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128th Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

AMENIA TIMES.
Amenia, Tuesday, May 12, 1863.
The 128th Regiment.
We are favored with the following extracts from a letter written to a friend in this village, by J. B. COFFIN, of the 128lh Regt. N. Y. S. V., now encamped near Carrollton, La., dated April 23d:
"I visited the Mechanic's Institute yesterday to see the wounded of the different Regiments who had been participants in the recent battles. I had first to procure a pass from the Medical Director, and was then admitted to the Hospital. It was a sad sight, I assure you. Here and there, scattered all over the room, lay young and intelligent-looking men upon beds, suffering from their wounds. Some were wounded in the arms, some in the body, others in the head, and several more bore the marks of Rebel liking on their hands and legs. I saw one young man belonging to the 159th N. Y. that was shot in the side, the ball passing through the body and then glancing upward, passed through the arm leaving the bone broken behind it. Among the wounded are several of my Hudson acquaintances, all of whom, (with but one exception,) are but slightly injured. This one was wounded in the side of the head by a piece of shell, and cannot long survive. It is only about three or four weeks ago that this same man was discharged from this (the Barracks) Hospital. Little did I think when I bade him good bye that I should look upon him in such a position as he is now. He recognized me and requested me to write to his cousin, who is a member of the 128th. The wounded all seemed to be in good spirits, and some were anxious to return to their Regiments. At the St. James' Hospital I found both of the Lieutenants of Co. D. 128lh—Doty and Armstrong —and a young Hudsonian with whom I was intimately acquainted. The two former left on account of disability, and the letter was among the wounded of the 159th. Well, leaving the Hospital and its heart-sickening scenes, I will look after our own regiment.
"The 128th left Camp Parapet on Saturday, and proceeded on an expedition to Pearl River. Col. COWLES was in command, and has rendered a good account of himself. They left Hickok's Landing at 2 o'clock and arrived at Fort Pike at sundown. The expedition then started for Mulatto Bayou, and arrived at a point about seven miles from its mouth at midnight. Here was landed the 128th and the 1st Vermont Battery. Here came the "tug of war." Now that the troops were on shore, who was to pilot them to their destination? This was the question. Some contrabands were accordingly seized and ordered to show the way, but they informed the Colonel that the path was a very difficult one, and that they could scarcely find it in the day-time, much less at the dead of night. The Colonel was not to be out done, however, and so he drew his men up in line, and gave the order to march, and, wheeling about, embarked his command and returned to Fort Pike. From there he went up Pearl River to Napoleon, which place he reached about daybreak. Here he left a detachment of 250 men, under command of Capt. Gilford, Co. A, with orders to proceed to Gainesville by land, while he (the Colonel) with the remainder of the men proceeded up the river to the same place. Curious as it may seem the orders and plans were so minutely carried out, that at the very moment the Col. was landing his troops in front of the town, Capt. Gifford, with his command, entered the rear of the place. After forming this junction, small scouting parties were sent in various directions to look after produce, lumber, and boats, or whatever might be of value. Learning that a steamboat was lying about fifteen miles further up the river a party was sent to look her up and take possession. She was soon spied out,—although concealed by the bushes and trees along the river's bank,—and brought down to Gainesville. It was soon discovered that part of her machinery was among the missing and that without it the boat would be useless. The Colonel had a suspicion that the 'lost might be found," and laid his plans accordingly. First he searched for the owner's wife and, having found her, then searched the house, in which he found about $250 in gold, and a like amount in Confederate Scrip. The woman professed to know nothing about the missing machinery, or where it was placed; but upon the Colonel's informing her that he should retain the cash until the "lost was found," she suddenly recollected something about their being hid away near the wharf. The missing machinery war soon found and the boat put in running order. So much for Yankee ingenuity. The steamer mentioned proved to be the A. G. Brown, a. swift going craft, about four years old. The captured money was returned to the owner's wife. While all this was going on, Capt. Hibbard, of the Vermont Battery, together with three officers and a private, discovered the schooner George Washington, which they captured and brought also to Gainesville. One of the other parties, overhauled three more schooners; but being unable to bring them away, burned them. A large number of mattresses were found and taken possession of. They were left by a section of rebel cavalry who, upon hearing of our advance, executed one of their stragetic [sic] movements—skedaddled. Besides the above mentioned property, the expedition captured 10 bales of cotton, 222 barrels of rosin, 108 barrels of tar, 1 metalic [sic] life-boat, and 21 cases of turpentine. The inhabitants are represented as having lots of money; but very little food, or clothing. Many of the whites, as well as the blacks, are suffering for the want of breadstuffs. The men had nearly all been forced ... few had fled to the swamps, and were there being hunted by rebel cavalry. Great credit is given to the 128th for their good behavior. The Colonel speaks very highly of both officers and men, and says they were active and vigilant. Capts. BOSTWICK and PARKER, and Lieutenant SINERBOX took a conspicuous part in the expedition, and they are particularly mentioned as having done their duty nobly. Who said the 128th was never going to do anything toward winding up the big clock—rebellion? Not a man was lost on our side, nor a gun fired. The expedition was a perfect success; and you may expect to hear of similar ones before long. The regiment returned to Camp Parapet yesterday—having been gone five days—in good spirits, and ready for another excursion of the same sort.
"The 159th lost in their recent encounter with the Rebels 160, killed, wounded and missing. The Regiment now musters but 300 men fit for duty, at least I am told so by a member of it.
"We have more good news from this Department to-day. Gen. Banks has taken Alexandria, La., and is still pressing upon the rebels with fair chances of driving them to Vicksburgh [sic], where he intends, no doubt, to bag the whole lot. In addition to this we have a report that six of our gunboats ran by Vicksburgh [sic] on the night of the 16th and that the bombardment of the place had commenced."

THE 128TH REGIMENT.—We are permitted to make the following extract, which will interest many readers, from a letter written by an officer of the 128th Regiment, under date of Saturday, June 20.
There was quite a heavy fight at Port Hudson last Sunday. Our Regiment was deployed as skirmishers on the extreme left, and our loss was one killed and 19 wounded. The wounded in my company are Henry Morris, who had the tip of his elbow taken off with a ball; Andy Silvernail, slightly wounded; Andrew Jackson, shot in the arm; George H. Fitchett, wounded in the arm. The wounds are all reported "slight," so shall expect my men (I can't call them "boys" after going through two such fights) to be as well as ever in a few days. Sergt. Light is sick; Sergt. Nesbitt is wagon master, and Sergt. Cannon is Lieut. in one of the colored regiments. I am getting well fast, and the Docotr says that in two weeks I shall be able to do duty,—that is light duty; but I am anxious to be at Port Hudson when the final assault is made, and so shall not wait two weeks before I return.

The 128th Regiment.
The Brigade of which this regiment is a part has been ordered from Donaldsonville, and have received orders to take post at Baton Rouge, which is a much more agreeable and healthy location.

128th Regiment.
Capt. R. J. Mitchell will leave for New Orleans to rejoin his Regt. (the 128th) early next week. Letters or packages to be forwarded by him, must be left at the residence of A. C. Mitchell, Esq., Allen street, by noon on Saturday next.

The 128th Regiment.—We are gratified to learn that James Smith, Esq., of our city, has been promoted to be Colonel of the 128th Regiment. On the breaking out of the war Col. Smith, then a Lieutenant in the famous "Ellsworth Grey" corps raised a company and entered service as a Captain of Company A, 20th Regiment. In this capacity he served until the organization of the 128th Regiment, when he was offered and accepted the Lieutenant Colonelcy. So faithfully did he discharge his duties in this position that now upon the death of Col. Cowles, we find our friend Smith in command of as fine a Regiment as ever met the enemy. His hosts of friends were will rejoice with us at the well-merited advancement of a Poughkeepsian.
Col. Smith reports, under date of the 18th of June, the following names of men belonging to his Regiment, who were wounded in the action of June 14:
Killed.—Private Robert P. Churchill, Company C.
Wounded.—Capt. G. W. Van Slyck, Company E, (now on duty); Lieut. John P. Williamson, Acting Adjutant; Private Alexander Shaw, Co. A; Martin Cody, Co. A; H. W. Morris, Jr., Co. D; Andrew Jackson, Co. D; Andrew J. Silvernail, Co. D; George H. Fitchett, Co, D; Sergt. ____ Thompson, Co. E; Private W. R. Showerman, Co. E; Sergt. Daniel Warren, Co. F; Private C. McManamy, Co. G; Private Wm. Spreadbury, Co. H; Private Wm. Brundage, Co. H; Sergt. Richard Enoch, Co. L; Corp. J. H. Miller, Co. K; Private Allen Sheldon, Co. K; John Haskel, Co. K; Daniel Westley, Co. _; _. _. Miller, Co. K.

Death of Capt. Edward Gifford.
By the return of his brother James, intelligence was received last week of the death, at New Orleans on the 10th inst., of Capt. EDWARD GIFFORD, CO. A, 128th Regiment. He fell a victim to the typhoid fever, which is making such fearful havoc in the ranks of our northern soldiers.
Capt. Gifford was a brave and capable officer and had already distinguished himself in the military operations against Port Hudson. His death is a severe loss to the Regiment, and will long be mourned by his many friends in this city. The remains will be brought home at some future time for interment.

Soldiers of Ohio, in Rosecrans; army, are denouncing the nomination of Vallandigham with the greatest vehemence. A number of regiments have already adopted and sent home resolutions on the subject which will by no means add to the comfort of Vallandigham's supporters.

NOT DEAD.—The Warren Mail says that Lieut. FRED. WILKINSON whom we mentioned a short time since as among the killed at Port Hudson is alive and well. He will have as good a chance to learn what folks intended to say about him after he was gone as did Lieut. (now Capt.) Sam. BAILEY after the battle of Williamsburg. We have often wondered if the flattering obituary ...

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHTH REGT. N. Y. VOLS.
Killed—Peter Wire, C; Chas E Kisshour, C; Corp J O Sparks, D; Corp J McCann, G; Geo Swords, H; Wm Laughian, H; R O Smith, I; Ed Van Nosdall, I; Jas Brown, K.
Wounded—Major F S Keese, back; Serg J C Delamater, A, side; P C Kinnaley, A, arm; P McGrath, A, ankle; A Williams, A, hand; Thos Lanagan, A, neck; O _ Tweedy, B, bowels; W B Orb, B, breast; L Rosell, B, side; Wilton Brownell, B, toe; C H Ferris, B, leg; D H Hanburgh, C, leg; L W Cashdolar, C, leg; A Govel, C, hand; D Wenon, C, hand; C Rikert, C, thigh; L Summons, C, bowels; J R Schryver, C, leg; William Hover, C, wrist; 1st Lt A R Hart, D, knee; 1st Serg R B Light, D, wrist; E F Halleck, D, hip; W Hineys, D, leg; G F Filchett, D, head; I F Ward, D, leg; R A Palmer, D, side; H Roth, D, shoulder; Serg J W Medler, D, groin; E J Bleuvelt, D, groin; Wm Conlan, D, arm; 1st lt Chas Van Tine, F, side; Serg N Kilmer, F, arm and hip; Serg C W Browne, F, hip; 2d Lieut Geo Murrell, C, hip; 1st Serg A M Osborne, G, leg; Corp M Storre, G, breast; W B Hand, G, arm; Wm Myers, G, shoulder; Thos Brown, H, side; W Marsh, H, shoulder; Thos Mahon, H, head; Corp S D Frowans, H, hand; G F Appleby, I, hand; Capt M V B De Bogart, K, breast; Serg S Brewer, K, hand; Wm Kellerhouse, K, bowels; Thos Doran, K, hand; J W Osterhause, K, arm; Thomas Rice, K, leg; Jno Wallace, K, leg.
Missing—E J Cains, B; Wm Park, D; R Saunders, D; J Smith, D; A Shell, D; DeLaney Myers, F; Corp M Keans, G; M Teator, G; Sergt C A Weller, H; C Ham, K; Wm H Traver, K; Chas Wooden, C, wounded and missing.

Description of Port Hudson.
The following brief sketch of Port Hudson will prove interesting at this time:—
Port Hudson is about twenty-five miles above Baton Rouge, on the east side of the Mississippi. It is at a point where a bend forms almost a right angle, thus completely commanding the river both ways. On the north, for a distance of eight miles, it is protected by an impassable swamp, which is bounded on the side nearest Port Hudson by Thompson's Creek, the bank of which is a precipitous bluff, crowned by an entrenched abattis. This abattis extends from the river eastward till it joins a series of entrenchments nine or ten miles in extent, sweeping to the south in a semi-circle till they rest upon the river on a crest of a range of high hills. This was the position carried by Gen. Weitzel. The country in the rear is rolling, and possesses many natural advantages in favor of the enemy. Between Baton Rouge and port Hudson is a long stretch of territory difficult of access at all times, being covered by dense woods and undergrowth, and abounding in bayous and marshes. The place, both by nature and art, is unquestionably one of great strength.
The water defences of Port Hudson are said to consist of eight batteries, numbering between twenty and thirty guns. One of these batteries is stationed on a bluff eighty feet high. Another is planted just below the mouth of Thompson's creek. The most of the guns are 24s, 32s and 42s, but there are one or two 120-pounders. The land defences were chiefly built after the advance of the Federal forces to Baton Rouge. They mount in all some thirty or forty guns, some of them of heavy calibre, and in addition to these there are at least four field batteries which can be readily moved to any part of the works. The position seems to be entirely inclosed in a series of fortifications of the most elaborate and formidanle character. The probability is that the exterior intrenchments include others, as was found to be the case at Vicksburg. Indeed, the general plan of the defences at Port Hudson appears to be the same as at the point just mentioned, the only deviations being such as required by the variations in the surface of the country.
Port Hudson district is commanded by Maj. Gen. Franklin Gardiner, a veteran soldier and an able officer, who was assigned to duty there on the 27th of December last.
The troops of the post were under command of Gen. Beal.
A deserter from the Rebel army furnishes a statement of the defences of Port Hudson from which we condense the following:
In November last Beal's brigade was ordered to move with all haste to Port Hudson. There were not many troops there then, and the force now in it was hurriedly concentrated there. The troops, soon after their arrival, were put to constructing the works, and unceasing activity was rigidly enforced. In a short time the works began to assume a regularity and a strength which evinced their purpose and the use to which they would ere long be put. The more outer works consist of intrenched abattis, extending in the form of a semi-circle for some nine or ten miles. The outer entrenchments bristle with cannon of heavy calibre, which sweep all the approaches. Some forty siege guns, besides lighter field batteries, are in position here, together with two 120-pounders. Great reliance is placed on the strength of these works; but there are interior lines of defence upon which the Rebels can rally in case of being driven back.
These works are not of a continuous character, like the semi-circle of outer works, but are detached, erected on positions favorable to the Rebels in case they were compelled to fall back and abandon their outer defences. Heavy siege guns are planted on these fortifications. Between these works and the town itself are several swamps and thick undergrowth, adding considerably to the strength of the place. The water defences consist of ten batteries numbering between thirty and forty guns, some of them being 11-inch and others 12-inch bore. One of these batteries is stationed on a bluff eighty feet high. Another battery, the most westerly of the water defences, is situated below the mouth of Thompson's creek. There is also a mortar battery, intended for throwing hot shell. The guns generally, are 32s and 42s. These batteries were erected early in the war, but the land defences were principally built after the advance of the Union forces to Baton Rouge.

LATEST WAR NEWS.
DESPERATE BATTLE AT PORT HUDSON.—On the 27th of May a severe engagement took place at Port Hudson. Our line of investment was as follows:—The extreme right of Banks' force was commanded by Gen. Weitzel, with his own and the division of Gen. Emeroy; the right center by Gen. Grover; the left center by Gen. Auger, and the extreme left by Gen. T. W. Sherman—the artillery brigade, being under command of Gen. Arnold.
The Second Division, Gen. Sherman fought great determination and bravery, and the Sixth Michigan and One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York, with the Second Louisiana (colored) regiments, actually carried the rebel works in their front by brilliant bayonet charge. Their supports, however, failed to come up in time and they were ultimately obliged to fall back before overwhelming numbers. This charge cost us heavily in killed and wounded, for the Sixth Michigan, and One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York each lost about half their effective strength, while the negro regiment, which, all accounts agree, fought with wonderful coolness and gallantry, suffered in killed, and wounded, and missing, to the number of 600. Gen. Sherman led this attack in person, and fell, severely wounded in the leg. Gen. Neal Dow was also wounded. Col. Clarke, of the Sixth Michigan, was killed. Col. Cowles, of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York, was also killed by a bayonet thrust; and Lieut.-Col. Smith, of the Zouaves, was severely wounded.
In the center the assault was pushed by Gens. Auger and Grover with the greatest determination. The rebels, were slowly but surely forced back from their rifle pits and intrenchments into the main works.
On the right line, however, Gen. Weitzel achieved a decided success. His division by a determined charge carried the famous six-gun battery which sunk the sloop-of-war Mississippi when Admiral Farragut's fleet ran the gaunlet [sic] of the rebel works several weeks since. This important position, which completely commanded the channel way of the river, was held by Gen. Weitzel, and the heavy pieces mounted there were at once turned upon their former owners.
Our entire loss in the day's engagement was estimated at about 3,000, killed, wounded and missing.
Among the killed we notice that the 128th suffered the loss of Col. D. S. COWLES, Capt. A. DERWINT, Lieut. J. ARMSTONG, Lieut. F. WILKERSON, and Serg. C. VAN HYCK. Capt. E. GIFFORD, of Hudson, is reported as missing—either killed or taken prisoner.

List of Killed and Wounded Men of the 128th Reg't, N. Y. Vols. in the assault of May 27, 1863.
KILLED.
Colonel David S. Cowles.
WOUNDED.
Capt. Arthur DeWint, Co. F, arm.
PRISONER.
Capt. Edward Gifford, Co. A, captured May _.

Company A.
KILLED.
Privates David Plumb; Myron Poncher.
WOUNDED.
Private Ambrose Holsapple, slightly, back.

Company B.
KILLED.
1st Serg't Riley Burdick, Private Phillip Allen.
WOUNDED.
Serg't G. H. Kniffin, head; Corp. S. H. Williams, hand; do. R. A. White, shoulder; Privates J. Story, foot; G. Story, shoulder; M Sullivan, arm; John Worden, arm; Oliver J. Walters, hip; Plattes Nichols, shoulder; Geo. Brownell, hip; Nicholas P. Hammond, hip; Corp. William Denanny, (color guard) back.

Company C.
NONE.

Company D.
KILLED.
Privates F. Herlig; J. Low.
WOUNDED.
Corp. R. Ganley, leg; Privates James Myers, breast; Alfred Hitchock, mouth; Daniel Rider, finger; Isaac Weddle, leg; John Osborn, head.

Company E.
KILLED.
1st Serg't Chas. L. Van Slyck, Privates John Tripp; John T. McIntyre.
WOUNDED.
Privates Geo. H. Woodin, arm; James Coop, foot; John Mosher, head; William Sitzer, hand; Jonas Miller, hand; R. S. Harop, groin; Chas. Thompson, leg; Henry Cheever, leg; John Woodard, shoulder.

Company F.
KILLED.
Private John Hughes.
WOUNDED.
Corp. Geo. W. Hauver, hand; Privates Wm. Jeffers, hip; Lewis Pearsall, ankle; George U. Wood, head; Silas Partington, head; George Pollock, arm; Henry Wenger, hand.

Company G.
KILLED.
Privates Charles Smith; Otto Schurry.
WOUNDED.
Corp. P. G. Collins, legs; Privates D. Pultz, arm; J. Kells, leg; A. Keane, foot; J. Brown, shoulder; J. J. Mickle, legs; N. A. Stevens, finger; Wm. S. Hull, breast; H. McCormick, back; W. W. Gardner, arm; G. F. Shaffer, testicles; S. C. Schutt, foot; A. Kieselburgh, hand; E. Hauver, hand; Abram Brodhead, hip, June 3d.

Company H.
KILLED.
Privates John Thompson; Traver Murphy.
WOUNDED.
Serg't G. F. Dillon, back; Privates Alson Hill, legs; James green, Face; Wm. H. Odell, arm; Chas. S. Wilber, leg; Mark Sheperdson, hand; Geo. T. Deacon, arm.

Company I.
KILLED.
Privates Henry Mackey; Cornelius B. Williams.
WOUNDED.
Serg't James Anthony, hip; do. Christopher Bieri, shoulder; Privates John Carle, arm; Isaac B. Gurney, leg; Robert Ham, thigh; Larence Horan, foot; Theodore Keltz, hand; Jeremiah Lane, legs; Oliver Slocum, hand; Amos Traganza, arm.

Company K.
KIILLED.
Corp. R. E. Van Valkenburg, Private Martin Stingle.
WOUNDED.
Serg't T. Horan, (dangerously in the side); Corp. Geo. E. Lasher, leg; Privates Chas. A Clapper, arm; Peter Decker, back; Oliver Graves, face; Mathias Graff, hip; Thadeus Hamlin, shoulder; Wm. Kellerhouse, heel; James Portland, arm; Ward Vanderbogart, arm; Samuel Near, shoulder.

Recapitulation.
KILLED.
1 Officer; 2 Orderly Sergeants; 1 Corporal; 16 Privates. Total 20.
WOUNDED.
1 Officer; 5 Sergeants; 7 Corporals; 66 Privates.
Total 79.
One Captain taken prisoner.

Capt. DeWitt of the 128th was not killed. A letter written by him June 1st, has been received by James Mackin Esq., of Fishkill. In this letter he says Col. Cowles was shot. He also says "our right, and the Michigan 6th did well, but the less said about the others the better." He gives the names of the following from Fishkill who were killed and wounded:
Kolled—John W. Hughes.
Wounded.—George Deacon, Mattewan; James Green, Mattewan; Corporal Lewis Pearsall, Mattewan; Sergeant Garrett F. Dillon, Carthage Landing; George H. Pollock, Wappinger's Falls; ____ Partington, ____ Jeffards.

The skeleton regiments of Col. Coles, Columbia county, and Col. Fredenhall, of Albany, have been consolidated under Col. Coles. The combined regiment now numbers 650 men.

THE LAMENTED COL. COWLES—The remains of Col. Cowles arrived in this city per steamer Oregon yesterday morning, in charge of the committee from this city appointed for that purpose. They were conveyed immediately to the City Hall, where they remained in state until half-past 2 p. m. to-day, when they were to be removed to the Presbyterian church.
The condition of the remains were such that it was found to be impracticable to open the coffin, either in New York or on its arrival here, which was a very great disappointment to no only his relatives, but also his many friends in this city and county.
The city is thronged with people as we go to press, and places of business closed in accordance with recommendation of Mayor.
We shall give a full report of proceedings of the day in to-morrow's paper.

LOSS OF THE 128TH REGIMENT.—Colonel James Smith, of this regiment, writes from New Orleans under date of May 31st that the loss of the 128th regiment was in killed, wounded and missing not to exceed eighty, as far as he could learn that Col. Cowles was the only officer killed, and Capt. Gifford is now a prisoner at Port Hudson.

From the 128th Regiment.
The Late Fight at Port Hudson.
How the Regiment Fared.
St. James Hospital, New Orleans,
May 29, 1863—10 o'clock A. M.
Editors of the Eagle:—I have just returned from the performance of a sad duty, which was the preparation of the body of our late beloved Colonel for the purpose of sending it home, as we hope to do so by the steamer Columbia this morning. Colonel Cowles was killed at Port Hudson on Wednesday, the 27th inst., while leading his regiment in a charge on the main batteries of the enemy. It was about four o'clock in the afternoon that Gen. Dow's brigade was ordered to storm the works, and gallantly did the 128th New York and the 6th Michigan advance amid one of the most terrific showers of grape and shell that could be imagined. But they walked up in the face of it all, and scaling the parapet carried the works, driving the rebels from their guns. But unfortunately the other regiments of the brigade faltered (15th N. H. and 26th Conn.,) and failed to come to their support, consequently our men, with those of the 6th Michigan, were obliged to retire, and allow the rebels to retake their guns, and when the messenger left, the fighting was still going on, the rebels having come but of the intrenchments.
It was at the time that the regiments mounted the parapet that the Colonel received his wound, which was that of a bayonet in the left groin just below the pubic bone. The femoral vein was severed, resulting in fatal hemorrhage. He lived about an hour. He refused to be taken from the field, preferring to remain and die there. Almost his last words were "tell my brother that I died with my face to the foe.” To say that we greatly mourn his loss, but feebly express our feelings, for we dearly loved him. I learn that the loss of the 128th in killed was 40 to 50, while the number of wounded is of course much greater. Capt. De Wint, Co. F, was wounded, and Capt. Gifford, Co. A, missing, supposed to be killed; Lieut. Armstrong, commanding Co. D, (Capt. Parker being sick at this hospital,) was also killed; Sergeant Merritt of Co. I, was killed. The names of the others of the Po’keepsie Companies killed, I have as yet been unable to obtain. I was not on the field, having been left at the camp in charge of the sick and convalescent there. The body of the Colonel was brought to this city yesterday afternoon.
Nobly has the 128th N. Y. Regiment sustained the honor of Dutchess and Columbia in this affair. For certainly there is no record of any act of the war more gallant or daring than this of the 128th New York and the 6th Michigan.
Further particulars will perhaps have to be deferred until the sailing of another steamer. Respectfully, &c.,
C. H. ANDRUS,
1st Ass't. Surgeon 128th N. Y. V.

Col. Cowles.--Among the killed at the battle of Port Hudson, the particulars of which will be found elsewhere, was Col. Cowles, of the 128th Regiment. N. Y. S. V. Col. C. was originally attached to the 61st Regiment, but when the companies raised in Columbia county were consolidated with those raised here, Col. Van Zandt was appointed to the command of the Regiment, and Col. Cowles subsequently raised the 128th Regiment, which he commanded at the time of his death. He was among the most gallant of the gallant men who left our State to fight the battles of the Union. Brave as a lion; a man of culture and scholarly attainments; a gentleman in the fullest sense of the word; endowed with social qualities that made him a general favorite—his death will be deeply lamented in the community of which he has long been an ornament. He died as he lived, full of heroic ardor. His last words were—"Tell my mother that I died with my face towards the enemy. Boys, I have tried to do my duty, as a soldier and a man." Col. Cowles resided at Hudson, and was a lawyer by profession.
Among the many who enlisted in the 128th Regiment was a man by the name of Uriah Albertson who belonged to Co. D, Capt. Parker. Mr. Albertson it can be truly said joined the regiment and went forth to fight for his country out of pure patriotism. Shortly after his arrival at New Orleans he was taken sick with chronic diarrhoea and his disconsolate widow this week received the news of his death. He died on the 3d of June and leaves a wife and two or three children to mourn his loss. Peace to his ashes.

Col. DANIEL S. COWLES, reported killed in the assault on the works at Port Hudson, was a native of Canaan, Litchfield Co., Connecticut, and about forty years of age. He has lately been a resident of the City of Hudson, Columbia County, in this State, where he has hold some of the highest positions in the gift of the people, and always performed his duties with the highest degree of honor and success. Col. Cowles raised the regiment which he commanded—the 128th—by his own individual exertions. It is composed of the flower of Columbia and Dutchess Counties. The last words of Col. Cowles were, "Tell my mother I died with my face to the enemy."

Seargeant [sic] Bell, of the 128th Regiment N. Y. V., leaves for New Orleans on Thursday, the 2d of July next, and will be happy to take charge of articles and packages for the members of the 128th and 159th Regiments. Packages left at the Post Office, prior to Thursday 10 A. M., will be forwarded by him.

The Late Col. Cowles, 128th N. Y. Volunteers.—The loss of this brave officer who was killed while leading his men against the Rebel works at Port Hudson, is mourned by all who knew him. Lieut. Col. Smith has issued an appropriate order relative to the death of the soldier, and a series of resolutions have been adopted by the officers of the regiment, one of which reads as follows:—
Resolved, That in the private character, and the professional and military career of Col. Cowles, we recognize all the virtues, the ability, and every element of a pure, talented and brave character; the devotedness of his
Revolutionary forefathers was repeated in his career, in a cause not less sacred; that as in life he exemplified the principles and energy which should animate the patriot soldier, so in the gallantry which distinguished his fall he taught us how to die. In death and life, without fear and without reproach.
Col. Cowles was a resident of the city of Hudson, New. York.

Army Correspondence.
Headquarters 128th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.
In Field near Port Hudson.
June 1st, 1863.
A. N. Werb, Editor Star—Dear Sir: Our Regiment was among those who so bravely assaulted the enemy's works on the 27th of May, and suffered severely in the engagement. As it is of great interest to all the friends of the regiment, I send you a list of the killed and wounded for publication.
The character of the wounds were in many instances very severe, and many have since died; but their names I cannot give at present, as the wounded, after having their wounds dressed, were immediately forwarded to the large Military Hospitals at Baton Rouge and New Orleans.
Colonel Cowles fell on the battle-field bravely leading his men in the thickest of the fire; as calm and collected as if on dress parade. His undaunted bravery and noble bearing was remarked by all who saw him on that bloody field. He fell—lamented by all who were so happy as to know him while living.
I remain, Respectfully,
Your obedient servant,
PALMER C. COLE,
Surgeon 128th Regiment N. Y. S. V.

List of the killed and wounded of the 128th regiment, N. Y. V., in the battle at Port Hudson, May 27th, 1863.

Col. D. S. Cowles, killed.

Company A.
Captain E. Gifford, taken prisoner.
Private Myron Poncher, killed.
   "       David Plumb, wounded in right hip, and since died.
Private Ambrose Holsapple, wounded, right side, slight.

Company B.
Private Riley Burdick, killed.
Sergeant Gilbert Niffin, wounded in head, serious.
    "         Charles Humeston, bruised, slight.
Private N. B. Hammond, bruised on hip.
    "       Sherman Williams, wounded, in head.
    "      C. J. Walters, wounded in hip, slight.
    "      George Story,      "         "  shoulder.
    "      James Story,        "         "  ankle, slight.
    "      Phillip Allen,       "         "  groin, since died.
    "      J. Hart, bruised in right side.
    "      Leroy Lineberg, sprained ankle.
    "      Michael Sullivan, wounded in right shoulder.
    "      George Brownell, bruised in back.

Company D.
Private Frank Neigley, killed.
    "       John P. Low,      "
    "       Jacob O. Sparks, wounded in hand.
    "       James Myers, wounded in breast.
    "       Daniel B. Rider, wounded in fore-finger, right hand.
Private Alfred Hitchcock, wounded in mouth, bad.
    "       Isaac Waddle, wounded in left thigh, slight.
    "       Robert Sanders, sprained ankle.

Company E.
Lieutenant C. E. VanSlyck, killed.
Private John T. McIntyre,       "
    "      John Tripp,                  "
    "      R. S. Harris, bruised.
    "      H. Chapin, wounded in left leg.
    "      Wm. Sitcor,    "          "   "   hand.
    "      Jonas Miller, wounded in right hand.
    "      James Cooper, wounded in right foot.
    "      John Mosier, wounded in head and face.
Corporal C. H. Woodin, wounded in right arm.

Company F.
Captain De Wint, wounded in right arm.
Private John Hugh, killed.
Corporal G. H. Hauver, wound in left arm.
Private Geo. N. Wooden,   "      "  head.
    "       Wm. H. Jeffiers,    "      "  right thigh.
         "      Silas Partington,"      "  face.
         "      Lewis Pearsall,  "      "  right ankle.
         "      G. H. pollock,    "      "  left elbow.
         "      H. S. Wenger,    "      "  hand, bad.

                         Company G.   
Private Otto Shurry, killed.
    "      Charles Smith,   "
    "      John Brown, wounded slightly.
    "      _. Shaffer, wound in testicle.
    "      David Pultz, right arm, amputated.
Corporal Peter Collins, left leg, left arm, right ankle.
Private Ezra Hauver, right hand.
    "       Isaac J. Mickle, through thigh.
    "       Henry McCormick, in back, slightly.
    "       Job Kelis, right leg.
Sergeant Wm. P. Hall, right breast by shell, slight.
Private Augustus Keiselbury, hand.
    "       Wm. A. Stevens, hand.      
    "        Mike Keene, foot.
    "        S. C. Scutt, foot.
    "        W. Gardner, slightly.

Company H.
Private John Thompson, killed.
    "      Traver Murphy,      "
Sargeant [sic] G. Dillon, wounded in back.
Private George Denkon, contusion of left arm.
    "      James green, in head.
    "      W. H. Odell, left arm.
    "      Charles Wilbur, left leg.
    "      M. Sheperdson, right hand.
    "      A. Hill, both legs, bad.
    "      Joseph O'Rourke, right leg, slight.

Company I.
Private Henry Mackey, killed.
    "      C. B. Williams,     "
Sargeant [sic] Berrie, wound in shoulder.
    "      James Anthony, hip.
Private Robert Ham, thigh.
    "      John Carl, arm, slight.
    "      Isaac B. Gearney, left leg, slight.
    "      Oliver Slocum, hand.
    "      Jeremiah Lane, both legs, bad.
    "      Theodore Kells, hand.
    "      Amos Fraganza, wrist, bad.

Company K.
Corporal Robert Van Valkenburgh, killed.
Private Martin Stingle, killed.
    "      Wm. Kelterhouse, wound in heel.
    "      Peter Decker, Jr., hip.
    "      T. Hamlin, shoulder.
Sargeant [sic] T. Horn, breast, dead.
Private Charles Clapper, slightly.
    "      James Portland, wrist.
    "      Oliver Graves, cheek.
    "      Matthias Graff, hip.
    "      Samuel Near, bruised on shoulder.
    "      Ward Vandebogart, arm.
Corporal George E. Lasher, leg.

COL. COWLES' FUNERAL.—The funeral of Col. Cowles, of the 128th Regiment, N. Y. S. V. that was recruited in Columbia and Dutchess counties, and who was killed a few days since, while leading his brave men in the siege at Port Hudson, took place at Hudson on Monday last, of which city he had for a number of years been a resident. A large number of people from different points on the Hudson river, were present at the obsequies. The military, foremen, and Masonic fraternity, of which deceased was a member, turned out on the occasion. A goodly number of the brethren belonging to Rondout and Kingston Lodges were in attendance, and occupied respective positions in the procession.—The ceremonies at the church were very solemn and impressive, a very able discourse being preached on the  occasion.— Col. Cowles was a native of Caanan, Litchfield, Conn., and was in the 47th year of his age.

THE SERGEANT in the 128th Regiment, who had both legs shot away at the knees, in the battle of Port Hudson, and continued to fire at the enemy until he received a fatal wound, was Orderly Sergeant Chas. L. Van Slyck, of Co. E, and a citizen of Kinderhook.
We are permitted, through the kindness of Mr. James Mackin, to publish a private letter received by him from Capt. Arthur DeWint. It gives interesting particulars, which all our readers will be glad to learn. For the convenience of our readers, we give below the names of all those from this vicinity who were killed or wounded in the late battle at Port Hudson, as far as heard from:
KILLED.
John W. Hughes, son of Wm. Hughes, of this village.
WOUNDED.
Geo. Deacon, Matteawan.
James Green, Matteawan.
Corporal Lewis Pearsall, Matteawan.
Sergeant Garrett, F. Dillon, Carthage Landing.
George H. Pollock, Wappingers Falls.
____ Partington.
____ Jeffards.

The Fishkill Standard.
JAMES E. MEMBER, Proprietor.
JOHN W. SPAIGHT, Editor.
Fishkill Landing, June 11, 1863.
THE STANDARD HAVING A LARGE AND INCREASING CIRCULATION, ADVERTISERS WILL CONSULT THEIR INTERESTS BY HAVING THEIR ANNOUNCEMENTS APPEAR IN ITS COLUMNS.
The Battle at Port Hudson.
THE 128TH NEW YORK SUFFER SEVERELY.
The sad intelligence which reached us on Saturday from Port Hudson, forshadowing [sic] more terrible news to come, cast a gloom of sadness over the entire community. The reported death of Col. Cowlos, Captain Arthur DeWint, and other officers from this vicinity, with the simple announcement that the entire loss in this regiment would reach as high as two hundred, placed hundreds of weeping relatives and friends in anxious suspense for details.—Later intelligence must have a twofold effect. Upon some the gloom of sadness will deepen as they hear of dear ones, who have fallen in the fierce struggle; while others, who have been tortured by suspense, will have all their fears suddenly driven away, as they learn of the safety of those whom they feared were among the victims.
Below we give a list of those in the 128th, who were reported killed or wounded, in the New York Tribune of Saturday last, with such corrections as we are enabled to make by referring for names to a list of the entire regiment in our possession:
Col. David S. Cowles, Hudson, killed.
Capt. Edward Gifford, Hudson, missing.
Lieut. J. Armstrong, killed. We do not find such an officer on the list. There is, however, a Second Sergeant, Jacob Armstrong, of Hyde Park, who is probably the person named.
Lieut. Frederick Wilkinson Poughkeepsie, killed.
Orderly Sergeant, Charles L. Van Slyck, Kinderhook, killed
The following account of the battle is furnished by a special correspondent of the N. Y. Tribune.
New Orleans, May 29, 1863.
We have had a desperate struggle at Port Hudson, the result of which is at present unknown. Since Friday, May 22, a continuous bombardment has been maintained by Admiral Farragut's fleet, and the 1st Vermont Battery, Capt. Kibbard, has annoyed the batteries during the day.
At 1 p. m., on Wednesday, the battle commenced. The lines extended for a distance of nearly four miles in front of the enemy's works. The extreme right was given to Gen. Wertzel, Gen. Grover occupying the next position, Gen. Augur the third, and Gen. Sherman the left.
On the left, the 165th New York, Lieut. Col. Abel Smith, were ordered to discharge their muskets and charge upon the enemy's ranks.
Gen. Sherman intended to carry a section of the fortifications at the point of the bayonet. The 2d Duryee Zouaves, and the 177th New York made a desperate onset, and were met by a rainstorm of bullets. Lieut. Col. Smith, of the former regiment was severely wounded. Finding it impossible to successfully accomplish the daring purpose, a retreat was effected. Col. Clark of the 6th Michigan, carried the colors of his regiment inside the first line of fortifications, and raised them upon the Rebel flagstaff. The 128th New York, Col. Cowles, immediately followed, and were within the walls of the earthwork, when both regiments were forced to retire on account of a lack of support by the 15th New Hampshire. Col. Cowles was killed.
Col. Clark was so terribly stunned by a shell while retreating, that he remained senseless for an hour. He escaped uninjured and was conspicuous for bravery and enthusiasm. Gen. Neal Dow was slightly wounded, and Gen. Sherman rallied and took charge of Dow's brigade, when he received a compound fracture of the right leg from a grape shot. Gen. Sherman's conduct is highly applauded.
The 3d Regiment Louisiana Native Guards, Col. Nelson, attracted great attention for their undaunted bravery. They sustained a loss of nearly 600 men. Their bearing upon this occasion has forever settled in this Department all question as to the employment of negro troops. Nearly every officer was killed.
After the death of Col. Cowles, the command of the 128th New York devolved upon Captain Gifford, who was almost immediately wounded. Capt. Keese, a mere youth, then assumed the duties of Colonel. His voice could be heard above the roar of artillery, urging forward his men. He displayed the bravery of a lion.
The struggle lasted until 5 p. m., when a general order was dispatched along the lined to retreat to the original position occupied at the commencement of the action.
The propeller Ida arrived here last evening from Baton Rouge. Gens. Sherman and Dow were brought down upon stretchers. The body of Col. D. S. Cowles was on board. From S. Bryant of the 128th New York, I learn that at _ a. m. yesterday, heavy cannonading could be heard at Port Hudson. Our loss is reported to be at least 4,000. I am informed that the Rebels could not have had over 10,000 men. The fight was without doubt renewed at daybreak yesterday. The most perfect confidence was felt that the Rebel stronghold would succumb to the Union forces.
An expedition composed of eight regiments, under command of Colonels Chickering of the 41st Massachusetts, and Morgan of the 90th New York, arrived last evening at Algiers, having marched thither from Franklin. These troops will be immediately sent to the relief of Gen. Banks at Port Hudson.
Upon receipt of the news of the death of Col. Cowles, Lieut.-Col. Smith of the 128th New York, who is on New Orleans on detailed duty, without awaiting a relief from detail, rejoined his regiment. The loss in this command is at least 200.
Lieut. Clark of the 6th Michigan, led his company with his right arm dangling at his side.
Sergeant Charles L. Van Slyck of the 128th New York, had both legs shot away at the knee. He continued to fire at the enemy until he received a fatal wound in the breast. The last words of Col. Cowles were, "Tell my mother I died with my face to the enemy. Boys, Have I not done my duty as a man and a soldier."
The Captain Keese spoken of above is Captain Francis S. Keese, son of John M. Keese, of Rhinebeck, well known throughout this county.
Col. David S. Cowles, killed in the assault on the works at Port Hudson, was a native of Canaan, Litchfield Co., Connecticut, and about forty years of age. He has lately been a resident of Hudson, Columbia County, in this State, where he has held some of the highest positions in the gift of the people, and always performed his duties with the highest degree of honor and success. Col. Cowles raised the regiment which he commanded—the 128th—by his own individual exertions. It is composed of the flower of Co1umbia and Dutchess Counties.

COLONEL COWLES.—A corresspondent [sic] of the Daily Press writing from New Orleans says: I viewed this evening the dead body of Colonel Cowles, of the 128th regiment New York Volunteers, which arrived here this afternoon from Baton Rouge. He was one of the finest looking men I have ever seen, a perfect model of manly beauty. He was killed yesterday afternoon, about two o'clock, by a thrust from a sword bayonet in the left thigh, which divided one of the larger veins. The main artery was not touched. He lived about an hour after the wound was received, and his last words were, "Tell my good old mother that I died doing my duty and with my face to the enemy." Colonel Cowles was a man universally beloved and respected. He was idolized by his regiment, and to them his loss will be irreparable. His body is being embalmed. He was a bachelor of wealth, and a resident of Hudson.

