, Chas L Bigelow, James Golden, F Bayne, Ceylon H Sheffer, E G Hamlin, Geo Nicholson, P J Hopkins, Nicholas Looms, Theo Vickery, John H Russell, Lieut A Huntoon, Lieut H B Owen, Wm B Westfall.
Co. I.—Sanford Ambrose, Chas Waters, Wm H Eddy, killed; wounded, David Berger, A H Pierson, Dennis Ryan, Wm H Wood, Stephen L Weatherlow; Sergeant Abram Cadmus, killed; Geo Ackerman, wounded; Thos Seabring, dead; H Kelignor, W Decker, H Kipp, John Hart, W H Tewksbury.
Co. K.—Capt Chas M Wheeler, killed; wounded, Lieut I A Seamans, Serg't Wm Criscadon, A K Davis, George Prouty, Geo Smith, Corporal B Logan, W H Adams, missing, H T Abbott, missing, Geo Macomber, Serg't Raleh H Crippen, Serg't A B Cooper, A W Cooper, Jerome Parks, John King, Lester Nelson, killed, A J Cady, missing.
Chaplain Harrison says in his letter:
Our regiment has won imperishable laurels, and gained a place in history for time to come, though at a fearful cost. What is left of us are in good spirits, and are now marching forward on the pursuit of our flying foe. The prospect is that Lee will regret ever having come North.

Funeral of Captain Shimer.
The body of Capt SHIMER arrived here on Monday evening last, via New York. That of Serg't J. BARNES arrived by the same train. The latter was taken to Benton for interment.
Capt. SHIMER being a member of the Masonic Fraternity, attached to Ark Lodge No. 33, to the Geneva Royal Arch Chapter, and to the Geneva Cammandery of Knights Templars, his funeral was conducted here on Wednesday last in accordance with the beautiful, impressive and solemn ritual of the Order. The brethren met at their Lodge room in Seneca street, their numbers augmented by delegations of Masons from Canandaigua, Phelps, Waterloo and Seneca Falls, and proceeded in a body to the house. There were about 175 in the line of procession, clothed with white gloves and aprons, and other insignia of the order. From the house the coffin was borne on the shoulders of the masonic pall bearers to the Ref'd Dutch Church. The following was the Order of Procession.
TYLER.
STEWARDS.
MASTER MASONS.
SENIOR AND JUNIOR BEACONS.
SECRETARY AND TREASURER.
SENIOR AND JUNIOR WARDENS.
MARK MASTERS.
PAST MASTERS.
ROYAL ARCH MASONS.
SELECT MASTERS.
KNIGHTS TEMPLARS.
The Holy Writings.
THE MASTER.
CLERGY.
COFFIN.
PALL BEARERS.
MILITARY PALL BEARERS.
CHIEF MOURNERS.
TRUSTEES OF GENEVA, IN CARRIAGES.
Returned and Furloughed Officers and Soldiers, in Uniform.
FIRE DEPARMENT OF GENEVA.
CITIZENS AND STRANGERS.
The introductory exercises at the Church were conducted by the Rev. Dr. Wiley, the pastor. His address embodied a fitting biography and eulogy of the deceased, referring as well to his character as a citizen as to his later career as a soldier.
The masonic ceremonies which followed, at the church and at the grave, were observed with deep interest by the large concourse of spectators. They could not fail to create a favorable impression on the minds of all as to the high and holy mission of the institution. Almost co-equal in existence with the birth of Christianity itself, it has kept pace with the latter in the inculcation and support of every moral and social virtue, chief of which are friendship and brotherly love. Thus knit together by the holiest of ties, the Masonic brethren feel scarcely less acutely than natural kindred, the severance of such ties by the hand of death. The void in the mystic circle is felt as in the family circle. The emblems of the Lodge room remind us of the bereavement and that the name of the deceased brother is on perpetual record among us. Thus will brother SHIMER, though dead to the world, live in the remembrance of his brethren of the craft.

The funeral of Capt. Wheeler, of the 126th Regiment, who died from wounds received at the battle of Gettysburg, took place at Canandaigua, a week ago Sunday.—Rev. Dr. Daggett delivered the funeral discourse, and the body was attended to the grave by Companies F and D, of the 54th N. G. and a very large procession of people. The funeral ceremonies were very impressive.

Ontario county lost three captains of the 126th Regiment at Gettysburg—Capt. Isaac Shimer of Geneva, Company F; Capt. Wheeler of Canandaigua, Company K; Capt. O. J. Herendeen, Company H. All men of excellent personal qualities and valuable soldiers.

SOLDIERS IN HOSPITAL—We have received the following:
BALTIMORE, Md., July 10, 1863.
EDITOR DEMOCRAT—Sir: The following members of the 126th New York Volunteers were admitted to the General Hospital, Annapolis Junction, on the 6th instant: E. D. Copp, Co. F, sergeant; Martin Young, Co. A, private; L, W. Rogers; Co. A, do.; C. C. Phillips, Co. H, do.; Geo. C. Chadwick, Co. C, musician; A. E. Depew, Co. H, private; Hugh Gibbon, Co. D, do.; F. T. Edgerton, Co. F, do.
Very respectfully, M. A.
The above was clipped from the Rochester ...t of Tuesday.

CAPT. BROUGH, commandant of Company E, 126th Regiment, was wounded in Thursday's fight at the battle of Gettysburg. He bound up his arm and went on fighting all day Friday. Said a man was a coward who would give out from such a wound. He went into the battle with 47 men, and on Saturday mustered but fourteen.

THE KILLED AND WOUNDED.—We received from Adjutant Brown, on Saturday last, a line written at Frederick, Md., on the 9th inst., in which he promised to forward to us a correct list of the killed and wounded in the 126th Regiment as soon as it could be made out, giving the nature of the wounds, &c. He desired that no other list should be published, as they were incorrect. We have anxiously awaited the Adjutant's list, but it has not come, and we are compelled to go to press without it. We publish in its stead the list sent by Elder Harrison, the Chaplain, to the Dundee Record. It is known to be imperfect, but is the best we can do. We ought to have had a correct list in the two companies, A and B, before this, but we must wait a little longer. We understand that Joseph Hollowell, and a young man by the name of Nichols, of Company B, belonging at Milo Centre, were killed. These names are not in Chaplain Harrison's list. Other errors and omissions have been mentioned which do not now occur to us.

Briefs.
The 126th Regiment captured three flags from the enemy during the fight at Gettysburg.

WOUNDED OF THE 126TH.—Hon. C. J. FOLGER has furnished the following list of the wounded of the 126th Regiment, and their wereabouts [sic].

At Gettysburg Pa.—SEMINARY HOSPITAL—Smith Stebbins, Lieut, Jacob Sherman, Mortemer Garrison, Wm. Stewart, Samuel Clark, Geo. Day (or Gay,) Hy T. Alcott.
Chas. P. Gray, Marcus Andrus, nurses; not hurt.
CHRIST CHURCH HOSPITAL, YORK ST.—John Morin, Wm. Wood.
AT HOSPITAL CAMP 2d DIVISION—Geo. Nickerson (or Nicholson.)
AT BALTIMORE AND VICINITY—Lieut. Sidney E. Brown, C. J. J. Camp, C. Lieut. M. H. Lawrence, B.
JARVIS HOSPITAL—P. W. Rappleyea, C. Peter Rappleyea, C. James R. Reynolds, E. 1st Sergt. Pratt Dibble, H. Wm. Snyder, D. Thomas Barnett, D.
N. B. It is supposed that all at Jarvis Hospital have been sent north, except  Sergt. Dibble, but as their names are not found elsewhere they are put down here.
MCKIMS HOSPITAL—John D. Rivers, D. John W. Overacer, H.
ANNAPOLIS JUNCTION—Frank T. Edgerton, F. Hugh Gibbon, D. Geo. E. Chadwick, musician, A. E. Depew, H. Curtis C. Phillips, H. L. W. Rogers, A. Martin Youngs, A., E. D. Copp, F.
At New York City and Vicinity.—McDOUGAL HOSPITAL, FORT SCHUYLER—Eldridge Barber, D., W. H. Thomas, B., W. B. Chambers, D., John Galivan, E., David Hoffman, G., Eugene H. Holten, E., O. C. Lyon, B., Edgar Oatman, D., R. F . Parker, D., Alex'r Moshier, A., Corp. Hy Mattoon, D., Sylvester Oatman, D., Sherman W. Robinson, E., Thos. Burnett, D., Geo. W. Fuller, D.
FORT WOOD BEDLOES ISLAND.—James Golder, H. Geo. Chapman, B. Geo. W. McComber, K. Sanford Ambrose, I.—Franklin Pettingill, B. Nathan B. Beedon, B. William Cassion, B. Edward A. Young, E. J. S. Parrish, I. John Heart, I. Andrew J. Davenport, F. John C. Beach. H. Alonzo K. Davis, K., Thomas Yeo, G., Orrin Bates, B.
UNITED STATES GENERAL HOSPITAL, NEWARK NEW JERSEY.—Ambrose Bedell, Co. E., Edwin Jessep, Serg't B., Theo. P. Vickery, H., Edwin Cogswell, B., T. C. Brooks, A., Hy. Kellenger, I., George Ackerman, L, Peter Norman, B., John. Goodrich, D., Fred. Bean, H., Theo. F. Stacy, F., M. J. Bachman, G., James A. Young, H., E. N. Loomis, H., J. A. Creed, E., Reuben Bullock, B., Wm. W. Woolworth, C., VanBuren Wheat, (probably) F., Corp. W. S. Decker, L., David Wilkins, B., C. M. Hayatt, B., A. J. Potter, B., John Clahecy, D., John King, K., John Duffin, G., Wm. L. Long, G., Fred. Sasur, G., Charles Hicks, B., J. B. Solin, D., Tyler Brink, E., Geo. W. Hafling, E., J . H. Russell, H., Nathan J. Briggs, H., George A. Carr, F., John Cochrane, K., Levi Coles, A., W. D. Ad_iance, E., Moses H. Booth, B., Sargt. E Howard, H., John Benjamin, E., Corp. B. Gelder, A., David Burger, I., Gilbert N. Bailey, G., Geo. B. Johnson, D., Geo. W. Larham, E., Leonard Seitz, E., Samuel Hayward, K., Corp. Geo. W. Smith, K., Henry Decker, E. At Newport, Rhode Island.—PORTSMOUSH GROVE HOSPITAL—Fred'k Ebert, D., Wesley D. Robinson, D., Charles Shirley, E., Edmund Craft, F., C. P. Kentz, F., Chas. L. Bigalow, H., Stephen C. Purdy, B., James K. Soden, H.
At Philadelphia & Vicinity.—BROAD ST. HOSPITAL—J. H. Stull, M. F. Dunham, Wm. H. Cole, L. P. Brizee.
SUMMIT HOUSE.—S. J. Calvin, E. H. McQuigg, D . Ryan, H. Kipp, B. (or R.) C. Lockhart, E. B. Norris, G. W. Conn, Norris Berley, M. Covert, John Bond, H. S. Dickins, (or Dickenson,) Ed. G. Hamblin, Benj. Swarthout, W. H. Tewskbury.
MOWER HOUSE OR CLERMONT HILL.—A. N. Fiero, John Blausett, Theron Dunn.
WEST PHILADELPHIA OR SATTERLEE—B. (or R.) Crippen, Chas. L. Clapp, Jerry Parks, Wm. G. Westfall.
GERMANTOWN HOSPITAL—C. S. Gilbert.
CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL—Francis M. Parker, John H. Chambers, Aliza Cubert.
It is to be observed, that the men who are reported above, as at Hospital in Baltimore, may have left as the Hospitals there are relieved as fast as possible, by sending north those who can bear transportation.
The place to make inquiries, at New York, Philadelphia, &c., is at the office of the Medical Director.
In New York 458 Broome St.
" Philadelphia, corner Grand & 13th St.
" Baltimore, near Barnums Hotel, and in New York a pass from the Medical Director, will much facilitate entrance to the Hospitals.
It may be well to say, that this list is not complete, for we know of men of the Regiment, who left Gettysburg, wounded, whose names have not been found on the books of the Medical Directors, and whose whereabouts has not yet been ascertained.
It may be satisfactory to friends, to state that the Hospital in the Cities seem in an extremely neat and comfortable condition.

FROM THE 126th REGIMENT.
We find in the Rochester Union of Saturday, a letter from a wounded member of Co. D, 126th Reg't, written shortly after the battle of Gettysburg. After describing their march from Centreville, which he represents as a severe one, averaging 20 to 36 miles per day over heavy roads, to accomplish which many of them were obliged to throw away all their baggage, he says:
Company D. of the 126th, lost many men in killed—the best material of which the company was composed. Among those were H. Wood, corporal; E. Tyler, sergeant, and C. Crandall, from Naples, Ontario county, N. Y. They were loved and esteemed of the whole company. H. W. Willson, Canandaigua, of Co. D, was a man of education, and proved to be under all circumstances one of the best soldiers the country afforded. T. Comstock, H. Lewis were of the same stamp as soldiers, and will be much missed when duty is to be performed in the company and regiment.—Among the wounded of Naples I will mention the names of O. C. Lyon, R. Porte and Z. Sabins, who had not only won the esteem of the men of their company but of the whole regiment, as true and willing men to the cause in which they were engaged. All, in fact, performed their part well, which was plainly shown by wounded rebels taken prisoners by us. Our company officers were all on hand, and behaved not only bravely but manfully. Lieuts. Lincoln and Geddis went through the whole three days fight without a scratch, not because they were unexposed, for such was not the case. Capt. C. A. Richardson was wounded in the foot the first day, and he was unable to be afterwards with his command. He made himself useful in taking care of his wounded men, giving them all the attention and aid that lay in his power. Our corporal, H. Mattoon, was shot by a sharp-shooter in the neck close to the backbone which was no more nor less than a pretty close call. He stated he did not know what they wanted to shoot him for, as he "wan't doing anything only just carrying the flag along.”
Col. Sherrill died of wounds received July 2d. A record of a high character will ever attend his memory. Lieut. Col. James M. Bull has proven to be not only a fighting man, but a perfect tiger in battle. Our major, P. D. Philips, was absent at the time at Washington, and, also the orderly of Co. D; but had they been with us, we are confident they would have been at their posts. Capts. Shimer and Herendeen were killed, and truer men never lived.
But some of what are termed our finest officers, were so fine that in battle they could hardly be seen—whether it was on account of smoke or not, I will leave to be told by others.
It is now generally conceded that were it not for the resistance of the draft in New York City and other places, that the battle of Gettysburg would be looked upon as the most desperate and decisive of the war.
And now to the friends of the killed and wounded of the 126th, allow me to say that the only consolation that you can obtain here below, is that your near and dear friends have been killed and wounded while doing their whole duty to themselves and their country.—And to you all that wish for greater consolation, may you look to a higher and better Commander who reigns where war and the rumors of war are heard of no more.

WOUNDED OF THE 126th REGIMENT.
A letter from Judge Folger at New York of the 18th inst., gives the names of some of the wounded of the 126th Regt., and the Hospitals where they are now located, as follows:
Mc DOUGALL HOSPITAL, FORT SCHUYLER.
Thos. Barnett, Co. D; Barber Eldridge, do; Edgar Oatman, do; Sylvester Oatman, do; Henry Mattoon, do; Robert T. Porter, do; Wm. R. Chambers, do.

FORT WOOD, BELLOWS ISLAND.
George W. McOmber, Co. K; Alonzo Davis, do.

U.S. GENERAL HOSPITAL, NEWARK, N. J.
John Goodrich, Co. D; John Clohacy, do; John Cockrane, Co. K; George B. Johnson, Co. D; Geo. W. Smith, Co. K; John King, do; Jepthar Z. Sabine, Co. D; John Benjamin, Co. K; Samuel Hayward, do; VanBuren Wheat, Co. F.

PORTSMOUTH GROVE, R. I.
Frederick Ebert, Co. D; Wesley D. Robinson, do.

BROAD STREET HOSPITAL, PHILADELPHIA.
P. Brizee; Mark F. Dunham.

SUMMIT STREET HOSPITAL, PHILADELPHIA.
S. J. Cotvin, D. Ryan, Edgar H. McQuigg, B. . Lockhart, E. B. Norris, G. W. Conn, M. Covert, Norris Burlew, John Bond, H. S. Dickens, E. G. Hamblin.

MOWER HOSPITAL, PHILADELPHIA.
A. N. Fiero, J. B. Blansett.

WEST PHILADELPHIA HOSPITAL.
R. H. Crippon, C. L. Clapp. Jerome Parks, V. G. Westfall.

NEWTON HOSPITAL, BALTIMORE.
Lieut. Sidney E. Brown, Co. C; J. J. Camp, do; Lieut. M. H. Lawrence, Jr., B; P. W. Rappleyea, C.

JARVIS HOSPITAL.
Peter Rappleyea, C; Serg't Pratt Dibble, H; Corp'l James R. Reynolds, E; Stephen C. Purdy, B.

M'KIMS HOSPITAL.
Frederick Ebert, E; John D. Rivers, D; Edward Kraft, F; C P. Kents, F; Wesley D. Robinson, D; E. L. Bigalow, H; G. Soden, H; John W. Overacre, H.

ANNAPOLIS JUNCTION.
Frank T. Edgerton, F; Hugh Gibbon, D; Geo. E. Chadwick, musician, C; A. E. Depew, H; Curtis E. Phillips, H; L. W. Rogers, A; Martin Young, A; E. D. Copp, F.

WEST'S BUILDINGS.
J. H. Frost, A; F. E. Pool, A. Sent to New York.—Thomas Bassett, D; Wm. Snyder, D. To Germantown, Pa.—C. S. Gilbert.

SOLDIERS IN HOSPITAL.—We have received the following, says the Editor Roch. Democrat:
BALTIMORE, Md., July 10, 1863.
Sir:—The following members of the 126th N. Y. Volunteers were admitted to the General Hospital, Annapolis Junction, on the 6th inst.:
E. D. Copp, Co. F, seargeant [sic]; Martin Young, Co. A, private; L. W. Rogers, Co. A, do; C. C. Phillips, Co. H, do.; Geo. C. Chadwick, Co. C, musician; A. E. Depew, Co. H, private; Hugh Gibbon, Co. D, do.; F. T. Edgerton, Co. F, do.

FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1863.
Killed and Wounded in the 126th.
The Chaplain of the 126th Regiment, furnishes the Waterloo Observer a list of the killed and wounded from our county in the Regiment. Co. C is from the south part of this county; F, partly from Tyre and Junius; G was Capt. Aikens company, mostly from Waterloo; and I, Capt. Lee's, from Waterloo and Fayette. It is not pretended that the list is perfect, but is as complete as circumstances would allow at the time it was made out. Here it is:
Co. C.—Killed—Sergeant C. T. Harris, Corp. C. L. Bailey, Privates E. D. Vaughn, Joshua Purcell, Geo. Kelly, J. L. Grant.
Wounded—Lieut. Sidney Brown, Sergeants Benj. Swarthout, Madison Covert, Corporals Wm. Herrington, Henry Peterson, Privates John M. Chambers, Henry H. Rumsey, Spencer J. Colvin, Richard Lockhart, George W. Comer, Richard C. Dimmick, Eugene K. Holton, J. F. Harris, F. M. Parker, Samuel Bleu, (dead) Geo. C. King, (leg amp., dead) Edgar H. M'Quigg, Peter W. Rappleye, Thomas M. Woodworth, James H. Stull, John Bond, M. Harriel, J . C. Scott, Wilmer Stuart.
Co. F.—Killed—Capt. Isaac Shinier, M. Cunningham, John Phillips, John Snelling.
Wounded—Charles Terbush, T. G. Wilson, George Carr, O. M. Leland, C. W. Nill, Oliver Perry, John Torrence, J. M. Wilson, E. Craft, Andrew J, Davenport, Samuel Jacort, Robert Jeffrey, A. N. Fiero, James Camp, Orderly Sergant Van Buren Wheat, Ephraim Dubois, Edward A. Young, Samuel Clark, John W. Bishop, Charles P. Keytz.
Co. G.—Killed—Lieut. Rufus Holmes, Sergeant T. J. Snyder, James Stevenson, jr.
Wounded—Frederick Spicer, Chas. Farnsworth, (dead,) James Harper, Thomas Yeo, Clinton Pasco, Wm. Long, John Morgan, (leg amputated,) D. Day, Geo, Hoffman, G. W. Bailey, John Duffy, James Place, Wm. E. Bishop.
Co. I.—Killed—Sanford Ambrose, Chas. Walters, Wm. H. Eddy, Sergt. Abram Cadmus.
Wounded—David Berger, A. H. Pierson, Dennis Ryan, W. H. Wood, Stephen L. Weatherlow, Geo. Ackerman, Thos, Seabring, (dead,) H. Kelignor, W. Decker, H. Kipp, J. Hart, W. H. Tewksbury.

LIST OF KILLED WOUNDED AND MISSING, 126th Reg't. N. Y. V., BATTLE OF GETTYSBURGH, PA., July 2nd, 3rd and 4th.
KILLED.—Col. Eliakim Sherrill; Sergt. Major Henry P. Cook.

COMPANY A.
KILLED.—Sergt. David H. Goff; Bugler Robt. H. Pool.
Wounded.—Sergt. Smith Stebbins, Severely; Sergt James Henderson, hand slight; Francis E. Pool, leg severely; Wm. Axtell, foot severely; Levi P. Brizee, thigh severely; John H. Frost, leg severely; J Wesley Parker, arm slight; Alexander Moshier, hip slight; Arthur W. Middleton, head slight; Levi Cole, hand slight; Charles W. Sterling, shoulder slight.

COMPANY B.
KILLED.—Color Sergt. Erasmus; E Bassett; Corp'l Ellas A. Norris; Corp'l Samuel A. Nichols; Chas W Gaylord; J K P Huson; L Will Hobart; Joseph Hollowell.
Wounded.—Capt Wm A Coleman, slight; Lieut M H Lawrence, leg severely; Sergt Edwin Jessop, arm severely; Cop'l T T McCarrick, leg severely; Corp'l Geo Chapman, foot severely; Moses W Booth, chest severely; Reuben Bullock, hand; Nathan D Beaden, knee; Wm Cassion, leg; Edwin Coryell, hand; Chas Dunning, leg; Mortimer Garrison, leg, died July 18; Orrin Edgelt, slight; Chas W Hyatt, foot; Chas Hicks, strain; Petre A Norman, hand; Franklin S Pettengill, ankle; Stephen Furdy, foot; Amos J Potter, foot; Raymond, leg, died July l5th; Wm Henry Thomas, head and arm; Luther Weaver, both legs, severely; David J Wilkins, hand; John B_nsett, hand; Orren Bates, hand; Melvine Bunce, wounded and missing; John Finger, missing, supposed dead.

COMPANY C.
Killed.—Sergt. Chas T Harris; Corp'l Cornelius L. Bailey; Samuel Blew; George Kelly; Jonathan T Grant; Joshua B Pursel; Edwin D. Vaughn.
Wounded.—Lt. Sidney E Brown, leg severely; Sergt. Benj. Swarthout, leg severely; Sergt Madison Covert, foot severely; Corp'l Wm Herrington, head severely; Corp'l Henry Peterson, side slight; Corp'l Wm H Cole, leg severely; Richard C Lockhart, leg severely; Peter W Rappleye, foot severely; Jas H Stull, hip severely; Richard C Dimmick, head slightly; Mathew Hannill, groin severely; Wilmer Stewart, thigh severely; Edgar H McQuigg, arm severely; Spencer J Calvin, leg severely; Frank M Parker, hand slight; John M Chambers, hand slight; C Rappleye, arm slight; Jas F Harris side slight; Henry H Rumsey, arm slight; Geo C King, leg severely; Geo W Conn, breast severely; Eugene Holton, hip severely; T M Woo.dworth, arm slight; J C Scott, hand slight; John Bond, hand slight.

COMPANY D.
Killed.—Sergt E W Tyler; Corp'l H B Wood; C C Crandall; F B Comstock ; H W Wilson.
WOUNDED.—Capt Chas A Richardson, heel slight; Corp'l H Mattoon, neck severe; Corp'l J Z Sabin, ankle slight; F Barnett, arm slight; J Cholecy, thigh slight; M Dunham, side severe; F Ebert, slight; B Eldred, hand slight; J Goodrich, arm severe; J Johnson, arm slight; H Lewis chest severely; O C Lyon, abdomen severely; S Oatman, leg slight; E Oatman, thigh slight; R Porter, shoulder severe; W D Robinson, leg slight; W Snyder, face severe; A J Yeckley, face severe; W R Chambers, leg severe. MISSING.—John Brodie, Wm Brando, Andrew Wilson.

COMPANY E.
KILLED.—Corp'l Jas P Boyd, John H Saulspaugh, Harvey Wilson, J W Thompson.
WOUNDED.—Capt John H Brough, arm broken; Lt Jacob Sherman, side severely; Sergt J E Barnes, both legs, dead; Corp'l Byron W Scott, hand slight; Corp'l Ambrose Bedell, hand slight; Corp'l Jas B Reynolds, leg slight; Lorenzo Phillips, leg amputated; S W Robinson, leg slight; Leonard Seitz, arm slight; J F Sloat, died July 12th; W D Adriance, hip slight; Henry Becker, shoulder slight; Jonathan Creed, arm slight; Theron T Dunn, hand slight; John Galivan, leg; Geo Hafling, leg; Geo Sarham, leg; Tyler Brink, ankle; Chas Scherly, leg; Geo W Turner, missing.

COMPANY F.
KILLED.—Capt Isaac Shimer, Michael Cunningham, John Snelling, John Phillips.
WOUNDED.—Sergt V B Wheat, hand severely; Corp'1 Chas Terbush, hand slight; Corp'l T J Wilson, hand slight; J W Bishop, leg severe; Geo Carr, side and arm severe; E Craft, hip severe; J G Camp, thigh severe; S J Clark, hip severe; A J Davenport, leg severe; E C Dubois, shoulder slight; A N Fiero, side and arm severe; R Jeffery, head severe; C P Kents, arm slight; C W Niles, shoulder slight; J Torrance, hand slight; J W Wilson, head slight; E A Young, bowels slight; Oliver Perry, wounded and missing.

COMPANY G.
KILLED.—Lieut Rufus P Holmes, Sergt Tyler J Snyder, Jas G Stevenson.
WOUNDED.—Sergt Chas H Farnsworth, severely; Gilbert N Bailey, shoulder slight: Wm Long, hand slight; Jas Place, leg severe; Frederick Seeser, back severe; David J Hoffman, leg severe; J Moran, leg amputated; John Duffey, arm severely; Daniel Day, thigh, died July 20th; Clinton Pasa, breast severely; Jas Harper, breast slight; T Yeo, missing.

COMPANY H.
Killed.—Capt. O J Herendeen, R Burns.
WOUNDED.—Lieut. Henry B Owen, arm; Lieut. Asbrah Huntoon, ancle [sic]; Sergt E P Dibble, arm and leg; Sergt A E Howard, leg slight; Sergt C
L Bigelow, leg severely; Corp'l W S Wedfall, missing; Corp'l J L Bullis, missing; Corp'l J H Russell, arm severely; Corp'l C L Clapp, hand; F Bayne, hand; N C Loomis, hand and leg; T P Vickery, leg severely; P J Hopkins, leg severely; L Nichelson, leg, dead; H S Dickens, ankle severely; E G Hambling, hand severely; C H Shiffer, hand and body; Jas Sodon, face severely; J Golden, leg slight; F F Stacy, head severely; N J Briggs, leg slight; David Phipps, arm amputated; Jas A Young, arm; T Law, breast; C S Gilbert, missing.

COMPANY L.
KILLED.—Corp'l Jacob Backman, Charles Walters, Abram Cadmus, Thomas Sebring. Wounded.—Sergt S Weatherlow, leg; Corp'l David Berger, hand and side; Corp'l W S Decker, hand; Sanford Ambrose, leg; Wm H Wood, foot severely; Albert H Pierson, leg; Henry Kelligner, hand; Corp'l Hipp, leg; Dennis Ryan, leg and arm; John Hart, side slight; Corp'l Geo Ackerman, hand slight; Wm Tewksbury heel slight; Wm H Eddy, missing.

COMPANY K.
Killed.—Capt Chas M Wheeler, Lester Nelson.
WOUNDED.—Lieut Isaac A Seamans, head slight; Sergt W S Chriscaden, foot slight; Sergt A B Cooper, arm slight; Sergt R H Crippen, face slight; Corp'l B Logan; Corp'l Jerome Parks, head severely; Corp'l Geo W Smith, abdomen; A W Cooper, hand; Alonzo Davis, leg severely; Samuel Henry, foot; A J Cady; John King, hip severely; Geo W Macomber, leg severely; Geo Prouty, face slight; Corp'l Geo Harris, hip slight; Wm H Adams, missing; H T Alcott, missing; Wm Morgan, missing.

Killed……………………………………. 42
Wounded................................................. 180
Missing...................................................... 13
Total......................................................... 235
Recapitulation of killed, wounded and missing, in the Third Brigade, Third Division, Second Army Corps.

                                                               Killed     Wounded    Missing
REGIMENTS.                                     Off. Men   Off. Men    Off. Men
89th N. Y. Vols.                                     1     14       3     77        -       -
111th     "                                                3     55       8   165        -     14
125th     "                                                2     24       5     99        -        9
126th      "                                               5     35       9   172        1     10 
Total                                                      11   128     25  513        1     33
LT. J. SMITH BROWN,
A. A. A. G., 3d Brigade.

Extract from the Monthly return for the Month of June, 1863, of the 126th
Regt., N. Y. S. V., in the Third Brigade, 3d Division, 2d Army Corps, Army of the Potomac.
PRESENT.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
For Duty................................................. 34
ENLISTED MEN.
For D u t y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 540
Sick........... ............................................. 41
In Arrest ………………………………    6
Total ......................................................587

ABSENT.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
On Detached Service................................ 3
Sick........................................................... 2
Total.......................................................... 5

ENLISTED MEN.
On Detached Service.............................. 26
With Leave…........................................... 7
Sick......................................................... 40
Total........................................................ 73

WHERE ABSENT.
Within the Department........................... 38
Without the Department......................... 35
Total........................................................ 73

PRESENT AND ABSENT.
Field and Staff....................................... 9
Line Officers........................................ 30
Total Commissioned…........................ 39

ENLISTED MEN.
Non-Commissioned Staff…….................. 6
Privates................................................... 515
Total Enlisted......................................... 660
Aggregate............................................... 699
Aggregate last Monthly Return….......... 711
Loss………………………….................. 12

GAIN.
By Transfer............................................ 2

LOSS.
Discharged for Disability….................... 2
Transferred.............................................. 1
Died of Disease....................................... 1
Deserted................................................ 10
Total Loss............................................. 14
Total gain................................................ 2
Loss....................................................... 12
(Signed) "Official"
J. SMITH BROWN,
Adjutant.

Result of the Harper's Ferry Investigation.
WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJ'T GENERAL'S
OFFICE, WASHINGTON, NOV. 8.
General Order, No. 183.—First: The military commission of which Maj. Gen. Hunter, U. S. V., is President, appointed to meet in the city of Washington on the 25th of September, pursuant to special order No. 225, of September 23, 1862, to investigate, the circumstances of the abandonment of Maryland Heights and the surrender of Harper's Ferry, have reported that Col. Thos. H. Ford, of the 82d Ohio volunteers conducted the defence of Maryland Heights without ability, abandoned his position without sufficient cause, and has shown throughout such a lack of military capacity as to disqualify him in the estimation of the commission, for a command in the service. The said Col. Thos. H. Ford is, by direction of the President, dismissed from the service of the United States.
Second. The commission having reported that the behavior of the 126th N. Y. V., was disgraceful, and that Maj. Wm. H. Baird, for his bad conduct ought to be dismissed, the said Major Baird of the 126th N. Y. V., is by direction of the President dismissed from the service of the United States.
Third. The commission having reported that Brig. Gen. Julius White, U. S. V., acted with decided capability and courage, and merits its approbation, and having found nothing in the conduct of the subordinate officers brought before the commission, they are released from arrest and will report for duty. E. D. TOWNSEND, Ass. Adj. Gen.

HARPER'S FERRY.
We print in other columns the report of the Military Commission appointed to examine into the recent surrender of Harper's Ferry—a document of the greatest importance and certain to command attention from the deep concern of the country in knowing the authors of that national disgrace. The Commission was composed of officers whose names give authority to their decision, and has evidently done its work with pains and impartial justice.
The material facts are as follows: Col, Miles was in command at Harper's Ferry. Gen. White was present from Sept. 12 till the surrender, but did not assume command. Col. Ford took command of Maryland Hights Sept. 5. Gen. McClellan left Washington for Rockville Sept. 7, most of his forces having preceded him.
The enemy attacked Maryland Hights on the morning of Sept. 13. The 126th New-York broke and fled disgracefully, and the breastwork on the hill was lost. Col. Miles was on Maryland Hights that evening for some hours, consulting with Col. Ford. He left between 11 and 12 o'clock, without directly ordering Col. Ford to evacuate the Hights, but with instructions to spike his guns if compelled to abandon. About 2 o'clock Col. Ford abandoned the Hights. The enemy did not occupy them, and the next day Col. D'Utassy sent over four companies, who brought away four guns and a wagon-load of ammunition.
After the evacuation of Maryland Hights, Col. Miles sent word to Gen. McClellan, then at Frederick City, that unless reinforced he could not hold out 48 hours. Gen. McClellan thereupon dispatched a messenger to Gen. Franklin, who was engaged with the enemy at Crampton's Gap, wholly unable to give the needed assistance, or to give it in time. Gen. McClellan appears to have made no other effort to relieve the beleagured stronghold.
The enemy attacked Harper's Ferry itself on the morning of the 15th, and at 8 a. m. the surrender was agreed on, Col. Miles representing to the brigade commanders whom he consulted that his ammunition was nearly exhausted, and they concurring in his decision to surrender.
The Commission acquit Gen. White, Col. D'Utassy and Col. Trimble of all blame for the surrender, and praise the capacity and courage of the former. They find that Col. Ford was given, by Col. Miles, discretionary power to abandon Maryland Hights, but that the exercise of his discretion was premature; that he conducted the defense with no ability, and that his exhibition of lack of capacity was such as to disqualify him for a command.
Col. Miles is convicted of incapacity and criminal neglect, especially in neglecting to fortify and hold Maryland Hights, the key of the position, and the evidence stated in the report concerning his communications with the rebels is such as to raise the strongest suspicions of treachery also.
Gen. Wool is gravely censured for placing so incapable an officer as Col. Miles in command.
Concerning Gen. McClellan the evidence adduced in the report, and the opinion expressed by the Commission, are most direct and damaging. The general-in-Chief testifies that Gen. ...

CASUALTIES IN THE 126TH REGIMENT.—The only list of the casualties incurred at Gettysburg by the brave but ill-fated 126th, which we have been able to procure, is one sent by Chaplain Harrison to the Dundee Record, and published in an extra of that paper last Saturday.—The following is the list of Companies A, B, E, and G:—
Co. A.—Killed—Sergeant David Goff, private Robert Pool. Wounded—Sergeants Smith Stebbins, Jas. Henderson; privates Levi Cole, S. P. Brezee, John Frost, Alexander Mosher, Wm. Axle, Frank Pool, Chas. Turbush.  Killed, 2; wounded, 9.
Co. B.—Killed—Sergeant Major H. P. Cook, Sergeant Erasmus Bassett, Corporal Elias Norris, Privates Wm. Hobart, Charles Gaylord, James K. P. Huson. Wounded—Lieut. M. H. Lawrence, Melvin Bunce, Sergeant Edwin Jessop, Corporals Geo. Chapman, Thos. T. McCarrick; Privates, John Blansett, John Finger, C. M. Hyatt, Moses Booth, David J. Wilkins, Chas. C. Hicks, Wm. Cassian, Wm. Raymond, Reuben Bullock, Chas. H. Dunning, N. D. Barden, Mortimer Garrison, Peter M. Norman, Stephen C. Purdy, Amos J. Potter, Orrin Bates, Orrin Edgett, Luther Weaver, Edwin Coryell,
Wm. H. Thomas, Franklin S. Pettengill.—Killed, 6; Wounded, 26.
Co. E—Killed—Harvey Wilson, Joshua Brink, John W. Thompson. Wounded—Capt. John E. Brough (of Rushville), Lieut. Jacob Sherman, Orderly Serg't Edwin Barnes; privates Jonathan Creed, Tyler Brink, Henry Becker, George W. Hafling, James Royal (dead), G. W. Larkham, John Gallivan, B. W. Scott, James B. Reynolds, Lorenzo Phillips, Leonard Seitz, John Saulspaugh (dead), John Sloat, Ambrose Bedell. Missing—George W. Turner. Killed, 3; wounded, 15; wounded and since dead, 2; missing, 1.
Co. G.—(Partly raised in Yates County)—Lieut. Rufus Holmes killed. Wounded—Frederick Seicer, Charles Farnsworth, James Harper, Thomas Yeo, Clinton Pasco, William Long, John Moran (leg amputated), Daniel Day, George Hoffman, G. W. Bailey, John Duffy. Killed, 1; Wounded, 11.
—In addition to the above, we learn that Joseph Hollowell and a son of J. A. Nichols of Milo Centre (both of Company B,) were killed.

Lieut. JACOB SHERMAN.—The news reached here yesterday morning, that Lieutenant Jacob Sherman, who was wounded at Gettysburgh [sic], died of his wounds, and that his body would arrive on the ten forty train. The news was very unexpected to his friends. It was generally supposed that he would get well, although his wound was a bad one; the ball having passed through his body and severing some of the intestines. Lieut. Sherman was a brave officer of the 126th Regiment, and his death will be regretted by all his friends and acquaintances.

The 126th at Gettysburg.
A correspondent of the Rochester Democrat gives in that paper an account of the part taken by the 126th Regiment in the battle of Gettysburg. The regiment was in the 3d Brigade and 3d Division of the 2d Army Corps. The Brigade was commanded by the Senior Colonel Willard, of the 125th N. Y. V., and the Division by Brigadier General A. HAYES. The Regiment arrived upon the field in the forenoon of battle. The lines of our army are described as having been "much the shape of a horseshoe, with the toe of the shoe toward Gettysburg, and half a mile from the town." The ground was mostly higher than that occupied by the rebels. The 126th was first posted in a young orchard at the front, but a little to the left of the centre, (where, on the next day, July 3d, the heaviest brunt of the battle fell.) The correspondent says:
"There was nothing more than skirmishing the second day of the battle (our 1st) till 4 P. M., when shelling begun in good earnest. We, however, did not move till near sundown, when we went to assist the left of our corps half a mile away where there had been very hard fighting for an hour or more. Here our brigade formed on the ridge and charged down the hill and into a small ravine which we crossed with a good deal of difficulty and considerable loss, for though the ravine was not deeper than a few feet, it was rocky and there were stumps of trees and underbrush which compelled us to break our lines to pass it, and under the galling fire we were not able to form our line well after crossing. We received a heavy fire from the rebels in this ravine, and as we charged with yells and shouts beyond it, we encountered an enfilading fire from two pieces of cannon the rebels had placed for that purpose. Here we suffered terribly, as we had advanced farther than any other regiment in the brigade and were in danger of being flanked. We soon had to fall back, as we had in ten minutes lost half our number killed and wounded. It however blosed the fighting of the day here.  Company F went into this action 41 strong and came out with only 19 men, though several were only slightly wounded—mere contusions. The roll and roar of musketry—it was so severe and continuous that it was more than a rattle—on this part of the field was terrible for two hours of the afternoon. We returned to our old ground and lay there that night. The next morning our regiment was ordered to go out as skirmishers. Here we lost several, mostly officers picked off by sharpshooters. There were three Captains killed in this skirmish—Capts. Shimer, Wheeler and Herendeen. I know more of Capt. Shimer's conduct during the battle than of the others, and know that he was always at his post leading his men. He was within five feet of me when killed, and you can judge how close work it was when I say that we were acting as a support and were lying on our faces and that when the Captain was shot his head was not more than a foot from the ground.

EXTRACT FROM MONTHLY RETURN FOR THE MONTH OF APRIL, 1863, OF THE 126TH REG'T N. Y. S. V., NOW STATIONED AT CENTERVILLE, VA.

PRESENT.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
For Duty................................................. 33
Sick.......................................................... 2
Total....................................................... 35

ENLISTED MEN.
For Duty................................................. 531
Sick.......................................................... 64
In Arrest..................................................... 4
Total....................................................... 599

ABSENT.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
On Detached Service.............................. 1
With Leave............................................. 1
Sick......................................................... 2
Total....................................................... 4

ENLISTED MEN.
On Detached Service.............................. 31
With Leave.............................................. 2
Without Leave......................................... 1
Sick........................................................ 51
Total....................................................... 85

WHERE ABSENT.
Within the Department........................... 49
Without the Department......................... 36
Total........................................................ 85

PRESENT AND ABSENT.
Field and Staff.......................................... 9
Line Officers.......................................... 30
Total Commissioned.............................. 39

ENLISTED MEN.
Non-Commissioned' Staff......................... 3
Privates.................................................. 537
Total Enlisted........................................ 684
Aggregate.............................................. 723
Aggregate Last Monthly Return........... 726
Loss.......................................................... 3

GAIN.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
By Promotion........................................... 1

ENLISTED MEN.
Returned from Desertion....................... 24
Total Gain.............................................. 15

LOSS.
ENLISTED MEN.
Discharged for Disability...................... 12
By Promotion.......................................... 1
Died of Disease....................................... 4
Deserted................................................... 1
Total...................................................... 18
Total Loss............................................. 18
Total Gain............................................. 15
Loss........................................................ 3

CHANGES IN COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
John Stevenson, promoted from Quarter Master Serg't to be 2d Lt. Co. "I," vice Charles C. Babbit, resigned.
The following was received too late for insertion officially:
TRUMAN N. BURRILL, Capt. Co. "A," honorably discharged per "Special Order 187 War Department, April 24, 1863, for physical disability.
By Order of the
Secretary of War."
I have been engaged in making out the Returns for the mouths of August, September, and October, 1862. When completed, I will forward them, with a roster of the original Commissioned Officers, with all subsequent changes.
Papers of the 26th Senatorial District, please copy.
J. SMITH BROWN, Adj't.

