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136th Regiment Infantry
New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

ONE OF THE "IRONCLADS."—Martin Graham, the Color Sergeant of the 136th Regiment has just returned to his home in Geneseo, on brief furlough. He received three wounds a the battle of Gettysburg, being twice struck by pieces of shell, and receiving a minie ball, which he still carries in the pit of his stomach, probably unable to digest it. We are glad to lean that none of these wounds are dangerous. Mr. Graham has temporarily hauled off for repairs, but will soon be in a condition to resume hostilities.

The 136th Regiment.
We had expected ere this to have received definite intelligence from this Regiment, but are obliged to go to press without anything reliable from it. It is in the first army corps, but as one brigade of that corps was detailed for some other duty, and we see no mention anywhere of the 136th, we think it quite certain that it could not have been engaged in the severe fight of Wednesday in which its corps was so badly injured. The Regiment can hardly escape taking an important part in the severe struggles and glorious successes that have been, and are now being won by the Army. But up to Wednesday morning we hear of no casualties in the Regiment.

Losses in the 136th.
The following is a correct list of casualties in the Wyoming companies of this gallant Regiment:
Co. D.—Private M. Graham, wrist and stomach, serious; corp. A. Walker, arm, serious; private A. Camp, head, slight; M. Vollmer, leg, severe.
Co. E—Sergt. James Hanigan, James Doran, Z. C. Wiggins, killed; corps. John Christ, foot, slight; John M. Fierro, hip and groin, severe; privates J. A. Barclay, bowels, slight; N. Conner, leg, severe; P. Duffy, side, by shell, slight; Milton Fosket, arm, flesh wound; James Lavery, head, severe—will live; Frederick Litzs, arm broken; W. H. Safford, arm, slight; M. Fitzsimons, arm, slight; John Maguire, thigh, flesh wound.
Co. H.—Privates F. M. Wood, Arzy West, Chas. D. Elwell and John Stowell, killed; Sergt. John Boyd, Jr., thigh and head, severer corp. Wm. Nooney, thigh and bowels, mortally; privates H. C. Orr, right arm amputated; R. Mann, thumb; Peter Mees, back, mortally; L. B. Curtiss, arm, slight; Rogers Lawton, head, slight; Geo. H. Kosher, arm, severe; Wm. Franklin, leg, severe and missing; corporal Clesher Warrmer, foot, slight.

NEW LAW FIRM.—Capt. A. A. Hoyt, of the 136th Regiment N. Y. S. V., has been compelled to resign on account of his health, and has returned to his home at Livonia Station. Capt. Hoyt was at the time of his enlistment engaged in the practice of law, which he will resume, having formed a co-partnership with our former townsman B. T. Squires, Esq., who has for some months been located at that place. The firm of Hoyt & Squires combines energy, talent and industry in an eminent degree, and we don't see how there can be any such thing as fail about their shop.

From Tennessee.
LOOKOUT VALLEY, TENN., NOV'R 3d, 1863.
FRIEND HARDING—You are undoubtedly aware, ere this, of the transfer of our regiment from the Department of Virginia to the Department of the Cumberland.
You can see by the enclosed General Order from our Division Commander, that the 136th has again acquitted itself in a manner that is not unbecoming the portion of the State that she represents.
The loss to my company was two wounded—Corporal Huggins and Private Russell.—Both are doing well.
Very truly yours, J. H. BURGESS,
Captain Co. F., 136th N. Y. V.