Army Correspondence of the GAZETTE.
From the 128th Regiment.
CAMP PARAPET, La., April 27th, 1863.
Mr. EDITOR:—As I know that every movement made by the 128th will be of interest to the readers of the Gazette, I send you an account of an expedition we have lately been on, up in the heart of Dixie.
We left camp at 8 o'clock a. m., on the 18th inst., according to the orders and instructions of Gen. Sherman, commanding the defences of New Orleans, and marched eight miles to Lake Pontchartrain, where there were two steamboats, (the J. M. Brown and Empire Parish,) ready to take them to Rebeldom. We, with the 1st Vermont Battery, under the command of Capt. Hibbard, embarked, and at 4 p. m. landed at Fort Pike. At 11 p. m. the J. W. Brown, with the left wing of the Regt., comprising companies B., G., K., E., and H. started, and at 1 a. m. landed in Mulatto Bayou, about eight miles from its mouth. At daylight a detachment of twenty men from each company, marched up the country about six miles where we had been informed three schooners were concealed in one of the narrow bayous. As the schooners could not be brought down, because of the shallow water, we burned them and returned to Fort Pike, and after transferring Co's B. and G. to the Parish, both boats started on the grand expedition, Col. Cowles in command of the Brown and Capt. Gifford, of Co. A., in command of the Parish.
At daylight of the 20th we landed at Poleon, seven miles below Gainsville, Miss., on the Pearl River. From thence two hundred and fifty men under the command of Capt. Gifford, marched up to Gainsville. Lieut. Langdon, of Company K., commanding the advance guard.
This movement was so well planned that the land force entered the rear of the town at the exact time that boats landed in front. While the Parish was being loaded with cotton, tar and other valuable in the store houses at the wharf, the Brown, under the command of Lieut. Burns, Co. K., proceeded up the river about two miles, where, the contrabands had informed us, some resin was hidden in the swamp; and after loading the resin, returned to Gainsville. At the same time, Col. Cowles being informed that a steamboat had been hidden about 12 or 15 miles farther up the river, to keep her out of the hands of the "Yankees," sent a party under the command of Capt. Parker, to bring her down. As the throttle valves and some other indispensable parts of her machinery had been taken out, the only way was to float her down, and after twelve hours hard work, they brought her safely into Gainesville, and by some means Col. Cowles found out from the owner of the boat, (who was a prisoner in our hands,) where the missing parts of the machinery were hidden, and after a few hours work the engineers had steam up, and we all proceeded down the river. On the way down the Parish discovered the schooner George Washington in one of the bayous, and took her in tow. At dark on the 22d, we were all back in our old Camp; every man in good spirits over the success of our expedition, and all anxious to try again.
While we were in Dixie we lived on the fat of the land—chickens, turkeys, pigs, honey, etc.
The fruits of the expedition were 222 pounds of resin, 108 barrels of tar, 10 bales of cotton, 21 cases of turpentine, 1 steamboat, 1 metalic [sic] lifeboat, the schooner George Washington, and a large lot of valuable lumber.
The country we passed through is low and swampy; very little of it cultivated, and very thinly populated. The inhabitants are, many of them, in the greatest want. Most of the men have been drafted into the Confederate army, and their families are suffering for the necessaries of life. To some Col. Cowles gave beef and "hard tack," and although we went there as enemies, we left a good impression behind us of the "Yankees," as they called us. New Orleans money, Confederate bonds, and gold and silver were plenty among the richer ones, and with some of the contrabands; but gold cannot buy everything they need. I asked one man why he did not fix his fence; he replied that he could not afford it—nails were worth ten cents apiece there.
To the perseverance, energy and well laid plans of Col. Cowles, are to be attributed the safe and successful termination of our expedition.
M. D. W.

Letter from Capt. Arthur DeWint.
ST. JAMES HOSPITAL,
NEW ORLEANS, JUNE 1ST, 1863.
DEAR JIM: I hardly expected to reply to your letter from a hospital, and with a bullet hole in my arm, but I imagine my letter will prove none the less acceptable on that account. I am doing well, and hope to be with my regiment in a fortnight. We had just returned from an expedition
to Ponchatoula (where we were disappointed in not having a fight) on the 21st ultimo, when we received orders to go to Baton Rouge. Hurrah! was the word along the line when the order was read, for we all knew Port Hudson was to be our destination. At 4 o'clock on the morning of the 22d, the four regiments, 6th Michigan, 15th New Hampshire (nine months regiments), 26th Connecticut, 128th New York, left Carrolton in steamers, and headed for Springfield Landing, the nearest approach that can be made by water to Port Hudson just at present. We disembarked about noon the next day, and took up the line of march towards the enemy, who were doubtless well aware of our approach, and awaiting our coming behind the breastworks and rifle pits, with which they are complete encircled. The men were in "light marching" order, many without blankets, and the sun was so excessively hot, right glad were they at being thus equipped. We had marched but a few miles, however, when from an inky black cloud the rain poured down in torrents upon us, but on we moved at "secured arms," and halted upon a broad plain, where with our feet to the camp-fires, we passed quite a comfortable night, the rain having ceased after having cooled the air most desirably and wet us to the skin most thoroughly.
I will now skip a few days until Monday, the 25th inst., and tell you of Co. F's doings only. We were then within two miles of the enemy's first line of defences. At one o'clock p. m., we were ordered out on picket, one mile to the front. Our picket line joined Gen. Auger's on the right, and Gen. Nickerson's on the left.—At 11 o'clock p. m., two guns of the Indiana battery were sent forward to the picket line, and commenced shelling the enemy. It was not long before a reply was elicited, and until sunrise the next morning, the woods were riddled with shell and balls, keeping Co. F's boys (who were rather unused to such sights and sounds) constantly dodging between trees and logs; they were consequently thoroughly tired out when relieved by a Co. of the 15th New Hampshire at 3 o'clock p. m., of the 26th inst.
On reporting with my company to Col. Cowles, I was ordered to go on picket that night nearer the enemy. The men had hardly time to eat their suppers when word came to "fall in," We marched to the rear of a burning building, directly opposite to, and about three quarters of a mile distant from the most awful of the enemy's batteries. At 2 o'clock a. m., we were relieved by Co. C of ours, and fell back to where the regiment were lying on their arms, and I assure you every man of us was soon wrapped in deep slumber, naught but the pacing to and fro of the sentry, disturbing the stillness that reigned around us; but it was the calm that preceeds [sic] the storm, for at 6 o'clock the assembly was sounded, and I was ordered to support a Wisconsin battery, which was playing the devil with the enemy's breast-works. Of course the rebels soon sent us their compliments in the shape of grape and cannister, which hummed around and above us, much more musically than agreeable. This position was maintained until 11 o'clock a. m., when we fell a few rods to the rear and left, to obtain a better range of the enemy's works. At noon the first platoon, under the command of Lieut. Anderson, was sent to the right and front as skirmishers. At 1 o'clock p. m., Col. Cowles ordered me to take my second platoon, and 40 men of Co. B's, under command of Lieut. Pearce, making a total of 68 men, to form a storming party. The Col. asked me if I would take command. You know what was my reply.  Marching to a thick wood to the left of the battery to be stormed, my force was increased by 68 men from the 6th Michigan under command of Capt. Montgomery of the same regiment, who was ordered by Gen. Dow to take command of the whole force, which was to be supported by the 15th New Hampshire, and 26th Connecticut regiments. We were to be preceeded [sic] by 30 negroes carrying pieces of timber to be laid across a Moat, pointing to the enemy's earthworks, each private of the storming party carrying a board 6 feet long to lay across the timbers, and thus get into the breast-works. At 2 o'clock the word forward was given, and we took the double-quick to cross the plain in front of the enemy. We had hardly got started, when Capt. Montgomery was wounded, and told me to take command. I hurried to the right of the line, encouraging the men meanwhile, and by the time I had attained my position, a shower of shot and shell was poured on us, that there was no withstanding, both men and officers fell flat, many a poor fellow to rise no more. The knuckle joint of the little finger of my left hand was numbed by a piece of a shell just before I got down. I lay still with my nose in the ground, the shot, shell, canister and bullets falling like hail-stones, and humming like the wind around and above us, until there was a slight cessation in the firing, when I jumped up, but could see nothing but a sea of boards on their edge and broadside to the enemy, but I knew that what I wanted was behind those boards, so I shouted forward, and rushed on, crossed a small bridge which spanned a ravine filled with fallen timber, and fell flat-again, and just in time, too, for I felt while falling, a bullet scrape across my shoulder blades. I crawled a few rods to a fallen log, and finally succeeded in getting a small signal flag, with about 15 men with me. We remained here about half an hour, firing at their gunners, and dodging bullets from friend and foe, for those in the rear were firing just as they saw fit, and one poor fellow near me was mortally wounded by a ball from the rear. Well, I waved the flag and shouted to those behind to come on, until I was disheartened, jumped over the log and moved forward within fifteen rods of the breastworks. I here stood waving my sword and shouting Forward! when suddenly my sword arm dropped powerless by my side, and I found the blood flowing from a hole a rebel bullet had made just below my elbow, but the bone was untouched. The bullet had taken its departure, and Lieut. Craig, of the 6th Michigan, the only officer who got there, tying his handkerchief above the wound, I was all right, and more fortunate than the next who ventured, a private of t he 15th New Hampshire. He received a bullet in his groin, just a few paces to the rear of me. It was now about 4 o'clock and until 6 o'clock Lieut. Craig and myself (for my wound was not very painful) tried to get men enough to make a charge, but in vain, only five privates returned to where we were, and about half-past 6 o'clock p. m., I crawled to the ravine before mentioned, leaving the wounded private and one man of the 6th Michigan to care for him until I could send a stretcher to bring him off.
I dragged my sword and pistol with me in my left hand, having left my scabbard when we started, for on such an expedition I judged it best to travel light, and ill-luck lightened me more yet, for I lost my pocket book on the field. It had only $23 in it fortunately, which some rebel is most probably enjoying ere this. Well, at _ o'clock P. M. I came off the field, meeting and passing the dead and dying, some farewell bullets passing me, but I was too tired to mind them. The first man I came to I asked to dress my wound. He did so, and I soon fell asleep, but passed but a restless night, dreaming of Bayonet charges, etc. Our right and the 6th Michigan did well, the less said about the others the better. Five of Co. F. were wounded and poor Jack Hughes was killed; you must let his Father know. I will write to him when my arm is better. He was one of the storming party, and died the death of a brave and fearless soldier upon the field of battle.
Pearsall had a ball through his ankle, but is doing well. Pollock of Wappingers Falls, is slightly wounded. Jeffards has a ball in his thigh, but he will come out all right, so the surgeon says. Partington had a bullet enter his cheek, and come out in his neck; he is also doing well. Our greatest misfortune is in losing Col. Cowles, who was shot at the head of his regiment, and lived but half an hour. I did not know of it until coming off the field, and of course was greatly shocked. I was the only other officer wounded. The fact is, Mr. Asssessor, we got into a hornet's nest, and any man who was well on that field, and came off alive, may think himself lucky. My wound is doing well. I have a good surgeon and comfortable quarters. My First Lieut., Williamson, was acting Volunteer Aid to Gen. Dow, and was not hurt. Second Lieut. Anderson did good service with the first platoon Co. F., which was not in the storming party; he is right. I was one of the last to leave the field, and every one was surprised to see me, for it was through the whole regiment, and in fact in New Orleans the next day, that I was killed. The account of that day's fight will not be published in the papers here, as it comes under the head of "contraband intelligence," and is buried.
Let me hear from home soon. Goodbye. Truly your left-handed friend,
ARTHUR DEWINT,
Commanding Co. F, 128th N. Y. Vols.

The Charge of the 128th Regiment at Port Hudson, May 27, 1863.

"Forward!"--and along the lines of burnished steel
Hushed were the voices of a thousand men.
"Forward!"--the command rang like a clarion's peal,
Forth a mighty shout came uplifting then.

Onward they moved to battle with the foe,
A groan! and a man dropped to the blood-stained ground,
Again the Captains cried, "keep cool, boys, and fire low."
And th' cannons replied with deep and booming sound.

The drummer boy thought of the long summer days,
When he played with his comrades by the road river's side;
The captain, stern with the fight of life's weary ways,
Marched bravely on—who would care if he died?

Hurrah if they have captured the guns!—the rebels are flying!
Afar down the lines the old flag is unfurled!
It brightens with joy the dim eyes of the dying,
And back in confusion the rebels are hurled.

"Where are the supports?" the brave Colonel said,
And backward he looked o'er the red battle field,
A rush through the smoke—on, on! the rebels are led;
Our men fight bravely, but overpowered, they yield.

"Boys, have I not done my duty?" the dying Colonel said,
"Far away my Mother lives,"—(her hair is white as snow,—
"Take her my dying words,"—the Colonel spoke and was dead.
And they bore as his dying message—"he fell faceward to the foe!"

Hudson, June 9th, 1863.          Charles C. Terry

Captain Arthur DeWint.
Killed at Port Hudson, in the attack on its fortifications, Capt. Arthur DeWint, of the 128th New York Volunteers.
Capt. DeWint was the second son of John Peter DeWint, one of the largest and wealthiest landholders on the Hudson, and on the maternal side was a great grandson of John Adams. Fire with the enthusiasm for the maintenance of this great Republic and its free institutions which he inherited from his progentiors, he was interested in the was as an Anti-Slavery struggle from its first beginnings in Kansas, and when it was fairly inaugurated by the outrage at Sumter, he was among the first to volunteer, entering the 16th Regiment N. Y. S. V., Col. Thomas E. Davies, as Quartermaster, and serving in Heintzelman's Division at the first Bull Run. He joined soon after, the Harris Light Cavalry, Col. Mansfield Davies, and after long exposure to the Virginia miasmas, he returned home to suffer for some months from the prostration of low typhoid fever. Nothing daunter, however, on his recovery he succeeded in raising a company for the 128th New York State Volunteers, of which he was made Captain, and left under Gen. Banks for New Orleans, where after chafing under long inactivity, his regiment was at last permitted to take part in the storming of the fortifications at Port Hudson, where he fell fighting bravely at the head of his men.
Only a few weeks ago he wrote to his sister, "I shall take no other method to gain promotion but that which lies in the path of duty and bravery."
The Great Commander has indeed promoted him to higher and more immortal honors than this world can offer, and another honorable name is added to that long list of heroes and self-sacrificing souls who have found their eternal reward in periling all for Freedom, Justice and Humanity.
Capt, DeWint leaves a young wife and a little boy six years old.

                          FUNERAL OBSEQUIES.
                          COL. DAVID S. COWLES.
                             In Memoriam.

Where waved thick ranks of gleaming steel,
Like harvest ears when summer winds play,
Where swept a host like a summer cloud,
There, passed a soldier from battle away.
It's shout the last sound on his falling ear—
His last sigh lost in its deadly blast;
On the foe and the fray—his upborne flag,
On his gallant men his dying look cast;
Breathing these words from his closing lips:
"Tell me when have I not faithful proved?
With face to my country's foe I fall—
A soldier I die—tell my Mother beloved!"

With dropping banner and dirge, O Earth,
We give thee to-day, a sacred trust;
That soldier's forth, now mantled in death,—
That manhood true, now veiled in the dust,
Rest thee there, Soldier, Patriot, Friend!
"Green be the turf" o'er thy honored grave;
It needs no marble to tell us thy worth—
No proud stone to mark where sleeps the brave.
To thy hush'd presence our tribute we bring;
These honors, these tears, are but for a day;
Yet memory a pure and fadeless wreath,
On the altar of grateful hearts will lay.

The funeral of the lamented Colonel DAVID S. COWLES, of the 128th Regiment, took place in this city yesterday afternoon, and was one of the largest and most imposing that has ever occurred in this city and vicinity. Every street through which the procession moved was so densely crowded with spectators that it was exceedingly difficult to find a passage. The escort of the carriages, made up of Citizens, Masons, Firemen and Military was very imposing, (the Military features were less conspicuous than those of the Masonic Fraternity and Firemen,) while the people who were looking on were to be numbered only by thousands. The religious services were at the Presbyterian Church, and were conducted by Rev. Mr. Folwell, Rev. W. S. Leavitt and Rev. Dr. Demarest, the choir of the church furnishing some solemn and impressive music.
The gallery was filled to overflowing with ladies, while the body of the church was reserved for the Legal Profession, Citizens and Soldiers from abroad, Masonic Fraternity, Firemen, and Claverack Cadets. Not one quarter of the immense crowd of people could get access to the church.
After the reading of the Scriptures by Rev. Mr. Folwell, and music by the choir, Hon. John H. Reynolds, of Albany, delivered the following

Eulogy
As we are about to commit to its kindred dust all that remains on earth of one we loved, we may pause a moment before the last scene is over, and see what precious relics now recline in death. At all times, and on all occasions, when we are taking a final leave of the remains of those who, for some time, have been our companions in the journey of life, our thoughts instinctively turn to the irrevocable past, and memory is busy with mournful recollections of the friend that was. When, as on this day, we gather with reverent grief around the coffin of one who has been very near and dear to us, whose life was beautiful and whose death heroic, who has, in the largest sense fulfilled all the conditions of a complete character, there is a melancholy pleasure in recalling the incidents of such a life and such a death, and in doing honor to the memory of such a man. It is not often that the garments of the grave have in their keeping a form that, in life, illustrated so many manly virtues as the friend we mourn, who, from infancy to manhood followed with unfaltering step the path of duty to himself, to his kindred, to his country and his God.  
Struck down in early manhood on the field of battle, while bravely struggling to uphold the honor of his country's flag, we have the sad duty to perform of placing the cypress wreath upon his grave, when much more dear would have been the grateful office of crowning his living brow with laurels, and of bestowing upon living merit the just eulogy of praise.
Colonel David Smith Cowles, whose honored remains now lie before us, awaiting the last rites of sepulture, was born in Canaan, Connecticut, on the 26th of February, 1817, and at the time of his lamented death was in the 47th year of his age. His father was the reverend Pitkin Cowles, a clergy-man of the Congregational church, and his mother, to whom his thoughts turned for the last time, amid the din of battle, was Fanny Smith Cowles, who still lingers among the living, and is now a venerable lady of 79 years. His maternal grandfather, Captain Ebenezer Smith, of New Marlboro, Massachusetts, served with great distinction in the army of the revolution, from the battle of Lexington until our liberties were achieved, and the Father of his country took final leave of his companions-in-arms at Newburg in 1783. The patriotic spirit which animated the ancestor was transmitted to his descendant; and, when an endangered country again demanded the services of her best and bravest sons, he laid aside the pursuits of peace and freely gave his life in her defence. Nurtured in infancy and childhood with the tenderest affection; instructed early in the great truths of a holy religion, his after life gave enduring evidence of his youthful training; and, while faithful to all the obligations that rested upon him here, he was ever mindful of the life that was to come. He received his education at Yale College, and on leaving that institution in 1839 commenced the study of the law in the office of Powers & Day, in Catskill, and completed them in the office of his brother, Edward P. Cowles, in this city, in 1843, after which he commenced practice and continued it with marked distinction and success until he entered the military service of his country. During the period of his professional life he held for three years the office of District Attorney of the County of Columbia, and performed its duties as he performed every duty, with firmness and fidelity. In the summer of 1861 he felt it his duty to take up the profession of arms, and at once recruited from among the young men of the county of Columbia, whose confidence he enjoyed, several  companies, to engage in the fearful struggle which has wickedly been forced upon our bleeding and unhappy country. In the exigencies of the public service the soldiers he had enlisted were consolidated with and formed the 91st Regiment of Volunteers, the command of which being given to another, he declined to share its fortunes in the field. After the disasters before Richmond, upon the call of the President for 300,000 men, under the auspices of a committee for the District composing the counties of Dutchess and Columbia, a regiment, filled with the flower of the youth of these two counties, was organized as the 128th Regiment of N. Y. Volunteers, and, by unanimous consent, Colonel Cowles was commissioned by the Governor as its commander; and upon none could this honor and responsibility have been more worthily bestowed.
The 30th day of August, 1862, will long be remembered by the citizens of the counties of Dutchess and Columbia. On that day were gathered in this city, the fathers, the mothers, the wives and the sisters of the gallant band who were about to commit themselves to the fortunes of war, under the leadership of their chosen Commander. There were gathered there of every age and condition—an earnest and patriotic throng—to witness the  interesting ceremonies, by which two magnificent standards, upon whose silken folds fair hands had emblazoned the stars of glory, were confided to the keeping of the young and brave who were to bear them aloft amid the storm of battle. These splendid emblems of confidence and pride were received by the manly figure that then stood forth, as the fit representative of your noble sons who had left a thousand hearth-stones to seek in deadly strife the enemies of their country and of mankind; and in their name be promised,—by the recollection of the homes and firesides they were about to leave—by the memory of the mothers, who cherished their infancy—by the sires whose manhood they desire to emulate—by the love and devotion which all brave men bear to their sweet-hearts and wives—by their attachment to the institutions which a heroic ancestry, have handed down for preservation—by the memory of the great names which people so gloriously the past history of our country—by that holy religion which they had been taught—by all these, and by the great God whom all reverently worship, be promised for himself and comrades, that those stainless banners should  never be returned in dishonor; and he told you, if it should be the destiny of some to fall, that you might with truth write upon the marble monument that  should mark the last resting place of each, "He lived as mothers wish their sons to live, and died as fathers wished their sons to die." Bearing these precious symbols of patriotic confidence and affection, with the prayers and blessings of thousands of loving hearts, these gallant children of Dutchess and Columbia, on the 5th of September, 1862, left the city of Hudson for the theatre of actual war. They proceeded to the city of Baltimore—remained there several weeks, and in early December embarked for the city of New Orleans, with the expedition under Major-General Banks; where, or in its vicinity, they remained until the 21st of May, 1863. During this interval of time, by untiring devotion to the efficiency and welfare of his command, Col. Cowles had brought it to that state of discipline and perfection, in military art, as to entitle it to the broad distinction of being pronounced by the Division Commander, the brave Gen. Sherman, as one of the best Regiments in that Military Department. In various expeditions into the interior of Louisiana, with other troops, although not encountering and considerable numbers of the enemy, their behavior was such as to command the confidence and admiration of their Commander-in-Chief, and placed them in the front rank of the brave men who there sustain the honor of our flag. On the 21st of May, Col. Cowles embarked with his command at New Orleans in the expedition for the reduction of Port Hudson. Upon his arrival near the stronghold to be assailed, the confidence of his superior officers, in his military skill and ability, and in the men under his command, was shown in his having confided to him and his Regiment the important duty of reconnoitering the enemy's works, preparatory to the contemplated assault, which occurred on the 27th of May, where he fell, gallantly leading his men to heroic deeds.
We know but little of the details of the conflict on that bloody day, but enough to know that our gallant friend bore a conspicuous part in the strife, and dearly illustrated the heroism of a true soldier. His regiment had the post of honor and the post of danger. The orders of his Division and Brigade com­manders, show the dangerous and desperate service he was expected to perform. In the early part of the action he was ordered by Gen. Dow to detail a captain and lieutenant and 50 reliable men, who were expected to carry a portion of the enemy's works by storm, and a little latter he was directed to hold his whole command in readiness for an  assault; at a later hour he was directed by Gen. Sherman to send portions of his men to the support of hard pressed batteries, and to quickly hurl the balance in the face of the foe; at half past 10 o'clock he received the last order from his superior in command giving directions as to the service of his guns and that on no account should he withdraw from the post of danger. These orders dated on the field and found upon his person, show that he was in the hottest of the fight and was counted upon for dangerous service; no one need doubt but they were  obeyed. Gens. Sherman and Dow both having been disabled and carried from the field, it is believed that the command of the 1st Brigade devolved upon him, and that he assumed it with the certainty that that day would end his life. But duty and honor called, and he was prompt in his obedience. There was no time or inclination to calculate upon dangers to himself for the conflict was raging with untold activity. His comrades in arms were struggling hand to hand with the enemy and he was eager to share with them the fortunes of the day. Placing himself conspicuously in front, and while with a clear voice—heard above the tumult—he was encouraging and leading his men to the assault, he was struck down and in an hour his intrepid spirit returned to God. Wounded and bleeding he refused to be carried from the field, but amid the smoke and din of battle, he divided the last hour of his
life between words of command and encouragement to his struggling  companions and  messages of affection to loved ones at home. He was conscious that he had received a fatal wound, yet his great heart was in the battle until it ceased to beat.
A christian soldier, he fought and fell in a holy cause, and when life was fast ebbing, he thought of her who had nurtured him in infancy and said "Tell my mother I died with my face to the enemy." He then with eyes reverently turned towards Heaven, murmured "Christ Jesus receive my spirit." In a few seconds, with an effort he opened his closing eyes and turning to the faithful Sergeant, in whose arms he lay, faintly whispered, "I have done my duty to the regiment as a man and a soldier," and thus sublimely closed the mortal career of David S. Cowles.    
It did not need this last message to his venerable mother to assure her that her noble boy had died loyal to honor and to duty, and that he fell with his face to the field and "his feet to the foe."
This rapid and imperfect sketch of a model life and a heroic death is all that the limits of this solemn occasion will allow. Brief though it be, there is a mournful pleasure in dwelling for a moment upon the perfection of that character which finds illustration in these simple and effecting details. It was my privilege to have known him, whose early death has cast gloom over so many hearts, intimately and well. For nearly twenty years he was my most intimate companion and friend. In the pursuits of professional life—in the hours of social enjoyment—in the association which binds men in the strongest ties of broth-hood, I have learned to respect his character and love the many nameless qualities that adorned his noble nature. In his professional life he was marked by every characteristic that distinguishes a true lawyer. Courteous and kind to all, he won the affection and commanded the respect of his brethren at the bar and upon the bench. Endowed with rare intellectual gifts, with a cultivated taste, quick judgment, correct legal learning, an exalted sense of justice and a just pride in the dignity of his profession, he was moving onward with steady steps to it highest honors. He was of modest deportment and without personal ambition. He was one of those gentle natures that shrink from public observation, yet bear themselves in all the dignity of conscious power. He was a quiet but devoted student, a serious and an earnest man. He was a close observer, and measured men and events with an accurate and cultivated judgment. He was genial and gentle in all his intercourse with his fellows, but firm and unyielding in his devotion to right principles and correct conduct. No temptations could seduce him from the path of rectitude or beguile him from the grave and serious contemplations that marked the manner of his life. With a heart sensitive to every right generous impulse, and open to every right impression, he was a faithful and devoted friend. Take him in all and all he was the model of a christian gentleman.
If there was any one characteristic, which more than any other, marked his character, it was his enthusiastic love and devotion to his country. He was a diligent student of our revolutionary history, and had made himself familiar with every spot, which great events had commemorated, and particularly the fields where those of his ancestral blood had snared the dangers of the battle. He had a special reverence for the memory of the brave, who have died in their country's defence. In seeking military service, he was not emulous of military glory, but actuated by and abiding conviction of patriotic duty. No motive of personal ambition prompted him to encounter the privations and perils of a soldier's life—he was moved by purer, holier and higher impulses. With "God and the rights" graven upon the hilt of his sword, it was to be drawn only in a cause that had the approval of Heaven, and the arm that wields it was nerved by an undying devotion to that flag of our country, whose stars shall glitter and whose folds fly in triumph over the heads of the brave.
Imbued with a fervent patriotism, the whole heart and soul of the heroic dead, was in the contest, for the restoration of our national sovereignty. That he possessed in an eminent degree the qualities of a brave and successful soldier his brief but glorious career sufficiently demonstrates. By patient attention, he made his regiment a model of efficiency and discipline. Fearless by nature, his example made heroes of the soldiers, who idolized him. Cautious and accurate in his judgment, he commanded the confidence and respect of his superiors, in rank,—he had no superiors in all the qualities of manhood. He died a soldier's death. His eyes closed on the first battle-field, under the folds of that flag he had sworn to protect with his life, and none will say that it may not be written upon the marble that shall mark the place of his repose. "He lived as mothers wish their sons to live, and died as fathers wish their sons to die."
Thus in early manhood, a heroic spirit has gone to rest—another victim to unholy rebellion. We will preserve the memory of his virtues, and lament his early death. Let us strive to emulate the example of his stainless life, and if our country demands it, follow him to an honored grave rather than surrender to accursed traitors one foot of soil consecrated by the blood of a glorious ancestry.
Of him, and of all who have fallen, or may fall, in the holy cause of our country, it will hereafter be truthfully said

"They fell wounded but undying
Their very names ...
The waters murmer of their name,
The woods are peopled with their fame,
The silent pillar lone and gray

Claims kindred with their sacred clay.
Their spirits wrap the dusky mountain,
Their memory sparkles o'er the fountain;
the mightiest rill—the mightiest river
Roll mingling with their fa_ie forever."

After singing by the Choir, Rev. Wm. Leavitt then delivered the following
                      Address:
"The beauty of Israel is slain upon the high places. How are the mighty fallen."
We have assembled to transact no formal ceremony. Our grief is honest. Our mourning is from the heart. We have left our homes and our employments from one impulse of sadness, and, with the emblems and voices of mourning all around us, we have come in to this hallowed place, to pay the last tribute of respect to him whose remains lie enshrouded—as they should—beneath that sacred flag.  Taking up the echoes of the grief uttered by ten thousand brave hearts that saw him fall amid the  thunder and shock of battle, we have come to say, in the words with which David began his lament for Jonathan and Saul: "The beauty of Israel is slain upon the high places: How are the mighty fallen."
We have come to say, on to another, "He has died like a hero; bury him with loyal hands, at his own home, where he wished to lie; where familiar faces shall gather about his coffin; where those who loved and trusted him shall do the last honors to his memory; and where the winds that play around his grave, if they be chill and laden with winter snows, are yet full of the freedom which he loved, and to whose battle he consecrated his life." We have come as christian people, to tell our common grief to the God and Father of all, and to seek for christian consolation in the bereavement which falls not only upon the kindred of the deceased, but upon us all; and while we mourn that the fates of war should have cut down in his prime, one so full of life and manliness—destroying so many precious hopes—we say to that Father, who to his wisdom and mercy appoints all our calamities, and determines the number of our days, and without whose providence, even a  sparrow falleth not to the ground—"Thy will be done.
We mourn for him because he was one of us—our neighbor—our friend—whose manly form and bearing we shall not look upon again; whose courteous words and sympathizing heart we shall miss. Not only the bereaved family but our city also has given of that which was most precious to it as a sacrifice for the nation's life. We mourn for him as the leader of our sons and brothers, of our friends and kindred, to whose care we trusted them; under whose command we had hoped to see them return, proudly and bravely, as on the day of their departure, when we thronged the streets, with tears and farewells and silent prayer for the blessings and protection of God. They still remain in the field, though with thinned ranks, covering themselves with honor; but he, their chosen and trusted leader, rides no longer at their head, and no longer cheers them onward in the fight. With them we mourn to-day. We mourn, too, a nation's loss; for it is a time when the nation needs every brave and noble spirit—every true and earnest heart—and  in this conflict of the age, when the question is being settled in the field of battle whether freedom or slavery shall overspread the land—whether liberty and order, intelligence and true religion shall be the nation's glory and its sure defence—or whether oppression, barbarism, degradation, anarchy, shall cover it with a night of horror and shame—whether this flag, which is daily growing dearer to our hearts with the price we pay for its salvation, shall be buried forever in the grave of our beloved ones who have fallen as martyrs in its cause, or whether, sanctified and made more precious  by their blood, it shall wave in triumph over a redeemed, purified, and united land;—in such a time, and when such questions are being decided, the nation knows not how to spare a spirit wise in counsel, chivalous in courage, earnest in a patriotism founded upon principle, true and unflinching amid the death-shower of the battle, like that spirit which from these mortal remains has re­turned to the God who gave it.
And yet we sorrow, not without consola­tion. The cause in which he fell throws a portion of its own sacredness around his death; and the sad memories are sweetened by the thought "he died for his country."  We do not, we cannot, feel that a life thus laid down, however prematurely as it may seem, is lost; and we think how many a life of four-score years has not in all its weary  length so much of true manhood and self-sacrifice; so much of noble being and doing as were concentrated in the few hours of that  fatal day. Can we in our secret thoughts avoid finding a comfort in these sacred words: "Whosoever will lose his life shall save it?" And do we not feel that there clings to his last utterances the fragrance of a comfort and hope, which prepared him for the end of earth? Whence but from a soul calm and trustful
amid those dying agonies, could come those words, breathed out with his expiring strength to the heart, which through all his life had been nearest and dearest to his own,—those words, which are enshrined in our memories, and which will live in history itself—"Tell my mother that I died with my face to
the enemy?" My friends, it is true—we all perhaps have marked it in the history of this war—that a consolation comes to the earnestly loyal and patriotic in their bereavements, which others know not of. God's own mercy
brings a balm to the wounded heart, and en­ables it to trust in His holy keeping the beloved ones who have fallen in defense of the nation's life; and the sympathies of Jesus who himself died for us all, are with the friends and kindred of those who die in a just and righteous cause. Here, then, to Jesus—to him who hath borne our griefs and carried our sorrows—let us bring the burden that is so heavy upon our hearts. He will not leave us comfortless. He who from the Cross spoke words of consolation to His own mother, tortured with the agonies of her dying son, will comfort the mother who mourns to-day. He will strengthen the faith of all the kindred of the deceased in the mercy of God, real and changeless, whatever clouds and darkness may hide it. The nation's cause shall not be less, but more sacred in our eyes for this fresh sacrifice it has cost us; for who  can be base enough to come as a  mourner here, and then go and plot or sympathize with the vile spirits that have robbed us of this precious life?
And now, with prayer to the God of all grace and consolation, that he will give the promised blessing to them that mourn and that he will make us all more true, more brave, more earnest; following in the steps   of him who has proved so well his truth and not done my duty as a man and a shoulder," —let us bear all that was mortal at our brother to his final rest. And there—close by the home to which his thoughts returned from that distant field of death—there, where no sound of battle disturbs the sacred stillness of the grave—there, with his noblest and most enduring monument in our memories and grateful love—peaceful in his sleep.
After the exercises in the church were concluded, the procession was formed in the following, order and marched to the Cemetery:—
            ORDER OF PROCESSION.
Marshall—Cornelius Bortle, and Alds: J. W. Hoysradt, P. Bogardus, Norman Crapser, Jas. M. Punderson.
Schrieber's Band.
Masonic Fraternity.
Clergy in Carriages.
Bearers.
Hearse, flanked by returned Soldiers of 14th Regiment, as Guard of Honor.
Colonel's body Servant, leading Horse, with Trappings.
Officers of the 21st Regiment and others, in full uniform.
Claverack Cadets.
Carriages with Relatives and Friends.
Members of the Legal Profession.
Mayor and Common Council and Supreme Judges in carriages. 
Strangers from abroad, in carriages.
Chatham Cornet Band, E. Lee, Leader.
Chief Engineer and Assistants, and the Fire Department, with belts. 
Chief Engineer and Engine Co. No. 6, of Poughkeepsie.
Citizens in carriages.

The ceremonies at the grave were conducted by the Masonic Order, of which the Colo­nel was a worthy and respected member. He was interred in the new plot of ground just appropriated by the Common Council as a burial place for all resident officers and soldiers who have or who may hereafter die in the service of the United States during the present rebellion. It is a fine lot, 64 by 32 feet, at the southern extremity of Vault Avenue.
The head of the coffin bore the following inscription in raised letters:
Col. Davis S. Cowles,
128th Regiment N. Y. S. Volunteers,
Died on the field of battle,
May 27, 1863.

The day was very universally observed, places of business generally closed in the afternoon, flags at half-mast, and several places draped in mourning. Among the buildings that attracted universal attention was the Daily Star office, and C. E. Butler's Jewelry store underneath, which was draped in mourning and decorated with the stars and stripes.   
There were many incidents connected with the doings of the day which we have not space for in to-day's issue, or time to write out.

The 128th Regiment. —We have just received a letter from Surgeon Palmer  C. Cole, of the 128th Regiment, too late for to-day's issue which we shall publish in our next, giving a full list of the killed and wounded of this Regiment in the battle of the 27th of May last.

The Late Col. Cowles, 128th N. Y. Volunteers. —The loss of this brave officer who was killed while leading his men against the Rebel works at Port Hudson, is mourned by all who knew him. Lieut. Col. Smith has issued an appropriate order relative to the death of the soldier, and a series of resolutions have been adopted by the officers of the regiment, one of which reads as follows:—
Resolved, That in the private character, and the professional and military career of Col. Cowles, we recognize all the virtues, the ability, and every element of a pure, talented and brave character, that the devotedness of his
Revolutionary forefathers was repeated in his career in a cause not less sacred; that as in life he exemplified the principles and energy which should animate the patriot soldier, so in the gallantry which distinguished his fall he taught us how to die. In death and life, without fear and without reproach.

Colonel David S. Cowles.
We perform this week, a most melancholy duty in announcing to our readers the death of Col. David S. Cowles, of the 128th Regi­ment, New-York Volunteers. He was kill­ed in the attack made by Gen. Banks' forces upon Port Hudson on the 27th of May 1863. He died gloriously in the discharge of his duty, in the conflict of battle and with his face to the foe. An account of the affair in as much detail as our present advices enable us to give, will be found in our columns. The enemy's works were attempted to be taken by storm— it was a hand to hand contest—and our lamented friend lost his life, pierced by a bayonet.
We would gladly give an extended notice of the life and career of Col. Cowles, but we have not the materials at hand for such a pur­pose. He was the son of a respected pastor of a Presbyterian Church in Canaan, Connecti­cut, and was born we believe, at that place.—He was about 45 years of age at the time of his death. He enjoyed, as most New England boys do, the advantages of a liberal education and we believe graduated or spent some time at Yale College. Some fifteen years ago—perhaps more, he came here to reside, pursuing his profession of the law with his brother E. P. Cowles, (now Ex-Judge Cowles, of New-York,) who had preceded him to this place. The brothers maintained a respectable position and lucrative practice here until some six or eight years since Judge Cowles removed to the city of New-York. His brother, (the late Colonel,) remained in this place and continued to reside in Hudson until his death. He was honorably distinguished and pecuniarily successful in the practice of the law. Possessed of a vigorous and discriminating mind, and of much energy of character, he found no dif­ficulty in winning his way to a respectable place in his profession. Having a fine personal appearance, much dignity and at the same time amenity of manners, a noble and manly spirit, and much generosity of heart, he drew to himself many warm and attached friends, and the respect and confidence of the community. He was distinguished for per­sonal integrity, for exalted honor, for manly courage, and for a high degree of cultivation of mind and heart. On the breaking out of this unhappy, but to us necessary war, he at once took high and manly ground on the side of his country. He entered into the feelings and questions involved in the contest with all the ardor of his nature and with the spirit of a true patriot. At an early stage of the war he took vigorous measures to raise a regiment in this county. He partially succeeded but failing to make up the full number necessary to complete a regiment, his men were consolidated with those of an Albany regiment and though offered a highly honorable but subordinate position there, he declined it and temporarily resumed the practice of his profession.
Last year when new volunteers were demanded, and new regiments organized, the attention of our citizens was again directed to Col. Cowles, and by the unanimous voice of the committee having charge of the subject, and with the entire approbation of the Commander-in-Chief, he was appointed to the command of a splendid regiment, (the 128th New York Volunteers,) composed of some of the best men of Dutchess and Columbia. None of our citizens will fail to remember the spirit and enthusiasm and success with which that regiment grew up under the fostering care of Col. Cowles and his associate officers, and influential citizens of this Congressional district, nor the just pride and favor, with which, for local and other reasons, it has always been regarded by the inhabitants of these two counties. No one will forget the interesting ceremonies which took place on the departure of the regiment for the war in the early part of September last—the presentation of the Regimental flag by the ladies of Hudson, with a patriotic speech from Judge Miller—the presentation of the National banner by the ladies of Dutchess with appropriate remarks from the historian Lossing—the spirited and eloquent responses of Col. Cowles to each in behalf of himself and his regiment. The whole proceedings were marked with a degree of interest and enthusiasm, and attended by a multitude of "fair ladies and brave men," that will make the day long remembered in the annals of Columbia. "Col. Cowles, in full dress uniform," (we quote from an account written at the time,) "was the cynosure of all eyes. His "handsome figure, his dignified and chivalrous bearing, seemed never so conspicuous as upon this occasion. The qualities of a commanding officer appeared to have been stamped upon him by nature, and all present, we doubt not, felt that our soldiers have a leader, who is worthy of them, and of the cause."
Alas, how different are the melancholy emotions inspired by the recent intelligence of the death of himself and his brave comrades, from the shouts of enthusiasm and joy which burst forth on the gala day in question. The regiment took its departure from our shores amid the cheers and the plaudits of the assembled multitude and with the hopes and prayers of every patriot wafted to Heaven for the successful accomplishment of its mission. Pausing for a while at Baltimore and doing honorable service there, proceeding thence to Fortress Monroe, it ultimately found its way under the direction of the Government to New Orleans and its vicinity. Its later and always honorable history is familiar to all. And now in that tide of alternate success and reverse which is the inevitable fortune of war, we are called upon to mourn, not the failure of our arms, but the death of a gallant commander, in whom and his compatriots we felt a warm personal interest, and for whose successful mission and happy return we had devoutly prayed. But such are the appointments of a wisdom which cannot err, and the fruits of a discipline, which is ultimately, we trust, to work out the nation's purification and safety. We trust that fitting honors will be paid to the memory of Col. Cowles, and that his funeral obsequies, which we understand will take place here, will be observed in a manner to show our appreciation of his worth and gallantry, and of the value and sacredness of the cause in the maintenance of which he surrendered his life.
We reserve an appropriate notice of the other officers and men who fell or suffered in the same engagement until fuller advices shall enable us to do them better justice.

PROGRESS OF THE WAR.
THE LATEST FROM NEW-ORLEANS.
ATTACK UPON PORT HUDSON!
THE 128TH REGIMENT ENGAGED.
DESPERAE [sic] FIGHTING.
Col. Cowles Killed by a Bayonet Thrust.
Heavy Loss in the Regiment.
The steamer Morning Star from New Orleans on the 29th ult., arrived at New York an early hour on Saturday morning.
In the Department of the Gulf the w... interest in military affairs re... in ... Hudson, which was completely invested in the Government forces. Gen. Banks commanded in person a force supposed to be sufficient for its reduction. The enemy's strength within their defenses is estimated at between 10,000 to 12,000 men.
Fighting was still in progress at the date of the departure of the Morning Star.
Brig. Gen. Sherman had arrived at New Orleans on the night of the 28th, severely but not dangerously wounded.
The 2d Louisiana negro regiment distinguished itself especially in charging upon the enemy's siege guns, losing in killed 600.
Gen. Weitzel had captured a portion of a line of defence, and held one of the enemy's heaviest batteries.
The North Star brings $150,000 (Me.) ... on freight from New Orleans, and 600 bales of cotton.