The 126th Regiment, (Ontario and Yates) lost in the battle of Gettysburg 40 killed, 181 wounded and 232 missing. This for a Regiment that probably did not number over 500 men is a fearful record.

HON. Wm. M. Oliver of Penn Yan, died last week aged seventy-one years.

DIED.—On the battle-field of Gettysburg, Friday, July 3d, 1863, in the 35th year of his age, HENRY W. WILSON, of Co. D. in the 126th Reg. N. Y. S. V. The tidings of his death, among other like messages and rumors from the scene of the late fearful strife, awakened tender memories in many hearts in this community, where he was born and reared, and where he was beloved not only by his numerous relatives, but by many associates and friends. He had his temptations, errors and struggles, which are best appreciated by that Lord to whom he has often addressed himself in sincerity and with tears, but he is remembered for his rare personal qualities that made him many friends and kept them to the last. His bright perceptions, lively fancy and inexhaustible humor, and still more his warm and generous affections, ever at the service of the sick, the needy or the dependent, endeared him to all who knew him.
When he enlisted last autumn, at the time his regiment was formed, it was with something like a presentiment of the issue. In the action at Harper's Ferry he exposed himself fearlessly to danger, and now has fallen in a victorious conflict, doing his duty gallantly, and winning the honors of those who die for their country. "Honor to the brave; tears for the fallen."
The list of killed, wounded and missing of the 126th prepared by Assistant Surgeon PELTIER and which was published in this paper last week, agrees very nearly with that now furnished by Col. BULL. We give below the names embraced in the latter which were omitted in the former:
Co. A., Wounded—J. Wesley Parker, Arthur W. Middleton, Charles W. Sterling. Missing—2d Lieut. Charles H. Forchay, ran away to the rear.
Co. B., Killed—Samuel A. Nichols, Melvin Bunce.
Co. C., Wounded—Wm. H. Cole, Edgar H. McQuigg, James F. Harris, John C. Scott, John Bond.
Co. E., Wounded—S. W. Robinson, W. D. Adriance, Tuler Brink, Charles Scherly.
Co. G., Killed—James G. Stevenson. Wounded—G. N. Bailey, D. H. Hoffman.
Co. H., Wounded—Sergt. E. P. Dibble, T. Lane.
Co. I., Killed—Corporal Jacob Bachman. Wounded—Sanford Ambrose. Missing—Wm. H. Eddy.
Co. K., Killed—A. J. Cady, Samuel Hervey. Missing—Wm. Morgan.
Col. BULL gives the aggregate of killed, wounded and missing of the 126th as follows—
KILLED.
Commissioned Officers, 5
Enlisted Men, 35-40
WOUNDED.
Commissed [sic] Officers, 9
Enlisted men, 171-180
MISSING.
Enlisted Men, 11
Total, - - - - - - - 231
We are also indebted to Col. BULL for the following recapitulation of killed, wounded and missing in the Third Brigade, Third Division, Second Army Corps, of which the 126th Regiment is a part:
                                   Killed.    Wound     Miss'g
Regiments.                Off Men  Off Men  Off Men
39th N. Y. Vols.           1   14      3    77
111th "                          3   55     8   165            14
125th "                          2   24     5     99              9
126th "                          5   35     9   172       1    10
Total.                          11 128    25   513      1     33

DIED IN BATTLE AT GETTYSBURGH, July 3, 1863, in the 26th year of his age, Capt. CHARLES M. WHEELER, Company K, 126th regiment N. Y. S. V., and son of JONAS M. WHEELER, Esq., of Canandaigua.
Of all the young men of our village, not one was more highly esteemed, or could be more lamented. He was born in this village, December 8, 1837, and has always resided here, excepting the four years of his course in Yale College, where he graduated in 1859. During that time he was the subject of a happy spiritual change, became a member of the College Church, and has continued to be exemplary in his habits, bringing no discredit on his Christian profession. Having studied law in the office of Messrs. SMITH & LAPHAM, he was admitted to the bar in 1861, and had entered upon the practice here, when last autumn he enlisted in the regiment then formed in this vicinity. He was much in society, and (a fact deserving notice,) a favorite among his acquaintances of both sexes. Good sense and manliness were the foundation of his character. He was remarkably free from conceit and affectation, upright, ingenuous, considerate and kind, a capable, conscientious and well deserving man in all the relations of life, He entered the service of his country at this crisis under a sense of duty, and has since borne himself as mindful of the obligation. When he was chosen captain of his company, we who knew him said, "He will make a good officer," and he has fulfilled our expectations, first under the disasters that befell the regiment at Harper's Ferry a few days after they received their arms, and now in their gallant fight and victory at Gettysburg. It is understood that he passed unharmed through the principal action of Friday, and afterwards fell by a ball from a sharpshooter.
His neighbors, and this community at large, have been deeply afflicted by the tidings of his death. His bereaved family, whose pride he was as a dutiful son and an affectionate brother, have the respectful sympathy of all about them. That a young man on whom so many hopes were built, should be snatched away so suddenly from life and its prospects, is one of those mysteries of Providence, (sadly multiplied indeed, of late, over our land,) which constrain us to bow in wonder and sorrow. But as his life was honorable so was his death. Fitted as he was to live, he was fitted to die. He has fallen as a patriot and a Christian at his post of duty. Having been "faithful unto death," we doubt not he has won "the crown of life." Let this new costly sacrifice quicken and purify the patriotism of survivors, and move our young men, especially, to honorable emulation.

FROM THE 126th REGIMENT.
Camp 126th, N. Y. Vols.,
Centerville, Va.,
May 15, 1863.
MY DEAR SIR:
Your kind letter of the 9th inst., acknowledging receipt of the remains of M. S., came to hand last evening.
Cases like that of young S. are among the saddest brought to our notice in the army. If death must come, the soldier courts it upon the battle field, yet a large proportion die of disease. The cause of this is apparent in an army constituted as ours, entirely of volunteers. Prompted by the highest motives of patriotism, many like the young man whose remains you have just received enter the service, unable to bear the duties imposed upon them, and are soon forced to yield. One can but admire the spirit animating such, and drop the sympathetic tear, as they consign them to their "final home." The fate of M. S, like that of many others, is, indeed, a sad one.—Though striken down by the hand of disease, they die no less in defence of their country, than if they fall upon the battle-field, pierced by the enemy's balls, or torn and mangled by shells. The memories of such will be treasured when the aiders and abettors of treason shall have sunk into the oblivion which they justly merit.
You say truly, "the North now realizes a terrible war is being waged in our country."—I agree with you, "the failure to sooner recognize this fact, has done much to impede our progress, and prolong the struggle." I admire the spirit of your letter, and rejoice to learn that you, and those with whom you have so long nobly acted are not disheartened.—There is a tone of sadness in all my letters from home, yet they all breathe the same spirit as yours—a firm determination to maintain the struggle until the last Rebel yields obedience to the rightful demands of a government they have so grossly outraged. I thank God, this is so, with the encouragement and approbation of those at home we can accomplish all we desire; without it, we might fail of success.
I believe a new order of things is being inaugurated, and that we are soon to enter upon an active, and I trust what will prove a decisive campaign. The government and people seem now to comprehend the magnitude of the task before them, and I doubt not will employ their every energy in putting down the rebellion, while we have the ability to do so, and before "foreign intervention shall have rendered the task a more difficult one. That we have a desperate foe to contend with, the experience of the past two years fully demonstrates, and the sooner we recognize this fact, and act in accordance with it, the better for all concerned. I will not so far insult the prowess of the free North, as for one moment, to doubt their ultimate success. The army is not despondent, the charge of newspapers and correspondents in sympathy with the rebels, to the contrary. It has unbounded confidence in itself, and in the ability and patriotism of those called upon to direct its operations. ‘Tis true, Gen. Hooker did not accomplish all we could have desired, nor even all we had anticipated, yet he dealt the traitors a crushing blow, and we believe in the end will triumph. Beyond a question, the rebel army, shorne of some of its best officers, its ranks decimated by the recent fight, though still powerful, is driven to terrible straits and a vigorous effort is only required to push them to the "wall." I worship no man nor care who leads, only that success crowns his efforts. The cause of humanity, as well as the interests of the government demands, the war should be prosecuted vigorously, and if need be to the bitter end. The rebels ask no terms, neither will they accept any, short of separation and to this the North must never, no, never consent. If we relax our efforts now, or for a moment yield to the demands of the South, then farewell to free government on this continent. While I shudder at the horrors of a civil war like ours, I can have no sympathy with those who cry "peace." Any effort at compromise would prove equally destructive to both sections, and should never for an instant be entertained. No, if need be, better fight to extermination, and leave the soil saturated with the blood of the entire nation, to the peaceful occupancy of others who might chance to follow us, than now yield, and entail upon a numerous and enfeebled population the wreck of a government incapable of affording them protection. The associations of home, kindred and friends is dear, yet of what avail are these, if the government that has so long protected us in their enjoyment is to be crushed?
I know we have the ability to maintain that government, and knowing this, sooner than abandon it in its hour of peril, and submit to a dishonorable peace at the dictation of armed rebels, I would sacrifice all, and yield my life amid the carnage and strife of the battle field. I firmly believe this spirit animates the entire army, and will lead to the prompt re-enlistment of most of the "Old Regiments." The force in the field must be kept up at all hazards. This can be accomplished only by volunteering, or conscription. What say the people, and how do they feel in reference to this? How would it be with our own Regiment, the 126th? The 111th and 125th now brigaded with us, are to try filling their ranks again by volunteers, and ought the 126th to be behind them? The matter is now being canvassed among us. Will the 26th Senatorial District give us, say 300 new recruits or must we wait the slow process of the draft? I know the people of that district have done much, yet they have the ability to do more, and I doubt not will, should the occasion demand. Our regiment now numbers a little over 700, officers and men, it should immediately be recruited to 1000. Will the people aid us in ob…
the front; we need more men, can you not obtain them immediately by volunteering? How could the subject be best brought before the people? I am confident they would receive it with favor. The 126th and 148th ought to be kept to their full standard of men. Will you give us your views?
I wish you could see the 126th now, and really if possible, I think you ought to visit us. 'Tis true, from various causes, our numbers are lessened, yet the ardor of the regiment in behalf of the cause in which they are engaged, and their confidence in their final triumph is unshaken. Our lot has been a hard one, but we look cheerfully to the future.
Thank Heaven, as a regiment, we have at last found a friend in the field, one in whom we place confidence, one on whom we can rely, and one who appreciates our efforts at improvement. It may not be strictly in accordance with military discipline to censure or praise those above us in rank, yet I cannot close this letter without saying a few words in favor of our brigade commander, Gen. Alexander Hays, the hero of many hard fought battles, the true soldier and gentleman, and the volunteer's friend. For six long weary months after our organization, we were kicked, cuffed and buffeted about by those above us in authority. First, basely surrendered by the treachery or imbecility of Col. Miles at Harper s Ferry, afterwards insulted by the haughtiness of those placed over us while under the "parole," and finally upon liberation, fretted and worried by the peculiar notions of a "Foreign adventurer," we had become almost discouraged, when Gen. Hays came to our relief. The Gen. is a strict disciplinarian, yet the soldiers love him none the less on that account. Our brigade is a good one, and we fancy we occupy no inferior position in it. Where Gen. Hays goes, the 126th expect and desire to follow. Every officer and man in the regiment loves him, and should the occasion require, would offer his own person as a shield in his defence. We know he will lead us into the thickest of the fight, for he is brave, and he is good. God bless General Hays, our brigade commander!
Our Division Commander, General Abercrombie is almost an entire stranger to his command, yet he impresses us in his favor, and we have full confidence in his ability.
In Col. Sherrill the fondest anticipations of his most sincere friends have been fully realized. Strongly devoted to the cause in which he is engaged; fully comprehending the dignity and importance of the position he occupies, he is ever alive to the interests and wants of his men, and has endeared himself to all under his command.
Thus fortunately situated, we are anxiously looking for the order 'forward.' I am aware that some out side of Dixie, are desirous the war should not close during the term of this Administration, but would prolong it, so as to ride another set of men into power. In my judgment, party, and party considerations should have but little right in times like these. Let us end the rebellion first, and attend to party and Presidents afterwards. This administration ought to be sustained by every loyal citizen until the last hour of its existence [sic]; if it then fails, the people will hurl it from power, and place a more competent one in its stead.
But I digress, and must hasten to close this already I fear, too long letter. The best of feeling prevails among the officers and men of the regiment, and a friendly rivalry springing up among companies as to who shall excel [sic], has done much at improvement, and rendered them quite proficient in the 'Drill.' Our camp is a beautiful one, finely located, and recent 'evergreen' decorations has added much to its appearance, eliciting praise, not only from our Brigade, but also from our Division Commander.
During the winter, those twin scourges, Measles and Small Pox, made sad havoc among our boys, and, in spite of every effort, carried away many of them, some of the brightest of their number, to their grave. Now the regiment is very healthy, sickness being hardly known among us.
Centerville is a quait [sic] old town, antiquated in style, but, before the war, must have been quite pleasant. The country around is very fine, some of the farms almost rivaling your best cultivated ones in the vicinity of your own beautiful Geneva. Many of them are completely devastated, while the improvements on others are untouched. Truly the 'Old Dominion' has paid dearly for the folly of secession, and long years must intervene before she will recover from the effect of the Rebellion.
Some of the heaviest 'earthworks' and the best planned 'rifle pits' in the world, are located here. They are really works of interest and stand monuments to the industry of an army, and the skill of those directing their construction, worthy a better cause. Volumes might be written in their description, but have already trespassed upon your time too long, and must close. At some future day I may attempt to describe them, or make them the subject of a letter.
With feelings of deep gratitude, for the kind personal allusions contained in your letter, and greatful [sic] for the many acts of kindness shown me by yourself, and other kind friends in Geneva, to all of whom I beg you will convey my sincere regards,
I am very truly yours,
Chas. S. Hoyt, Asst. Surgeon,
126th Reg't, N. Y. S. V.
[Geneva Courier.

CAMP AT CENTREVILLE, VA.,
May 16, 1863.
Friend Sentell:—
Allow me to return to yon my sincere thanks for the weekly present of your paper. You can hardly appreciate how acceptable it is to me and to all from our vicinity, and with what eagerness it is received and read. It is the only means we have of getting the general news from our neighborhood, and, next to letters from our friends, it is most acceptable.
The Regiment is very pleasantly located in a beautiful camp, enjoying the best health, and in the best spirits. We are improving in drill, and, in the review last week by Div. Gen. Abercrombie, had the praise from him of being the finest Regiment in the Brigade.
From all appearances we shall remain here some time, although, of course, it is uncertain, and we may move at any moment.
With the best wishes for your success and happiness, I remain,
Yours, truly, MARTIN V. STANTON.
1st Lt. Co. G., 126th Regt. N. Y. V.

The 126th Regiment.
ELMORA, N. Y., WEDNESDAY, AUG. 27, 1862.
The 126th Regiment of New-York Volunteers, Col. Sherrill, passed through Elmira yesterday evening at 7 o'clock, on the way from Geneva to Washington. They were detained here only one hour. The regiment was armed by C. Shepard at Elmira.

From the 126th Regiment.
CENTREVILLE, Va., June 16, 1863.
MR. EDITOR:—Once more through the silent medium of the pen, allow me, if you please, by way of information to the many friends of the 126th, to say that as it is generally understood and at the present time almost universally appreciated, that this world is nearly round and inhabited by an almost innumerable race of human beings, just so should it be understood and appreciated that the general character of the Yankee nation is go-a-head.
But the question may be asked by many and with propriety too, where are we headed? The answer, as things look now, is, that Grant is bound for Vicksburg, Banks for Port Hudson on the Mississippi. As to Hooker, leave that to him and the dictators at Washington, D. C. But to return to the 126th. You will find it in good health and spirits.
Those having charge of the Medical Department look well to the health of the men, which is their duty, and but little complaint is heard. Our Colonel, E. Sherrill, of Geneva, has returned, and also Dr. Hoyt, after a few days absence. Col. Sherrill is, as I would be pleased to say by every commander, a brave and true man. This is acknowledged by the officers and men under his command—that he is a true man to the cause of this Union. And as yet we claim it to be a Union; but at present not very well united.
As to complaints which are often made by some in the ranks, about our officers being so strict about the men; how they look and appear and oblige them to black their boots or shoes, and also to scour their buttons and the brass on their accoutrements, &c. They will find by looking to the rules and regulations of war, adopted in 1861, by which officers are to be guided, that they only comply with their superiors appointed over them. The first duty of a soldier is to obey; and to enjoy good health he must as far as possible, not only keep himself but his clothes clean—for there is ample opportunity, only on long marches and in time of battle. Always take rest when you can, and also sleep. Not much danger of a soldier getting too much, especially when doing picket duty. Our officers when on drill or duty are strict and particular. But this is no more than military authority requires, and for aught I know should be enforced. In private conversation our commanders are kind and pleasant, and have hearts seemingly as large as a double-yolked goose egg. But the men, some of them, talk as though (although not in our company) they would compare better with the egg of a bantam. Be that as it may, I write from what I think.
Our Drum-Major, C. G., has been recently to Washington for a supply of new caps for the drum corps, of which he is Major. This makes the men look well, and I am happy to say they play accordingly.
We are anxiously awaiting the final result of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. We watch closely the movements of Hooker as far as practicable. His troops are now on the alert, but whither they are bound we know not. A great stir just now around by troops passing.
The 136th Regiment is now camped near us. They have a fine regiment, and the men look as though they had found out the life of a soldier. The boys of the 126th have had many calls from those who belong to other regiments. It does them good to meet, seeing the men are all in good spirits, and ready for another Bull Run fight, which apparently seems to be in progress at this, the usual season of the year; and God grant if such proves to be the case we may meet with success.
The Bible tells us "man is of but a few days and full of trouble;" but at the present time the 126th is free from trouble, and full of rations. So at present we have but little to complain of as to living. But what we don't like is to have no sugar to put in our coffee, which sometimes happens, and occasionally we have no coffee to put our sugar into.
Of late, a few furloughs hare been granted, and the boys are anxiously awaiting their turn. We are now haying fine weather, very warm, and no rain, which is needed much if the land was cultivated. But such is not the case.
We learn on good authority that the enemy have once more got into Maryland, and we are now watching the army of Gen. Lee, who may make a dive for the Capital or the Federal army. In case he does he will meet with a warm and quick reception. This the friends of the cause in which we are engaged may rely upon.
I will for the present close this, a sort of pastime, by saying you can without doubt, look out soon for stirring news, as everything indicates it as far as the naked eye can see.   Yours, &c., C. R. W.

From the 126th Regiment.
MCDOUGAL HOSPITAL, FORT SCHUYLER,
N. Y., July 1st, 1863.
Mr. EDITOR:—Since my last letter printed in your paper, many changes have taken place in the 126th, also in the 108th Regiments, as well as all others that were in the late engagement before Gettysburg, Penn. And to those who are most deeply interested in the welfare of the 126th, I will state, by way of information, that we left Centreville, Va., the latter part of June, 1863, and started on a march to join the Army of the Potomac. Our officers were under very strict orders, which were issued to them and their men. The roads were wet and heavy, but thank fortune free from dust. We marched from 20 to 36 miles per day in order to report at places designated by our commanding General. Very few of our men fell out by the way. As fast as they were about giving out they would throw away some article of their baggage, so that when we got to our destination the men had but little besides their haversack and canteen, and some of them were short of both. We were obliged to ford all streams where no bridges were built, and owing to the rain, which came almost every day, many there were. But they were finally got along with without any grumbling or trouble, as the men had made up their minds to meet what ever came. We were termed by the Army of the Potomac, previous to our departure from Centreville, as they passed through, "Band-box soldiers;" and when we were ordered to join them we were determined to show them, and the country for which we were called into the field, to understand that we could fight and stand hardships on the same basis with themselves. That we have proved it the record and result will show for itself. We were put in the 3d Brigade, 3d Division of the 2d Army Corps, in the same division with the 108th of your city. That the 108th is one of the first and best regiments in the field, I do not deny. That the 126th regiment stands now on the same platform, I positively affirm. In proof of this, ask Gen. Alex. Hays, our former Brigadier, who now commands the 2d Army Corps. The rebels hate him, he being one of the very best fighting Generals in the Federal service. He fears shell and bullets seemingly no more than straws flying in the wind; always cool and sober when in a fight, which is more than many commanders in the army can say. As we have had the unjust name of Harpers Ferry cowards. We asked the rebs, part of those we took prisoners, when we were called on to make a bayonet charge on one of their batteries, on Thursday, July 2d, what they thought of the Harpers Ferry cowards. Their answer was, "What, you fellows that charged on us right smart in these bushes—Harpers Ferry devils as much, you would not give an inch." In this hospital there are some members of the 108th, but I am not acquainted with their names, but am told they are doing well. As I have seen no statement of the casualties of the 126th or 108th Regiments, all I now know is what I saw. A D. J. McDonald, of Honeoye Falls, a Lieutenant in the 108th, was in the same hospital with myself, was badly wounded in the arm. I was informed by the men of his company that he will be much missed as he was one of the best officers of the regiment. Wm. Fairchild of North Bloomfield, a member of the same regiment, was killed by a shell. I had quite a talk with him before the final engagement took place. He looked well and hearty, and seemed confident of success. The boys of his company told me he was one of the best men in the regiment, always ready for duty. It was their luck to lose just such men. But such is the fate of war. Company D of the 126th, lost many men in killed—the best material of which the company was composd [sic]. Among these were H. Wood, corporal, E. Tyler, sergeant, and C. Crandall, from Naples, Ontario county, N. Y. They were loved and esteemed of the whole company. H. W. Willson, Canandaigua, of Co. D, was a man of education, and proved to be under all circumstances one of the best soldiers the country afforded. T. Comstock and H. Lewis were of the same stamp as soldiers, and will be much missed when duty is to be performed in the company and regiment. Among the wounded of Naples I will mention the names of O. C. Lyon, R. Porter and Z. Sabins, who had not only won the esteem of the men of their company, but of the whole regiment, as true and willing men to the cause in which they were engaged. All, in fact, performed their part well, which was plainly shown by wounded rebels taken prisoners by us. Our company officers were all on hand, and behaved not only bravely but manfully. Lieuts. Lincoln and Geddis went through the whole three days fight without a scratch, not because they were unexposed, for such was not the case. Capt. C. A. Richardson was wounded in the foot the first day, and he was unable to be afterwards with his command. He made himself useful in taking care of his wounded men, giving them all the attention and aid that lay in his power. Our corporal, H. Mattoon, was shot by a sharpshooter in the neck close to the backbone, which was no more nor less than a pretty close call. He stated he did not know what they wanted to shoot him for, as he "wan't doing anything only just carrying the flag along."
Col. Sherrill died of wounds received July 2d. A record of a high character will ever attend his memory. Lieut. Col. James M. Bull has proven to be not only a fighting man but a perfect tiger in battle. Our major, P. D. Philips, was absent at the time at Washington, and also the orderly of Co. D; but had they been with us, we are confident they would have been at their posts. Capts. Shinier and Herendeen were killed, and truer men never lived. But some of what are termed our finest officers, were so fine that in battle they could hardly be seen—whether it was on account of smoke or not, I will leave to be told by others.
It is now generally conceded that were it not for the resistance to the draft in New York city and other places, that the battle of Gettysburg would be looked upon as the most desperate and decisive of the war.
And now to the friends of the killed and wounded of the 126th, allow me to say that the only consolation that you can obtain here below, is that your near and dear friends have been killed and wounded while doing their whole duty to themselves and their country. And to you all that wish for greater consolation, may you look to a higher and better Commander who reigns where war, and the rumors of war are heard of no more.
And now, in conclusion, to the remainder of the members of the regiment now left in the field: May you meet with success in all subsequent battles, if more are to be fought, and come out safe and sound; and may the time soon come when you can all return to your peaceful homes, bearing the news that the Rebellion is ended and peace is once more restored to this unhappy country.
W. R. C., Co. D 126th N. Y. S. V.

McClellan, after receiving orders to drive the enemy from Maryland, marched on an average of only six miles a day in pursuit, and that in his opinion he both could and should have relieved and protected Harper's Ferry, and in this opinion the Commission fully concur.
There will be no complaint against this report, of whitewashing. Its array of facts, and its logical conclusions upon them are impregnable. The country will gratefully recognize the courage and just severity with which the Commission, while awarding due censure to inferior officers, has declared that the shame of the surrender of Harper's Ferry rests chiefly on Gen. McClellan. For, if McClellan had moved with decent swiftness he would have raised the siege, or would have taken the enemy in detail, with the Potomac dividing his forces.

THE 126TH REGIMENT.—This regiment, which was unjustly under a cloud at the time of Col. Miles' disgraceful surrender of Harper's Ferry, suffered terribly in the recent battle at Gettysburg. The Colonel of this regiment, Eliakim Sherrill, was father of Mrs. Lewis H. Babcock, of this city, and was killed, according to a report in the New York Herald of yesterday. Three other officers were killed. Three hundred men were also killed, wounded and missing. This is an awful record truly.

ON FURLOUGH.— Capt. C. A. RICHARDSON, Co. D 126th Regiment N. Y. S V., who was wounded in the battle at Gettysburg, came home last week, having a furlough for twenty days. His wound is not serious and he expects soon to report himself sound again.

Letter from Lt. Yost.
We have been favored with the following letter from Lt. Yost to his father, detailing the movements of the 126th from the time it left Centreville, until it took part in the bloody fight at Gettysburg. It will be found interesting.
CAMP AT Two TAVERNS, PA.,
July 6th, 1863.
DEAR FATHER:—I wish you were here at the present moment, you would see one of the roughest looking boys you ever saw, and I hardly think you would recognize him as G. L. Yost.
I have written two or three times on our journey here, but I have not had a letter from you in two weeks. I suppose as soon as we stop I will get a lot of them. But I will copy from my diary just as I noted it down at the time.
June 25th.—Our Brigade started from Centreville to Hooker or some other man. Ordered to report to Maj. Gen. Hancock of the 2d Army Corps. First day we marched to "Green Springs," 12 miles. It rained a little, but very comfortable marching. Pitched our little house for the first time and slept soundly. I can stand on my knees and touch the highest point with my head.
June 26th.—Marched to Edward's Ferry on the Potomac. I went out with the picket guard, but was re-called for we received orders to cross the river that night. Pulled up tent and started on, and didn't stop until next morning. It was a very fatigueing [sic] march. I had command of the company.—Crossed the river on Col. Stuart's Pontoons.
June 27th.—Saw Lieut. Van Rennsselaer, Capt. Van Brocklin, and many other boys from Waterloo. I am sorry I did not see Will Stringham and Truman Smith. Marched to Cedar Mountains, and a hard march we had, for the roads were stony and muddy. Hard on the horses. Feet sore and blister on my heel. Going up a little hill, I slipped and fell down. Somebody standing near said, "jump up, young man," to which I remarked "go to the devil." The boys afterwards told me it was Gen. Hays. I would have said so to the President. Here I had a chance to see the army, and no one can form any idea of it without seeing it. How one man can manage it is a wonder to me. Have to come down to army fare, that is "hard tack, coffee and pork." I wouldn't eat pork at home but now I eat it with relish, and often I don't get enough of that. I carry a little article called tea, which I find a great luxury.
June 28th.—Felt a little lame—blister on my heel—otherwise all sound. Reached Frederick City about 4 o'clock P. M. Encamped on the old grounds we were on when we were prisoners from Harper's Ferry. Had a swim in the Monocacy. Could not go down town for fear the Regiment would move. June 29th.—Marched to Union Ville a distance of 31 miles, the hardest and longest march we ever made. Stopped with A. Cadus, and got a good meal. Concluded to stay all night and have breakfast next morning. People along the road very accommodating. Regiment thrown out as pickets, but saw no rebels. We were mustered for pay to-day. Had what we call it a square meal, cherry pie, too. Had to dispose of my Robe and sold it to an old farmer for $2. Picked up an old nag and piled on him all our baggage.
June 30th.—Rested.
July 1st—Marched to within four miles of the battle field. 1st Army Corps had been engaged but without success. Had orders to proceed on our journey at 4 o'clock next morning.
July 2d.—Arrived at the battle field and were drawn up in line of battle every moment expecting to hear the rebels burst out with their cannonading. Col. Willard of the 125th N. Y. V., commanded the Brigade.—Gen. Hays a Division and Gen. Hancock the gallant 2d Army Corps. Our line of battle, I mean Gen. Meade's, was like a horse shoe, in shape and situated on high grounds. The 1st, 3d and 12th Corps' were on the right, the 2d on the centre and the 5th and 12th on the left. The 6th were the reserves. About 10 o'clock the fight commenced on the right and left in force, but light in the centre. We were successful on the right but not on the left. At 6 o'clock we (our Brigade) were moved off to charge the Rebel batteries, and take them and gain the lost ground. This was new for us, but we went into it with such a yell and scream that it made my blood chill in my veins. I can't tell you how the shell and shot flew. Oh! what a sight! To see the men fall, fall one after another. But their groans were drowned by our shouts.—On we go, and our left, I mean the left of the 126th, takes the battery, and drive them flying from the field. The Garibaldi Guards drag the cannon off. We took a great number of prisoners, and strew the ground with dead Rebels. As we returned, cheer after cheer went up for the Brigade by the old troops, who said they never saw such a splendid charge. Many a fine fellow fell on that day. Col. Willard was killed. Col. Sherrill then took command. Our company went in with 32 men and came out with 16—and so with all the companies.

COL. BULL of the 126th Regiment, gives the following as the number of men killed, wounded and missing, in the Third Brigade, Third Division, Second Army Corps, of which the 126th is a part. The Brigade consisted of the 39th, 111th, 125th 126th Regiments, N. Y. V.
The number of Officers killed            11
   "       "        "  Men         "               128
   "       "        "  Officers wounded      25
   "       "        "  Men           "             513
   "       "        "  Officers missing          1
   "       "        "  Men           "              33

IN MEMORIAM.—Mr. Editor.—The following resolutions were unanimously passed at the last session of the Genesee Lyceum. You will oblige by giving them a place in your paper:
Whereas, It hath pleased Divine Providence to permit the decease of our friend and brother James R. Hibbard, of the 126th Regiment N. Y. S. V., who died in the hospital at Centreville, Va., on the 14th ult., in the 23d year of his age, therefore
Resolved, That as members of the Genesee Lyceum, of which he was a faithful, earnest and useful member, we cannot but express our unfeigned sorrow at this dispensation, and pay a tribute of great respect to him personally, and of our high appreciation of the many noble qualities which made him so beloved and honored by us all.
Resolved, That in him we have lost a friend who was ever true, a brother who never forgot his obligations, a young man of elevated and generous impulses, and, last, but not least, a soldier, whose death is a calamity to his country, no less than to his many mourning relatives and friends.
Resolved, That we extend to his parents and relatives our deepest sympathies in their bereavement, and commend them to the God of their country, whose justice always rewards the self-sacrificing, and whose sympathy never fails to eye the falling tear or comfort the distressed.
Resolved, That these resolutions be entered on our minutes, and that copies of them be furnished to the parents of the deceased, to the Northern Christian Advocate, Northern Independent, the Penn Yan weekly papers, and the Rochester dailies, for publication.
Com.:
JOSEPH JONES,
GEO. H. DECKER,
JOHN C.YATES,
LIMA, N. Y., May 9, '63.

The 126th Regiment.
We are pained to notice that the 126th regiment suffered terribly at the battle of Gettysburg. If the accounts in the papers are true, very nearly three fourths of the regiment are among the killed, wounded and missing. The following list of killed and wounded officers is taken from the N. Y. Tribune:
Killed—Col. E. Sherill, Capts. Shinier, O. J. Herrendeen and Wheeler, Lieut.
Holmes.
Wounded—Capts. Brough and Richardson, Lieuts. Lawrence, Brown, Sherman, Owen, Henion, and Seamans, Sgt. Jessop.
Another report is that Col. Sherrill is wounded. It will be several days before a full list of the killed, wounded, and missing, can be obtained.
The 126th was most causelessly and unjustly censured at the time of the surrender of Harper's Ferry, and it may be that it has had the effect of inducing them to make the most desperate efforts, which, if the accounts we receive are true, have nearly annihilated the regiment.

[Lines in memory of JAMES H. Hibbard and WILLIAM HERRIES, Privates in Co. A, 126th Reg't N. Y. S. V.]

Not on the battle field,
Nor in the tented grove,
But suffering in the Hospital
Far away from those they love;
No mother's voice to bless them,
No sister's words of cheer—
Reached the death-bed of these dear ones,
These lonely volunteers.

Mindful of their Country's welfare—
Valiantly obeyed the "call,"
Laid upon her sacred altar—
Comfort, health and life and all;
Ne'er escaped their lips a murmur,
Stifled every starting tear,
Known to God above the sad hours,
Of these lonely volunteers.

Pledged to each other firmly,
Whate'er their weal or woe,
When the cry "to arms" was given,
They arose to meet the foe.
Though their brothers fell around them,
Through the clouds no sunshine peers,
True to every order given,
Were these faithful volunteers.

Parents—though your hopes are blasted,
And you can lean no more
On those who would support you,
Passing to the other shore—
Brothers—though your band be broken,
And you walk with cautious tread
Above the graves,—where sleep
The lost—the early dead,—

Sisters—you have prized these jewels,
And your loss so deeply felt,
Would crush—but you confiding—
Can kneel as you have knelt.
God bless these stricken mourners,
In heaven in coming years,
Unite, parents, brothers, sisters,
With these cherished volunteers.

F. C.
PENN YAN, May 4, 1863.

THE LATEST.—The following is the list of killed and wounded among the officers of the 126th Regiment:
Col. E. Sherrill, killed.
Capt. I. Shimer Co. F., killed
Capt. O. J. Herendeen Co. H., killed
Capt, Wheeler Co. K., killed
Lieut. Holmes Co. G., killed
Lieut. M. H. Lawrence Co. B., wounded
Capt. J. H. Brough Co. E., wounded
Lieut. J. Sherman Co. E., wounded
Lieut. Brown Co. C., wounded
Capt. Richardson Co. D., wounded
Lieut. Owen Co. H., wounded
Lieut. Honloon Co. H., wounded
Lieut. J. Seaman Co. K., wounded
Three hundred of the brave men of this Regiment are among the dead, wounded, and missing. We have no list of casualties further than the above.

CASUALTIES IN THE 126th (GENEVA) REGIMENT.—Among the killed in this regiment at Gettysburg, on Friday last, were Col. E. Sherrill and Capt Isaac Shinier, both of whom were well known here. Their remains will be brought to Geneva for interment. Capt. Shimer was a brother in law of Wm. B. Rhoades, of this city, and a member of this commandery.

List of the Killed Wounded and Missing in the 126th Regiment.
GETYSBURG, PA.
July 6, 1863.
Mr. Editor:
Sir—Herewith you will find a list of killed and wounded in the 126th. I send it to you in order to relieve the painful anxiety of friends. Our Reg. has won imperishable laurels, and gained a place in history for time to come, though at a fearful cost:
Col. E Sherrill, killed.
Co. A—Killed, Serg't David Goff, private Robert Pool; wounded, Serg'ts Smith Stebbins, James Henderson; privates Levi Cole, S. P. Brezee, John Frost, Alexander Mosher, Wm. Axle, Frank Pool, Charles Turbush.
Co. B., Killed—Serg't Major H. P. Cook, Serg't Erasmus Bassett, Corp'l Elias A. Norris, privates Wm. Hobart, Chas. Gaylord, James K. P. Huson.
WOUNDED.—Lieut. M. H. Lawrence, Melvin Bunce, Serg't Edwin Gessop, Corp'ls Geo. Chapman, Thos. T. McCarrick, privates, John Finger, C. M. Hyatt, Moses Booth, David J. Wilkins, Chas. C. Hicks, Wm. Cassian, Wm. Raymond, Reubin Bullock, John Blansett, Chas. H. Dunning, Nathan D. Baden, Mortimer Garrison, Peter M. Norman, Stephen C. Purdy, Amos
J. Potter, Orrin Bates, Orrin Edgett. Luther Weaver, Edwin Coryell, Wm. H.
Thomas, Franklin S. Pettingill.
Co. C. KILLED—Serg't C. T. Harris, Corp' C. L. Bailey, privates, E. D. Vaughn, Joshua Purccll, Geo. Kelly, J. L. Grant, Samuel Bleu.
Wounded.—Lieut. Sidney Brown, Serg'ts Benj. Swarthout, Madison Covert, Corp'ls Wm. Herrington, Henry Peterson, privates John M. Chambers, Henry H. Rumsey, Spencer J. Colvin, Richard Lockhart, Geo. W. Comer, Richard C. Dimmick, Eugene K. Holton, J. F. Harris, F. M. Parker, Geo. C. King, leg amp., Edgar H. McQuigg, Peter W. Rappleye, Thos. M. Woodworth, James H. Stall, John Bond, M. Harriel, J. C. Scott, Wilmer Stuart.
Co. D. Killed—Serg't Edwin W. Tyler, Corp'l Hiram B. Wood, privates Henry W. Wilson, Truman B. Comstock, Chas. C. Crandall, Hosea Lewis.
WOUNDED.—Capt. Chas. A, Richardson, Corp'ls J. Z. Sabine, Henry Mattoon, privates Wm. R. Chambers, Sylvester Oatman, Barber Eldridge, Geo. B. Johnson, Wm. Snyder, John Goodrich, JR., Arnold J. Yeckly, Mark Dunham, Wesley D. Robinson, Edgar Oatman, John Chloecy, Frederick Ebert, Robert T. Porter, O. C. Lyon, Thos. Barnett, John D. Rivers, sun stroke.
MISSING.—A. J. Wilson, Decatur A. Hedges, Wm. B. Brondo, John Brodie.
Co. K. KILLED—Harvey Wilson, Joshua Brink, John W. Thompson. James Boyd, John Saulpaugh, John P. Sloat, Orderly Serg't Edwin Barnes, the last two died since the battle.
WOUNDED.—Capt. John E. Brough, Lieut. Jacob Sherman, privates Jonathan Creed, Tyler Brink, Henry Becker, Geo. W. Hafling, G. W. Larkham, John Gallivan, B, W. Scott, James B. Reynolds, Lorenzo Phillips, Leonard Seitz, Ambrose Bedell.
Missing.—Geo. W. Turner.
Co. F. KILLED—Capt. Shimer, M. Cunningham, John Phillips, John Snelling.
WOUNDED.—Chas. Terbush, T. G. Wilson, Geo. Carr, O. M. Leland, C. W. Nill, Oliver Perry, John Torrence, J. M. Wilson, E. Craft, Andrew J. Davenport, Samuel Jacort, Robert Jeffery, A. N. Fiero, James Camp, Van Buren Wheat, Orderly Sergeant, Ephraim Dubois, Edward A. Young, Samuel Clark, John W. Bishop, Charles P. Ketz. G. Lieut. Rufus Holmes,
Sergeant Snyder. Wounded.—Frederick Seicer, Chas. Farnsworth, James Harper, Thos. Yeo, Clinton Pasco, Wm. Long, John Moran, leg amputated, Daniel Day, Geo. Hoffman, G. W. Bailey, John Duffy, James Place.
Co. H. KILLED—Capt. O. J. Herendeen, Robt. Burns, Peter J Hopkins,
WOUNDED—Corp.Chas. L. Clapp, David Phipps, Ame Camp, James A. Young, Sergt Anson E. Howard, Nathaniel J. Briggs, H. S. Dickens, Theodore F. Stacey, James Sodon, Charles L. Bigelow, James Golden, Fred'k Bayne, Ceylon H. Sheffer, E. G. Hamlin, George Nicholson, Nicholas Loomis, Theodore Vickery, John H. Russell, Lieut. Asbrak Huntoon, Lieut. H. B. Owen, Wm. S. Westfall.
MISSING—John L. Bullis, Edward T. Swan, C. L. Gilbert.
Co. I. KILLED—Sanford Ambrose, Chas. Waters, Wm. H. Eddy, Sergt. Abram Cadmus, Thos. Seabring.
WOUNDED—David Berger, A. H. Pierson, Dennis Ryan, Wm. H. Wood, Stephen L. Weatherlow, Geo. Ackerman, H. Kelignor, W. Decker, H. Kipp, John Hart, W. H. Tewksbury.
Co. K. KILLED—Capt. Charles M. Wheeler, Lester Nelson.
WOUNDED—Lieut. I. A. Seamans, Sergt Wm. Criscadon, Alonzo K. Davis, Geo. Prouty, Geo. Smith, Corp. B. Logan, Geo. Macomber, Sergt Ralph H. Crippen, Sergt A. B. Cooper, A. W. Cooper, Jerome Parks, John King.
MISSING—Wm. H. Adams, H. T. Alcott, A. J. Cady.
This list is as complete as I could make under the pressure of circumstances.—Please have the Geneva, Penn Yan, Canandaigua, and Ovid papers copy. A hard fought battle, but a complete success for the army of the Potomac. Large numbers of the wounded rebels brought in. Their dead left, a great number of them for us to bury. So completely demoralized were they that many of them when attacked by our boys, gave themselves up. I understand that their officers made their men believe that we were green militia, but said they found out the mistake. I guess they did. What is left of us are in good spirits and are now marching forward on the pursuit of our flying foe. The prospect is that Lee will regret ever having come North. God be praised for this success.—
Yours, &c.,
T. SPENCER HARRISON,
Chaplain 126th N. Y. V.

DEATH OF A SOLDIER.—HOSEA LEWIS, a member of Capt. PHILLIPS' Company, 126th Regiment N. Y. S. V., who was wounded at Gettysburg on the 2d of July, died in hospital on the 6th ult. at the age of 24 years. He was a son of GUSTAVUS A. LEWIS, of Gorham, and had been eleven months in the service. His remains were brought home for interment.