CHURCH OF JOHN THE BAPTIST,
2d Div., 11th Corps, Oct. 31st.
General Orders.
The General, commanding Division, desires to express to his troops his appreciation of the valor shown by them in the action of the 28th and 29th inst. This Division formed the advance during the march from Bridgeport to this place. The 1st Brigade, under Col. Bushbeck, leading. Their movements were marked by calmness and resolution; whatever resistance was made by the enemy, was quickly borne down. During the night of the 28th and 29th, the rebels made a fierce attack upon the command of General Geary. Our corps was ordered out for his support.—The division moved forward on the double-quick, the 2d brigade under Col. O. Smith, in advance. On the left of the road by which the division must pass to support General Geary, a high hill commanding the way, was found occupied by two rebel brigades. The 2d brigade was ordered to take and hold this position. The 73d Ohio and 33d Massachusetts formed line of battle, and with the greatest determination scaled the precipitous slope, moving over almost impassible ground, in the face of rapid volleys. The 136th regiment N. Y. V. was now ordered to support the left of the two advancing regiments, and advanced with heroic bravery, as did the 55th Ohio, which was to support the right. On the crest a fierce hand to hand contest ensued.—The enemy, although well fortified in a position almost impregnable by nature, could not withstand the extraordinary bayonet attack, and were forced to inglorious flight, leaving many arms and intrenching tools behind their parapets. The storming of this hill against such stupenduous odds, is a brilliant episode of the war—a feat of arms rarely surpassed in history.
Officers and Soldiers, by your courage you have gained your badge, a proud distinction. Let your valor preserve unsullied the honor of the white crescent.
By command of Brig. Gen. AVON STIENWEHR.
(Signed) F. W. STOWE, A. A. G.

136th Regiment, Company B.
Killed—Aaron Baker.
" Geo.Gibbs.
" Elles Gage.
Wounded—Geo. Drehmer, right thigh, doing well.
" J. Bacon, slightly.
" L. Bradley in side, severely.
" B. Foot, leg slightly.
" J. Garigan, wrist slightly.
" E. Luce, and J. Stebbens, both shot by accident of our men.
Of further casualties in this company, and the Regiment, I am unable to learn.
Lieut. I. W. Drake was reported to me to be positively killed; but from some facts since, come to my knowledge, I have much hope he is a prisoner.
I visited the 86th, "Steuben Rangers," found them much destroyed, and I think more severe wounds and greater suffering than in our Division. Yet but few lived within your circulation. I have much I want to write, but my list makes so long a letter, I must stop, and I shall go to look after those who have been since fighting, as soon as possible, and report again.
In great haste, yours, I. R. T.