Correspondence of the New York Tribune.
NEW-ORLEANS, May 29.
We have had a desperate struggle at Port Hudson, the result of which is at press time unknown. The troops are confident of ultimate success, and have lost none of their enthusiasm. Even the wounded diusplay great ...- ty and eagerness to return to the scene of the conflict.
The enclosed meager list of those killed and disabled will reflect a deep gloom in the North, as it has done here. Since Friday May 22, a continuous bombardment has been maintained by Admiral Farragut's fleet and the 1st Vermont Battery, Capt. Hibbard, has annoyed the batteries during the day.
At 1 p. m., on Wednesday the battle commenced. The lines extended for a distance of nearly four miles in front of the enemy's works. The extreme right was given to Gen. Weitzel, Gen. Grover occupying the next position, Gen. Augur the third, and Gen. Sherman the left.
On the left, the 165th New-York, Lieut.-Col. Abel Smith, were ordered to discharge their muskets and charge upon the enemy's ranks. For the following details of the movement I am indebted to Sergeant-Major Casselli A. Palmieri, who is reported as having displayed unusual gallantry:
Gen. Sherman intended to carry a section of the fortifications at the point of the bayonet. The 2d Duryee Zouaves and the 177th New-York made a desperate onset, and were met by a rain-storm of bullets. Lieut.-Col. Smith of the former regiment was severely wounded. Finding it impossible to successfully accomplish the daring purpose, a retreat was effected.
Col. Clark of the 6th Michigan carried the colors of his regiment inside the first line of fortifications, and raised them upon the Rebel flagstaff. The 128th New-York, Col. Cowles, immediately followed, and were within the walls of the earthwork, when both regiments were forced to retire on account of a lack of support by the 15th New-Hampshire. Col. Cowles was killed.
Col. Clark was so terribly stunned by a shell while retreating that he remained senseless for an hour. He escaped uninjured, and was conspicuous for bravery and enthusiasm. Gen. Neal Dow was slightly wounded, and Gen. Sherman rallied and took charge of Dow's brigade, when he received a compound fracture of the right leg from a grape shot. Gen. Sherman's conduct is highly applauded.
The 3d Regiment Louisiana Native Guards, Col. Nelson, attracted great attention for their undaunted bravery. They sustained a loss of nearly 600 men. Their bearing upon this occasion has forever settled in this Department all question as to the employment of negro troops. Nearly every officer was killed
Capt. Badeau of Gen. Sherman's staff was seriously wounded. Sergt.-Maj. Palmers, of the 2d Duryee Zouaves obtained four assistants and carried him upon a litter for a distance of nearly two miles to the hospital.
After the death of Col. Cowles, the command of the 128th New York devolved upon Captain Gifford, who was almost immediately wounded. Capt. Keyes, a mere youth, then assumed the duties of Colonel. His voice could be heard above the roar of artillery urging forward his men. He displayed the bravery of a lion.
The struggle lasted until 5 p.m., when a general order was dispatched along the lines to retreat to the original position occupied at the commencement of the action. I am unable to give you even a conjecture as to the result. Gen. Weitzel is reported to have taken two batteries.
The propeller Ida arrived here last evening from Baton Rogue. Gens. Sherman and Dow were brought down upon stretchers. The body of Col. D. S. Cowles was on board. From S. Bryant of the 128th New York, I learn that at 2 a. m., yesterday heavy cannonading could be heard at Port Hudson. Our loss is heavy.
It is reported to be at least 4,000. I am informed that the rebels could not have had over 10,000 men.
Gen. Banks moved from point to point along the lines with perfect coolness. His quick eye would detect a laggard movement or an unprotected position, and an aid would be dispatched with instructions. He indulged in no vain display of staff officers.
The fight was without doubt renewed at daybreak yesterday. The most perfect confidence was felt that the Rebel stronghold would succumb to the Union forces.
An expedition, composed of eight regiments under command of Cols. Chickering of the 41st Mass. and Morgan of the 90th New York, arrived last evening at Algiers, having marched thither from Franklin.
These troops will be immediately sent to the relief of Gen. Banks at Port Hudson. Of the details of their march I will give you more hereafter.
The following list of officers killed and wounded has been furnished me by a staff officer:
Gen. T. W. Sherman, seriously.
Gen. Neal Dow, slightly.
Col. D. S. Cowles, killed.
Col. Payne, 2d Louisana [sic], killed.
Col. Kingsley, 26th Conn., jaw, severely.
Col. Kingman, 15th New-Hampshire, slightly.
Lieut.-Col. Abel Smith, 105th N. Y., severely.
Lieut.-Col. Blair, 15th N. H., seriously.
Major Governeur Carr, 15th N. H., badly.
Major Haffkie, Engineer, killed.
Capt. Badeau, Gen. Sherman's staff, seriously.
Capt. Gould H. Thorpe, 165 New-York, shoulder.
Capt. H. C. Inwood. do., slightly.
Capt. E. Gifford, 128th New-York, missing.
Capt. A. Dewint, do., killed.
Lieut. Chas. R. Carville, 165th New-York, killed.
Lieut. J. Armstrong, 128th N. Y., killed.
Lieut. F. Wilkeson, 128th N. Y., killed.
____ Clark, 6th Michigan, killed.
Sergt. C. Van Slyck, 128th N. Y., killed.
Upon receipt of the news of the death of Col. Cowles, Lieut.-Col. Smith of the 128th New-York, who is in New-Orleans on detailed duty, without awaiting a relief from detail, rejoined his regiment. The loss in this command is at least 200.
Lieut. Clark of the 6th Michigan led his company with his right arm dangling at his side.
Sergent [sic] Charles Van Slyke of the 128th New-York had both legs shot away at the knee.
He continued to fire at the enemy until he received a wound in the breast. The last words of Col. Cowles were:—"Tell my mother I died with my face to the enemy. Boys, have I not done my duty as a man and a soldier."
The Major Haffkie mentioned in the list of killed was a Prussian officer of rare ability.
Maj. Gray and Adjt, Roberts of the 157th New York were captured by guerrillas at Franklin on Monday last.
It is reported that the latter has been hanged, though nothing positive as to his fate has been received.

Army Correspondence.
We are permitted to publish the following letter just received in this city from Major J. P. Foster, of the 128th Regiment N. Y. S. V. It will be read with interest:
Court Martial Room,
New Orleans, Thursday evening, May 28.
To-day the melancholy news came to me of Col. Cowles' death. The was killed yesterday, at about half-past 2 o'clock p. m., by a bayonet thrust in the groin, while leading up his Regiment to the assault of the rebel works at Port Hudson. His death was all that the true soldier could desire. His Regiment, encouraged by his example, fought nobly, and had the Colonel not been stricken down, would have taken that part to the works which they attacked.
Capt. Gilford, day before yesterday, led a forlorn hope of volunteers from the Regiment to take a building in the enemy's works. It was showered with grape and shell, and set on fire, and poor Gifford has not since been heard of. Encourage his friends to think that he may have been taken prisoner; there is a chance that this may be so. I will inform them through you at the earliest moment I hear.
Capt. Bostwick, late of Co. B, has lately been promoted to the Majority in the colored Engineer Regiment.
After Col. Cowles' death the command of the 128th fell upon Capt. Keyes, of Co. C, a young man scarcely past his majority. He is a young veteran of Peninsular experience, and behaved coolly and bravely, as did all the officers and men. Captain DeWint, of Dutchess Co. is also missing. Our regiment was ordered by Gen. Sherman, from General Dorr's Brigade, to the post of honor—the right of the line,—and, with the 6th Michigan, took the enemy's works; but, being unsupported by the other regiments, was obliged to fall back, after fighting nobly. Lieutenant Armstrong and acting Lieut. Van Slyck are also killed, and about 40 men; will forward their names as soon as received.
You can imagine my feelings at the thought that my noble friend, Col. Cowles, was struck down and I not on hand to help him. It will be a subject of regret to me to my last hour. We have made application to be permitted to dissolve or adjourn our Court and go to our regiments, but have been refused. Had I known that our regiment was really going to be put to the front, I should have gone in spite of orders, which I shall now do as soon as I properly dispose of poor Col. Cowles' body. It was my firm belief that our regiment (going up the river at so late a day) would be held in reserve, but, from the high opinion held of them and Col. Cowles by Gen. Sherman, they were selected to take the brunt of it. Lieut. Colonel Smith was also here. He is President of the Board of Prison Inspectors. He goes up to-morrow, and I shall follow as soon as I dispose of Col. Cowles' body. I trust ir will arrive in Hudson in a recognizable condition. The expression of the features now is very pleasant. His death was beautiful. He lived about an hour after he was struck, and, though in great pain, sent messages to his mother and others. "Tell her," said he, "that I died with my face to the enemy. Oh, that I had lived but a little longer, and their works would have been ours. Have I not stood up like a man? Christ Jesus, receive my spirit!"
God bless his brave heart; would I had been by thee to have taken thy place, noble soul! I hope to hear of the arrival of his body and its burial with the highest honors. No braver, nobler soul has been sacrificed in this satanic rebellion. I can write no more. I hope to get to the regiment soon. It is very wrong to keep us here when it is so necessary now that the men should have their officers with them. I shall go without leave if I lose my commission thereby.
J. P. F.

THE SIEGE OF PORT HUDSON.
How the Negro Troops Fought Under General Banks—Official Despatch to the Government, &c.
NEW ORLEANS, MAY 29—2 P. M.
To G. S. Dennison, Special Agent:—
The negroes are reported by all parties to have fought well. The enemy yesterday tried to get through our left wing, but were driven back with heavy loss. This morning heavy cannonading was heard constantly. All is going on well. Pickets of the rebels who have deserted to our lines report provisions short at Port Hudson. General Banks is well and in fine spirits, and confident of entire success. C. S. BULKLEY,
Superintendent U. S. M. Telegraph.

SKETCH OF COL. COWLES.
Col. Davis S. Cowles, who was killed at the recent attack on Port Hudson, was a resident of this city of Hudson in this State, and was the brother of Judge Edward P. Cowles of that city. When the call for further troops was made last summer, the deceased raised the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth regiment New York State Volunteers, of which regiment he was appointed the commander, with rank from July 22, 1862. The regiment was mustered into service the latter end of August, and formed part of the Banks expedition. It has been on duty until very recently in the vicinity of New Orleans, and attached to gen. Sherman's division. The deceased met his death while assaulting the works of the rebels, and "died with his face to the enemy."

The 128th Regiment.
The 128th Regiment has passed through the fiery baptism of battle, and its gallant leader has fallen. To our noble volunteers was assigned the duty, in company with another Regiment, of storming the enemy's works and planting the stars and stripes within the almost impregnable fortifications of Port Hudson. Bravely, unshrinkingly they appear to have done their part, but, not being properly supported, were compelled to retire and abandon the advantage which their heroic bravery had won. In this terrific charge and retreat the Regiment suffered a heavy loss, the extent of which we have only begun to learn. We know that Col. Cowles was killed by a bayonet thurst [sic] in the left thigh; that Capt. Gilford was wounded and is missing and that some forty of the Regiment were killed and perhaps one hundred and fifty wounded. There are many anxious hearts in oar midst, who await in deep suspense the arrival of further news.
It is with a melancholy interest that we recall the thrilling words of Capt. Gifford, when he appealed to the young men of Hudson to go with him to the war. "I am going," said he, "to fight till this rebellion is crushed, or I sleep the sleep of death!" How fully he has kept his promise, we almost fear to learn. It is but too probable that he shared the fate of the lamented Colonel, whose place he filled.

Col. Cowles' Funeral Obsequies.
We are requested by the committee to say that the attendance and participation of all the returned soldiers whose terms of service have recently expired, now in this city or vicinity, is most respectifully [sic] solicited at the funeral of Col. Cowles. Notice will be given of the day on which the funeral ceremonies will take place, at the earliest practicable moment.

COL. COWLES.—Among the killed at the battle of Port Hudson was Col. Cowles, of the 128th Regiment. He was among the most gallant of the gallant men who left our State to fight the battles of the Union. Brave as a lion; a man of culture and scholarly attainments; a gentleman in the fullest sense of the word; endowed with social qualities that made him a general favorite;—his death will be deeply lamented in the community of which he has long been an ornament. He died as he lived, full of heroic ardor. His last words were:—"Tell my mother that I died with my face to the enemy. Boys, I have tried to do my duty as a soldier and a man."
Col. COWLES resided at Hudson, and was a lawyer by profession. He raised a part of a regiment, but lost the command by its consolidation with the 91st. He made a second effort, worked night and day, recruited a new regiment, and left for the seat of war last fall.

SAD NEWS FROM THE 128TH.—Our city was thrown into a great state of excitement this morning, in consequence of the receipt of a telegraph dispatch announcing the death of Col. Cowles, and the wounding of Capt. Gifford. We publish in another column full particulars. We have been requested to say that a meeting of citizens will be held this (Saturday) evening, at 8 o'clock, at the City Hall, to make arrangements to attend the funeral of Col. D. S. Cowles, which it is expected will take place on Tuesday or Wednesday of next week. We understand the Mayor has called the Council together this evening, to co-operate with the citizens in making arrangements to attend the funeral. The Herald's correspondent, in speaking of Col. Cowles, says:
"I have viewed this evening the dead body of Col. Cowles, of the 128th Regiment New York Volunteers, which arrived here this afternoon from Baton Rouge. He was one of the finest looking men I have ever seen—a perfect model of manly beauty. He was killed yesterday afternoon about 2 o'clock, by a thrust from a sword bayonet in the left thigh, which divided one of the larger veins. The main artery was not touched. He lived about an hour after the wound was received, and his last words were: "Tell my good old mother that I died doing my duty and with my face to the enemy." Colonel Cowles was a man universally beloved and respected. He was idolized by his regiment, and to them his loss will be irreparable. His body is being embalmed, and will probably go home tomorrow on the Morning Star. He was a bachelor of wealth and a resident of Hudson.
The following telegraphic message was received in this city this morning:
NEW YORK, June 6th, 1863.
To Hon. Henry Hogeboom:—Judge Cowles expects the remains of his brother here on Monday, by steamer Continental. Col. Cowles desired to be buried in Hudson. His wishes will be carried out.
WILLIAM BOIES.

The remains of Col. Cowles, it is expected will arrive in this city to-day or tomorrow, and will be deposited in a public place, and lay in state until the time designated for the funeral ceremonies.
Particulars of the ceremonies, and the order of the arrangements, will be made public as soon as they are completed.
We would suggest that the flags of the city be displayed at half-mast, until after the remains are deposited in their last resting place.

COMMON COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS—Special Meeting , Saturday evening, June __, 1863—present—Jacob Ten Broeck, Mayor; Alex. S. Rowley, Recorder; Ald. Burdwi__, Evens, Groat, Holmes, Roraback, Townsend, Terry.
His Honor stated that he had convened the Council for the purpose of making arrangements for receiving the remains of our much esteemed friend, Col. D. S. Cowles, of the 128th N. Y. V., who was killed at the recent battle of Port Hudson.
Ald. Townsend said: As we are convened here after the sad news received in our city to-day, I would submit the following resolution:
Resolved, That we are solemnly and deeply impressed by the mournful casualties which occurred to the 128th Regiment N. y. S. V., under the command of Col. David S. Cowles, on the 27th and 28th of May, 1863, in the attack upon Port Hudson.
Resolved, That the death of the Commanding and several of the subordinate officers and soldiers of the Regiment, and the severe injuries inflicted upon others of the officers and soldiers, demand and receive the expression of our sincere and heartfelt sorrow for the dead, our sympathy with the survivors, and our condolence with their relatives and friends.
Resolved, That inasmuch as the Colonel of the Regiment and a large portion of his command resided among us, and left here their families or their friends, and have thus far, and especially in the attack upon Port Hudson, conducted themselves with unquestionable gallantry, we do not deem it inappropriate that the constituted authorities of this city, in their official capacity, should express in this public manner their sense of the bravery and patriotism of the officers and men of the gallant 128th Regiment.
Resolved, That inasmuch as we have received intelligence that the remains of Col. Cowles are on their way to this city, with a view to their interment here, we will attend his funeral in a body and mark with fitting honors the obsequies of this gallant officer.
Resolved, That a committee of three from this body be appointed to proceed to the city of New York to accompany the remains of Col. Cowles to this city, and to cooperate with his friends and the citizens of Hudson in making suitable arrangements for his funeral.
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions signed by the Mayor and Clerk, be forthwith transmitted to the family and relatives of the deceased Col. Cowles, and be published in the several papers in this city.
On Motion, the resolutions were adopted.
The Mayor appointed as the committee mentioned in the above resolution, Aldermen Townsend, Groat and Holmes.
On motion, Council adjourned.

FUNERAL OF COL. COWLES.—The last tribute of respect was paid to the remains of this gallant hero at Hudson on Monday last. The sun rose brightly in the eastern horizon, thus bringing a most beautiful and pleasant day upon the earth. Early on the morning the streets were thronged with people, while the tolling of the bells and the flags at half mast announced the death of a great hero. Flags were spread across the streets, houses draped in mourning, and all the stores closed. During the morning a large number of the Colonel's friends, together with other citizens, arrived from the different places in the different boats and trains.
At two o'clock the body of the Colonel was carried from the City Hall, where the remains had been lying in state, to the Presbyterian Church, where already an immense multitude had assembled. After the services here the remains were borne from the Church to the street, where the procession had already formed. At the command of the Marshal they started in the following order:
Marshal of the Day and Aids.
Hudson Band.
Hudson Lodge I. O. of O. F.
Hudson Lodge F. and A. M.
Invited Lodges F. and A. M.
Mayor and Common Council in carriages.
Invited Guests in carriages.
Committee of Arrangements.
Hearse.
Escorted on each side by Returned Volunteers.
Col. Cowles' horse, led by his groom.
Field and Staff officers 21st Regt., N. Y. S. M.
Line officers of Co. A, D and H, 21st Reg.
Adjutant General J. T. Sprague and Staff.
Officers of Volunteer Regiments.
Claverack Institute Cadets.
Clergy in carriages.
Friends of the Deceased in Carnages.
Brass Band.
Hudson and Athens Fire Departments.
Young America Engine Co. No. 6 of Poughkeepsie.
Delegations from Phoenix and Lady Washington
Hose Companies, Poughkeepsie.
The procession, having marched through the principal streets of the city, amid the solemn sound of the music and the ranging bells, marched to the Cemetery, where, after the Masonic and Odd Fellows rites had been completed, the remains of the gallant and brave soldier were consigned to the tomb.
The streets along the route of the procession were thronged with people. Flags, with mournful black, were hanging from nearly every house. Some houses were splendidly adorned with red, white, blue and black. Among the latter was a Hotel, which bore in the midst of the national colors draped in mourning, a black canvass upon which were the following and last words of the Colonel: "Tell my mother that I die with my face to the enemy."
Thus ended the life of Col. David S. Cowles, who while living was lowed by all for his kindness and politeness, and in death was adorned by all for his bravery and gallant behavior. Peace be to his remains.

Meeting at City Hall.
In accordance with a notice of a meeting called at the City Hall on Saturday evening last, a large number of our citizens assembled for the purpose of expressing their condolence with the family and friends of Col. Cowles, and making suitable arrangements for his funeral. On motion of John Gaul, Jr. Esq., Hon. John Stanton Gould was called to the Chair, and Wm. BRYAN appointed Secretary.
The objects of the meeting were briefly and appropriately stated by the Chairman, after which the Hon. HENRY HOGEBOOM in a few well-timed remarks paid a fitting testimonial to the character and services of the deceased, in which he alluded briefly to the high estimation and respect in which the deceased was held by the citizens of Hudson. He alluded to the dying message he left his mother, his last words to the officers and men under his charge, and to the request of the Colonel that his remains might be brought to this city for burial. No man ever sacrificed the comforts and endearments of friends and home, to take up arms in defence of the Union, with purer and more patriotic motives than he whose loss we now mourn. He left a lucrative business which demanded his personal attention—he severed family ties and friendly associations, at a time when the Government stood most in need of true patriots, and hurried into the field to do his duty, and if need be, sacrifice his life. God, in his infinite wisdom, has seen fit that his life should be sacrificed on the altar of his country—and we, who have not yet shared the toils and dangers of our gallant army, owe it to the heroic dead that we should demonstrate our respect for the memory of a brave man, by uniting together in paying the last sad tribute to his memory.
At the conclusion of the remarks of Judge Hogeboom, a motion was made that a committee of five be appointed by the Chair, to draft resolutions expressive of the sense of the meeting, whereupon the Chair appointed. Hon. Henry Hogeboom, Rev. E. Bradbury, C. P. Collier, Esq., J. W. Fairfield, Esq., Hon. Darius Peck. The committee retired from the meeting, and in a few moments returned, and through their Chairman, Hon. Henry Hogeboom, reported the following preamble and resolutions, which were unanimously adopted:—
WHEREAS, Information has been this day received of the death of Col. D. S. Cowles, and of the death or severe casualties to other officers and soldiers of the 128th Regiment, in the attack made by our forces under Gen. Banks on the enemy's works at Port Hudson, on the 27th and 28th Ultimo. And whereas, we desire to take the earliest opportunity to record our sense of the gallantry of those of our officers and soldiers who participated in that sanguinary conflict, therefore,
Resolved, That we have heard with profound sorrow of the death of Col. Cowles, Captain De Wint, Lieutenants Armstrong and Wilkinson, and Sergeant Van Slyck, and of the severe wounding of Captain Gifford, and of probable casualties to other gallant officers and soldiers (whose names have not yet reached us) of the 128th Regiment N. Y. S. V., in the affair at Port Hudson on the 27th and 28th of May, 1863.
Resolved, That we cannot express in terms sufficiently strong and decided our admiration of the brave and gallant conduct of the officers and men who participated in that engagement, and especially of those who were attached to the 128th Regiment, composed mainly of citizens of the Counties of Columbia and Dutchess.
Resolved, That we hereby testify our most profound and sincere sympathy and condolence with the families and friends of the brave men who were killed or wounded on the occasion above referred to, and shall ever be ready to manifest and record our gratitude and respect for their valuable services which the gallant sufferers have rendered to their country, as well as our heartfelt sympathy and respect for their surviving friends.
Resolved, That having heard of the probable arrival of the body of Col. Cowles among us at an early day, and of the wish of himself and his friends that he should be buried here, we feel and express a melancholy satisfaction in giving to his remains a place of sepulture in our midst and in preparing to attend and honor his funeral ceremonies. That his personal character, his well earned popularity at home and in the Army; his gallant conduct throughout the war, his unquestionable courage, and his patriotic devotion to the cause of his country under all circumstances and in every crisis, well entitle him to every distinction which it is in our power to pay to his remains and his memory.
Resolved, That we shall gratefully perform the same sad duty to any other of our brave officers and soldiers whose remains may be interred among us, and hope, on some proper occasion, to participate in the erection of a fitting monument to their memory.
Resolved, That we desire to include in our expressions of admiration, respect and gratitude the gallant soldiers, to whatever regiment attached, who have recently returned among us after loyal and faithful service, as well as those who in this sanguinary war have fallen victims to their patriotism on the field of battle or elsewhere, and those who shall continue to devote themselves with unswerving courage and fidelity to the cause of their country.
Resolved, That we deem this a fitting occasion to renew the expression of our devoted and unfaltering attachment to the holy cause in which our armies are engaged—our conviction that the war should be prosecuted until the last rebel is subdued, or an honorable peace established—and our earliest and abiding hope that patriots of all parties may feel it to be  their imperative duty to give to the prosecution of the contest an energetic  and unqualified support until these objects are accomplished.
Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed by the chairman of this meeting to co-operate with a committee of the Common Council of this city, and of the Masonic Fraternity, and with friends of the deceased, in making suitable arrangements for the funeral ceremonies of Col. Cowles, and also of the other officers and soldiers of the 128th, 159th and other regiments whose remains may be brought here for burial.
Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be subscribed by the officers thereof, by published in all the newspapers of the Counties of Columbia and Dutchess, and that a copy thereof be transmitted to the family and friends of the brave officers and soldiers of the 128th Regiment who fell in the action at Port Hudson, and also Louisiana.
While the committee on resolutions were out, John Gaul, Jr. Esq., addressed the meeting briefly, paying a fitting tribute to the memory of the deceased, and alluding in a very feeling manner to the high estimation in which the deceased was held, not only by the citizens of this city and county, but by the officers and men in his Regiment.
The Chairman then alluded to the time of the departure of Col. Cowles' Regiment from the city—to the services which were had at that time, in which Hon. Theodore Miller took a prominent part, and called upon Mr. Miller, who was present, to address the meeting. Mr. Miller was so overwhelmed with grief at the intelligence of Col. Cowles death, that he begged to be excused.
Just before the close of the meeting a committee of three were appointed from the meeting, consisting of Charles Esselstyn, Esq., Stephen A. Dubois, Esq., and C. P. Collier, Esq., to confer with a similar committee from the Common Council, consisting of J. N. Townsend, Robert F. Groat, and Lemuel Holmes, to make the necessary arrangements for the reception of the remains and the funeral ceremonies.
The Members of Hudson Lodge No. 7, of Free and Accepted Masons, of which the deceased was a member, also held a meeting at their Hall the same evening, at which a committee of three, consisting of the following Brothers, F. A. Gifford, A. Wagoner, A. Colton, were appointed to confer with the committees from the citizens and Council, in regard to the reception of the remains and the funeral ceremonies.
The meeting then adjourned.

A Hero at Rest.
Col. Daniel S. Cowles, of Hudson, N. Y., (brother of Judge Edward P. Cowles, of N. Y. city,) was killed in the assault at Port Hudson on the 27th ult. He commanded the 128th regiment of New York Volunteers, made up in good part of the hardy young farmers of Columbia county, many of them men of wealth and high social position. Col. Cowles was himself wealthy, stood at the head of the bar of Columbia county, was a widower, about forty years old, of fine physical development, being over six feet high. He went into the war as a matter of patriotic duty, telling his friends that he did not expect to survive it, but considering many such lives a cheap sacrifice for the preservation of such a country as ours. From a private letter just received from Major Foster, of the same regiment, we gather that he died as the true old soldier would wish to die, leading up hit men to the enemy's works. He was killed by a bayonet thrust in the groin, and lived about an hour alter he received the wound. He was carried a short distance to the rear by Sergeant Bell, who supported him in his arms until he died. He was every inch a soldier, cool in council, brave in battle, polite in his intercourse with others, and happy in all his relations. His last words were: "Tell my mother I died with my face to the enemy. Lord Jesus receive my spirit." It is expected that his remains will arrive here shortly, and will be taken to Hudson for burial.

Tribute to the Late James Williamson.
At a special meeting of the members of the St. Andrews's Society of this city, held on the evening on the 15th inst., the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, We have learned with sincere regret that Lieut. James Williamson, one of our members, fell in battle before Port Hudson on the 27th of May, 1863; and being desirous that some memorial expressive of our deep and lasting regard for him be entered on our minutes.
Resolved, That we bear our cordial testimony to the numerous excellencies of our deceased brother in public and private life, his integrity, his truthfulness, his open and manly adherence to principle, the large and generous sympathies pf his heart for the wants of the suffering and the wrongs of the oppressed, the purity of his character, the suavity of his manners and that fine combination of moral and Christian qualities which endeared him to those by whom he was intimately known.
Resolved, That we desire to express with feelings of admiration, his ardent devotion to his country which induced him, in the hour of its peril to renounce the gains of a lucrative profession and the comforts of a loved home, at the call of patriotism, and feel that in the death of this gallant officer, whose career ha been this briefly though honorably closed, the Nation has lost an ardent and devoted friend.
Resolved, That we record it with satisfaction, that though of foreign extraction, and always cherishing with a loving heart the land of his birth, he was, in the truest sense of the word, "an American;" affiliating himself in heart and soul with the Government and its institutions of the land of his adoption, upholding them in the exercise of their functions, vindicating them when assailed and throwing himself at last with his characteristic enthusiasm into the contest when these were imperiled; and while we hallow his memory, we will resolutely defend that paternal government under which it is our privilege to live and to which we owe the enjoyment of all our social and civil immunities.
Resolved, That we tender our affectionate sympathy to the bereaved wife, supplicating in her behalf the support of religious consolation, and to the numerous relatives and friends of the deceased; and also that his early and lamented death may be blessed to the members of our society in gathering up those solemn lessons of duty which it is designed and fitted to convey.
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be transmited [sic] to the widow of the deceased, and that they be inserted in the daily papers of the city.
JAMES DUNCAN, President.
PETER SMITH, Secretary.

Camp Correspondence.
The Storming of Port Hudson.
IN BIVOUAC FRONT OF REBEL BATTERIES
AT PORT HUDSON, MAY 29TH, 1863.
Day before yesterday we had a terrible battle and were repulsed. Both Generals Sherman and Dow were wounded, and the heroic Colonel (Cowles) killed. You must excuse me for not having written before, but it was impossible. Even now the paper on which I am writing, was taken from the inside of a box of ammunition. You will want to know why I have not written before so I will tell the particulars. My last was written May 11th. On the 12th, our regiment and the 6th Mich, under command of Col. Clark of the 6th, left camp in light marching order. The M. O. and Jackson R. R. was about 1/2 a mile back of our camp. Here we embarked on some platform and cattle cars, and went by railroad to Manchackbass, the junction between Lakes Pontchartrain and Maurepas. At this point the R. R. bridge has been burnt, we crossed the pass in flat boats, we then marched 6 miles through a dense cypress swamp over the rail road tressel works, which was very tiresome, and stopped for the night. At 1 next morning we were up and off, arriving within a mile of Ponchatoula by daylight, threw out skirmishers, formed lines of battle, and advanced on the town. The rebel infantry left the town a couple of hours before, their cavalry remained, fired into us a few rounds and then run. Several hundred U. S. cavalry soon joined us, having made a forced march from Baton Rouge, they brought in a rebel Lieut, and about 20 men. We remained here a number of days, during which the cavalry had a fight, took one hundred prisoners and destroyed a great deal of property. On the 19th returned, reaching Camp Parapet at dark, where we had the first real night rest in 8 days. Towards night next day we left camp taking knapsacks, we laid in Carrolton till 2 o'clock A. M. and went aboard of the steamship United States, and in company with steamships Crescent, and Creole and Sallie Robinson and Iberville, started up the river, comprising Nickerson's, Dow's, and a part of the 2d Brigades of Sherman's Division. Reached Baton Rouge at night, and next day started for Springfield Landing, just below Port Hudson, landed, left our knapsacks on board the boat to go back to Baton Rouge, and took up our line of march directly from the river, taking nothing with us but accoutrements, haversacks and  canteens, not even a blanket. This was a week ago, since which time we have slept every night in the open air (two nights in a heavy rain) without a stitch of covering over us. On day before yesterday t he battles took place. All the forenoon we shelled them vigorously. Now I will give you some idea of how our troops are posted. Sherman's Division on the left, Augur's in the center and Banks on the right. About noon of the 27th, we commenced making preparations for storming their parapet. This parapet extends completely around the town, touching the river above and below. It is also encircled by a wide deep moat. Although our artillery had dismounted several of their guns, yet still a large number remained to give us a reception. The Parapet was likewise occupied by thousands of rebel infantry and sharpshooters patiently waiting for our onset. Our orders were to storm the place at 2 P. M. At ten minutes before two the 1st Vt. Battery and 9th Indiana Battery came out on the edge of the woods (where they had been masked) on a gallop and took position directly in front of the rebel batteries where they opened a terrific fire of shells on the rebels. (You will perceive that I only give an account of our own Brigade.) As soon as the batteries opened, our brigade started from the edge of the woods where they had been drawn up in line, and preceeded [sic] by a detachment of negro troops carrying poles and boards to bridge the rebel ditch, advanced rapidly forward. Full 600 yards of level plain was to be passed before reaching the formidable parapet which, instantly commenced pouring a terrific fire, shot, shell, grape, c___ and bullets. The first discharge ... rebels was so terrific that our lines wavered and were broken, and Gens. Sherman and Dow, and Col. Clark of the 6th Mich. next in command, fell wounded. Col. Cowles was then in command, drawing his sword he rallied the men, and rushed forward, the line pressed forward after him. A ceaseless storm of iron and lead was poured into us, and when almost to their works our gallant colonel fell, struck by six bullets. He lived nearly an hour, but would not allow himself to be carried off.— The battle lasted 4 hours, but it was an unequal contest and we withdrew without carrying the works. I was exposed to the fire the whole 4 hours and by the mercy of God escaped with only a bullet through my coat just grazing my shoulder. I cannot conceive how the number killed and wounded was not infinitely greater. Our regiment lost 1/4 who went into the fight, killed or wounded. You must not worry about me for the future, as I do not think the place will be stormed again, until thoroughly reduced by siege. A heavy siege tram is now on its way—more anon.
Yours in the cause of Liberty,
AMBROSE B. HART.

A letter from the 128th regiment, from Thomas L. Jones, formerly a clerk in Hicock's Book Store, and who enlisted as a private in that regiment says that they (the regiment) have been in a fight at a place called Pontchatuld, a rebel town forty miles from New Orleans. Our boys driving the rebels and took possession of the place and now hold it. He state [sic] the boys all fought well, and that this was their first battle.
Mr. Jones has by strict attention to his duties as a private soldier and his talent and good disposition secured the appointment of clerk in the Assistant Adjutant General's office at New Oleans [sic]. He received the appointment from General Sherman on the 16th of May. It is a position which he is fully competent to fill as his abilities are ...
Colonel Cowles, of the 128th Regiment, who was killed at the recent battle of Port Hudson, was a gallant and brave soldier, and a gentleman of fine attainments and attractive manners. His last words were:—"Tell my mother that I died with my face to the enemy. Boys, I have tried to do my duty as a soldier and a man." Col. Cowles resided at Hudson, and was a lawyer by profession. He raised a part of a regiment, but lost the command by its consolidation with the 91st. He made a second effort, worked night and day, recruited a new regiment, and left for the seat of war last fall.

Deserved Promotions.
James Smith, of Poughkeepsie, has been promoted to Colonel of the 128th Regiment. We agree with the Poughkeepsie Telegraph, that "his promotion to the command was due to the faithful soldier who has worked his way meritoriously up from a subordinate position."
James P. Foster, of this city, has been promoted to Lieut. Colonel of the same Regiment. He too has honorably won his promotion by his services on the field, and the faithful discharge of his duties as a soldier.

Col. Cowles' Funeral.
ORDER OF SERVICES AT THE CHURCH.
Reading the Scripture.
Sacred Music.
Eulogy by Hon. J. H. Reynolds.
Sacred Music.
Address by Rev. W. S. Leavitt.
Prayer.
Sacred Music.
Benediction.
PROGRAMME OF FUNERAL PROCESSION.
MARSHAL.
CORNELIUS BORTLE.
MUSIC.
Masonic Order.
Clergy in Carriages.
Bearers.
Hearse, Horse and Trappings; led by his body servant.
Returned Soldiers to act as Guard of Honor.
Relatives, in Carriages.
Mayor, Common Council and Supreme Judges, in carriages.
Strangers from Abroad.
Members of the Bar and County Officers.
Chief Engineer and Assistants, and the Fire Department, with belts. Procession to form on Fourth Street, move down Union street to Front, round Franklin Square to Warren, up Warren to the Cemetery.
BY ORDER OF COMMITTEE.
The remains will lie in state at the City Hall from Sunday morning till Monday afternoon, in charge of the guard of honor.
The citizens are requested to join in the procession.

Proclamation.
I hereby request all stores and places of business to be closed from 1 to 5 o'clock p. m. on Monday, the 15th instant, during the funeral ceremonies of Col. D. S. Cowles and that all flags be at half-mast, and that the citizens join in the procession.
JACOB TEN BROECK, Mayor.
Hudson, May 12th, 1863.

COL. COWLES.—We are informed that the funeral of Col. D. S. Cowles, of the 128th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., will take place at Hudson on the Monday next, at 2 o'clock P. M.
The companies of the 21st Regiment stationed here are making arrangements to go up to Hudson next Monday. They intend to charter a boat and leave here together with all who wish to accompany them, about 8 o'clock a. m. Nothing certain, however, is known as to the latter.—Pough. Eagle.

MEETING OF THE BAR—A meeting of the members of the Bar of Columbia County, is to be held on the forenoon of Monday next, immediately after the adjournment of the Court, in connection with the recent deaths of the late Hon. John Snyder and the late David S. Cowles, and for the purpose of paying a suitable tribute to their memories. A full attendance of the members of the Bar is desired. See special notice.

From the 128th Regiment,
In another column we publish a letter from the 128th Regiment, giving an account of the battle at Port Hudson on the 14th of June, which reached us a few hours too late for our last week's issue. Below we give the list of the killed and wounded referred to in the letter. We have the satisfaction to state that but few of the number are seriously wounded.
Killed—Private Robert P. Churchill, Co. C.
Wounded—Capt. G. W. Van Slyck, Co. E., (now on duty); Lieut. John P. Wilkinson, Act. Adjt. (on duty); Privates Alexander Shaw, Co. A., Martin Cady, Co. A., Henry Norris, Co. D., Andrew Jackson, Co. D., Andrew J. Silvernail, Co. D., George H. Fitchett, Co. D., Sergt. Wm. Thomson, Co. E., Private W. R. Showerman, Co. E., Sergt. Daniel Warren, Co. F., Privates C. McManamy, Co. G., Wm. Spreadbury, Co. H., Wm. Brundage, Co. H., Sergt. Richard Enoch, Co. I. Corp. J. H. Miller, Co. K., Privates Allen Sheldon, Co. K., John Huskle, Co. M., Daniel Westley, Co. K., S. Miller, Co. K.

The Republican.
Official Paper of the City and County.
WM. BRYAN, F. H. WEBB,
Editors and Proprietors.
HUDSON, TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 1863.
The 128th Regiment in Battle.
Death of Col. D. S. Cowles—Capt. Gifford Wounded and Missing—Other Casualties—Reception of the News in Hudson—Meeting of the Common Council and Citizens—Addresses by Hon. H. Hogeboom and John Gaul, Jr.,—Appropriate Resolutions adopted and Committees appointed.
Early on Saturday morning our citizens were apprized by a telegram from New York of the result of an assault on Port Hudson in which the 128th Regiment participated and suffered an extraordinary loss of life. The death of Col. Cowles, while gallantly leading his Regiment, was announced, and reports brought concerning Capt. E. Gifford, of Co. A, which rendered it too probable that he also had fallen, immediately after taking the command, which, in the absence of the Lt. Col. and Major, devolved upon him. These announcements, in connection with the report that about 200, or nearly one half the Regiment had been sacrificed, spread a feeling of gloom over the entire community. All the flags were at once lowered to half-mast, and a public meeting called at the City Hall to unite in a suitable expression of grief, and provide for a becoming reception and interment of the remains of Col. Cowles and such other officers or soldiers as may be returned to us. The proceedings of the meeting were as follows:

Meeting of Citizens.
A Public Meeting of Citizens was held at the City Hall on Saturday evening, June 6th, over which JOHN STANTON GOULD was called to preside, and WILLIAM BRYAN chosen Secretary.
The meeting having been, organized, the Chairman stated its object to be to take suitable measures to pay fitting honors to the memory of Col. David S. Cowles, of this city, who had recently fallen while in the active discharge of his duty to his Country and his God.
Suggestions and remarks having been invited:—
Judge HOGEBOOM said: I rise, Mr. Chairman, to perform one of the most melancholy duties of my life—to bring to the notice of this meeting the death of our gallant friend Col. Cowles, and his brave associates and comrads [sic] on the field of battle, and to ask that fitting honors be paid to their memory. It is within the knowledge of those assembled here, from intelligence derived from the papers of to-day that on the 27th and 28th of May last an attack was made by our forces under General Banks upon the enemy's fortifications at Port Hudson. It would seem to have been determined to carry the works by storm instead of awaiting the slow and tedious process of a regular siege. As a consequence of this it was naturally to be expected that great loss of life would ensue, and such turned out to be the case. The 128th Regiment of New York Volunteers had an honorable position on the left of the line, and was one of the advance guard. They succeeded in penetrating the enemy's fortifications; the 6th Michigan
Regiment seized the enemy's colors—the 128th New York under the command of our gallant friend, followed; both were within the enemy's works; they expected, but failed of support, it would seem, from the 15th New Hampshire, and were consequently obliged to retreat. This was successfully accomplished, but at the expense of the life of the gallant commander of the 128th. He met death as a brave soldier would desire to meet it, and as he wished his mother and friends to understand, "with his face to the foe." He has paid the forfeit of his life, but if death must be met on the field of battle, it could not come in a more honorable guise than on this occasion it did to Col. Cowles. He met it with the spirit and bravery characteristic of the man, and we take a melancholy pleasure in rendering to his bearing the tribute of our admiration and respect.
Upon the fall of Col. Cowles, and in the absence of the Lieut. Colonel and the Major from the field, the command of the Regiment devolved upon our young and gallant friend, Captain Gifford. Nobly did he respond to his duly, but was immediately wounded—we trust not mortally. But we must wait for further advices before we are able to tell how much of sadness and mourning the history of those two melancholy days will develope. We have reason to fear it will bring grief and tears to many a household, but we will not anticipate the melancholy developements [sic] of the future. On the retirement of Capt. Giffords the command devolved on Capt. Keese. The papers speak in terms of unqualified admiration of his conduct in this trying crisis, and it is most gratifying to recognise [sic] the spirit and bravery with which he conducted the command. Hostilities were at length suspended, but they have left behind them a melancholy record, doubtless, in the list of killed and wounded, of whose names and fate we are as yet but imperfectly advised.
We are met this evening to record our sense of these gallant achievements, and to testify our gratitude and esteem for the conduct of the brave men who have suffered and fallen in our behalf.
Of the personal qualities of Col. Cowles it is unnecessary before you, Sir, and this assemblage, who knew him well, to speak in much detail. He is spoken of in the papers (and we recognize the portrait) as a model of manly beauty. He was a man of cultivation and refinement, of fine intellectual qualities, and of a generous heart. This made him eminently popular with his men—as we know him to have been among us. His gallant bearing, his dashing courage, his devotion to the cause in which he was enlisted, we all know and recognize. Truly his heart was in his work—his feelings and his judgment were alike deeply engaged in the service and present a model for imitation. Let us respect and honor his memory and copy his example.
It is but simple justice to the noble dead, that we should render fitting honors to their memory. And it is but simple justice to the cause in which these brave men fell, that we should recall the memory of these gallant deeds, and thus stimulate, if need be, the slumbering patriotism of our citizens. It is a cause in defense of our dearest rights—nay, of our national existence—and it would be matter of mortification and regret if we could not bring to it the utmost unanimity of feeling and energy of action.
It is understood, Mr. Chairman, to have been the wish of Col. Cowles, as it is the desire of his friends, that he should be buried among us, and it is another evidence that he regarded himself as identified with and belonging to us. I trust that all suitable measures will be adopted to carry into effect his wishes in this particular, and to pay the last tribute of respect to his remains. I move you, Sir, that a committee of five be appointed by the Chair to express the sentiments of this meeting in regard to the melancholy circumstances which have called us together, and to make proper arrangements for the funeral ceremonies.
The Chair named Judge Hogeboom, Judge Peck, Rev. Mr. Bradbury, J. W. Fairfield, and C. P. Collier, Esqrs., such committee.
The committee having retired for consultation, the meeting was further eloquently addressed by JOHN GAUL, Junior, Esquire, whose remarks were felt by all present to embody a most timely, just and appropriate tribute to the memory of our brave officers and soldiers both of the 128th and 159th Regiments, who have fallen in the shock of battle or by lingering disease in defence of our country and its free institutions, against the assaults of a wicked and unholy Rebellion. [They will be given in full hereafter.]
The committee on resolutions having returned, submitted, through their chairman, Judge Hogeboom, the following:
WHEREAS, information has been this day received of the death of Col, COWLES, and of the death of, or severe casualties to several other officers and soldiers of the 128th Regiment in the attack made by our forces under Gen. Banks on the enemy's works at Port Hudson on the 27th and 28th ultimo;
And Whereas, we desire to take the earliest opportunity to record our sense of the gallantry of those of our officers and soldiers who participated in that sanguinary conflict, Therefore—
Resolved, That we have heard with profound sorrow of the death of Colonel Cowles, Capt. De Wint, Lieutenants Armstrong and Wilkinson and Sergeant Van Slyck, and of the severe wounding of Captain Gifford, and of probable casualties to other gallant officers and soldiers (whose names have not yet reached us,) of the 128th Regiment New York State Volunteers, in the affair at Port Hudson on the 27th and 28th of May 1863.
Resolved, That we cannot express in terms sufficiently strong and decided, our admiration of the brave and gallant conduct of the officers and men who participated in that engagement, and especially of these who were attached to the 128th Regiment, composed mainly of citizens of the counties of Columbia and Dutchess.
Resolved, That we hereby testify our most profound and sincere sympathy and condolence with the families and friends of the brave men who were killed and wounded on the occasion above referred to, and shall ever be ready to manifest and record our gratitude and respect for the invaluable services which the gallant sufferers hare rendered to their country, as well as our heartfelt sympathy and respect for their surviving friends.
Resolved, That having heard of the probable arrival of the body of Col. Cowles among us at an early day, and of the wish of himself and his friends that he should be buried here, we feel and express a melancholy satisfaction in giving to his remains a place of sepulture in our midst, and in preparing to attend and honor his funeral ceremonies. That his high personal character, his well earned popularity at home and in the army, his gallant conduct throughout the war, his unquestionable courage, and his patriotic devotion to the cause of his country under all circumstances and in every crisis, well entitle him to every distinction which it is in our power to pay to his remains and his memory.
Resolved, That we shall gratefully perform the same sad duty to any other of our brave officers and soldiers whose remains may be interred among us, and hope on some proper occasion to participate in the erection of a fitting monument to their memories.
Resolved, That we desire to include in our expressions of admiration, respect and gratitude, the gallant soldiers, to whatever regiment attached, who have recently returned among us after loyal and faithful service, as well as those who in this sanguinary war have fallen victims to their patriotism on the field of battle or elsewhere, and those who still continue to devote themselves with unswerving courage and fidelity to the cause of their country.
Resolved, That we deem this a fitting occasion to renew the expression of our devoted and unfaltering attachment to the holy cause in which our armies are engaged—our conviction that the war should be prosecuted until the last Rebel is subdued or an honorable peace established—and our earnest and abiding hope that patriots of all parties may feel it to be their imperative duty to give to the prosecution of the contest an energetic and unqualified support until these objects are accomplished.
Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed by the Chairman of this meeting to co-operate with a committee of the Common Council of this city and of the Masonic Fraternity and with the friends of the deceased, in making suitable arrangements for the funeral ceremonies of Col. Cowles, and also of the other officers and soldiers of the 128th and the 159th Regiments whose remains may be brought here for burial.
Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting, subscribed by the officers thereof be published in all the newspapers of the counties of Columbia and Dutchess, and that a copy thereof be transmitted to the families and friends of the brave officers and soldiers of the 128th Regiment who fell in the action at Port Hudson and also to the present commanding officer of that regiment in Louisiana.
The resolutions were unanimously adopted, and the Chair named Messrs. Charles Esselstyn, Stephen A. Dubois, and C. P. Collier, the committee co-operate with a committee on the part of the Common Council, to make suitable and proper arrangements for the funeral obsequies.
On motion the meeting then adjourned.
JOHN STANTON GOULD, Chairman.
WILLIAM BRYAN, Secretary.