DEMOCRAT & AMERICAN.
TUESDAY MORNING, JULY 14.
LOCAL AFFAIRS.
OUR ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
From the 126th Regiment.
Correspondence of the Democrat and American.
Two TAVERNS, NEAR GETTYSBURG,
July 6th, 1863.
We have just been through one of the severest battles of the war, according to the acknowledgment of old soldiers, and I will undertake to describe that part of the battle which I could see, it being mostly that in which the 126th N. Y. V. was engaged. We got into the field July 2d, in the forenoon, the second day of the battle. At the time of our arrival our lines were much in the shape of a horse shoe, with the toe of the shoe towards Gettysburg and half a mile from the town. The ground occupied by our army was mostly higher than that occupied by the rebels. Our regiment is in the 3d Brigade, 3d Division, 2d Army Corps. At the commencement of the battle our Brigadier General, A. Hayes, was in command of the division, and Col. Willard, of the 125th N. Y. V., was in command of the brigade. Our regiment was at first posted in a young orchard at the front, but a little to the left. We were formed in line of battle with the 111th, 39th and 125th behind us. The 39th N. Y. (Garibaldi Guards,) were thrown out after a little as skirmishers, and met the rebel skirmishers, who were thrown out of the woods in which the rebels lay, in the valley between. They lost considerably from rebel sharp shooters, who picked off our skirmishers, and especially officers of skirmishers, during the whole fight. At one time the 39th retreated, but Gen. Hayes rode rashly down to the line and rallied them, and they held their ground well. This gallant officer exposed himself constantly during the whole of the battle, and had two or three horses shot under him, but wonderfully enough came off unscathed.
There was nothing more than skirmishing the second day of the battle (our 1st) till 4 P. M., when shelling began in good earnest. We, however, did not move till near sundown, when we went to assist the left of our corps half a mile away where there had been very hard fighting for an hour or more. Here our brigade formed on the ridge and charged down the hill and into a small ravine which we crossed with a good deal of difficulty and considerable loss, for though the ravine was not deeper than a few feet, it was rocky and there were stumps of trees and underbrush which compelled us to break our lines to pass it, and under the galling fire we were not able to form our line well after crossing. We received a heavy fire from the rebels in this ravine, and as we charged with yells and shouts beyond it, we encountered an enfilading fire from two pieces of cannon the rebels had placed for that purpose. Here we suffered terribly, as we had advanced further than any other regiment in the brigade and were in danger of being flanked. We soon had to fall back, as we had in ten minutes lost half our number in killed and wounded. It however closed the fighting of the day here. Company F went into this action 41 strong and came out with with only 19 men, though several were only slightly wounded—mere contusions. The roll and roar of musketry—it was so severe and continuous that it was more than a rattle—on this part of the field was terrible for two hours of the afternoon. We returned to our old ground and lay there that night. The next morning our regiment was ordered to go out as skirmishers. Here we lost several, mostly officers picked off by sharpshooters. There were three Captains killed in this skirmish—Capts. Shimer, Wheeler and Hessenden. I know more of Capt. Shimer's conduct during the battle than of the others, and know that he was always at his post leading his men. He was within five feet of me when killed, and you can judge how close work it was when I say that we were acting as a support and were lying on our faces and that when the Captain was shot his head was not more than a foot from the ground.
He was a man we could always rely on in battle—cool, as well as brave, and I can say the company feel deeply the loss of so brave an officer. We were relieved about noon, and returned to our position. At 2 P. M. the rebels concentrated their fire on the point our brigade was on—the most terrible cannonading, old soldiers say, they ever saw, and it was returned with equal fury. I never witnessed anything like it, for fearful grandeur. The fire of the rebels at this time, as at others, was most of it too high. Our artillery evidently do much better than their's, for they no sooner opened a battery than our batteries would get their range and in a very short time silence it entirely.—Rickett's battery, in particular, did finely. This cannonade lasted about two hours, when the two heaviest guns of Rickett's battery, which we supported, were out of ammunition, except cannister, and they were hauled by hand, out of range, the horses being nearly all killed. The number of horses killed by this cannonading was almost beyond belief. In one place I counted nineteen, none of which was more than half its length from another one. Our fire, from want of ammunition, had almost entirely ceased, and in a few moments one of the officers discovered the rebels advancing on us, in line of battle, out of the woods, which were a cover for all their movements. Our brigade was ordered up into line to meet them. Their line of battle must have been two miles long, and they advanced in a fine line. They first came out in three lines, but soon formed but one. It was a terrible sight to us, fine as it was, for we did not suppose we could repulse them, and we expected to have to fight terribly and suffer heavy losses. The two cannon that had been taken back were brought to the front, and they shelled them till they got into musket range, when they gave them cannister, and we gave them the swift Minie messengers. They fired all they could, and threw some grape at us.—Our fire soon opened gaps in their ranks, but they were quickly closed, and still they came on over fences, and it seemed that there was no hope for us. Better fighting was seldom seen than we did in that fifteen or twenty minutes. The enemy advanced to within from ten rods In some places, to twenty in others, when they broke and ran, mostly to the rear; but I should think a thousand threw away their arms, and waving their handkerchiefs or hats—anything to indicate their surrender—came into our lines. In this attack I think the brigade killed and wounded as many as we numbered, and captured as many more.
I never saw men so wild with excitement as we were when they retreated, and we pursued them for some distance, until we were ordered to fall back. We captured five stands of colors, one of which had inscribed on it, among other battle fields, Harper's Ferry. Such cheers and shouts that greeted it as it was handed to Gen. Hayes, who rode along the lines dragging it on the ground, are seldom heard. It was the most jubilant moment of my life. This ended the fight at our point, except that on the morning of the July 4th there was a good deal of skirmishing with the enemy's sharpshooters. During the day, July 5th, we buried the rebel dead, and brought in a good many of their wounded, whom their sharpshooters would not allow us to touch, and if we went to them with a stretcher, we were sure to get shot at.
Henry Dore, Co. D, brought in one stand of colors, and a number made captures of swords and other trophies.
Our killed (Co. F.) are Captain J. Spinner, Michael Cunningham, John Phillips and John Snelling.
Wounded.—Sergt. V. B. Wheat, hand; Carp. C. Terbush, hand; Corp. T. J. Wilson, hand; J. W. Bishop, leg; Geo. Carr, side and arm, severely; E. Craft, arm; J. G. Camp, leg; S. J. Clark, hip; A. J. Davenport, leg; E. C. Dubois, slightly; A. N. Fiero, side and hand; R. Jeffrey, head, severely; C. P. Kents, arm; A. M. Leland, slightly; C. W. Niles, slightly; John Torrance, hand; J. M. Wilson, slightly; E. A. Young, side, severely; Oliver Perry, wounded and missing.
We are sad in missing these men from our ranks, but are rejoiced that we have been able to assist in winning this victory—for a victory it certainly is. We acknowledge God's Providence in it, and would humbly acknowledge His kindness in sparing those who are left.—May He help us to devote the lives He has spared to the service of God and our country!
Truly, yours, L. A. B.
P. S.—I learn from our Surgeon that the citizens near Gettysburg charged one dollar a gallon for milk, and one dollar a loaf for bread for the wounded soldiers. Comment is needless.

THE 126TH.—The 126th Regiment fought bravely and splendidly during the late actions at Gettysburgh [sic], and suffered fearfully in killed and wounded. It went into the fight with about five hundred effective men, and its aggregate loss is reported to be nearly Three Hundred. The Regiment has sustained a great loss in the death of its gallant Colonel, SHERRILL, who was shot through the head and instantly killed. The following is a list of the officers killed and wounded in the Regiment.
Col. E. Sherrill, killed.
Capt. Isaac Shimer, Co. F, killed.
Capt. O. J. Herendeen, Co. H, killed.
Capt. Wheeler, Co. K, killed.
Lieut. Holmes, Co. G, killed.
Lieut. M. H. Lawrence, Co. B, wounded slightly.
Capt. J. H. Brough, Co. E, wounded.
Capt. Richardson, Co. D, wounded.
Lieut. J. Sherman, Co. E, wounded.
Lieut. Brown, Co. C, wounded.
Lieut. Owen, Co. H, wounded.
Lieut. Honloon, Co. H, wounded.
Lieut J. Seaman, Co. K, wounded.

Democrat & American.
THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 16.
LOCAL AFFAIRS.
ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
The 126th Regiment at Gettysburg.
We publish by request the following extracts from a letter written by JAMES P. FULTON, of the 126th N. Y. Regiment:
It was about two hours before sundown when the third brigade, in command of Col. Williard advanced in line of battle to meet a column of rebels who were advancing around our left, intending to flank us. The 126th, of the third brigade stood their ground nobly, never flinching until ordered, the ranks being well thinned with the shower of balls, which flew so thickly around us. A great many of our company were killed and wounded, they falling thick and fast. John Wilson was taken in the top of the head with a spent ball, which deprived him of his senses for about a couple of hours; the color bearer advancing a few feet from me was shot dead; one of the color guard who took the colors was wounded. We drove the rebels steadily before us until Col. Williard was shot dead on his horse. One of my boots was spoiled about this time by a ball or shell tearing off the sole and stinging my foot so I thought it was knocked to pieces. I could not walk for about half an hour, but lay among a lot of rebel slain and wounded. A great many of our men were killed and wounded and left over night. Our Sergeant-Major was killed. He was a first-rate fellow. We laid on our arms all night, and the conflict again commenced with the skirmishers and sharpshooters, who were active in picking off the men. Our company were ordered out as skirmishers. We took our position along the road, laying down flat near the fence in a ditch. Here Captain Shimer was shot by a rebel sharpshooter, while raising his head up to look between the boards. He never spoke again. A good many shots were fired through the board above my head. All this time our artillery were active, silencing the rebel guns. We were relieved about noon, and in the afternoon there began a terrific shelling on the battery belonging to our brigade, killing most all the horses and a great many men; the shells bursting about one every second around us. I heard General Hays say that this was the most terrific fight of the war. The rebels thought they had so effectually silenced the battery that they could easily take it, and advanced in line or battle to make their charge. When they had advanced far enough they were mowed down in large swarths in their well kept ranks; and the stream of fire from the third brigade, sending the leaden hail, covered the ground for over 50 acres with dead, dying and wounded. Some of the rebels advanced within ten rods of us, but were soon despatched. They broke and ran, and over 2,000 prisoners surrendered. We captured most every flag the rebels had. The 126th captured three flags. JAMES P. FULTON.

MILITARY FUNERAL AT CANANDAIGUA.
On Sunday the funeral of Capt. Wheeler, 126th Regiment, who died of wounds received at Gettysbug [sic], took place at Canandaigua, companies D and F of the 54th Regiment acting as escort. A large concourse of people followed the remains to the cemetery where the usual …

PATRIOTIC.
We find in the last number of the Geneva Courier a long and excellent letter from Dr. C. S. HOYT, 1st Assistant Surgeon of the 126th. It sounds like the language of a patriot. Here is an extract showing the way he talks:
"I am aware that some 'out side of Dixie,' are desirous that the war should not close during the term of this Administration, but would prolong it, so as to ride another set of men into power. In my judgement [sic], party, and party considerations, should have but little weight in times like these. Let us end the rebellion first, and tend to party and Presidents afterwards. The administration ought to be sustained by every loyal citizen until the last hour of its existence: if it then fails, the people will hurl it from power and place a more competent one in its stead.
But I digress, and must hasten to close this already I fear, too long letter. The best of feeling prevails among officers and men of the Regiment, and a friendly rivalry springing up among companies as to who shall excel, has done much at improvement, and rendered them quite proficient in the 'Drill.' Our camp is a beautiful one, finely located, and recent 'evergreen' decorations has added much to its appearance, eliciting praise, not only from our Brigade, but also from our Division Commander."
Such men as Dr. HOYT do not waste their breath wailing over the arrest and punishment of Vallandigham, nor howl for Peace, except on the single condition of rebel submission.

A SAD RECORD.—Among the lamented dead of the battles at Gettysburg, are Col. Sherrill, of Seneca Falls, commanding the 126th regiment, and Col. O'Rorke, of Rochester, commanding the 140th. Col. Wheelock, of Utica, was taken prisoner; Lieut. Col. McDougal, of Auburn, was badly wounded. Lieut. Col. Arrowsmith, of Madison county, was killed.

AN ERROR CORRECTED.—Mr. Editor: In the list of deserters from the 126th Regiment, as furnished by Adj. J. Smith Brown, for publication, is the following:
"Ab. W. Sherman, private, Co. F, age 29; 5 ft. 8 inches; fair complexion; blue eyes; dark hair; residence, when enlisted, Seneca; occupation, farmer; deserted Dec. 1863, City Hospital Chicago, Illinois; probably to be found in Seneca."
Now, Mr. Editor, will you publish a copy of the following discharge, the original of which I herewith send you for examination:
To all whom it may concern: Ab. W. Sherman; a private of Capt. Shimer's Company F, 126th Regiment of Infantry, N. Y. Vols., who was enrolled [sic] on the 11th day of August, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, to serve three years, is hereby DISCHARGED from the service of the United States, this 11th day of December, 1862, at Chicago, Ill., by reason of Surgeon's Certificate of disability.
Said Ab. W. Sherman was born in Seneca, in the State of New York, is 29 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches high, fair complexion, blue eyes, brown hair, and by occupation, when enrolled, a farmer. Given at Chicago, Ill., this 11th day of December, 1862.

The Wounded of the 126th.
Judge Hadley has handed us the following letter from Senator Folger, giving the locality of the wounded of the 126th Regt. NEW YORK, July 18, 1863.
Dear Sir:—I ENCLOSE AN IMPERFECT LIST OF men from the Seneca county companies of the 126th Regt., and their whereabouts.
It may be of use to print it, for information of relatives and friends.
McDougal Hospital, Ft. Schuyles, New York City.—David Hoffman, G.
Ft. Wood, Bedloe Island, N. Y. City.—Thomas Yeo, G. Sanford Ambrose, I. S. Parish, John Hart, I.
U. S. General Hospital, Newark, New Jersey.—Henry Kellinger, George Ackerman I, W. W. Harrington, Henry H. Ramsey, F, M. Woodworth, C, M. J. Bachman, Frederick Seeser, Wm. Long, Gilbert N. Bailey, G, W. S. Decker, David Berger, I.
Jarvis Hospital, Baltimore.—P. W. Rappleye, Peter Rappleyc, C.
Annapolis Junction, Maryland.—George E. Chadwick, C.
Newton Hospital, Baltimore.—Sidney E. Brown. Lt., C.
Broad Street Hospital, Phila.—J. H. Stull, W. H. Cole, C, M. F. Dunham, L. P. Brizee.
Summit Hospital, Phila.—W. H. Tewksbury, S. J. Calvin, D. Ryan, E. B. Norris, M. Covert, Ed. G. Hamblin, E. H. McQuigg, H. Kipp, B. C. Lockhart, G. W. Coan, Norris _erlew, John Bond, H. S. Dickins, Benjamin Swarthout.
Mower Hospital, Phila.—A. N. Fiero, The_n Dunn.
West Philadelphia Hospital—R. or B. H. _rippen, Charles L. Clapp, Jer. Parks, W. _. Westfall, John Blauvelt.
Germantown Hospital.—C. S. Gilbert.
Convalescent Hospital, Phila.—Francis M. Parker, John H. Chambers, Abijah Cubert, C.
Seminary Hospital, Gettysburgh [sic].—Wm. Stewart, Samuel Clark; David Day.
Christ Church, York Street, Gettysburgh [sic].—John Morin, Wm. Wood.
As to those named as being in hospital at Baltimore it is proper to say that they do not stay long there, but are sent north as soon as possible.
In endeavoring to visit the hospitals in this city, a pass should be asked for at the Medical Director's Office, 458 Broome street.
This is not a perfect list, but it is the best that can be got from the books up to this date. Yours truly,
C. J. FOLGER.

EXTRACT from the Monthly return for the month of July, 1863, of the 126th Regt., N. Y. S. V., 3d Brigade, 3d Division, 2d Army Corps.
PRESENT.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
For Duty.......................................................15
In Arrest........................................................ 3
Total.............................................................18
ENLISTED MEN.
For Duty.................................................... 296
Sick............................................................. 18
In Arrest........................................................ 3
Total.......................................................... 317
ABSENT.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
On Detached Service…................................ 5
Sick.............................................................. 4
Wounded ..................................................... 7
Total………………………………………16
ENLISTED MEN
On Detached Service.................................. 37
With Leave................... ............................... 2
Without Leave............................................ 13
Sick (including wounded)......................... 249
Total.......................................................... 301
WHERE ABSENT.
Within the Department............................... 23
Without the Department........................... 278
Total...........................................................301
PRESENT AND ABSENT.
Field and Staff.............................................. 8
Line Officers.............................................. 26
Total Commissioned.................................. 34
ENLISTED MEN.
Non-Commissioned Staff............................ 6
Privates..................................................... 487
Total Enlisted........................................... 618
Aggregate................................................. 652
Aggregate Last Monthly Return…………699
Loss............................................................ 47

GAIN.
ENLISTED MEN.
By Transfer.................................................. 1
LOSS.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Killed in Action…....................................... 5
ENLISTED MEN.
Killed in Action......................................... 41
By Transfer................................................. 1
Deserted...................................................... 1
Total Loss................................................. 48
Total Gain................................................... 1
Loss........................................................... 47
CHANGES IN COMMISSIONED OFFICES.
Col. Eliakim Sherrill, killed. Isaac Shimer, Capt. Co. E, killed. O. J. Herondeen, Capt. Co. H, killed. Charles M. Wheeler, Capt, Co. K, killed, Rufus P. Holmes, 2d Lt. Co. G, killed.
John F. Randolph promoted to be Sergeant Major, vice Henry P. Cook, killed in action.
(Signed) "Official" J. SMITH BROWN,
Adjutant.

DESCRIPTIVE LIST OF DESERTERS from the 126th Regt. of N. Y. S. V., (Col. Eliakim Sherrill,) called into the service of the U. S. by the President.
Geo. N. Davis, Private, Co. B. age 29, 5 ft 9 inches high, light complexion, brown eyes, black hair, residence when enlisted at Starkey, laborer, enlisted Aug. 6, 1862, at Starkey, N. Y., deserted June 25th, Centreville, Va.
Nelson Millis, Private, Co. B., age 44, 5 ft 8 inches, fair complexion, dark eyes, dark hair, residence when enlisted Penn Yan, occupation painter, deserted June 27th, Edward's Ferry.
Henry W. Bradt, Private, Co. D, age 18, 5 ft. 4 inches, dark complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, residence when enlisted at Canandaigua, occupation Clerk, deserted June 28th, at Monocacy, Md.
Asa J. Rose, Sergt., Co. F., age 32, 5 ft. 11 1-2 inches high, fair complexion, blue eyes, brown hair, residence when enlisted Tyre, occupation Carpenter, deserted Dec. 1862, City Hospital, Chicago, Ill., probably to be found at Tyre, N. Y., says he is discharged. Have received no notice of his discharge.
Henry B. Munson, Corp., Co. F., age 29, 5 ft. 8 inches, fair complexion, black eyes, black hair, residence when enlisted Tyre, occupation farmer, deserted Dec. 1862, City Hospital, Chicago, Ill.
Henry Loper, Private, Co. F., age 24, 5 ft. 6 inches, fair complexion, blue eyes, light hair, residence when enlisted Phelps, occupation farmer, deserted Dec. 1862, City Hospital, Chicago, Ill.
Charles E. Baggerly, Private, Co. F., age 21, fair complexion, hazel eye, dark hair, residence when enlisted Phelps, occupation farmer, deserted Dec. 1862, City Hospital, Chicago, Ill.
Heman J. Smith, Private, Co. F., age 22, 5 ft. 7 inches, fair complexion, blue eyes, light hair, residence when enlisted West Bloomfield, occupation farmer, deserted Dec. 1862, City Hospital, Chicago, Ill.
Ab. W. Sherman, Private, Co. F., age 29, 5 ft. 8 inches, fair complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, residence when enlisted Seneca, occupation farmer, deserted Dec. 1863, City Hospital, Chicago, Ill., probably to be found in Seneca.
Oliver Decker, Corp. Co. F., age 25, 5 ft. 6 in., fair complexion, grey eyes, brown hair, residency when enlisted Phelps, occupation farmer, deserted October 1862, at Baltimore, probably to be found in Michigan.
John Coburn, Co. F., Private, age 35, 5 ft. 6 in., fair complexion, brown eyes, brown hair, residence when enlisted Seneca, occupation Mechanic, deserted May 6, 1862, Centreville, Va., probably to be found in Canada.
Daniel Meade, Private, Co, G., age 25, light complexion, brown hair, occupation laborer, deserted Centreville, Va.
Theodore F. Shears, Private, Co. H, age 23, 5 ft. 7 in., dark complexion, grey eyes, dark hair, residence when enlisted Coonsville, occupation Showman, deserted May 24, Centreville, Va.
Wm. H. O'Neil, Private, Co. I., age 18, 5 ft, 6 in., swarthy complexion, dark eyes, brown hair, residence when enlisted Waterloo, occupation student, deserted July 6th on the march, probably to be found at Waterloo, N. Y.
Papers of the 26th Senatorial District please copy.
(Signed "Official") J. SMITH BROWN,
Adjutant 126th N. Y. S. V.

SOLDIERS IN HOSPITAL AT BALTIMORE.
We have received the following letter:
BALTIMORE, MD., JULY 9, 1863.
To the EDITOR ROCHESTER DEMOCRAT—
Sir:—Will you publish for the benefit of the 126th N. Y. Volunteers, the names of the few members of that regiment, who have this day been admitted to the hospitals of this city:
Company H, Private G. Soden, and Sergeant E. L. Bigalow.
Company D, Privates Wesley D. Robinson and John D. Rivers.
Company F, Privates C. P. Keats and Edwin Kraft.
Company E, Private Frederick Ebert.
Others are expected at an early date. I will furnish lists as they arrive.

Letter from Col. Bull.
Headquarters THIRD BRIGADE, THIRD DIVISION
Sec. Army Corps, Camp near Sandy Hook,
Maryland, July 17, 1863.
N. J. Milliken, Esq., Editor and Publisher of the Ontario County Times:
SIR—On the morning of the 2d inst., after a fatiguing forced march from Centerville, Va., our brigade,—the 3d of the 3d division second army corps—reached Gettysburg, Pa., numbering about eighteen hundred officers and men.
The brigade was stationed in front to support a battery of artillery. We remained in that position until about five o'clock in the afternoon, when our forces on the left, being sorely harassed and pressed by the enemy's artillery and infantry in front, this brigade was ordered to their relief.
Marching pursuant to such orders by the rank to the left, under command of Col. Willard of the 125th N. Y. V.—Gen. Alexander Hayes, our brigadier general, being in command of the division—for the distance of about one-third of a mile, the brigade was formed in line of battle facing the enemy, and was ordered to advance "double quick"—at "charge bayonets." Advancing, it charged through a thick underbrush, in which, in large numbers, the enemy's infantry and sharpshooters were stationed. These forces, unable to resist our advancing column, after inflicting such injury upon us as they could, fell back in confusion. Pressing on in as good a line as the circumstances would admit, to the foot of a hill, on which to the left, in a commanding position, the enemy's batteries were located, the brigade ascended the hill to a considerable distance, and re-took a battery of the 5th N. Y. artillery, which the enemy had previously captured. Still pressing on up the hill, undismayed, though the loss up to that time had been terrible, the commanding officer, seeing the brigade exposed to a destructive cross fire from artillery on the left, and infantry on the right, involving the certain destruction of the command wisely ordered a retreat. In good order, this command was carried into effect, under a severe fire of artillery and musketry. The men fell by scores, but the ranks were immediately closed up by the survivors. Emerging from the underbrush mentioned, the brigade, sadly reduced in numbers, but still firm and obedient to orders, was formed under command of Col. Willard, and its other inferior officers, in good order. A few minutes afterwards Col. Willard was killed, and the command devolved on the late lamented Col. Sherrill, as the senior officer—than whom a braver man and a more faithful soldier never existed—under whose command the brigade was marched to its former position, in this carrying into effect the order of his deceased predecessor.
Before proceeding further to narrate the operations of the command, I desire to say that my intimate friend, Henry W. Willson of Canandaigua, so well known at home, and whose high soldierly qualities none can appreciate more than myself, fell on the advance mentioned. Poor fellow! how much I regret that I had no opportunity of saying a word to him in his departing moments. We remained without being disturbed in our position, until about noon of the next day, when, under orders, we took a position to the right of the original one, a stone fence running at right angles to our main line. About one o'clock the enemy opened on this line from nearly one hundred pieces of artillery, stationed on a slope across a valley, nearly one-half a mile distant from our line. A more terrific cannonading has not been known during this war. Our men held their position without flinching, suffering a loss unexpectedly small.
A lull in the fire occurring after an interval of about two hours, it was announced that the enemy were advancing in line of battle. Stepping hastily up the hill I observed the enemy across the valley, advancing in four lines of battle, loading and firing as they advanced. Immediately, under orders from Gen. Hays and Col. Sherrill, who were present, I formed the regiment by right wheel in line of battle on the crest of the hill, from which place we poured a destructive fire from our long range rifles, which, with the artillery fire from our front, and the flanking fire of our detail of skirmishers in advance, soon threw the left of their line into utter confusion.
At this moment we observed that many of the first line had thrown down their arms, and waving their handkerchiefs were advancing toward our position. These men were from North Carolina, and as I learn on account of their disaffection had been placed in front by Gen. Longstreet. When their lines were broken and dispersed, our men along the crest of the hill gave long and hearty cheers.
We did not lose many in this engagement, but we have to regret the death of Col. Sherrill, about five o'clock this afternoon. During the forenoon of this day, Capt. Shimer, Co. F., Capt. Herendeen, Co. H., and Capt. Wheeler, Co. K., 126th N. Y. Vols., were killed by the enemy's sharpshooters while skirmishing in front of our lines.
This is a brief account of our operations during the engagements of the two days, and I regret that I am unable to give a more detailed and minute account thereof. At some future time I hope such an account may be furnished.
I inclose a list of killed and wounded—not showing the nature of the wounds—prepared by Lieut. J. Smith Brown, Adjutant of the regiment, which I consider perfectly reliable.
I also inclose a statement of the killed, wounded and missing in the brigade. This list and statement furnishes the best evidence of the manner in which the brigade and regiment conducted themselves during this memorable combat.
If you deem this communication sufficiently interesting to the community, you may consider yourself at liberty to publish it.
Believe me, sir, respectfully yours,
JAMES M. BULL,
Lt. Col., Comdg. Brigade.

We have received a letter from J. Smith Brown stating that he has sent us an account of the battle of Gettysburgh [sic], and also an official list of the killed and wounded, but up to this date they have not come to hand. The following is a recapitulation of the killed, wounded, and missing of the 126th regiment:
KILLED
Commissioned Officers.............................. 5
Enlisted Men............................................. 35
WOUNDED
Commissioned Officers.............................. 9
Enlisted Men........................................... 172
MISSING
Commissioned Officers.............................. 1
Enlisted Men............................................. 10
Total killed, wounded and missing…..... 232

FUNERAL OF CAPT HERENDEEN.—EDITORS UNION AND ADVERTISER: The funeral of Capt. Herendeen, Co. H, 126th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., who was killed at the battle of Gettysburg, took place yesterday in the grove near the late residence of the deceased. The exercises were conducted by the Rev. O. E. Daggett, of Canandaigua. The number in attendance was remarkably great, not only of the citizens of the town but of many adjoining towns. Capt. H. was held in high estimation as a citizen. He was a brave soldier and fell at his post. F. July 28th, 1863.
Martin Young and L. W. Rogers, of Co. A., 126th Regiment, wounded at Gettysburg, are now in hospital at Annapolis Junction. J. H. Frost and F. E. Poole, of the same Company, are in hospital at West's Buildings, Baltimore.

THE LATE CAPT SHIMER.—The body of Capt. Shimer, late of Company F, 126th New York Volunteers, arrived at Geneva last evening. The deceased was among the many victims of the late terrible battle at Gettysburg. While out with a party of skirmishers on the morning of the 3d he was shot by a rebel sharpshooter, the ball taking effect in his mouth and coming out at the back of his neck. His death was instantaneous. Capt. Shimer was a most highly respected citizen of Geneva. And among the associations to which he was most strongly attached, and where his sterling worth was perhaps best appreciated, was the Order of Free Masons. He was a member of the Ark Lodge of the Geneva Royal Arch Chapter, and of the
Geneva Commandery of Knights Templar.
The funeral of Capt. Shimer will take place on Wednesday next, at half-past one o'clock, from his residence in Geneva. Services will be conducted according to the impressive and solemn ceremonies of the Masonic Order. Brethren of the adjoining towns are invited to unite in the exercises appointed for honoring ...

From the 126th Regiment.
NEAR BEALTON STATION, July 31, 1863.
We are in camp in the woods about 5 miles from Rappahannock Station. Our march has been a very crooked and at times a very severe one since leaving Gettysburg. At Williamsport we expected to fight as much as any one ever expected to. Indeed, we were in line of battle and expected the beginning of a battle every moment for over two days, and great was our chagrin when we learned that the rebel army had crossed the Potomac a few hours only before we were to attack them. From Williamsport we marched through Sharpsburg, over the battle field of last summer, to Harper's Ferry. But little change here. A new bridge had been built over the Shenandoah, over which there was none last summer. It was the same ruined town, looking as if an earthquake had been shaking it down. We passed over the same pontoon bridge, and the very spot where we passed out of the rebel line, paroled prisoners, last September. Maryland Heights, however, were greatly changed. Where a year ago was only a dense thicket with a single path through it, we saw a large fort and lines of breastworks in every direction. The woods were all cut down, making it impassable for everything but a mouse or a squirrel. The Heights seemed impregnable.
From Harper's Ferry our course was down Loudon Valley on the eastern slope of the Blue Ridge. We stopped about 5 o'clock the first day and had a most rare and delectable treat,—The fields around were thickly covered with the early kind of blackberries, of splendid size and most luscious ripeness. Our whole Corps stopped there, some nine or ten thousand men, and every one, I think, had all he wanted and more too. I never saw berries so plenty. One boy in our company picked a ten-quart pail nearly full in an hour and a half. Ripe fruit of any kind has an excellent effect upon men who, like us, have been living for a long time on "hard tack," coffee and salt pork.
We passed Snicker's Gap and went on to Ashby's Gap, to a little place called Paris, just in the Gap. Our next halting place was Bloomfield, about two miles east of the Ridge. The next day's march brought us to Springfield, a little depot, huddle of houses, at the entrance to the Gap. We had just arranged for a night's stay, when heavy firing was heard at the other end of the Gap. Very soon the bugle sounded "fall, in double quick," and in about ten minutes off we started and marched at a sort of hard gallop upwards of five miles before we halted a moment, rested a moment and started again over the roughest road I ever saw. We had nearly reached the scene of action, when Gen. Spinola was carried by on a stretcher.—When we reached the scene of action the fighting was over with, and we laid down on a very steep and rough side hill, to sleep. It was the worst ground to sleep on that ever I tried.—This was a very hard march. Here we fell on short rations, and marched seventeen miles breakfastless and dinnerless, on a very warm day besides. White Plains was the place where we refilled our havershacks [sic], and showed the wondering natives how hungry soldiers can eat. From White Plains to Warrenton, from there to Warrenton Junction. This region is a real wilderness. Where houses stood two years ago, now stand only two stone chimneys, according to Virginia fashion. These reminds one very strongly of the pictures of ancient ruins where the massive pillars are the only standing things. Rumors says another corps crossed the Rappahannock to-day to make a reconnisance, and we are to go to their assistance, if they need any. A detail has been made from each regiment to go to their respective States for conscripts. The 108th N. Y. V. is generally camped near us, being in one division. They are sadly diminished, not having at present over 150 men for duty. Our regiment left Centerville with 450 men for duty, but cannot now muster over 230. Such campaigns as these use men up very fast. Old soldiers say that the Army of the Potomac never made such marches as they have made since the middle of June.
G. W. S.

Extract from the Monthly return for the Month of August 1862, of the 126th Reg't N. Y. S. V. Infantry, stationed at Harper's Ferry, Va.
[We will publish the returns of 1862, now made out for the first time, in order to have our record complete. Papers of the 26th Senatorial District please copy.    Ed. Chronicle.]

                        PRESENT.
Commissioned Officers.
For Duty................................................38
Enlisted Men.
For Duty..............................................900
Sick.......................................................44
In arrest...................................................2
Total....................................................946

                         ABSENT.
Commissioned Officers.
With Leave.............................................1
Enlisted Men.
Without Leave........................................7
Sick........................................................1
In Arrest.................................................2
Total.....................................................10

 PRESENT AND ABSENT.
Field and Staff......................................9
Line Officers.......................................30
Total Commissioned..........................39

Enlisted men.
Non-Commissioned Staff....................5
Privates............................................818
Total Enlisted..................................956
Aggregate........................................995

The Adjutant general in his report gives the strength of the regiment as one thousand and four (1,004), but I am unable to find any record of more than nine hundred and ninety-five (995).
J. SMITH BROWN,
Present Adjutant.

All Appeal to the Ladies.
CAMP 126TH N. Y. VOL.,
NEAR THE "RAPPAHANNOCK,"
August 1st, 1863.
To the Ladies of the 26th Senatorial District, N. Y.
LADIES:—The past few weeks have been important ones in the history of our country. For the first time since the inauguration of this unholy war, its authors, emboldened by former success, and rendered desperate by the destitute condition of their armies, have dared invade a Free State, and polute [sic] its soil by their unhallowed tread.—Charged with the mission of driving the invaders from our soil, the "Army of the Potomac," in the accomplishment of the task, has covered itself with imperishable honors. The traitorous hordes have been scattered before our victorious hosts, as chaff before the wind, and now seek safety in the mountain gorges of their own country. The battle of Gettysburg has taught the rebels the superiority of our arms, and, flushed with success, the Army of the Potomac, in future, knows no retreat, until Richmond is ours.—Our own regiment shares with that army, its hardships, it honors. Already has the struggle told fearfully upon our numbers.—Over 200 of our comrades fell upon the fields of Gettysburg, and are now silent in death, or suffering in hospitals, in various parts of the country. The sacrifice has been a fearful one, yet, if needs be, we must submit to greater.
We have now been on the move 38 days. During that time we have marched 430 miles, laid in line of battle 8 days, fought desperately 3 days, and skirmished with the enemy more or less during the whole time. Your fathers, your husbands, and your brothers, share with others in these hardships. Charged with the care of their health, we deem it our duty to neglect no means in providing for their every want. Encamped in a country where not only the luxuries, but the comforts of life, are unknown, we naturally look to you for aid and we know our appeal will not be in vain. The government provides in abundance, yet there is a lack of variety, which only the generosity of those at home can supply. Deprived of vegetables, we need fruits and can use them in great quantities to advantage. Preserved or canned fruits cannot be safely shipped, and dried fruits only should be sent. Pack in bbls. or boxes any kind of dried fruits, ship by express, mark Washington, D. C., send invoice by mail, and we assure you, their receipt shall be promptly acknowledged, and distributed to those under our care. Truly yours,
CHAS. S. HUNT,
P. D. PELTIER,
Asst. Surgeons, N. Y. Vol.

LIEUT. COLONEL BAIRD—Mr. William H. Baird of this village has been appointed Lieut. Colonel of the 126th Regiment. In justice to Mr. Baird we will say that the charges brought against him for bad conduct at the surrender of Harper's Ferry, have been thoroughly investigated by the War Department, and found to be without any foundation. In conversing with soldiers of the 126th at Gettysburgh [sic] we found that Major Baird stood well with the men of that Regiment, and that his appointment would give general satisfaction. Col. Sherrill wrote a letter to the War Department refuting every charge against Major Baird, as far as his knowledge extended, and and we have no doubt but he was better prepared to judge of Major Baird's conduct than any other man on the grounds.—[Geneva Courier.

LOSSES OF THE 126TH REGIMENT.—It is with regret that we read the report of the losses of the 126th regiment in the late battle, and first in the list of killed stands the name of the gallant Col. Sherrell. This regiment was raised at Geneva, and if we remember right, came in from Ontario and Yates counties. It was surrendered by Ford & Co., at Harper's Ferry under  circumstances mortifying to the regiment and the country, but it was no fault of the 126th. Its losses in the recent battle fully attest to the bravery of officers and men. The following is the report given:
Col. E. Sherrell, killed; Capt. Shimer, Co. F, killed; Capt. O. J. Herrenden, H, killed; Capt. Wheeler, K, killed; Lt. Lawrence, B, wounded Capt. J. H. Brough, E, wounded; Lt. Brown, C, wounded; Capt. Richardson, D, wounded; Lt. Sherman, E, wounded; Lt. Holmes, G, killed; Lt. Owen, H, wounded; Lt. Honloon, H, wounded; Lt. Seaman, E, wounded. Three hundred men killed, wounded and missing.
Col. Sherrell was once a member of Congress from Ulster, we believe. He removed to Geneva a few years since, and there in the outskirts of the village laid out a large and model farm, in conducting which he was engaged when called to the field. It was remarked in these columns at the time that he was making a sacrifice of great personal comfort in taking command of the regiment, and as a model farmer his neighbors could illy afford to loose him. But he went, and has done his duty at all times. At Harper's Ferry he received a ball in his face which inflicted a severe wound. For several weeks he was in a critical situation, but at length recovered and joined his command. The circumstances of his death are not related, but we may be sure he fell at the post of duty, for he was a brave man and did not flinch at the moment of danger. He was respected by all who knew him, and his death will cause general sorrow.
The bodies of Capt. Isaac Shimer and Orderly Sergeant Edwin Barnes, arrived in this village on Monday evening last. The funeral of Capt. Shimer takes place to day, at the residence of Mr. Wm. Tuttle in Geneva. The body of Orderly Barnes we understand has been taken to his friends at or near Bellona.

TERRIBLE NEWS.—Our community was thrown into deepest gloom last night, by reports and rumors relative to the terrible destruction of life in the 126th Reg't, which was in the hotest [sic] of the fight near Gettysburg, only to be plunged deeper at its confirmation this morning. By the papers and letters, we learn that Colonel Sherrill, was killed, several of the captains and lieutenants—and among Com. C, Charles Harris and Samuel Blew of Sheldrake; Joshua Pursel, of Scott's Corners, and Cornelius Baley, of Romulus, were also killed; E. D. Vaughn, wounded in arm, and since died;
Wash. Conn, wounded in the right lung, will probably die. Wilmer Stewart, of this village, badly wounded in the thigh, doing well; Jas. Harris, also of this village, slightly wound in the hip. The news is appalling. We write in sadness.
We find the following additional casualties reported in the New York papers.
ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIXTH.
Capts. Shimer, Co. F, O. J. Herrenden, H, and Wheeler, K, killed; Lt. Lawrence, B, Capt. J. H. Brough, E, Lt. Brown, C, Capt. Richardson, D, Lt. Sherman, E, wounded; Lt. Holmes, G, killed; Lt. Owen, H, Lt. Honloon, H, Lt. Seamans, K, wounded. Three hundred men killed, wounded and missing.
The above is the noble record of the brave regiment known by their traducers as "Harper's Ferry Cowards." Capt. Brough is severely wounded, but still talks of nothing but fighting and conquering the rebels.

THE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIXTH REGIMENT.
ELMIRA, N. Y., Wednesday, Aug. 27.
The One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regiment of New-York Volunteers, Col. SHERRILL, passed through Elmira yesterday evening at 7 o'clock, on the way from Geneva to Washington. He was detained here only one hour. The regiment was armed by Col. SHEPARD at Elmira.

Personal.
Col. E. SHERRILL of the 126th arrived home yesterday, in good health and spirits. He left the regiment encamped at Centreville.

From the 108th and 126th Regiments.
A correspondent of the Rochester Union, writing from McDougal Hospital, Port Schuyler New York, says:
As I have seen no statement of the casualties of the 126th or 108th Regiments, all I now know is what I saw. A. D. J. McDonald, of Honeoye Falls, a Lieutenant in the 108th, was in the same hospital with myself, was badly wounded in the arm. I was informed by the men of his company that he will be much missed as he was one of the best officers of the regiment. Wm. Fairchild of North Bloomfield, a member of the same regiment, was killed by a shell. I had a talk with him before the final engagement took place. He looked well and hearty, and seemed confident of success. The boys of his company told me he was one of the best men in the regiment, always ready for duty. It was their luck to lose just such men. But such is the fate of war. Company D of the 126th, lost many men in killed—the best material of which the company was composed. Among these were H. Wood, corporal, E. Taylor, sergeant, and C. Crandall, from Naples, Ontario county, N. Y. They were loved and esteemed of the whole company. H. W. Willson, Canandaigua, of Co. D, was a man of education, and proved to be under all circumstances one of the best soldiers the country afforded. T. Comstock and H. Lewis were of the same stamp as soldiers, and will be much missed when duty is to be performed in the company and regiment. Among the wounded of Naples I will mention the names of O. C. Lyon, R. Porter and Z. Sabins, who had not only won the esteem of the men of their company, but of the whole regiment, as true and willing men to the cause in which they were engaged. All, in fact, performed their part well, which was plainly shown by wounded rebels taken prisoners by us. Our company officers were all on hand, and behaved not only bravely but manfully. Lieuts. Lincoln and Geddis went through the whole three days fight without a scratch, not because they were unexposed for such was not the case. Capt. C. A. Richardson was wounded in the foot the first day, and he was unable to be afterwards with his command. He made himself useful in taking care of his wounded men, giving them all the attention and aid that lay in his power. Our corporal, H. Mattoon, was shot by a sharpshooter in the neck close by the backbone, which was no more or less than a pretty close call. He stated he did not know what they wanted to shoot him for, as he "wan't doing anything only just carrying the flag along."
Col. Sherrill died of wounds received July 2d. A record of a high character will ever attend his memory. Lieut. Col. James M. Bull has proven to be not only a fighting man but a perfect tiger in battle. Our major, P. D. Philips, was absent at the time at Washington, and also the orderly of Co. D; but had they been with us, we are confident they would have been at their posts. Capts. Shimer and Herendeen were killed and truer men never lived. But some of what are termed our finest officers, were so fine that in battle they could hardly be seen—whether it was on account of smoke or not, I will leave to be told by others.
It is now generally conceded that were it not for the resistance to the draft in New York city and other places, that the battle of Gettysburg would be looked upon as the most desperate and decisive of the war.
And now to the friends of the killed and wounded of the 126th, allow me to say that the only consolation that you can obtain here below, is that your near and dear friends have been killed and wounded while doing their whole duty to themselves and their country. And to you all that wish for greater consolation, may you look to a higher and better Commander who reigns where war and the rumors of war are heard of no more.
And now, in conclusion, to the remainder of the members of the regiment now left in the field: May you meet with success in all subsequent battles, if more are to be fought, and come out safe and sound; and may the time soon come when you can all return to your peaceful homes, bearing the news that the Rebellion is ended and peace is once more restored to this unhappy country.
W. R. C., Co. D 126th N. Y. S. V.