---Warsaw, .....
Our Army Correspondence
FROM THE 136TH REGIMENT.
BIVOUAC, GOOSE CREEK, Va.,
June 22d, l863.
Editor Mirror:—Friday, June 12th, we broke camp at "Near Stafford C. H.," and marched a little that afternoon. By sundown we had reached Hartwood Church, having made twelve miles in a half day. We bivouacked here for the night in an open field and resumed our march on Saturday morning at daylight. To-day we made Catlet's Station where we had been ordered to report. The weather was excessively hot, the roads very dusty, and with blistered feet and sore shoulders we pitched our tents by the side of Cedar Run, just outside of a very small town called Weaverville. We hoped that here we might be allowed to stay long enough to rest and wash some of our clothes; but at 8 o'clock on Sunday morning marching orders come again, the bugle sounded to strike tents, pack up and start. Our orders were to report that night at Manassas Junction for further orders. We halted at Bristow's Station a couple of hours for dinner and to rest, and then resumed our weary march. A little before sundown we made Manassas Junction, and on our left we saw again the blue line of Bull Run mountains, and our old acquaintance, Thoroughfare Gap.
Contrary to our expectations we did not stop at the Junction, but continued our march in the direction of Centerville. We marched till nearly one o'clock at night when just as we had crossed Bull Run stream we halted and stacking our guns we lay down to sleep without pitching any tents. This day was intolerably hot, more so than any one preceding.
Monday morning we again started a little after sunrise and a march of three or four miles brought us to Centerville.—Glad were we to get here and to have a prospect of a little rest. We had made a march of over sixty miles in about two and a half days, and our poor feet and aching backs bore testimony of the fatigue we had undergone. We rested at C. till Wednesday morning, by three o'clock we were in line ready for a forward movement—the orders for which were soon given—our brigade taking the advance of the whole corps. That morning we made some tall marching, for we reached Gum Springs, twelve miles from Centerville, in four hours from the time of starting. The guide on our march said he had conducted flying artillery, but never before flying infantry. Between three and four we reached our present location, and camped in a meadow of nice grass, fit for the scythe, but we have saved the owner the labor of cutting it, for we put it to a more noble and glorious purpose; we used it for forage for the horses, and for beds for Union soldiers. "One good turn deserves another," so after despoiling Mr. Secesh's meadow, the kind hearts of our soldiers turned in sympathy towards his flocks and herds.—A fine flock of sheep—a hundred or more—were feeding in a pasture not a quarter of a mile distant, and our boys concluded it would be an act of mercy for some one to devise means by which this innocent flock should be saved from the slow and torturing death of starvation next winter. There is no doubt that the soldiers hit upon a plan by which all this might be avoided. Those sheep will never starve. Nice, fat, tender, juicy mutton has been plenty in our camp, and skins with wool on, have been "laying around loose," and that flock of sheep has disappeared.
We heard artillery firing the day we arrived here, the day after, and yesterday (Sunday,) all day. Where the fight was you will know before we do, although the fighting, by the sound of the guns, could not have been more than twelve or fifteen from us.
We are stopping about seven miles from Leesburg, and five from Edward's Ferry, and, by the road we came, are over eighty miles from our old camp. As we approach the Blue Ridge we notice a great improvement in the looks of the country. There is a much greater breadth of land under cultivation, the pine forests have given way to oak, chestnut, sycamore, mulberry, &c., fields of wheat and corn greet the eye, we see, too, large meadows in which the farmers are just beginning their haying. By the by, the hay crop is very light, the season has been too dry. We have had no rain since the storm immediately succeeding the battle of Chancellorville, until within the past three days, since which time we have had a good, nice, succession of showers. To-day the weather is cooler and quite comfortable.
The health of our Regiment is remarkably good. We have not lost a man by death since we re-crossed the Rappahannock, May 5th. As a Regiment we are proud of ourselves, and of our Regimental and Line officers. I have heard it hinted that in some quarters there was a feeling that Wyoming County had not been fairly dealt by in promotions, &c. In reply, I would say Wyoming County has had fully as much done for her, as the officers she sent out have ever done for the Regiment or for their Companies. Of the eight line officers from our county, six hare resigned, three Captains and three 1st Lieutenants. Lt. Cameron, who came out as 1st Lieutenant of Co. E, is now Captain of Co. D, and Hall now in command of Co. H, came out as 2d Lt. of Co. H. It seems to me that if our War Committee was unfortunate in selecting officers to come out with our Regiment, our Col. ought not to be blamed for it. I believe our Col. has ever been influenced by the best of motives in making his selections of officers to fill the places of those who have resigned,—that the soldiers are satisfied, I know.
This letter already too long, I must close, with a promise to write you again.
L. O. S.

PERSONEL.—Adjutant C. H. Young of the 136th, Livingston County Regiment, is in town to-day, looking very well. He came to Elmira

Good—We learn that Capt. Wells Hendershott has been detached from the 136th regiment, and has been appointed Commissioner for the Draft, for the district composed of Wyoming, Genesee and Niagara Counties, with head quarters at Batavia. He returned on Tuesday morning.

THE 136TH IN BATTLE.— The Times' correspondentmakes the following allusion to our 136th Reg't; in describing the sharp battle before Atlanta on the 23d ult:
" The brigade which formed the .... Ward's division is commanded by Col. James Wood, of the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth New-York. But two of its regiments were in front line when the conflict commenced, the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin and Twentieth Connecticut. The Fifty-fifth Ohio afterward took part in the fighting, as did the Seventy-third, which relieved the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, and the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth New-York, which relieved the Twentieth Connecticut. The troops immediately opposed to Col. Wood were a Mississippi Brigade, under command of a "Brigadier-General" Featherstone, who was killed early in the fight. Col. Wood did all that was required of him, as might be expected from so excellent a commander."