Meeting of the Common Council.
The Common Council also met on Saturday evening. Appropriate Resolutions were offered by Ald. Townsend, which were unanimously adopted. A committee, on the part of the Council, consisting of Aldermen Townsend, Groat and Holmes, was appointed by the Mayor to proceed to New York to meet the remains of Col. Cowles, and to make such other arrangements as might be necessary for the funeral.

The Late Lieut. Bradbury.
A Memior [sic] of Lieut. Augustus U. Bradbury, has been published, and a limited number of copies have been left at the Bookstores. It is neatly put up, and contains a likeness of the deceased.

For the Daily Eagle.
The 128th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.
Headquarters 128th Reg't. N. Y. Vols. 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 19th Army Corps.
Before Port Hudson, July 6th, 1863.
Hon. H. A. Nelson, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and
Hon. Henry Hogeboom, Hudson, N. Y.
GENTLEMEN:—As there are many persons residing in the counties of Columbia and Dutchess, who are constantly directing their eyes towards the doings of, and many who have relatives and friends in this Regiment, the Col. commanding considers that a correct record of the losses the Regiment has sustained since it has been in the United States service, from death, by disease, in action, wounds received, discharged and deserted, from each company, will be valuable as such to those who have lost friends and relatives, besides being interesting to the many friends, which this regiment has throughout the 12th District—it being a representative one—hereby appends such list on record.
The several papers in the District will confer a favor upon those serving with the regiment by publishing the same for general information, and as a matter of history, both for the Regiment and its friends, and in which the whole District is deeply interested.
With this is forwarded a recapitulation, showing the number enlisted and mustered into the Regiment, the losses sustained and the present strength up to this date.
Such record will hereafter, if practicable, be forwarded monthly. You will confer a favor by interesting yourselves in the above. I am gentlemen, your obe't Servant,
JAMES SMITH,
Col. commanding 128th Reg. N. Y. V.

STATEMENT.
Number of men enlisted and mustered into the 128th Regiment, New York Volunteers, the losses sustained accounted for by name, with the dates thereof as far as can be obtained, together with the present strength of the command.
Killed.—Colonel David S. Cowles, May 27th, 1863.
COMPANY A.
    "         David Plumb, May 26th, 1863.
    "         Myron Poncher, May 27, 1863.
    "         John B. Taylor, July 8.
Wounded—Martin Codey, June 18, Port Hudson.
    "         Alexander Shaw,     "            "
    "         David BeHows, June 29.
Died of Disease—Jacobus C. Moett, Dec. 20, 1862, Quaranantine [sic] Station, La.; Henry B. Hulbert, Jan. 7, 1863, do.; John E. DeGroff, Jan. 8, 1863, do. John Harrison, January 22, Camp Chalmette.
Corporal John Baker, Feb. 8, hospital N. O.
Private James Moon, Feb. 20, Camp Parapet.
Ord Serg't A. W. Bradbury, Feb. 26, St. James Hosp., N. O.
Private Alonzo Almstead, Dec. 20, 1862, Fortress Monroe,
    "       Richard T. Burch, April 5, 1863, Camp Parapet, La.
    "       George H. Harvey, April 14, Fortress Monroe.
    "       Abram E. Miller, Feb. 16, Barracks Hospital, N. O.
    “       Martin Wilcox, Quarantine Station, La.
Discharged.
Priv. John Fogarty, U. S. gen Hosp Balt, Nov 28, 1862.
Sergt Lewis B Fairbanks, Stewarts Mans, Balt, Apl. 6.
Private George Finch, March 1863, US Barracks, N. O.
    "       Thomas Wands, May 29,        "        "
    "       Samuel DeGroff, June 1,        "         "
    "       Joseph E Churchill, June 1     "         "
Missing—Priv Frank Shaw, since June 24, 1863.
    "              "   Wallace Brower, July 1, 1863.
Deserted—John Burrit, from Camp Kelley, Aug. 6, 1862
Present aggregate, Com'd Officers 2. Enlisted men 76.
Total 78.

COMPANY B.
Killed—1st Sergt, Riley Burdick, May 27, Port Hudson, La.
   "         Private Phillip Allen            "            "         "
   "         Sergt Gilbert H. Kniffin,      "            "        "
Wounded—Sherman H Williams,     "            "        "
   "         Rant A White, now on duty, May 27 "
   "         LeRoy Lineburgh,    "     "        "        "        "
   "         Chas Records,           "     "        "        "
   "         Michael Sullivan,      "     "        "        "
   "         James Story,              "     "        "        "
   "         Geo Story, now a prisoner,        "        "
   "          John Wooden,          "                "       "
   "          O J Wattles,              "                "       "
   "          Walter L Orr,            "         June 14,  "
Died from disease.
William E Haight, Dec 10, 1862, at sea.
Harrison LeRoy, Dec 25, 1862, Quar. Sta. La.
John Van Hovenburgh, 31, 1862, "        "
Peter Carlow, Jan 1, 1863.
Isaac Brownell, Jan, 27, Camp Chalmette, La.
Ord Sergt Lewis Holmes, April 1, Camp Parapet.
H Buckingham, May 29,      "            "
Discharged—Chandler McCarty, John Richmond, Solomon Woodin, Geo Townsend, Wm B Sackett, May 5th, 1863, US Barracks, La.
D W Waller, May 20, 1863, Camp Parapet.
Deserted—Wm Bingle, Aug 15, 1862, Camp Kelley, N. Y.
   "              J H Parmenter, in 1862 on the march.
   "              Chas Smith, Oct 31, 1862 Camp Wellington, Md.
Present aggregate—Com'd Officers 2. Enlisted men 72.
Total 74.

COMPANY C.
Killed—Private Robt Churchill, June 14, Port Hudson.
Died from Disease.
Private Jasper Dewint, Dec 12, 1862, at sea.
    "       Robt N Haynor, Fortress Monroe, Va.
    "       Nathan E Day,         "           "
Corp Wm B Noxon, Camp Parapet, La.
Private Everett Traver, "
    "      Henry Coon,     "
Corp John W Kipp,      "
Private George W Hadden, Jefferson City, La.
Discharged—Private John Gay, Baltimore, Md.
    "                Benj Churchill,           "             "
    "                Jas H Holdridge, Balt. Md.
    “                Harrison Hawkins, Fortr’s Monroe, Va.
    "                Walter Churchill,       "            "
    "                 Chas E Rynders, Camp Parapet, La.
Deserted—Privates Robert Dykeman, Harvey Odell, Isaac Burdick, Martin Hawkins, Camp Millington, Md. Francis Betterton.
Present aggregate, enlisted men 75. Commissioned officers 3. Total 78.

COMPANY D.
Killed—1st Lieut. Francis N Sterling, died at sea, Dec 6th.
    "        Private John P Low, May 27, 1863, Port Hudson, La.
    "             "      Francis Helig,  "                         "
    "             "     Alfred Hitchcock, May 29,        "
Wounded—Corp Richard Ganley,  "     "
    "     Private James H Myers,        "     "
    “          “     David B Rider,          "     "
    “          “     Isaac I Weddet,         "     "
    “          “     Jacob O Sparks,        "    on duty, Port H.
    “          “    Andrew Jackson, June 14,    "          "
    “          “    Henry W Morris, jr,  "          "          "
    "          “    A J Silvernail,           "          "          "
    “          “    Geo H Fitchett,         "          "          "
Died from Disease—W M ____, Ethan S Lattin, Nov.
         “     Private Henry C Stillwell, Feb'y 14.
         "          “     Philetus Tentor, Feb _.
Discharged—Drummer John T Tanner, June.
        “      Privates —Levi L Brooks, June; John J. Marshall, Uriah Allison, August Banther, Michael Fitzgerald, Henry Hustis, Henry Lawrence, John Sherman.
Deserted—Edmond L Druory, James Morris, Garret T Benneway, C Willis Benny.
Present aggregate.—Commissioned officers 3. Enlisted men 71. Total 74.

COMPANY E.
Killed—2d Lieut Chas L Van Slyck, May 27, Port Hudson.
   "    Private John Tripp, May 27,                               "
   "         “     John T McIntyre, May 27,                      "
Wounded—Corp G H Woodin, May 27,                    "
      "      Private Henry Chever, May 27,                     "
      “           “      Jonas Muller, May 27, now on duty "
      "           “      William Sitzer, 27,          "        "      "
      “           “      Chas Thompson, 27,       "        "      "
      “           “      Robert Harross, 27,         "        "      "
      “           “      John Mosher, 27,             "        "     "
      “           “      John S Woodard, 27,       "        "     "
      "      Sergt Wm H Thompson, June 14,                "
      "      Private Wm R Showerman,     "                   "
      "           "      Elijah Kennicut, jr, now on dnty,    "
Died from Disease.
    "          Serg Wm Smith, Dec 16, '62, Quar Station, La.
    "          Private Nelson S Gott, Feb 25,             "
Discharged—1st Lieut John W Van Valkenburgh, Sergt. Frank J Childs, Jan 30, 1863.
     "         Privates, Ezekiael E Bates, Jan 30, Geo Mooney, December, John Miller, Dec, Wm Ostrander, Jan 29, Thos Potts, Feb 9, Andrew M Clark, March 2, Lambert J Hubbel, March 2, William Doty, June 23, Charles R Moors, June 23, 1863.
Deserted—Privates James Calligan, September 7, Baltimore, Wm H Pulver, Sept 8, Baltimore, Geo Tanner. Oct 7, Balt, Wm Hunt, Nov 3, Balt, Benj Rogers, Nov 4, Balt, Edward G Garner, Nov 4, Bait, Ralph Denn, Nov 5, Balt, Isaac Webster, Nov 31, Fortress Monroe, Va, James Kelley, Dec 25, Quarantine Station, La.
Present aggregate. Commissioned officers, 2. Enlisted men, 71. Total 73.

COMPANY F.
Killed—Private John Hughes, May 27, Port Hudson, La.
    "             “      Isaac M Olivett,   "               "
Wounded—Capt Arthur DeWint,  "               " returned.
    “        Sergt Daniel Warren, June 14,          "
    "        Corp Geo Hawver, May 27,              " returned.
    "        Privates Lewis Pearsall, May 27, Wm Jeffers, May 27, Geo Pollock, May 27, Silas Partington, May 27, Geo Wood, May 27, Orrin Hall, June 6th, Henry T Wenger, June 2.
Died from Disease—Privates Joseph O Malley, Oct 31st, Austin Terry, January 31, Harmon Palmateer, March 3d, Wm Partington, April 12, William Allen, April __.
Discharged—Private John Dengee, Feb 26, 1863, Sergt Augustus Myers, March 28, Privates Thos Furlong, March 28, Byron Stacy, March 26, John Mathers, jr, May 18, Geo Daseum, June 1, Egbert Brille, June 8, George Brower, June 12, 1863.
Deserted—Privates Everet Knickerbocker, Sept 3, 1862, Harrison Moore, Sept 3, John Holsier, Sept 3, Lewis Baker, Sept 3, Edgar Risedorph, Sept 3, Frederick Schipp, John Boon, Sept 5, Spafford Miller, Sept 5, Peter Williams, Sept 18, James Washburn, Sept 18, Chas Pindar, Oct 5, Martin Leonard, Oct 12, John E Cole, Oct 13, Jacob Palmer, Oct 14, Jas H C frost, Oct 31, 1862.
Present aggregate—Commissioned officers, 3. Enlisted men, 67. Total 70.

COMPANY G.
Killed—Private Chas Smith, May 27, 1863, Port Hudson, La.
    "             "      Otto Schurry,       "                       "
Wounded—Privates David H Pultz, Michael Beam, Samuel C Scutt, Isaac I Mickle, William A Stevens, Augustus Kisselburgh, John Brown, Job Kells, Cyrus Hawver, May 27, 1863, Abram Broadhead, June 3, Morris Bridenburgh, June 26, Martin Scott, July 2, Cornelius McManamy, June 14, 1863.
Died from Disease—Privates Wm Ostrander, Jan 2, Cyrus Griswold, Feb 14, Banjamin F Miller, March 2, (Peter G Collars, June 17, of wounds.)
Discharged.—Privates John F Warner, Nov 28, 1862, John Teator, Feb 21, 1863, Daniel J Randell, May 27, James Butts, May 4, Chas C Waugh, April 15, David H Gilkinson, June 2, Peter Hemtsing, March 26, Wilson Dykeman, June 1, Jacob H Dykeman, March 21, Leonard Poland, June 9.
Deserted—Priv. George Armstrong, Aug 26, Camp Kelly.
    "               "     James Guione,             "               "
    "               "     William Waldron,           27,        "
    "               "      Henry Mapes,                  "          "
    "               "      Geo Kipp,               Oct. 9,          "
    "               "     Geo Brown,          Sept. 23,          "
    "               "     John Best,               Nov. 5,          "
    "               "     John Selby,                "     "           "
    "               "     Fred'k Shaffer,        Dec 18,          "
Present aggregate—Commissioned Officers 3. Enlisted men 71. Total 74.

COMPANY H.
Killed—Priv. Traver Murphy, May 27, 1863, Port Hudson, La.
    "           "     Jno. Thompson,      "                          "
    “           “     Sylvanus Brown, June 10,                 "
Wounded—Serg't Garrett F. Dillon. May 27,           "
Private—James Green,                         "     "             "
     “        Mark Shepardson,                  "     "             "
     “        Chas S Wilber,                       "     "             "
     “        Alton Hill,                              "     "             "
     “        George Desron,                      "     "             "
     “        Wm. H. Odell,                        "     "             "
     “        Joseph O'Rouke,                     "     "             "
     "        Webster Brundage,               June 14,          "
Died from Disease—Corp'l Benj. Crowther, Mar. 19, 1863,
  Camp Parapat, La.; Private John P. Way, April 29.
      "          "                   "      Wm. East, June 6.
      "          "
Discharged—Priv. Valentine Van Nostrand, May 4, 1863.
Deserted—Priv Chas. Strausbury, Sept. 4, 1862, Camp Kelly, N. Y.; Jeremiah D. Wood, Sept. 4, 1862, Camp Kelly, N. Y.; Joseph Ambler, Oct. 11, 1862, Camp Millington, Md; Musician Emanuel Point, Nov 29, Newport News, Va; Private Frank Stephens, Jan. __ 1863, Quarantine Station, La.; Alanson Pollard, Jan. __ 1863, Quarantine Station, La., Willhelm Krow, Sept. 8, 1862, Baltimore, Md.,
Present aggregate—Commissioned Officers 3. Enlisted men 81. Total 84.

COMPAYN [sic] I.
Killed—Privates Henry Mackey, and Cornelius Williams, May 27, 1863, Port Hudson, La.
Wounded—Ord Sergt Richard Enoch, June 14, Port H.'n     
     "                 "          James Anthoy, May 27,           "
     "       Captain Chris Pierce, May 27,                       "
     "            "       Isaac B Gurney,   "                           "
     "        Privates John Carle, Robert Ham, Lawrence Horan, Theodore Keller, Jeremiah Lane, Oliver Slocum, Amos Traganz, May 27, Port H.
Died from Disease.—Corp Jessie D Vail, Camp Chalmettee, La., Corp Caleb Hicks, June 29, Port Hudson. Privates Albert Barker, Egbert Shear, Jessie Baker, Alex Furguson, Camp Parapet, La. John B Cypher, Hazard VanDewater, Quarantine Station, Miss. river, La.
Discharged.—Corp Fred M Williams, Balt, June 18, Musician Edward Walter, Feb 12, N. O., Privates Charles E Dennis, Balt., Theodore Montfort, Camp Parapet, La. Daniel Haw and James O'Donel, Balt., Isaac I Smith, New Orleans, Levi F Williams, Camp Parapet, Elihu S Wing, Balt., Geo H Walter, Feb 23, Camp Parapet, Benjamin P Woodin, Balt.
Deserted—Privates John Carroll and John Morris, 1863, New Orleans, Edward Jones and Wm Brennan, 1862, at Balt., John G Hoag, 1862, Hudson, N. Y., D. Mortmer Wilson and Lawrence Taafe, Balt.
Present aggregate—Commissioned Officers 3. Enlisted men 67. Total 70.

COMPANY K.
Killed—Corp Rob't E VanValkenburgh and Private Martin Stingle, May 27, Port Hudson.
Wounded—Sergt Timothy Horan and private Mathias Graff, May 27, (both since died,) Port H'n.
Died of Disease—Privates John H Smith, Abram Gardner, Oliver Lamphire, John W VanTassell, Egbert Stoutenburgh, Seth F Plass, Peter E Rufenburgh, Edward Roberts, Corporal Robert W Blunt.
Discharged—Capt Richard Decker, June 1. Privates Wm H Walters, Walter Bruce, Norman E Hermance, Jonas Rifenburgh, Norman Kline, Allen Decker, Wm Hall, Reuben Kilener.
Deserted—Ord'y Sergt Geo W Flint, Dec 1862, Fortress Monroe, Private Benj Best, Jan 10, 1863.
Present aggregate—Commissioned Officers 2. Enlisted men 72. Total 74.

RECAPITULATION—Showing original strength, losses sustained, and present strength.
Number of men enlisted in the Regiment,                     1021
     "           "       mustered "           "           Sept 4, 1862, 993
Killed in action, picket, skirmishing, &c.               24
Died of disease,                                                       62
   "    from wounds,                                                    2
Discharged for disability,                                        77
Missing,                                                                     6
Deserted,                                                                  62
Present strength Com'd Officers,                  33
   "              “       Enlisted Men,                   727     760
                                                                                993   993
Wounded, in action and by accident since the Regiment has been in service, nearly all of whom will return to duty, 79.
Respectfully, &c.
JAMES SMITH, Col. Comd'g 128 N. Y. S. V.
OFFICIAL.
John P. Wilkinson, Adj't.

Army Correspondence.
HEADQUARTERS DEFENCES NEW ORLEANS,
NEW ORLEANS, April 25th, 1863.
Colonel: I am directed b y the Brig. Gen. Commanding to say that your report of your expedition to Pearl River, is highly satisfactory.
The General directs me to express his thanks to yourself, and to the officers and men of your command, including the 1st Vermont Battery, for your conduct upon that occasion. The General considers that you displayed sound judgment and much energy in the manner in which you discharged your duties; and that your officers and men are entitled to much praise for their orderly conduct and excellent discipline [sic].
The results of your expedition are valuable.
Respectfull your ob't. serv't.
WICKHAM HOFFMAN,
COL. D. S. COWLES, A. A. G.

DEATH OF A SOLDIER—Robert M. Blunt, of Company K., 128th Regiment, died at Port Hudson on the 20th of June, aged 33 years. He had been in the hospital at New Orleans some months, ill with fever, but recovering partially, was ordered to duty again. He ate a hearty meal on the day of his death, and while walking a short distance from his tent dropped to the ground dead. He is one of the three brothers who have been or are now in the volunteer service. He was from Hudson, where he leaves a wife and four children.—Chatham Courier.

Returned.—Wm. H. Bartley, of this village, a member of Co. H., 128th Regiment, returned home on Thursday of last week. He has received his discharge, having received injuries unfitting him for service. JAMES GREEN, a member of the same Company, is now in town on a sixty days' furlough. He was wounded at Port Hudson, a rifle ball passing through his face, going in just in front of the right ear, and coming out near the left side of his nose. He reports the regiment in good condition, many of our boys having been promoted.

Army Correspondence.
HEADQUARTERS 128th REGIMENT N. Y. V.,
In Field near Port Hudson,
July 5th, 1863.
EDITOR STAR—Dear Sir:—I forward you for publication a correct list of casualties in the 128th Regiment N. Y. V., from the 28th of May to the 5th of July, 1863:
June 7th—ISAAC Oliver, Private Co. F., killed by shell
    " 11th—S. Brown, Private, Co. H., compound fracture of left leg by shell;                                         died June 12th.
   "    " —Charles Reckerts, Co. B., index finger of right hand by rifle ball; amputated.
   " 14th—Capt. G. W. Van Slyck, Co. E., contusion on head by shell, slight.
   "    "  —Lieut. John Wilkinson, Adj't, contusion of left shoulder by grape   shot, slight.
   "    "  —Sergeant R Enoch, Co. I., rifle ball through left hand.
   "    "  —Sergeant Wm. N. Thompson, Co. E., index finger by rifle ball.
   "    "  —E. Kinnicutt, Private, Co. E., bayonet wound in hand, slight.
   "    "  —Wm. R. Showerman, Private, Co. E., right leg by Minnie ball,  slight.
   "    " —Walter L. Orr, Private, Co. B., right thumb amputated.
   "    " —Daniel J. Wesley, Co. K., first two fingers right right hand by Minnie ball.
   "    " —George Hamilton, Private, Co. C., first two fingers
   "    “ —Robt. Churchill, Private, Co. C., killed by shell.
   "    " —H. W. Morris, Jr., Private, Co. D., left elbow by Minnie ball, doing  well.
   "    " —Andrew Jackson, Private, Co. D., right elbow shattered by rifle  ball; resection of elbow joint; doing well.
   "    " —S. N. Fichett, Private, Co. D., left thumb by rifle ball.
   "    " —A. I. Silvernail, Private, Co. D., right forearm fractured by shell, severe.
   "    " —Silas Miller, Private, Co. E., right index finger by rifle ball;  amputated.
   "    " —Cornelius McManaman, Private, Co. G., index finger right hand by rifle ball.
   "    " —Henry Brundage, Private, Co. H., flesh wound of right forearm by  grape, slight.
   "    " —Wm. Spreadburg, Private, Co. H., index finger right hand by rifle ball; amputated.
   "    " —Allen Shelden, Private, Co. K., contusion on hip by shell, slight.
June 28th—David Bellows, Private, Co. A., right hip by rifle ball, severe but  not dangerous.
July 3d—Corporal John Taylor, Co. A., killed by rifle ball through head.
   "       —Corporal Martin Scott, Co. G., thumb of right hand, first joint, by rifle ball.
I remain, very resp'y,
Your ob't servant,
PALMER C. COLE, Surgeon 128th Reg't, N. Y. V.

ARRIVED HOME.—A. Ashley, Jr., and J. Van Valkenburgh, who went out with the 128th Reg't., last fall, arrived home from New Orleans on Monday. We understand that both gentlemen have been acting in positions connected with the post quartemaster's [sic] department. They design, we are told, to return to New Orleans some time in October —Chatham Courier.

A. N. WEBB, ESQ., EDITOR STAR:
—Dear Sir:—The following letter and General Order have just been received by me. Perhaps the public will be pleased to see them through the medium of your paper. The record of the Regiment therein mentioned is retained at Poughkeepsie for insertion in the papers there, and, I am advised, will be published in the Telegraph and Eagle of that place, from which it can be copied, if desirable, into the papers here, it being deemed too long conveniently to send a manuscript duplicate here.
Resp'y yours,
H. HOGEBOOM.

A Flattering Testimonial.
A New Orleans paper gives the particulars of a presentation to Capt. C. B. Chittenden, "Quartermaster of the Cavalry Depot of Gen. Lee's (not rebel) Division," on a recent Saturday evening. The present consisted of sword, belt, sash, brace of Colt's revolvers, spurs and field glass, all of the finest quality, and was carried to his residence by a strong force of friends, accompanied by a band of music. An address was delivered by one of the party, to which Capt. Chittenden responded in a suitable manner. After the ceremony the company were invited to a repast prepared by Mrs. C. (formerly Carrie Hammond, of this city.) Capt. Chittenden, it will be remembered, is a son of Geo. Chittenden, Esq., of Stockport, and went with the 128th Regiment.

Death of Major Gifford.
The following Resolutions, passed at an officers' meeting of the 128th Regiment, have been sent us from Baton Rouge for publication:
At a special meeting of the officers of the 128th N. Y. Vols., held at Baton Rouge, La., Sept. 5th, 1863, the following Resolutions were unanimously adopted in memory of their late brother officer Major Edward Gifford, who died on the 8th day of August, 1863, at the city of New Orleans, of fever brought on by the hardships in which he was subjected during his incarceration in a prison at Port Hudson together with the exhaustion and exposure attendant upon his escape.
Whereas, We have heard, with heartfelt sorrow, of the death of our esteemed friend and companion-in-arms,
Resolved, That in his death our regiment has lost one of its most efficient and valued members, and the service a faithful, gallant and patriotic officer; one who during the year of his association with us, endeared himself to us all by his uniform kindness and courtesy, and who, by his cool courage and noble daring, as manifested upon several occasions during the last few months of his career, as well as by the success attending his efforts, proved that he brought into camp and field a will and capacity equal to every emergency.
Resolved, That we tender to the bereaved family and friends of the deceased our sincerest sympathies in this their irreparable loss.
Resolved, That in testimony of our grief for the departure of our friend and brother officer, we wear a badge upon the left arm for thirty days.
Resolved, That copies of these Resolutions be forwarded by the Adjutant to the family of the deceased, to St. John's Lodge, F. and A. M., Hudson, N. Y., and to the prominent papers of Columbia and Dutchess Counties.
Capt. F. S. Keese,
Capt. R. J. Mitchell, Committee
Lieut. Geo. T. White

DEATH OF W. H. JEFFERS—INQUIRY FOR HIS FRIENDS.—We have received the following communication:
Editors of the Times & Courier:
Will you please notice in your paper that we have received a dispatch directed to the "Friends or relatives of W. H. Jeffers, One Hundred and Twenty-eight regiment, N. Y. S. V.," announcing his death, and asking instructions as to the disposition of his remains. By so doing, you will greatly oblige yours, respectfully, C. S. CUTLER,
Western Union Telegraph Office.
ALBANY, April 27, 1864.

Deserved Promotion.
We are gratified to learn that Burges Sneed, of this city, who entered the 128th Regiment as a sergeant in Co. K., has been promoted to 1st Lieutenant of his company, as a just recognition for bravery on the field.

HUDSON, July 22d, 1863.
HEADQUARTERS 128th REGIMENT N. Y. V.,
1st Brigade, 2d Division, 19th Army Corps,
Before Port Hudson,. July 6th, '63.
Hon. H. A. Nelson, and Son. Henry Hogeboom; Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and Hudson, N. Y.
Gentlemen:—As there are many persons residing in the Counties of Columbia and Dutchess who are constantly directing their eyes toward the doings of, and many who have relatives and friends in, this Regiment, the Colonel Commanding considers that a correct record of the losses the Regiment has sustained since it has been in the U. S. service, from death, by disease, in action, wounds received, discharged, and deserted, from each Company, will be valuable as such to those who have lost friends and relatives, besides being interesting to the many friends which this Regiment has throughout the 12th District, (it being a representative one,) hereby appends such list or record. The several papers in the District will confer a favor upon those serving with the Regiment by publishing the same for general information, and as a matter of history, both for the Regiment and its friends, and in which the whole District is deeply interested. With this forwarded a recapitulation, showing the number enlisted and mustered into the Regiment, the losses sustained, and the present strength up to this date. Such record will hereafter, if practicable, be forwarded for information monthly.
You will confer a favor by interesting yourselves in the above. I am, gentlemen,
Very resp'y your ob't servant,
JAMES SMITH, Colonel Commanding,
128th Regiment N. Y. V.
HEADQUARTERS 128th REGIMENT, N. Y. V.,

Before Port Hudson, La., June 25th, 1863.
GENERAL ORDERS -- No. 56.
I. The Lieut. Col. Commanding takes the earliest opportunity afforded him to notice especially the decease of Col. DAVID S. COWLES, up to May 27th, 1863, commander of this Regiment, and to express the deep sense he entertains of the loss sustained by this Regiment in his death. To speak to the men who have been under the command of Col. Cowles for nearly twelve months, in admiration of his qualities as a man or soldier, is unnecessary; their universal and growing affection for him best evidence his constant care for the interests of his command, and their respect for, and obedience to him,  are the most satisfactory testimony to his decision and wisdom as an officer, while the manner of his death, and the heroism which illuminated the last hours of a life always noble, are final proofs of his bravery and devotion to the sacred cause, fighting for which he fell.
The memory of the illustrious dead, as the example of the living, should inspire soldiers with a new determination and a more lofty zeal. Let the officers and men of this Regiment, while sadly recalling the virtues of the leader they loved so well, find in his death a motive for renewed diligence and daring, that his name may be perpetuated in their achievements and in their fame. Let us mourn the loss of so gallant a commander, but in our sorrow remember that his blood has sealed anew our obligations to the Government he died to protect; any other death would have been unworthy of him.
II. Major J. P. Foster, Capt. Robt. Wilkinson and Lieut. Geo. F. White are constituted a committee to prepare resolutions expressive of the feelings of the officers of this regiment on this occasion.
III. The officers of this Regiment will, as soon as practicable, assume and wear for 30 days the usual badge of mourning, in view of the death of Col; COWLES.
This order will be read to each Company in this command at retreat to day, and placed in their records. By command of Lieut. Colonel JAMES SMITH,
Commanding 128th Regiment N. Y. S. V.
Lieut. J. P. WILKINSON, Adj't.

WALLACE BREWER RETURNS To our Lines.—In the list of casualties in the 128th Regiment, published b y us last week, Wallace Brewer (for a number of years in our employ) was put down as missing. We have not heard a word from him till this morning, when his sister called and showed us a letter from him, dated "Parole Camp, Annapolis, Md. June 24th," in which he writes as follows:—
“I suppose you have heard before this of me being missing. I was taken prisoner on the 27th of May last, by a band of Guerrillas and they kept me until the 22d of this month (July.) I left the Regiment to go and see Sylvester, and on my way back, about 500 of these fellows surrounded me and took me prisoner. I had to ride about 40 miles to the Rebel camp, where they kept me four days; then they sent me on to Jackson, Miss., about 75 miles, which I had to walk, and all they gave me to eat was a little corn bread. From there they sent me and about 50 others to Richmond, where we arrived on the 16th. While in Richmond they used us shameful—they gave us only a quarter of a loaf of bread a day, a piece of meat as big as my two fingers, which was so strong that it almost knocked me down to smell of it, and a little rice soaked in water for supper. I can tell you they had me down to fighting weight, But I am picking up fast now since I got in our lines. They kept me in the Libby Prison six days and I can tell you I was glad to get out of it."

Army Correspondence.
We have been permitted to make the following extracts from a letter directed to A. Rossman, Esq., of this city:
QR. MR. DEPARTMENT, 95 Magazine St.,
New Orleans, June 1st, 1863.
Friend Rossman.—I hasten to first opportunity to inform you of the sad disaster to the 128th Regiment and to the Country, in the loss of Col. David S. Cowles, who was killed at the great battle fought at Port Hudson on the 27th of May.
Capt. Gifford is alive and well, but is a prisoner in the hands of the Rebels. Capt. Arthur Dewint was wounded in the right arm, a flesh wound only. I saw him last night and he said he thought he should be able to return to his company in two weeks. I hope you will lose no time, but inform their friends of their safety. Sergeant Van Slyke's brother was killed, his body has been brought to this city. This is all the reliable information we have received. When Col. Cowles fell he was in command of General Sherman's division, and a better representative never stepped in those brave warrior shoes. In the early part of the battle Gen. Sherman rode back to urge up General Neal Dow's Brigade to the support of those in the advance, who were then in a hand to hand fight with the enemy, and these were the brave 128th N. Y., 6th Michigan, 23d New Hampshire and one other regiment, number and State not remembered; they had driven the enemy to the Fort and torn down the Rebel flag and raised the stars and stripes, and if they had been supported by Neal Dow's Brigade, (composed of several of the nine months regiments who showed the white feather,) the whole Rebel works would have been carried, and a complete victory would have rewarded our brave officers and men. When commanded by Gen. Sherman, Gen. Dow mounted his horse and advanced with his command, but before reaching a supporting point, received a severe wound in his leg and fell back to the rear. Gen. Sherman then riding up in the advance urging on his men, received a very severe wound in the knee and was taken to the rear, the command then devolved upon our brave Col. Cowles. When this fact became known to himself, he said to some of his officers and men near him, "I shall not go out of this battle alive, but I shall do my duty," and nobly he done it too, he mounted the breastworks in a very exposed position to urge (regiment from Massachusetts and new Hampshire, who had got into the ditch and refused to come out) those in the rear to advance to the support of their brave fellow soldiers who were contending hand to hand with superior numbers in front. (They still refused to come out.) While in this position he received a bayonet wound, of which he died in one hour. He refused to be carried from the field, but continued to command until he fell. He asked his men if he had done his duty; they answered yes. The last words he said was "Tell my mother I died with my face to the enemy." His body will be sent home by the first transport, which I think will sail this week. In haste,
Very respectfully,
Your Ob't servant,
ABRAM ASHLEY.

We regret to learn by a letter received in this city on Saturday last, from James Gifford to his father, conveying the unwelcome intelligence that Captain EDWARD Gifford, of Company A, of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth regiment, was lying in a very critical situation at New Orleans. From the tenor of the letter, it was very evident that there was very little hope of his surviving long.--Hudson Star.

Death of John B. Taylor.
John B. Taylor, of Co. A, 128th Regiment, is reported to have been killed on the 3d by a shot through the head at Port Hudson. He was 19 years of age, and a member of Washington Engine No 3 of this city, whose flag was at half-mast on Sunday.
Mr. Tice of the 128th regiment, is in town, having received his discharge from the service. Mat. is looking well, and says when he left, the boys were generally well.

COMMON COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS. —Special Meeting, June 10, 1863—present—Jacob Ten Broeck, Mayor; Hon. S. Rowley, Recorder; Aldermen Behrens, Burdwin, Holmes, Roraback, Terry, Townsend.
His Honor the Mayor stated that he had convened the Council for the purpose of taking into consideration the requests of the late Col. Cowles, 128th Regiment N. Y. V. to be interred in the Hudson Cemetery and to set apart a lot therein as a burial place for all soldiers from Hudson and such other business as might come before the meeting.
On motion of Ald. Townsend, the following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That the city set apart a certain lot of ground in our Cemetery, situated on the westerly side of Vault Avenue, adjoining the Vault belonging to the estate of James L. Stratton, deceased, on the northerly side extending southerly sixty-four feet and westerly holding that width thirty-two feet in depth, as a burial place for all officers and soldiers who have died or been killed or may hereafter die or be killed in the service of the United States, in the line of their duty during the present rebellion, who were residents of this city at the time of their enlistment; all burials therein to be made under the direction of the Burying Ground Committee of the Common Council of said city. Carried.
On motion of Ald. Terry the following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That the plot of ground set apart for the use of the officers and soldiers be laid out on the plan offered by Ald. Townsend, (the laying out to consist of staking the said lot and laying out the plots) under the control of the Burying Ground Committee of the Common Council of this city.
On motion, Council adjourned.

Command of the 128th Regiment.
It having been reported through some of the newspapers that Col. James Smith is not with or in command of the 128th Regiment, we deem it a duty to him and the gallant men under him, to say that he is, and has been since the first of June, in command of the Regiment, and has led it through all the noble achievements it has won since the death of the lamented Cowles.
Capt. Edward Gifford. —We regret to learn, says the Columbia Republican, of Tuesday last that this gallant officer, of Co. A, 128th Regiment, is now lying ill at the residence of Lieutenant-C. C. Chittenden, in New Orleans. Letters from James Gifford, his brother, who went in search of him, have been received. The history of Capt. Gifford's capture, imprisonment and escape will form an interesting and thrilling chapter of the war.
It will be remembered that he was selected, with a few daring companions, to advance on the 26th, the day before the assault, and secure a position which was deemed essential in the success of the attack. In doing so he fell into the hands of the enemy, and soon reported himself a prisoner. For thirty-nine days he remained under guard at Port Hudson subsisting almost exclusively upon corn meal and molasses. On the 4th day of July, he and a fellow prisoner planned an escape. The glorious recollections of that anniversary were too inspiring to submit longer to the bonds of imprisonment on American soil. During the night Capt. Gifford crept out of the building, and found the guard asleep. The golden opportunity came unexpected to him, and fearing to return he made his way out of the rebel lines. In attempting to ford a creek, however, he was carried by the current out into the Mississippi River, and for about four hours compelled to buffet with the waves at the peril of his life! He finally reached the opposite shore in an exhausted condition and was picked up by an Indiana company of artillery, just previously posted at that point. Considering the strong currents and dangerous undertow of the river, and its width—the escape of Capt. Gifford is almost miraculous. Has he not been an excellent swimmer, his life would have been sacrificed to his love of freedom. The terrible struggle occurred in the dark hours between midnight and __ o'clock. Capt. G. divested himself of his clothing in the water, on finding that there was no alternative but to cross the river or be borne back by the tide to Port Hudson shore. The prodigious effort which he was compelled to put forth, together with the debilitating effects of an insufficient diet, resulted in prostration and illness, from which he has not recovered. It is hoped, however, that two weeks of rest would restore him to health, at the end of which time he is expected to embark for home on leave of absence. Shall he not be welcomed?