In Memoriam.
MR. EDITOR:—The following resolutions were unanimously passed at the last session of the Genesee Lyceum. Yon will oblige by giving them a place in your paper:
Whereas, It hath pleased Divine Providence to permit the decease of our friend and brother, James E. Hibbard, of the 126th Regiment N. Y. S. V., who died in the hospital at Centreville, Va., on the 14th ult., in the 23d year  of his age; therefore,
Resolved, That as members of the Genesee Lyceum, of which he was a faithful, earnest and useful member, we cannot but express our unfeigned sorrow at this dispensation, and pay a tribute of great respect for him personally, and of our high appreciation of the many noble qualities which made him so beloved and honored by us all.
Resolved, That in him we have lost a friend who was ever true, a brother who never forgot his obligations, a young man of elevated and generous impulses, and last, though not least, a soldier whose death is a calamity to his country, no less than to his many mourning relatives and friends.
Resolved, That we extend to his parents and relatives our deepest sympathies in their bereavement, and commend them to the God of their country, whose justice always rewards the self-sacrificing, and whose sympathy never fails to eye the falling tear or comfort the distressed.
Resolved, That these resolutions be entered on our minutes, and that copies of them be furnished to the parents of the deceased, to the Northern Christian Advocate, the Northern Independent, the Penn Yan weekly papers, and the Rochester dailies, for publication.
JOSEPH JONES,
GEO. H. DECKER,
JOHN C. GATES,
Committee.

Lima, May 9, 1863.
CAPT. W. A. COLEMAN we observe in own on a short visit. The Captain is on detached service at Elmira to obtain conscripts to fill up the 126th Regiment. He is looking well, although he has seen some very tough service, and been closely grazed by rebel bullets.

Killed and Wounded of the 128th.
We publish below a list of the killed and wounded in Companies C, F, G and I of the 126th at Gettysburg, which has been furnished by Rev. T. S. Harrison, Chaplain of the Regiment. Company C is from the south part of the county, F partly from this county. G. was Capt. Aikins' Company, and I Capt. Lee's. The list is imperfect, but is as complete as circumstances would perfect.
Co. G.—Killed—Sergeant C. T. Harris, Corp. C. L. Bailey, Privates E. D. Vaughn, Joshua Purcell, Geo. Kelly, J. L. Grant.
Wounded—Lieut. Sidney Brown, Sergeants Benjamin Swarthout, Madison Covert Corporals Wm. Herrington, Henry Peterson, Privates John M. Chambers, Henry H. Rumsey, Spencer J. Colvin, Richard Lockhart, George
W. Comer, Richard C. Dimmick, Eugene K. Holton, J. F. Harris, F. M. Parker, Samuel Bleu (dead), Geo. C King, (leg amp.,) Edgar H. McQuigg, Peter W. Rappleye, Thomas M. Harriel, J. C. Scott, Wilmer Stuart.
Co. F.—Killed—Capt. Isaac Shimer, M. Cunningham, John Phillips, John Snelling.
Wounded—Charles Terbush, T. G. Wilson, George Carr, O. M. Leland, C. W. Nill, Oliver Perry, John Torrence, J. M. Wilson, E. Craft, Andrew J. Davenport, Sam'l Jacort, Robert Jeffrey, A. N. Fiero, James Camp, Orderly Sergeant Van Buren Wheat, Ephraim Dubois, Edward A. Young, Samuel Clark, John W. Bishop, Charles P. Keytz.
Co. G.—Killed—Lt. Rufus Holmes, Sergt. T. J. Snyder, James Stevenson, jr.
Wounded—Frederick Spicer, Chas. Farnsworth, (dead,) James Harper, Thomas Yeo, Clinton Pasko, Wm. Long, John Morgan, leg amputated, D. Day, Geo. Hoffman, G. W. Bailey, John Duffy, James Place, William E. Bishop.
Co. I.—Killed—Sanford Ambrose, Chas. Walters, Wm. H. Eddy, Sergt. Abram Cadmus.
Wounded—David Berger, A. H. Pierson, Dennis Ryan, W. H. Wood, Stephen L. Weatherlow, Geo. Ackerman, Thos. Seabring, (dead,) H. Kelignor, W. Decker, H. Kipp, J. Hart, W. H. Tewksbury.

CARE FOR THE WOUNDED.—The War Committee of this village received a dispatch on the 8th instant from Capt. C. A. RICHARDSON, of Company D, 126th Regiment N.Y. S.V., stating that the wounded soldiers were suffering from want of proper attention and urging that the committee should send on a number of able bodied men to assist in taking care of them. The call was promptly responded to by the committee, and before night the following persons had been accepted as volunteers for the required service:
Dr. W. FITCH CHENEY, ANDREW CHESEBRO, HENRY LATES, NATH'L N. COOLEY, WM. MCGINNIS, ____ SHERWIN and EDWARD BLAKELY. In the meantime the ladies of the Hospital Aid Society were actively at work, and with the co-operation of a number of gentlemen, very soon collected and prepared for shipment a large lot of such supplies as were likely to be needed for the relief of the sufferers. The persons whose names we have given above, started on their mission of mercy a week ago this P. M.—going by way of Elmira to Harrisburg; but finding it impracticable to proceed thence by way of Carlisle to Gettysburg, which is the direct route, they were obliged to turn back and go by way of Philadelphia and Baltimore to their destination. We trust they arrived safely, and will be able to afford relief to all who need it.
We are informed that several physicians and others have gone on a like errand from Geneva.

NOTICE.—Excursionists wishing to engage Seneca Point, with the Public Cabin or either separately, will please give notice to Capt. ROBINSON of the steamer Joseph Wood, in order to avoid collisions with other parties, and to the end that all may be accomodated [sic] with the steamer and gronnds [sic].

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIXTH.
Col. E. Sherrill, killed; Capt. Shimer, Co. F, killed; Capt. O. J. Herrenden, H. killed; Capt. Wheeler, K, killed; Lt. Lawrence, B, wounded; Capt. J. H. Brough, E, wounded; Lt. Brown, C, wounded; Capt. Richardson, D, wounded; Lt. Sherman, E, wounded; Lt. Holmes, G, killed; Lt. Owen, H, wounded; Lt. Honloon, H, wounded; Lt. Seamans, K, wounded. Three hundred men killed, wounded and missing.
The above is the noble record of the brave regiment known by their traducers as "Harper's Ferry Cowards.” Capt. Brough is severely wounded, but still talks of nothing but fighting and conquering the rebels.

ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHT RIGIMENT [sic].
Lieut. Col. Pierce, slight; Lieut McDonald, slight—he has been reported killed; Lieut. Dutton, slight; ___ Skinner, Co. F; ___ McVatey, Co. F, thigh; Lieut. Amiet, killed; Capt. Fellman, both legs shot away, dangerous; Lieut.
Graham, head, dangerous; Sergt. Welsh, killed; Fitzner Co. F, killed; Meeker, Co. F, severe; Schout F. slight.

From Capt. GILBERT H. REYNOLDS, of Battery L, 1st N. Y. Artillery, who returned home last night, we obtain the following partial list of casualties in his command:
Capt. G. H. Reynolds side and left eye—it is feared that the sight of the eye is destroyed; Edward Costello, killed; John Volen, Oswego, shot in heel; John P. Conn, badly in head; Amos Gibbs, through the wrist; Cramble, (detailed from a Pennsylvania regiment,) in side; Edward Foster, Rochester, slightly; Sergt. Chas. A. Rooney, of Rochester, and Patrick Gray, of Oswego, missing.
Capt REYNOLDS was wounded and made a prisoner with most of his men, on Wednesday, and remained in the hands of the rebels till Saturday, when they were all recaptured by our forces. He says that his men exhibited great resolution, and not one flinched. As a specimen of the desperation and tenacity of our troops generally, he states that his battery was between two others, and when the rebels charged, an artillerist at one of the guns knocked a rebel down with a rammer, and a member of the other battery seized a musket from an infantry soldier, and actually bayoneted [sic] one of the enemy.

LETTER FROM LIEUT. CHARLES KELLY.
WARRENTON July 31st 1863.
FRIEND CLEVELAND:—It has been some time since I have written to you, I have no excuse to offer, but that I have been on the march since the 27th of May last, having been in two battles during that time, and one skirmish, and traveled about 400 miles to our present encampment. I am tough enough to stand another heat, if one of those rebel bullets don't snuff me out, and by the way they are mighty careless things if a person should happen to get in their way. I saw some of the 126th Regt. after the fight at Gettysburgh [sic], they did nobly in that fight, well have they redeemed their name, and Little Yates has reason to be proud of the men they sent to fight the battles of their country, and may the friends of those that have fallen find consolation in the thought that they died in a good cause. Now a word or so in regard to the 44th, their loss was quite heavy in the fight at Gettysburg, it being over one third of the number that went into the action that day. The loss of our own company was 2 killed and 7 wounded, one of the wounded has since died, his name was Wm. N. Norris, from the Town of Barrington. He was wounded in the leg, the two men that were killed on the field were the finest soldiers in the regt. Corporal McElligatt was as good a soldier as ever handled a musket, he was enlisted from the town of Torrey. The other, F. M. Griswold, enlisted from the town of _taly, he was as good  dispositioned boy, and as fine a soldier as was in the Regt. May the parents of those boys be comforted in their sorrow by the consolation that they died in the best cause that the sun ever shone upon. The others of our company that were wounded, the last time that I heard from them were doing well, those that are left in the company are in good spirits. They are somewhat fagged out by the long marches for the last two months.
We have been encamped at Warrenton, for the last four days in order to get newly clothed up once more, when the men came here, many of them were without shoes, and shoes are the thing that a soldier wants on the march, they must be obtained the first thing, or no marching. We have marching orders to be ready in the morning with three days rations, I suppose it is to establish the lines before the next fight. I don't think there will be any fight until the Army of the Potomac is reinforced by conscripts from the north. Well send them along, we want to fill up the old regiments once more. Remember me to the people of Penn Yan. The weather is quite warm here at present. The health of the regiment is good, better than it was last winter when we were encamped so long at Stoneman's switch. Hurry up those drafted men, as we don't want LEE to get the start of us this time, we want to get a larger force in Va. than he can raise, and fight one more battle, whip him, and then I think we can all get a chance to go home for good. I have said my say, so good bye for the present.
Yours Truly,
CHAS. KELLY.

The Wounded at Fort Schuyler—Incidents, Accidents and Reflections.
U. S. GENERAL HOSPITAL, FORT
SCHUYLER, N . Y., July 31, '63.
MR. EDITOR:—Having at present a plenty of spare time during the long and warm days of July and August, I know of no better way than to while away some of the dreary hours by penning a few lines to the columns of your paper, which is so widely circulated among the many friends of the troops in the field, and also at present in the U. S. Hospitals. And, as usual, I wish to communicate to the friends of members of Regiments herein mentioned. And now, taking the above statement for the foundation of this letter, I will state that I received a letter from the 126th Regiment, N. Y. V., bearing date the 28th inst., from a member of the same, Geo. J. Rose, a former resident of Victor, Ontario Co., New York. The substance of it as regards the regiment, is as follows:
We have been moving south as fast as circumstances would permit. We have passed Harper's Ferry and so on through Loudon Valley; but have now halted for a short time near Warrenton. He farther says that the company (D) is now commanded by Lieut. S. F. Lincoln, in the absence of Capt. Charles A. Richardson. He also states, we have had a very hard time during this long and tedious march, and when near Harper's Ferry we came dum, (or some other word composed nearly of the same, letters) nigh starving. And concludes by adding, that most of the boys stood it well, and are all in good spirits.
In regard to those who are here as patients, they all appear to be getting along nicely, and those who appear the worst have friends from home with them, and they are trying to get leave of absence, and as they meet with some encouragement, this gives the patient joy as it would to the thousands of others who are denied the privilege for the present. But they all live in hopes, and in this respect many live in vain and by it are sadly disappointed. By it they are brought to realize how strong the ties are with which they are bound.
As to the members of the 108th who are here, there are four from Co. F, who are doing well and appear to enjoy hospital life with the air of true soldiers, obedient and patient.
And now as to the affairs at the hospital in charge of Dr. Barthlon.  Everything up to yesterday appeared to be well regulated for the care of the wounded brought from Gettysburg. Competent and kind surgeons ready to perform the difficult operations which are always necessary after every battle, especially the one referred to above; good nurses on hand to meet the many wants of the patients; rations issued regularly, and also clothes provided in abundance.
Previous to July 30th the dull monotony of our ward was once in a while broken by the remarks of our friend P. G., a native of Ireland. And as "a little fun now and then is relished by the wisest men," I will mention them in order to break the monotony of a letter from an inmate of a hospital. A discussion took place here as to what was the best thing a man could have been before enlisting, provided he lost his left arm. The native spoken of took the side of a "rale, ginuine fiddler." "Well," says another, "how is he going to hold his fiddle?" "Wid his chin, to be shure,—the same as any other." Up speaks another and wishes to know how he can finger and tune it. "And shure," says P., "and couldn't he git one already tuned?"
As the conversation here often turns upon the way men are used as compared with officers, and as P. G. has a hand generally in all talks of this kind, he said he did not know but what officers were always considered men until he went once to buy some tobacco of a sutler on a Sunday morning. He stated: "I went to the sutler and asked him if he had any tabackay." He told me had. I asked him to give me two plugs. He speaks up very short, and says, I don't sell any to men. Don't sell any to men. says I; and sure, says I, you don't sell any to women. No, says he, I don't sell only to officers. And why says I, and ain't officers men. And faith and he tells that the "don't view themselves in that light." Ha, ha, says I. Says P. G., I see what ye are. You try to pass me beat some time when I am on guard and I will make ye mark time at the point of the bayonet, until the officer of the guard comes to your rescue.
But now our attention is called from remarks of this kind to the whistle of the boat, which is about to land here with wounded soldiers, who were taken prisoners and paroled at Charleston by the rebels, and sent to Hilton Head and thence to this place for treatment. Three of them are now in our ward. They are all badly wounded and only one of them can live but a few days from all appearances. I find one wounded in the thigh and right elbow joint; another with one foot off and the other waiting for the saw and knife as soon as he is able, and also his right arm; but I fear death will close the operation soon. The third one has a ball through his right lung. I find by conversation with them that one is from your city, out of the 100th, Co. C.; his name is Michael McGuire. The others are from the New England States. The Rochester man is the best off; as he has good spirits, and has money, which is always convenient in hard and needy times. He states that no doubt Charleston will soon fall into our hands; and may this prove true.
But now we hear music, and on looking out of the door notice that a detachment of soldiers, headed by a band of music, are marching in rear of the hospital to the fort to camp awhile. The men looked nearly tired out with fatigue, and were not closed up in very good military style. You would notice among the number a few small boys, seemingly not more than ten years old, carrying a drum and knapsack, which would weigh as much as half their heads and all their body. Along with the same troops you would notice a few of the colored gentry soldiers, but mind you, they were large and healthy looking men, and having but a small load on his back compared with the rest, unless it was a large haversack to hold rations. It is a very common thing, when on a long and weary march, to notice a boy of about 17 years old trudging along with a gun and all the accoutrements, besides 60 rounds of cartridges, each weighing over an ounce, besides haversack, canteen, and above all, the lung-cramping knapsack. In contrast with this you will also notice the darkey seated on a fine horse, worth, perhaps, $200 or more in greenbacks. The reason of this, perhaps, may he that it is owing to the constitution of the colored race, they being unable to hear the fatigue of the many long and weary marches necessary to be made in the hottest season of the year.
The 108th regiment has awful dislike for darkies. Why it is I will leave it for them to say. Some of the above race came here for protection during the riot in New York city, but they were not frightened so as to change their color, for which I attach no blame to them for being black. But to that party which is so worried as to the condition of the negro race previous to the breaking out of the present rebellion, I do attach the cause in a great measure of our present trouble. I will not enter into a splurge about political parties. But I would like to see how a government knapsack and other war utensils furnished free for a time for the benefit of a man in the United States service, would fit on the backs of such men as Greeley, Beecher, and many others of the same stamp. I think they would find a vast difference between shoving the pen and handling a musket and the accoutrements for the same. I have tried both, and I profess to know. As Smith, the famous razor strop man says, a member of the 140th N. Y. Vols, he has sold razor strops, and handled a musket, and he prefers the former when he can have one more left for only 25 cents. A queer chap (like many others in the army) this Smith is. He saw a man from Monroe county gazing around in the woods, where the hospital was established, at the deadly effects caused by war, he calls out as he was devouring a mammoth Pennsylvania custard pie: "Hallo, Old Brockport, come up here and see a fellow!" Up steps the man. He says: "You need'nt think I am cheating the government out of this—for I am not; I bought it with my own money, saved by selling honest razor strops." I conclude this Smith must be some relation to the famous John Smith we hear so much about. I notice in looking over the N. Y. Times that seven lawyers of Canandaigua have been drafted, and a few of them with whom I am acquainted. But I am aware that the little $300 clause will keep them safely out for a time. But God knows pity their next client after they pay it, unless he is one of the rank Abolitionists of the past and present time. And now I would ask, have we no reason to lay a part of the blame on this class of individuals just mentioned? I believe we have, and a pretty strong one, too. Having taken the opportunity to converse with the rebels when a chance was open, I came in contact with an aid of General Trimble of the rebel army, who was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Gettysburgh [sic]; and I can state that this is a fellow of good education and well informed upon all subjects connected with the present tumult of the U. S. of America, having been in the service since the first crack on Fort Sumter. He says John Brown was looked upon as a sample of many at the North; what they would do, only give them a chance; and this until the present time seems to be thoroughly instilled into the minds of both officers and men in the Southern army. But some of them said, be this as it may, we may have to come under, as you fellows fight like devils, and we have found out that you can fight if you have the right kind of leaders. But, say they, you change commanders too often. We have always dreaded General George B. McClellan, and this Meade more than all the rest that was ever connected with the Army of the Potomac. He farther states that McClellan was always feared by our generals, and most of them have no fear; and this government should have learned by this time to hold that which is good, and discard that which is false or incompetent for the position in which it is placed.
But now once more music breaks upon my ear, but of a mournful sound, and I find on looking out again, that soldiers are being conveyed to their final resting place with the flag for which we are contending wrapped around them. I learn on making inquiry, that of the number brought here from Hilton Head eight died last night. When a soldier dies here he is taken to the dead house, laid out, and placed in a suitable coffin and sent to New York city for burial.
And as long as this rebellion continues, the result of a battle, when viewed with the naked eye, will ever present scenes too horrible to be placed upon paper. On the battlefield, in every tent, over acres of ground sufficient for a good farm, are sights awful beyond description;—dead unburied, the air filled with effluvia of human and equine bodies, hundreds of decaying bodies ail over the battle ground two miles in width by six in length, graves in every field, by the roadsides, in gardens, lanes, meadows, groves and almost everywhere, many so superficially covered that a hand or foot protrudes, and in some cases the eyes, forehead and nose visible. And then in every church and house nearby, there are scores of wounded and vast numbers of dying men.
This being the case, the drafted men of Monroe and Ontario counties will be met with a strong welcome in the field by the side of those who have gone before them. That they will see new scenes and behold many strange sights, I am already aware. And many a farmer's boy will be made to think of daddy's best cow and mother's large milkpans.
But as paper is high, and there being no discount on postage stamps, I must bring this to a close.
In conclusion I will state that I have had of late a present from the government, and it is a splendid headed cane; but mind you the word gold, used in the sense of an adjective, does not precede the word headed; but it answers the purpose for which it was intended in and under all circumstances. And may it continue to do so until it becomes useless for want of a person to use it from necessity.
But I must close, earnestly trusting that this once proud Union may be restored, and that too before the cold winds of autumn approach, and the sorrow and dread now existing be removed from the many aching hearts, and which are so plainly stamped on many a countenance, never more to be revived,
W. R. C.
Co. D, 126th N. Y. V.

Correspondence of the Ontario Republican Times.
Casualties in the 126th Regiment.
The extent of the losses sustained by the 126th Regiment in killed, wounded and missing, in the recent fight near Gettysburg, is shown by the following letter from Assistant Surgeon Peltier:
GETTYSBURG, PA., July 6, 1863.
MR. EDITOR—Dear Sir:—Having a few leisure moments this evening, I will give you a list of the killed, wounded and missing of the 126th Regiment, as far as I am able to ascertain. Our regiment has covered itself with glory, not a man faltering during the whole of this terrible engagement. We have to mourn the loss of our beloved and gallant Colonel, and several other officers. The remnent of our regiment is in fine spirits and are now in pursuit of the flying rebels. I am detailed to remain with our wounded. We are in tents in a grove within two miles of Gettysburg.
Very respectfully yours,
P. D. PELTIER,
Ass't Surgeon 126th N. Y. S. V.

OFFICERS KILLED.
Col. E. Sherrill, Capt. O. J. Herrendeen, Co. H; Capt. Isaac Shimer, Co. F ; Capt. Charles M. Wheeler, Co. K; Lieut. Rufus P. Holmes, Co. G.
WOUNDED.—Capt. Charles A. Richardson, Co. D; First Lieut. Isaac Seamans, Co. K; First Lieut. H. B. Owen, 2d Lieut. Asbrah Huntoon, Co. H; Lieut. M. H. Lawrence, Co. B; Lieut. Sidney E. Brown, Co. C; Lieut. Jacob Sherman, Co. E; Capt. John E. Brough, Co. E.

NON-C0MMISSIONED OFFICERS & PRIVATES.
Co. A—Killed—Serg't David Goff, Rob't Pool, bugler. Wounded— Sergeant Smith Stebbins, Serg't. Ja's Henderson, Levi Cole, S P Brezee, John Frost, Alex Mosher, Wm Axle, Frank Pool, Chas Turbush.
Co. B— Killed—Serg't Major H B Cook, Serg't Erasmus Bassett, Corporal Elias H Norris, William Hobart, Charles Gaylord.
Wounded—John Finger, Serg't E Jessup, Corpl Geo Chapman, Corpl Thos T McCarrick, Moses Booth, David J Wilkins, Peter M Norman, Chas C Hicks, Stephen C Purdy, C M Hyatt, Amos J Potter, Wm Cassian, Orin Bates, Wm Raymond, Orin Edgett, Reuben Bullock, Luther Weaver, John Blansett, Edwin Coryell, Chas H Dunning, Wm H Thomas, Nathan D Beedon, Franklin S Pettingill, Mortimer Garrison, Jas K Huson, dead, Melvin Bunce.
Co. C—Killed—Sergt C T Harris, Corp C L Bailey, E D Vaughn, George Kelley, Joshua Purcell, J T Grant. Wounded—Sgt Benj Swarthout, Sgt Madison Covert, Corp Wm Harrington, Corp, H Peterson, John M Chambers, Geo C King, leg amputated, Henry H Rumsey, Edgar H McInigg, Spencer J Colvin, Peter W Rappleye, Richard Lockhart, Cedric Rappleye, Geo W Conn, Tho's M Woodworth, Rich'd C Dimmick, Jas H Stull, Eugene K Holton, G F Harris, M Hamil, F M Parker, G C Scott, Wilmer Stuart, Sam'l Blew, dead.
Co. D—Killed—Sergt Edwin W Tyler, Corp Hiram B Wood, Henry W Wilson, Truman B Comstock, Charles Crandall.
Wounded—Corp Henry Mattoon, Corp J Z Sabin, Wm R Chambers, Wesley D Robinson, Sylvester Oatman, Edgar Oatman, Barber Eldridge, John Clohassy, George B Johnson, Fred'k Ebert, Wm Snyder, Rob't T Porter, John Goodrich, Jr., Hosea Lewis, dead, Arnold J Yeckley, Octarius C Lyon, Mark Dunham, Tho's Barnett. Missing—A J Wilson, Wm B Brando, John Brodie.
Co. E—Killed—Harvey Wilson, John W Thompson, Joshua Brintt. Wounded—Orderly Sergt Edwin Barnes, Theron T Dunn, Jonathan Creed, B W Scott, J B Reynolds, Tyler Brink, Lorenzo Phillips, leg amp., Henry Becker, Leonard Seitz, Geo W Hoffling, John Saulspaugh, dead, James Boyd, dead, John Sloat, G W Larkam, Ambrose Bedell, John Gallivan, George W Turner, missing.
Co. F—Killed—M Cunningham, John Phillips, John Snelling. Wounded—Cha's Ferbush, T G Wilson, Geo Carr, O M Leland, C W Niles, Oliver Perry, John Torrence, G M Wilson, E Craft, Andrew J Devenport, Sam'l G Jacart, Rob't Jeffrey A N Fiero, Ja's Camp, Ord Sergt Vanburen Wheat, Ephraim Dubois, Edward A Young, Sam'l Clark, John W Bishop, Cha's P Kents.
Co. G—Killed—Serg't Tyler Snyder. Wounded—Fredk Seizer, Chas Farnsworth, Jas Harpee, Thos Yeo, Clinton Pasco, Wm Long, John Moran, leg amp., Daniel Day, George Hoffman, C W Bailey, John Duffy, James Place.
Co. H—Killed—Rob't Burns. Wounded, Corp Chas L Clapp, David Phips arm amp., Ja's A Young, Sergt Anson E Howard, Nath'l G Briggs, H S Dickens, Theodore T Stacey, Ja's Sodon, Cha's L Bigelow, Ja's Golden, Fred'k Bayne, Ceylon H Sheffer, E G Hamlin, Geo Nicholson, Peter J Hopkins, Nicholas Loomis, Theodore Vickery, John H Russell, Wm S Westfall. Missing—Jo'n L Billis, C S Gilbert, Edw'd T Swan.
Co. I—Killed—Sanford Ambrose, Cha's Waters, Willam H Eddy, Abram Cadmus. Wounded— Dennis Ryan, David Burger, A H Pierson, Wm H Wood, Geo Ackerman, Thomas Seabring, dead; H Kellignoe, W Decker, H Kipp, John Hart, W H Tewksbury, Sergt Stephen L Weatherlaw.
Co. K—Killed—Lester Nelson. Wounded—Sergt Wm Criscadon, Alonzo Davis, Geo Prouty, Corp Geo Smith, Corp B Logan, Geo. W Macomber, Sergt Ralph H Crippen, Sergt A B Cooper, Corp Jerome Parks, A W Cooper, John King. Missing, Wm H Adams, H T Alcott, Andrew J Cady.

From Company D, 126th Regiment.
HOSPITAL NEAR GETTYSBURGH, PA.
July 6th, 1862.
N. J. MILLIKEN—Sir: I snatch a few moments to send this note to be mailed by a member of the Sanitary Committee. Our brigade took up its march from Centerville, Pa., June 25th, at 3 P. M., to join the 2d Army Corps in its movements, and joined it and arrived at Gettysburgh [sic] the morning of the 2d inst. Our brigade immediately formed in three lines, our regiment in front, on the heights south-east of the town, where we remained until near night—the enemy shelling us some—when our forces having been driven back on the left, our brigade was ordered to charge on the enemy there. We did it and drove them back handsomely, but with a heavy loss, including Col. G. W. Willard of the 125th N. Y., commanding the brigade. The next day, the 3d, the enemy made his most desperate effort of the war, and there was undoubtedly the heaviest cannonading ever known on this continent, if not the heaviest in the world. The enemy advanced on our center when our brigade lay in three lines, when we opened on them with grape and canister, reserving our infantry fire until they came up to within about twenty-five rods, when we poured our volleys from our rifled muskets so hotly that, although most desperately rallied, they came no nearer than ten rods without breaking. They finally fell back in a rout leaving the ground so thickly strewn with the dead that one could walk for rods on their dead bodies.
On the fourth we had skirmishing, and lost severely from rebel sharp-shooters Col. Sherrill, commanding brigade, fell mortally wounded on the 3d, and died the next morning. Col. McDougal, 111th N. Y. next in command, was wounded, and the command of the brigade fell on Lt. Col. Tull. Capt. Coleman, commanding our regiment, (Maj. Phillips being dangerously sick at Washington.) Capts. Shimer, Wheeler and Herendeen were shot dead by sharp-shooters. Our regiment lost 60 killed and 200 wounded.—but they drove the enemy every time, took twice their number of prisoners, and killed and wounded at least their own number. The regiment took a stand of colors with seven battles inscribed upon it, among them that of Harper's Ferry. It also took several battle flags.
I subjoin a list of my company killed and wounded:
Killed—Serg't E. W. Tyler; Corp'l H. B. Wood, T. B. Comstock, H. W. Willson, C. C. Crandall.
Slightly Wounded.—Capt. C. A. Richardson, Corp. C. W. Watkins, Corp. J . Z. Sabin, S. Mead, F. Ebert, W. D. Robinson, B. Eldridge.
Severely Wounded.—Corp. H. Mattoon, H. Lewis, O. C. Lyon, R. T. Porter, Mark Dunham, J. A. Yeckley, Wm. R. Chambers, S. Oatman, E Oatman, J. Clohassy, Wm. Snyder, G. B. Johnson, John Goodrich.
Missing.—A. J. Willson, Wm. B. Brando, D. A. Hedger, J. Brodie, T. Barnett.
Our victory was complete. The enemy have fallen back, and this P. M. have encountered some other force, as we hear distant rapid cannonading in a south-westerly direction. All in good spirits—every man fit for duty is now taking up his march for the scene of action, in order, it is hoped, to wipe out the grand rebel army. This battle is the greatest of the war, and I think the last great battle, if we are prospered a few days longer.
Respectfully yours,
C. A. RICHARDSON.

THE BATTLE FIELD.—We left Geneva on the 8th instant in company with twelve others, for the Gettysburg Battle Ground, to help look after and take care of the wounded men at that place, belonging the 126th Regiment, N. Y. V.
We took the boat in the afternoon and found the ride up our beautiful Lake, the most pleasant of the whole journey. Arriving at Watkins, the party was made the guests of our Steamboat Captain, H. Tuthill, who, it is hardly necessary to say, entertained them in a way that was pleasing to the whole company. We took the cars at Watkins, and arrived in Elmira between eleven and twelve o'clock; had a comfortable sleep of three or four hours and left at four in the morning, for Williamsport, where we arrived at late breakfast time—we thought it was late, for there was only provender enough to be got hold of to give each man about half what he wanted to eat.
After we left Williamsport (only staying there some twenty minutes.) we began to enter the garden of the old Keystone State,—for such crops of wheat, corn, oats, &c., we never saw before as were there being harvested all along the line from Williamsport to Gettysburg—the latter place lying in one of the finest and richest sections of the State. Corn in many places was as high as a man's shoulders, and farmers from Ontario, Seneca and Yates Counties, who were on the train with us, said that many of the fields of wheat we passed, would yield from forty to fifty bushels per acre.
We arrived in Harrisburg about one o'clock, where we saw the first effect of the Rebel invasion. The whole Southern and Western side of the city was surrounded by entrenchments and rifle pits. The place and its suburbs were swarming with Pennsylvania Militia. Large droves of horses were constantly passing through the City, on their way back to the Gettysburg country—they having been driven away from there to keep them from falling into the hands of the Rebels. The people of Harrisburg seemed to have been frightened out of their senses, if they ever had any;—for it was utterly impossible to obtain any knowledge from them, whatever, as to which way we should go to get to Gettysburg. Some advised one way and some another, and none of them seemed to know anything about the roads whether they were passable or not. After spending about three hours in that city in trying to find how we should get out of it, and save ourselves the expense of twenty miles walk, with a heavy load of baggage on our backs, which we had in store for the soldiers, we concluded to follow the lead of our Townsman, Hon. C. J. FOLGER. We took the cats about four o'clock, P. M. and started for Columbia, which place we reached at a little before six, crossed the river (Susquehanna) in skiffs, the bridge having been burned to keep the Rebels from crossing, and then hired teams to carry us to York (twelve miles), where we stayed all night. The next morning at seven o'clock, we took the cars for Hanover Junction, and from there to Gettysburg arriving at the latter place about two o'clock, P. M.—At the suggestion of Judge FOLGER we proceeded immediately up into the village to find out where our wounded men were. We had walked but a short distance before we were tapped on our shoulder by Dr. Chisson, a member of the 126th, who had been left in care of our wounded men. After having a hearty and welcome shake of the Doctor's hand we inquired for the whereabouts of our men. He informed us that four or five were being brought from the field in a wagon, which would be along in a few minutes. Turning around in the direction from which it was coming he exclaimed there i t is. We made for the wagon in double quick, and who should we find in it that we knew, but Jacob Sherman and Edward Barnes. We at once informed them who were with us and what we had come for. The boys were overcome with joy, and tears dropped from their eyes as free and as large as rain drops. From this time until Sunday, when eight of the party left for home, the whole were busily engaged in attending to the wants and comforts of the brave men of the 126th, who fell at the greatest battle of the war. They were all taken from the field about four miles south of Gettysburg and brought to the village, where they were all washed, their wounds dressed, and clean clothes put on them. They were then examined by physicians, and all that were able to ride in the cars, were sent to Baltimore, and from there to different hospitals about the country. As near as we could learn, only twelve or fifteen were left at Gettesburg [sic].
Three of the boys died of their wounds while we were there. The first was Peter J. Hopkins, a member of O. J. Herendeen's company, (H) and a resident, we believe, of the town of Farmington. He died about sundown, on Saturday Evening the 11th inst. The next was John F. Sloat from Gorham, belonging to company C.—He appeared to be a very fine young man, and gained the deepest sympathy of all who made his acquaintance. He was shot in both his ankles, but said he cared nothing for those wounds. A shell or a piece of one, had passed close to the small of his back, and the concussion was so great that it injured his back very much, and threw him into the lock-jaw and he died some time during Saturday night about eight days after the battle. The third was Edward Barnes who had a very severe wound in the groin and died on Sunday morning. These three young men had everything done for them that could be after the party from this place arrived at Gettesburg [sic]. Their friends can rely upon it that they were not neglected. Hopkins died in the tent where the boys were all brought to prepare them for other places. Barnes died at the Seminary Hospital and Sloat at a Church which was used for a hospital. All the boys were in good spirits, and one thing was noticed by all, that not a single groan was heard from any of them, it mattered not how bad their wounds were.
We travelled [sic] over the battle ground to some extent, and spent some time in talking with the Rebel prisoners, that lay on the ground wounded. There must have been then some twelve or fifteen thousand wounded Rebels. Many of them, or a large majority of them, were full of grit as secesh, and said that they would give us as good a drubbing as we had them, the next time they had a fight. Others were heartily sick of the war, and expressed themselves in favor of the old flag, and hoped soon to see it waive in triumph over all the States of the Union. We had a talk with a Lieut. for one of the North Carolina Regiments, who said he was a Union man when the war broke out—had been in almost every battle, and was a Union man yet. He told us there were thousands in the Rebel army just in his position. He said his relatives and all his associates were in favor of the Rebellion and there was nothing left for him but to join the army and fight or leave the country. To stay there with his sentiments would have been sure death. He had a severe wound but did not consider it dangerous. He expressed himself strongly in favor of the Government, and said he would never go back to Seccsh if he could help it. We learn that he died after we left.
We went into one of the camps where they were amputating Rebel limbs, (and there were quite a number of such places,) and there saw a stack of arms, legs, feet and hands piled up together, that would fill a box six or eight feet square.
We noticed in going among the Rebels, that they were wounded principally about the head and body while a large majority of the Union Soldiers were wounded in the feet and legs. We asked a Rebel Captain what made the difference. He informed us that they had orders to shoot low—that it took two well soldiers to take care of one wounded man, while a dead man needed no help.
The battle field extends from the east border of Gettysburg to a line about five miles west of the village, and from the north border of the place to a line four miles south of the village—a square of country four by five miles, and being eighteen miles in circumference.
At the commencement of the battle the Rebels lay on the north side of Gettysburg in a circular form, and our army on the south side, in about the same shape. Howard's corps extended down in the village, and within a half mile of the Rebel army. The battle was carried on at first among the infantry, and Howard's corps was driven directly through the village of Gettysburg, by Lee's army, until it reached our main army on the south, when Lee was repulsed and forced to fall back. The fences and houses in the village show the marks of the battle very extensively. We counted in one dwelling house door eighteen ball holes. The fighting the second and third day, was on the west of the village. We have not space to give details, as we heard them related by those who witnessed the whole three days fight.
It is an exciting scene to travel over the battle field, and one that a person never wishes to witness the second time. The ground in every direction, as far as the eye can see, is strewn with implements of war—dead horses will number their thousands, and the graves of dead men tell a tale that is indescribable.
The people of Gettysburg (with some exceptions of course), are a set of uncultivated hogs. If the Rebels had stolen every thing they had, no person who has visited that place would sympathize with them in the least. They have outrageously imposed upon everybody who has been down there to help take care of the wounded soldiers, by charging them enormous prices for everything—knowing they could not help themselves. Four shillings for a pie and a dollar for a loaf of bread, are the kind of prices asked for things in that place, among the traders. We presume they are the same persons who informed the Rebels when ...

From the Dundee Record Extra.
CASUALTIES IN THE 126th REGIMENT,
N. Y. Volunteers.—Gettysburg, Pa.,
July 6, 1863—Mr. Editor—Sir: Herewith you will find a list of killed and wounded in the 126th. I send it to you in order to relieve the painful anxiety of friends. Our regiment has won imperishable laurels, and gained a place in history for time to come, though at a fearful cost:
Col. E. Sherrill, killed.
COMPANY A.—Killed, Sergeant David Goff, private Robert Pool; wounded, Sergeants Smith Stebbins, James Henderson, privates Levi Cole,
S P Brizee, John Frost, Alexander Mosher, Wm Axle, Frank Pool.
COMPANY B.—Lieut M H Lawrence, wounded; killed, Sergeant Major H P Cook, Sergeant Erasmus Bassett, corporal Elias A. Norris, privates Wm Hobart, Charles Gaylord; wounded, Melvin Bunce, Sergeant Edwin Jessup, corporals Geo. Chapman, Thos T McCarrick, privates John Finger, C M Hyatt, Moses Booth, David J. Wilkins, Charles C Hicks, Wm Cassian, Wm Raymond, Reuben Bullock, John Blansett, Charles H Dunning, Nathan D Baden, Mortimer Garrison, Peter M Norman, Stephen C Purdy, Amos J Potter, Orrin Bates, Orrin Edgett, Luther Weaver, Edwin Coryell. Wm H Thomas, Franklin S. Pettingill, James K P Huson, dead.
COMPANY C.—Lieut Sidney Brown, wounded; killed, sergeant C T Harris, corporal C L Bailey, privates E D Vaughn, Joshua Purcell, Geo Kelly, J L Grant; wounded, sergeants Benj Swarthout, Madison Covert, corporals William Herrington, Henry Peterson, privates John M Chambers, Henry H Rumsey, Spencer J Colvin, Richard Lockhart, Geo W Comer, Richard C Dimmick, Eugene K Holton, J F Harris, F M Parker, Sam'l Bleu, dead. Geo C King, leg amputated, Edgar H McQuigg, Peter W Rappleye, Thomas M Woodworth, James H Stull, John Bond, M Harriel, J C Scott, Wilmer Stuart.
COMPANY D.—Killed, sergeant Edwin W Tyler, corporal Hiram B Wood, privates Henry W Wilson, Truman B Comstock, Charles C Crandall; wounded, Capt Chas A Richardson, corporals J Z Sabine, Henry Mattoon, privates Wm R Chambers, Sylvester Oatman, Barber Eldridge, Geo B Johnson, Wm Snyder, John Goodrich, Jr. Arnold J Yeckly, Mark Dunham, Wesley D Robinson, Edgar Oatman, John Chlocey, Frederick Ebert, Robert T Porter, Hosea Lewis, dead, O C Lyon, Thos Barnett, John D Rivers, sunstroke; missing, A J Wilson, Decatur A Hedges, Wm B Brondo, John Brodie.
COMPANY E.—Killed, Harvey Wilson, Joshua Brink, John W Thompson; wounded, Capt John E Brough, Lieut Jacob Sherman, Orderly sergeant Edwin Barnes, privates Jonathan Creed, Tyler Brink, Henry Becker, George W Hailing, James Boyd, dead, G W Larkham, John Gallivan, B W Scott, James B Reynolds, Lorenzo Phillips, Leonard Seitz, John Saulspaugh, dead. John Sloat, Ambrose Bedell; missing, Geo W Turner.
COMPANY F.—Capt Shiner, M Cunningham, John Phillips, John Snelling, killed; wounded, Chas Terbush, T G Wilson, Geo Carr, O M Leland, C W Nill, Oliver Perry, John Torrence, J M Wilson, E Craft, Andrew J Davenport, Samuel Jacort, Robert Jeffrey, A N Fiero, James Camp, Van Buren Wheat, Orderly sergeant Ephraim Dubois, Edward A Young, Samuel Clark, John W Bishop, Charles P Keetz.
COMPANY G.—Lieut Rufus Holmes, killed; wounded, Frederick Seicer, Charles Farnsworlh, James Harper, Thos Yeo, Clinton Pasco, William Long, John Morgan, leg amputated, Daniel Day, Geo Hoffman, G W Bailey, John Duffy, sergeant Snyder, dead, James Place.
COMPANY H.—Capt O J Merendeen, Robert Burns, killed; missing, John L Bullis, Edward T Swan, C L Gilbert; wounded, corporal Charles L Clapp, David Phipps, Ame Camp, James A Young, sergeant Ansop E Howard, Nathaniel J Briggs, H S Dickens, Theodore F Stacey, James Sodon, Charles L Bigelow, James Golden, Fred'k Bayne, Ceylon H Sheffer, E G Hamlin, George Nicholson, Peter J Hopkins, Nicholas Loomis, Theodore Vickery, John H Russell, Lieut Asbrak Huntoon, Lieut H B Owen, Wm S Westfall.
COMPANY I.—Sanford Ambrose, Chas Waters, Wm H Eddy, killed; wounded, David Berger, A H Pierson, Dennis Ryan, Wm H Wood, Stephen L Weatherlow; sergeant Abram Cadmus, killed; Geo Ackerman, wounded; Thos Seabring, dead; H Kelignor, W Decker, H Kipp, John Hart, W H Tewksbury.
COMPANY K.—Capt Charles M Wheeler, killed; wounded, Lieut T A Seamans, sergeant William Criscadon, Alonzo K Davis, Geo Pouty, George Smith, corporal B Logan, W H Adams, missing.