The Republican
GENESEO, N. Y.
THURSDAY MORNING, July 9.
We had expected ere this to have received definite intelligence from this Regiment, but are obliged to go to press without anything reliable from it. It is in the first army corps, but as one brigade of that corps was detailed for some other duty, and we see no mention anywhere of the 136th, we think it quite certain that it could not have been engaged in the severe fight of Wednesday in which its corps was so badly injured. The Regiment can hardly escape taking an important part in the severe struggles and glorious successes that have been, and are now being won by the Army. But up to Wednesday morning we hear of no casualties in the Regiment.

, 1863.
At the request of friends in this vicinity .... following respecting the death of .... Richard Youell, who was killed at the battle of Gettysburg. The letter will be read with mounful interest by many friends,
136th REGIMENT, N. Y. V. INFANTRY
WARRENTON JUNCTION, VA.
July 29th, 1863.
MR. YOULLS—Dear Sir:—Last evening I received a letter from my father, informing me that he had received a visit from you, and requesting on your behalf a statement of facts concerning the death and burial of your son. I will cheerfully do anything to assuage the grief you must feel at the loss of so brave and faithful a soldier and son as was Richard —My acquaintance with him began at Portage, during the formation of our Regiment in September last. Our acquaintance soon grew to a friendship. He united in an extraordinary degree, the manly qualities of a good soldier. He was always ready for duty. His place was never vacant. No matter how wearisome and painful the march, or other duty, I never heard him utter any complaint. In action he bore himself gallantly. He passed unharmed through all danger until about 4 o'clock of Friday, July 3d. He, with his comrades from our Regiment, was in the advance, skirmishing, when the enemy charged on our works. He was fighting manfully when he received his fatal wound. He was struck by a rifle ball, which lodged in his bowels. When hit he dropped his gun, placed both hands upon his wound and exclaimed, "I am shot" when he turned and walked off the field. He was temporarily placed in the cellar of a brick house on the field. Hearing that he was there, I immediately visited him. While here he suffered but little. He was cheerful and seemed grateful for the attention shown him. I immediately directed a litter to be procured and he be removed to the Hospital. As we met he smiled, and extending his hand we bade each other farewell. I was conscious he would not survive his wound. At the Hospital he received all the attention and care which under the circumstances could be given.
He lingered until the morning of Saturday July 4th, when he died. Collecting his effects we bore him to his narrow, soldier grave, where beside many others of his fallen comrades, he now sleeps.
If you visit Gettysburg, you will find his grave beneath an apple tree on the west side of the Cemetery Hill field, and about half a mile south of the Town of Gettysburg. When he received his wound he was in the cornfield, in the rear of the brick house, west of his grave.
When we left, there were about twenty graves there in a cluster. At the head of his grave we placed a board, whereon was marked his name, Regiment Company and date of death. I think you will have no difficulty in finding the spot. The apple tree stands about five rods from the road, near a stone wall.
It may be gratifying to you to know that it was the intention of his Officers to promote him at the first opportunity, for his fidelity as a soldier. Any further service which I can render will be cheerfully given.
Respectfully, EDWARD E. SILL.

The acquaintances of Priv. Martin Graham, 136th Reg't., were much surprised to see him walking down Main street on Thursday evening last. He was severely, and pronounced mortally wounded, by the explosion of a shell at the battle of Gettysburg, hitting him on the right arm, leg and breast. His devoted wife found him in a hospital at Philadelphia and returned with him. The wounds are severe and dangerous, but he is able to walk.