Letter from on Officer in the 128th Regiment.
On account of the deep interest taken by a large portion of our citizens in this regiment, we publish to-day the following extracts which, as they contain some particulars of the siege and capture of Port Hudson that have not heretofore appeared in print, will be interesting to those who have relatives or friends in the regiment, and to all who feel proud of our brave boys who have acquitted themselves so nobly.
Baton Rouge, La., July 14, 1863.
Dear ____: You will undoubtedly have heard, long ere this reaches you, of the surrender of Port Hudson; yet my brief and uncolored description may not be uninteresting. All the newspaper accounts of the fights we have had there, have been in some particulars incorrect.
On the morning of the 8th inst., news reached us that General Gardiner, commanding the rebel forces, had asked for a cessation of hostilities in order to consider a plan of surrender. At 9 a. m. that morning, commissioners from both sides met and agreed upon the plan of surrender. At three p. m. our regiment received orders to march to general Auger's headquarters and enter the column which was to take possession of the place. When we arrived there, we found that the time of entrance had been postponed until six a. m. the next day. We bivouacked for the night alongside a road leading to the fort.—During the night there was a heavy rain, but next morning the "boys" were all on the qui vive to enter the fort. The column started at seven a. m., and consisted of nothing but picked regiments. Our regiment was the only one from our brigade. I think the people of the eleventh district can know from this in what way the one hundred and twenty-eighth is appreciated in this department.
Having marched in, we passed through to the river bank, and passing the rebel prisoners who were drawn up in line, we halted and formed in line of battle facing the rebels. They were then ordered to "ground arms" after which they became our prisoners.
The agreement as to the surrender was, that the officers should retain their side-arms and not be paroled, and the men were to be paroled. There were about two hundred officers and five thousand men. We also took about sixty pieces of artillery and six thousand stand of arms. It was a sight worth seeing, I can assure you. The men were a rough looking set, but the officers, for the most part, had good uniforms, and seemed to be very intelligent men. The officers in the rebel army are generally men of wealth.
I had a long talk with a Colonel Provence, of South Carolina, who was in command of a brigade of five regiments, who told me he was the owner of a plantation and two hundred slaves in South Carolina, and another, with forty slaves, in Arkansas. He had been in the army since the war broke out. He said he had never until now doubted the ultimate suc­cess of the confederates, but, now that Vicksburg and Port Hudson had fallen, he felt that the backbone of the confederacy was really broken. This is one of the many instances of discouragement we find among both officers and men.
After the surrender, our regiment was placed as guard over the prisoners. On the 10th we were stationed as guard at General Banks' headquarters, and, also, did all the provost guard duty in the fort. In military circles it is considered an honor for a regiment to be detailed as provost guard. On the 11th we received orders to escort nine batteries (fifty four pieces,) of artillery to the junction of the "Bayou Sara and Springfield Landing roads." When we arrived there (about six p. m.), we were ordered to march with the third brigade, third division, to Baton Rouge, distant from that place eighteen miles, and from Port Hudson, whence we had just marched, twenty five miles. It was very necessary that the artillery should go through in the night, as we had to pass through a portion of country which was infested with roving bands of guerrillas.
We arrived at Baton Rouge about four a. m. On Sunday, (12th), our men having marched about twenty-five miles in twelve hours, mostly in the dark. It was the hardest march our regiment has ever had. Colonel Smith has had  considerable experience in heavy marches, and he says he never saw a harder march for his men than this was. We were obliged to keep up with the artillery, which frequently required us to take a "double-quick." On our arrival here, we halted in one of the streets, "stacked arms," "broke ranks," and in less then five minutes every man had selected a "soft place" on the brick side-walk, and nearly all lay down to sleep.
Baton Rouge, previous to the rebellion, was a very pretty place; but at the occupation of the town by our troops, in August last, a portion of it was burned, so that now everything looks desolate and deserted.
Yours affectionately, J. P. W.

HEAD QUARTERS 128th Reg't N. Y. S. V.
BEFORE PORT HUDSON LA,
June 25th 1863.
GENERAL ORDER
No. 56.
1. The Lt. Col. Commanding takes the earliest opportunity afforded him to notice officially the decease of Col. David S Cowles, up to May 27th, 1863, Commander of this Regiment—and to express the deep sense he entertains of the loss sustained by this Regiment in his death.
To speak to the men who have been under the command of Col. Cowles for nearly 12 months in addition of his qualities as a man or soldier is unnecessary. Their universal and growing affection for him, best evidences his constant care for the interests of his command and their respect for and obedience to him are the most satisfactory testimony to his decision, and wisdom as an officer—while the manner of his death and the heroism which illuminated t he last hours of a life always noble, an proof of his bravery and devotion to the sacred cause, fighting for which he fell.
The memory of the illustrious dead as the example of the living, should inspire soldiers with a new determination and a more lofty zeal. Let the officers and men of this Regiment while sadly recalling the virtues of the leader they loved so well—find in his death a motive for renewed diligence and daring that his name may be perpetuated in their achievements and in their fame. Let us mourn the loss of so gallant a commander—but in our sorrow remember that his blood has sealed anew our obligations to the Government, he died to protect. Any other death would have been unworthy of him.
2. Maj. J. P. Foster, Capt. F. Wilkinson, and Lieut. Geo. F. White are constituted a committee to prepare resolutions expressive of the feelings of the officers of this Regiment on this occasion.
3. The Officers of this regiment will soon as practicable, assume and wear for 30 days the usual badge of mourning in view of the death of Col. Cowles.
This order will be read to each Company in this command at retreat to day and placed on their records.
By command of Lt. Col.
JAMES SMITH.
Commanding 128th N. Y. Y.
Lt. J. P. WILKINSON
Adj't

THE LATE COL. Cowles.—The body of Col. Cowles of the 128th regiment, who was killed at the storming of Port Hudson, arrived at New York on board the steamer Cahawba.
We understand that Lewis Pearsall, of Matteawan, a member of the 128th Regiment N. Y. Vols., died in hospital at New Orleans, recently. He was wounded in the first assault upon Port Hudson.

FUNERAL OF CQL. COWLES.—The funeral of Cowles, killed at the late attack on Port Hudson, will take place on Monday evening next, at 2 o'clock, from the Presbyterian Church, in the city of Hudson. The friends and acquaintances of the deceased are respectfully invited to attend.

John B. Taylor, of Co. A, 128th Regiment, is reported to have been killed on the 3d by a shot through the head at Port Hudson. He was 19 years of age, and a member of Washington Engine No. 3, of this city, whose flag was at half-mast on Sunday.

For the Soldiers.
The ladies of the Soldiers' Relief Society of Hudson will dispatch a quantity of supplies the 128th Regiment to-day. Packages should be left at the Ref. Dutch Church early this morning.

The Romance of War.
Capt. Edward Gifford, of Co. A, 128th Regiment, who was taken prisoner at Port Hudson by the rebels on the 26th of May, while executing an important command, made his escape to our lines on the night of the 4th of July, by passing the guard while they were, asleep, and swimming the Mississippi. The attempt was a most daring one, and the accomplishment of his object shows a strong will, undaunted nerve, and a daring bravery of which any soldier might feel proud.
The night was dark, the current was running strong, and the fugitive patriot was greatly reduced in strength by his almost forty day's light diet of meal and molasses. But the price of freedom was not to be lightly purchased, and he did not hesitate to hazard everything, even his life, in its accomplishment. For four hours he struggled with the boiling current, and finally reached the opposite shore where he was duly cared for by a company of Artillery who had a few hours previously been posted at that point. He was conveyed to New Orleans in an exhausted state, and at last accounts was laying ill from the effects of his extraordinary exertion. His case was not considered dangerous, however, and it is expected he will be able to return home within a week or two. It is probably the information he conveyed to gen. Banks of the forlorn condition of the rebel garrison at Port Hudson, that led to the postponement of the contemplated attack of the 6th of July, and finally to the unconditional surrender of the place.

Capt. Edward Gifford.
Intelligence from New Orleans this week brings the melancholy announcement that Capt. Edward Gifford, of the 128th Regiment, was very low from typhoid fever, and but slight hopes were entertained of his recovery. The next news from that quarter is looked for by his friends with the deepest solicitude. It is the ardent prayer of all that it may bring the joyful tiding of his recovery.

Personal.
Captain Edward Gifford, of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York regiment, died on the 10th instant, at New Orleans, of typhoid fever, in the thirtieth year of his age. Captain Gifford was the youngest brother of S. R. Gifford, the artist, and was a resident of Hudson, New York, where his regiment, of which he was the senior captain, was raised. In one of the attacks on Port Hudson he was taken prisoner, and while confined among the rebels contracted the disease of which he subsequently died. One of his brothers was with him during his illness and death, and ministered to the young soldier's wants. He was a brave and efficient officer, and possessed of a kind and genial disposition, which caused him to be regarded by his men with feelings of admiration and love. Parson Brownlow accompanies General Burnside in his movement on Knoxville. His object is to reissue the Knoxville Whig at the earliest opportunity.
A Washington despatch to the Philadelphia Inquirer says Frederick Law Olmsted has received the appointment of Superintendent of the Mariposa Mining Company in California. His salary is ten thousand dollars a year,

The Republican.
City and County Intelligence.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1864.
The 128th Regiment.
A meeting of the 128th sends us an extract from Gen. Emory's official report of the engagement of Sept. 22, which he thinks is necessary to correct a statement made by a correspondent in our paper of Oct. 18. The extract is as follows:
"To strengthen and shorten our lines, it became necessary to drive in the enemy's skirmishers and occupy their lines. This was handsomely done by the 128th N. Y. V., Lieut. Col. Foster Com'dg, supported by the 176th
N. Y. V., Major Lewis Com'dg, under a vigorous and most terrific shelling.
Both our home Regiments shared largely in the glory of Sheridan's gallant exploits in the Shenandoah. History will do them justice.

It is said that one of the newly raised Negro Regiments in Louisiana has been officered almost exclusively from the 128th N. Y. Regiment, which was recruited in Columbia and Dutchess counties. Its Colonel is Charles E. Bostwick, of Amenia, formerly Captain of Co. E; Lieut. Col. George Parker, of Poughkeepsie, recently Captain of Co. H; Major, Rufus J. Palen, of Hudson, until recently Lieutenant in Co. D.

Memorial of Augustus U. Bradbury.
The many friends of this estimable young patriot, who died in the service of his country at New Orleans, will be pleased to know that a brief memorial prepared of his father, Rev. E. Bradbury, by this city, has been published. It contains many facts of interest relative to the deceased, together with the funeral discourse of Rev. W. S. Leavitt, letters from Col. Cowles, Capt. Gifford, and others. Only a limited number of copies have been printed, the memorial being designed for private circulation. They may be obtained at the bookstores of P. S. Wynkoop, E. P. L. Elmer and Geo. Parton. Each copy contains a photograph likeness by Forshew. The printing and binding was done at the REPUBLICAN office.

Col. Cowles.--Among the killed at the battle of Port Hudson, the particulars of which will be found elsewhere, was Col. Cowles, of the 128th Regiment, N. Y. S. V. Col. C. was originally attached to the 21st Regiment, but when the companies raised in Columbia county were consolidated with those raised here, Col. Van Zandt was appointed to the command of the Regiment, and Col. Cowles subsequently raised the 128th Regiment, which he commanded at the time of his death. He was among the most gallant of the gallant men who left our State to fight the battles of the Union. Brave as a lion, a man of culture and scholarly attainments, a gentleman in the fullest sense of the word; endowed with social qualities that made him a general favorite;--his death will be deeply lamented in the community of which he has long been an ornament. He died as he lived, full of heroic ardor. His last words were--"Tell mother that I died with my face towards the enemy. Boys, I have tried to do my duty as a soldier and a man." Col. Cowles resided at Hudson, and was a lawyer by profession.

Casualties in the 128th Regiment.
Below we publish a list of killed and wounded in the 128th Regiment between the 27th of May (the date of our last report) and the surrender of Port Hudson. For this list we are indebted to Palmer C. Cole, Surgeon of the Regiment:
KILLED.
Corporal John B. Taylor, Co.A., rifle ball through the head.
Private Robt. Churchill, Co. C., by shell.
    "      Isaac Oliver, Co. F., by shell.
    "      S. Brown, Co. H., compound fracture of leg; died June 12th.
WOUNDED.
Adjutant John Wilkinson, contusion of left shoulder by grape shot, slight.
Private Martin Coley, Co. A., toe of left foot by rifle ball.
    "      David Bellows, Co. A., right hip, by rifle ball.
    "       Alex. Shaw, Co. A., index finger right hand by rifle ball.
    "      Charles Reckerts, Co. B., index finger of right hand by rifle ball; amputated.
    "      Walter L. Orr, Co. B., right thumb; amputated.
    "      George Hamilton, Co. C., first two fingers of right hand by Minnie ball.
    "      A. I. Silvernail, Co. D., right fore-arm fractured by shell, severe.
    "     Andrew Jackson, Co. D., right elbow shattered by rifle ball.
    "     H. W. Morris, Jr., Co. D., left elbow by Minnie
Captain G. W. Van Slyck, Co. E., contusion on head by shell.
Sergeant Wm. N. Thompson, Co. E., index finger by, rifle ball.
Private Wm. R. Showerman, Co. E., right leg by Minnie ball.
    "       E. Kinnicutt, Co. E., bayonet wound in hand.
Corporal Martin Scott, Co. G., thumb of right hand by rifle ball.
Private Cornelius McManaman, Co. G., index finger right hand by rifle ball.
    "       Wm. Spreadbury, Co. H., index finger right hand by rifle ball; amputated.
    “      Henry Brundage, Co. H., flesh wound of right fore-arm by grape.
Sergeant R. Enoch, Co. I., rifle ball through left hand.
Private Silas Miller, Co. K., right index finger by rifle ball; amputated.
    "       Allen Shelden, Co. K., contusion on hip by shell, slight.
    "       Daniel J. Wesley, Co. K., first two fingers right hand by Minnie ball.
    "       J. R. Ferguson, Co. K., contusion left hand by shell.
    "       John Hinkle, Co. E., left thigh, by rifle ball.

Mournful Intelligence.
We learn with deep regret that intelligence has been received by the last arrival from New Orleans that Capt. EDWARD GIFFORD, of the 128th Regiment, was, on Sunday, the 9th inst. lying in a very critical condition, with but slight hopes entertained by the physician of his recovery. Soon after reaching New Orleans he was attacked with typhoid fever, and the exhausted state of his system rendered it but too probable he would fall another victim to this scourge. Another week must pass before further news can reach his friends at home. James Gifford is still at New Orleans.

PLAQUEMINE, AUG. 20, 1863.
Mr. Editor: As I have a few spare moments, I will improve them by giving you a brief account of the doings in our regiment, after the taking of Port Hudson. The 11th of July the regiment received orders to march to Baton Rouge, which we done, arriving there the next morning. We stayed there until the steamer St. Charles for Donaldsonville. The rebs were there trying to take the Fort. Three thousand rebs tried to take that little fort, but were repulsed after losing some six hundred of their number. We having only 80 fighting men in the fort, assisted by a gunboat. Our loss was eight killed and twelve wounded. We remained at Donaldsonville until the 1st of August, and then received orders to march thirteen miles up the river to guard the negroes on the Government plantations. We arrived there the next day. The place is called Old Hickory Landing. We considered ourselves on good Democratic soil; and remained in camp until the 12th, when we were again ordered to move to a village thirty miles up the river, called Pla1uemine, arriving there in the night, where we are now encamped.--It is a fine village, the County seat, with three churches and one newspaper. The rebels destroyed three steamers by burning them at the landing about two months ago. This is considered quite a secesh place. Our Colonel will attend to them if they undertake to show themselves. Col. Smith is appointed post commander. The 4th Wisconsin mounted infantry are encamped near us.  Our boys are recovering now from the hardships they endured at Port Hudson. There is more work ahead. Troops are congregating at Carlton. Some 30,000 have already arrived. Five boat loads came down from Grant's army. You will soon hear some encouraging news from this department.
Last week I went to Baton Rouge, and had the pleasure of returning on the first free trade boat; ... to the city, loaded with provisions of all kinds. The citizens said it looked old fashioned.
I am sorry to say we have lost our senior captain—Capt. Gifford, Co. A, who so nobly escaped from the rebels after being taken prisoner at Port Hudson. We have lost twelve men since our regiment first went into action at Port Hudson, four killed and eight died from disease.
I will close my letter, stating that our regiment is ready at a moment's warning to defend our country and our homes.
Yours truly,
SERGEANT ESHLEMAN,
Co. K, 128th N. Y. V.

Report from the 128th Regiment.
Colonel Smith, of the 128th Regiment, has forwarded the following report to Hon. H. A. NELSON, of Poughkeepsie, and Hon. Henry Hogeboom, of this city, for publication. It furnishes a complete list of casualties, that have occurred in the Regiment since its organization, and forms a valuable accompaniment to the list we published in September, 1862, in the departure of the Regiment from Camp Kelly.
STATEMENT.
Number of men enlisted and mustered into the 128th Regiment, New York Volunteers, the losses sustained accounted for by name, with the dates thereof, as far as can be obtained, together with the present strength of the command.
Killed—Colonel David S. Cowles. May 27th, 1863.
COMPANY A.
Killed—David Plumb, May 26th, 1863.
   "         Myron Poucher, May 27, 1863.
   "         John B. Taylor, July 3.
Wounded—Martin Codey, June 18, Port Hudson.
   "              Alexander Shaw,   "             "
   "              David Bellows, June 28,      "
Died of Disease—Jacobus C. Moett, Dec. 20, 1862, Quarantine
Station, La., Henry B. Hulbert, Jan. 7, 1863, do. John E. DeGroff, Jan 8, 1863, do. John Harelson, January 22, Camp Chalmette.
Corporal John Baker, Feb. 8, hospital N. O.
Private James Moon, Feb. 20, Camp Parapet.
Ord. Serg't A. U. Bradbury, Feb. 26, St. James Hosp. N. O.
Private Alonzo Almstead, Dec. 20, 1862, Fortress Monroe.
   "        Richard T. Burch, April 5, '63, Camp Parapet, La.
   "        George H. Harvey, April 14, Fortress Monroe.
   "        Abram E. Miller, Feb. 16, Barracks Hosp, N. O.
   "        Martin Wilcox, Quarantine Station, La.
Discharged—Priv. John Fogarty, U. S. gen. hosp. Balt, Nov. 23, 1862. Sergt, Lewis B. Fairbanks, Stewart's Mans., Balt., April 6.
Private Geo. Finch, March, 1863, U. S. Barracks, N. O.
   "        Thomas Wands, May 29,           "                  "
   "        Samuel DeGroff, June 1,           "                   "
   "        Joseph E. Churchill, June 1,      "                   "
Missing—Private Frank Shaw, since June 24, 1863.
   “            Wallace brewer, Jiny 1, 1863.
Deserted—John Burrit, from Camp Kelly, Aug 6, 1862.
Present aggregate, Com'd Officers 2; Enlisted men 76.
Total 78.

COMPANY B.
Killed—1st Sergt Riley Burdick, May 27, Port Hudson, La.
  “          Private Philip Allen,            "               "
   "         Sergt. Gilbert H. Kniffin,    "                "
Wounded—Therman H. Williams,   "               "
   "          Rant A. White, now on duty, May 27  "
   "          LeRoy Lineburgh,    "                 "        "
   "          Chas. Records,          "                "         "
   "          Michael Sullivan,      "                "         "
   "          James Story,              "                "         "
   "          Geo. Storey, now a prisoner,      "         "
   "          John Wooden,         "                  "         "
   "          Walter L. Orr,         "           June 14,     "
Died from Disease—Wm. E. Haight, Dec. 10, 1862, at sea.
Harrison Leroy, Dec. 25, 1862, Quarantine Station, La.
John Van Hovenburgh, Dec. 31, '62,     "            "
Peter Carlow, Jan. 1, 1863,                    "            "
Isaac Brownell, Jan. 27, Camp Chalmette, La.
Ord. Serg't. Lewis Holmes, April 1, Camp Parapet.
H. Buckingham, May 28,                     "          "
Disacharged—Chandler McCarty, John Richmond, Solomon Woodin, Geo. Townsend, Wm. B. Sackett, May 5th, 1863, U. S. Barracks, La.
D. W. Weller, Mau 20, 1863, Camp Parapet.
Deserted—Wm. Bingle, Aug. 15, 1862, Camp Kelley, N. Y.
J. H. Parmenter, in 1862, on the march.
Chas. Smith, Oct. 31, 1862, Camp Millington, Md.
Present aggregate—Com'd Officers 2; enlisted men 72.
Total 74.

COMPANY C.
Killed—Private Robt. P. Churchill, June 14, Port Hudson.
Died from Disease—Priv. Jasper Dewint, Dec. 12, 1862, at sea. Private Robt. N. Haynor, Fortress Monroe, Va.
Private Nathan E. Day,          "
Corp. Wm. B. Noxon, Camp Parapet, La.
Private Everett Traver           "
   "       Henry Coon,              "
 Corp. John W. Kipp,            "
Private George W. Hadden, Jefferson City, La.
Discharged—Private John Gay, Baltimore, Md.
Private Benj. Churchill,                    "
   "       Jas. H. Holdridge,                  "
   "       Harrison Hawkins, Fortress Monroe, Va.
   "       Walter Churchill,                  "
   "        Chas. E. Rynders, Camp Parapet, La.
Deserted—Privates Robert Dykeman, Harvey Odell, Isaac Burdick, Martin Hawkins, Camp Millington, Md., Francis Betterton.
Present aggregate—Enlisted men 75; Com'd officers 3.
Total 78.

COMPANY D.
Killed—1st Lieut. Francis N. Sterling, died at sea, Dec 6.
   "     Private John P. Low, May 27, '63, Port Hudson, La.
   "         "       Francis Helig,       "                  "
   "         "       Alfred Hitchcock, May 29,      "
Wounded—Corp Richard Ganley, "   27,      "
   "        Private James H. Myers,       "           "
   "            "      David B. Rider,          "           "
   "            "      Isaac I. Weddel,          "          "
   "            "      Jacob O. Sparks, May 27, on duty, Port H.
   "            "      Andrew Jackson, June 14,   "              "
   "            "      Henry W. Morris, jr,  "        "              " 
   "            "      A. J. Silvernail,          "        "              "
   "            "      Geo. H. Fitchett,        "         "             "
Died from Disease—W. M___, Ethan S. Lattin, Nov.
   "        Private Henry C. Stillwell, Feb, 14.
   "            "       Philetus Tentor, Feb. __
Discharged—Drummer John J. Tanner, June.
   "          Privates—Levi L. Brooks, June; John J. Marshall, Uriah Allison, August Banther, Michael Fitzgerald, Henry Hustis, Henry Lawrence, John
Sherman.
Deserted—Edmond L. Druory, James Morris, Garret T. Benneway, C. Willis Bennuy.
Present aggregate—Com'd officers 3; enlisted men 71.
Total 74.

COMPANY E.
Killed—2d Lieut. Chas. L. Van Slyke, May 27, P. Hudson.
   "     Private John Tripp, May27,                              "
   "          “     John T. McIntyre,                  "              "
Wounded—Corp. G. H. Woodin, May 27,                 "
   "         Private Henry Chever,         "                        "
   "              "      Jonas Muller,           " now on duty   "
   "              "      William Sitzer,        "         "              "
   "              "       Chas. Thompson,   "          "             "
   "              "       Robert Harross,      "          "             "
   "              "       John Mosher,          "          "             "
   "              "       John S. Woodward, "         "             "
   "         Sergt. Wm. H. Thompson, June 14,               "
   "         Private Wm. R. Showerman, June 14,            "
   “             "       Elijah Kennicut, Jr., now on duty      "
Died from Disease—Sergt. Wm. Smith, Dec. 16, '62, Quar. Station, La. Private Nelson S. Gott, Feb. 25.
Discharged—1st Lieut. John W. Van Valkenburgh, Sergt. Frank J. Childs, Jan. 30, 1863. Privates, Ezekiel E. Bates, Jan. 30, Geo. Mooney, December, John Miller, Dec., Wm. Ostrander, Jan. 28, Thos. Potts, Feb. 9, Andrew M. Clark, March 2, Lambert J. Hubbel, March 2. William Doty, June 23, Charles R. Moors, June 23, '63.
Deserted—Privates James Calligan, Sept. 7, Balt., Wm. H. Pulver, Sept. 8, Balt., Geo. Tanner, Oct. 7, Balt., Wm. Hunt, Nov. 8, Balt., Benj. ROgers, No. 4, Balt., Edward G. Garner, Nov. 4, Balt., Ralph Denn, Nov. 5, Balt., Isaac Webster, Nov. 31, Fortress Monroe, Va., James Kelley, Dec. 25, Quarantine Station, La.
Present aggregate—Com'd officers 2; enlisted men 71;
Total 73.

COMPANY F.
Killed—Private John Hughes, May 27, Port Hudson. La.
   "             "       Isaac M. Olivett,   "                "
Wounded—Capt. Arthur DeWint,  "                " returned.
   "               Sergt Daniel Warren, June 14,      "
   "               Corp. Geo. Hawver, May 27,        "
   "               Privates Lewis Pearsall, May 27, Wm. Jeffers, May 27, Geo. Pollock, May 27, Silas Partington, May 27, Geo. Wood, May 27, Orrin Hall,
June 5th, Henry T. Wenger, June 2.
Died from Disease—Privates Joseph O. Malley, Oct. 31st, Austin Terry, Jan. 31, Harmon Palmateer, March 3d, Wm. Partington, April 12, William Allen, April __.
Discharged—Private John Dengee, Feb. 26, 1863, Sergt. Augustus Myers, March 28, Privates Thos. Furlong, March 28, Byron Stacy, March 26, John Mathers, jr., May 18, Geo. Daseum, June 1, Egbert Brille, June 8, George Brower, June 12,1863.
Deserted—Privates Everet Knickerbocker, Sept. 8, 1862, Harrison Moore, Sept. 8, John Holsier, Sept. 3, Lewis Baker, Sept. 3, Edgar Risedorph, Sept. 3, Frederick Schipp, John Boon, Sept. 5, Spafford Miller, Sept. 5, Peter Williams, Sept. 18, James Washburn, Sept. 18, Chas. Pinder, Oct. 5, Martin Leonard, Oct. 12, John E. Cole, Oct. 13, Jacob Palmer, Oct. 14, Jas. H. C. Frost, Oct. 31, 1862.
Present aggregate—Com'd Officers 3; enlisted men 67.
Total 70.
COMPANY G.
Killed—Private Chas. Smith, May 27, 1863, Port Hudson,
   "              "      Otto Schurry,         "                     "
Wounded—Privates David H. Pultz, Michael Beam, Samuel C. Scutt, Isaac I. Mickle, William A. Stevens, Augustus Kisselburgh, John Brown, Job Kells, Cyrus Hawver, May 27, 1863, Abram Broadhead, June 8, Morris Fridenburgh, June 20, Martin Scott, July 2, Cornelius McManamy, June 14, 1863.
Died from Disease—Privates Wm. Ostrander, Jan. 8, Cyrus Griswold, Feb. 14, Benjamin F. Miller, March 2, (Peter G. Collars, June 17, of wounds.)
Discharged—Privates John F. Warner, Nov. 28, 1862, John Testor, Feb. 21, 1863, Daniel J. Randall, May 21, Jas. Butts, May 4, Chas. C. Waugh, April 15, David H. Gilkinson, June 2, Peter Hemtsing, March 26, Wilson Dykeman, June 1, Jacob H. Dykeman, March 21, Leonard Foland, June 9.
Deserted—Priv. Geo. Armstrong. Aug. 26, Camp Kelly.
   "                "     James Guione,              "           "
   "                "     William Waldron,        27         "
   "                "     Henry Mapes,               "           "
   "                "     Geo. Kipp, Oct. 9,                     "
   "                "     Geo. Brown, Sept. 23,               "
   "                "      John Best, Nov. 5,                    "
   "                "      John Selby    "                          "
   "                "      Fred'k Shaffer, Dec. 18,           "
Present aggregate—Com'd officers 3; enlisted men 71.
Total 74.

COMPANY H.
Killed—Priv. Traver Murphy, May 27, 1863, Port Hudson.
   "            "     Jno. Thompson,         "                      "
   "            "     Sylvanus Brown, June 10,                "
Wounded—Sergt. Garrett F. Dillou, May 27,         "
   "          Private—James Green.            "                "
   "              "         Mark Shepardson,     "                "
   "              "         Chas. S. Wilber,        "                "
   "              "         Alton Hill,                 "                "
   "              "         George Dearon,         "                "
   "              "         Wm. H. Odell,           "                "
   "              "         Joseph O'Rouke,        "                "
   "              "         Webster Brundage, June 14,       "
   "              "         Wm. Spreadsbury,     "                "
Died from Disease—Corp. Benj. Crowther, Mar. 19 1863. Camp Parapet, La.; Private John P. Way, April 29, Camp Parapet, La., Wm. East. June 6.
Discharged—Priv. Valentine Van Nostrand, May 4, 1863.
Deserted—Privates Chas. Strausbury, Sept. 4, 1862, Camp Kelly, N. Y., Jeremiah D. Wood, Sept. 4, 1862, Camp Kelly, N. Y., Joseph Ambler, Oct. 11, 1862, Camp Millington, Md., Musician Emanuel Point, Nov. 29, Newport News, Va., Private Frank Stephens, Jan. _, 1863, Quarantine Station. La., Alanson Pollard, Jan. _, 1863, Quarantine Station, La., Willhelm Krow, Sept. 8, 1862, Baltimore, Md.
Present aggregate—Com'd. officers 3: enlisted men 81.
Total 84.

COMPANY I.
Killed—Privates Henry Mackey and Cornelius Williams,
May 27, 1863, Port Hudson, La.
Wounded—Ord. Sergt. Richard Enoch, June 14, Port H'n.
    "                "    James Anthoy, May 27,                  "
   "        Corporal Chris. Pierce, May 27,                   "
   "              "        Isaac B. Gurney, May 27,             "
   "        Privates John Carle, Robt. Ham, Lawrence Horan, Theo. Keller, Jeremiah Lane, Oliver Slocum, Amos Traganz, May 27 Port Hud'n.
Died from Disease—Corp. Jessie D. Vail, Camp Chalmettee, La., Corp. Caleb Hcks, June 29, Port Hudson. Privates Albert Barker, Egbert Shear, Jessie Baker, Alex. Furguson, Camp Parapet, La., John B. Cypher, Hazard Van Dewater, Quarantine Station, Miss. river La.
Discharged—Corp. Fred. M. Williams, Balt., June 18, Musician Edward Watles, Feb. 12, N. O., Privates Chas. E. Dennis, Balt., Theodore Montfort, Camp Parapet, Lt. Daniel Haw and James O'Donel, Balt., Isaac P. Smith, New Orleans, Levi F. Williams, Camp Parapet, Elihu S. Wing, Balt., Geo. H. Walter, Feb. 28, Camp Parapet, Benjamin P. Woodin, Balt.
Deserted—Privates John Carroll and John Morris, 1863, New Orleans, Edward Jones and William Brennan, '62, at Balt., John G. Hoag, 1862, Hudson, N. Y., D. Mortmer Wilson and Lawrence Taafe, Balt.
Present aggregate—Com'd officers 3; enlisted men 67.
Total 70.

COMPANY K.
Killed—Corp. Robert E. Van Valkenburgh and Private Martin Stingle, May 27, Port Hudson.
Wounded—Sergt. Timothy Horan and Private Mathias Graff, May 27, (both since died) Port Hudson.
Died of Disease—Privates John H. Smith, Abram Gardner, Oliver Lamphire, John W. Van Tassel, Egbert Stoutenburgh, Seth F. Plass, Peter E. Rufenburgh, Edward Roberts, Corporal Robert W. Blunt.
Discharged—Capt. Richard Decker, June 1, Privates Wm. H. Walters, Walter Bruce, Norman E. Hermance, Jonas Riffenburgh, Norman Kline, Allen Decker, Wm. Hall, Reuben Kilener.
Deserted—Ord'y Sergt. Geo. W. Flint, Dec. 1862, Fortress Monroe, Private Benj. Best, Jan. 10, 1863.
Present aggregate—Com'd officers 2; Enlisted men 72.
Total 74.

RECAPITULATION—Showing original strength, losses sustained, and present strength:
Number of men enlisted in the Regiment,   1021
     "              "    mustered  "            "      Sept. 4, '62   993
Killed in action, picket, skirmishing, &c.,   24
Died of Disease,    62
Discharged for disability,  77
Missing,  6
Deserted,  62
233
Present strength Com'd officers,   33
    "           "        Enlisted men,   727   760
Wounded in action and by accident since the Regiment has been in service, nearly all of whom will return to duty, 79
Respectfully, &c.,
JAMES SMITH, Col. Comd'g 128th N. Y. S. V.
Official—John P. WILKINSON, Adj't.

Head Quarters 128th Reg't. N. Y. S. V.
Before Port Hudson, La., June 25th, 1863.
General order No. 57.
1. That Lt. Col. commanding take the earliest opportunity afforded him to notice officially the decease of Col. David S. Cowles, up to May 27, 1863, Commander of this Regiment—and to express the deep sense he entertains of the loss sustained by this Regiment in his death.
To speak to the men who have been under the command of Col. Cowles for nearly 12 months in admiration of his qualities as a man or soldier is unnecessary. Their universal and growing affection for him, best evidences his constant care for and obedience to him are the most satisfactory testimony to his decision and wisdom as an officer—while the manner of his death and the heroism which illuminated the last hours of a life always noble, are final proofs of his bravery and devotion to the sacred cause, fighting for which he fell.
The memory of the illustrious dead as the example of the living should inspire soldiers with a new determination and a moral lofty zeal. Let the officers and men of this Regiment while sadly recalling the virtues of the leader they loved so well—find in his death a motive for renewed diligence and daring, that his name may be perpetuated in their achievements and in their fame. Let us mourn the loss of so gallant a commander—but in our sorrow remember that his blood has sealed a new our obligations to the Government he died to protect. Any other death would have been unworthy of him.
2. Maj. J. P. Foster, Capt. F. Wilkinson and Lieut. Geo. F. White are constituted a committee to prepare resolutions expressive of the feelings of the officers of this Regiment on this occasion.
3. The Officers of this regiment will soon as practicable, assume and wear for 30 days the usual badge of mourning in view of the death of Col. Cowles.
This order will be read to each Company in this command at retreat to-day, and placed on their records.
By command of Lt. Col.
JAMES SMITH,
Commanding 128th N. Y. S. V.
Lt. _. P. Wilkinson, Adj't.

RESOLUTIONS.
Whereas, Col. David Smith Cowles the originator and late commander of this regiment, was killed while leading it up to an assault on the Rebel works at Port Hudson, La., on the 27th of May, 1863, therefore,
Resolved, That in this painful and inscrutable dispensation of the God of Battles, his friends, this regiment and the cause of our country, have suffered an irreparable loss.
Resolved, That in the private character, and the professional and military career of Col. Cowles, we recognize all the virtues, the ability and every element of a purer talented and brave character; that the devotedness of his Revolutionary forefathers was repeated in his career, a cause not less sacred; that as in life he exemplified the principles and energy which should animate the patriot soldier, so in the gallantry which distinguished his fall he taught us how to die. In death and life, without fear and without reproach.
Resolved, That the name of Col. Cowles will always be identified with this Regiment, and that it is due to his memory that its officers and men should ever strive to maintain the high standard of excellence to which he had brought it.
Resolved, That we tender to the family and friends of our lamented Colonel our heartfelt condolence, and the sympathies of the entire regiment.
Resolved, That as soon at practicable, we will wear a badge of crape for thirty days upon the left arm, as a token of grief and respect for the loss of our esteemed friend and commanding officer.
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions, signed by every officer in the regiment, be forwarded by the Adjutant to the family of Col. Cowles, to St. John's Lodge of Masons, to the Mayor and Common Council of the city of Hudson, New York, to the prominent daily newspapers of New York City, and to the Papers of Columbia and Dutchess Counties.
Signed by all the officers of the regiment.

From the One Hundred and Twenty-Eighth
Regiment N. Y. S. V.
Correspondence of the Newburgh Journal.
ON THE BATTLE-FIELD IN FRONT OF PORT HUDSON,
June 18, 1863.
[CONCLUDED FROM SATURDAY.]
Wednesday, May 28th.—This morning, at four, o'clock, our batteries and siege guns opened fire on the Rebel fortifications on every side. Our batteries continued to shell, them until about two o'clock p. m., when our division (Sherman's) made a charge on the parapet of Port Hudson, but was repulsed with a very heavy loss in killed and wounded, by a tremendous storm of Rebel bullets, shell, grape and canister, and every other kind of missile. The loss in the division was something over two hundred killed and five hundred wounded. The One Hundred and Twenty-Eighth lost nineteen killed and eighty-nine wounded. General Sherman was wounded seriously in the leg, the same ball killing his horse. General Dow, our Brigadier General, was wounded. Colonel Cowles, of the One Hundred and Twenty-Eighth, was killed; he was shot through the bowels by a musket ball, and lived only about twenty minutes. He died the death of a brave and patriotic officer with his face toward the enemy while bravely leading his men on in the hottest of the, fire of the hardest fought battle of this accursed rebellion. The last words he said, were: "How is the day going? are the boys in the parapet yet?" He died the death of a Christian as well as a brave man—speaking of his aged mother and his dear friends left behind; he was perfectly sensible until he breathed his last. Lieutenant Van Slyck, of Company E, was killed by a ball hitting him in the head; and Captain DeWint, of Company F, was severely wounded. There were two killed in Company H—John Thompson, of Poughkeepsie, and Traver Murphy, of East Fishkill. Our Company had seven wounded—Sergeant G. F. Dillon in the shoulder, severely; Alson Hill, in both legs, severely; James Green, through the face, severely; Charles S. Wilber (ex-editor of the Fishkill Journal), in the leg, slightly; Mark Shepherdson, in the hand, slightly; George T. Deacon in the shoulder, slightly. The battle lasted until after dark, when we retreated under the cover of night. The One Hundred and Twenty-Eighth New York and Sixth Michigan stood till the last under a galling fire from the enemy, but the rest of our brigade—the Twenty-Sixth Connecticut and Fifteenth New Hampshire Volunteers—broke and ran like a panic-stricken flock of sheep into a deep ravine near by. Both the last-named regiments are nine months' men, and their time is about out at that. I speak not boastingly of the One Hundred and Twenty-Eighth because I belong to it but because they deserve credit. All the division officers give us great praise for standing up so bravely under such a tremendous shower of lead and iron. After the battle, Companies H and E were detailed to go on picket only about nine hundred yards from the parapet from which we had been repulsed in the afternoon.
Thursday, May 28th.—At four o'clock this afternoon we were relieved from picket and drawn back in the woods nearly half a mile, where the remainder of the regiment lay supporting batteries. There was considerable musketry firing in the division on our right during the evening. We expected to be routed up every minute during the night by an attack from the Rebels, but they did not disturb our peaceful repose.
Friday, May 29th.—We lay in the same place that we did yesterday. Towards night we had a very heavy shower, drenching us all to the skin. Aside from the shower, nothing of importance happened us.
Saturday, May 30th.—Still in the same position; our batteries sending an occasional shell over the parapet to keep the graybacks from sleeping too soundly.
Sunday, May 31st.—Bombarding the Rebels was renewed this morning, and continued throughout the day. 
Monday, June 1st.—About the same as yesterday and Saturday.
Tuesday, June 2d.—Our batteries still continue to shell the Rebel works. At eleven o'clock this forenoon all our batteries, consisting of between seventy-five and a hundred guns, opened a heavy fire on the Rebel works, which lasted half an hour, throwing inside the parapet over a hundred shells per minute, making several tons of iron. Occasional shots were fired all through the day and in the evening. All remained quiet until nearly twelve o'clock, when the Rebels commenced shelling the woods in which the Union troops lay, doing, however, but little damage to our folks. One of their shells burst over the Fifteenth New Hampshire Volunteers, killing one man and wounding two others. Heavy picket firing on both sides continued all night.
Wednesday, June 3d.—All quiet during the day, with the excption [sic] of an occasional report from our siege guns. While Company G. was going out on picket this afternoon one of their men was wounded by a shot from the Rebel sharpshooters. At five o'clock cannonading was again commenced pretty sharp and continued for nearly an hour. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night the Rebels again commenced shelling the woods in which we lay, so that we had to fall back about a quarter of a mile for better protection.
Thursday, June 4th.—We returned to our original position in front of the breastworks in the morning. Nothing of importance occurred during the day, with the exception of an occasional shot from our batteries to keep the Rebels from mounting cannon on their fortifications. In the afternoon, Company H went on picket. Myself and four men were stationed on the advance post, within but a few hundred yards of the parapet. Heavy bombarding all night from the gunboats.
Friday, June 5th.—Bombarding from the gunboats continued during the forenoon. Relieved from picket duty at four p. m. by Company C. Occasional firing from our batteries, as usual. Retire to the woods at night for better protection from the enemy's shells.
Saturday, June 6th.—Returned to our original position in front in the morning. Heavy firing from our batteries from five to half past five a. m. During the day it was the same as it had been for several days. At night we again fell back in the woods. The gunboats fired considerable during the night.
Sunday, June 7th.—Returned to our original position. Nothing of importance happened until between two and three o'clock p. m., when a man in company H, by the name of Olivett, was accidentally killed by the explosion of a shell from one of our batteries; he was going after water. At twelve o'clock at night we were ordered to pack up our things in order to change our position. We moved about half a mile farther to the front to support heavy seige guns. The Rebs tried their best to drive in our pickets, but they found that the "Yanks." Were a stubborn set of fellows—not to be driven so easily. Heavy firing from the gunboats was kept up nearly all night.
Monday, June 8th.—Moved back to our old position at ten a. m. All was quiet along the lines during the day. At night we again moved forward and occupied the same position we did last night.
 Tuesday, June 9th.—Nothing of importance occurred during the day. In the afternoon company H again went on picket. Heavy cannonading during the night.
Wednesday, June 10th.—Our heavy howitzers shelled the Rebel fortifications pretty severely during the day. We were relieved from picket at four p. m. At ten p. m., part of companys [sic] C, H, and B, was sent out as skirmishers between the Rebel parapet and our lines. We had a pretty severe time of it during the night. The Rebs. poured volley after volley of musketry and grape and canister into us, but doing us little harm, as we was sheltered from their fire by getting behind stumps and logs. We also had a drenching shower—wetting each of us to the skin. One man in our company by the name of Sylvanus Brown, was severely wounded in the leg.
Thursday, June 11th.—This morning the skirmishers were drawn back in the woods to our old camp. We got our wounded man in camp as best we could—carrying him in blankets. An old adage says: "There is no rest for the wicked," but I say there is no rest for the soldier, especially when in front of the enemy, for we scarcely had time to get our breakfast of pork, coffee and hard-tack, before we again had orders to "fall in." "What's up now," spoke out fifty voices; "where are we going this time," was whispered thoughout  [sic] the ranks; but our wondering soon ceased when Lieutenant Sincerbox, the officer commanding us, gave the order "forward, file left, march." A short tramp through mud and water brought us to the edge of the woods, where we were deployed as skirmishers last night. Well did we know what was up now; we again had to deploy as skirmishers and creep up as far to the enemy's breastworks as was considered healthy for us, and act as sharpshooters through the day also—this making the fourth day and last night the third night for us on duty, with scarcely any rest at all; I tell you it is rough, but such is the life of a soldier, especially when on the battle-field.—Our heavy batteries keep up a continual shelling of the Rebel works to-day. While I am now taking notes the bullets and bomb-shells of the enemy are flying thick and fast around us—one just hit the tree behind which I am sitting. At night the 128th was ordered forward to throw up breastworks for heavy artillery and to dig rifle-pits for infantry, only about two hundred yards from the Rebel's breastworks. Sylvanus Brown died this afternoon from the effects of the wound he received last night.
Friday, June 12th.—Heavy firing from our siege guns still continues; but without a reply from the infernal traitors. The regiment returned this morning to their old quarters, after doing an extraordinary night's work. The 128th received great praise from all the officers for their bravery. At night we again went forward to finish the breastwork and rifle-pit commenced last night. About mid-night the Rebs. opened fire on us both with musketry and artillery. This made us throw down our picks and shovels and take up our arms to return the compliment which we did in "double-quick." Their fire however did not do us much harm—wounding only three or four of our regiment slightly.
Saturday, June 13th—We fell back to our old position in the woods before daylight this morning. At 10 minutes past 11 o'clock this forenoon, the commencement of a second assault upon the breastworks of the Rebel stronghold opened, which continued for nearly an hour; the attack was made as a feint to draw the Rebels out of their holes, so that our artillery could play upon them with grape and canister. There was not a man in the One Hundred and Twenty-Eighth wounded in this affair.
Sunday, June 24th.—At 2 o'clock this morning, our regiment was ordered to move; they went to the left some three or four miles. Being unwell and under the doctor's care at the time, I was left in quarters. A general engagement took place in the night at 3 o'clock, a. m., which lasted until after sunrise. The One Hundred and Twenty-Eighth reached their appointed destination about daylight, when they rested twenty minutes, after which they again advanced a short distance, when they again rested a short time; then they deployed as skirmishers and advanced towards the enemy's works as best they could under cover of the woods and underbrush. Thus they lay until dark when they fell back to the edge of the woods under the cover of night. Company H remained on picket all night. One man in Company C was killed by the explosion of a shell; here was several in our regiment wounded; there was two in Company H slightly wounded in the hand, their names were Wm. Spredbury and Web. Brundage. Adjutant Wilkinson was wounded in the shoulder slightly; Captain Van Slyck, of Company E, was slightly wounded.
Monday, June 15th.—The regiment lay in ambush all day; in the afternoon I rejoined the regiment. All is quiet to-day with the exception of occasional firing from our sharpshooters and batteries.
Tuesday, June 16th.—We lay in the same position that we did yesterday. In the afternoon Heaven's artillery opened very heavy upon us, and poured a drenching shower upon the soldiers laying in front of Port Hudson, wetting every one to the skin. At night about half of our company were detailed as sharpshooters to advance until they came to about one hundred yards of the parapet.
Wednesday, June 17th.—This morning we had a repetition of yesterday's wetting, still laying in the same position that we have since Sunday's battle. This afternoon I was sent to the hospital.
C. M. H.