LIEUT. M. H. LAWRENCE, JR., OF Company B, 126th Regiment, arrived home last Saturday evening, greatly exhausted and worn down by the effect of his wound and his journey home, by way of Baltimore and New York. He was wounded by a large grape shot, which entered his leg just above the knee in front, passed around the bone and came out back. It is said to be a very fortunate wound, as no arteries nor tendons are severed nor bones broken; and yet it will be painful and slow in recovery. As he was rendered nearly helpless by the wound, his journey home was tedious and difficult. But he succeeded in reaching that best of all places—home, and is already improving. We trust he will soon be restored to sound health and strength. H T Alcott, missing, George Macomber, sergeant Ralph H Crippen, sergeant A B Cooper, A W Cooper, Jerome Parks; John King, Lester Nelson, killed A J Cady, missing.
This list is as complete as I could make under the pressure of circumstances. Please have the Geneva, Penn Yan, Canandaigua and Ovid papers copy. A hard fought battle, but a complete success for the Army of the Potomac. Large numbers of the wounded rebels brought in. Their dead left, a great number of them, for us to bury. So completely demoralized were they that any of them, when attacked by our boys, gave themselves up. I understand that their officers made their men believe that we were green militia, but said they found out the mistake. I guess they did. What is left of us are in good spirits, and are now marching forward on the pursuit of our flying foe. The prospect is that Lee will regret ever having come North. God be praised for this success Yours, &c.,
T. Spencer Harrison,
Chaplain 126th N. Y. V.

WOUNDED OF THE 126TH.—Hon. C. J. FOLGER has furnished the following list of the wounded of the 126th Regiment, and their wereabouts [sic].
At Gettysburg Pa.—SEMINARY HOSPITAL.—Smith Stebbins, Lieut. Jacob Sherman, Mortemer Garrison, Wm. Stewart, Samuel Clark, Geo. Day (or Gay,) Hy T. Alcott.
Chas. P. Gray, Marcus Andrus, nurses; not hurt.
CHRIST CHURCH HOSPITAL YORK ST.—John Morin, Wm. Wood.
AT HOSPITAL CAMP 2d DIVISION—Geo. Nickerson (or Nicholson.)
AT BALTIMORE AND VICINITY—Lieut. Sidney E. Brown, C. J. J. Camp, C. Lieut. M. H. Lawrence, B.
JARVIS HOSPITAL—P. W. Rappleyea, C. Peter Rappleyea, C. James R. Reynolds, E. 1st Sergt. Pratt Dibble, H. Wm. Snyder, D. Thomas Barnett, D.
N. B. It is supposed that all at Jarvis Hospital have been sent north, except Sergt Dibble, but as their names are not found elsewhere they are put down here.
MCKIMS HOSPITAL—John D. Rivers, D. John W. Overacer, H.
ANNAPOLIS JUNCTION—Frank T. Edgerton, F. Hugh Gibbon, D. Geo. E. Chadwick, musician, A. E. Depew, H. Curtis C. Phillips, H. L. W. Rogers, A. Martin Youngs, A, E. D. Copp, F.
At New York City and Vicinity.—McDOUGAL HOSPITAL, FORT SCHUYLER—Eldridge Barber D., W. H. Thomas, B., W. B. Chambers, D., John Galivan, E., David Hoffman, G., Eugene H. Holton, E., O. C. Lyon, B., Edgar Oatman, D., R. F. Parker, D., Alex'r Moshier, A., Corp. Hy Mattoon, D., Sylvester Oatman, D., Sherman W. Robinson, E., Thos. Barnett D., Geo. W. Fuller, D.
FORT WOOD BEDLOES ISLAND—James  Golder, H. Geo. Chapman, B. Geo. W. McComber, K. Sanford Ambrose, I.—Franklin Pettingill, B. Nathan B. Beedon, B. William Cassion, B. Edward A. Young, E. J. S. Parrish, I. John Heart, I. Andrew J. Davenport, F. John C. Beach, H. Alonzo K. Davis, K., Thomas Yeo, G., Orrin Bates, B.
UNITED STATES GENERAL HOSPITAL, NEWARK NEW JERSEY.—Ambrose Bedell, Co. E., Edwin Jessop, Serg't B., Theo. P. Vickery, H., Edwin Cogswell, B., T. C. Brooks, A., Hy. Kellenger, I., George Ackerman, I., Peter Norman, B., John Goodrich, D., Fred. Bean, H., Thco. F. Stacy, F., M. J. Bachman, G., James A. Young, H., E. N. Loomis, H., J. A Creed, E., Reuhen Bullock, B.; Wm. W. Woodworth, C., Van Buren Wheat, (probably) F., Corp. W. S. Decker, I., David Wilkins, B., C. M. Hayatt, B., A. J. Potter, B., John Clahecy, D., John King, K., John Duffin, G., Wm. L. Long, G., Fred. Sasur., G., Charles Hicks, B., J. B. Solin, D., Tyler Brink, E., Geo. W. Hafling, E., J. H. Russell, H., Nathan J. Briggs, H., George A, Carr, F., John Cochrane, K., Levi Coles, A., W. D. Adriance, E., Moses H. Booth, B., Sargt, E. Howard, H., John Benjamin, K., Corp. B. Gelder, A., David Burger, I., Gilbert N. Bailey, G., Geo. B. Johnson, D., Geo. W. Larham, E., Leonard Seitz, E., Samuel Hayward, K., Corp. Geo. W. Smith, K., Henry Decker, E.
At Newport, Rhode Island.—PORTSMOUSH GROVE HOSPITAL—Fred'k Ebert, D., Wesley D. Robinson, D., Charles Shirley, E., Edmund Craft, F., C. P. Kentz, F., Chas. L. Bigalow, H., Stephen C. Purdy, B., James K. Soden, H.
At Philadelphia & Vicinity.—BROAD ST. HOSPITAL—J. H. Stull, M. F. Dunham, Wm. H. Cole, L. P. Brizee.
SUMMIT HOUSE—S. J. Calvin, E. H. McQuigg, D. Ryan H. Kipp, B. (or R.) C. Lockhart, E. B. Norris, G. W. Conn, Norris Berlew, M. Covert, John Bond, H. S. Dickins (or Dickenson,) Ed. G. Hamblin, Benj. Swarthout, W. H. Tewskbury.
MOWER HOUSE OR CLERMONT HILL—A. N. Fiero, John Blansett, Theron Dunn.
West Philadelphia or Satterlee—B. (or R.) Crippen, Chas. L. Clapp, Jerry Parks, Wm. G. Westfall.
GERMANTOWN HOSPITAL—C. S. Gilbert.
CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL—Francis M. Parker, John H. Chambers, Aliza Cubert.
It is to be observed, that the men who are reported above, as at Hospital in Baltimore, may have left as the Hospitals there are relieved as fast as possible, by sending north those who can bear transportation.
The place to make inquiries at New York, Philadelphia, &c., is at the office of the Medical Director.
In New York 458 Broome St.
 " Philadelphia, corner Grand & 13th St.
 " Baltimore, near Barnums Hotel, and in New York a pass from the Medical Director, will much facilitate entrance to the Hospitals.
It may be well to say, that this list is not complete, for we know of men of the Regiment, who left Gettysburg, wounded, whose names have not been found on the books of the Medical Directors, and whose whereabouts has not yet been ascertained.
It may be satisfactory to friends, to state that the Hospital in the Cities seem in an extremely neat and comfortable condition.

LOCAL RECORD.
Col. Eliakim Sherrill.
The fall of this brave and gallant soldier at the battle of Gettysburg, has called forth from the Rev. Dr. Wood, of Geneva, the following biographical sketch of his life, which, we doubt not, will be read with interest in a community where the virtues of the deceased hero were so well known and appreciated. It is sad that such men must die that the nation may live, but his memory will be held in perpetual honor, by thousands who have been witnesses of his courage and patriotism. The scroll of fame making up for the admiration of posterity will contain the name of no truer or nobler man than Eliakim Sherrill, Colonel of the 126th Regiment of New York Volunteers. But to the sketch:
Eliakim Sherrill was born in Greenville, Greene County, N. Y., February 16, 1813. His father and mother were of high respectability and among the earliest settlers of the place. He was the seventh of eight children. His father was a tanner and in connection with that business also cultivated a large farm; and the son not only learned the father's trade, but acquired also that fondness for agricultural pursuits which ultimately led him to choose his home in this community. He received a good English education at the academy in his native town, and early formed those habits which laid the foundation of his character and fitted him for the spheres of usefulness and influence which he afterwards filled. He began life for himself at the early age of sixteen, in Coxsackie, as a clerk in a store, where he continued about four years—removing in 1832 to Salisbury, Herkimer County, to assist in the business of his father. While here, his energy, activity and faithfulness secured the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens to such an extent, that he was chosen Supervisor, which office he held for two years. During his residence in Salisbury he was married to Emily E. Eldridge, the daughter of Judge Eldridge, of Madsion [sic] County, who is with us in her bereavement to-day. After remaining about six years in Salisbury, he removed to Shandaken, Ulster County, in this state, then an almost unbroken wilderness, to aid in the management of an extensive tannery. This may be considered the actual commencement of his eminently successful business career, in which he started with no other resources than those furnished by his own energy and sagacity.—He held at first a subordinate position, but his rare qualities were at once discovered by his judicious employers, and he was soon admitted to a partnership in the business, of which he ere long became the managing head. He now found a field for the full occupation of his powers, and great success attended him. His prosperity was largely promoted at all times by his excellent wife, and was worthily illustrated and adorned by his public spirit and his generous benefactions.
In 1847-8 he served as a member of the Congress of the United States from the Ulster district, and though, at the close of this period, he was earnestly solicited to accept a renomination, he felt compelled by his business engagements to retire from the duties of public life. Such, however, was the confidence universally reposed in his judgment and integrity, that in 1854, contrary to his own expressed wishes and after even a refusal to allow his name to come before them, his fellow citizens with rare unanimity, elected him to the Senate of this state. In this canvass he received almost every vote in the town of his residence, although the opposite political party was largely in the ascendency. While a member of the State Senate, he was chairman of the committee on banks; and our present most excellent banking system confessedly owes to his practical wisdom much of its value and security.
At the close of his senatorial career, in which his uniform courtesy, his unbending integrity and his sound common sense won the esteem of all who knew him, Col. Sherrill removed from Ulster County, carrying with him the regrets of the whole community. He sought retirement from business and political life. He resided for a short time in Brooklyn, to which place he removed in 1857, and after looking about for a home in which he might find place and opportunity for the gratification of his tastes, in 1860 he removed to Geneva. What he has been among us all his fellow-citizens know. Giving himself to the culture of his farm, which he speedily made one of the best and most productive in the vicinity, he did not lose sight of other things. He was an active and efficient member of the State Agricultural Society, and served on its executive committee, until, at the voice of his country, when, as he believed, she needed his services, he joined the army of her defenders. We know also how nobly, freely, heartily he gave himself to her cause—the great personal sacrifices he made for it—the home he left—the loving household from which he tore himself away. When it was suggested that he was of an age to exempt him from military service, he had this one answer: "My country needs me. It is my duty to go."
And now I come to speak of things which are fresh in the memory of you all —his unsolicited appointment to military office—the ardor and energy with which he threw himself into the work—the influence which his name as commanding officer of the 126th Regiment, New York Volunteers, carried with it—the rapidity with which its ranks were filled—the untiring efforts, day and night, with which he prepared for their departure for the field—the crowds which filled these streets—the shouts that rent the air, and the earnest wishes and devout prayers which followed that body of men.
Then came days of suspense—broken at last by the sad tidings of the surrender of Harper's Ferry, and his own severe and dangerous wound. We saw him once more, pale and exhausted from weakness and suffering, but with a heart as true and loyal, and a spirit as firm as ever. In the published accounts of the matter at Harper's Ferry, Col. Sherrill believed that great injustice had been done to his men, and this, together with the love which he bore to them, and the noble cause in which they were engaged, led him, while his strength was but imperfectly restored, to return to the army. We saw him once more among us for the last time; but such was his sense of public duty, that before his furlough was much more than half expired, on the 8th of June, he left us for his regiment. It seems but as yesterday that he filled his place in the sanctuary, and now, in little more than a single mouth, we are met here again. But we are not all here. Our eyes seek a vacant seat, and we weep as we look for him in vain.
And now, how shall I speak to ... this last most eventful month—the invasion of loyal states by the enemy—the sad feelings of apprehension and suspense which weighed down every heart—the gathering of our forces for the attack—the final closing around Gettysburg—the noise and shock of battle in a crisis where the life of the country seemed at stake—the dreadful charge over fields red with blood, and then the victory after such days of struggle: victory obtained at such fearful cost.
Col. Sherrill was in Hay's division of Hancock's brigade, the second army corps, and, on Friday, July 3d, while leading the brigade, after Col. Willard, its former commander, had fallen, in the most desperate charge of that memorable day, he fell.—The same spirit of self forgetfulness—of pressing on in the way where duty leads—the spirit which seemed to mark his whole life, distinguished its close. The officer who succeeded him in command, and who is present here to day, was near him and saw him fall. He had him immediately taken up and borne to the military hospital, and cared for with such care as under the circumstances was possible. Col. Sherrill was conscious of his situation, and then, as I am told, he was asked by the attending Surgeon what words he had to and to his friends and family, he replied. "Tell them that I died at my post. I led doing my duty."
It was at 6 o'clock in the afternoon of the 3d day of July, that he received his mortal wound; but it was not until Saturday, the 4th, that he passed away. Had it been left to him to choose the day in which he would wish to die, it seems to me that, out of all others, he would have chosen this—the day so hallowed in all its associations, and so dear to every patriot heart.

" ___ to the hero, when his sword
Has won the battle for the free,
Death's voice sounds like a prophet's word,
For in its hollow tones are heard
The thanks of millions yet to be."

He has gone! The warm friend, the worthy citizen, the noble patriot has passed away. But the example he has left of true integrity, and above all, of the high sense of duty—the consecration of life itself to a great and noble cause—these live! These are with us still. We will embalm them in our memories. We will seek to imitate them.

COLONEL SHERRILL.—The funeral of Col. Sherrill took place last Sunday, and was attended by an immense concourse of people from all parts of this Senate District. He was buried with military honors, and the public expression of sorrow for his loss was prompted by sincere respect for his noble qualities as a man and a soldier. Col. Sherrill was a native of Herkimer county, but lived for many years in Ulster county, where he carried on an extensive business as a tanner. He represented his district in the State Senate and in Congress, and was a prominent Whig and Republican in politics. About four years ago he purchased a fine farm near Geneva, where he lived in pleasant retirement, in affluent circumstances, till he was called to take command of the 126th Regiment. His history as commandant of that regiment has been in the highest degree honorable to his capacity, bravery, fidelity and patriotism.

Sherrill.
Col. Sherrill of the 126th regiment, N. Y. V. who was killed at Gettysburg, can almost be claimed as an Ulster man. He was for many years identified with our County business, as one of its most successful and largest tanners. And he claims a place in its political history, having represented it in Congress and in the State Senate. He is well remembered as a judicious, enlightened and liberal minded man, and a gentleman in its truest sense.
In one of the disastrous battles of 1862, he was so shockingly wounded at the head of his regiment that we supposed he never could take the field again, and the first news that he has done so, comes in the bulletin of his death at Gettysbury [sic]. Honor to the memory of Eliakim Sherrill.—Rondout Courier

OBITUARY.
DIED—Of his wounds, in the hospital at Washington, May 14th, 1864, Major Ira MUNSON, Of Tyre, age ... years.
Maj. MUNSON enlisted in the 126th N. Y. V., in the Summer of 1862, and shared in all the hardships and vicissitudes of that unfortunate regiment except the battle of Gettysburg, as at the time he was ill.
He was chosen Lieut. of Co. F, which office he held till the death of Capt. Sheimer, when he became Capt. He was promoted to the office of Major just before his death, his friends receiving the papers subsequently.
At the battle of the Wilderness his Company was in the terrible skirmish line, and he was struck by a ball in the hip, while cheering on his men. He was borne off the field by his faithful men, and after a weary ride of 48 hours in an ambulance, reached Belle Plain, whence he was sent to Washington, where he lived but a few hours.
Maj. Munson was a true soldier, brave and intrepid without being rash or imprudent. He was generous and kind as a father to the men of his command; courteous and respectful to his superiors in office, and as a consequence he was loved by the former, and honored by the latter.
Many mere boys were entrusted to his care by their parents, for they knew he would be a friend and a guardian to their sons, and their confidence was not misplaced. His elevation in rank did not make him tyrannical. And when advised by his surgeon to resign on account of ill health, he replied that he should never leave the boys whom he had induced to enlist, while he was able to do duty.
His fine talents, his noble and generous heart, his cheerfulness and suavity of manners, won him friends wherever he went.
His body was embalmed and sent home. Appropriate funeral services were held at the M. E. Church, Tyre—sermon by Rev. E. Hotchkiss, from Deut. 4:22.
A large circle of relatives and friends mourn his early death. But he died nobly in a noble cause. He loved his country, and like many another hero, he gave to her his life.
P. E. S.

FALLEN IN BATTLE.
We regret to announce the death of Col. Eliakim Sherrill, commanding the 126th Regiment. He fell, gallantly leading his men on the battle field at Gettysburg. No more worthy man or more devoted patriot ever lived.
None knew Eliakim Sherrill but to love him. A native of Greene County, years ago he came to Ulster, locating in Shandaken, and carried on the business of tanning extensively, honorably and prosperously. His sterling qualities of head and heart, won for him at once a commanding position. This was clearly shown in his election again and again to the office of Supervisor by his fellow townsmen. Subsequently he represented the counties of Ulster and Delaware in Congress, and still later the counties of Ulster and Greene in the State Senate.
In 1858, Mr. Sherrill, having acquired a competency, retired from business and removed to Brooklyn. Shortly after he became permanently a resident of Geneva, occupying a rich farm and proving his interest in Agriculture by his enlightened management of his estate and his service as a member of the Executive Committee of the State Agricultural Society. When, a year ago, about sixty regiments were raised in this State under the call of the President for 600,000 men, Mr. Sherrill was designated by the War Committee of his Congressional District for the Colonelcy of the One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth; and under his auspices the ranks soon filled. Going to the field, he bore himself bravely till the day of his death. At Harper's Ferry, last September, he was desperately wounded, and narrowly escaped with his life; ere he was fully recovered, he returned to his command, and has since remained with his men. For his courage and fidelity at Harper's Ferry, he was highly complimented by the Committee which investigated that affair. Every part of his military career will bear the scrutiny of patriotic men.
Col. Sherrill's great characteristics were candor and honesty. He never practiced the arts of deception to gain an end or subserve a cause. And with a reputation for integrity unquestioned—with a character for bravery above suspicion, he has yielded up his life a willing sacrifice on the altar of his country. He died on the field of battle—a hero martyr to Freedom; and his memory will live in the hearts of all who knew him, so long as the Flag which he followed shall remain the emblem of Liberty, Justice and Humanity.
Col. Sherrill's remains, having been embalmed, were conveyed to his family at Geneva. The funeral obsequies took place on Sunday afternoon last.—Kingston Journal June 15th.

Col. Sherrill.
The death of this gallant officer was announced in our paper last week. It appears that he was shot in the abdomen during the battle near Gettysburg on Friday the 3d instant, and died early the next morning. His remains were sent home, arriving at Geneva on the morning of the 11th instant, and on the day following were deposited in their final resting place. The funeral was attended by an immense concourse of citizens, including a large number from Canandaigua and other remote parts of the district which he so nobly represented as commander of the 126th Regiment.
Col. SHERRILL became a resident of Geneva some four or five years since, where he engaged in farming pursuits. He was born in Greene county, but established himself early in life at Shandaken, Ulster county, where he carried on an extensive tannery and accumulated a handsome property. He served a term in Congress from 1845 to 1847, and in 1854-5 represented his district in the state Senate. He was a man of genial temperament, with fine abilities, generous impulses and an honesty of purpose that gave him a strong hold upon the affections and confidence of all who knew him.
The Genera Courier in remarking upon his death says: "We have no need to eulogize the fallen. He left behind him a reputation of spotless integrity—an unblemished character, combining all of the virtues, and God knows if he had faults, we know not what they were. Generous, unselfish, noble self-sacrificing, patriotic, brave. Beloved in all the relations of life—as husband, father, friend, commander, he has yielded up his life a willing sacrifice on the alter of his country. His military career has been singularly unfortunate. Wounded at Harper's Ferry, he suffered terribly, and his reputation for bravery and courage on that memorable occasion, was fully established. Before he recovered from the effect of his wound, he was off to his regiment again, and the fearful story of three hundred gone from its ranks, tells how well it has done its duty on this occasion. He loved his men with sincere affection, and they looked upon him as a father and a friend."

COL. R. F. TAYLOR, late of the 33d Regiment, is about to raise a Regiment of cavalry.

Death of Col. Sherrill.
The news of the death of Hon. Eliakim Sherrill, who sacrificed his life for his country, at Gettysburgh [sic], will sadden many hearts in this section of country, where he was so well and favorably known.
Col. Sherrill represented the 10th Congressional District, (Delaware and Ulster) in the 30th Congress in 1847-9. He at that time resided at Shandaken, Ulster Co., where he was engaged most extensively in the tanning business.
In 1854-5 he represented the 10th Senatorial District (Ulster and Greene) in the State Senate. In both these positions he won golden opinions as a faithful representative.—From Ulster he removed to Brooklyn, we think, in 1856. For the last four years he has resided at Geneva, where a year ago the War Committee of his district called upon him to lead the Regiment (26th) raised under the Presidents' call for 600,000 men. His bravery on the battle-field was second to none. He was severely wounded at Harper's Ferry, but was not long absent from his command. He was an ardent Whig and Republican, and of course a firm supporter of the War. His age was 50 years—a native of Greene County.

DEATH OF COL. SHERRILL.—We regret to learn of the death, in the Gettysburg battle of Col Sherrill, of the 126th (Ontario) Regiment. The Colonel was a man much beloved by his neighbors for his many excellent qualities. His regiment was taken prisoners at the capture of Harpers Ferry over a year ago and he was severely wounded in the mouth. The regiment was afterwards exchanged, and Col. Sherrill having recovered and joined them was killed while leading his men in a charge upon the rebels.—He fell with his face towards the foe.

FUNERAL OF COL. SHERRILL AT GENEVA, —The corpse of the lamented SHERRILL, late Colonel of the Ontario Regiment, (the 126ih,) reached Geneva, on Saturday morning, via Elmira.
The funeral obsequies on Sunday were very imposing, and the number in attendance was very large.—Mr. Theo. Smith acted as Marshal, assisted by Messrs. PROUTY, LEWIS and S. S. COBB. Maj. PLATNER, of the late 33d, had command of the military, with Perkins’ Brass Band of Rochester. The procession moved from the residence co the deceased about 2 ½ o'clock, P. M., through Genesee, Castle and Main streets, to the Presbyterian Church, where the religious ceremonies were conducted,—clergymen of the various denominations taking part, rev. Dr. WOOD, the Pastor, preaching the sermon. At the conclusion of the exercise, the procession reformed, passing up Maine, through Hamilton, Pultney and Washington streets to the Cemetery, where a vast crowd were waiting. Here the burial service was read, after which three vollies were fired over the grave, closing the last sad ceremonies. 
Col. Sherrill was acting as Brigadier General at the time he received his wound.

DEATH OF COL. SHERRILL.—The family of LEWIS H. BABCOCK, Esq., are deeply afflicted by intelligence of the death, on the battle field, of Col. ELIAKIM SHERRILL, of the One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth Regiment, the father of Mrs. BABCOOK, Seeing the came of Col. SHERRILL among the killed and wounded in yesterday's New York papers, Mr. BABCOOK last evening employed the telegraphic wires to obtain the fullest information regarding his father-in-law. In a very short time he learned that the news that Col. S. was killed in Friday's battle at Gettysburg was too true, and that his remains, embalmed and en route for home, had already reached Baltimore.
Col. SHERRILL has won a name in both political and military life. Born in Greene County in 1813, his business and political career reached its height, if it did not begin, in Ulster County. Carrying on a heavy tannery, and prosperous in business, he yet gave large attention to politics, and the people of his district honored him with elections to seats in the State Senate and the National House of Representatives. He was a Whig until the organization of the Republican party, to which he attached himself. He has been a resident of Geneva during the last four years, occupying a rich farm and proving his interest in Agriculture by his enlightened management of his estate and his service as a member of the Executive Committee of the State Agricultural Society. When, a year ago, about sixty Regiments were raised in this State under the call of the President for 600,000 men, Mr. SHERRILL was designated by the War Committee of his Congressional District for the Colonelcy of the One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth; and under his auspices the ranks soon filled. Going to the field, he bore himself bravely till the day of his death. At Harper's Ferry, last September, he was desperately wounded, and narrowly escaped with his life; ere he was fully recovered, he returned to his command, and has since remained with his men. For his courage and fidelity at Harper's Ferry, he was highly complimented by the Committee which investigated that affair. Every part of his military career will bear the scrutiny of patriotic men.
Mr. and Mrs. BABCOOK left town this morning for Geneva, to attend the funeral of the deceased.

FUNERAL OF COL. SHERRILL AT GENEVA. The corpse of the lamented Sherrill, late Colonel of the Ontario regiment, (the 126th,) reached Geneva on Saturday morning via Elmira.
The funeral obsequies were very imposing and the masses in attendance from above and below, as well as the surrounding country, was very large. Mr. Theo. Smith acted as Marshal, assisted by Messrs. Prouty, Lewis and S. S. Cobb. Maj. Platner, of the late 33d, had command of the military, with Perkins' Brass Band from Rochester. The procession moved from the residence of the deceased about 2 1/2 o'clock P. M., through Genesee, Castle and Main streets, to the Presbyterian church, where the religious exercises were conducted,—Clergymen of the various denominations taking part, Rev. Dr. Wood, the Pastor, preaching the sermon, after which the procession reformed passing up Main and through Hampton, Pultney and Washington Streets to the Cemetery, where a vast crowd were waiting. Here the burial service was read, after which three vollies were fired over the grave, closing the last sad ceremonies.
We learn that Col. Sherrill was acting as Brigadier-General at the time he received his wound. Another of nature's noblemen is thus added to the roll of true men, who have sealed their devotion to their Country with their blood.

DEATH OF COL. SHERRILL.—This gallant soldier was killed at Gettysburg! No truer patriot ever entered the field. He loved his country with the intensest affection, and deemed his life, as nothing, if, by its sacrifice, he could contribute to the restoration of the Union. And he has made the sacrifice. He died on the field of battle—a hero martyr to Freedom; and his memory will live in the hearts of all who knew him, so long as the Flag which he followed shall remain the emblem of Liberty, Justice and Humanity.
The Utica Observer says:—
The family of LEWIS H. BABOOCK, Esq., are deeply afflicted by intelligence of the death, on the battle field, of Col. ELIAKIM SHERRILL, of the One Hundred Twenty-Sixth Regiment, the father of Mrs. BABCOCK. Seeing the name of Col. SHERRILL among the killed and wounded in yesterday's New York papers, Mr. BABCOCK last evening employed the telegraphic wires to obtain the fullest information regarding his father-in-law. In a very short time he learned that the news that Col. S. was killed in Friday's battle at Gettysburg was too true, and that his remains, embalmed and en route for home, had already reached Baltimore.
Col. Sherrill has won a name both in political and military life. Born in Greene county in 1813, his business and political career reach­ed its height, if it did not begin, in Ulster county. Carrying on a heavy tannery, and prosperous in business, he yet gave large attention to politics, and the people of his district honored him with elections to seats in the State Senate and the National House of Representatives. He was a Whig until the organization of the Republical [sic] patry [sic], to which he attached himself. He has been a resident of Geneva during the last four years, occupying a rich farm and proving his interest in Agriculture by his enlightened management of his estate and his service as a member of the Executive Committee of the State Agricultural Society. When, a year ago, about 60 regiments were raised in this State under the call of the President for 600,000 men, Mr. Sherrill was designated by the War Committee of his Congressional District for the Colonelcy of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth; and under his auspices the ranks soon filled. Going to the field, he bore himself bravely till the day of his death. At Harper's Ferry, last September, he was desperately wounded, and narrowly escaped with his life; ere he was fully recovered, he returned to his command, and has since remained with his men. For his courage and fidelity at Harper's Ferry, he was highly complimented by the Committee which investigated that affair. Every part of his military career will bear the scrutiny of patriotic men.
Mr. and Mrs. BABCOCK left town this morning for Geneva to attend the funeral of the Colonel.

COL. SHERRILL KILLED.—The report of the death of Col. Eliakim Sherrill turns out to be too true. He was killed in the battle of Gettysburg. He commanded the 126th Regiment, N. Y. V., recruited at Geneva.—Col. Sherrill was wounded at Harper's Ferry last fall; and, although the wound was severe, (in the mouth and face,) he had sufficiently recovered to rejoin his Regiment.—He was one of nature's noblemen. Many in Ulster and Greene will remember him as a gentleman, esteemed and honored by his fellow-citizens. Col. Sherrill formerly represented Ulster and Delaware in Congress, and afterwards Ulster and Greene in our State Senate.  

DEATH OF COL. SHERRILL.
We are pained to learn of the death of Col. SHERRILL, of the 126th. He was killed at the battle of Gettysburg on. Friday last, while gallantly leading his regiment against the enemy. He was a brave and faithful officer, and his loss will be deeply felt by those under his command.
The Geneva Courier in remarking upon his death says: We have no need to eulogize the fallen. He left behind him a reputation of spotless integrity—an unblemished character, combining all of the virtues, and God knows if he had faults, we know not what they were. Generous, unselfish, noble, self-sacrificing—patriotic, brave. Beloved in all the relations of life—as husband, father, friend, Commander, he has yielded up his life a willing sacrifice on the altar of his Country. His military career has been singularly unfortunate. Wounded at Harper's Ferry, he suffered terribly, and his reputation for bravery and courage on that memorable occasion, was fully established. Before he recovered from the effects of his wound, he was off to his regiment again, and the fearful story of three hundred gone from its ranks, tells how well it has done its duty on this occasion. He loved his men with sincere affection, and they looked upon him as a father and a friend.
The 126th appears to have been in the thickest of the fight, judging from the loss which it has sustained, and we fear that full particulars of the battle will furnish sad news for many families in our county who have contributed loving fathers, sons, and brothers to its ranks.

ONE OF THE SLAIN.—Col. Sherrill of the 126th regiment, N. Y. V. who was killed at Gettysburg, can almost be claimed as an Ulster man. He was for many years identified with our County business, as one of its most successful and largest tanners. And be claims a place in its political history, having represented it in Congress and in the State Senate. He is well remembered as a judicious, enlightened and liberal minded man, and a gentleman in its truest sense.
In one of the disastrous battles of 1862, he was so shockingly wounded at the head of his regiment that we supposed he never could take the field again, and the first news that he had done so, comes in the bulletin of his death at Gettysburg. Honor to the memory of Eliakim Sherrill.

FUNERAL OF COL. SHERRILL.—The funeral of this brave and lamented officer took place at Geneva last Sunday, and was attended by an immense concourse of people. The village was crowded with a dense mass of citizens from all parts of this Senatorial District. The remains of the hero and true man were buried ... appropriate military honors.

The late Col. Sherrill.
The old residents of this county will remember the late Col. SHERRILL, who was killed at Gettysburg while commanding the 126th Regiment. He was a man of great usefulness and popularity, having been a member of Congress from the Ulster district, and afterwards State Senator. He was also prominently identified with the State Agricultural Society. At Geneva, where he has resided for some years past, most impressive funeral obsequies were held. ELIAKIM SHERRILL was born in Greenville, Greene County,
N. Y., Feb. 19th, 1813. His father and mother were among the earliest settlers of t he place. He was the seventh of eight children. He learned his father's trade of tanning, and removed to Salisbury, Herkimer County, 1832, to assist his father in that business. He there married a daughter of Judge ELDRIDGE, of Madison County. After residing there about six years, he removed to Shandaken, Ulster County, then an almost unbroken wilderness, to aid in the management of an extensive tannery.

GENEVA COURIER.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 1863.
The Funeral of Col. Sherrill.
This sad occasion brought together on Sunday last, one of the largest and saddest assemblages, that ever met in our Village. The demonstration showed both the respect that is felt for the memory of the man and the sympathy that pervades the community, for the cause in which he so nobly, so heroically lost his life. At half past one o'clock the assemblage of persons at the late residence of the deceased, on North Street, was already large and rapidly increasing. At about two the procession was formed, under the control of Messrs S. S. COBB, PHINEAS PROUTY, J. S. LEWIS and T. E. SMITH. It was preceded by the Rochester Band and Companies of Infantry, under the immediate command of Major Platner, of the late 33d Regiment, and was made up of discharged soldiers, who, in consequence of having served their time or wounds, incapacitating them for further service, had been discharged.
Then followed the Military Bearers—Gen's SWIFT and Hillhouse, Col. Stew art, and Captain CRAVEN of the Navy.—After these, four civilians as Bearers also—then the Clergy of the place. Following the Hearse were the mourners, the horse of the late Col. SHERRILL and a long train of friends in carriages. The procession passed down Genesee Street, up Castle to Main Street to the Presbyterian Church. The Sidewalks—the Park—the Streets in all directions, were full. At the church the services were solemn and impressive—The Discourse, by the Rev. Dr. WOOD, the Pastor, and although prepared in great haste, and under almost every conceivable disadvantage—was appropriate, and in points exceedingly touching and eloquent. We hope it will be published, and therefore forbear any further remarks concerning it.
After the services at the Church the Procession formed again in front of it, and moved slowly and sadly toward the new Cemetery where the body was deposited, with appropriate words from Dr. WOOD, and three vollies of musketry by the soldiers. Cannon had been fired at intervals of about half an hour during the day.— These services over, the vast multitude slowly retired—thoughtful, and as we cannot doubt, more firmly resolved than before, that come what might, this Rebellion which has cost the Country so many of its most cherished citizens, and so much of its best blood, shall be put down—and put down too so far and completely that it can never arise again.
We hope next week to be able to give a further account of Col. SHERRILL. We will only add that we learn on inquiry—and our intelligence comes from one who was by him when he fell—that Colonel Sherrill had been wounded in the left shoulder, early in the day of the 3d of July. At about six o'clock in the afternoon, while in command of a Brigade, resisting a charge from the enemy, he was struck in the abdomen by a musket or minnie ball. He was on foot at this time with the men in an orchard, where the limbs of the trees were so low as to interfere with his riding about on horseback. He was immediately picked up by two men and carried to a hospital. Care was taken of him until he died—which, as we understood—was about five o'clock on the fourth of July—and a few hours after he had been found by his friend, Lt. Col. Bull, who succeeded him in the command of the Regiment.
No purer—no truer or more loyal man ever fell in his country's cause than Col. ELIAKIM SHERRILL. And, although he had lived with us but a short time, so deeply had he endeared himself to all who knew him, that scarcely a man could have been taken from our midst who would have been longer remembered, or whose loss would have been more deeply regretted. Such men are the bone and sinew [sic] of our Nation, and by the sacrifice of such lives are the rights and liberties of a people gained and perpetuated. Next to the martyrs to Religion none stand higher in the awards of fame, or in the gratitude of posterity, than the martyrs to their Country's ...

COL. SHERRILL.
BY MILLIE.

Ah! never shall the land forget
How gushed the life-blood of the brave,
Gushed warm with hope, and courage yet,
Upon the soil they fought to save.
BRYANT.