FROM THE 136TH REGIMENT.—A correspondent from the above Regiment writing to the Dansville Herald, says they are finely situated a short distance from Washington, on the rebel Gen. Lee's farm. Col. Wood is now acting as Brigadier General. The Warsaw Brass Band, which accompanied them, is to be a Brigade Band. The health of the Regiment is good.

Martin Graham, of the 136th, arrived home last week. He was wounded in the second day's fight, first by a piece of a shell striking him on the back of the right hand, soon after another piece of a shell struck him on the leg below the knee and while being moved off the field he was hit in the pit of the stomach by a minnie-ball. On the day of the battle he was acting as color sergeant. On going into the action he wound the india rubber cover of the flag around his waist, tieing it in front with a large knot. The minnie ball struck the knot passing through it and into his person where it yet remains. He is now improving, but it will be some time before he is fit for duty.

PERSONEL.--Lieut. Col. Faulkner, of the 136th Regiment, arrived at Dansville on Monday last on a brief leave of absence. We understand that he is willing to take back a few respectable conscripts to fill up the depleted ranks of the 136th.

The 136th at Gettysburg.
The Warsaw Democrat makes the following extracts from a letter from Sergt. Carroll, who was with his Regiment in the terrible fight at Gettysburg.
" We followed Lee's army to this place, and began the fight first, the First Corps being some three hours ahead of us. The rebels drove them until we came up with all our guns and checked them. The First and Eleventh Corps are the centre in line of battle now. On the 2d they tried to break both our wings, but we held them through the day, and in the night were heavily reinforced. At daylight on the 3d the fight began. At 10 a. m. our company was sent out as skirmishers. We lay out till about 2 p. m., when the artillery opened on both sides; we lay between the two armies, and such heavy firing I never heard for one hour, then it stopped. We saw the rebels coming on in four lines to take our center. They drove us in till we got back within forty rods of the regular battle line when our artillery opened with grape and canister, shooting over our heads. That checked them—we were reinforced and charged on them. They ran and many of them threw down their arms and surrendered. I don't know how many prisoners we took, but a good many. ....John M. Feiro, John Christ, N. Conner, F. Litz, Jerrold Lavery badly wounded. I think we had 3 killed, and 13 wounded, altogether. I stood behind Hannigan when he was hit—he fell dead. I was not touched.