In Memorium.
Col. David S. Cowles.
"Soldier rest, thy warfare's o'er,
Sleep the sleep that knows no waking;
Dream of battle fields no more,
Days of toil and nights of waking."

A long illness and consequent absence from the Regiment so closely associated with its gallant leader, with the ... influence of time had mellowed o're the catastrophe of his death, but a brief sojourn in the city of his love, brings back by a thousand associations the image of Colonel David S. Cowles. Again the heart loves to dwell upon his manly beauty and chivalric career, the beauties of his well nigh perfect character, and realizes anew the irreparable loss sustained by his friends, this regiment and the cause of his country. An appreciation of this loss is plainly manifested here, and no more eloquent eulogy could be pronounced, nor more touching testimony exhibited than that which falls lovingly from the lips of his fellow citizens, and is written in their brimming eyes. Tho' this attachment had been growing for years, and was but the fruit of his endearing qualities, yet his brief military career excited the pride of those who watched how well he did act his part, as surely as his sweet remembrance will ever blossom, so the reputation he had gained will be high and enduring. The reputation is not based alone upon the partiality of bereaved friends but attracted the admiration of his brother officers, and one--by academic and practical education regarded the first soldier in his department, paid this rare and valuable tribute to our lost friend.
*"There died an excellent officer before he was fully appreciated."
Only those who were more immediately associated with Colonel Cowles, can fully appreciate the shock, which more appalling than the death-rattle of rebel musketry or the scream of their hurtling shell, struck dismay to his faithful regiment on the memorable 27th of May. "Colonel Cowles is killed!" —This was the direful message whispered with white lips thro' the decimated ranks. "Col. Cowles is killed!" flew over the wires to startle mourning comrades at New Orleans, and with those "who go down to the sea in ships," was borne to his venerable mother, his devoted relatives and "troops of friends" at the North. His death alone for its sublime beauty and heroic courage is unsurpassed in all history. Only to those whose lives have been pure and raised above the littleness of ordinary life could such a fit ending come. The gothic types of chivalry shrink into moral dwarfs besides these noble martyrs to our country's salvation. The blood of the revolution flowed in no degenerate channels in the veins of Col. Cowles. Most fitting was it that the ceremonies which awaited the arrival of his noble form at his northern home, should have been preceded by the military honors to which his rank and career entitles him. There in the far-off city, with only a few faithful friends to mourn him, wraped [sic] in his country's flag, with the measured tread of a thousand men—the slow beat of muffled drums, with the wails of heart-searching music we left him to a brief repose and hastened to his regiment, to feel only more sensibly the great vacancy which his loss has made. A vacancy for aye in the heart of his aged mother, his loving friends and the martial ranks of his countrymen.

Poor stricken friends! poor sorrowing hearts!
What can his followers do,
But to plant in each heart a for-get-me-not,
And shadow them o'er with yew.

* Gen. T. W. Sherman, U. S. A.
Hudson, Sept. 29th, 1863.

About Home Matters.
From the 128th Regiment.
We publish below a valuable letter from Col.
Smith, of the 128th Regiment, showing the promotions and losses which the Regiment has sustained since July, 1863, together with an Order relative to the death of Major Edward Gifford, of this city:
HEADQUARTERS 128th Regt., N. Y. V.
3d Brig., 1st Div., Baton Rouge, La., Sept. 4, 1863.
I herewith send you a list of the names of those who have been promoted, in and out of the regiment, resigned, discharged, and died. Showing the changes which have occurred in the regiment since July 1st, 1863. Also the present aggregate strength of the Regiment.
After the fall of Port Hudson, this Regiment was one of the two selected from the Division, to form the column to march into, and occupy the place, and receive the surrender of arms, &c., from the Rebel Garrison.
On the 11th of July, the Regiment received orders to escort a large train of artillery from Port Hudson to Baton Rouge, a distance of twenty-five miles. The march was made in one night.
On the 15th of July, the Regiment was assigned to another Brigade, (3d Brig., 3d Div.) which is now 2d Brigade, 1st Division.
Left Baton Rouge on transports with the Brigade for Donaldsonville, La., where our forces were attacked and driven back. Remained at this place until August 2d, when the Regiment was detached and sent up the river some ten or twelve miles above Donaldsonville—the object being to prevent guerrillas from attacking or firing upon passing boats.
On the 11th of August, received orders to proceed with the Regiment to the village of Plaquemine, fifteen miles higher up the river, at which place the Regiment arrived at midnight,—disembarked and encamped near the village—remained at that place until August 29th, when orders were received to embark and proceed to Baton Rouge, where we are now encamped.
The Regiment is again under marching orders, destination unknown.
The foregoing will show to all who have an interest in the Regiment that we have been constantly at work since the fall of Port Hudson.
The Regiment is generally in good health. The following is the list referred to:
DIED.
Major Edward Gifford, Aug, 8th, New Orleans.
Company A—Promoted.
Lieutenant John V. Whitbeck, to be Captain.
Sergeant Geo. F. Wilber,            "     1st Lieutenant.
    "         Theo. W. Krafft,          "      2d        "
DISCHARGED.
Private—Geo. Whiteman,     April 10th, 1863.
    "          David Roney,            "       "        "
    "          SAMUEL DEGRAFF, June 1st  "
    "          Thomas Wands,               "     "    "
    "          J. J. Dusenbury,            July 25th "
KILLED.
Corporal —John B. Taylor, killed at Pt. Hudson, July 8.
DIED.
Private—Ambrose Holsapple, August 18th, 1863.
Company B.—PROMOTED.
Lieutenant T. N. Dutcher, to be Captain.
    "            J. S. Pierce.         "     1st Lieutenant.
Corporal Rant A. White,      "     2d        "
Sergant [sic] Goodman T. Noble, July 5th, 1863.
Private Isaac T. Winans,                    "          "
DIED.
Corporal E. Hammond, August 12th, 1863.
Private Manassa Benson,         "            "
    "      Curtis S. Porter, August 2d,       "
    "      Lander P. Rider,    "       4th       "
Company C.—Discharged.
1st Lieutenant H. H. Morse, Resigned Aug. 13th, 1863.
Private Gilbert H. Warner, July 5th, 1863.
COMPANY D.—Promoted.
Sergant [sic] Ambrose B. Hurt, 1st Lieutenant.
Discharged.
1st Lieutenant Spencer C. Doty, Resigned July 23d, '63.
Private James H. Onderdonk, July 28th, 1863.
Died.
Private Joseph Moore, August 20th, 1863.
    "      Andrew Jackson,    "     24th     "
Corporal John H. Smith, July 30th,      "
Company E.—PROMOTED.
Sergant [sic] John L. Holt, to be 2d Lieutenant.
Corporal John D. Wilkinson, Aug. 17th, 1863.
Privates Wm. R. Showerman, July 10th,    "
    "        August Reiger, Aug. 22d,             "
Company F.—Promoted.
Privates H. T. Winger, July 28th, 1863.
    “        Louis Pearsall,  "    13th,    "
    “        Sam'l Wilcox,   "    28th,    "
    “       Wm. Teator,      "     28th,   "
Company G.—Promoted.
1st Lieutenant C. B. Chittenden, to be Captain and A. Q. M., U. S. A.
DISCHARGED.
Private Horace Denegar, July 5th, 1863.
DIED.
Privates Robert Lapham, August 15th, 1863.
    "        Henry McCormick, "      22d,     "
Company H.—DISCHARGED.
____H. Bartley.
Company I.—DISCHARGED.
____ C. Noxon, August 11th, 1863.
____ B. Haviland, July 5th,       "
DIED.
____ Horn, August 4th, 1863.
Company K.—Promoted.
____ John I. Langdon, to be Captain.
____ V. B. DeWitt,         "    2d Lieutenant.
DISCHARGED.
Richard Decker, Resigned.
Rob't H. Burns, Resigned.
Francis Hodes, July 5th, 1863.
____ard Hogie,    "  5th,    "
DIED.
___rt M. Blunt, July 2d, 1863.
____ E. Allen, Aug. 4th,   "
___rd Roberts. July 4th,    "
___lin M. Sherow, July 28th, 1863.
___el Near,              "    11th      "
____ Foster,             "    11th      "

THE 19TH REGIMENT CORPS D'AFFRIQUE AND COMMISSIONS FROM MAJOR GENERAL
____Bostwick, Co. B, to be Colonel.
____ Parker,      “    D,   “    Lt. Colonel.
____ Palen,        “    G,   “    Major.
____ Reynolds,  "    A,   "    1st Lieut.
____ Platto,        "    D,   "    2d Lieut.
____ P. Wilson, "     D,   "    2d Lieut.
___les M. Bell,   "    G,   "    1st   "
___in Smith,       “    G,   "    1st    "
___et T. Dillon,  "    H,   "    1st    "
___ge Culver,     "    H,   "    2d     "
___ F. Keys,        "   H,   "    2d     "
___as E. Merritt, "    I,    "    Captain.
___ard Enoch,     "    I,    "    1st Lieut.
____ M. Ames,    "   K,   "    2d Lieut.
The following named Officers are on detached service:
____ V. Whitbeck, Chief Q. M. Department.
___as N. Dutcher, Paymaster Eng'r Dep't.
___rt F. Williamson, Judge Advocate on Gen. Weitzel's Staff.
____ Williamson, Acting Ordnance Officer on Gen. Franklin's Staff.

PRESENT STRENGTH OF REGIMENT.
Commissioned Officers, 27
Enlisted Men,               674
Total                             701
NO. IN REGIMENT SINCE JULY 1ST, 1863.
Enlisted Men, 59
JAMES SMITH, Col. Com. Regt.
... Wilkinson, Adjt.

HEADQUARTERS 128TH N. Y. VOLS.,
BATON ROUGE, LA., Sept. 3, 1863.
Orders No. 63:
... commanding is called to the performance ... duty of officially announcing to this command ... ...ase of Major Edward Gifford, of this Regiment, Captain of Co. A. who departed this life ... New Orleans, on the eighth day of August ... ... (then Captain) was taken prisoner by ... ...es on the 26th day of May, 1863, in the ad- ... Union forces upon the fortifications of ... La. After his capture he suffered close ... in a rebel prison. His long incarceration ... days) and a want of the proper necessaries ...ther with the fatigue and exposure attend-… ...pe on the night of July 4th, 1863, so worked ... system that death was the result.
Referring to the past life of Major Gifford, it is not ... interesting part to recall his private virtues. ...nection with this Regiment was of the most ...ons and pleasing nature. Engaged in the same ...ncountering the same perils—suffering the ... and privations—participating in the most in- ...g scenes and events—the mutual and cherished ...ents were no less ardent than the ties of brothers.
The Regiment has by his death sustained an irreparable loss. Long will he be remembered as an honored and efficient officer; an ornament in the martial circle; a noble companion and generous friend. No man was more unassuming—none more delicately alive to the feelings of others.
To the testimony of private friendship, may be added ... less partial strangers, who have borne witness, to his public and private virtues. !
... praise him for his military talents alone, would be to deprive him of half the eulogium he merits, both as an officer and gentleman.
The Colonel commanding recommends that the officers take such action expressive of their feelings re- ... to the decease of Major E. Gifford. Captain F. ...eese, Captain Robt. J. Mitchell and Lieut. Geo. T. ...te are appointed a committee for this purpose.
This order will be read at the first dress parade of the Regiment, and entered on the records of each Company.
(Signed) JAMES SMITH, Col. Com'dg.

The One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Regiment.
FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.
HEADQUARTERS ONE HUNDRED AND
TWENTY-EIGHTH N. Y. V.,
SECOND BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION,
BATON ROUGE, LA., Sept. 5, 1863.
DEAR POUGHKEEPSIAN: On the 8th of July Port Hudson formally surrendered to the forces of Major-General Banks. Orders were issued to the several regiments who were detailed from the several divisions, to form the column, march in and occupy this famous place. The One Hundred and Twenty-eighth had the honor of being one regiment of that column, which was composed of about ten regiments.
The place was not occupied or the surrender finally completed until the morning of the 9th, when orders were received to march in-- arriving inside of the fortifications from the land side. The column was obliged to march through to nearly the banks of the river, where the rebel garrison were drawn up in line. Our forces marched from their right to left, halted and fronted before those who were the day before our enemies. At a given signal the rebels proceeded by battallion [sic] to ground their arms. Stores, artillery, etc., were then turned over by their proper officers, and Port Hudson with its contents was ours.
The regiment remained near the headquarters of General Andrews, who assumed command of the post, until the 11th of July, when one of those mysterious orderlies rode up with an order that the regiment should form an escort for a large train of artillery to Baton Rouge. The march from Port Hudson to Baton Rouge was made in one night, a distance of about twenty-five miles. It was one of the most severe marches that this regiment has performed since it has been in the service of the United States, besides having to follow and keep in proper place in column of march through an enemy's country. The regiment arrived at Baton Rouge considerably fatigued. We lay in the street the greater part of next day and were then ordered to bivouac in a vacant lot in the suburbs of the city, where we remained until the 15th of July, when the whole brigade, composed of the Thirty-first Massachusetts, Thirty-eighth Massachusetts, Fifty-third Massachusetts, (a nine-months' regiment), One Hundred and Twenty-eighth, One Hundred and Fifty-sixth and One Hundred and Seventy-fifth New York Volunteers, commanded by Col. O. P. Gording, of the Thirty-first Massachusetts Volunteers, were ordered to take transports, and with the artillery proceed to Donaldsonville, where our troops met met with a repulse, to reenforce [sic] them. Arrived at Donaldsonville at about midnight, disembarked and bivouacked in line of battle, expecting, of course, from what had taken place the day before, that we would be attacked the next day. On the disembarking of the troops they were told all sorts of stories of the nearness of the rebel pickets and of their numbers by those who had been engaged the day previous, which had, in many instances, the effect of keeping the ears and eyes of many open. Camp stories are so oftentimes exaggerated that but little attention was paid by many to the stories that were told them.
The regiment remained at Donaldsonville until August 2, when the order came again to pack up and proceed up the river some ten or twelve miles and encamp, the object of which was to look after a guerrilla force which were said to be hovering about the vicinity to which we were ordered. Everything was got in readiness by six p. m. to march to the place designated in orders. Marched some seven or eight miles that night, and bivouaked [sic] on a very sour-looking secessionist's plantation until the next a. m. At five o clock we again took up our line of march, and arrived at our destination about ten a. m.
The weather was exceedingly warm and therefore our march was necessarily slow.—The place where we encamped was on one of those fine plantations which was at that time worked under the supervision of government employees. The landing near which we were encamped was called "Hickory Landing," but from what it derived its name I could not ascertain. The regiment was encamped on Madame Sigui's plantation, about a mile below the landing. At this place the whole of the regiment obtained many luxuries which could not be obtained in any of the villages.
The regiment while at this place was at one time threatened by an attack from a large force which were in the rear, but as no attack was made it is not worth while to pursue the subject further.
Remained at the Sigui plantation, or Hickory Landing, until the 11th of August, when we embarked for the village of Plaquemine, which was at that time picketed by and in the possession of rebel cavalry. We arrived at that place about midnight. Two companies were deployed around the principal part of the village with a view to make some captures, but none were made. In the meantime the whole disembarked and remained on the levee until daylight, when we went into camp. Our force was afterwards increased by the addition of four companies of the Fourth Wisconsin cavalry, which were of great service to us.
We remained at this place until August 28, when we were ordered again to embark and join the brigade at Baton Rouge, where we are now encamped in a healthy location.
You have probably learned ere this reaches you, that Major-General Franklin, formerly of the army of the Potomac, has been placed in command of the Ninteenth [sic] army corps, which relieves Major-General Banks, by his own order, from the immediate command of the troops, yet he still commands the department, which I hope—and it is the wish of every officer and soldier—he will command it as long as any troops are required therein. One great complaint in this department is the great scarcity of ice, both for the use of the sick in hospitals and for general consumers. We have no news as to military movements except that which would be it contraband to mention.
All are anxious that the draft should be enforced, and the regiments again filled up to their maximum numbers. The regiment and in fact the whole brigade, has been under marching orders for the last week, but where we are going is as uncertain as all military movements usually are. Some say Mobile others predict that Texas is the next point which must be brought under the wing of Union army. I hope it is so, (the latter). Gen. Grant was in the city of New Orleans a few days, in consultation with Gen. Banks, but the uninitiated know but little of what transpired or what the programme is for the coming fall campaign, but that it is to be an active one is certain, judging from the preparations which are being made. You have already heard of the great services which the Nineteenth army corps has performed. You will hear of still greater, and with like success. Without being considered egotistical, I venture the opinion that since Gen. Banks assumed command there has not been a better corps for discipline and efficiency in the army of the United States. In fact, I have been told by some of Gen. Grant's officers that they were surprised to find such an efficient army in the department of the gulf. To us it was no news, but to be thus complimented by officers from another department is certainly highly gratifying. The regiment is in good health generally. I have given you the details, without going too much into particulars, of the movements of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth from the capture of Port Hudson to the present time. Not wishing to weary you too much, I bring this to a close.
Yours, &c., J. S.

Correspondence of the Gazette.
From the 128th Regiment.
Present location and condition of the Regiment—Important Operations in the Department of the South—The Regiment to be filled up to its maximum force—The Corps de Afrique—The Sabine Pass Expedition—Annoyances from Rebel Cavalry—Cotton and Cotton Speculators, etc., etc.
Headquarters 128th Regt., N. Y. V.
2d Brig., 1st Div., Baton Rouge, La., Sept. 26, 1863.
Friend Williams:—A few lines from the seat of War in the far South, will not be uninteresting to your readers, particularly coming from this Regiment, in which are many of their hearts' dearest treasures. The 128th, at the present time, is in fine condition, and are located in camp on a fine and healthy location in the suburbs of the Capitol of this State. Whether we are to remain here long, or how long, is a matter of great uncertainty considering the present state of affairs in this Department. Active operations are going on, the results of which will be of the greatest importance, should success attend the efforts now being made, of which we have not the least doubt.
A few days since I forwarded to you a list of the losses this Regiment has sustained, by promotions out of the regiment, deaths and discharges. I hope that you have received it, as it is of much interest to the whole district, who I am assured feel a deep interest in all who are connected with the Regiment.
The detail from this Regiment, of officers and men, to receive volunteers or conscripts, or both will soon arrive at home to obtain their quota assigned to fill this Regiment to its maximum number. The number required, is somewhat over three hundred men. If the draft is rigidly enforced, and the men drafted promptly forwarded to their respective regiments, they can soon be made good soldiers, which is something that should be highly appreciated, as they will have as precedents, the habits and experience of true and good soldiers, who have, to use a common phrase, "seen the elephant" in all shapes and conditions.
Recruiting is going on briskly to fill up the Negro Regiments, which I believe now number twenty. They will without doubt be used principally for garrison duty. The Corps de Afrique is commanded by Brig. Gen. Andres—Headquarters at Port Hudson. In appearance, the negroes make very good soldiers.
Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant has been in the city of New Orleans for some time past, the guest of Maj. Gen. Banks.
The 19th Army Corps has had quite an addition made to it by the transfer of the 13th Army Corps, temporarily commanded by Maj. General Washburn,—they composed a portion of General Grant's Army before Vicksburg, and are mostly old soldiers, having seen much service. It is what we have long needed, as the extent of territory to be held was so vast, that before their arrival, great portions of it was evacuated.
Our Division is commanded by Brig. General Godfrey Weitzel, a very popular and efficient officer. The Brigade is under the command of Col. O. P. Gooding, of the 31st Mass. Vols. He has just returned from the North on furlough. Col. Gooding is now in command of this Post; the chatter of the Brigade will consequently devolve upon the officer next in rank.
The Expedition which left here some two weeks since for Sabine Pass, Texas, and with which we were expected to go, returned to New Orleans yesterday. The results or information, for which the expedition was sent to obtain, are not yet made public. Two gunboats were lost—one of them, the Clifton, which had on board a very heavy armament; the other was the Sachem.—They were both captured, A heavy loss to the Navy in the Gulf. In consequence of this failure, I am inclined to think that the Teche compaign [sic] will have to be gone over again.
We are constantly being harrassed [sic] by General Logan's rebel cavalry by dashes on our pickets. A few evenings since on one of the roads leading from here, we lost two killed, one wounded, and one taken prisoner; all belonging to the 4th Wisconsin Cavalry. The post was surprised.
The Brigade was immediately ordered under arms, but no further demonstration being made, all returned to their quarters and slept as quietly as if nothing had occurred "to hurt or make us afraid."
The 128th was first on its color line, and were fully prepared to give any intruder a warm reception. In fact, since we left Port Hudson and its hardships and excitement, and settled down again to quiet camp life, all hands have been spoiling for an opportunity to meet secesh on open ground.
Cotton comes into this place in large quantities. Speculators in the article are as plentiful as mosquitos [sic]—of which we have at this time of year a bountiful supply. Several officers of the Regiment have no doubt before this reached Hudson, and given you eyesight particulars of the seige of Port Hudson.
J. S.

Army Correspondence of the GAZETTE.
From the 128 Regiment.
HEAD-QUARTERS, 128TH N. Y. V., 3d BRIGADE,
1st DIVISION 19TH A. C.
BATON ROUGE, LA., NOV. 13TH, 1863.
EDITOR GAZETTE:—The following are the names of those who have died, been discharged, transferred and deserted since the last published report and up to date, Nov. 10, 1863. Also names of those promoted with their rank and Company.
L. Van Deusen, Private Co. K, died at Baton Rouge, La., Oct. 1st.
H. D. Austin, Private Co. I, died at Baton Rouge, Oct. 5th.
J. F. Silvernail, Private Go. G, died at Baton Rouge, Oct. 6th.
Henry Austin, Private Co. K, died at Baton Rouge, Oct. 10th.
Alfred Smith, Private Co. H, died at Baton Rouge, Oct. 23rd.
W. G. Cronk, Corporal Co. I, died at Baton Rouge, Oct. 23rd.
H. L. Benson, Corporal Co. I, died at Baton Rouge, Oct. 26th.
Wm. Jeffers, Private Go. F, died at New Orleans, Sept. 2d, of wounds received at Port Hudson.
Smith G. Case, Private Co. I, died at Baton Rouge, Nov. 1st.
P. S. Baker, Sergeant Co. I, died at Baton Rouge, Nov. 6th.
Charles Records, Private Co. B, died at Baton Rouge, Nov. 8th.
Morris Fradenberg, Private Co. G, discharged for disability, Aug. 10th.
L. Lester, Private Co. H. discharged for disability, Aug. 29th.
W. B. Naven, Musician Co. K, discharged for disability, Sept. 12th.
O. P. Wright, Private Co. E, discharged for disability, Sept. 28th.
H. Cheever, Private Co. E, discharged for disability, Sept. 28th.
J. G. Moore, Private Co. I, discharged for disability, Oct. 9th.
Adrian Langdon, Private Co. K, discharged for disability, Oct. 22d.
Patrick Lyden, Private Co. C, discharged for disability, Nov. 5th.
Benj. Kelly, Private Co. I, discharged for disability, Nov. 5.
E. H. Ensign, Private Co. B, discharged for disability, Nov. 5th.
Orville Davis, Private Co. B, discharged for disability, Nov. 6th.
C. W. Morris, Private Co. D, discharged for disability, Nov. 5th.
G. H. Horton, Private Co. B, transferred to Corps d'Afrique, May 20th.
J. A. Wilcox, Private Co. A, transferred to Invalid Corps, Sept. 1st.
R. O. Smith, Private Co. I, transferred to Invalid Corps, Sept. 1st.
Augustus Eyth, Private Co. F, transferred to Invalid Corps, Sept. 1st.
Wm. Spreadbery, Private Co. H, deserted at New Orleans, Oct. 3d.
Peter Foster, Private Co. E, deserted at Baton Rouge, Oct. 24th.

PROMOTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS.
H. H. Sincerbox, 1st Lieut. Co. H, promoted to Captain Co. D.
T. A. Davis, 2d Lieut. Co. C, promoted to Captain Co. C.
S. H. Mase, 2d Lieut. Co. H, promoted to Quartermaster.
M. V. B. DeWitt, 2d Lieut. Co. K, promoted to 1st Lieut. Co. K.
H. E. Mitchell, Serg't Major, promoted to 1st Lieut. Co.G.
G. W. McKown, 1st Sergeant Co. C, promoted to 1st Lieut. Co. C.
Augustus Aweng, 1st Sergeant Co. I, promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. I.
George Murrill, Sergeant Co. G, promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. G.
John H. Hagar, Sergeant Co. C, promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. C.
C. M. Davidson, Sergeant Co. H, promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. H.
C. S. Keyes, 1st Sergeant Co. H, promoted to 1st Lieut. Co. H.
Allen Shelden, Private Co. K, promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. K.
Henry Rothery, Sergeant Co. F, promoted to Sergeant Major.
Commissioned Officers 36. Aggregate strength of Regiment, enlisted men 654.
You will confer favor by publishing the foregoing.
Respectfully, &c.,
JAMES SMITH,

Summary of the 128th Regiment.
Col. Smith, of the 128th Regiment, has favored us with a resume of the services of his Regiment from September 4th, 1862 (the day before the Regiment left its quarters in this city), to January 1st, 1864, which is comprised in the following summary:
Total number mustered   993
Killed                                24
Wounded                          93
Died                                100
Discharged                     113
Transferred                       32
Missing                              1
Deserted                           62
Temporary Transfer         17
Present strength              655
Of the present officers, twelve have been promoted from the ranks, and six are on detached service.

Army correspondence of The Gazette.
A Perilous Adventure.
Letter from Lieut.-Col. Foster, of the 128th Regiment.
New Orleans, La., May 25th, 1864.
DEAR GAZETTE.—I trust the newspaper story that I was killed on the Red River has not reached you; or if so, that you did not credit the report.
Through the watchful care and protection of a merciful Providence, I have gone through many perils unharmed, except a slight flesh wound from a  fragment of shell driven into the calf of my right leg some two or three inches . Its force was expended when it reached that depth, because the piece was so small. Had ir been twice as large it would have ruined my leg. Had my wound been any severed I could not possibly have escaped.
After returning from Grand Ecore to Alexandria, (during which march we drove the enemy at Cone River Crossing, from a strong position at
Monet's Bluff, I leading the 128th in a charge, which they "did up" in gallant style, Col. Smith being n command of part of the 3d Brigade,) having obtained a seven days' leave to visit New Orleans, I took passage on the U. S. transport steamboat John Warner, convoyed by the tinclad gunboats Covington No. 25, and the Signal No. 8. At about 6 o'clock in the afternoon of the 15th inst., about twenty-five miles below Alexandria, the enemy fired upon us with musketry. I picked up three large Minnie balls in the saloon, while they were warm, and the rear of the saloon had eight holes through it, yet we did not mind this much, most of the passengers having had this sort of experience before, and knowing that pounds of bullets thrown at steamboats were wasted before any one was hurt.
The three boats tied up to the bank for the night hoping that an expedition under General Nickerson, which was about ready to move when we left Alexandria, would come down during the night. In the morning by the first streakings of daylight, we pushed on for a few miles. At about half-past 5 o'clock we saw a mounted man galloping his horse at full speed, his sabre glittering in the rising sun. We knew then and said, "we'll catch it pretty soon." This had scarcely been thought or uttered, when puff went the smoke from a piece of artillery, at such long range that the report of the gun and the demoniac screech of the shell reached us simultaneously. Another and another in quick succession, responded to by the deafening guns of the Covington and Signal. Our boat was frequently struck by cannon shot and shell, and soon we got just opposite a rebel force posted behind the levee on the right bank of the river, who threw bullets into and around us by the thousand.
When I dressed myself in the morning I had slipped on a pair of very old slipper shoes, not dreaming that we should be compelled to leave the boat, or that the fire would get too hot to enable me to put on my boots and save my baggage, and to get my despatches from Gen. Banks to Admiral Farragut, Maj.-Gen. Reynolds, and others. That part of the saloon protected by cotton bales being crowded by men and women, crouching on the floor, I went down upon the forward deck, which was well fortified by a semi-circle of cotton bales, divided by a line from the center. There I felt perfectly secure, though crowded among soldiers of a veteran Ohio Regiment, (the 56th who were en route to enjoy their furlough at home.) For one fellow who was a good shot, I had half a dozen men load muskets, and between two cotton bales he silenced a row of rebels on the shore.
About this time the bell ropes from the pilot house to the engineers were cut by a shot, and from the captain, posted behind three cotton bales standing endwise upon the hurricane deck, we passed word to the engineers:—"Work the port engine." "Go slow on the starboard engine." "Work both engines," &c. Soon a shot cut some steam-pipe, and the boat was run into the left bank. Here we lay and took it from the opposite bank, the river no wider than Catskill creek, and the dodging of any one who wanted to change position was sure to bring a shower of bullets.
Col. Raynor, of the Ohio Regiment, called to his men to go ashore. The poor fellows went scrambling up the bank two or three at a time, and Col. Raynor, and Lieut. Gibson of 114th N. Y., were struck, the former just below the right knee and the latter through the calves of both legs. I could see them plainly when they were struck, and they scrambled back aboard. I rushed past the exposed places and was helping to get them on mattresses, and examining their wounds, assuring then that they were not dangerous, and that they were not bleeding rapidly, when from one of the shells almost constantly exploding on the boat, Col. Raynor was again struck and at the same time I felt a sharp stroke upon my leg. I did not then think I was wounded, but that it was a wooden splinter that had hit me. The cry, "Hoist the white flag!" was then raised and I went to the stern of the boat and told the men that Col. Raynor was disabled, that I was a Lieut. Colonel, and was then the senior officer on board in command, and that no white flag should be raised unless the boat was unable to turn her wheels. I spoke loudly, and both Col. Raynor and Capt. Dane of the Warner, begged me to let the flag be raised.
While a group was fixing a white sheet upon an oar, I went through the saloon to my state room in the rear, and got Gen. Banks' dispatches from under my pillow, and my pistols, the ballance [sic] of my baggage I left behind. To go up the bank, screen myself in the woods and undergrowth from the rebel sharp-shooters, and rush down the banks and through a port-hole on board the gunboat Covington, was the work of but a few minutes. Here I asked the captain of the gun-boat to give me a party to bring down Col. Raynor and Lieut. Gibson. With his consent, seamen, gunners and ship-boys immediately volunteered, and an officer of the Covington, named Daum, insisted that I was not fit to go with my wound, and took command of the party, taking with him turpentine and other combustibles with which to fire the Warner.
While they were gone the gun-boat's surgeon examined my leg, confirmed my opinion that it was not a serious wound, and bandaged it. The wounded officers were soon brought down from the Warner and gotten on board the Covington without further injury. To get down out of the way on the crowded gun deck, I lay myself under the stair, and while there a shell cut a steam-pipe and one piece took off a gunner's head and another's hands. The rush of the steam and the agonized howls of the latter wounded man created a stampede of nearly every one on board to the Signal gun-boat, to which we was lashed alongside, and which had signalled [sic] "disabled" some time before. The accident to the steampipe was not serious, and I stayed on board and helped to get the men back to their posts at the guns.
About half an hour afterwards there was another panic, and I found greatly to my surprise and disappointment, that the Lieutenant commanding the Covington had ordered that she be abandoned and set on fire. Again the gauntlet must be run, and it was severe indeed. Close to the guards and paddle-box of the boat were we obliged to keep to escape the bullets, and when any one or a group started up the bank, the command from the opposite shore could be distinctly heard, "fire by volleys." Upon a space but a few paces broad and deep, I do not exaggerate to say the bullets were literally showered. Between these drops thirty men made their way into the woods, no one being struck that I know of, but the brave surgeon of the Covington, and he slightly in two places.
When we had put a short distance between us and the rebel bullets, a brief consultation was held, and though I was in favor of pushing on down the river to Fort De Rusey, I was content to go with a majority of the party, who determined to make an attempt to return to Alexandria, and report to Admiral Porter there. My leg had begun to feel stiff, and I asked Capt. Lord and his officers not to leave me behind; showed them my despatches, and promised to work along as fast as I could. For three hours we were lost in a labyrinth of chapperal, making no headway in any continued direction.
It was a great relief when we saw a clearing and a habitation, though we knew not but an enemy was awaiting us there. I was delegated to make a reconnoissance, and soon made signal "all clear." A few were so fortunate as to get some milk, corn-bread, &c, while I was trying to improvise a bridle from a clothes line for an old horse grazing upon the lawn. A draught of good water was a luxury we obtained here. Up to this time we were compelled to drink fetid water covered with a green scum, and distilled to an odor far less inviting than our friend Hubbel's "Golden Bitters." My Rozenante proved to be stone blind, and finding that I could make no more progress thereon than did Don Quixote against the windmill, I acted again as dismounted infantry until an "unbleached American" of the party had caught a jackass for his own use, and being as yet unable to receive the popular opinion that" a nigger is better than a white man," I succeeded in mounting the intractable animal, which, not being bridle-wise, I impressed the said private in the "United States Infantry--Colored" to lead the same. Here nursing my leg, riding woman fashion, we pursued the devious tenor of our way to Alexandria.
At about three o'clock we fell upon a "good Samaritan" woman. She had a son, she told us, in one of the loyal Louisiana Regiments, and she exhausted her larder and stable in feeding and mounting those of our party who were exhausted.
Late in the afternoon we were startled by three musket shots. Owing to the stubborness of my assinine locomotive, I had fallen behind Captain Lord and his party, with only the lame and wearied with me. We made a detour to the left around the house and mill from which these shots had come. Again we took to the road, and though an occasional shot was fired, we pushed on, and as dusk came on I gave the usual loud orders used toward a Regiment, to deceive the bushwackers if possible, to suppose we were several hundred strong. Soon we heard the, riding down on our rear. I slipped off the ass, ordered the men to form in line, and draw their pistols, and challenging the rebels, by this time almost upon us, and receiving no satisfactory reply, we fired a volley upon them, cocking and discharging our pistols rapidly. Our enemies wheeled, one tumbling from his saddle in the road, and we pressed on.
Finding a bridge near us, we were satisfied our enemies were in our rear. Nothing more did we see or hear from them. The rumbling of the tattoo in the far distance from opposite Alexandria was the pleasantest music we had ever heard, and though the distance seemed interminable after this, before we reached our videttes, and I was urged to permit the party to rest until the following morning, yet having no blankets to protect us from the damp night air, and wounded as three of us were, and all reeking with perspiration, we dragged ourselves into the camps of our friends.
Unintentionally I passed my Columbia County comrades, Lieut.-Col. Gaul and Major Waltermire, who were enjoying a soldiers' repose in their tents.
We found our way to Col. E. L. Moleneaux's head-quarters, where having reported to him, he insisted upon keeping us, and dispatching a messenger to head-quarters.
The next morning, after an excellent breakfast, he had me taken to Gen. Grover's, to Maj. Gen. Banks' to the surgeon, who took out the piece shell from my leg, and then to camp, where the officers and men of the Regiment crowded around to congratulate me upon our escape, a transport having gone down the river and picked up some refugees from the Signal, who reported all killed or prisoners.
My wound is healing as fast as can be expected, and I hope to return to the Regiment in ten or twenty days. Col. Smith is said to have come down to the city quite sick, upon one of the hospital boats.
Our officers and men are generally in good health, Surgeon Cole being the only one who has been very ill, and he is convalescing. The esprit de corps of the Regiment is A.—1.
Yours truly, J. P. F.

Acknowledgment from the 128th.
Col. Smith, of the 128th Regiment, sends to the ladies of this County, the following acknowledgement of the receipt of the new stand of colors:
CAMP OP THE 128TH N. Y. V.,
MORGANZA, La., June 16th, 1864.
At a special meeting of the Officers of the 128th Regiment, convened at their Camp on the 10th day of June, 1864, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
WHEREAS, The ladies of Columbia County have generously presented this Regiment with a most magnificent color:
Resolved, That we tender our grateful thanks to the donors for the kindness they have evinced by forwarding this valuable token of their esteem.
Resolved, That these resolutions, together with the enclosed circular from Col. Smith, be published in the papers of Columbia and Dutchess Counties.
Committee:
Capt. Thos. A. DAVIS, Lieut. Fred. WILKINSON, Lieut. H. E.  MITCHELL.

Head-quarters 126 N. Y. V.,
FRONT OF PETERSBURG, VA.,
Aug. 22, 1864.
The following is the list of casualities [sic] in this Regiment, at Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 14th.
Killed.—John Getchell, private Co. F;
James Snelling, private, Co. I.
WOUNDED.—Wm. S. Westfall, Sergt., Co. H, hip; Henry Armstrong, private, Co. I, hand. Lieut. John F. Randolph, Acting Adjutant.

The 128th and 150th in Battle.
These two home Regiments bore an important part in the recent severe engagements in the Shenandoah Valley, and proved themselves equal to any veterans in the field. Their loss in wounded has been quite serious, but few are recorded in the list of killed and missing. Lieut. Col. Foster, of the 128th, furnishes us the following list of casualties in that Regiment during the engagement Sept. 19th:
Major F. S. Keese, commanding regiment, across the back, severe, but not serious.
Company A—Sergeant John C. Delemater, side, severe, not serious. Privates Charles P. Kingsley, forearm broken, Patrick McGrath, leg, below knee, slight flesh wound, Alonzo Williams, middle finger lost.
Company B—Privates, C. F. Tweedy, bowels, since died; Walter L. Orr, breast, piece of shell, severe, not serious; Lewis Rosell, side, not serious, with Regiment; Milton Brownell, big toe; Chas. H. Ferris, ankle wound not serious; E. J. Cains, missing.
Company C—Corporals Geo. F. Simmons, both feet, not serious; Daniel H. Hannaburgh, leg very slight; Privates, Edward Kisshourr, killed; Peter Dyer,  killed; Lewis W. Cashdollar, leg, severe, below knee; Daniel Neenan, hand, slight; Calvin Rikert, groin not serious; Lewis Simmon, leg and stomach, not serious, flesh; Charles Wooden, wounded and missing; Augustus Gobel, hand very slight; ____ Felts, arm, very slight; Lemuel Marquet, breast, very slight; Lanson G. Hicks, shoulder, very slight.
Company D—First Lieut. Ambrose B. Hart, knee, slight, with regiment; First Sergeant Robert B. Light, wrist, severe. Privates, E. F. Hallock, hip, slight; Wm. Hineys, leg, severe, flesh wound, not serious; G. H. Fitchett, head, slight, flesh wound; Isaac S. Wood, leg, severe; Robert A. Palmer, side, slight; Allen Rote, shoulder, slight; William Park, missing; Robert Saunders, missing.
Company F—First Lieut. Charles Van Tin..., left breast, not serious; Sergeant Norman Kilmer, arm and hip, not dangerous; Sergeant Charles W. Browenship, serious; Private ... F. Ball, leg, above knee, severe; Privates Leonard P. Lawson, leg, below knee, severe; DeLancy Myers, missing.
Company G—Second Lieut. George Murrell, hip, slight; First Sergeant Angustus M. Osborne, leg, above knee, severe; Corporals James McCann, killed; Morris Straus, breast, not serious; Michael Keane, missing. Privates Wm. B. Hand, arm, slight; Wm. Myers, shoulder, slight; Martin Teator, missing.
Company H—Sergeant Charles A. Weller, missing; Corporal Stephen D. Yeomans, hand, severe. Privates George Swords, killed; Theodore Brown, hand slight; Wm. W. Marsh, leg, flesh wound, severe; Thomas Mahon, head and breast, not serious; Napoleon B. Hartson, shoulder, severe.
Company I—Corporal Peter E. Potts, foot, very slight. Privates Robert O. Smith, killed, Edward Van Wosdall, killed, Thos. F. Appleby, hand, slight.
Company K—Captain M. V. B. DeWitt, head, severe, in Hospital at Winchester; Sergeant Ward Van DeBogart, breast; Sylvester Brewer, head, slight, with Regiment. Corporal Brazil Van Deusen, hand slight. Privates Josepg Brown, killed; Thomas Doran, wrist, severe; Wm. Kellerhouse, bowels, severe; J. W. Ousterhondt, wrist, slight; Thomas Rice, leg, not serious; Wm. H. Traver, shoulder, not dangerous; John Wallace, leg, slight; Charles Ham, missing.
Col. Foster further writes that after Major Keese (who had command of the 128th) was wounded, the Regiment was led by Capt. Charles R. Anderson, who, with the remnant of the Reg't, stuck by the colors, through which there are eleven bullet holes, until they were carried victoriously into Winchester.
The 128th took upwards of twenty prisoners. There was scarcely a man in the Regiment who had not some portion of his clothing or accoutrements struck. "It is probable" he adds "that the majority of those reported missing were wounded, and are now at Winchester, but owing to the rapid pursuit of the enemy, we had no opportunity to visit them.