One more hero gone with his glory yet fresh upon him. One more patriot given to the soil, which his blood flowed forth to save. And so, here we are mourning inconsolably for a brave man who might have given more than one collossian deed for the National preservation and majesty.
The people always lament the death of a man whose life has been potent in the great aims and deeds of ennobling humanity; and if he had lived his four score years and ten, and his powers had wrought all the works of valor and wisdom, which God, by virtue of his life, had allotted him, in this lamentation for the dead, there is always the fullness of rest. That he did what he could, and that all which his powers held, was spent to earth-long immortality, with the perfect vigor of his manhood, and the creative scope of his broadest life, and prime, upon them.—There was nothing more left  uncreated for the public good. They knew the breadth and volume of the man. They had his talents all coined out in great works, and the grave had hidden nothing from them in its ravenous maw. All he could do was done. And with mournfulness but satisfied repose, they consign his worn-out body to the tomb, and his ever fresh, majestic mind, to their eternal records, and to a world of immortality. Thus it was with Wellington, All heroes are made of the same stuff. They are all born of the same royal dynasty—that of God's—and some have expanded to their heroic girth, and some have been taken ere their measure was half filled. But they are all sublime heroes, who were born for the world's grandeur, whether veteran Wellingtons—or newly-made American Colonels.
We cannot rest in the full fruition of Col. Sherrill's scope of being; and we mourn in terrible bitterness, vast and unsoothable for him, but a little time since a citizen of peace, and then a brave warrior, wondrously rising to the broad majesty of hero bravery—and at last a martyr for the cause of Eternal Right, coming still and useless from the battle field among us, and drawing us to an agony of worshipful sorrow, by the potency of his dumb presence. I said "coming, still, and useless from the battle field." The great God knows that never in all the records of the Recording Angel, was there a less useless body borne from the field than this body of our citizen warrior.—He proved to the world that a man born with an olive branch in his hand, can go out with his sword, when duty calls, and bear off as noble victor-palms, as he who came into life, with the boom of cannon, in his ears. A man can be a veteran hero for Freedom's sake.
There are winged seeds from this man's glory and death, which shall spread broad cast through the land, and shall germinate more than one brave patriot and sturdy yeoman soldier. Then call not his body useless, for it shall rise ten fold in the souls of other freemen. Where now there is one body impotent to our glory thro' death, there are scores of living ones, nerved, with untried vigor, whose future shall record in our coming glory, this man's name a thousand times o'er. From this sacred dead a living host shall spring and swell their memories to his own, until the future alone shall measure the height of this memorial monument.
We are a nation, athletic and healthy, with Freedom—and shall there none arise, inspired from the circle of this man's intrepid daring? Great God forbid that one fallen Chief fell in vain! Forbid it God! that American hearts should be so cold that a great man's life and death, should awaken no kindred fires of patriotism for a like victorious life, and if need be—death.
Notwithstanding all this which his few but wonderful deeds have done, and will do, we are heavy with sorrow for greater deeds which we know are left undone in his unfinished life. We cannot fathom the future. We cannot lift the mystery from our Chieftain's grave. But we know that he who could step from the plough to the battle field; he who, bred for peace and seclusion, could ride valliantly [sic] out, like a veteran Chief, to as high and daring an honor as has ever been chronicled for any of our brave men—and yet fresh in this novitiate of war, would have still wrought wonders for his name, and cabalistic charms almost for the blood-purification of our land.
We know that many an unheralded work yet uncreated, was buried in the fat of our brave Colonel. We must feel that he who could master one great achievement, would be the master-mind of many more.
Stricken down in the lusty hardiness of manhood, when the soul and body, and mind were wrought strongly and. courageous; y; just when all powers of life had culminated to the highest heights of perfection.
It was terrible to be thus lain aside forever, when the very nerves were swollen with energy, and the soul had expanded to such a breadth of valor, that it must have submerged more than one unholy traitor in its ocean-like immensity—and when every physical element was inspired with an heroic theurgy, and a broadening mentality, gloriously meting out to these physical powers, this terrible theurgy, and plenipotence of war. God help us to beat the unutterable loss thrust upon us, by the death of this brave soldier-leader with the true fortitude of a brave and strong-willed people. If we could only have seen the true breadth of this man's energies—if all which he might do, could have been done for the salvation and re-resurrection of our almost fallen mother-land, we should have walked with proud and peaceful mournfulness, to a tomb which held but relics of that life which should still lives, and of that presence which should be present with us through our earthly lives forever. But now we mourn inconsolably, for we know what the grave hath hidden from us; and from the past we know the grander purposes and fulfillments of the future. We weep o'er the grave of an unfinished hero, and from its shadow rises the semblance of a gigantic hero, which might have been. But mourn we though forever, the future will still be un..ormed; and the dead warrior will expand no more to our eyes in the tomb.
God leaves us nothing but resignation, and with His Almighty arm, bending us mercifully, we will bow to his strong Providence.
Why should we not consecrate this name of our honored citizen, beloved in peace, and worshipped devoutly in war, to the village memorial of our sacred dead.
We all know how nobly he responded when the Country called him. I dont believe there was a throb of Col. SHERRLL'S heart that swerved from the terrible duty before him. He went into the work with such a kind, big soul—so much patriotism in his purposes, so christianly in his love for those brave soldiers under h i m —“the boys," as they say of each other; well, it does seem terribly mysterious, that God should have taken the man, of all men, which we needed most.
They were dear to us as our hearts' blood—every one of those soldier boys—and yet we reposed, with trustful hope, in the intrepid skill of their leader. It was a vast and awful legacy which we gave him; but we knew the man would gloriously sustain it, and so he did. He led our kinsmen to victory, and many of them to Death. But it was an heroic death—and it were better to be orphaned, and widowed, and childless, than welcome back a kinsman with the curse of cowardice stamped, Cain-like, on his brow. It was god-like to die for one's country; and to this supreme honor was Col. SHERRILL gathered with many of his brave followers; and to them we look with pride as well as sorrow.
Well, as I said, Col. SHERRILL, as a godly, upright man—built by the great God for a pillar to our fallen nation, stood up like a kind Father in his supremacy over our soldier boys; and we at home grew hopeful and contented, knowing that when war tidings should reach us, leader and followers would prove brave and worthy of each other, and of the land. And thank God our hopes found their fruition.
So our boys left us, and many a shadow, and vacancy, went in to possess our hearthstones. There were no more the dear torments and teazings of brothers; no more the protective embraces of husband, neither were there fatherly blessings for many of us; but down towards the grand Potomac, fled our saddened souls, and we saw them all, those who had made such sunniness for our homes—and they were sublimed into fearless heroes, with their lives in their hands, and girded mightily for war; with freedom eternal, and forever high in their hopes, and leading them on, as did God in the pillar of fire, those who in another age fled into freedom. And so our souls went with them, paying drop for drop, in anxiousness for all sufferings and privations.
It was but a little time after they went from us, crowding the noble steamers, which swept mercilessly through the water and our hearts at once, that our cheeks grew crimson, and our hearts painful, at the unjust contumely, thrown upon our boys—"Harper's Ferry Cowards"—and amidst this terrible sadness, Col. SHERRILL returned to us; not as he had gone, but with wounded body, and nobly perfected patriotism of soul. We mourned his physical sufferings—grew proud over his glorious daring which came to us from the battle field.
But God spared the life of our brave Colonel; and we were grateful and full of thanks; and He spared his patriotism to us, and for that we were thankful, because it gave back to "our boys" a beneficent and noble-hearted leader, who would guide them to honor, were the road thro' a wall of bayonets, and piled mountains high with rebel slain, and ocean deep with blood.
With hardly restored strength, and with more than restored energy of purpose he went from our sorrowing midst, back to his men; and we all bid him "God speed!" for we all knew how much such daring, iron-willed men  were needed; and altho' we parted with him sadly, we were glad the man would so soon stand again on Potomac plains at the head of our little village army.
We again rested in his broad strength. We were like the rich man in the Bible.—We said to our souls "Take thy rest!"—And we tore down our little granaries of anticipation, and built larger ones, filling them high with rich argosies of expected triumphs, and splendid victories, and great achievements—all for our boys and their leader on the next battle field, and their lives yet spared for our honors and our hearts.
But God overruled us. The hand of Him who ruleth the nations, struck our golden granaries down; and a monument soddened in blood, and splintered bones, reared its craped front in their ruins—for the future, and life-long agony of many of us.
It as after the battle of Gettysburg where our 126th Regiment had flung off its unjust jeer of "Harper's Ferry Cowards" by their grand charge and seizure of victory for our loyal forces, that every soul of us in our quiet homes, flung ourselves to an agony of suspense into the lists of killed and wounded, following so terribly after.
The battle had been a Union victory and Col. SHERRILL and the now memorable 126th had turned for God and liberty, the victory of the day, by their unparallelled [sic] heroism. We breathed hard; for we knew the gap must be deep in our brave little regiment, and so it was. The hardy band that left us cheering so lustily for freedom was broken. It was but a fearful and scathed remnant, that left that scarlet field of blood. They should return to us no more together. 
And with these brave, unknown heroes, giving their lives for liberty, was a noble hero; one whom the world should know, and whose name would be a patriotic tallisman [sic] forever. Col. SHERRILL was dead. Killed when opposing armies clashed for decisive victory. Riding in the foremost of the ranks, a brave Chieftain, on his white charger, when the rebel hordes came thundering on like incarnate devils, charged to the death, with hell—he with his brave, impatient soldiers, met them as sturdily and as full of solid zeal and fire.
The enemy fell back howling and infuriate, slain and crushed to destruction—and defeat, like a huge blood bird, flapped over their disloyal banner-rag. We had gained the victory—and triumph wheeled and circled around the proud forehead of our venerable old Flag. But there were piles of dead and dying, offered in a sea of blood that day, as the redemption price of this Union victory.
And there were many homes made desolate, and many eyes were sprung to an eternal ocean of tears; and all errors, and woes after war, and all given for this conquering which should raise the nation still farther out of its slough of treason and dishonor. The Eternal God bless all hero martyrs—and those who nobly yield these martyrs up to the Great Cause.
There was the stain of dishonor upon our brave boys as they went in, but they came out, the scarred, blasted remnant did, with this contumely fearfully washed out in blood. They should no longer be called "Harper's Ferry Cowards"—but should henceforth be known through the land as the "gallant 126th"; and through all the breadth of war-time, and the after-time of peace, should their sublime daring and heroism be known; for it came at a time like a balancing motor of new energy and hope, when our land was dark, and our souls were sad as ever souls could be.
But a white steed went riderless that day, and many a death-spent bullet went deathless as the fearful price of this battle vantage.
We were all smothered here at home with thoughts of blood and bullets, and fierce, death-brimmed cannon—and we were sadly right in this; for many of our brave boys, and he who stood proudly as their leader, weltered in gore and carnage, and all battle horrors on the field, that terrible day. They had given up their lives and we our future gladness; and it had been well. For the nation needed it and all her sanctuaries which were bent down with unutterable woe, should rise through such sacrifices as these, sublime and christian-like in hope and fulfillment.
There was a fearful gap left in our regiment; but into it we filed ourselves, taking up lovingly and with mournful tenderness, the bodies and lives of our dead heroes, and shrining them forever more in our sacred beings. They, enshrined in us, we stood before the world, heroic and deathly calm, filling up the gap in the band of our brave men. The regiment was again complete;—but walking forever more through past tracks of blood, and bullets that had drank the kindred lives of us—and over a sod which should always in the future, round up with graves. So we felt in our sacrifices.
Col. SHERRILL came home. It was a solemn pagent [sic] that conducted him to his last resting place—narrower and nakeder than the household home, where smiles and tears of loved ones kept silently telling him that he was in a loving, living world.
The streets were thronged with sad, curious faces, and martial dirges filled the air, and the slow, muffled clatter of hoofs, and the long mournful lines of carriages, and the march of soldiers, who had passed unharmed through the death they were now following, and the riderless horse, slowly stepping just back of its dead rider, sleeping under the grand Stars and Stripes. And besides, there were wounded heroes in the train, who should wear the scars of war through life, as long as life was left to color them, for ensigns of their country's glory.
It was a noble tribute, all this, and we were proud and yet sad for the dead hero who deserved it all.
Then the solemn church with its throng of subdued faces, and the processions, slowly pacing up the aisles, majestically bowed with sorrow. The coffin bearing the man of so much promise and rich unfruition of honor and hope, and laden with an unborn multitude of unfulfilled deeds, mighty in their scope—and over all, the proud free Flag, under which this body of hero-make fell, and proved to the world its sublime legitimacy. And God pity them, the mourners, who could hardly find in the blackness of crape, a mournfulness, deep as their hearts required—and who should, through life yearn with unutterable hopelessness, and yearn ever vainly and bitterly, for the strong heart and great rich love, and protection, lost forever in the pall of that long silent box of death. God pity the mourners with all god-like depths of pity, for there was a vacancy in their future lives, and by their hearth-stone always which should never, never be filled again. Mourning hopelessly and without rest, the widow for her husband; and the children for their father. And then the soldiers filing in martially and quietly, and the bodies of grave, honorable men, and ministers, and the honored pall bearers, bearing themselves nobly, both civic and military, and all else which we know, kept up the funeral pageant in its splendor. Then all the while the organ dirge, which had seemed to flow out from the martial death march, kept melting us to tears, and subdued spasms of mourning. We felt drawn in its melody to the infinitude of a grief, which compassed sublimely the coffined hero, and which soared up to "The Mastery," where his soul must float star-like forever and ever. We were all submerged into the organ-dirge; and we seemed sublimed in vision;— and through tears for what death had taken, and a strange uprising of pride, that it was so noble for death to take, we saw an heroic angel, girded with the invincible panoply of immortal honor; and he reached mountain-like—a warrior-saint, carrying the motor of patriotism and angelic bravery, which should unhouse many a heroic soul from the cramped arches of slavishness and cowardice. This was COL. SHERRILL'S soul; a shadow of it; and his spirit-influence which we know should bend yearningly and protectingly over the nation, until the nation should no longer live—and all of us proud Americans should worship, and know of a truth, the living of this man's valorous deeds. This was what the superhuman organ-music told us.
Then the eloquent sermonal tribute to our Colonel's bravery—a glorious master-piece of conception and sublime christian hope, and honor, from the eloquent soul of one of God's chosen ministers. This was the church pageant: the pomp of religious rites.
Then the slow march to the grave—and the men with reversed muskets, and the stately steeds up and down the road, and the cemetery and the niches of the procession, flecked with people, and the martial dirge still telling us how triumph was won through death,—and the three vollies [sic] of musketry over the beloved grave, which its honored inmate should hear no more— and oh! they were noble musket vollies [sic], breathing in sacred and glorious flame and smoke, a sort of strange, entheal bewitchment for war & daring, and battle triumphs, and all victories which fire the inner soul of one, even to quench it again in death. And yet there was an unearthly funeral echo in those vollies [sic], sounding and resounding, mournfully, through the City of tombstones.
The grave was left alone, and the band marched back with what might be a wedding march. We had paid our last honors to Col. Sherrill's body, but we should do honor to his still living soul, and to his immortal deeds, until our narrow homes held us as silently as it did him.
Col. Sherrill is dead, but his memory lives. We have lost a brave man, but saved a master-piece of glory from his past life. We are sad and yet proud:—Bow'd down, yet risen hopefully up.
God, in mercy and love, guard and protect the mourners who have given us such a sacred dead and such a memorable memory of nobleness and grandeur. God, rest this bereavement lightly on them, and Time with his lethean touch, unfold a higher spirit than mere mourning for the dead, and a spirit which shall pillow on its triumphant bosom, the great and eternal Good risen up from the ashes of this yearned-for dead. God bless them.
Peace to thy ashes, brave hero, and rest eternally for thy soul! And village tribute, and nation-honor, immortally exalt thy daring deeds and honored name!— Peace to thee eternally, brave martyr Hero! Peace forever and ever! A glorious monument for thee, on Earth, and a more enduring monument, one everlasting, for thee in heaven. Peace! Peace! Peace for evermore.
Geneva, July, 1863.

From the 126th Regiment.
We find the following letter, giving the particulars of their route, from Chicago after they were exchanged, to their present location in the Rochester Democrat. It will be read with interest by those having friends in that Regiment:
CAMP NEAR UNION MILLS, Va.,
January 10, 1863.
Since my last letter written to my friends, and to those interested in the welfare of the 126th regiment, many things have transpired which would interest them. When I last wrote, we were prisoners of war, penned up in mean, miserable, filthy barracks in Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.; but happily our stay was of short duration. Toward the latter part of October it was whispered we were exchanged, and soon the order from the Secretary of War came to us through Brig. Gen. Tyler. The countenances of all seemed to brighten; glorious news was received; we were no longer prisoners of war, but free American soldiers, eager for the fray, longing for a chance to pay back the rebels for their insolence exhibited at Harper's Ferry, where we were surrendered to the enemies of our beloved country by one, of whom, 'tis said, his sympathies were with the South.
November 24th, we left Camp Douglas and marched to the cars of the Southern Michigan & Northern Indians Railroad. At 3 1/2 P. M., we bid adieu to Camp Douglas, and started on our journey Dixie-ward, rejoicing. After traveling all night, we arrived at Toledo at daybreak, and partook of a sumptuous breakfast, kindly provided by the Railroad Company.
After resting a few hours, at 8 A. M., boarded the cars, and away to Pittsburg. On our way passed through Cleveland and many smaller places of minor importance. At 10 1/2 P. M., we arrived at the Iron City. Here we were kindly treated by the "Ladies' Relief Association." Weary with riding, it seemed as if angelic hands had anticipated the wants of the soldier. May the blessings of the God of 'Battles ever rest upon the noble ladies of Pittsburg, and may they ever continue their kindness to others, as they did to the 126th N. Y. Volunteers, both upon going to, and returning from Chicago.
At 4 A. M., we left Pittsburg via. Pennsylvania Central RR, for Washington, D. C. This is a fine road to travel over; the scenery is magnificent. At one time you rush over high embankments; at another, through deep cuts; at another, along the side of high mountains, awful even to look at; and again, dash under the Alleghanies, &c. In short, the trip is grand, the scenery superb. Passing Altoona, the city upon the mountains, night soon shrouded the lofty hills in darkness. Weary and worn, we sought rest, which we obtained to some extent.
The morning of the 27th of November found us near the capital of Pennsylvania—Harrisburg. Onward did the iron horse rush with his load of patriots, rushing forward to defend the honor and dignity of the "dear old flag," the Constitution and the laws.
At 2 P. M. we arrived at the monumental city—Baltimore. Here again were we entertained by the Relief Association, and let me say that the latter city has many true and devoted friends engaged in the cause of "Union and Liberty."—At 5 P. M. we again found ourselves on board the cars, and at 8 we arrived in Washington.—There we remained over night, sleeping upon the floor. Although our bed was hard, we arose in the morning greatly refreshed, and eager to cross into the land of Dixie. We were soon gratified. At 12 M. the line of march was taken up. We crossed the long bridge, and camped for the night on Arlington Heights, at Camp Chase.—Without tents we lay upon the bosom of mother Earth, our covering, the sky, and slept soundly. There we remained for five days. In the meantime we received our tents and our arms, the latter the latest and best improved Springfield rifled muskets. All seemed well pleased to receive the little "'Springfield pets," with which to drive back the invader.
December 2d, we struck our tents and marched to Alexandria, where we arrived at 11 A. M., and immediately took cars bound for "Union Mills, Va.," expecting to see at least a mill and some vestige left of habitation; but upon nearing the place we were very agreeably surprised to see nothing but the remains of an old frame of what was once a small "mill.'' Glad to escape from the cars we soon were on terra firma, and formed in column, marched about one mile N. E. and encamped on the plain above overlooking the old Bull Run battle field—the history of which is familiar to all. To-day, rainy as it is, finds us in the same place.
We are in the 3rd Brigade, Casey's Division.—Heintzleman's reserves, 3rd army corps for the defense of Washington, Brig-Gen. Alex. Hays, commanding Brigade. Vice Col. F. G. d'Utassy 39th N. Y. Volunteers, removed. Our duty has been, and is now, picketing, principally along Bull Run, the field of which location, &c., I shall speak of in another letter. The weather has been very fine, until this morning, when it began to rain, with every indication of continuing some time, at least we look for it.
The Paymaster is anxiously looked for with his or Uncle Sam's Green-backs; when he arrives, he will be cordially received, and treated as hospitably as our situation in this place will admit of. The hoys are in fine spirits and anxious for a brush. More anon.
Yours, &c.,
JOHN H. BROUGH,
Capt. Co. E. 126th Reg't, N. Y. Vols.

The Wounded at Fort Schuyler—Incidents, Accidents and Reflections.
U. S. GENERAL HOSPITAL, FORT SCHUYLER, N. Y. July 31, '63.
Mr. EDITOR:—Having at present a plenty of spare time during the long and warm days of July and August, I know of no better way than to while away some of the dreary hours by penning a few lines to the columns of your paper, which is so widely circulated among the many friends of the troops in the field, and also at present in the U. S. Hospitals. And, as usual, I wish to communicate to the friends of members of Regiments herein mentioned. And now, taking the above statement for the foundation of this letter, I will state that I received a letter fro the 126th Regiment, N. Y. V., bearing date the 28th inst., from a member of the same, Geo. J. Rose, a former resident of Victor, Ontario Co., New York. The substance of it as regards the regiment, is as follows:
We have been moving south as fast as circum-stances would permit. We have passed Harper's Ferry and so on through Loudon Valley; but now have halted for a short time near Warrenton. He farther says that the company (D) is now commanded by Lieut. S. F. Lincoln, in the absence of Capt. Charles A. Richardson. He also states, we have had a very hard time during this long and tedious march, and when near Harper's Ferry we came dum, (or some other word composed nearly of the same letters) nigh starving. And concludes by adding, that most of the boys stood it well, and are all in good spirits.
In regard to those who are here as patients, leave of absence, and as they meet with some encouragement, this gives the patient joy as it would to the thousands of others who are denied the privilege for the present. But they all live in hopes, and in this respect many live in vain and by it are sadly disappointed. By it they are brought to realize how strong the ties are with which they are bound.
As to the members of the 108th who are here, there are four from Co. F, who are doing well and appear to enjoy hospital life with the air of true soldiers, obedient and patient.
And now as to the affairs at the hospital in charge of Dr. Barthlon. Everything up to yesterday appeared to be well regulated for the care of the wounded brought from Gettysburg. Competent and kind surgeons ready to perform the difficult operations which are always necessary after every battle, especially the one referred to above; good nurses on hand to meet the many wants of the patients; rations issued regularly, and also clothes provided in abundance.
Previous to July 30th the dull monotony of our ward was once in a while broken by the remarks of our friend P. G., a native of Ireland. And as "a little fun now and then is relished by the wisest men," I will mention them in order to break the monotony of a letter from an inmate of a hospital. A discussion took place here as to what was the best thing a man could have been before enlisting, provided he lost his left arm. The native spoken of took the side of a "rale, ginuine fiddler." "Well," says another, "how is he going to hold his fiddle?" "Wid his chin, to be shure,—the same as any other." Up speaks another and wishes to know how he can finger and tune it. "And shure," says P., "and couldn't he git one already tuned?"
As the conversation here often turns upon the way men are used as compared with officers, and as P. G. has a hand generally in all talks of this kind, he said he did not know but what officers were always considered men until he went once to buy some tobacco of a sutler on a Sunday morning. He stated: "I went to the sutler and asked him if he had any tabackay." He told me had. I asked him to give me two plugs. He speaks up very short, and says, I don't sell any to men. Don't sell any to men, says I; and sure, says I, you don't sell any to women. No, says he, I don't sell only to officers. And why says I, and ain't officers men. And faith and he tells that the "don't view themselves in that light." Ha, ha, says I. Says P. G., I see what ye are. You try to pass me beat some time when I am on guard and I will make ye mark time at the point of the bayonet, until the officer of the guard comes to your rescue.
But now our attention is called from remarks of this kind to the whistle of the boat, which is about to land here with wounded soldiers, who were taken prisoners and paroled at Charleston by the rebels, and sent to Hilton Head and thence to this place for treatment. Three of them are now in our ward. They are all badly wounded and only one of them can live but a few days from all appearances. I find one wounded in the thigh and right elbow joint; another with one foot off and the other waiting for the saw and knife us soon as he is able, and also his right arm; but I fear death will close the operation soon. The third one has a ball through his right lung. I find by conversation with them are from the New England States. The Rochester man is the best off, as he has good spirits, and has money, which is always convenient in hard and needy times. He states that no doubt Charleston will soon fall into our hands; and may this prove true.
But now we hear music, and on looking out of the door notice that a detachment of soldiers, headed by a band of music, are marching in rear of the hospital to the fort to camp awhile. The men looked nearly tired out with fatigue, and were not closed up in very good military style. You would notice among the number a few small boys, seemingly not more than ten years old, carrying a drum and knapsack, which would weigh as much as half their heads and all their body. Along with the same troops you would notice a few of the colored gentry soldiers, but mind you, they were large and healthy looking men, and having but a small load on his back compared with the rest, unless it was a large haversack to hold rations. It is a very common thing, when on a long and weary march, to notice a boy of about 17 years old trudging along with a gun and all the accoutrements, besides the 60 rounds of cartridges, each weighing over an ounce, besides haversack, canteen, and above all, the lung-cramping knapsack. In contrast with this you will also notice the darkey seated on a fine horse, worth, perhaps, $200 or more in greenbacks. The reason of this, perhaps, may be that it is owing to the constitution of the colored race, they being unable to bear the fatigue of the many long and weary marches necessary to be made in the hottest season of the year.
The 108th regiment has awful dislike for darkies. Why it is I will leave it for them to say. Some of the above race came here for protection during the riot in New York city, but they were not frightened so as to change their color, for which I attach no blame to them for being black. But to that party which is so worried as to the condition of the negro race previous to the breaking out of the present rebellion, I do attach the cause in a great measure of our present trouble. I will not enter into a splurge about political parties. But I would like to see how a government knapsack and other war utensils furnished free for a time for the benefit of a man in the United States service, would fit on the backs of such men as Greeley, Beecher, and many others of the same stamp. I think they would find a vast difference between shoving the pen and handling a musket and the accoutrements for the game. I have tried both, and I profess to know. As Smith, the famous razor strop man says, a member of the 140th N. Y. Vols., he has sold razor strops, and handled a musket, and he prefers the former when he can have one more left for only 25 cents. A queer chap (like many others in the army) this Smith is. He saw a man from Monroe county gazing around in the woods, where the hospital was established, at the deadly effects caused by war, he calls out as he was devouring a mammoth Pennsylvania custard pie: "Hallo, Old Brockport, come up here and see a fellow!" Up steps the man. He says: "You need'nt think I am cheating the government out of this—for I am not; I bought it with my own money, saved by selling honest razor strops." I conclude this Smith must be some relation to the famous John Smith we hear so much about. I notice in looking over the N. Y. Times that seven lawyers of Canandaigua have been drafted, and a few of them with whom I am acquainted. But I am aware that the little $300 clause will keep them safely out for a time. But God knows I pity their next client after they pay it, unless he is one of the rank Abolitionists of the past and present time. And now I would ask, have we no reason to lay a part of the blame on this class of individuals just mentioned? I believe we have, and a pretty strong one, too. Having taken the opportunity to converse with the rebels when a chance was open, I came in contact with an aid of General Trimble of the rebel army, who was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Gettysburgh [sic]; and I can state that this is a fellow of good education and well informed upon all subjects connected with the present tumult of the U. S. of America, having been in the service since the first crack on Fort Sumter. He says John Brown was looked upon as a sample of many at the North; what they would do, only give them a chance; and this until the present time seems to be thoroughly instilled into the minds of both officers and men in the Southern army. But some of them said, be this as it may, we may have to come under, as you fellows fight like devils, and we have found out that you can fight if you have the right kind of leaders. But, say they, you change commanders too often, We have always dreaded General George B. McClellan, and this Meade more than all the rest that was ever connected with the Army of the Potomac. He farther states that McClellan was always feared by our generals, and most of them have no fear; and this government should have learned by this time to hold that which is good, and discard that which is false or incompetent; for the position in which it is placed.
But now once more music breaks upon my ear, but of a mournful sound, and I find on looking out again, that soldiers are being conveyed to their final resting place with the flag for which we are contending wrapped around them. I learn on making inquiry, that of the number brought here from Hilton Head eight died last night. When a soldier dies here he is taken to the dead house, laid out, and placed in a suitable coffin and sent to New York city for burial.
And as long as this rebellion continues, the result of a battle, when viewed with the naked eye, will ever present scenes too horrible to be placed upon paper. On the battlefield, in every tent, over acres of ground sufficient for a good farm, are sights awful beyond description;—dead unburied, the air filled with effluvia of human and equine bodies, hundreds of decaying bodies all over the battle ground two miles in width by six in length, graves in every field, by the roadsides, in gardens, lanes, meadows, groves and almost everywhere, many so superficially covered that a hand or foot protrudes, and in some cases the eyes, forehead and nose visible. And then in every church and house near by, there are scores of wounded and vast numbers of dying men.
This being the case, the drafted men of Monroe and Ontario counties will be met with a strong welcome in the field by the side of those who have gone before them. That they will see new scenes and behold many strange sights, I am already aware. And many a farmer's boy will be made to think of daddy's best cow and mother's large milkpans.
But as paper is high, and there being no discount on postage stamps, I must bring this to a close.
In conclusion I will state that I have had of late a present from the government, and it is a splendid headed cane; but mind you the word gold, used in the sense of an adjective, does not precede the word headed; but it answers the purpose for which it was intended in and under all  circumstances. And may it continue to do so until it becomes useless for want of a person to use it from necessity.
But I must close, earnestly trusting that this once proud Union may be restored, and that too before the cold winds of autumn approach, and the sorrow and dread now existing be removed from the many aching hearts, and which are so plainly stamped on many a countenance, never more to be revived.
W. R. C.
Co. D, 126th N. Y. V.

MONTHLY Report of the sick and wounded, 126th N. Y. S. Vols., for the month ending Dec. 31st., 1863:
Mean average strength of command present during the month:
Commissioned Officers.......................... 17
Enlisted Men......................................... 230
Total...................................................... 247
Remaining Sick at last report…............... 8
Taken Sick during the Month................. 36
Total Sick during the month.................. 44
Changes during the Month:
Returned to Duty................................... 33
Remaining Sick..................................... 11
Total...................................................... 44
Commissioned Officers Sick.................. 7
Enlisted Men Sick................................. 29
Total...................................................... 36
Daily average Sick during the Month:
In Hospital.............................................. 3
In Quarters.............................................. 7
Total..................................................... 10
Average sick daily, same ratio, 1000 men
present.................................................. 40
Reference to the above Report shows but little variation from that of the last month, in the number, character and result of the diseases treated. Yet if we compare it with some of the months in the early history of the Regiment, the difference will be more marked. The daily average of sickness for the present month, amounts to a fraction under four per cent., a rate lower than is often obtained in the army. In organizations that are new, the daily ratio of sickness usually amounts to eight or ten per cent., and not unfrequently, twelve or fourteen per cent. It was thus with this Regiment. Examination of the records for October and November, 1862, while at Chicago, Illinois, and for December, January and February following, shows a daily average sick of full ten per cent., and, a portion of the time, even a higher rate. It should be borne in mind, however, that the most of the time during the months above referred to, Small Pox and measles were prevalent in the Regiment, adding much to the amount of sickness. Since February last the rate of sickness has gradually declined, and now, probably, does not equal the amount occurring in the same number of persons in civil life. The present month has been a favorable one to the health of the army. During most of the time the air has been cool and dry, but little rain has fallen, and but few sudden atmospheric changes have occurred. The arduous duties of the army, in the campaign accross [sic] the Rapidan, terminating on the 2d inst., would have led one to expect an increased amount of sickness to follow; but such has not been the case so far as this command is concerned. The sanitary condition of the Regiment was never better than at this date. No accidents have occurred during the month requiring medical or surgical treatment, nor have any surgical operations been performed. The sick have all been treated within the command—none being sent to General Hospital, nor have any deaths occurred.
The Regiment went into camp at this point on Monday, Dec. 7th. Since that date officers and men have been busily engaged in preparing and fitting up suitable quarters for the Winter. The ground occupied is high and rolling, and at the time it was taken possession of, heavily wooded. This has served the double purpose of furnishing fuel, and sufficient timber for building houses.—Substantial stockades have been erected, covered with the ordinary shelter tents, warmed by fireplaces, and are really comfortable. These stockades are generally built so as to accommodate four persons; occasionally they were put up so that six persons may live in them comfortably. Several springs near camp furnish sufficient excellent water for drinking and cooking purposes, and no surface or brook water is used.
The sick of the Regiment are treated in hospital or quarters. Of the thirty-six taken sick during the month, eight have been treated in hospital and twenty-eight in quarters. One ordinary hospital tent is used for the hospital; but the food for the sick is preparred [sic] in the cook-house adjoining. This tent has been floored, is warmed by a fire-place, and the ordinary wooden bunk, with bed-sacks filled with straw, is used for beds. Thus far one tent has been quite sufficient to accommodate [sic] all the sick requiring more attention than can be given in quarters, and I trust will be amply so during the Winter, unless the Regiment should be filled by volunteers or conscripts, in which case more accommodations may become necessary. Recent receipts of supplies on account of the hospital fund of the Corps, and private donations from home and from Sanitary Commissions, has done much for the comfort of the sick, and due care is being exercised that these supplies be properly distributed, not only to those in hospital, but to the sick in quarters. The hospital is now supplied with Lemons, Dried Fruits, Butter, Eggs, and a variety of Vegetables in abundance.
Special care has been observed in the inspection of the rations issued to the men during the month. Without exception it has been of good quality, abundant, and regularly issued. The cooking is done by the men in small messes—those occupying a stockade usually joining in one mess. With the ration, and abundance of delicacies received by express from home, the tables of all are well supplied.
In concluding this communication, we cannot better do so than by congratulating officers and men on the favorable manner in which they are situated, and with the assurance on the part of the medical staff of the command, that no effort will be spared to raise the Regiment to the highest point of efficiency, by raising, to the highest possible standard, the health of those composing it.
CHARLES S. HOYT,
Ass't Surgeon 126th N. Y. S. V.

Correspondence of the Democrat.
From the A r m y of the Potomac.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 25, '64.
MESSRS. EDITORS:—Yesterday I returned from the Army of the Potomac; my stay with the army was short but very pleasant. I stopped with the 126th Regiment, a regiment literally of veterans—a glorious war-seared regiment which has done good and effective service—reduced in numbers, yet they are indomitable in spirit; cheerful, contented, and ready for any duty that may be demanded of them—the Army of the Potomac has no braver set of men than the veterans of the 126th. So much for the 126th, and now a word as to their whereabouts: They are on the extreme front, a very little the nearest infantry regiment to the rebels; occupying the right of the 3d Brigade, and on a gentle elevation, overlooking one of the most commanding and beautiful landscape views imaginable [sic]. On the west and north, the Blue Ridge, some 16 or 20 miles away, stretches itself away as far as the eye can reach; on either band of the camp is a plain of good looking country, which in the days of its glory and prosperity, when old Virginia was the pride of the land, must have been one of unexampled fertility and beauty. But alas, the iron band of war has passed over these plains, and while the landscape with its beauty remains, the works of culture, and the adornments of art, taste and cultivation are gone; fences have disappeared; dwellings are-razed to the earth; trees and shrubs are gone, and the whole vast outspread of land is one scene of waste and desolation. The armies, both Union and Confederate, have moved over it and fought over it time and again, and there is no trace left of vegetation and culture—nor will there be this season. How this part of Virginia is to regain landmarks or find the boundry [sic] lines of farms and plantations, is more than I can tell, they are certainly obliterated now. Here then, on this fine prospect hill, is the 126th Regiment, all comfortably housed, and enjoying themselves; with none sick among them, and all looking well and hearty. Their houses are small but clean, dry and warm, and are built of logs about 10 feet by 12, four or five feet high, with the tent for a roof, and all with fireplaces. They have cleared up the forest in which they originally located—indeed, the timber of this part of old Virginia is fast disappearing before these live Yankee soldiers—they use it for fires, wood for houses, railroads [sic], ties and timber, and for corduroy roads. First the dry rails and fence boards are burnad [sic], and then the green wood; the occupancy of any territory by an army, even for a short time, makes it desolate.
Just on the Rapidan, in front of the 2d Corps, of which the 126th is a part, and not over four or five miles away, is the Rebel army. We could see the smoke of their camps, and from the lookout on Pony Mountain just a little way off, could see the tents and company grounds of Gen Lee's army. These armies are literally confronting each other; their pickets in sight of each other and both watching closely the movement of the other. Culpepper village or Court House is in plain sight of the camping place of the 126th Regiment, some five miles away on the plain, which is as far as the cars run, it is a small village and about sixty miles from Washington. We left the cars at Brandy Station four miles from Culpepper, which is near Gen. Meade's headquarters, and I suppose near the centre of the Army of the Potomac as it lies encamped in winter quarters. The 21 Corps is some four miles toward the front or nearer rebeldom, and still further on about a mile is Gen. Kilpatrick's head-quarters, and about him are the Cavalry Corps which occupy the extreme front and picket up to the Rapidan.
I arrived at the front on the 22d of February about four o'clock in the afternoon; left Washington about ten o'clock on Sunday, and had a delightful ride on a good railroad in good cars with a fine load of ladies and gentleman, who were going to the front, mainly to attend the general ball of the 2d Corps, and to see the army, etc. The ball came off and was a very grand and splendid affair, it was at Gen. Warren's head-quarters and was largely attended by the General officers, and was graced by the presence of some hundred and fifty ladies, some of them dressed in the height of fashion. From our own regiment and locality was Mr. Capt. Coleman, Mrs. Col. Baird, Mrs. Lieut. Stanton, and Miss Louisa Ogden. Among the notables present was Generals Meade, Sedgwick, Warren, Hays, Owen, Pleasonton, Kilpatrick, Vice President Hamlin, Gov. Sprague, etc., etc. Of the 126th regiment, Lieut. Colonel Baird, now in command of the regiment, Major Brown and Lieut. Lawrence were in attendance. The ballroom was decorated with flags old and new, and presented a very gay and fine appearance; the music was excellent; the supper table elegant; and as a whole it was a complete success. This grand ball was within a few miles of the Rebel army, in the very heart of old Virginia, and very well illustrated the feeling and spirit of the army as a whole; the officers present (and there was three or four hundred of them,) were as fine, intelligent and gentlemanly looking men as would be found anywhere in the country. The dancing was good, consisting of Quadrills, Lancers, Gallops, Waltzes, Schottisches, &c., &c., and the light fantastic toe was tripped till the small hours of the morning.
On the 23d there was a grand review of the 2d army Corps, at which I had the good fortune to be present. It was a grand and imposing sight; the day was beautiful, the air balmy, the sun shining bright and the review ground a vast plain where the whole movement could be seen from any point. As the various divisions of infantry marched on the ground and took position, and the cavalry with the light batteries came by themselves in another direction, the scene to one who had never seen such a sight, was in the highest degree exciting and imposing—the orderly tread and stately movements of the infantry, and the more rapid but well trained movements of the mounted men and their horses—all was truly grand and splendid. When all was nearly in line, the cavalry with the artillery on the right and the whole line spreading over two miles in length, Gen. Meade made his appearance and was joined by Gen. Warren and other General officers and some ten or fifteen ladies on horseback, and away went the gay calvacade [sic] some hundred strong, on full gallop, to make the grand review. It was a gay sight, reminding one of the days of Chivalry and of the gay scenes when gallant knights and fair ladies joined in the parade over the plain; and up the lines rode the grand cavalcade, and then, after the whole lines were passed the reviewing party came to a halt in the center, and the whole Corps cavalry and infantry, some twelve thousand strong passed in review before the Generals, and they appeared soldierly and hardy, and no doubt are as good if not the best fighting men in the brave Army of the Potomac.
The review occupied some four hours, and was terminated by a grand cavalry charge by two or three companies of Kilpatrick's best men, and it was exciting in the extreme—one can hardly realize what war is until he looks upon an army thus prepared for war and ready for deadly strife. The grand review was within three or four miles of the Rebel camp, and probably in plain view from their signal stations and lookouts. They could see and note every movement, for the day was very clear and fine. Who can tell how soon this review will be turned into the fierce charge and the actual manuevering on the battle field? But come when it may, be assured that the 2d Corps, yea the whole of the Potomac army, will be ready for the fray and will give a good account of themselves. It is a noble army, receiving now large accessions daily, and by Spring will be a very strong and effective army. The men are well fed and cared for, and are in very comfortable winter quarters, are in good spirits and so inured to war and hardships that in the next campaign they will be able to give the rebellion a strong, and I trust a finishing blow.
I visited the Hospital of the 2d Corps, it is located in the woods and is really a very pleasant place; it is laid off into divisions, and the soldiers have decorated it with evergreens and made plank walks, and it really made one feel glad to see how mild and carefully the sick soldier even in the field is taken care of. The Hospital tents are large and comfortable, and I am satisfied that everything is done for the comfort and care of sick and wounded soldiers of the Army of the Potomac that can be.
On the morning of the 24th, the weather being still fine, we returned to Brandy Station, and the sight there presented was a very busy, active, stirring one. Here is the place from whence most of the supplies for the army are drawn, and the number of army wagons are innumerable and moving here, there and everywhere. Here were officers, soldiers, citizens, orderlies, aid-decamps, and all the stir and bustle of a great camp and army. How long this army will stay here is quite uncertain, the roads are now getting good, and the weather fine, and if it continues much longer a movement may be looked for; a few days of rain however will make the whole plain a vast mud hole where the army cannot move, but when the frost is out of the ground it don't take long to settle the roads. At 10 o'clock we took cars for Washington, and at 3 P. M. were landed in the city,
Yours, D. A. O.

Testimonials to Col. Bull.
Head-quarters 126th N. Y. V.,
Camp near Strausburgh, Va.,
April 30th, 1864.
N. J. MILLIKEN, Editor Ontario Co. Times.
DEAR SIR:—I am directed by the officers of this Regiment to hand you the enclosed copies of communications, the originals of which are now in possession of Col BULL, and request that you will publish the same. It is due to Col. BULL that I should state that this request is made without his knowledge. In giving publicity to these testimonials, we do but simple justice to a brave and efficient officer, and I am happy in being the medium of their communication.
Respectfully yours,
SPENCER F. LINCOLN.

Headquarters 2d Brigade,
2d Division, 2d Corps,
April 29th, 1864.
Col. James M. Bull, commanding 126th N. Y. Vol's, attached to my Brigade, by his uniform prompt obedience to orders, and intelligent administration of regimental affairs, possessed my entire confidence and respect.
He distinguished himself, and his command won for itself a name imperishable, at the battle of Auburn, Oct. 14th, 1863, where I detailed his regiment to act as skirmishers to clear the road for the advance of my column in the direction of Catlet's Station. A regiment of cavalry and a section of artillery attacked the head of the column. Col. Bull displayed much personal bravery in the management of his troops and in finally dislodging the enemy from his position.
I regret very much the necessity of Col. Bull's retiring from the service, and hope his improvement in health will soon enable him to join his companions in arms.
JOSHUA T. OWEN,
Brig.-Gen'l Vols.

Head-quarters 126th, N. Y. V.,
Camp near Strausburgh, Va.,
April 23d, 1864.
To James M. Bull, late Col. 126th N. Y. V.
DEAR SIR:—The undersigned commissioned officers, 126th N. Y. V., having learned of the acceptance of your resignation as commanding officer of this regiment, take the occasion before your departure from among us, to bear cheerful testimony as to your worth as an officer and man.
We have served under you for most of the time since the organization of the regiment, and, as Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel, in camp, on the march, and in the field you have discharged your duties fearlessly and with fidelity to all under your command. We regret that declining health has compelled you to resign, and as you go from among us you carry our best wishes for your future wellfare [sic] and happiness.
In taking leave of you we express the hope, that the new field upon which you are about to enter may prove the path to promotion and continued distinction.
Very truly your friends,
Wm. H. Baird, Lieut. Col., 126th N. Y. V.
J. Smith Brown, Major,                    "
P. M. Hammond. Surgeon,               "
Chas. S. Hoyt, Asst. Surgeon,          "
Spencer F. Lincoln, Adjutant,          "
John C. Stainton, Lt. and A. Q. M., "
T. Spencer Harrison,                        "
Winfield Scott, Capt. Co. C.,           "
Ira Munson, Capt. Co. F.,                "
Henry B. Owen, Capt. Co. H.,         "
Sandford H Platt, Capt. Co. G.,       "
Morris Brown, Jr., Capt, Co. A.,     "
J. A. Seamens, Capt Co. K.,            "
R. A. Bassett. Capt. Co. I .,             "
M. V. Stanton, 1st Lieut. Co. G.,    "
Geo. A. Sherman, 1st Lieut. Co. K., "
A. Huntoon, Jr., 1st Lt. Co. H & A. D. C.
John B. Geddis, 1st Lt. Co. D., 126th N. Y.
John McDonald, 1st Lt. Co. I.,          "
M. H. I awrence, 1st Lt, Co. B. & A. D. C.
T. G. Munson, 1st Lt. Co. F., 126th N. Y. V.
John F. Randolph. 2d Lt. Co. E.,       "

THE 126TH REGIMENT N. Y. V.—In the late reconnoisance upon the Rapidan, the 126th Regiment performed most gallant service, receiving the unqualified commendation of the General in command, and reflecting the highest credit upon both officers and men. It seems that after our forces had crossed the river by fording it where the water was waist deep, that the 39th and 126th New York Regiments were deployed as skirmishers at right angles with the river; the right wing being commanded by Col. Bull of the 126th, and the left wing by Lieut. Col. Wm. H. Baird of the same Regiment. The detachment under Col. Baird then steadily advanced upon the enemy who resisted their progress with determination. Furious skirmishing then ensued, in which it is stated the forces under Col. Baird lost one-fourth of their number in killed and wounded, after driving the enemy and occupying their position.—Col. B. received high encomiums for the coolness and intrepidity of his conduct. Our entire loss in killed, wounded and missing is put down at 200. We notice the following among the causalties [sic] of the 126th:
Killed—Corporal Chestnut, Co. C.
Wounded—Adjt. Spencer F. Lincoln, Corp. Thos. Lowe, Co. H, arm; Andrew Kellickner, Co. I, neck; Byvron Fields, Co. G, knee; Edward M. Comb, Co. F, thigh; Nicholas Keller, Co. H, thigh; Corp. John R. W. Chase, Co. B, shoulder and ribs; Corp. Chas. Benedict, Co. G, leg; Sergt. C. Alliger, Co. I, arm.

The 126th Regiment.
Headquarters 126th N. Y. V.
CAMP IN THE FIELD,
May, 2nd, 1864.
Editor Yates County Chronicle:
DEAR SIR,—Enclosed I hand you copy of testimonial to Capt. William A. Coleman, the original of which is now in his possession, and I am instructed by the officers whose signatures are attached, to request of you its publication.
In justice to Capt. Coleman, permit me to state, this request is made without his knowledge.
Happy in being the medium of transmitting a communication reflecting so much credit upon one of the citizens of our own county, I am truly,
Your obdt. servant,
CHAS. S. HOYT,
Asst. Surgeon 126th N. Y. V.