…. 1863
From the 136th Regiment.
Below we give an official list of the casualties in this Regiment, which we have been kindly furnished with by Adjutant Young, in the late battles in Pennsylvania. The small number reported as "missing" shows that officers and men were in their places, and that they performed their duty is attested by the list:
KILLED.
Co. B.—Corporal George Gibbs, Privates Elias Gage, William II. McWhorter, Aaron R. Baker.
Co. E.—Sergeant James Hannagan, Privates James Doran, Z. C. Wiggins.
Co. F.—Marsena Stout.
Co. G.—Sergeant William Hover, Corporals George Blackall, John Hayen.
Co. H.—Privates Francis M. Wood, Charles C. Ellwell, Arzy West, John Stowell.
Co. I.—Privates Solomon L. Wise, Daniel L. Confer.
WOUNDED.
Co. A.—Corporal Jacob H. Whiteman, in face, severe; Privates Geo. H. White, in face, severe; William Van Pelt, face, severe; Clinton H. Miner, arm and thigh; Alonzo Crandall, head, slight; Martin L. Finch, head, slight; Charles A. Finch, arm, slight; Silas L. Pire, hand; William Hawks, hand; Michael Galvin, foot.
Co. B.—Corporals Leneius G. Bradley, right breast, severe; John H. Wright, left foot; Dorr Faulkner, shoulder; Privates William S. Stebbins, foot; Edwin Lence, a n k l e ; George Drehmer, left thigh; John B. Tattenshall, breast, slight; Baldiss Foot, left l e g ; James F. Bacon, hand, neck and arm; William A. Edwards, hand; John Gavagan, wrist.
Co. C.—Corporal Lorett Sherwood, leg, slight; Privates Monroe H. Annis, hand, severe; Thomas Boyle, hand, slight; George F. Briggs, wrist; William C. Dubois, arm; Michael Geiner, hand and neck; Wells G. Nash, leg, slight; Seward J. Pearsons, arm; John B. Ray, shoulder; William K. Selden, shoulder; Leman B. Withey, head, severe; Richard Touells, mortally, (since died.)
Co. D.—Corporal Aaron Walker, shoulder; Privates Alonzo Camp, head; Matthews Vlliner, leg; Martin Graham, groin and hand, severe.
Co. E.—Private Patrick Duffee, breast; Corporals John M. Fiero, bowels; John Christ, foot; Privates William H. Safford, arm; Nicholas Connor, leg; James Lowry, head; Fred. Litz, arm broken; James A. Barclay, side; Milton Foskett, shoulder; John McGuire, thigh.
Co. F.—Corporal Joseph E. Malone, right arm; Privates Henry Limrick, head, mortally; Jacob Past, leg; Jeremiah Cullman, left side; Elisha T. Herdendorf, right side; James R. Herdendorf, left shoulder; Gilbert Rulapaugh, left hip; William L. Hewitt, head.
Co. G.—Corporals Ronald McDonald, shoulder, slight; Lucien J. Smith, foot and breast, mortally; Privates John Folmsbee, shoulder and neck; John Whitmore, shoulder; Charles Vogel, thigh; Daniel V. Hull, thigh; Robert E.
Marsh, shoulder, slight.
Co. H.—Sergeant John Boyd, Jr., head and thigh, mortally; Corporal William Mooner, hip, mortally; Private Peter Mus, lungs, mortally;
Corporal Chester Warriner, foot; Privates Henry C. Orr, right arm (amputated); George H. Mosher, left arm; Lorenzo B. Curtiss, right hand; Russell Mann, right hand; Rogers Lawton, head.
Co. I.—Sergeant Solomon Swarfs, breast; Corporal James Conlon, arms; Privates Sam'l H. Dye, left leg, right arm and hand; George Kuhn, shoulder; Milton Flory, shoulder; Wm. A. Miller, neck; James Compton, breast with stone; John Gill, arm bruised; David B. Price, neck.
Co. K.—Corporal J. B. Isenhour, head; Privates Simeon Ikins, arm, (amputated); Zack Barber, hand and arm; Musician S. L. King, foot, slightly; Private Peter Connor, thigh.
MISSING.
Second Lieutenant Isaac W. Drake, and Private Philip Cooligan, Co. B. Private Wm. Franklin, Co. H.

THE 136th Regiment.—This Regiment at the battle of Fredericksburg was in the 11th Army Corps. Gen. Howard, and while in line of battle several different times and for a whole day at a time, was not called into action; being held with other troops as a reserve. We do not hear of any casualties in the Regiment.

From Co. F, 136th Regiment, N. Y. V.
BATTLE FIELD, GETTYSBURG, Pa.,
JULY 5TH, 1863.
FRIEND HARDING :—For the information of friends interested, I send you a list of the casualties in my company, during the terrible engagement of the 1st, 2d, and 3d insts.:—
Marsena S. Stout, killed.
Corp. Jos. E. Malone, wounded in wrist.
Priv. Henry Limerick, " head, mortally.
" Wm. L. Hewitt, " head.
" Jeremiah Cullinan, " side.
Joseph R. Hardendorf, in shoulder.
Elisha F. Hardendorf, in breast.
Gilbert Rulepaugh, in the hip.
Jacob Post, in the leg.
Corp. Luther Whitenack slightly, not disabled.
All the wounded are doing well excepting Limerick. Stout, after participating in a gallant charge on the 2d inst., was killed by a cannon ball on the following day, while removing a wounded comrade from the field. Our regiment has suffered severely; the loss in killed and wounded foots up one hundred and thirty eight. Yours truly,
J. H. BURGESS,
Capt. Co. F, 136th Regiment.