Casualties in the 128th.
Lieut. Col. J. P. Foster communicated the following complete list of casualties in the 128th Regiment during the battle of Oct. 19:
Capt. Robert F. Wilkinson, detached on staff of Major Gen. Emory, commanding 19th Army Corps, wounded severely.
Company A.—Lieut. Thoe. W. Kraft, prisoner in the hands of enemy. Privates Henry Wood and Wallace Brewer, wounded slightly in leg.
Corp. Michael Gninan, Privates Lewis Clum, Martin Codey, Samuel Comstock, John H. Bennett, Anson O. Knapp, Fred'k H_nsey, John M. Lains, John F. New, Crawford W. Manor, Joseph C. Mosher, Reuben Moores, Wm. Maegan, John N. Hague, Freeman Ostrander, prisoners in hands of enemy.
Company B.—Sergt. C. S. Doge, flesh wound in hip. Private W. S. Appleby, slightly in elbow.
Privates J. O. Pitcher, O. S. Walters; Corp. L. Linsburgh, missing in hands of enemy.
Company C.—J. H. Asher, wounded slightly in hip. Private Henry Kehos, do. Geo. Minker, slightly in head. Sergt. W. Rikert; Corp. D. H. Hanaburg, Privates Wm. B. Brower, James Doyle, Gilbert Dedrick, Sam'l Morgan, John Hadden, missing in hands of enemy.
Company D.—Private E. S. Wells, killed in action. 2d Lieut. Jacob Armstrong, Corp. J. W. C. Blauvelt, Privates W. H. Mackey, William Baker, John W. Earle, George Earle, Thomas Flynn, Francis Gillingham, Mathew Foster, John D. Heilman, James Myers, Frederick Fleck, Albert R. Clark, Robt. A. Palmer, John Ransch, Adam Schale, Chas. D. Wilson, Ab'm Turner, prisoners in hands of enemy.
Company E.—Corp. Geo. M. Coffin, killed. Privates Barnett, James Calligan, Elijah Kennecutt, Jr., Horace Priar, Sebastion Shiltz, Wm. H. Sharp, Geo. A. Tipple, missing in action.
Company F.—Corp. Jacob Powles, Privates John Dinger, James Stevens, Chas. H. Potter, George H. Wood, John Rafferty, missing in action.
Company G.—Privates Ebenezer Burrth, killed. Serg't L. C. Brooks, wounded, head slight, Private Michael Harder, wounded, hip, slight.
Corp. Manderville Hoffman, Private Benj. A. Hand, missing in action.
Company H.—Privates Mark Sheapardson, Edward Kelly, killed.
Privates Johanus Wilhelm, Wm. Friar, Chas. Van Vart, missing in action.
Company I.—Private John Casey, killed. Capt. Robert P. Wilkinson, wounded severely.
Corp. P. Potts, Corp. G. W. Potts, Privates Stephen H. Moure, Stephen Kellerhouse, Chas. W. McCord, Uriah Davison, missing in action.
Company K.—Corp. Daniel Wesley, wounded, leg, amputated below knee.
Corp. T. H. Johnson, Corp. Chas. Hover, Corp. Geo. Elting, Privates Ethan Allen, C. P. Chase, J. F. Coons, Peter Decker, R. M. Harris, John Hinker, Phillip Gilroy, Jonas M. Plass, John H. Plass, Peter Plass, Chas. Seeley, Geo. A. Weeks, James Winters, missing in action.

RECAPITULATION.
Com'd officers missing in action, 2; Wounded, 1; Enlisted men killed, 6; Wounded 14; Missing 80. Aggregate loss 103.

From the 128th Regiment.
Headquarters 128th N. Y. Vols., 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 19th Army Corps, Morganza, La., June 6, 1864.
To the Officers and men of the 128th N. Y. Vols:—It is with feeling of pride and gratification that the Colonel Commanding, officially announces that a new color has been received, intended for the Regiment as a gift from the Ladies of the City of Hudson, N. Y. Through their liberality the regiment has received a new color, which for its magnificence and neatness is not, nor can it be surpassed for the exquisite workmanship of the coat of arms of the Empire State; the motto and the inscriptions of the different engagements in which the regiment participated with so much honor to itself; the Government and its many friends in the Counties of Columbia and Dutchess.
Many have fallen while serving under the old colors, whose loss we mourn. How many may fall, or be taken away by disease while serving under the new color no one can tell.
It is needless to say to any officer or enlisted man belonging to the regiment that having in view the different engagements—Port Hudson, May 27th and June 14th, 1863; Cane River, April 23d; Marksville and Mansura, May 15th and 16th, 1864, without water and under a burning sun. That it is necessary to ask that the new color will at all times be defended, and carried in battle in a manner that the donors thereof can well feel proud of.
In behalf of the ladies of the City of Hudson, I deliver to you the new color, presented by them to you. By Order of
JAMES SMITH
Col. Commanding Reg't
OFFICIAL.
Lieut. Fred. Wilkinson, Acting Adj't
Camp of the 128th N. Y. Vols.
Morganza, La., June 10, 1864.

At a special meeting of the Officers of the 128th Reg't, convened at their Camp on the 10th day of June, 1864, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, The ladies of Columbia County have generously presented this Regiment with a most magnificent color:
Resolved, That we tender our most grateful thanks to the donors for the kindness they have evinced by forwarding this valuable token of their esteem.
Resolved, That these resolutions, together with the Circular from Colonel Smith be printed in the papers of Columbia and Dutchess Counties.
Capt. THOMAS N. DAVIS,
Lieut. FRED WILKINSON,
   "     H. E. MITCHELL
Committee.

From the 128th Regiment.
The following letter from Lieut. Col. Foster, of the 128th Regiment, is worthy of careful perusal. The regiment was sent forward with high hopes and every encouragement. It has distinguished itself in the field. Let it not be deserted now when it is about to receive the wreath of honor:
CAMP 128TH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V., INFANTRY,
Headquarters, Guard to MAJ. Gen. Sheriden,
CHARLESTOWN, VA., AUGUST 20TH, 1864.
M. P. WILLIAMS, Esq., Editor Gazette:--I have the honor to address you upon the subject of recruiting for this regiment. The 128th has only received about thirty recruits since it came into the field; though owing to our mails having frequently been lost or captured by the enemy, and no account having been received of those who enlisted for it, many recruits have never been forwarded who were intended for this command.
This regiment is now less than 600 strong, a number too small to permit the muster of several meritorious officers who have held commissions for several months. On behalf of these, and the sustaining of a regiment that has done and will always do credit to the District where it was recruited, I respectfully and urgently request your efforts to forward the recruiting of men for one year from Sept. 4th next, the date of the muster in the service of this regiment.
An hundred or two recruits of a good class would greatly cheer the regiment, and would be the very best practical evidence that the friends who sent us forth are still supporting us by their efforts at home.
I have the honor to remain,
Very Respectfully, Yours,
Lt. Col. Commanding Regiment.

New Flag for the 128th.
The ladies of this County have procured a new Regimental Flag for the 128th Regiment, to take the place of the old one, which has been returned in a very dilapidated condition, showing the marks of many a hard fought battle. The old flag has never been disgraced. The brave boys in whose hands it was placed have done honor to the donors and themselves through many sieges. The ladies, dear, patriotic souls, have replaced it by one more costly and durable. It will be on exhibition at the Fair to be held in this city next week, after which it will be forwarded to the Regiment. The Secretary and Treasurer submits the following report:
REPORT OF THE SSECRETARY AND TREASURER FOR THE FLAG.
Rec'd through Mrs. Charles Stott, from the employees
in the Stottsville Factory                                                 $25 20
Mrs. Charles Stott, from south part of Stockport              19 87
Miss Jennie Lathrop, north         "             "                      11 00
Mrs. Peter Hoffman, Claverack,                                       40 00
Mrs. A. Flack,                 "                                                 25 50
Mrs. Peter S. Pulver, Mrs. John A. Bain, Copake,            41 50
Mrs. James DuBois, Greenport,                                        19 00
Mrs. Cornelius Esselstyn, "                                               14 75
Mrs. M. M. Bullock, Mrs. Rutsen Hunt, Hillsdale,           12 00
Mrs. P. W. Rockefeller, Jr., Germantown,                        13 00
Mrs. Josiah Kniskern                    "                                     3 00
Mrs. H. J. Whiting, Canaan,                                                9 80
Mrs. Suydatn, Kinderhook,                                               15 50
Miss Anna Shleden, Taghkanic,                                         7 00
Mrs. John S. Gould, Hudson,                                            11 50
Miss Nancy Morgan,                                                           8 50
                                                                                         275 62
Paid for the Regimental Flag,                                          200 00
Express on            "           "                                                    75
A. N. Webb's bill,                                                                2 81
Uncurrent bill,                                                                     1 00
Express to N. Orleans and other expenses                          5 00
                                                                                       $209.56
Leaving a balance on hand of $66 06 cents, to be appropriated to the "Soldier's Relief Association" in this city, or other towns in the county, as shall be decided upon by the donors.
Mrs. GEO. E. SEYMOUR,
Secretary and Treas.

The Hundred and Twenty-eighth and its Flag.
The 128th New York regiment, composed of men who have won lasting fame in the different campaigns of the Army of the gulf, has recently been the recipient of a new and beautiful stand of colors. The following brief sketch of the regiment and its banners will prove interesting to its hosts of friends in this city:
The 128th New York volunteer was recruited during the months of July and August, 1862, in Columbia and Dutches  [sic] counties composing the 10th Senatorial and 12th Congressional districts of the State of New York, by the gallant Colonel David S. Cowles. Before the regiment left Camp Kelly, near Hudson, the ladies of Dutchess county presented it, through Benj. E. Lossing, Esq, with a rich stars and stripes color and the ladies of Columbia, through Judge Miller, with a color of blue silk with the coat of arms and motto of the Empire state elegantly inscribed thereon. A years campaigning in Maryland and Louisiana faded and raveled them to such a degree that they were scarcely presentable on a dress parade; when according to promise to the lady friends of the regiment, they were returned, and have been replaced by duplicates more ornate and elegant than the originals. The new stars and stripes color arrived to the regiment upwards of two months ago, and has been with it through the late Red River campaign. It is made of the heaviest silk, stitched with exquisite neatness, and mounted and ornamented in the richest manner.
The color from Columbia county arrived in this city on Sunday last. We received an invitation from Col. Foster to call and see it. The color is about 8 feet square, of the richest blue silk. In the center, in perfect proportion are the beautiful arms of the State of New York, wrought in silk and chenille below the motto "Excelsior," and above is an eagle perched upon the world. Parallel with the upper edge of the color is inscribed in yellow silk, "Port Hudson, May 27th, and June 14th, 1863." The lance is of rosewood, highly polished, and upon a silver band is the following inscription: "Presented to the 128th New York State Volunteers by the ladies of Columbia county, in the place of the flag returned."
To appreciate the beauty and exquisite workmanship of this elegant color, it should be seen. As soon as practicable, it is contemplated for a lady from Dutchess and one from Columbia county to visit this regiment and to present these new colors in behalf of their sisters at the North.
The 128th still maintains its high reputation acquired under the gallant Cowles. It was among the foremost in charging upon the enemy at Monet's Bluff; and its officers hope that an order will be made that this fight also may be inscribed upon their new colors.
Mr. Webb—Sir: Will you please publish the following communications upon the reception of the New Flag by the 128th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.
Mrs. GEO. E. SEYMOUR, Sec'y.

HEADQUARTERS 128TH REG'T N. Y. S. V. THIRD BRIGADE, 2D DIVISION, 19TH A. C. MORGANZA, LA., June 6, 1864.
——: The new Flag came duly to hand by Sergeant Milo P. Moore. I can assure you that it is much admired, and we all feel proud of it—at the same time many compliments are paid to the donors thereof, for the taste displayed. Many have come from other regiments to look at it, and all agree that it is the most beautiful flag in this Department.
The Flag was properly presented to the Regiment in whose behalf, as well as my own, permit me to thank you and all the Ladies who interested themselves to procure it.
In conclusion allow me to add that all can rest assured that it will never be disgraced; that it will be carried and defended by the. Regiment upon all occasions in a manner that the donors thereof never need be ashamed that it was presented by them to the 128th Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. I have the honor to be
Very Respectfully &c.,
JAMES SMITH,
Col. Comd'g 128th Reg't N. Y. V.
HEADQUARTERS 128TH REG'T N. Y. S. V.
THIRD BRIGADE, 2D DIVISION, 19TH A. C.
MORGANZA, LA., JUNE 6, 1864.
To the Officers and, Men of the 128th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.:
It is with feelings of pride and gratification that the Colonel Commanding announces officially that a new Color has been received, intended as a gift from the ladies of Columbia County, New York.
Through their liberality the Regiment has received a new Flag, that for its magnificence and neatness is not, nor can it be surpassed for the exquisite workmanship of the coat of arms of the Empire State. The motto, and the inscriptions of the different engagements in which the Regiment participated with so much honor to itself, the Government, and its many friends in the Counties of Columbia and Dutchess.
Many have fallen under the old Colors, whose loss we mourn. How many may fall or be taken away by disease while serving under the new Color, no one can tell. It is needless to say to any officer or enlisted man belonging to the Regiment, that having in view the different engagements, Port Hudson, May 27th and June 14th, 1863; Cane River, April 22d; Marksville and Mansura, May l5th and 16th, 1864, without water and under a burning sun, that it is necessary to ask that the new Colors will at all times be defended and carried in battle, in a manner that the donors thereof well be proud of. In behalf of the Ladies of Columbia County, I deliver to you the new Color presented by them to the Regiment.
By Order of
JAMES SMITH,
Col. Commanding Reg't.

Colors of the 128th Regiment.
The New Orleans Era of a recent date contains the following notice of the 128th Regiment and its colors:
"The 128th New York Regiment, composed of men who have won lasting fame in the different campaigns of the Army of the Gulf, has recently been the recipient of a new and beautiful stand of colors. The following brief sketch of the Regiment and its banners will prove interesting to its hosts of friends in this city:
The 128th New York volunteers was recruited during the months of July and August, 1862, in Columbia and Dutchess counties—composing the 10th Senatorial and 12th Congressional districts of the State of New York—by its late gallant Colonel, David S. Cowles. Before the Regiment left Camp Kelly, near Hudson, the ladies of Dutchess county presented it, through Benj. F. Lossing, Esq., with a rich stars and stripes color, and the ladies of Columbia, through Judge Miller, with a color of blue silk, with the coat of arms and motto of the Empire State elegantly inscribed thereon. A year's campaigning in Maryland and Louisiana faded and raveled them to such a degree that they were scarcely presentable in dress parade; when, according to promise to the lady friends of the Regiment, they were returned, and have been replaced by duplicates more ornate and elegant than the originals. The new stars and stripes color arrived to the Regiment upwards of two months ago, and has been with it through the late Red River campaign. It is made of the heaviest silk, stitched with exquisite neatness, and mounted and ornamented in the richest manner.
"The color from Columbia county arrived in this city on Sunday last. To appreciate the beauty and exquisite workmanship of this elegant color, it should be seen.
"The 128th still maintains its high reputation acquired under the gallant Cowles. It was among the foremost in charging upon the enemy at Monet's Bluff; and its officers hope that an order will be made that this fight also may be inscribed upon their new colors."
The following communications have been received from Colonel Smith, acknowledging the safe arrival of the flag:
HEADQUARTERS 128TH REG'T N. Y. S. V.
MORGANZA, LA., June 6, 1864.
LADIES—The new Flag came duly to hand. I can assure you that it is much admired, and we all feel proud of it—at the same time many compliments are paid to the donors thereof, for the taste displayed. Many have come from other regiments to look at it, and all agree that it is the most beautiful flag in this Department.
The Flag was properly presented to the Regiment, in whose behalf, as well as my own, permit me to thank you and all the Ladies who interested themselves to procure it.
In conclusion allow me to add that all can rest assured that it will never be disgraced; that it will be carried and defended by the Regiment upon all occasions, in a manner that the donors thereof never need be ashamed that it was presented by them to the 128th Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. I have the honor to be
Very Respectfully &c.,
JAMES SMITH,
Col. Comd'g 128th Reg't N. Y. S. V.
HEADQUARTERS 128TH REG'T N. Y. S. V.
MORGANZA, LA., June 6, 1864.
To the Officers and Men of the 1128th Regiment:
It is with feelings of pride and gratification that the Colonel Commanding announces officially that a new Color has been received, intended as a gift from the Ladies of Columbia County, New York.
Through their liberality the Regiment has received a new Flag, that for its magnificence and neatness is not, nor can be surpassed for the exquisite workmanship of the coat of arms of the Empire State, the motto, and the inscriptions of the different engagements in which the Regiment participated with so much honor to itself, the Government, and its many friends in the Counties of Columbia and Dutchess.
Many have fallen under the old Colors, whose loss we mourn. How many may fall or be taken away by disease while serving under the new Color, no one can tell. It is needless to say to any officer or enlisted man belonging to the Regiment, that having in view the different engagements, Port Hudson, May 27th and June 14th, 1863; Cane River, April 22d; Marksville and Mansura, May 15th and 16rh, 1864, without water and under a burning sun, that it is necessary to ask that the new Colors will at all times be defended and carried in battle, in a manner that the donors thereof can well be proud of. In behalf of the Ladies of Columbia County, I deliver to you the new Color presented by them to the Regiment.
By Order of
JAMES SMITH,
Col. Commanding Reg't.

FLAG RAISING OF THE 128TH NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—From the Baton Rouge (La.) Gazette and Comet of the 13th February, we copy the following:
"We had the pleasure on the afternoon of the 3d inst. of being present on the occasion of raising the stars and stripes over the camp of the 128th regiment N. Y. V. The weather was delightful, and the assembly—for the most part military—was larger than we have seen at similar festivities for a long time. Among the invited guests we noticed most of the military and civil officials at this post. Fair ladies also honored the scene with their presence and smiles.
"The 128th, at the opening of the exercises, were drawn up in column by division directly in front of the speaker's stand. This was the fourth time since their entering the service that they had assembled on like occasions to raise this same flag, which is of good proportion and fine workmanship, and the gift of a gentleman of wealth and patriotism, of the Empire State. The pole from which this flag is to float was prepared and successfully raised by members of the regiment; and from its height—over 100 feet—and symmetry attracted universal admiration.
"The opening prayer was made by the Rev. Mr. Birge, Chaplain of this post, followed by Major Keese, of the 128th—president of the day—who made a brief but eloquent address. After the remarks of the gallant Major, which were listened to with pleasure and frequently applauded, the Rev. Mr. Sumner, Chaplain 22d Ky., took the stand and delivered an able and eloquent address. Next followed the ceremony of raising the flag, which was successfully accomplished mid music by the band and the wild huzzas of the soldiers. Thus closed the literary entertainment, but in their liberality the officers of the 128th had not forgotten the creature comforts of man. A fine collation had been provided in the adjutant's tent to which a cordial invitation was extended to all. The colonel, (James Smith) determined not to be out done by the subordinate officers of his command, had spread in his own tent a beautiful repast, to which most of the officers present did honor. On the whole, we can say the affair was a complete success, and Colonel Smith can well congratulate himself in having so successfully entertained for an afternoon so large a concourse of soldiers and citizens. When next the 128th raise their flag over some new camp, may we be present."

Returning Regiment.
THE ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT arrived this morning. The regiment was recruited in Dutchess and Columbia counties, rendezvoused at Hudson in 1862, and was mustered in on the 4th of September of that year. It served in Louisiana under General Banks, was in the charges at Port Hudson, where Colonel Cowles was killed, and was detailed as one of the regiments to receive the surrender of the place. The regiment was in the Red River expedition, after which it returned to New Orleans, and was sent to Shenandoah Valley, where it served under Sheridan, participating in the battles of Winchester, Cedar Hill, &c. At the former engagement, Lieutenant-Colonel Keese and Major Robert Wilkinson were so severely wounded that they were not able to serve with the regiment in its subsequent campaigns. From the Valley it went to Savannah, where it joined Sherman and went with him through the Carolinas to Raleigh. From thence it went to Morehead City and back to Savannah; thence to Augusta, which it garrisoned about six weeks, when it returned to Savannah, was mustered out, and sent here to be paid off. It will remain at the Barracks. The regiment went out 1040 strong and returns with 500 men. It has received quite a number of recruits.
The following are the officers:—
Captain—T. M. Davis, commanding; went out as First Lieutenant.
Adjutant—Ambrose B. Hart; went out a Corporal.
Surgeon—J. Mortimer Crawe.
Assistant Surgeon—Wm. H. B. Post.
Co. A—Lieutenant Crafts, commanding; went out as Corporal.
Co. B—Captain Pierce; went out as Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant White; went out as private.
Co. C—Lieutenant Hager; went out as Sergeant. Second Lieutenant Asher; went out as Sergeant.
Co. D—Lieutenant Armstrong; went out as Orderly Sergeant.
Co. E—Lieutenant Keese; went out as Orderly Sergeant.
Co. F—Captain Anderson; went out as First Lieutenant. First Lieutenant Van Tine; went out as Sergeant.
Co. G—Captain Mitchell; went out as Sergeant. Lieutenant Morell; went out as private.
Co. H—Captain Sinderbox; went out as First Lieutenant. First Lieutenant Benson; went out as Sergeant.
Co. I—Captain Wilkinson; went out as First Lieutenant. First Lieutenant Schouten; went out as private.
Co. K—First Lieutenant Speed; went out as private.

THE RETURNING REGIMENTS.
Arrival of the 128th and 157th Regiments.
—The 128th and 157th Regiments, N. Y. S. V., arrived here yesterday morning, and were properly received and entertained by the Citizen's Committee. The 128th was recruited in Dutchess and Columbia counties, and was mustered into service Sept. 4th, 1862. It went out 1,040 strong, and returned with 500 men. It served in Louisiana, was in the charges at Port Hudson, took part in the Red River expedition, and was afterwards sent to the Shenandoah Valley, participating in several battles under Sheridan. From the Valley it went to Savannah and joined Sherman's army. From thence it went to Morehead City and back to Savannah; thence to Augusta, which it garrisoned about six weeks, when it returned to Savannah, was mustered out, and sent here to be paid off. It will remain at the Barracks.
The following are the officers:
Captain T. M. Davis, commanding.
Adjutant—Ambrose B. Hart.
Surgeon—J. Mortimer Craive.
Assistant Surgeon—Wm. H. B. Post.
Captains—Pierce, Anderson, Mitchell, Sincerbox and Wilkinson.
Lieutenants—Crafts, Hager, White, Asher, Armstrong, Keese, Van Tine, Morrell, Benson, Schouten and Speed.
The 157th was recruited in Cortland and Madison counties, and was mustered into service Sept. 19, 1862. It went into the field l,040 strong, and returns with 420 men. It left 160 recruits in the field, consolidated in the 54th Regiment. It participated in the battles of Gettysburg and Chancellorsville.
The regiment was subsequently sent to the Department of the South, where it has served in Folly Island, siege of Fort Wagner, John's Island, &c. It distinguished itself in what was one of the last engagements of the war, viz.: Sumterville, where it charged through a swamp and brought off two pieces of artillery and a Rebel flag.
The following are the officers:
Lieut. Colonel—James C. Carmichael.
Major—Frank Place.
Adjutant—Chas. A. Baldwin.
Acting Adjutant—Lieut. C. H. Paddock.
Surgeon—H. C. Hendrick.
Assistant Surgeon—B. R. Holcomb.
Acting Quartermaster—Lieut. C. Pierce.
Chaplain—C. H. Seymour.
Captains—C. Burlingame, C. H. Van Slyke, W. H. Saxton, George L. Warren, G. S. Van Hoesen, D. G. Briggs, T. E. Yates.
Lieutenants—W. H. Morgan, F. Banjamin, R. W. Bourne, D. T, Jones, J. F. Wright, C. M. Palmer, Jerome Forbes, John Campbell, H. P. Minor.
The regiment went west yesterday forenoon.

THE REPUBLICAN.
City and Country Intelligence.
TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1865.
Welcome Home!
The 128th Regiment reached Albany on Friday morning last, and went into barracks on the Troy road, preparatory to being paid off and discharged. During the day a number of the officers and men from this city procured temporary leave and visited home where they were warmly welcomed.
Our citizens immediately took steps to tender the regiment a befitting reception. An interview was had with Maj. Wilkinson, who kindly seconded the efforts to have the regiment paid off at Hudson, and on Saturday obtained the consent of the Paymaster to the arrangement. It was proposed to have a general turnout of our Fire Department and citizens, an address and dinner at the City Hall, &c., as soon as the soldiers should arrive. At noon yesterday however the following dispatch was received by a member of the committee:
ALBANY, July 24, 1865.
It will be impossible for the 128th to come to Hudson.
(Signed) R. F. WILKINSON.
This, we are sorry to say, deprives us of the pleasure of paying our tribute to the entire Regiment, but it need not deter our citizens from welcoming our own soldiers back in a liberal and enthusiastic manner. They will doubtless paid off and discharged to-day or tomorrow—let us be prepared to do them honor on their return wither by company, squads or individuals.
In the barracks officers and men are subjected to a strict surveillance, in consequence of a recent special order from the War Department requiring officers to "stay constantly with their men" until paid off, so as to prevent delay, &c. The accommodations at the barracks are by no means so "salubrious" as to attract our men one moment beyond the time necessary for settling their accounts with the government. They are not at all in love with the place, and will be glad to get away and breathe once more the atmosphere of home.

"Are they coming? Tell—Oh! tell me!
Are our brave boys coming home?
Shall we soon in rapture greet them?
Are they truly free to come?
Are their weary marches ended?
Is their lonely exile o'er?
Will their browned and radiant faces
Brighten lonely homes once more,
Tell me! Is the struggle over?
Is the last proud victory won?
Is the booming cannon silenced?
Are the traitorous ... one?
Is the sword now sheathed forever?
Is our banner waving bright,
Over all our glorious country?
Are we saved from sorrow's night?
They tell me they are coming!
From the gory battle-field
They are returning to our hearth-stone,
Never more the sword to wield.
They are coming! Hark—I hear them!
Hear the hurrying tramp of feet,
See their noble radiant faces,
Eager for the loved to greet.
They are coming—surely coming!
Hear the echoing marshal tread,
They’re returning from the Southland
But they leave behind—our dead!
They are coming from the conflict,
Proudly wearing battle scars,
They are bearing home our banner,
Bringing back the stripes and stars.
See how proudly it is waving,
Battle-smoked though it may be,
Never a more glorious banner
Floated over land or sea.
Yes, I see them—they are coming,
Coming from the field and camp;
Ah! and many wan and dying,
Come from out the prisons damp.
Yes—they're coming—some are coming,
Others we shall see no more
Till these transient glories faded,
These life battles all are o'er.
But they see victorious comrades,
Leaving now the vanquished foe,
And rejoice with songs of gladness,
Songs that only angels know.
They are coming—Yes they're coming,
Soon they'll mingle with us here!
Hear the joyful shouts of triumph—
As they hear our welcoming cheer,
Welcome—welcome! gallant soldiers!
Welcome! brothers brave and true!
Long we've waited for your coming,
We have greetings glad for you."

The One Hundred and Twenty-Eighth.
ITS RETURN HOME.
A Brief History of the Regiment from its Organization.
As our brave boys of the 128th return to us, it is but just that we should turn for a moment to the history of that noble Regiment which, as it was the first to go out from us, is now first to return, thinning in numbers, but radiant with the glory of its deeds. We regret that our facilities for obtaining information are so limited that the brief sketch now proposed, will necessarily afford but an imperfect record from which to estimate the services of the soldiers whose return we welcome.
The 128th Regiment was raised during the months of July and August, 1862, in Dutchess and Columbia Counties (the former having the majority) and was mustered into the U. S. service in the Fair Grounds in this city on the 4th day if September. On the 5th it embarked, one thousand strong, under command of Col. DAVID S. COWLES, on board the steamer Oregon for New York, destined to Baltimore. At 5 o'clock P. M. on the 7th it reached Baltimore and bivouaced on Stewart's Hill, where arms and ammunition were supplied and the regiment soon went into camp.
The first active duty required of the Regiment was October 11th during the excitement caused by the raid of the rebel Gen. Stewart into Pennsylvania. With several other regiments then under command of Maj. Gen. Wool the 128th went to Gettysburgh [sic] where, upon a report that the enemy were advancing their first line of battle was formed, and the boys stood ready to face Gen. Stewart "or any other man" who chose to venture on northern soil. But the time had not come for the hills of Gettysburg to become historic ground. On learning of the position of affairs there, Stewart abandoned his raid in that direction and retired across the Potomac.
The 128th returned to its camp and remained there without incident to note until November 5th, when orders were received to embark on the steamer Arago, which was to form a part of Gen. Banks' famous expedition to New Orleans. For about a month they were delayed alternately on board the vessel and on shore in the vicinity of Fortress Monroe, and during that time much suffering was experienced from the confinement and ill provisions supplied. The superior officers in command of this portion of the expedition appear to have been but poorly qualified to have the care of so many soldiers. There was considerable sickness among the men, and much alarm was felt by our citizens at the time.
On the 4th of December the expedition set sail. On the 13th the 128th landed at Ship Island, Miss. The following day they proceed to Quarantine Station, and were detained there until January 5th, having been permitted however to disembark and occupy a vacant store house. On that day they were removed
by steamer to a point about three miles below New Orleans, known as "Camp Chalmette," one of Jackson's battle fields in 1815. The stay here was disagreeable. The weather was cold and rainy, and the ground became so soft that it was barely possible to go from one tent to another. It was not until February 3d that an order came to leave this uncomfortable spot, and the boys were glad enough to get away from it. The next stopping place (for the Regiment up to this time seem to have been kept on a kind of hopping movement,) was Camp Parapet, not many miles distant. Here they remained, with nothing but guard duty and daily drill to vary the monotony until April 18. At this time an expedition was projected by some of the Brigadiers across Lake Pontchertrain to Fort Pike and thence to Gainesville, on the Pearl River, and the 128th selected to carry it into execution. Col. COWLES entered into it with great spirit, and had the satisfaction of returning on the 22d without the loss of a man, although he had captured a large amount of property, consisting of one steamboat, 222 lbs raisins, 164 bbls tar, 10 bales cotton, &c, besides gaining information of far more value than the property. This was about the first active service rendered by the Regiment, and the boys were highly complimented by Sherman (then Brigadier) for the efficency [sic] and gallantry displayed.
On the 12th of May another expedition was formed and the 128th with the 6th Mich. Volunteers, all under command of Col. Clark, if the latter, proceeded to Pontchatoula, from which the enemy retired and the place was occupied by our men until the 19th, when they returned to camp Parapet.
The siege of Port Hudson by Gen. Banks, which was one of the leading objects of the expedition, had now commenced, and on the 20th of May the brigade in which the 128th was under command Brig. Gen. Neal Dow, embarked on transports to join the main army. They landed on the 22d about five miles below Port Hudson, and on the following day moved forward, and were among the first to take possession of some of the outer works, from which the enemy withdrew to their principal fortifications.
On the 26th of May Capt. Edward Gifford (afterwards promoted to Major,) was taken prisoner while in command of a detachment to burn some buildings along and within the lines of the enemy. For fear that the work had not been thoroughly done, he went alone to look after it, and seeing some troops hailed them. An answer was returned designating one of our regiments, and upon going to them he found himself a prisoner. The story of his suffering in the rebel prison until his escape on the glorious 4th of July has been told at length in our paper. The brave spirit chafed within the prison walls, and when the memorable anniversary of his country's independence came he walked forth at the hazard of his life and struck for freedom in the rapid current of the Mississippi, where he barely escaped death by drowning. He reached his comrades again, but the privations he had undergone, and the almost superhuman efforts out forth to regain his liberty, proved too much for his body, and he went in hospital at New Orleans, where he died on the 8th of August. A proper tribute of respect was paid by the Regiment, and on the return of his remains to this city, they were buried with military honors.
On the 27th of May that memorable and desperate assault was made upon the works of Port Hudson, on which the gallant Col. COWLES received his mortal wound—day long to be remembered in the annals of Columbia County. Gen. Sherman and Neal Dow were also wounded. Twenty men of the Regiment were killed by the murderous shot of the garrison against whose strong entrenchments they were contending. It was a desperate attempt to achieve a (then) impossibility and failed. Among the killed was brave Sergt. Van Slyck, of Kinderhook, who had both legs shot off, and continued to fire at the enemy until another shot struck him in the breast! Also Myron Poucher, of Claverack, and David Plumb, of Hudson.
An incident occurred at this assault which we believe has never before been made public, but which shows what kind of pluck the 128th was made of. The 6th Mich. regiment, next to which the 128th was engaged lost its colors and abandoned them to the enemy. All the color bearers had been shot down in the attempt to hold or recover them. At this moment Corp. Wm. Platto, of Co. D. 128th, seeing the predicament, ran forward amidst a storm of bullets at the imminent peril of his life, seized the flag and bore it back in triumph, afterwards restoring it to the owners! He was subsequently promoted to a Lieutenancy in the Corps d'Afrique.
Col. Cowles, who succeeded Sherman on the field, fell early in the day, pierced by a musket ball, and died in half an hour with these words upon his tongue—"Tell my mother I died with my face to the enemy. His remains were brought home and interred with imposing solemnity on Monday, June 15, 1863. The funeral cortege was composed of delegations from the Masonic order of eleven different adjoining towns, the Fire Department, Col. Wright and staff of the 21st Regiment, Members of the Bar, Claverack Cadets, &c. An appropriate eulogy was delivered by I. H. Reynolds, Esq., and a funeral discourse by Rev. W. S. Leavitt. The place of interment was the plot of ground just previously appropriated by the Common Council for the burial of those who should fall in the service of their country. The memory of this gallant and patriotic officer will ever be cherished by the people of Columbia County.
The whole brigade fell back after this re-pulse, and, still within reach of the enemy's shells, waited until June 14, when another advance was attempted at the left, with a very similar result. A charge was made by skirmishers though a deep ravine almost impassable by felled trees and commanded by the enemy's cannon and sharp shooters. One battery was also placed so as to keep up a raking fire upon our men, while engaged in this desperate and hazardous undertaking. The 128th was ordered to hold its position just in rear of the skirmish line, which it did. Soon after a general order was issued calling for a storming party of a thousand men to make a final assault upon the works of Port Hudson. The commanding officer said, "Let them come forward! Officers who lead the column of victory may be assured of the just recognition of their services by promotion, and every officer and soldier who shares its perils and glory shall receive a medal to commemorate the first grand success of the campaign of 1863, for the freedom of the Mississippi, and his name placed in general orders upon the roll of honor." A large number from the 128th, (which was then in command of Capt F. S. Keese,) immediately volunteered in this "forlorn hope," and joined the column, where they remained until the surrender. It is said that the men were then ordered to return to their respective regimens without thanks or compliment of any kind.
The 128th was selected, on account of its good conduct in all these engagements, as one of the regiments to march into and occupy the fortifications. They remained there but two days and were then transfered [sic] to another brigade and proceeded to Baton Rouge. The regiment was kept here on garrison duty, varied only by two or three expeditions down the river, without finding any enemy to fight. They were encamped on a sugar plantation and enjoyed very good health.
The regiment remained at Baton Rouge until March 23d, 1865, when the Red River campaign opened and it joined the advance of Banks' division at Alexandria. Gen. Grover's division, to which the 128th was attached, remained here while the rest of the army proceeded to Shreeveport [sic] and fought the battles of Pleasant Hill and Mansfield, rejoining the main army at Grand Ecore. On the 20th of April this place was evacuated and the army fell back towards Alexandria. The battle of Cane River was fought at this time, and the 128th distinguished itself by making a decisive charge at a critical stage of the engagement, routing the enemy and capturing one officer and thirty men. Lt. Col. Jas. Smith led the regiment in this charge and was complimented by Generals Birge and Grover on the skill and bravery displayed by officers and men. The losses were one killed and eleven wounded.
The army reached and remained at Alexandria until the gunboats were safely floated over the dam constructed for that purpose by our engineers. While here the brigade to which the 128th was attached was ordered to advance the picket line, and drove the enemy's pickets back about one mile, capturing several prisoners.
Alexandria was evacuated May 11, Grover's division in the advance. On the 16th and 17th the battle of Mausura Plains was fought, chiefly with artillery, and on the 22d the army reached the Mississippi river. On the 27th three brigades, including the 128th, returned to the Atchafalaya river to guard against a flank movement of the enemy, and after several day's skirmishing proceeded to Morganza, where they remained till July 3d. During the month of June an expedition was made to Fort Adams on the Mississippi, to look after a blockade attempted by the rebels, who retired without a fight.
On the 3d of July the regiment embarked on board the steamer City of Memphis and proceeded to Algiers, opposite New Orleans, where it encamped till the 20th. On that day it re-embarked on the Daniel Webster, sailing under sealed orders, and arrived at Washington July 29th. The day following proceeded to Monocacy Junction where the different regiments composing the 19th corps were reunited and moved immediately to  Halltown, near Harper's Ferry. Here Gen. Sheridan with his cavalry from City Point, assumed command of the army of the Middle Military Division, to which the 19th corps was now attached.
On the 10th of August Sheridan advanced against Early, then encamped at Winchester. Then followed the battles of Halltown, Berryville, Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, in all which the 128th was conspicuously engaged.
At the three engagements of Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, between the 19th of Sept. and the 19th of August, the regiment lost two hundred in killed, wounded and prisoners.
At the battle of Winchester five officers and sixty men were killed and wounded, among whom was Maj. (now Lieut. Col. S. F. Keese, who was severely wounded.
At the battle of Cedar Creek, Maj. Wilkinson, then Capt. and Judge Advocate on Gen. Emory's staff, was wounded by a shot through the lung while attempting to save the guns of a battery from capture. From this wound he has not yet fully recovered. In short the regiment shared nobly in the perils and glory of that day when Sheridan won such imperishable renown.
At the battle of Fisher's Hill, the regiment being deployed as skirmishers, drove the enemy from a hill in front of the position with such impetuous gallantry as to win the applause of all their comrades who witnessed it, and elicit compliments from Generals Sheridan, Emory and Grover.
In the month of August Sheridan requested Gen. Emory to detail one of his best regiments for headquarters guard. The latter directed Gen. Grover, commanding the 2d division, to comply with the order, and he designated the 128th by name from the twenty two regiments of his division for that purpose. It was kept on this duty until the army fell back to Harper's Ferry.
At the close of Sheridan's valley campaign the 128th was one of the regiments chosen to garrison Winchester, where it remained until the 6th of January last, when the whole division was ordered to Baltimore and thence to Savannah by transports.
On the 5th of March two brigades, including the 128th, left Savannah for New Bern, N. C. to assist in opening a base of supplies for Sherman's army. Immediately on arriving there the 128th was detailed by Gen. Schofield, commanding the department of N. C. to repair the road connecting Newburn [sic] with Kinston. This labor occupied about three weeks, during which the "boys" became familiar with the use of the ax and spade as well as the musket.
The regiment returned to Savannah on the 4th of May and soon after marched to Augusta, where it was engaged in garrison and provost duty when the order came to return to Savannah, where it was formally mustered out of service dating from the 12th of July.
On the 16th inst., in embarked on board the steamer Charles Thomas for New York, reaching there on the morning of the 20th. In the afternoon the regiment was transferred to the steamer Commodore, without leaving the pier, and reached Albany early on the following morning. Breakfast was furnished at the hotels for the whole regiment through the liberality of the city relief society and the men then went into the barracks on the Troy road.
Immediately on arriving there the muster and pay rolls were turned over to the mustering officer of the State, Col. Townsend, and thence sent to the Paymaster of the post.
While at New York the men were regaled with a quantity of watermelons, whortle berries and apples, through the kindness of Col. Collier, State agent.
The Regiment has inscribed on its flag (an elegant new one drawn from the service) twenty battles as follows:
PUNCHATILLA,
PORT HUDSON, MAY 27, AND JUNE 14, 1863.
CANE RIVER, ALEXANDRIA,
ATMCHAANFSAOLRAAY, A, HALLTOWN, BERRYVILLE,
WINCHESTER, FISHER'S HILL,
CEDAR CREEK.
The beautiful regimental flag presented by the ladies of Colombia County is preserved.
The present roster of the Regiment is as follows:
Field and Staff—Capt. Thos. N. Davis in command.
Surgeon, J. M. Crawe; Asst. Surgeon W. H. B. Post; Adjutant, A. B. Hart; Quartermaster, S. H. Mase.
Line Officers—Co. A, Lieut. R. W. Kraft; Co. B, Capt. J. S. Pierce, Lieut. R. A. Whte; Co. C, 1st Lieut. J. H. Hager, 2d Lieut. J. H. Asher; Co. D, Lieut. J. Armstrong, Co. E, Capt. G. T. White, Co. F, Capt. C. R. Anderson, Lieut. C. Van Tine; Co. G, Capt. H. E. Mitchell, Lieut. G. Murell; Co. H, Capt. H. H. Sincerbox, Lieut. C. S. Keyes, Lieut. B. T. Benson; Co. I, Lieut. J. Schouten; Co. K, Lieut. B. Speed. 

The regiment returns with exactly four hundred of the original 960 men, and 173 added by recruits. The loss by desertions has been far less than the average of N. Y. regiments, being less than 50, while some have lost as many as 200.
For the past two years the health of the men has been uniformly good until during the past month. There are at present, we regret to say, some twenty cases of chills and intermittent fever, attributable, no doubt to the unwholesome climate and impure water of Savannah. The surgeon of the regiment, Dr. J. Mortimer Crawe, appears to be more popular than some of his predecessors.
Such is the history, in brief, of the gallant soldiers who return to us to-day, after nearly three years in faithful service. They have always been found ready for any duty, and in several instances have been selected by general officers for especially hazardous enterprises, or duties requiring peculiar intelligence and capacity to perform.
In the name of our common country, whome [sic] cause they have so nobly defended; in the name of Columbia County whose honor they have maintained in the field of battle,—let them be welcomed, thrice welcomed back to their homes, their families and to the enduring hospitality of our citizens.
We are indebted to Maj. Wilkinson and Adj. Hart for courtesies extended, and especially to the latter for valuable assistance in preparing this sketch. It has been if course impossible to do exact justice in this brief review, and many names equally deserving of mention will appear when the full history of the Regiment shall be written.