(COPY.)
HEAD-QUARTERS N. Y. V.,
CAMP NEAR STEVENSBURGH, VA.,
March 24th, 1864.
To WILLIAM A. COLEMAN,
LATE CAPT. CO. B, 126th N. Y. V.:
DEAR SIR—Having learned of the acceptance of your resignation as Captain of Co. B, 126th N. Y. Vols., we desire to express to you our approval of your conduct and bearing, as an officer and man, on all occasions during the time in which you have been so intimately connected with us.
In the early organization of the regiment, during the many months in which we were being drilled, trained, and fitted for active duties on the long and weary marches which subsequently followed; amidst the strife and carnage of the battle field, and as commanding officer of the regiment, (in the absence of the field officers) you have ever shown yourself worthy of our confidence, and by your devotion to the cause in which we are engaged, have merited and won our esteem.
By your resignation we have lost a faithful companion, your company an efficient commander, and the service one of its best officers.
You go from us with our best wishes, and in taking leave of you we do so with the hope that you may soon recover from your illness, and again enroll yourself among the defenders of our common country, its honor, its flag, and its nationality.
Truly your friends,
JAMES M. BULL, Col. 126th N. Y. V.
WM. H. BAIRD, Lieut-Col. 126 N. Y. V.
I. SMITH BROWN, Major 126th N. Y. V.
F. M. HAMMOND, Surgeon 126 N. Y. V.
CHAS. S. HOYT, Asst. Surgeon 126th N. Y. V.
SPENCER F. LINCOLN, Adjt. 126th N. Y. V.
IRA C. STAINTON, Lieut. and A. Q. M. 126th.
T. S. HARRISON, Chaplain 126th N. Y. V.
WINFIELD SCOTT, Capt. Co. C, 126th.
MORRIS BROWN,         "         A,   "
SANDFORD H. PLATT, "        G,   "
HENRY B. OWEN,         "         H,   "
J. A. SEAMAM,               "         K,   "
IRA MUNSON,                "         F,    "
R.A. BASSETT,               "         B,    "
M. V. STANTON, 1st Lieut. Co. G. 126.
JOHN B. GEDDES,         "          D,   "
T. E. MUNSON               "           F,   "
JOHN A. M'DONALD    "           I,    "
GEO. A. SHEARMAN,   "          K,   "
A. HUNTOON,                "          H,   "
M. H. LAWRENCE,        "          B,   "
JOHN F. RANDOLPH, 2nd Lieut. Co. E.

From the 126th.
Correct List of Killed, Wounded and Missing.
Below we give our readres [sic] a correct list of the killed, wounded and missing of the 126th N. Y. V. up to May 13th as reported by their Hospital Steward, Geo. W. BECLER.

COMPANY A.
Wounded—Capt. Morris Brown, Serg'ts Jas Henderson, Smith Fuller, and Phineas Tvler, Corp. A. C. Shepherd, Privates Frank Pool, Levi Cole, John Garrison, P. F. Parris, A, C. Olds, W. Leaman, Geo. Bunch, J. N.Suthy, L. L. Lawrence, J. H. Garrison.

COMPANY B.
Killed—Corpl's H. F. Ellis, G. Chapman, Privates W. Casson, Obed J. Potter. Chris. Houghtailing.
Wounded—Lieut. H M Lawrence, Serg't O C. Squier, Corps.W. H. Armstrong, H.S. Nichols. Privates Charles Hyatt, A. Poller, C. Hazelett, O.  B. Smith, S. C. Purdy, J. H. Lathey, O. J. Potter.
Missing—E. G. Hopkins, Asa Sherwood, W. Casson.

COMPANY C.
Killed—Private J. B. Huff.
Wounded—Capt. W. Scott, Serg't W. H. Cole, Privates C. W. Dev, F. M. Haynes, A. B. Wyckoff, J. Bond, A. Moulton.

COMPANY D.
Killed—Private E. H. Dewey.
Wounded—Privates John Monroe, Fred Ebert, Geo. Johnson, Barber Eldridge, John Dwyer, Geo. Stark, John Dutzour, J. F. Denver, N. McMillan.
Missing—Corp. J. B. Sabin, A. Murdock.

COMPANY E.
Killed—Wm Clark, J. Olf.
Wounded—Lieut. J. F. Randolph, Serg't G. T. Kelley, F. Green, Corp. B. W. Scott, A. Bedell, Privates W. H. Pinch, J. Fountain, J. Galivau, W Clark, J. Morse, A J Davenport.
Missing—Private A. Bogart.

COMPANY F.
Wounded—Capt. Ira Munson, Serg't H. B. Ferguson, Corps. Chas. Proudfit, C. Turbush, E. R. Heazlit, Lyman Loomis, Privates F. Edgerton, S. Rafter, J. Sheehan, S. V. Tompkins, J. Snelling.
Missing—N. J. Davenport, J. Coleman, E. Dubois, J. P. Fulton, F. Wilcox.

COMPANY G.
Killed—Corp. Chas. Benedict.
Wounded—Lieut. M. N. Stanton, Corp. J. S. Hollenbeck, Sergt. S. Hughes, T. Cayton, Privates J. Dunningan, J. Southard, J. Barron, M. Rogers.
Missing—Private G. Hilt.

COMPANY H.
Killed—Capt H. B. Owen.
Wounded—Sergt. W. H. Chillson, Privates Geo. Currier, F. Spray, O McGinty, E. Ka__ous, T. Shears, Charles Love, W. M. Brown, A Algerney, J Garnson, Ed Adsit.
Missing—Lieut A Huntoon, Corp. E. Jones, Privates U. Osgood.

COMPANY I.
Killed—Capt W Newbury.
Wounded—Sergt. D. Berger, Corpl's B. F. Kime, and G Ackerman, Privates L. Toombs, P. Garnett, J Short, C. Burch.

COMPANY K.
Killed—Corp. Jerome Parks.
Wounded—Lieut J Hurlburt, Sergt's R. Crippen, L. Clark, and J. Barrenger, Privates M. Benjamin, P. Kanaly, W. Seamans, F. Barnes, J. Nuthent, R. Kumby, M. C. Loi_, Fred. K. Geiger, Serg't W. Chrisraden.
Missing—Lieut G A Sherman, Private Jno Cochran.

FROM THE 126TH REGIMENT.
The Geneva Gazette of last week publishes the following letter written by Dr. Hoyt to Judge Folger, from the field 12 miles from Richmond, under date of June 1, 1864:
HON. CHAS. J. FOLGER,
My Dear Sir:—We left the North Anna River on Friday morning last, crossed the Pamunkey River near Hanover Town on Saturday noon, advanced about four miles from the river Sunday afternoon, found the enemy, and have been fighting here ever since. They fight like devils, but cannot stand the wild, desperate charges of our boys.
To-day completes the 29th of the campaign. It has been a desperate one, and thus far successful. Grant strikes his hard blows first in front, and before Lee is aware, shows himself on the enemy's flank. In this way we have pushed him almost to the wall, and a few days must end the conflict. There is to be no failure. All are confident of success, and every man works with a right good will.
The fighting here has been desperate, and the enemy are reported falling back; all is quiet to-day. The battle takes the name of Polopottomy. Below I hand you a list of casualties in the 126th, since I wrote you last:

KILLED.
Charles Wheeler, Co. E.

WOUNDED.
Geo. Tyler, Co. B, shoulder; Gilbert Smith, Co. C, bowels; Chas. Finger, Co. G, hand; P. Bulger, Co. G, foot; A. J. Cady, Co. K, arm.
Smith is severely wounded, and his recovery quite doubtful. The other cases are severe, yet all will probably recover.
Young Wheeler is the son of Capt. Wheeler of your place. He was a brave little fellow, and met death with his face to the enemy; he had been in all the fights, and borne himself like the true soldier. A grateful country will perpetuate the memory of such. God bless and sustain his bereaved parents and friends.
In haste, yours for victory,
CHAS. S. HOYT,
Surgeon 39th N. Y. V.

Correspondence of the Ontario County Times.
More from the 126th Reg't N. Y. S. V.
BATTLE-FIELD NEAR COLD HARBOR, VA.,
June 8, 1864.
ED. TIMES—DEAR SIR: To-day seems almost like a Sunday on account of the great quiet along the lines. Yesterday P. M. from 6 to 8 o'clock there was a general cessation of hostilities to care for the wounded and bury the dead between the lines, some of whom had lain uncared for since the morning of the 3d inst., while shot and shell and bullets from thousands of muskets were almost continually interchanged over their heads from the opposing lines. The proposition for this act of humanity toward the wounded came from Gen. Grant, and was passed through our lines by flag of truce on the 5th inst. I had the fortune to assist in opening communication with the enemy and of accompanying the flag of truce to the enemy's outposts. The rebel officers were sociable, and both Union and Rebel officers seemed to recognize the propriety of conversing on subjects only that could give offence to no one.
To-day, by common consent, until just now, there has been no firing, and along the lines officers and soldiers of both sides have stood up with impunity and conversed with each other—the lines being only three or four rods apart in some places—but a few solid shot and shell have now been interchanged, and as if by magic, at the first shot, all disappeared behind the breastworks or sunk into their hiding-places in the rifle-pits, and nothing but bare mounds of earth can be seen where a moment ago all was life; and instead of the friendly conversation, the witty retort and lively jest, there is the sharp crack of the rifle and the hum of the bullet as it sings its song of death on its way to the luckless head that has too daringly raised itself above the breastworks to reconnoiter. Such is war, and the unnatural relations which it begets.
We have had heavy work for the last few days, of which you must be fully informed by the dailies.
I subjoin a list of the casualties in the 126th not included in the last I sent you:
Lt. Geo. A. Sherman, Co. K, wounded in a charge at Spottsylvania, May 12.
Capt. Winfield Scott, Co. C., wounded in a charge at Spottsylvania, May 17, by solid shot in thigh.
Lieut. Asbury Huntoon, Jr., A. D. C. to Gen. Owen, shot through the right lung June 5th, by musket ball; died at 2 A. M., June 7th. (The report of his being missing, published before, was a mistake.

COMPANY A.
Killed—William Tyndall, shot on picket June 1st. Wounded—Peter F. Paris; Geo. Millis, in foot, June 3d, on picket.

CO. B.
Killed—Christ. Houghtailing. Wounded —Corp. Geo. Chapman, wounded and missing; Asa Sherwood; Geo. B. Tyleron, in shoulder. May 30. Missing—Wm. Cassim, Geo. Davis.

CO. C.
Wounded.—Francis Haines; Gilbert Smith, side, May 30. Corp. Simeon Salier, missing.

CO D.
Wounded—William B. Brando, in arm, May 6; James Monroe, in leg, May 6; Eugene M. Smith, in foot, May 14; James Graham, in thigh by chance shot, June 5. Henry Hagadorn, missing May 18.

CO. E.
Killed—Charles Wheeler, in skirmish, May 30; Walter Clark. Wounded—Serg't Geo. T. Kelley; Serg't Fayette Green; Corp. Byron W. Scott; Corp. Ambrose Bedell; John Galivan; John Olf, wounded and missing; Albert L. Bogart, missing.

CO. F.
Wounded—Frank T. Edgerton, Frederick Wilcox.

CO. G.
Killed—Corp. Charles Benedict, in wilderness, May 5. Wounded—John Baron, in chest, in wilderness, May 6; John Rector, right thigh, Spottsylvania, May 12; Patrick Bulger, left ankle, in skirmish, May 30; Charles Finger, in right hand, May 30.

CO. H.
Charles Stevens, wounded, since reported dead.

CO. I.
Killed—Corp. William Newbury, May 12. Wounded—Serg. David Berger, right shoulder, at Po River, May 10; Charles Burch, in leg, at Po river, May 10; Philip Garnett, in hand, in wilderness May 6; James Snelling, in hand, at Spottsylvania, May 12.

CO. K.
Killed—Corp. Jerome Parks, in wilderness, May 6. Wounded—1st Serg't Ralph Crippen, in arm, Spottsylvania, May 12; Serg't Lewis Clark, finger, on picket, May 10; Elias Barnes, in head, in wilderness, May 6; Marcus Benjamin, side, May 6; Fred. Geiger, side, at Po River, May 10; Henry Barnes, at Spottsylvania, May 17; Andrew J. Cady, arm, in skirmish, May 30. Missing—John Benjamin, at Po River, May 10; John Cochrane, wounded and missing, in wilderness, May 6; Owen Kidd, in wilderness, May 6.

The above list makes, with the former reports of killed, wounded and missing in the 126th—10 officers and 117 enlisted men.
C.A. RICHARDSON.
P. S.—We have just had an exhibition of the novel punishment to which a correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer is being subjected by order of the commanding General. He is riding a horse with two short boards slung across his shoulders, one in front, and the other on his back, on which is placarded in large letters, "The Libeller of the Press." A Sergeant and an orderly carrying the Provost Marshal's flag, ride ahead, and three or four mounted men with a bugler bring up the rear, the bugler sounding "Attention" at short intervals. Thus the unlucky correspondent is made to ride along the lines of the army, wherever they are out of musket range. His offence is sending unauthorized and false communications for publication, prejudicial to the service.
C A. R.

Correspondence of the Ontario County Times.
Casualties of the 126th Regt. N. Y. S. V.
HEADQUARTERS 126TH N. Y. VOLS.,
Camp near Petersburg, Va. Aug. 28, 1864.
To the Times:—The following is a list of the casualties of the 126th in the battles of Deep Bottom, Aug. 14th, and Ream's Station, Aug. 26th:

DEEP BOTTOM.
KILLED.—James Snelling, Co. I; John Getchel, Co. F.
WOUNDED.—Sergt. Wm. Westfall, Co. H., thigh; Henry Armstrong, Co. I, hand.

REAM'S STATION.
Killed—George M. Fuller, Co. D.
WOUNDED.—Corp'l John Quick, Co. C, face; Aaron H. Abeel, Co. E, leg; Chas. Wolverton, Co. E, neck; 1st Sergt. Cornelius Alliger, Co. I, leg.
Missing and supposed to be prisoners:
Sergt. Martin McCormick, Co. B; Isaac Miller, Co. C; Alex. Wykoff, Co. C; Michael Cunningham, Co. D; Chester B. Smith, Co. E; Andrew J. Ralph, Co. G; Edgar T. Havens, Co. G; Nathan D. Beedon, Co. B; Charles H. Dunning, Co. B; Frank Dunnigan, Co. G.
None of the wounds are necessarily fatal. I have prepared this list hastily.
Yours truly,
J. H. WILDER.
Capt. Comd. Regt.

Correspondence of the Ontario County Times.
From the Field.
CAMP 126TH NEW YORK VOLS.,
NEAR SIX MILE HOUSE, VIRGINIA,
December 12th, 1864.
MR. EDITOR:—Again I take my old pen, in order to dedicate our new table which is now situated in our little mansion built for the comfort of the Union soldiers, (and by the way we trust) for the whole of the present winter of '64 & '65, and at the same time to keep the friends of this regiment posted as to our whereabouts, and also our position in this now great struggle for peace, between the North and South. The late message of the new and old President is at hand and partly digested. Very few changes have taken place in the regiment. It is divided into two companies, known as the first and second, and in command of Captain JOHN B. GEDDIS; Lieut. JOHN F. RANDOLP, Adj't; Lieut. JOHN M. STANTON, Quarter-Master; Lieuts. LEE HUGHS and HOOPER, present, and for duty. Our Doctor home on short leave of absence, Chaplain in the rear. Doctors HOYT and HAMMOND, who came out with us are filling higher and more important positions. The former of these two men well deserves the promotion, as he is a true man to the position he so well fills. The latter I know nothing about. Charles W. Lisk is Quarter-Master and Serg't Ward, W. Watkins, Acting Serg't-Major. Of the first company, J. Snook is orderly and C. Parker of the 2nd Serg't. Geo. H. Dose is on detail as ordnance Serg't at Brigade Headquarters. Kline, Ackerman, Allen, Barret and Covert are among the Sergeants and Corporals present for duty. Our duty has been various since my last writing, and among the verious [sic] kinds of duty we have  performed is some of the most severe picket duty which has been known through the whole war thus far. This was on the line before Petersburg, and the picket detail consisted of our regiment and two others. All these were in command of Capt. Geddis, now acting as Col. of this regiment. We were placed in the most important position, and only lost three men—one killed and two wounded. We are now near the six mile or what may be perhaps better known as the Yellow House, Va. On Friday some snow fell which still continues on the ground. The health of the regiment is good, and we can safety say none of us ate so much of the good things sent on Thanksgiving Day as to make us sick; and what little we got was more suitable for a "Country School Pic-Nic," as it mostly consisted of sweet cake—"small and sweet."—But to the kind hands of those at home we do not lay the blame, as we are ever reminded of the helping hand that were stretched to us in time of need at Gettysburgh [sic]. We look forward to the time when we shall once more be free, which we trust will return to us the coming summer. But some of our number state their intention of remaining longer if they are needed. Such no doubt will be the case, as it has in many others. Wm. S. Hancock, our Corps commander, has left us. He paid a high tribute to his Provost-Guard, which is out of the 126th, and also to the regiment itself. And well he may, for this command have gone wherever led, and stood the blunt on many a bloody field, as their record will show. A fight is now in progress or about over between the forces of Gen. Warren and the enemy. We are ready and willing if need. Your papers come pretty regular to camp and are eagerly sought. Continue to send as often as you please, for they're read on picket and in camp at our ease.
Yours truly,
C. W. R.
126th N. Y. Vols.

The Army of the Potomac—The 108th N. Y. V., and the Hospitals—Diserters [sic] Hung—Desertion by Bounty. Men—The 126th N. Y. V.
Near Six Mile House, Va.,
December 22d, 1864.
MR. EDITOR:—Everything has the appearance, of a rest for thus army. As all are now engaged in building winter quarters. The sixth corps is now back from the valley and the Army of the Potomac once more together. And I am informed this corps will take the place of the 5th. The 2d remains where it is, and the 5th hunt a new camp on this line, which is about thirty miles from Richmond and nine from Petersburg, and a very quiet place to what is found around Fort Haskel or Battery 13, in front of the last named city.
The weather is now cold and windy; the ground slightly frozen, having had during the present month some rain, and but very little snow.
I paid a visit to the 108th N. Y., at their camp on Sunday last, and found them in good stockades, with a fire place in each and in every respect comfortable. They now draw rations for 110 men. I saw and conversed with many of the old members who were all in good spirits, but counted the time when they would once more be released. All spoke well of their commanding officers. Some of the men had half a dozen scars, and some stated a good receipt for more. This regiment is now situated one and one half miles from Patrick's Station on the City Point Railroad. And as far as comfort, when in their quarters, they are as well off as at home, especially when plenty of rations are on hand. I asked them about their thanksgiving dinner and some said they had a bone out of a leg, and one got a wing. But the meat was very scarce. All donations of this kind amount to about the same when sent to the army in general. If soldiers get their share of the good things sent to them from home they must be directed to them in person and by this they most always get their dues and appreciate the favor. The Sanitary Commission is and has ever been a good thing for the army, but it seems they always keep the cheapest kind of material. In this respect it resembles the sutlers. The letter paper given to the soldiers in the field is of the poorest kind, better calculated for doing up Jews harps for shipment or show.
Having paid a brief visit to the 1st, 2d and 3d Divisions Hospitals of the 2d corps, I must confess the patients get far better care than in former days, and all when very sick or badly wounded are sent to City Point when circumstances will admit. The 1st Division Hospital is in charge of Dr. Hoyt, formerly of the 126th Regiment N. Y. V., and all the patients speak of him in the highest terms.
A soldier, of all other persons, knows how to appreciate good attention and kind treatment, but this they seldom get, especially in the field. The number of sick in the field is far less at the present time than in former periods at this season of the year. A soldier has to undergo the experience of building about four or five houses before he can have a permanent one, owing to the changes of army affairs by superior commanders. But officers meet with the same disappointment as the men, and all take it with that sang froid known only to those of the Army of the Potomac.
On Friday last three men were hung in front of the First Division Headquarters, they being out of the 3d Brigade, same Division—two from the 7th N. Y. V., and one from the 5th N. H. This brigade now commanded by Col. C. McDougal, formerly of the 111th N. Y. Vols. The full particulars  I will not give, the report in the New York papers is out in full long before this, for reporters were taking notes directly after the hanging. I will state this much, as I had some conversation with the chaplain who attended them during their last moments. I learned that two of them were Germans, and the third an Englishman. The Germans had on the Confederate uniform. They had enlisted in the rebel service, and then intended to take the benefit of Grant's order as they did that of Jeff. Davis. The third man had on the rebel uniform when he came into our lines, hut changed it for that of ours at City Point. Before he was hung he said he never enlisted on the other side, but was gobbled up by them and made to do duty. One of the others confessed that they did enlist. The last man states that the reason of his deserting was that he enlisted in the navy, and then was denied the privilege. As he was a sailor by occupation, he would do duty no where else. Two of them seemed very much affected, but one seemed not to shrink in the least. The scaffold was built under the supervision of the Wagon Master connected with the 1st Division of the 2d Corps. It consisted of two upright timbers, with one across the top for support. A platform with steps leading to the same were prepared for their reception. Three ropes were attached to the beam, and at the lower end of each were the loops for their necks. A door was prepared, which formed a part of the main platform. The graves for them were in front of the scaffold. The prisoners rode to the scaffold in an ambulance, each having on a white cap, their hands tied behind them. The 1st Division band lead and discoursed music for the occasion, followed by one of the headquarter wagons with the coffins. They alighted from the ambulance, stepped upon the platform, and then made a few feeble remarks stating their guilt, and a warning to others.
This matter of desertion is becoming a very common thing. Our men desert to the enemy. This is done to a great extent while on picket, and the most of the men who desert are the big bounty ones, who came out this last season. The way picket duty is done on this part of the line is to place men out about ten rods from the main part of the line. These are called videttes. Then they place a man to watch them from running, and at every post they have orders to shoot any man in the attempt to leave, and also giving to every one a thirty day furlough and one hundred dollars for every deserter they shoot.
Much is said about the deserters coming into our lines. To some extent they come, but not in such numbers as represented. Last night some came in, and they bring the news that Jeff. Davis is dead—died by taking poison—but I attach but little importance to the statement; still it is believed by a good many.
But now a word to those who are more especially interested in the changes in the 126th N. Y. V. The different companies of the Regiment are now consolidated into five companies, and it is to be known as the 126th Battalion. The full particulars I am not prepared to give, but will close by stating that the true patriotism which once existed in our army is now nearly played out, and this is one reason I assign for the rebellion being yet the great question of the day; and the reason for this is owing in a great measure to the inequality of the pay of a soldier, and also men fighting for money and to avoid a draft. The class of soldiers who came out in '63 are of the opinion that they have done their share already, and those who are left are  trying to save their bacon if possible, and con- tend that those who get the big bounty should  take the risk, as their time is so short, and the  men who came out for this bounty want to enter that branch of the service where there is the least danger, and also they want to worry though next summer, for their time will be out and then they can enjoy their bounty as their full pay for one year amounts to more than most officers, and this is about the length of time most of them entered the service. On the other side, the rebels, so-called, are most of them fighting out of true patriotism and love for the cause in which they are engaged. Most of our men who came out previous to 1862 came to fight, and this is to the public fairly demonstrated. You well know that no better fighting was ever done by men than at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and these were all during the first year, of a large portion of our army; but when larger bounties were paid and many promises were broken by county committees to the support of families of volunteers, as this the case of some, and old Ontario is a fair sample, or some portion of same. But as there is now another draft before the public, let us see what will bring the men—money, patriotism or conscription. The reason above stated has been one great trouble "with hanna" all the way thro' our last campaigns. Many of our leaders are good fighting men, but many more do not fight for the cause but for promotion. The Army of the Potomac are with the public in this—that Maj. Gen. Sherman is the one now doing the business. Let him continue to do so and others take example.
Yours, &c., W. R. C., 126th N. Y. V.

THE 126th REGIMENT.—Capt. Richardson of the 126th Regiment informs us that there are a t this time, of the men who left Geneva in the 126, full seven hundred or more, that are now living. The general impression has been among the people that the whole regiment has been killed off excepting one or two hundred men.
Our Regiments.—In all probability both the 126th and the 148th regiments have, with their gallant and patriotic comrades from other places, been engaged in the severe conflicts of the past few days. Friends at home will naturally feel anxious for their safety—but none fear but what both regiments will do their whole duty with credit to themselves and the locality from which they hail. A list of the wounded at Carver Hospital appears in the morning papers, among which we find the following names:—
T. F. DWYER, 126TH REG'T, CO. D. Corp. T. P. Moulton, 126th Reg't, Co. C.

126th REGIMENT.—The friends of the 126th N. Y. V. are making strenuous efforts to recruit this well known and meritorious Regiment to its maximum number, for special service in the 2d A Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. HANCOCK. No Regiment has better represented the County and District on the Field than this noble Regiment, and none deserves the hearty support of the people more than this.
Capt. WINFIELD SCOTT, CO. C, with Head-Quarters at Waterloo, is Recruiting Agent for Seneca County. Any man can enlist in the Regiment by expressing his wishes to any Recruiting Agent in the District.

126th REGIMENT.—The following are the casualties in the 126th Regiment during the late attack on the Rapidan:
Adj. Spencer J. Lincoln, slight wound in face. Nicholas Ketter, wound in thigh.—Corporal J. R. W. Chase, Co. B, in shoulder and ribs. Corporal Charles Benedict, Co. G. in leg. Sergt C. Alberger, Co. I, in arm. A. Kellickner, Co. I, in neck. Mr. Combs, Co. F, in thigh.
This move was made, it seems, in concert with one made by Gen. Butler. The latter intends to enter Richmond with a strong Cavalry force and relieve our prisoners, while Gen. Meade was engaging the whole Rebel army on the Rapidan. The plan faded on account of its being carried to the Rebels by a deserter from our ranks.

The 126th Regiment.
Col. SHERRILL'S regiment is the 126th. It is officered as follows:
Colonel—E. Sherrill, of Geneva.
Liet. Col.—James M. Bull, Canandaigua.
Major—Wm. H. Baird, Geneva.
Adjutant—A. S. Wheeler, Geneva.
Quartermaster—J. K. Loring, Waterloo.
Surgeon—F. H. Hammond, Penn Yan.
Assistant Surgeons:
C. S. Hoyt, Potter,
P. D. Peltier, Manchester.
Hospital Steward—Henry T. Antis, Canandaigua.
The regiment left Camp Swift at Geneva, yesterday morning, proceeding to Elmira and thence direct to Washington.

THE 126TH.—There have been several promotions in this regiment of late. Maj. J. Smith Brown has been advanced to the post of Lieut. Colonel; H. M. Lawrence, Jr., has been promoted to the office of Captain. Below we give some names of the wounded, the latest we can find;—
Capt. W. Scott, Co. C, re-wounded by solid shot in thigh, severely.
Michael Cunningham, Co. D, foot.
Charles Williams.          "    " left shoulder.
Charles Stevens, Co. H, knee—leg amputated
James Barnes, Co. K, head, slightly.
George Willson, "  " wounded and missing.

FURTHER FROM THE 126TH.—The following casualties are reported in the 126th: Col. Baird, killed. Wounded—Capt. C. A. Richardson, Co. D; W. Finch, Co. A; C. Smith, Co. C ; F. Dibbler, Co. H; H. R. Lorick, Co. C; G. W. Smith. Co. C; B. Logan, Co. K; G. R. Goodall, Co. G; W. J. Pool, Co. A; A. Dallen, Co. A ; F. Eldridge, Co. D; J . Barnes, Co. K; Lieut. S. F.  Lincoln, Co. D.

ARRIVAL OF SICK AND WOUNDED SOLDIERS.
—About three hundred and seventy-five sick and wounded soldiers arrived at Rochester, yesterday afternoon. This morning's paper gives a complete list of their names, and below we give those which belong to our home regiments:—
126th.
Co E.—S W Robinson. Co. G.—George Tupehman. Co. H.—Chas. E Love, Nicholas Keller. Co. I.—A H McPherson. Co. K.—J Willson, W L Christeadon.

148TH.
Co. A.—J A Havens, Co. C.—N Harwood. Co. D.—Corp D P Burnes, M Dean, G W Huntington, J B Moore. Co. E.—G Hasdell. M Quinn, J Woodley, R Freer. Co. F.—Chas W Stark, J Connolly, A Blue. Co. G.—W Rouse. Co. H.—T Dowe, J Bird, J Parker, J Kelley. Co. I.—R M Jones.

Company C, 126th Regiment.
The following are the officers of Company "C" 126th regiment, with their rank:
Philip D Phillips, Capt.
Charles A. Richardson, 1st Lieut.
Spencer F. Lincoln, 2nd do
John R. Geddis, 1st Sergt.
Edward E. Fairchilds, 2nd do
Ira H. Wilder,              3d    "
Martin Pierce,             4th   "
Edwin W. Tyler,         5th   "
Corporals:
Darius C. Sacket,
Henry McKee,
Milo H. Hopper,
Charles Gage,
Henry Mattoon,
Charles W. Watkins,
Hollister N. Grimes.
Captain PHILLIPS is a young man of some millitary [sic] experience in this war. He entered the service as a Lieutenant and was promoted to Captain. He was at the battle of "Bull Run" where he was wounded. He afterwards, in consequence of his injuries, resigned his commission and returned home. Having recovered his health he was induced by the war committee to raise this company, under the first call for 300,000 volunteers. As he has done heretofore, he will now give a good account of himself.
Lieut. RICHARDSON is one of the Law firm of GOODING & RICHARDSON, of this village. He enters now upon his first exprience [sic] as a military man. He has given up a good and increasing practice as a lawyer, to serve his country in this her hour of peril. Industrious, and of the strictest moral habits, energetic and resolute, his friends may look for him to make his mark in the service upon which he has entered.
The 2nd Lieut., SPENCER F. LINCOLN, was a law student in the office of H. O. CHESEBRO Esq. He had nearly completed his studies preparatory to being admitted to the bar, when he volunteered. He was also special Deputy Clerk, performing the duty of the County Clerk during the sessions of the several Courts of the County. He had the prospect before him of a successful life in the profession he had chosen, but he has abandoned all at the call of his country, and "went in."
The non-commissioned officers are all good men in their several places, and on the whole this company is one of the best that has gone from Ontario County.
May God preserve them, and a successful and glorious career attend them

RESIGNED.—Col. James M. Bull, of the 126th Regiment N. Y. S. V., has resigned for reasons with which we are not acquainted, and is reported to be on the way home. He has proved himself a spirited and capable officer, and his resignation will be much regretted by the brave fellows who have so gallantly served under his command.
[Ontario Times.

FIRST LIEUT. SAMUEL WILSON, of Company A, 126th Regiment, is home on a few days leave of absence. He is looking extremely well, and evidently finds army life no disadvantage to his physical well being. He has proved himself a courageous and valuable officer.

Lieut. GEORGE A. SHERMAN, of the 126th, a printer, and formerly of this Village, is reported as among the missing at the battle of the Wilderness. He had proved himself a good officer.

Sergeant WM. NEWBURY, of Co. I, 126th N. Y. V., and brother of Robert Newbury, of this Village, was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, on the 13th inst. He was a good soldier, and lost his life while bravely discharging his duty.

CHAPLAIN HARRISON, of the 126th Regiment, has been home for some time, quite sick, but is now recovering. Mr. Harrison is an excellent Chaplain, and very much in favor with the Regiment; and we hope he will soon be restored to his position, with good health.

E. L. Walrath, formerly Colonel of the 12th Regt. N. Y. Vols., and now ranking Captain of the 126th N. Y. Vols., is filling the office of Provost Marshal at Beaufort, S. C.

—Capt. Winfield Scott, of the l26th N. Y. V. who was formerly pastor of the Second Baptist Church of this city, and was severely wounded at the capture of Harper's Ferry, sustained a severe wound in the thigh on the 18th ult.,  near Spotsylvania. He reached here last night, accompanied by his wife, and remained at the St. Charles till this morning, when he proceeded on the way to his home at Farmer, Seneca county. Capt. Scott was borne on a stretcher, being unable to sit up, and although his recovery was considered doubtful for several days, we are glad to know that he is now in a fair way to fully recover.

PERSONAL MENTION.—Capt. Winfield Scott, of the 126th N. Y. V., formerly paster of the Second Baptist Church in this city, has been five times wounded, twice dangerously. He is gradually recovering from a terrible wound in the thigh, inflicted by a rebel shell at Spottsylvania Court House.

DIED.
On the 5th inst., at Mount Pleasant Hospital, Washington, D. C., George O. Stark, of Co. D, 126th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., aged about 20 years.
The deceased was a son of JEDEDIAH H. STARK, of Gorham. He received the wound which caused his death in the battle of the Wilderness.

J. SMITH BROWN, Major 126th N. Y., has been detatched [sic], and ordered to the command of the 39th N. Y., the Regiment formerly commanded by Col. D'Utassy. This Regt. has lately received over four hundred recruits.—The Regiment has a Col.—Augustas Funk—but he is in New York, recruiting. It is quite a compliment to Major Brown to be assigned to the command of an old Regiment. It is composed entirely of Germans; but the Major, we believe, speaks German fluently. Col. Bull is absent on sick leave. The Regiment has fine Winter quarters, and is very comfortably situated. The recent order concerning furloughs does not apply to the 126th—consequently none of the men can come home.

The 126th Loses Another Colonel.—Col. Wm. H. Baird, of the 126th Regiment, was killed in the battle before Petersburgh [sic] last week. When the war first began, Col. Baird raised a company and joined the 38th Regiment. After the battle of Ball Run he was promoted to Major, which position he soon after resigned. He was afterward made Major of the 126th Regiment, then promoted to Lieut. Col., and by the resignation of Col. Bull, was made Colonel. He was much esteemed by the men under his command, and his loss will be regretted by his regiment and by the community in which he lived. He leaves a wife and two children to mourn his loss. The 126th seems fated. Every day brings the report of the death of some of its heroes. So says the Geneva Courier.

DEATH OF ADJUTANT LINCOLN.—We are pained to 1earn of the sudden and unexpected death of Adjutant Spencer F. Lincoln, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New York regiment. He was wounded in battle before Petersburg, in the left arm, which was amputated. He was taken to Seminary Hospital, Washington, where he appeared to be doing well until last week, when he took cold, which suddenly resulted in his death. Adjutant L. entered Co. D, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth regiment, in July, 1862, as Second Lieutenant, and on the resignation of Capt. Brown, was promoted to First Lieutenant, from which position he was advanced to the Adjutancy of the regiment. He was an active and capable officer, discharging every duty faithfully and promptly. His remains are to be brought to his home, in Naples, for interment.—Ontario Messenger.
We knew Lieut. Lincoln well. He was a graduate of Union College. He will be recollected by many as the Postmaster at that institution some four or five years ago. A truer spirit never breathed than Lieut. Lincoln. Endowed with excellent natural abilities which had been disciplined to accomplished scholarship, and just entering upon life's duties with the highest promise of usefulness and honor, his love of country rose above all considerations of self aggrandizement and renown, and he enlisted in the army to fight for the salvation of the Union whose beneficent advantages and institutions had opened for him as for others the way of honor and prosperity. He was a steady-minded, cool and heroic soldier. He has served his country with distinction; he has given his young life to the defence of its integrity; his memory will be cherished as among the brightest of the galaxy of fallen heroes whose untimely loss shall be recompensed in the triumph of the cause for which they died. The blood of the martyrs shall be the seed of a regenerated Republic. Their friends and all loyal men have resolved in the innermost recesses of their true hearts, that these brave men and patriots shall not have died in vain. Could their spirits hold converse with the living to-day, they would say,—"Stand by "THE OLD FLAG; press your hosts with increasing numbers against the wicked rebellion; as you cherish our memory, and love the good old Union for which we have laid down our lives, stand by the old flag; strike down its assailants until treason sinks to rise no more—
"And the star-spangled banner in glory shall wave,
"O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave."

THE FUNERAL OF LT. HUNTOON.—The funeral of the late Lt. Huntoon took place at Port Gibson yesterday, and was attended by a large number of people. The Rochester Light Guard with Perkins' Band went to act as escort. The company were met at Palmyra by the Committee of Arrangements, and carried in wagons to Port Gibson, where an excellent dinner was provided. The company then marched to the house, where the procession formed and proceeded with the remains to a beautiful grove fitted up for the funeral ceremonies. Suitable platforms and benches were prepared and over 2,000 people were present. Three clergymen participated in the exercises which occupied some two hours.
The remains were then interred in the burial place.
The Light Guard returned about 9 o'clock and the members speak highly of the hospitality of the people of Port Gibson.
We suspect that the Democrat is in error in stating that the expense of the funeral was defrayed by General Owen. We hear that the people of Port Gibson incurred the expense.
Since the above was written the following communication has come to hand:
PORT GIBSON, June 17, 1864.
MESSRS. EDITORS UNION:—Generous actions, when prompted by the proper spirit, demand grateful acknowledgment; will you, therefore, through the columns of your paper give publicity to the following testimonial as freely offered as deserving:
Yesterday the residents of our village and vicinity were overshadowed with gloom and sadness on account of the burial of one of our most promising and hopeful young men, Lieut. Asbrah Huntoon, Jr., Co. H, 126th Regiment, N. Y. S. Vol., and acting A. D. C. to General Owen. His remains were attended by an escort from your city, Co. C of the 54th Light Guard, accompanied by Perkins' Band, and it is his due then that mention should be made of their very efficient service. For their ready response to our invitation, and their gentlemanly and dignified bearing while performing their respective duties as soldiers and musicians they have endeared themselves alike to the relatives and acquaintances of the deceased and this community, and with one voice would unite to do them honor, the most we may now do in reciprocation is to render them this public expression of our thanks.
We congratulate the citizens of Rochester upon the possession of two such organizations. They have our best wishes for the future and our hope that they may long live to grace other occasions with similar honor as that of ours.
By order of Committee of arrangements.
J. W. PARKER, Sec'y.

The Funeral Obsequies of Lt. Huntoon.
—We cheerfully give place to the following in reference to the burial of Lieut. Huntoon:
PORT GIBSON, June 18, 1864.
EDS. UNION AND ADVERTISER—Gents.: In your issue of June 17th, concerning the funeral of the late Lt. Huntoon, you intimate that the Democrat is in error in saying that Gen. Owen defrayed the expenses, and you further say you were informed that the people of Port Gibson met the expense.
The truth is both publications are at fault. The facts of the case are that the Lieutenant's father paid all the expense, from the embalming of the body to the burial. And we, not at his request, but that in his almost lavish liberality in providing for the ceremonies he may have justice done his generosity, and that the friends may be relieved from all embarrassment, make this correction. The people of this place had only the honor of providing for the entertainment of the military and band from your city, aside from paying that general respect due such an occasion.
By order of Committee,
J. W. PARKER, Sec'y.

From Gettysburg—Death of a Soldier.
Correspondence of the Democrat & American.
GETTYSBURG, Sept. 3, 1863.
Mr. Stewart requested me to send you, for publication, the following notice:
DIED—In Gettysburg, August 27th, of his wounds, received in battle July 2d, Wilmer Stewart, son of Cornelius and Mary Stewart, of Ovid, Seneca county, aged 18 years, 9 months and 7 days, and a member of Co. C, 126th Regiment N. Y. S. V.
Young Stewart's wound at first was not deemed mortal, but, notwithstanding the most devoted care and attention of both Mr. and Mrs. Stewart, the former being with him to the last, he sank from day to day, until death put an end to his sufferings. His body was taken home for interment.
I believe Mr. Stewart is a subscriber of your paper, and I hope you will publish the death of his son.
For two months past I have been amid scenes of suffering and death. To-day I visited the general hospital, and found, as a general thing, that our wounded men are doing well. I met the "razor strop man," the veritable Smith; also Bostwick, of your city. Both are doing well. The hospital is neat, clean and orderly, and everything reflects great credit upon Dr. Chamberlain, surgeon in charge. Those that are able to move are being sent to Philadelphia. Fifty were sent this A.M., and Dr. C. told me last evening that it was the design to send all as fast as it was safe to do so.
Yours, W. C.WAY
Chaplain 24th Mich. Vols.

Died ,
Of his wounds, May 10th, 1864, in the battle on the north bank of the river Po, Va., Corp'l GEORGE CHAPMAN, son of PORTER CHAPMAN, of this village, aged 25 years and six months.
He enlisted in Company B, under command of Capt. COLEMAN, of Penn Yan, of the 126th Regiment, N. Y. V., in August, 1862, and was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Harper's Ferry. He remained on parole with his comrades at Chicago, until November following, when, upon being exchanged, he accompanied his Regiment again to the field, at Union Mills and Centerville, Va., and in June following joined the Army of the Potomac. He fought in the battle of Gettysburg, where he was severely wounded, and remained in Hospital until March, 1864, having, in the meantime, suffered a long and severe illness. He was not fully recovered, when his Company being ordered to the front, and most of the officers of the Company having been killed or disabled, he was ordered to perform the duties of Lieutenant, and was bravely discharging his duty, when he fell, on the field.
This energetic young officer had won the strongest attachment of his comrades, and the respect and confidence of his superior officers, and would undoubtedly have been advanced to an honorable position, if his life had been spared. A funeral discourse, on occasion of his death, will be delivered in the Presbyterian Church, of this village, by Rev. F. S. HOWE, on Sunday morning next.

FUNERAL OF CAPT. WHEELER.—The funeral of Capt. Wheeler of the 126th N. Y. V., killed at Gettysburg—took place at Canandaigua yesterday, and was attended by a large concourse of citizens. The two companies of the 54th from this city, under Capts. Bellinger and Westcott, turned out as an escort, and citizens of Canandaigua say they executed the duty in a very creditable manner.