List of Casualties in the 136th Regiment N. S. V.
The following is the list of casualties in the 136th Regt. N. Y. V. at the late battle of Gettysburg. The 136th was recruited at Geneseo and vicinity and has done glorious work in the service of the Union.
HEADQUARTERS 136TH REGT. N. Y. S. V.,
GETTYSBURG, Pa., July 5th, 1863.
ISAAC BUTTS: I send you a list of the killed, wounded and missing in the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Regt. N. Y. S. V., which please publish.
Co. A—Corp. Jacob H. Whiteman, severely in face; Privates Clinton H. Miner, flesh wound arm and leg, severe; Geo. H. White, face, severe; Wm. Vanpelt, face severe; Wm. Hawks, hand, slight; Michael Galvin, foot, slight; Alonzo Crandall, head, slight; Charles F. Finch, arm, slight; Martin L. Finch, head, slight; Silas L. Pire, hand, slight. None killed.
Co. B—Lt. Bailey, very slightly in mouth; Lt. Drake, missing; Elias Gage, killed; Corp. Geo. Gibbs, do; Private Jas. F. Bacon, breast, neck and arm—will live; Corp. L. G. Bradley, breast, serious; Corp. Dorr Faulkner, arm, serious; Private Wm. S. Stebbins, foot, serious; Corp. J. H. Wright, foot, slight; Private George Drehemer, leg, flesh wound; Privates Wm. A. Edwards, hand; J. B. Tattenhall, breast, slight; Baldess Foote, leg; Edward Luce, foot; John Gavigan, wrist, slight; P. Cooligan, missing.
Co. C—Private Simon B. Withey, head, severe; Corp. Lovett Sherwood, thigh, slight; Privates Monroe H. Annis, hand, slight; Thomas Boyle, hand, slight; Geo. F. Briggs, wrist, severe; Wm. E. Duboise, arm, slight; Michael Geimer, thumb and neck, severe; Wells G. Nash, knee, slight; Seward J. Pearsons, arm, severe; John B. Kay, shoulder, severe; Wm. K. Selden, arm, slight; Richard Youells, bowels, mortal—died July 4th, 1863.
Co. D—Private M. Graham, wrist and stomach, serious; Corp. A. Walker, arm, serious; Private A. Camp, head, slight; M. Vollmer, leg, severe.
Co. E—Sergt. James Hanigan, James Doran, Z. C. Wiggins, killed; Corpls. John Christ, foot, slight; John M. Fierro, hip and groin, severe; Privates J. A. Barclay, bowels, slight; N. Conner, leg, severe; P. Duffy, side, by shell, slight; Milton Foskett, arm, flesh wound; James Lavery, head, severe—will live; Frederick Litzs, arm broken; W. H. Safford, arm, slight; M. Fitzsimons, arm, slight; John Maguire, thigh, flesh wound.
Co. F—Corp. Joseph E. Malone, slightly wounded in the arm by a fragment of shell; Privates Henry Limerick, mortally wounded by a piece of shell on the head; Jeremiah Cullisean, severely wounded by a musket ball shot through the side; Gilbert Rullopaugh, shot through the hip by a musket ball; Joseph R. Herdendorf, shot thro' the shoulder by a musket ball; Elisha F. Herdendorf, shot through the breast by a musket ball. The above three are mortally wounded. Jacob Post, flesh wound by musket ball through the leg—wound severe but not dangerous; Corp. Luther Whittnack, slightly wounded in the foot, also struck by a piece of shell on the back—some bruised; Privates Marsena Stout, killed instantly by solid cannon ball and buck shot—hit by the ball on the shoulder and by the shot in the back of the neck, passing through mouth; Wm. L. Hewitt, struck by a musket ball in the fore part of the head, wound severe.
Co. G—Sergt. Wm. Hover, Corpls. Geo. Blackall and John Hayen, killed; R. McDonald, shoulder, slight; L. J. Smith, breast and foot, severe; Privates Chas. Vogel, thigh; John Folmsbee, neck and shoulder, serious; D. V. Hall, leg; John Whitmore, arm and shoulder, severe; Robt. R. Marsh, shoulder, slight.
Co. H—Privates F. M. Wood, Arzy West, Chas. C. Ellwell and John Stowell, killed; Sergt. John Boyd, Jr., thigh and head, severe; Corp. Wm. Noonen; thigh and bowels, mortally; Privates H. C. Orr, right arm amputated; R. Mann, thumb; Peter Mees, back, mortally; L. B. Curtisss, arm, slight; Rogers Lawton, head, slight; Geo. H. Mosher, arm, severe; Wm. Franklin, leg, severe and missing; Corp. Clesher Warrmer, slight, foot.
Co. I—Privates ___ Wise, killed; D. L. Confer, killed; D. B. Price, slightly wounded; Capt. Jas. Conlon, in both arms, slightly; Privates S. H. Dye, leg and shoulder, severe; M. Flong, shoulder, slightly; Geo. Coon, arm; Wm. A. Miller, neck, slight; Jas. Campton, breast, slight; John Gill, bruise in arm. Sergt. S. Swarts, breast, severe; Privates Wm. H. McWhorter, A. B. Baker, killed.
Co. K—Corp. J. B. Isenhorn, head; Musician S. L. King, foot; Privates Simeon Skins, arm; Zack Barber, head and arm; Peter Conner, thigh; Sergt. Theron R. Cross, slight.
L. B. FAULKNER,
Lieut.-Col. 136th N. Y. S. V.