The Newburgh Times.
R. H. BLOOMER & SON.
The 128th Regiment N. Y. S. V.
RECEPTION OF COS. F AND H AT FISHKILL.
Yesterday was a great day with our over-the-river neighbors. The preparations made to receive Co. F, Captain Anderson, 1st Lieut. Charles Van Tine, and Co. H, Captain Sincerbox, 1sr Lieut. Benj. T. Benson, of the 128th Regiment, was on a grand and imposing scale, and did our neighbors great credit. The 128th was recruited in Columbia and Dutchess Counties, and rendezvoused at the City of Hudson. The Regiment was first commanded by Col. Cowles and was immediately sent to New Orleans, where it shared in many of the important events that occurred upon the Mississippi and Red Rivers. At the engagement at Port Hudson its Colonel was killed. The Regiment returned, and participated in the battles of Windsor, Cedar Hill, &c., under Gen. Sheridan. From the Shenandoah Valley it was sent to reinforce Gen. Sherman by way of Savannah; joining him they proceeded as far as Raleigh, N. C., but soon returned back, doing garrison duty at several of the large cities on the route just past. They left Savannah on the 16th inst., embarked on board the Steamer Charles Thomas, proceeded on their way to New York, thence to Albany without stopping, to be mustered out and paid off, the companies dispersing to their various homes to receive a welcome worthy of their noble deeds. The people of Fishkill Landing and Matteawan entered into the matter with a hearty will, and gave the "brave soldier boys" a most cheering welcome. The companies, F and H, arrived at Fishkill Landing on the 2:17 train. The citizens turned out en masse, and a procession was formed composed of military, returned veterans, civic societies and horsemen. By Half-past two the line was in marching order. First came the carriages containing the committee, municipal officers, speakers, and invited guests. Two carriages were appropriated to the press—there were twelve carriages in all in the procession. Then followed Captain John S. Scofield, Grand Marshal of the Day, assisted by six aids: R. L. Carpenter, Capt. Arthur DeWint, Clark Peck, Walter Brett, Capt. Adolphus Vandewater, and Sidney Scofield. Then came the citizens on horseback—then Eastman's College Band, giving forth beautiful strains of music, then Col. Wright and staff—fine soldierly men—then the Denning Guards, of Fishkill—and Ellsworth Greys, of Poughkeepsie, fresh out of bloodless carnage—then came the returned veterans under command of Capt. Augustus Mowatt, turning out some sixty muskets, were a marked feature of the procession; but the observed of all observers were the returned soldiers of the 128th, whose battle scarred flag told plainly of the ordeal through which they had passed; they were greeted with cheer upon cheer—and a great fluttering of handkerchiefs. The
Newburgh Band, discoursing some lively airs of genuine martial music, led the second division, consisting of Freemasons, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Fire Department, all of which bedecked with the height of embellishments, and adding much to the interest of the occasion.
The line of march was a long one, and the extensive preparations made along the whole distance, through the several streets of Fishkill Landing and Matteawan, was like a grand ovation; and drew away all thoughts of weariness; wreaths, mottoes and banners of welcome, with hundreds of different inscriptions upon them, were seen upon every hand; young ladies dressed in their prettiest and smiling their sweetest, thronged the wayside and proved that Fishkill and Matteawan were great on girls. The reporters were uneasy, as they passed in front of the array of beauty and loveliness; handkerchiefs and '''notebooks" flew carelessly about, and it was feared at one time that we would all surrender, but the provoking driver would wag his jaw, in making his droll observations, succeeding thereby in lifting us out of a queer quandary; we are indebted to him for some very pretty names whose owners are very fair to look upon. The Journal man has signified his intention of sending his card around.
One notable feature in the line of march was the numerous Sabbath Schools out in full holiday trim, that of the Ref. Dutch Church under their Superintendent, Capt. Brett, deserve notice as they gave the returned soldiers a handsome reception in a pretty song composed by one of their members. It was well done. The procession at last reached the stand, near the tent, situated on the Fishkill Landing and Matteawan road, when the exercises commenced by prayer by the Rev. Mr. Heroy of West Point; the address was delivered by Rev. Joseph Kimball, of the Reformed Dutch Church, of Fishkill Landing. It was solid and plain, and eloquently delivered, and for an extemporary effort, was well worthy of the occasion. The Reverend gentleman was frequently applauded. The exercises were interspersed with music from Eastman's Band and the booming of cannon.
At the close of the exercises the soldiers and invited guests repaired to the tent where was a bountiful collation spread upon tables with seats. Eastman's Band discoursed some excellent music—by the way we might say the two drummer boys who accompanied this Band are some on a drum as well as on a field of conflict; one served a conspicious [sic] part in the fall of Fort Donelson and the other made a wide world reputation in the assault upon Fredericksburgh [sic], an extended account of which appeared in the New
York daily papers. He uses a handsome drum, with a large silver plate bearing the inscription of the noble deed, presented by his numerous friends, who witnessed it. The ladies were very active, and all attention was given to the returning soldiers. The reporters, however, came in for a good share of their attention. A young miss, who is given to using high adjectives, came near capturing the Press reporter and would have taken the Eagle man by storm, had he not been under our own immediate supervision. A large number of the City fathers and other distinguished men of Poughkeepsie were on hand, and added considerable to the enjoyment of the reporters and others. After eating, drinking and merry-making generally, the crowd dispersed to their several homes, highly pleased with the day's reception, which was carried out without a disappointment to any. The representatives
of the press then proceeded to the Mary Powell on this side of the river, to bid adieu to Davies, of the Daily Eagle and Osborn of the Daily Press and their Poughkeepsie friends. We are under many obligations to Mr. James Mackin, President of the Committee of Arrangements, and Mr. J. W. Spaight, of the Fishkill Standard, and others, whose names do not occur to mind, for kind courtesies and attention.

HUDSON GAZETTE EXTRA.
COMPLETE LIST.
OFFICERS AND PRIVATES OF THE
ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT REVISED BY THE WAR COMMITTEE.
One Hundreth [sic] Twenty-Eighth Regiment.
GAZETTE OFFICE,
September 20th, 1862.
This fine Regiment, under command of Col. DAVID S. COWLES, left Camp Kelly, Hudson, for the seat of war, on Friday afternoon, September
5th, 1862, with full ranks, and completely equipped.
Through the courtesy of the Regimental and line officers, and the assistance of the War Committee, we are enabled to present this accurate list of the names and residence of the persons composing the Regiment, to whose friends we respectfully dedicate it:

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.
Colonel.—DAVID S. COWLES, Hudson.
Lt. Colonel—JAMES SMITH, (in the field.)
Major.—JAMES P. FOSTER, Hudson.
Adjutant.—A. ASHLEY, Jr., Chatham.
Quartermaster.—ALEX. ANNAN, Fishkill.
Surgeon.—PALMER C. COLE, New York.
1st Assistant Surgeon.—C. H. ANDRUS, Po'keepsie.
2nd      "            "        —D. P. VAN VLECK, Kind'hk.
Chaplain.—Rev. JOHN PARKER, Hudson.

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF.
Sergeant Major.—S. H. BRADY, Hudson.
Commissary Sergeant.—E. AUG. BRETT, Fishkill.
Quartermaster's Sergeant.—GEO. S. DRAKE, Amenia.
Ordinance Sergeant.—JOHN MATHERS, Jr., Mattewan
Color Sergeant.—JAMES M. BRALEY, Rhinebeck.
Hospital Steward.—JOHN E. SCHUYLER, Hudson.
Surgeon Orderly.—JACOB CARL, Hudson.
Sutler—JOSEPH WILD, Stockport.

COMPANY A.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain.—EDWARD GIFFORD, Hudson.
1st Lieutenant.—GRANVILLE P. HAWES, Hudson.
2d       "          —JOHN V. WHITBECK.
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant.—Augustus U. Bradbury, Hudson.
2d Sergeant.—John C. Delemater, Hudson.
3rd     "       —Freeman Skinner, Hudson.
4th     "       —Lewis B. Fairbanks, Hudson.
5th     "       —Franklin H. Traver, Ghent.
1st Corporal.—George F. Wilbur, Chatham.
2d      "         —Milo P. Moore, Hudson.
3d      "         —Henry C. Lay, Chatham.
4th     "         —Robert R. Baringer, Hudson.
5th     "         —Reuben Reynolds,        “
6th     "         —John H. Whiteman, Austerlitz.
7th     "         —Theodore W. Krofft, Ghent.
8th     "         —Lewis Best, Hudson.
PRIVATES.
John W. Hague,     Hudson
Abraham E. Miller,    "
Charles A. Ostrander, "
Andrew Miller,           "
William II. Rowley,   "
Henry Wood,             "
John B. Taylor,         "
William C. Melius,   "
Wallace Brewer,       "
John Heermance,      "
Charles Lutz,            "
George H. Harvey,   "
Leonard C. Winslow,"
John Burritt,             "
Alexander Shaw,     "
John C. Baker,         "
Reuben Moores,      "
Arthur A. Moore,    "
Leonard C. Covey,  "
Daniel II. Simmons,"
David Plumb,          "
Michael Guinan,     "
John Fogarty,          "
Joseph Schill,          "
Thomas Lanighan,  "
Levi Gerow,            "
George W. Whiteman,”
Freemond Ostrander, "
Joseph Sterling,       "
Edward Gallagher,  "
Jas. Van Deusen, Living'n.
James Moore, Greenport.
Myron Poucher, Clav'k.
John P. Proper,      "
Robert Ham,          "
Henry B. Hulbert, Chat'm.
Joseph Mosier,          "
William King,           "
Horace Ogden, Germant'n
Lewis H. Clum,        "
Harry S. Traver, Ghent
Patrick McGrath,    "
Alexander Gaddis, "
Henry Williams,    "
John Gaddis,          “
David Bellows,      "
Moses Thomas,      "
George Morrison,   "
Christopher Meggert, "
Jacob C. Moett,      "
W. W. Cambridge, "
Ambrose Holsapple, "
William H. Flint,    Aust'z.
Alonzo H. Almstead, "
David Roney,             "
Joseph M. Downing,  "
Richard T. Birch,       "
Wm. W. Whiteman,   "
Horatio Murry,           "
Henry H. Sluyter,   N. Leb.
Jared Harrison,            "
Martin P. Carpenter,   "
Thomas E. Wand,       "
Frederick H. Lindsey, "
Aaron A. Knapp,        "
Michael Cady,            "
John Fitzgerald,          "
John H. Humphrey,    "
James Seeley,             "
Franklin H. Shaw,      "
Thaddeus Mattoon, Can'n.
George Finch,             "
Samuel De Groffe,     "
John E. DeGrotte,      "
John J. Dusenbury,    "
Daniel Blinn,             "
James McCauley,      "
Aaron K. Mullin,      "
Alonzo Williams,     "
Samuel Comstock,    "
Lorenzo D. Ford,      "
Martin V. Wilcox,     "
Justin A. Wilcox,       "
Joseph L. Churchill,  "
John R. Harrison,      "
Charles P. Kingsley, "
Patrick Sullivan,       "
James Morshemer,    "

COMPANY B.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—CHARLES E. BOSTWICK, Amenia.
1st Lieutenant—THOMAS N. DUTCHER, Dover.
2d        "        —JEREMIAH S. PEARCE, Pawling.
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant.—Lewis Holmes, Washington.
2d Sergeant.—Henry L. House, Arnenia,
3d       "       —Charles Humiston, Dover.
4th      "       —Goodman T, Nobles, Washington.
5th      "       —Wm. Bingel, Pawling.
1st Corporal—Gilbert J. Kniffin, Dover.
2d       "       —George H. Gorton, Arnenia.
3d       "       —David Sprague, Pawling.
4th      "       —Wm. E. Haight, Washington.
5th      "       —Wm. E. Hamilton, North East.
6th      "       —Chandler McCarty. Dover.
7th      "       —De Witt Duncan, Washington.
8th      "       —Ransom A. White, Dover.
PRIVATES.
John Hart, Washington.
David Welden,       "
Manassa Benson,   "
Egbert Rowe,         "
George L. Bartlett, "
Orville L. Davis,   "
Nicholas Platt,      "
Alfred Nobles,      "
Wm. H. Applebee,"
Peter Carlow,        "
Lewis Rossel,        "
Harrison Le Roy,   "
Charles H. Ensign, "
J Van Hovenburgh Amenia
Francis Mitchell,        "
George Haight,           "
Riley Burdick.            "
Seneca H. Marks,       "
Wm. H. Haskins,        "
Edwin Johnson,          "
Charles Tweedy,        "
Oscar F. Parks,           "
Charles II, Baker,       "
Geo. L. Drake,            "
Wm. H. Spielman, N. East.
Wm. Parker,                  "
Michael Sullivan,          "
James Campbell,           "  
L. Van Alstyne,             "
Leonard Loucks,           "
Charles H. Ferris,          "
George Bishop,             "
Jacob Burch,                  "
J. R. Wooden,                "
Walter H. Loucks,         "
E. Hammond,      Pine Plains.
H. A. Courtney,             "
Nicholas P. Hammond, "
Walter A. Law,             "
John S. Pitcher,             "
James Story,                  "
George Story,                "
Isaac O. Mitchell,   Dover.
Merritt Humiston,      "
Gary Wilcox,              "
Herman Buckingham, "
Charles Smith,            "
Leroy Lineberg,          "
Edward Lineberg,       "
Charles Records,        "
James Brant,               "
John Richmond,   Pawling.
Archibald Penney,       "
Solomon M. Wooden, "
George Brownell,        "
Wm. H. Millard,          "
Isaac Brownell,            "
Charles S. Dodge,        "
Wm. Dewanny,            "
Milton Brownell,         "
Wm. H. Nichols,         "
Wm. H. Beach,            "
Charles W. Wilcox,     "
Philip Allen,                "
J. E. Anderson,   Stanford.
Burtlett H. Bishop,   "
Wm. H. Snyder,       "
J. H. Palmatier,        "
Henry V. Wood,      "
Edgar George,         "
Curtiss L. Porter,     "
Landon P. Rider,     "
Geo. Drury,             "
Rens. Mosher,         "
John McIntyre,        "
Geo. II. Payne,        "
John Payne,             "
Wm. B. Sackett,      "
Oliver J. Walter,      "
Sherman Williams,  "
Isaac Winans,          "

COMPANY C.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—FRANCIS S. KEESE,     Rhinebeck,
1st Lieutenant—HOWARD H. MORSE, "
2D        "        —THOMAS N. DAVIS, Milan.
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant.—Charles W. McKown, Rhn'beck
2d Sergeant.—J. Howard Asher, Rhinebeck.
3d       "       —John E. Barlow, Milan.
4th      "       —John W. Keese,     "
5th      "       —John H. Hager, Red Hook.
1st Corporal—Henry A. Brundage, Red Hook.
2d        "      —Geo. Tremper, Milan.
3d        "      —F. W. Rikert,       "
4th       "      —Jacob S. Bowman, Milan.
5th       "      —Derrick Brown, Clinton.
6th       "      —Clement R. Dean, Rhinebeck.
7th       "      —Benj. H. Cooper, Red Hook.
8th       "      —David H. Hannaburgh, Rhinebeck.
PRIVATES.
James M. Braley, Rhin'beck    Lansing G. Hicks, Milan.
John W. Kipp,            "            Alfred Burnett,          "
Lemuel Marquart,      "             David P. Fero,          "
George W. Hamilton, "            John Van Elten, Red Hook
John'H. Van Etten,     "            Lewis W. Cashdollar,  "
Charles Rynders,        "            George F. Newvent,    "
Martin V. B. Hawkins, "          Albert Cole,                 "
Wm. H. Hawkins,       "            Gilbert Dedrick,          "
James A. Fraleigh,      "            James Doyle,              "
John W. Myers,          "             Montgomery Finger,  "
Wm. A. Noxon,          "             Augustus Gobel,         "
Calvin Rikert,             "             William Hover,           "
Evert Traver,              "              George W. Minkler,   "
Charles W. Marquet,  "              Peter Moore,               "
Albert Ostrom,            "             Daniel Neenan,           "
Robt. P. Churchill,      "             Anson A. Norcutt,      "
Jasper De Wint,          "              Robert Rector,            "
Charles Wodden,        "              George Wagoner,       "
Patrick Lyden,            "              Lewis Simmons,         "
Robert H. Hayner,      "              George F. Simmons,   "
Benjamin A. Brown,  "              Peter Dyer,                  "
Peter Scalley,             "              Wm. B. Brown,    Clinton
John E. Cole,             "               Robert A. Day,           "
Nathan Day,               "              James M. Hewitt,        "
John Gay,                   "              Augustus Ashorn,       "
Edward F. Tator,        "              James K. Brown,         "
Robt. Risely,              "               John S. Hadden,          "
Jas. L. H. Holdridge,  "               Murray Howard,         "
E. H. Delamater, Milan.             Roger T. Jones,           "
Robert D. Stall,      "                  Chas. E. Kisshover,     "
Gilbert D. Morgan, "                 Chas. Ketterer,             "
Henry Coon,           "                 Chas. P. Murch,           "
Isaac Burdick,         "                Alvin G. Murch,           "
Harvey Odell,          "                Chas. H. Draper, Wash'ton
George Dykeman,   "                George D. Cronk, H'd P'k.
Henry R. Hicks,      "                 Geo. H. Hadden,        "
Robert Millroy,       "                 John Schryver,           "
Alfred Shatter,        "                  W. E. Churchill, Stanford.
Elisha D. Morgan,  "                  Benj. T. Churchill,   "
Alfred P. Fetts,       "                  Robert D. Dykeman, "
Hiram Couse,         "                   Samuel G. Morgan,   "
Henry D. Morgan,  "                  Wm. C. Millroy,        "
Myron Horton,       "                   Wm. Porter,              "
Hiram B. Eddy,      "                   Gilbert H. Warner,   "

COMPANY D.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—GEO. PARKER, Poughkeepsie.
1st Lieutenant—Francis N. STERLING, Po'keepsie
2d         "        —SPENCER C. DOTY,           "
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant—Arnout Cannon, Jr., Po'k.
2d Sergeant—Jacob Armstrong, Hyde Park.
3d      "       —Palareman Chichester, Po'keepsic.
4th     "       —Robert B. Light,                   "
5th     "       —David A. Nesbitt,                 "
1st Corporal—Ambrose B. Hart,                "
2d      "        —Wm. B. Riggs, Hyde Park.
3d      "        —Chas. A. Smith, Beekman.
4th     "        —Levi L. Brooks, Poughkeepsie.
5th     "        —Edwin E. Blauvelt,       “
6th     "        —Washington J. Maufort, Fishkill.
7th     "        —Geo. H. Fitchett, Poughkeepsie.
8th     "        —Isaac J. Weddle,          "
PRIVATES.
Warren S. Silvernail, Po'k
Henry W. Morris, Jr.,  "
Robert Sanders,           "
Samuel Oddy,             "
Thomas L. Jones,        "
Albert Hitchcock,        "
John L. Osborn,           "
Uriah Alverson,           "
Andrew J. Silvernail,  "
John Spence,               "
Wm. Hines,                 "
Francis Heilig,            "
John P. Law,               "
Wm. Platts,                 "
John W. Medler,         "
W. C. Beneway,         "
O. C. Alverson,          "
Edward L. Drury,       "
R. J.M. Tallman,        "
Isaac E. Pye,               "
A. R. Clarke,              "
Wm. Conlon,              "
Isaac W. C. Blauvelt, "
Jas. H. Onderdonk,    "
John B. Hielman,       "
James Morris,            "
Jacob O. Sparks,        "
Wm. H. Weaver,        "
August Faust,             "
Augustus Bunker,      "
Garrett F. Beneway,  "
J. Smith,                    "
Geo. Sparks,              "
J. F. Eckert,               "
Thos. Flinn,              "
Isaac S. Ward,          "
Harvey Hustis,         "
Isaac Leroy,              "
Theo. DeGrotte,        "
Chas. P. Wilson,       "
Aug. Coyle,              "
Andrew Jackson,      "
J. P. Van Vleck,        "
A. T. Turner,   Po'keepsie.
J. L. Delamater,       "
August Bantlin,       "
Robert Potter,          "
Ethan S. Lattin, Hyde P'k.
John W. Earle,        "
Abm. W. Ostrom,   "
Richard Gauley,      "
Alex'r Mosher,        "
F. E. Cramer,           "
John Burrows,         "
Archibald Field, Amenia.
D. B. Ryder, Pleasant Val.
Mathew Foster,        "
W. W. Palmertier,    "
Benj. H. Van Wyck, "
Wm. H. McKay,       "
John H. Smith,          "
Philetus Kater, Pine Plains
John Scherman,        "
Michael Fitzgerald,  "
A. Kellerhouse,        "
Edward Mulhaine, Dover.
L. Van Wagoner, Stanf'd.
Robert Palmer, Liv'ston.
Christian Schiller,  "
Jonas Coon. Jr.,      "
Benj. Myers,           "
J. W. Myers,      Clinton.
J. J. Marshall,          "
Chas. Boyce,           "
Martin Rickett,        "
Morgan S. St. John, "
H. C. Stilwell, Lagrange.
C. R. Rust, Washington.
Henry Lawrence, Pawling.
A. Rifenbergh, Hudson.
George McKown, "
Allen Rote, Taghkanic.
Cornelius Stickles, Gr'port
Chas. Huddleston,      "
Wm. Park,                  "
Joseph Moore,            "

COMPANY E.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—GEO. W. VAN SLYCK, Kinderhook.
1st Lieutenant—J. W. VAN VOLKENBURGH, Chat'm.
2d         "        —GEORGE T. WHITE, Hudson.
NON COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant.—Chas. L. Van Slyck, Kind'hook.
2d Sergeant—Frank J. Child, Chatham.
3d       "      —John L. Holt,          "
4th      "      —William Thompson, Kinderhook.
5th      "      —William Smith,               "
1st Corporal—Henry L. McArthur, Chatham.
2d       "       —Leverett O. Mansfield,    "
3d       "       —Isaac Van Dyck, Kinderhook.
4th      "       —Ephraim A. Earl,       "
5th      "       —Jacob G. Trimper,      "
6th      "       —Barent Bennett, Chatham.
7th      "       —Lambert J. Hubbel, Kinderhook.
8th      "       —Orra P. Wright, Chatham.
PRIVATES.
Allen Mosier,      Chatham.
Edward Lee                  "
John D. Wilkinson,      "
George W. Mooney,    "
John Miller,                 "
William M. Doty,        "
William H. Ostrander, "
George Tanner,           "
Horace C. Ham,          "
George H. Coffin,       "
Andrew M. Clark,       "
Isaac Webster,             "
Peter E. Foster,            "
Robert II. Crissey,       "
George M. Noyes,       "
John Mosier,                "
John S. Woodward,     "
Stewart II. Roberts,     "
William Starrs,            "
Sebastian Schultz,       "
Smith F. Reynolds,      "
Joseph T. Hogeboom, "
John E. Doty,              "
Charles Thompson,     "
John D. Manning,       "
Henry Cheever,           "
James E. Clark,           "
David S. Orr,              "
James Filkins,             "
Austin Fairchild,   Kind'hk.
August Reiger,            " 
W. H. Sharp,               "
William Lafferty,        "
Patrick Kelly,              "
Thomas Potts,             "
Martin F. Filkins,        "
Leonard Kline,            "
James Murphy.            "
Elijah Kinnicut, Jr.,     "
Charles L. Dearborn,   "
David R. Dennis,         "
John Laferty,               "
Thomas Mexted,         "
George H. Tipple,       "
James Cooper,            "
George Maraquett,      "
William Sitzer,           "
Elijah Kinnicut,          "
Jonas Miller,               "
John Decker,              "
Philip Smith,              "
Daniel Conner,           "
Chas E. Reynolds,      "
John S. Hardick,         "
Edward G. Garner,     "
Theodore Nevin,        "
Peter H. McIntyre,     "
Wm. H. Chase,          "
Cornelius Garvey,     "
Napoleon Martin,      "
George H. Woodin,   "
David H. Skinkle,     "
Charles E. Becker,    "
Wm H. Pulver,          "
Benjamin V. Rogers, "
Edward Hinman,       "
Ralph Denn,              "
W. H. Hunt,               "
James Kelly,              "
John F. McIntyre,      " 
James Callaghan, Hillsdale.
Chas. R. Moore,         "
Samuel H. Whitbeck, "
Wm. R. Showerman,  "
Horace Pryor,             "
Wm. E. Crawford,      "
Charles Lacey,            "
Stephen L. Scott, Aust'litz
Cyrus Cole,                "
Henry J. Shelly,         "
Nelson Gott,              "
Ezekiel Bates,           "
John Tripp,               "
Philo Smith,              "
James A. Hewett, Clinton

COMPANY F.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—A. DE WINT, Fishkill.
1st Lieutenant—J. J. WILLIAMSON, Fishkill.
2d        "         —C. A. ANDERSON,       "
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant.—Henry Rotherby, Fishkill.
2d Sergeant.—Charles Van Tine,            "
3rd     "        —Daniel Warren,                 "
4th     "        —David E. Van Amburgh,   "
5th     "        —Francis H. Brett,                "
1st Corporal—Augustus M. Myers,         "
2d      "        —Joseph Seymour,               "
3d      "        —Samuel Speedling,            "
4th     "       —Lewis Pearshall                 "
5th     "       —Austin H. Terry,                "
6th     "       —Jeremiah Boyce,                "
7th     "       —William Bailey,                 "
8th     "       —Robert Pickles,                  "
PRIVATES.
William Carnes, Fishkill.
John Worden,           "
Peter Williams,        "
A. J. Smith,              "
David Hawks,          "
George N. Wood,     "
John Mathews, Jr.,   "
Jacob Palmer,           "
Augustus Eyth,         "
Henry Gerard,           "
Isaac Sevine,             "
James E. Post,           "
John W. Hughes,       "
Leonard Lawson,      "
Wm. J. Lester,           "
Delaney L. Meyers,   "
John M. Farrell,         "
John Boone,               "
John Dinger,              "
Joseph D. O'Malley,  "
Isaac P. Ball,             "
Geo. W. Hauver,       "
Wm. Agnew,             "
Godfrey Lodge,         "
Oren II. Hall,             "
Geo. V. Hall,              "
Charles A. Lawrence,"
James Rogers,            "
Geo. W. Brower,        "
Geo. H. Pollock,         "
Silas Partington,         "
Solomon Lawson,      "
Wm. Partington,         "
Charles W. Brower,    "
Frederick Schuff,        "
Egbert Brill,         Pawling.
James A. Stevens,       "
Jacob Poulse,              "
Spafford Miller,          "
Benjamin T. Hoag,     "
Geo. W. Sprague,       "
Randolph Brownell,   "
James Penny,              "
John J. Evans,             "
Alexander Jones,        "
Charles S. Travis,       "
Geo. H. Dascen,          "
Lewis Baker,               "
Lawrence D. Olivet,    "
Gilbert A. Stevens,      "
Simon Wilcox,            "
Adam Waldron, Stanford.
John H. Payne,            "
Isaac T. Winans,         "
Wm. B. Sackett,         "
George A. Drury,       "
Geo. C. Payne,           "
Edgar Risedorf,   Wash'ton.
Harrison Moore,         "
Moses W. Lake,         "
Torrance Locklin,      "
Charles H. Pinder, Amenia
Wm. Teater,               "
John Raferty,      Hudson.
Theo. V. Smith,  N. East.
Theo. Simpson,        "
Patrick Connors,      "
Cornelius Ireland, Dover.
George Coles,          "
Ther'on Jones,          "
Wm. J. Allen,        Pine Plains.
John II. Hoisier,            "
Edward Knickerbocker,"
Byron Stacy,                 "
John C. Thorne,            "
Tames H. Washburn,    "
J. K. P. Frost, Rhinebeck.
William Carnes, Red Hook.
W. Keansler, Greenfield.

COMPANY G.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—ROBT. J. MITCHELL, Hudson.
1st Lieutenant—CHAS. B. CHITTENDEN, Stockport.
2d         "        —R. J. PALEN, Hudson.
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant—P. J. Schermerhorn, Stuyv'st.
2d Sergeant—Richard H. Thurston, Hudson.
3d       "      —Chas. M. Bell, Ancram.
4th      "      —Martin Smith, Claverack.
5th      "      —Howard E. Mitchell, Hudson.
1st Corporal—Augustus M. Osborn,   "
2d       "       —Wm. H. S. Hull, Stuyvesant.
3d       "       —Peter G. Collins,      "
4th      "       —George Murrell,       "
5th      "       —David H. Gilkinson, "
6th      "       —Franklin Sagendorph, Clermont.
7th      "       —John F. Warner, Stuyvesant.
8th      "       —Lewis C. Brooks, Clermont.
PRIVATES.
George Brown, Hudson
David Haner,           "
William B. Hand,    "
Benjamin A. Hand, "
George A. Carter,   "
John Best,               "
Matthew B. Tice,   "
Job Kells,             Claverack
John I. Miller,               "
Augustus Kieselburgh, "
William A. Stevens,     "
Charles Smith,              "
Charles S. Silvernail,    "
John F. Silvernail,         "
Philip II. Friss,              "
William Kells,              "
Mandeville Hoffman,   "
Samuel C. Scutt,           "
Martin Scutt,                 "
W. II. Simmons, Tagh'k.
Ebenezer Buirtch,     "
Alexander D. Smith, "
Edward Gardiner,     "
John Teator,              "
Martin Teator,           "
George I. Gordon,     "
Robert A. Brush,       "
Sylvester C. Miller, Liv'stn
Michael Keane, Ghent.
Robert Lapham,     "
Morris Strass, New Leb.
Ezra Hauver,           "
George Armstrong, "
Michael Halpin,      "
James Garvin,         "
Jacob Ham,      Ancram.
Peter Hulet,            "
John Byrnes,          "
John H. Shook,      "
Henry Ingles,         "
James Butts,           "
John Brown,           "
William Waldron,  "
Theodore Kipp,      "
William Wheeler,   "
William Myers,      "
Henry McCormick "
Charles C. Waugh, "
James McCann,      "
George Kipp,          "
Daniel J. Rundell,   "
Michael Harder, Stockport.
M. Fredenburgh,      "
Robert Van Ciiren,   "
Peter Huntzing,         "
Ezra M. Ackley, Jr., "
John Q. Smith,          "
Abram Sitser,         Stuyvesant.
Barent Sherriger,            "
George F. Shafer,           "
Benjamin F. Miller,        "
Charles Hoes,                 "
Isaac J. Mickle,              "
Frederick Shafer,           "
Isaac A. McAllister,      "
David II. Gilkinson,      "
Porter J. Schermerhorn "
Philo Story,                   "
Simeon P. Bryant,         "
John White,                   "
David H. Pultze,            "
James Harvey,               "
Peter R. Plass,                "
William Ostrander,        "
Abram Brodhead,          "
John Selby,                    "
George Slater,                "
Wilson Dykeman, Gallatin.
Jacob J. Dykeman,        "
George E. Philips,         "
Cyrus Griswold, Austerlitz.
James Plainer, Hillsdale,
Horace Denegar,   Cler'nt,
Leonard Poland,         "
William W. Gardner, "

COMPANY H.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—JOHN A. VAN KEUREN, Poughkepsie [sic].
1st. Lieutenant—HENRY H. SINCERBOX, Fishkill.
2d          "        —SYLVESTER H. MASE,        "
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant.—Columbus S. Keys. Fishkill.
2d Sergeant—Charles Davidson, Poughkeepsie.
3d       "      —Benj. T. Benson, Fishkill.
4th      "      —Caleb S. Hoatling, Poughkeepsie.
5th      "      —Garrett F. Dillon, Fishkill.
1st Corporal—Hiram Rous, Poughkeepsie.
2nd     "       —Benj. F. Chamberlin, "
3d       "       —Abner B. Mase, Fishkill.
4th      "      —Geo. N. Culver,       "
5th      "      —John S. Fosbay, Beekman.
6th     "       —Mark Shepardson, Poughkeepsie.
7th     "       —Charles S. Wilbur, Fishkill.
8th     "       —Walter Hicks, Poughkeepsie.
PRIVATES.
Francis Marston Fishkill.
Frank Stephens        "
John Cherry             "
Edwin H. Bogardus "
Thomas Mahan        "
Joseph Doxey          "
Joseph Cheney         "
John F. Keys            "
Sidney Churchill      "
Geo. W. Swords       "
William Conklin      "
Geo. Farrington        "
Geo. Van Voorhies  "
Joseph E. Depeu      "
Elijah T. Horton       "
William Odell          "
Charles Weller         "
William Althouse     "
James J. Hervy         "
John P. Way             "
Stephen Yeomans    "
James E. Munger     "
Dewight Cotterell    "
Geo. F. Deacon        "
Wm. Townsend       "
Geo. F. Falconer      "
Wm. H Bartley         "
Valentine Van Nostrum "
Benj. Crowther            "
James Greene              "
Anthony Vincent         "
Stephen A. Farrington "
Joseph W. Crowther    "
Columbus L. Keys      "
John Germond             "
Jeremiah D. Wood      "
James Armstrong        "
Joseph Ambler            "
Theodore A. Bowne    "
A..B. Hartson              "
John Slotesburg           "
Willis W. Marsh,         "
James C. F. Thayer      "
Wm. East            East Fishkill.
Benj. Smawley            "
Henry S. Hawver         "
Wm. H. Bowne            "
Webster Brundage       "
Levi Niver                   "
Wm. Kronts                 "
Johannas Whilhelm     "
Stephen A. Yelverton  "
Smith W. Darling        "
Wm. Spreadbury         "
Sylvester Brown         "
Wm. H. Hawver          "
Richard Scofield         "
Wm. H. Wooden         "
Elijah T. Horton          "
Mathias Millback Pok'sie.
John Thompson          "
Albert A. Ballard        "
Andrew S. Albertson  "
John A. Warmslee      "
Martin Polhemons      "
James M. Lewis         "
Andrew Tripp             "
Emanuel Point            "
Wm. Laughlin            "
Mark Shepherdson     "
Alson Hill                   "
Adam McGeorge        "
Alanson Pollard          "
James H. Hill             "
James W. Hill            "
Francis Derbrow        "
Edmond Cable           "
H. A. Heusted  Hyde Park.
Robert F. Heusted      "
E. A. Whitman Union Vale
Eliphalet Luster         "

COMPANY I.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—ROBT. F. WILKINSON,      Poughkeepsie.
1st Lieutenant—FREDERICK WILKINSON, "
2d         "       —JOHN P. WILKINSON,          "
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant.—Richard Enoch, Poughkeepsie.
2d Sergeant.—Thomas E. Merritt,             "
3d      "        —DeWitt C. Noxon, Lagrange.
4th     "        —Augustus A. Wing, Poughkeepsie.
5th     "        —Charles H. Heath,             "
1st Corporal —Fred'k M. Williams, Lagrange.
2d      "         —Christopher Beiri, Pleasant Valley.
3d      "         —Isaac Gurney, Poughkeepsie.
4th     "         —Horton Van Nordall,     "
5th     "         —James Anthony,             "
6th     "         —Jesse D. Vail,                 "
7th     "         —David McIntyre, Union Vale.
8th     "         —George W. Gray,           "
PRIVATES.
George H. Walters, Pok'sie.
Wm. F. Carlow,          "
Karl F. Haeber,           "
John Prosseur,            "
Edward Walter,          "
Caleb Hicks,               "
Wm. T. Lewis,           "
John Casey,                "
Amos Chase,              "
Mortimer Wilson,       "
Edward Van Nordall, "
Dominick Travis,       "
Stephen Gildersleeve, "
Edward Stanford,        "
Lawrence Horn,          "
Thomas McDonough, "
Lorenzo Barrett,         "
Jacob B. Coffin,         "
Wm. B. Haviland,      "
John G. Hoag,            "
Benj. Kelly, Union Vale.
Patrick Monahan,      "
Amos Fraganzic,       "
Charles F. Appleby,  "
Uriah Davidson,        "
John Lake,                 "
Henry Mackey,          "
Henry L. Benson,      "
James E. Gilford,      "
Charles Roselle,        "
David Rim,               "
Jeremiah Lane,         "
Theodore Vail,         "
Oliver Slocum,         "
Benj. Barrett,            "
Charles C. Dennis,    "
Jesse Baker,      Lagrange.
Theodore Montfort,  "
Levi F. Williams,      "
Charles McCord,       "
Wm. W. Baker,         "
Edward Jones,           "
John H. Mastin,         "
John Carroll,             "
James Holdridge,      "
John V. Wilson,        "
Stephen Moore, Clinton.
John G. Moore,         "
Isaac P. Smith,          "
John Donnelly,         "
Lawrence Taaffe,     "
Robert O. Smith,      "
David Chase,            "
George E. Thomas,  "
John I. Schouten, H'd P'k.
Peter S. Baker,         "
Daniel Hawes, Amenia
James O'Donnell,    "
H. VanDewater,    E. Fish'll
Cornelius B. Williams, "
John Taff, Pleasant Valley
Wm, Walker,              "
Isaac Olivet,        Pawling.
Wm. H. White,           "
Wm. Gulliver,            "
Thomas Furlong,        "
Benjamin P. Woodin, "
Elisha J. Wing,           "
Egbert P. Halleck,      "
Albert M. Barker,       "
Wheeler G. Cronk,     "
Egbert Shear,              "
Henry D. Austin, Tagh'ic.
Stephen L. Bayle,       "
S Kellerhouse,    Livingston.
Robert Van Tassel,       "
Martin Potts,                 "
Jefferson T. O'Connor, "
John Carroll,     Gallatin.
William Duntz,       "
Peter E. Potts, Clermont.
Edward Gallagher, Hudson

COMPANY K.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—Richard DECKER, Hudson.
1st Lieutenant—ROBERT H. BURNS, Hudson.
2d        "         —JOHN I. LANGDON, Copake.
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant—Geo. W. Flint, Chatham.
2d Sergeant.—Francis Hodes, Hudson.
3d      "        —Uleric Eshleman, Hyde Park.
4th     "        —Timothy Horan, Hudson.
5th     "        —Burgess Speed,       "
1st Corporal —Robert M. Blunt,   "
2d      "         —Robert E. Van Valkenburgh, Hudson
3d      "         —Edward Hogle, Claverack.
4th     "         —John H. Wagoner, Hudson.
5th     "         —George E. Lasher, Germantown.
6th     "         —Sylvester Brewer, Hudson.
7th     "         —Ethan Allen,               "
8th     "         —John Bunt, Greenport.
PRIVATES.
John H. Smith, Greenport.
EdwardRoberts,        "
Scth J. Plass,             "
Wm. H. Bunt,           "
George Elting,          "
Thomas S. Johnson, "
Charles S. Houck,    "
Wm. Sundeman,      "
Wm. W. Dyer,         "
Jonas H. Plass,         "
Virgil Ham,              "
John Becker,             "
William Wood, Gallatin.
C. McMcnamy, Hudson.
Charles Hous,            "
Charles Seely,           "
Martin Leonard,        "
William Vanbak,       "
Bruce G, Crossman,  "
Jacob H. Miller,        "
Thomas Doran,         "
Thadeus Hammond, "
Benjamin Best,         "
Geo. A. Weeks,        "
Abram Gardner,       "
William B. Navin,    "
Leonard Horton,       "
Oliver Lamphear,     "
John E. Lape,           "
John E. Decker, Claverack
Oliver Graves,          "
Henry Tutor,             "
William H. Jefferts,  "
William Walters,      "
John McKenny,        "
Charles A,. Clapper, "
John B. Decker,        "
John Wallace,           "
John E. Allen,           "
Sidney Melius,     Copake.
Allen Sheldon,            "
Samuel Near,              "
Adrian Langdon,        "
Ward Van DeBogart, "
Orville Veely,            "
Edwin Pulver,            "
Reuben Kilmer,         "
Charles Ham,             "
John W. Van Tassel,  "
Silas Miller,               "
Walter D. Card,         "
Otto Shurry,              "
Samuel P. Curtis,      "
Brazille Van Deusen, "
Walter Bruzie,           "
Norman Kline,           "
Loren Van Deusen,    "
|Jacob Finkle,             "
Allen Decker,             "
Peter Decker, Jr.,        "
Thomas Rice,             "
William Kellerhouse, "
Henry A. Austin, Hillsdale
C. D. Chase, Stuyvesant.
John R. Fergerson, Tagh.
John Hinkle, Germantown
George A. Funk,        "
James Healy,              "
Peter E. Rifenburgh,  "
George E. Lasher,      "
Jacob M. Ames,         "
Martin V. B. DeWitt. "
Charles H. Hawver,   "
Josiah Miller,             "
James Portland,          "
Henry S. Sipperly,     "
Robert M. Harris, R. Hook
Norman E. Hermance, "
John W. Ousterhout,    "
Fernando Hilliker, H'd. P'k
Thomas B. Foster,     "
Martin Stengle,          "
Wm. H. H. Traver,    "
John Fitzpatrick,        "
Franklin M. Sherow, "
Wm. Hall,                 "
Jesse Foster,              "
Joseph Brown,          "
Edgar Hilliker,          "
Wm. Moore,              "
Edward Stotenburgh, "
Daniel J. Wesley,       "
Mathias Graff,       Clinton.

Army correspondence of the GAZETTE.
Letter from the 128th.
CAMP MILLINGTON, near Baltimore,
Maryland, Sept. 13th, 1862.
Soon after our arrival at Baltimore, the regiment was ordered to encamp at Stewart's Wood, situated just outside the suburbs of the city. On Monday evening Col. Cowles was ordered to be ready to move up the road towards Frederick at 7 o'clock the next morning. As the rebel cavalry had taken breakfast that morning within thirteen miles of Baltimore, this looked like a fight. As the arms had not been distributed, the regiment was ordered to turn out in the night. This created some alarm, as many believed the enemy were upon us. The regiment moved off however at 7 o'clock, but we had not marched more than three miles before a counter order came for us to move around to the south-west of the city, and encamp on the ground we now occupy. This is a beautiful site, on elevated ground, and commands a charming view of Baltimore and the bay. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad runs round the foot of the hill. Some five or six regiments pass en-route to Washington every day. They are cheered on by our men as they pass. Should Baltimore be approached by the rebels on the Frederick road, we hold a most important position to drive them back, and was our regiment older and well drilled, we could keep off ten-fold the number. A creek crosses the Frederick road at right angles which is fringed by trees, behind which infantry could be posted to good advantage. A battery of the 5th U. S. Artillery occupies the hill with our regiment. Their guns command the road and bridge. In case of an attack they would fire over our heads, the road being higher than the alley which we would occupy.
DEMOCRITUS.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: August 2, 2011
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/128thInf/128thInfCWN.htm

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