OBITUARY.—The bell had hardly ceased to sound its "funeral notes" and the band its solemn dirges, on Monday last, for the gallant Sloan, when the community was again startled by the intelligence that another young soldier had fallen; that still another name alas! was added to the long list of  youthful heroes whose deaths have saddened so many heads and hearts.
Captain Morris Brown, Jr., writes Surgeon Hammond, June 23d, "was killed yesterday while leading the Regiment in a charge, by a ball through the head. His death was instantaneous. I have not been able as yet to recover his body, but every effort will be made to do so."
Thus sudden came the announcement to a once happy but now grief-stricken family.—This death has fallen with more than usual solemnity upon the hearts of our citizens. A precious young life, full of hope and promise, in the prime of his physical and intellectual manhood, gone from us forever, is a sad thought. As the news was communicated from one to another among his hosts of friends and acquaintances, many an eye moistened with tears, and many heartfelt expressions of sorrow fell from their lips as they recalled to mind his frank virtues and his glorious death.
Captain Brown was the youngest son of Hon. Morris and Maria C. Brown. He was born August 22d, 1842. His boyhood was passed in the village of Hammondsport until 1855, when he removed with his father's family to this village. He subsequently joined the Presbyterian Church, and in the fall of 1860 became a student of Hamilton College; and it was there the writer of this, became more intimately acquainted with him, and ever found him the true hearted man and generous friend. Possessed of a sound mind, genial qualities of heart, a soul of honor, and that rarest of gifts, a cheerful disposition, he naturally became a favorite with his classmates.
At the close of the second year of his course and while spending a vacation at home, his patriotism became enkindled and he felt that duty called him to battle for the honor and integrity of his country. Enrolling himself as a private in Co. A of the now famous l26th Regt. N. Y. S. V., in less than one year by successive promotions he became Captain of his Company. In their first engagement at Harper's Ferry, in the absence of his superiors in rank, as Orderly Sergeant, he led the Company into action, and it was his conduct at that trying time which gave promise of his future success as one of the best officers in the Regiment. At the battle of Gettysburg he led the skirmish line on the left flank of the rebel army. It was in their terriffic [sic] charge upon our forces that by his own personal bravery he captured a battle flag now among the trophies of war in the State Capitol at Albany, took of prisoners three times the number of his own men, and marched them into our lines amidst the cheers of a whole brigade. It was by such heroic conduct and his never tiring vigilance for the rights and comfort of his men, that he was able always to lead them to victory. In the words of one of the wounded soldiers, "He stood right by us every time." He followed the varied fortunes of the Regiment and took part in the battle of Wapping Heights, Culpepper, Auburn, Bristol Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford.
Participating in Grant's campaign, beginning  with the terrible battle of the Wilderness and continuing through the ten days' fight—at one time leading the Company, at another the Regiment—he ever displayed the same courage and cool determination. After Col. Baird was killed during the fearful charge by our forces in the battle of Petersburg, on the 16th, he assumed command of the Regiment, and behaved with great gallantry, performing such acts of personal daring as called forth the highest praise of his brigade commander at the time. On the 18th he writes: "I am all right yet, but oh! what terrible fighting we have had for the last two or three days. Our loss has been very severe, particularly in officers." He saw his brother officers falling on every side and their ranks growing thinner day by day, until as he stated, "There are but two of us left to be chosen from in the next fight." "Such fighting I never saw before, and such narrow escapes I never had. A merciful Providence and a God who hears the prayers of the dear ones at home, is certainly protecting me; I am confident of it. My faith is stronger; I feel it more and more every day. I picked up a testament during the battle of the Wilderness, and since that time it has been my constant companion. I go into a fight now with different feelings than ever before. I have no fear of death as formerly. My dear parents, I feel as if I was going through with this campaign safely." May kind friends pass gently over the publication of this, which was intended only for the eyes of his parents.
On the 23d he again led the remnant of his veteran band in the deadly assault upon the enemy's lines; and right nobly did he do it, as numerous letters indicate.
"Cannon to right of them; cannon to left of them; cannon in front of them volleyed and thundered," yet he shrank not from duty. And when the fatal ball came crashing through his brain a noble spirit went up from that bloody
field and left behind
"One of the few, the immortal names
That were not born to die."

To the family circle of which he was one of the brightest ornaments; to the friends and companions of his early youth; to the war worn veterans, his associates in more mature manhood; to his classmates in college, and to the Chi Psi Fraternity, of which he was a member, his death, though heroic, is a sad bereavement.
Although he now sleeps "where the foe and the stranger will tread o'er his head," still we trust the sacred dust of the hero may yet be laid among the familiar scenes of home, within sight of the beautiful waters of the Keuka, where he had passed his boyhood days.
But he has passed away. Not amid friends and the peaceful quiet of home, but on the field of battle, as the soldier loves to die, with his face to the foe—in the thickest of the fight
"His few surviving comrades saw
His smile when rang the proud hurrah,
As the red field was won;
Then saw in death his eyelids close
Calmly as to a night's repose,
Like flowers at set of sun:"

What a Lie!
A few weeks since the Geneva Gazette published the statement that the 126th Reg't N. Y. V., had been reduced from 1000 men down to 35 rank and file, and carries the idea that the Regiment had been destroyed by the casualties of war. This was evidently done for the purpose of deterring others from enlisting.—Kindred papers have siezed [sic] upon this false statement, and given credit to the Gazette, and it has thus been used in the cause of treason to queit [sic] an extent.
We have the most unquestionable authority for saying it is all false, and the blockhead, who gave the start to it knew at the time of writing it, he was penning a notorious and willful lie. We are assured that Capt. E. A. Bassett, formerly Lieut. of Co. B., of the 126th, now of Co. E., has a detail of 100 men as a Provost Guard at the head-quarters of the Second Army Corps. Then there are others who are detailed for other purposes not in the field. We know of several others who are in Canada, where these of like stamp with the Gazette do congregate.
Then we know of many who have been discharged at different times, who are at their homes, in good health and fully able to discharge the duties of a soldier. We also know that in our rambles we have seen many caps upon the heads of boys, which bore the figures 126 on the same, and these boys on being asked "where did you get your cap? Say at once, "Pa got it when he was a soldier." Then add to these Lieut. BARRAS, and we ask, is not the Gazette guilty of telling one false hood for a mean sinister purpose.

Rochester Democrat. FRIDAY MORNING, FEB. 3.
From the 126th Regiment.
A correspondent in the 126th Regiment favors us with a letter containing some information which will be interesting to many in this part of the State, but we are obliged to omit part of it, for two reasons. One of these is that our friend forgot to enclose the last pages of his manuscript, and the other is that the part received is rather too long. We give some of the items, retaining as much as possible our correspondent's language.
The 126th was, at the date of the letter, Jan. 24th, located near the 108th and 188th Regiments. The 188th is in the 5th Corps, commanded by Gen. Warren, and for a new regiment is more like a body of old soldiers than is usual, owing perhaps to the fact that many veterans hold commissions in it. The regiment was engaged at Hatchet Run, and the men speak very highly of the manner in which Maj C. C. Davison led them on that occasion. He is looked upon as an excellent officer. The regiment is housed in comfortable huts, built of logs, with canvass roofs, and is now serving in the reserve, but will probably be sent to the front line before long.
The 108th is in the 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 2d Corps. This regiment, like the 126th, is small. Col. Pierce is in command. The standing of the organization is high, and its thinned ranks show that it has seen hard service. The men are in good quarters, doing no severe duty at present, but guarding or supporting a fort. The 108th is the favorite regiment of the brigade commanded by Gen. Smyth. Among the recent promotions is that of Serg't Jay Smith to 2d Lieutenant.
The 126th was raised in the counties of Yates, Seneca and Ontario, mainly, but a few of the men are from Monroe. The regiment has been in the 2d Corps since June, 1863, and has fairly won a reputation for bravery and steadiness which few have equaled [sic]. It fighting career commenced at Gettysburg, under the lamented Col. Sherrill. Six hundred men went into the fight, and when the roll was called afterward, only one hundred and twenty-five answered. Of the absent, all but eleven could be accounted for as killed or wounded. The 126th was with the old 2d Corps through all its perils under command of Maj. Gen. Hancock. It is now in the 3d Brigade, 1st Division of the 2d Corps, and is at the Yellow or Six Mile House, doing severe duty—mostly on picket in sight and sometimes within speaking distance of the enemy. The present commander of the regiment, Capt. John B. Geddis, is appointed Lieut. Colonel, and this he well deserved, as his record will plainly show. Of his appointment and record he may well be proud. He enlisted as a private, and by military tact soon gained the appointment of Orderly Sergeant of Co. D. From this he received a commission as Second Lieutenant in the same company of which he was Orderly. After this he was promoted to Captain of Co. H, by his superior officers.—Several months ago he was appointed commander of the regiment. Having filled this position with the same ability as all others, he now has the present appointment of Lieutenant-Colonel.
Next comes the promotion of Milo H. Hopper, formerly Sergeant Major, to First Lieutenant in Co. D. He, too, well deserves particular mention, having entered the service in 1862 in the humble position of a private, and fairly worked his way up to his present position upon his own merits. While acting in the capacity of Color-Sergeant, he bore the stars and stripes on many a bloody field, and bore them at the front and not the rear, and in short, for daring and bravery his record stands high as a true soldier.

Correspondence of the Ontario County Times.
NEAR SIX MILE House, Va.
January 9th, 1865.
Mr. EDITOR.—For the first time in the year 1865, I will send you a few lines from the Camp of the 126th N. Y. V., and by way of a commencement I can say we greet this year as the one which will release us, after a full term of three years service, from military rule, unless we follow the example of many others and re-enlist for another term. I have no doubt many of the remaining ones will do so even after their term now expires. I have heard some of the members of the Regt., state their intention to this effect, but all seem anxious to see the end of this term first. The time we have now to complete according to our date of muster is up to August the 22d, 1865. This looks and seems yet a long period. But there is no place in which a man can be put, in which time flies so fast as in the field. There are now nearly 400 men which belong to this Regiment, or Battalion, as it is now known, at the War Department. This includes all men detached or in hospitals and in the field. The Regt. has lately been consolidated into five companies known as those of A B C D E, and by this consolidation 19 non-commissioned officers get mustered out of service, and among these are Sergts. Bishop, Stanton, Huff, Bingham, and also Corporals Harris, Dunn, and several others unknown to me at this time. W. W. Watkins is Orderly of Co. D., C. Pasco, of Co. E., Wm. Chriseaden of Co. A., and J. Snook Co. C. Others I believe are not yet appointed. M. Hopper has returned and is now Sergt. Major, and by the way we have received a large number from hospitals, who have been absent from wounds received during the spring and summer.
The Regiment is still in command of Captain J. B. Gcddis, and the Commissioned officers now here are as follows; Capt. John B. Geddis, John F. Randolph Adjutant. First Lieuts. H. E. Lee, and John M. Stanton and also Surgeon Pasco who ranks as First Lieut. and fills the place of our old one to the satisfaction af all. Those filling other positions remain just the same. The fact of it is, the Provost Guard of Gen. Humphry, the present commander of the 2d Army Corps, contains some of the best of the blood now remaining in the Old Regiment which left Geneva in 1862. And by the way we hear we are yet to be consolidated with another Regiment, and lose our number by this change entirely, but for the truth of this you will please wait until further developments. This will not meet with the wishes of officers or men, but as a matter of course we will have to submit for a few months more, and then we trust we may be able to consolidate ourselves according to our own notions of military tactics.
The weather at present is clear and chilly no snow, and we have not had any of any amount thus far this winter, but some rain and with it plenty of mud. Deserters come in about every twenty-four hours, in squads of from four to ten, and by the way we have deserters from our ranks too, but they are putting a stop to this here. By an order lately issued by Lieut. Gen. Grant, deserters who go over to the enemy find when caught their fate at the end of a rope.
But if we can judge any thing from the truth of statements made by rebel deserters our men fare very hard when leaving outlines and entering theirs, they are often robbed of their clothes and in return obliged to take those of the rebels—all rags—and which sometimes include lice of large dimensions. I would advise all those who intend to desert, to stay on this side and take the chances, and thereby save their reputation as well as their big bounty. Four deserters came in on Friday evening last who were mounted, they brought their horses and arms, and Capt Munson the Assistant Provost Marshal offered one of them $175 for his horse but the man thought he could do better and said this was an animal brought from home, and for the same in Confederate notes he had been offered the sum of $4,200. He said if you buy a good horse, you must take a trunk to carry the pay, if in Confederate notes. He stated he had been in the service now nearly four years and had seen enough, as there were but very small chances of success. We are now having a church built near our Regt. by order of the Brigade Commander Col. C. McDougall, and then we can attend church as well as at home, We are in hopes to hear our Chaplain once more preach to the 126th N. Y. Vols. And near here they are also building a look-out, and I was informed by one of the Staff Officers that it is to be 147 feet high from the ground. When on picket you can plainly see the Johnnies at their posts, and from our Camp, Rebel huts are visible and rebel music audible. Now is the time for a civilian to visit the army. They can easily find their friends and have many privileges by way of entertainment not found at other seasons of the year. They can see our Forts and picket lines as well as those of the enemy, and learn something of Camp life by a week's sojourn here. But Father Abraham has given a very polite invitation to some 300,000 more men and I trust they will be forthcoming by way of acknowledgment of the acceptance of the invitation. The season of business of this now silent army will soon need them for active service.
I will now close by stating that the men are really in good spirits and have most of the time good rations, warm quarters and plenty to do in the line of their duty.
Many of the boys are now getting short furloughs home to see their friends. Our officers, I think, show the men more of a helping hand in this respect than ever before. We now look for visitors down here from home every day, and would say to them come along, and we will treat you as well as the camp affords. And we will show you sights, along the whole line, And a good big fire which is made from the pine.
Yours, &c., W. R. C.
126th N. Y. V.

Yates Co. Chronicle.
PENN YAN, N. Y.
THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1865.
RECORD OF THE MONTH.
The 126th N. Y. V. was organized at Geneva, N. Y., in July and August 1862, and consisted of 995 officers and men. The Regt. left Geneva Aug. 36th [sic], and proceeded to Harper's Ferry via Baltimore. In the engagement on Maryland Heights, the Regt. lost 39 men. After the surrender at Harper's Ferry, the Regt marched to Annappolis [sic], and from there transferred to Chicago, being paroled prisoners of war. Being duly exchanged in Nov. 1892, [sic] the Regt, was ordered to Washington and picketed Bull Run at the time the army of Gen. Hooker lay at Falmouth. In March, 1863, the regt. was moved to Centreville. June 25th, broke camp and joining the Army of the Potomac, marched for Gettysburg, Pa. The Regt. went into that Battle with 27 officers and 375 men, and came out with a loss of 16 officers and 254 men, in killed, wounded, and missing. The Regt captured 5 flags during this battle. At this time the Regt. was joined to the 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 2nd Army Corps.
The Regt. then marched to Williamsport, by way of Frederick City and Crampton's Gap. After the escape of Gen. Lee, it marched to Harper's Ferry, via Antietam. Remaining there a day or two, it marched through London Valley down to the battle of Wapping heights. From Manassas Gap, it marched to white plains and from there to Warrenton Junction via Warrenton. From there it moved to Elk Run where it lay for several weeks.
On the 12th of September, the Regt. again broke camp, and crossing the Rapahannock [sic], marched to Robinson's Creek, via Brandy Station, Culpepper and Cedar Mountain. Remaining there until the first of October, the Regt. returned to Culpepper and then to Centreville, participating in the engagements at Auburn Ford, and Bristoe Station, Oct. 14th.
Oct. 19th, the Regt. again marched to Warrenton. Broke Camp at Warrenton, Nov. 7th, and crossing the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford, marched to Brandy Station, and went into camp at Milton's Mills.
Aug. 27th started on the Mine Run campaign, returned, and went into camp near Sievensburg, Dec. 12, 1863. Remained there during the winter.—Feb. 9, 1864, took part in the engagement at Morton's Ford.
May 2, 1864, broke camp at 9 P. M. Crossed the Rapidan early next morning, and marched to the Chancellorsville House. May 6th, participated in the battle of the Wilderness, sustaining a loss of one haft the number engaged. May 8th, moved to Todd's Tavern. May 10th and 11th, was engaged at Po River. May 12th, the Regt, took a part in the charge made by the 2nd Corps near Spottsylvania. The Regt. was afterwards engaged at North Anna, Polopotomy and Coal Harbor. Arriving near Petersburg, on the 16th of June, it took a part in the operations in front of the City.
July 24th, and Aug. 14th was engaged at Deep Bottom. Aug. 25th, participated in the engagement at Reams' Station. Remained on the line before Petersburg, during the Winter.
This Regt. moved from camp near Petersburg, at 8 A. M., March 29th, crossing Hatch's Run. After the Division was in position, and the advance commenced, this Regt. was sent on the skirmish line.
March 30th, at about noon, the enemy's pickets were met and driven across the Boydton Plank Road. Here the Regt. was relieved from the skirmish line, and rejoined the Brigade.
March 31st, at 4 A. M., the Regt., with the rest of the Brigade, moved still further to the left, resting behind skirmish breastworks on the Plank Road about two hours, then moved in line of battle towards the enemy's works. But soon t h e Brigade made a left wheel, bringing the line perpendicular to the enemy's works. In this position we moved forward, capturing many prisoners, and losing some killed and wounded. Among the wounded were Capt John B. Geddis, Commanding the Regt., and Lieutenants Hopper and Pasko, but one private killed. At night, breastworks were built in front of where we lay in the morning.
April 1st, moved back to the works, where the morning before, we rested, and built breastworks perpendicular to these. There we remained until near sundown, when we were moved again to the works in front Soon after, we were marched to the left, and continued the march until 4 A. M. of the 2nd inst., halting near Dinwiddie C. H.—At 7, A. M. we were moved to the right again about 3 miles, halted, formed a line, and rested. Soon the order Forward, double-quick, was given, and the troops crossed the enemy's main line of works at 10 A. M.
About noon, we found the enemy entrenched. We charged their works twice and were repulsed, the third time however, we succeeded in driving him and capturing many prisoners. The troops then moved on about a mile, and went into camp for the night.
April 2d, the Regt. and the rest of the Brigade marched to the vicinity of Lemon Grove Church and encamped for the night.
April 4th, this Regt. with the balance of the Brigade repaired roads to enable the wagon trains to pass. April 5th, we marched with the wagon train and joined the Division at sundown on the Richmond and Danville R. R. near Amelia Springs. On the morning of the 6th we moved out and soon found the enemy, but t h e troops of this command were not engaged until after noon, when we were moved in line of battle, charging the enemy, wherever they would make a stand. About 5, P. M., we charged through a piece of woods, and came upon quite a large wagon train. The enemy had one piece of artillery in position, still further on, but succeeded in escaping, with it. We moved on to the hill where this piece had been, and encamped for the night. There were no casualties in this command during the day.
April 7th, the Regt. was not engaged, although under a sharp artillery fire in the afternoon. No casualties during the day. The enemy were found to be strongly entrenched. At night we built breastworks and rested behind them until daylight.
April 8th the Regt. went on to the skirmish line and advanced as skirmishers during the day. Found none of the enemy except stragglers, until near sundown, when a few cavalrymen made their appearance. At 8, P. M., we were relieved from the skirmish line, rejoined the columns and marched about 4 miles and went into camp.
April 9th at 8, A. M. the Regt. was again in motion and moved slowly on until near noon, when there seemed to be a lull, and we rested quietly along the road. Soon after it was announced that Gen. Lee had surrendered his entire command.
The Regt. has participated in the following engagements:
Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Coal Harbor, Petersburg, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Ream's Station, Boydton Road, South Side Railroad, Farmville.

Field and Staff.
Eliakim Sherrill, appointed Colonel August 20, 1862. Wounded in action at Maryland Heights, September _, 1862. Killed in action at Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863, while in command of the 3d Brigade, 3d Division, 2d A. C.
James M. ____, promoted from Lt. Colonel vice Eliakim Sherrill, killed in action. Participated in the following engagements: Gettysburg, Pa., July 2d 3d and 4th, 1863; Auburn Ford, Pa., October 14, 1863; Bristow Station, October 14, 1863; Mine Run, Va., November, 1863; Morton's Ford, Va., Febuary [sic] 6, 1864. Resignation accepted per S. O., No. 107, Headquarters 2d A. C., April 18. 1864.
William H. Baird, appointed Major, August 9, 1862. Dismissed the service November 27, 1862, for cowardice in engagement on Maryland Hights September 13, 1862. Commissioned as Lt. Col. November 5, 1863. Participated in the following engagements: Mine Run, Morton's Ford, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Coal Harbor. Killed in action, June 16, 1864, near Petersburg, Va., while in command of the Regiment.
J. Smith Brown, enlisted as private in Berdan's U. S. S. S., May 27, 186_; promoted to be Corporal, Sergeant Major, Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant. Resigned after the battle of Antietam and joined the 126th Regiment as Adjutant. Promoted to be Major, November 20, 1863; Commissioned as Lt. Colonel, April 18, 1864; Commissioned as Colonel, June 17, 1864. Appointed U. S. Inspector, Stale of Wisconsin, April 2, 1864, with Headquarters at Madison; Ordered to St. Louis December 18, 1864, before an Examining Board and recommended for Colonel of U. S. Colored Troops, and appointed April 12, 1865, but recruiting was stopped before the regiment was organized. Participated in the following battles: Lewinsville, 2d Big Bethel, Yorktown, Siege of Yorktown, Williamsburgh [sic], Hanover Court House, Mechanicsville, Ga___ Hill, Chicahominy, White Oak Swamp, Chan__ City Cross Roads, Malvern, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Sharpsburgh, Gettysburgh [sic], Mine Run.
Philo D. Phillips, appointed Major from Captain, November 27, 1862, vice Wm. H. Baird. Participated in the engagements at Harper's Ferry and Bristow Station. Resigned October 29, 1863.
Albert S. Wheeler, appointed Adjutant, July 17, 1862, resigned September 1862.
John K. Loring, appointed Quartermaster July 15, 1862. Acting Quartermaster, 3d Brig., S. O. No. 134, Headquarters, 3d Brig., 3d D, 22d A. C. Promoted to be Captain and C. S. July 27, 1864.
John C. Stainton, appointed 2d Lieutenant December 16, 1862. Appointed Regimental Quartermaster September 1, 1864, in which capacity he has acted ever since,—John K. Loring acting as Brigade Quartermaster,—Mustered as 1st Lieutenant October 27, 1863.
T. Spencer Harrison, appointed Chaplain August 22, 1862.
F. M. Hammond, appointed Surgeon July 16, 1862. Appointed Chief Medical Director of the 3d Brig., 3d Div., 2d A. C., by S. O. No. 3, Headquarters Abercrombie's Division, 22d A. C., January 1, 1863. Placed in charge of 2d Corps Hospital, City Point, Va., per S. O. No. 184, Headquarters 2d A. C., June 26, 1864. Detached at Elmira January 6, 1865, per S. O. No 8. Rejoined the regiment from Elmira March 27, 1865. Appointed Surgeon-in-Chief 1st Div., 2d A. C.
Charles S. Hoyt, appointed 1st Assistent [sic] Surgeon August 11, 1862. Promoted to be Surgeon 39th Regt. N. Y. Volunteers May 18, 1864.
G. D. Peiltir, appointed 2d Assistant Surgeon August 11, 1862. Resigned November 3, 1863, per S. O. No. 285, Headquarters A. P. Ferdinand M. Pasco, appointed Assistant Surgeon November 6, 1864. Promoted from private "I" Co., 111th Regiment N. Y. V.
John F. Randolph, enlisted as private in "E" company, August 15, 1862. Promoted to be Corporal January 1, 1863, promoted to be Sergeant March 1, 1863. Sergeant Major July 2, 1863, 2d Lieutenant, "E" company, February 29, 1864, 1st Lieutenant "E" company, September 22, 1864, Adjutant, September 22, 1864. Participated in the following battles: Harpers Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, Wilderness, Po River, Spotsylvania, where he was shot through the body. Returned August 14, 1864. Deep Bottom, Reams' Station, before Petersburg, Boydton Plank Road, South Side Railroad, Farmville and all the engagements up to the surrender of General Lee.
Spencer F. Lincoln, 2d Lieutenant "D" company, promoted to be 1st Lieutenant November 27, 1862. Adjutant December 7, 1863. Participated in the following battles: Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, Wilderness, Po River, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Coal Harbor, wounded, June 16, before Petersburg, died July 18, 1861.

Non-Commissioned Staff.
Sergeant Major De Witt Farrington, appointed August 5, 1862. Promoted to be 1st, Lieutenant, "H" company, December 2, 1862, resigned March 14, 1863.
Henry P. Cook, appointed Sergent [sic] Major December 2, 1862, killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863.
John F. Randolph, appointed Sergeant July 2, 1863, promoted to be 2d Lieutenant, "E" company, February 29, 1864.
Henry M. Lee, appointed Sergeant Major February 29, 1864, promoted 2d Lieutenant, "F" company, June 10, 1864.
Milo H. Hopper, appointed Sergeant Major June 10, 1864, promoted to be 1st Lieutenant "B" company, January 20, 1865.
Charles A. Garlinghouse, appointed Sergeant Major January 20, 1865, promoted to be 2d Lieutenant "B" company, March 1, 1865.
Albert S. Andrews, appointed Sergeant Major May 1, 1865.
Quarter Master Sergeant John Stevenson, appointed Quartermaster Sergeant August 2, 1862, promoted and transferred to N. Y. Artillery.
John Davis, appointed Quartermaster Sergeant March 1, 1864, vice John Stevenson.
Hospital Stewards: Henry T. Antis, appointed August 20 1862, discharged to accept position as Assistant Surgeon November 20, 1862.
George W. Becker, appointed November 20, 1862.
Chief Buglers: John M. Chadwick, appointed September 1, 1862. Appointed leader of brigade Band January 1, 1863.
Charles A. Garlinghouse, appointed May 1, 1863.
George A. Miller, appointed January 20, 1865, promoted from Musician "A" company.
Lolman E. Jacobus, appointed January 20, 1865, promoted from private "C" company.
Commisary [sic] Sergeant Charles R. Lisk, appointed July 12, 1862.
"A" Company.—Captain Truman N. Burrill, appointed Captain August 1, 1862. Honorably discharged the service of United States on account of physical disability per S. O. No. 187, Adjutant Generals Office, April 24, 1863.
Captain Morris Brown, Jr., promoted from Sergeant to be 1st Lieutenant, vice S. A. Barras dismissed the service, December 18, 1862, promoted to be Captain, vice Truman N. Burrill honorably discharged April 24, 1863. Killed in action at Petersburg, Va., June 22, 1864. Participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station. Mine Run, Wilderness, Po River, Spottsylvania, where he was wounded in the knee, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Coal Harbor, before Petersburg, June 16 and 22. During the battle of Gettysburg Capt. Brown saw a battle flag in the opposing ranks upon which was enscribed [sic] among other battles, Harper's Ferry. Making a desperate charge he succeeded in capturing it, and, being supported by Lieutenant Wilson and 21 of his men, he brought, back 90 prisoners. This flag had the names of 13 battles inscribed on it, including  1st Manassas.
S. A. Barras, appointed 1st Lieutenant August 4, '62. Dismissed the service December 13, '62. with loss of all pay and allowances by Special Order No. 393, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, December 13, '63. Was in battle of Harper's Ferry.
Samuel Wilson, promoted to be 2d Lieutenant December 27, '62. vice George D. Carpenter, resigned; promoted to be 1st Lieutenant April 24, '63. Promoted to be Captain in United States Colored Troops. Participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auburn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run and Morton's Ford.
George D. Carpenter, appointed 2d Lieutenant August 4, '62, resigned December 29, '62.
Charles Forshay, promoted to be 2d Lieutenant, April 21, '63, vice Samuel Wilson promoted—returned to duty as Sergeant for misbehavior in front of the enemy at Gettysburg, Pa, July 2, '63, S, O. No 186, H'd Q'rs Army Potomac, August 24, '63—returned to duty as private by G. C. M. for Cowardice and misbehavior before the enemy at battle of Bristow Station October 14, '64.
James H Griggs appointed 2d Lieutenant June 9, '64, from Sergeant "B" Co., participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Auborn Ford, Bristow Station, Mine Run, Morton's Ford, Before Petersburg.
John H. Brough, "E" Co., appointed 2d Lieutenant August 2, '62—appointed Captain December 22, '62. Discharged to accept appointment as 2d Lieutenant in the Invalid Corps March 7, '64. Was in battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg.
Frederick Stewart, "G" Co., appointed 1st Lt. Aug. 15, '62. Resigned Jan. 6, '63. Was in battle of Harper's Ferry.

Enlisted Men.
Wallace Betts, discharged at Chicago, Nov. 4, '62.
O. M. Paris, discharged for disability Sept. 17, '63.
CORPORALS.—Daniel Kelley, promoted to 4th Sergeant November 2, '62. Discharged Feb. 5, '63.
Smith Fuller, appointed Sergeant. Died of wounds May 15, '64.
Barnard Gelder, discharged for disability [sic] December 11, '63.
Charles Stebbins, reduced to the ranks; transferred to the Invalid Corps, September 1, '63.—(Non commissioned officers are often reduced to the ranks, not from any fault, but in order that their places may be filled if they are to be absent for a long time.)
David H. Goff, died of wounds received at Gettysburg, July 4, '63.
Smith Stebbins, promoted to be Sergeant, and discharged for disability at Elmira Feb. 12, '64.
Lot W. Rodgers, discharged for disability October 5, '63.
Charles Norcott.
Privates—"A" Co —Allen R. M., promoted to be Sergeant; Allen Warren; Axtill William, missing in action July 2, '63, Gettysburg; Baker Oliver, deserted September 16, '62; Baker Wm.; Brisee L. P.; Bylington Geo. A.; Burns James, deserted September 19, '62—returned; Brainard Wm. H., recruit January 18, '65; Beebe William, promoted to be Principal Musician; Bezea Daniel J., deserted October 19, '62—returned December 3, '62, missing in action October 14, 63, Auburn; Bilson Henry, Deserted October 19, '62; Burch George; Chisson A. B., Deserted November 16, 62—returned April 4, '63, deserted July 4, '63 at Gettysburg; Cummins John; Conklin John, deserted October 19, '62; Cole Levy, discharged for disability February 15, '65; Danes Eben B., died of disease March 27, '63; Dubois Wm. H., deserted September 8, '62; Feagles A. K., deserted November 1, '62; Finch Daniel, promoted to be 2d Corporal November 7, '62, missing in action October 14, '63, Britsow—returned May 27, '64; Frost John H.; Garrison John H. deserted October 19, '62—Returned December 8, '62; Gelder Barnard, killed in action, Bristow Station, October 14. '63; Hainer William, deserted Oct. 19, '62—returned October 5,'63; Harford F. A., died of disease, Union Mills, Va., January 10, '63; Harris John; Henderson James, promoted to be Corporal; Henries Abner, deserted November 2, '62; Herries William, died of disease April 2, '63, at Baltimore; Hibbard James _., died of disease April 14, '63; House William P.; Kelly Neil; Lincoln R. A , discharged September 2, '62; Linkletter O. R.; Little David, deserted September 26, '62; Mace John C.; Manly Patrick, deserted September 17, '62—Returned November 1, '63; Maynard John D.; McNight George W. discharged for disability at Chicago, Feb. 7, '63; Middleton A. W., missing in action Oct. 14, '63, Bristow, transferred to V. R. C. March 15, 65; Millis George, deserted September 17, '62—returned, missing in action October 14, '63, Auburn,—returned May 27, '64; Moore Charles E., discharged May 21, '63, at Alexandria, Va.; Moore Henry O., promoted to be Corporal; O'Brien Michael, recruit November 20, '64; Moshier Alexander; Murphy Lewis, transferred to the Invalid Corps Sept. 30, '63; McAllaster James, discharged December, '62; Nicholson C. M., missing in action October 14, '63, Bristow; Oakly John J., discharged for disability at Chicago, February, '63; Olds A. C.; Parris David H.; Parris Peter F.; Parker J. W.; Parsons H. T., died of disease Sept. 21, '63, Washington; Partridge, L. T.; Pool Francis E., transferred to V. R. C. March 15, '65; Pool Robert H., killed in action at Gettysburg July 2, '63; Pool William J., missing in action October 14, '63, Auburn—Returned May 22, '64—transferred to V. R. C. January 10, 65; Power Charles H.; Richard Anson, recruit November 1, '64, transferred to 186th New York, February 4, '65; Reed Calvin L.; Rice Sidney L.; Robinson William, deserted August 25, '62; Ryan James, deserted September 8, '62—returned October 2, '63; Sheppard Albion C., promoted to be Corporal; Sherwood Cyrus, Deserted October 19, '62—returned December 8, '62; Shoemaker W. H., missing in action October 14, '63; Slingerland Spencer, discharged for disability at Centerville, Va., March 31, '63; Sterling C. W.;
Stevens George A., deserted October 19, '62; __obridge W. H., appointed Corporal—killed in action March 25, '65, at Petersburg; Strong Charles P., discharged on account of disability January 14, '63; Taylor David D., promoted to be Corporal November 7, '62; Taylor David E.; Taylor James; Tears David O., discharged for disability at Chicago January, '63; Tobin Thomas, killed in action at Auburn, Va., October 14, '63; Traverse Isaac,  died at Chicago, November 24, '62; Turner Spencer, deserted September 8, '62; Turner Alexander, died at Harper's Ferry, Va., September 24, '62; Tyler Phineas, appointed Sergeant, discharged for disability December 23, '64. Tindle William R., killed in action June 17 '64; Twitchell T. B., killed in action at Auburn, Va. October 14, '63; Vaughn John, transferred to the Invalid Corps, Washington, September 1, '63; Warren James E.; Walters Charles S.; Youngs Martin, deserted September 25, '62—returned January 1, '63, discharged for disability October 13, '63; Abed D. Allen; Hamilton Thomas, recruit February 15, '65.
"B" Co.—William A. Coleman, appointed Captain August 8, '62. Resigned March 18, '64. Participated in the battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg.
Richard A. Bassett, appointed 1st Lieutenant August 8, '62. Promoted to be Captain vice William A. Coleman, resigned. Discharged on account of physical disability January 18. '65.—Was in battles of Harper's Ferry and Gettysburg.
H. M. Lawrence, Jr., appointed 2d Lieutenant August 8, '62. Appointed 1st Lieutenant vice R. A. Bassett promoted, discharged on account of wounds August 10, '64. Was in battles of Haper's [sic] Ferry, Gettysburg, where he was wounded, Wilderness and Po River.
Sergeants.—1st Sergeant Oscar C. Squyer, mustered out on consolidation December 25, '61.
T. Spencer Harrison, appointed to be Chaplain August 22, '62.
Erasmus E. Bassett, promoted to be 2d Sergeant and Color Sergeant, killed in action at Gettysburg. July 2, '63.
Henry P. Cook, promoted to be Sergeant Major December 2, '62, vice D. C. Farrington promoted to be 1st Lieutenant H Co., killed in action at Gettysburg July 2, '63.
Henry O. Childs, deserted November 21, '62.
CORPORALS. Edwin Jessup, promoted to be Sergeant, transferred to V R C.
M Edward Knapp, discharged on account of wounds at Elmira January, '63.
Martin P. McCarrick, appointed Sergeant, missing in action at Reams' Station August 25, '64, died at Andersonville, Ga.
George Chapman, killed in action Po River, Va., May 10, '64.
William McAllister, discharged November, '62, at Chicago.
Samuel A Nichols, killed in battle at Gettysburg, July 3, '63.
Henry S. Nichols, mustered out on consolidation December 25, '64.
Elias A Norris, killed at Gettysburg, July 2, '63.
PRIVATES—Armstrong William H., promoted to be Corporal and mustered out on consolidation; Auston Charles Wm, deserted September 24, '62; Bates Oren; Bunce Melvin, missing in action at Gettysburg, Pa, July 2, '63; Beach Rollin, killed on Bolivar Heights, September 15, '62; Bowen Wm H, wounded on Bolivar Heights September 15, '62, since died; Butler James, deserted November, '62, at Chicago; Badger James, deserted November 21, '62, at Chicago; Brace Ansel; Brown Nathan D; Blansett John, wounded at   Harper's Ferry—went home without leave from Chicago—returned April 5, '63, transferred to invalid Corps November 6, '63, Co. "G"; Booth James M, died of disease at Union Mills December 31, '62; Booth Moses N; Bullock Reuben, discharged for disability March 14, '61; Bellis Isaac, killed in battle on Bolivar Heights September 15, '62; Cassion William, wounded and taken prisoner May 6, 1864; Coryell Edwin, transferred to Invalid Corps G O No 370 War Department, November 18, '63; Chase Benj F; Dunning Charles H, missing in action at Reams' Station August 25, '64; Davis George W, deserted at Centerville, June 25, '63—returned September 23, '63; Du Pew Isaac P, transferred to Invalid Corps August 1, '63; Edgett Orren; Ellis Horace F, promoted to be Corporal and killed in action at Po River, May 10, '64; Embree Rowland LeRoy, killed in battle on Bolivar Hights, September 15, '62; Finger John W, missing in action at Gettysburg July 3, '63; Garrison Mortimer, died July 18, '63, of wounds received at Gettysburg; Gaylord Charles W, killed at Gettysburg, July 2, '63; Griggs James H, promoted to be Sergeant; Huson James K P, killed at Gettysburg, July 2, '63; Hobart L Will, killed at Gettysburg, July 2, '63; Houghtailing Alexander H, deserted September 24, '62: Houghtailing Christopher, deserted September 24, '62—returned September 29, '63; Houghtailing Amos V, died of disease at Harrisburg, October, '62; Hyatt Charles M, promoted to be Corporal; Hays William A, deserted September 18, '62; Hays George, deserted September 18, '62; Haight E, Died Union Mills, February 7, '63; Hamlin Frank R, promotcd to be Sergeant; Hopkins E C, promoted to be Corporal; Hicks Charles C, promoted to be Corporal; Hicks Ja's E, discharged December 7, '62, at Washington; Hollowell Joseph, killed in battle at Gettysburg, July 3, '63; Lathy James H, deserted November 21, '62—returned March 16, '64; Lott L C, deserted November 21, '62—returned March 4, '64; Miles R H, deserted November 21, '62—returned April 16, '64; Millis Nelson, deserted September 16, '62—returned March '63—deserted June 27, '63—returned September 26, '63—deserted December 2, '63, at Culpeper; Moshier James H; Millard E F; Mathews Anson, died of disease at Union Mills, March 2, '63; McCarrick Thomas T, promoted to be Corporal and mustered out on consolidation; Moore George; Norman Peter M, transferred to Invalid Corps, G O No. 370, War Dep't, November 18, '63; Osborne John H, discharged for disability February 17, '63. at Union Mills; Osborne Caleb, deserted September 25, '62; Pinneo C R; Pettingill F B; Perigo David, deserted November 21, '62, at Chicago; Purdy S C; Potter Amos J, discharged January 13, ''65, for disability; Potter Orrin, Discharged at Chicago, December, '62; Putnam Andrew, died at Union Mills, January 13, '63; Quick Albert, killed in battle on Bolivar Heights, September 15, '62; Raymond William, died July 13, '63, of wounds received at Gettysburg; Roney J Nelson, discharged for disability February 13, '63, at Union Mills; Smith O B; Snyder J B, deserted September, '62; Sprague A S, died at Union Mills, January 16, '63; Stanton W F, discharged for disability at Baltimore, Janury [sic] 22, '63; Sutton Robert F, discharged for disability February 27, '65; Stephens Charles P, promoted to be Corporal; 'Sherwood Asa, missing in action May 6, '65; Seward C A, deserted September 26, '62; Thomas Albert; Thomas William H; Trimmer Lewis, killed at Bolivar Heights, September 15, '62; Tyler George, wounded and taken prisoner at Auburn, October 14, '63—returned May 27, '64—wounded May 30, '64 and died while at home; Tuttle John R, killed on Bolivar Heights, September 15, '62; Updyke James; Walker James E, deserted November 21, '62, at Chicago; Wall Jerry, was presented a medal of honor by Major General Mead for capturing a rebel battle flag at Gettysburg; Weaver Luther; Wheaton Richard, discharged for disability April 11, '63, at Washington; Wilkin D J, transferred to V R C; Wolf Josiah, deserted December 22, '62, at Chicago; Hedden George, arrested as deserter from the 27th New York Volunteers, and assigned to this regiment to serve out his time, October 6, '63; Tuthill Joseph R, killed in battle on Bolivar Hights, September 15, '62.
"C" Co.—Morse Private Myron C, discharged for disability July 14, '64; Murdock Albert, joined March 24, '64.
"D" Company.—John J. Monroe, joined Feb. 4, 1864, wounded in Wilderness; Eugene Smith, joined Feb. 4, 1864, wounded.
"E" Company.—Green Fayette, reduced to the ranks Oct. 27, '62, promoted to 5th Sargeant [sic] Jan. 1, '63, mustered out on consolidation; Scott Byron W., promoted to 1st Corporal, October 27 '62, color Corporal, Jan. '63, mustered out on consolidation; Harris Alonzo; Abeel Ranson H; Raymond Chas E, discharged for disability, Centreville, Va., April 1, '63; Benedict Jewet, discharged for disability, October 17, '62; Palmer Edwin, wounded Maryland Heights. September 13, '62, discharged June 12, '62; Runyan Henry, promoted to Corporal; Dunn Theron T, Transferred to V R C, March 23, '54; Knapp F R, deserted Nov 2, '62; Randolph John F, promoted to be 1st Corporal, Jan 1, '63, promoted to be 1st Sergeant March 1, '63, Sergeant-Major, July 2, '63; Creed Jonathan, transferred to V R C, Mar. 23, '64.
"F" Company.—Shearman A W, discharged at Chicago.
"G" Company.—Bairen John; Collins James; Culver J P, promoted to be corporal; Cayton J H; Day Daniel, died July 20, '63, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa, July 2d, '63; Feagles B K, Died of wounds Feb 19, '64, Stevensburg; George Henry, deserted Sept 28, '62, returned Sept 28, '63; Hudson W T, deserted Nov 9, '62: Mead Daniel, deserted June 25, '63, (day the regiment started for Gettysburg) returned Sept 26, '63. died of disease in hospital; Potts Norman, Deserted Sept 26, '62, returned Nov 1, '63, died Jan 13, '64 of disease; Place James; Rector Madfred; Rector John; Shaw George B; Bolger Patrick, wounded; Torris James, deserted Nov 26, '62; Snyder James, died of disease, Oct 11, '63, at Potter, N Y.
"H" Company.—Copley J Jr., reduced to the ranks, died of small pox Jan 2, '64; Briggs Nathaniel J ; DePew Abijah, discharged for disability, Oct 6, '63.
"J" Company.—Donnelly Geo.
"K" Company.—Adams John C; Erwin Geo W; Harris Geo W; Norman James, deserted Oct 5, '62, returned Feb 4, '64, dishonorably discharged, G C M, and sent to Dry Tortugas to hard labor; Wilson Hiram.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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