From the 136TH REGIMENT.
CAMP OF THE 136th REGT.,
GREENWICH, VA.,
AUG. 26th 1863.
EDITOR MIRROR:—Since I last wrote you we have enjoyed comparatively quiet times; our changes of camp have not been numerous nor our marches long ones. In the last month we have done a little drilling, and a great deal of guard and picket duty, at the several points of Warrenton Junction, Catletts Station, Brentsville, Bristows Station, and here (Greenwich.) The rest, we have been enjoying, was necessary to recruit the health of the army, after the fatigue of the campaign in Maryland and Pennsylvania. We are now located in the pleasantest camp we have had since we came into Virginia. We are in a nice piece of woods on the plantation of a wealthy Englishman, who, being a British subject, has had his property protected by safeguards whenever either of the contending armies have occupied this part of the country; his buildings, grounds and fences are none of them disturbed, his stock can visit our camp without fear of being made rations of, and the corn in his fields will ripen for anything we shall do to it. But what we prize more than anything else is the pure cool water, that we get here.—Around Warrenton Junction, Catletts Station and Bristows Station, we was obliged to drink most miserable warm stuff.
This morning is cool and delightful, a great change has taken place in the temperature of the atmosphere within the past two days; right gladly do we welcome the change, for the heated term we had been enjoying so long was beginning to make a great many of us sick; the early morning of to-day, however, woolen blankets and fires are comfortable.
Our Regiment is camped here alone, the rest of the Brigade are at Bristows Station doing picket duty, and guarding the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from the attacks of the numerous bands of guerrillas that infest this whole country, the guerrillas are well posted in regard to our every movement, and on the look-out for every train or Sutler’s wagon that gets outside our pickets unless protected by a strong guard. Last week the 73d Ohio, had a wagon, six mules, their mail and their guard of six men captured by them while going from here to Bristows. Four of our teamsters were also taken about the same time, they were out mounted on mules, looking for two other mules that we had lost, when suddenly a dozen mounted men with guns cocked, and their barrels on a line with their heads ordered them to surrender, which request they thought best to comply with. The guerrillas started them for Richmond, crossing over Bull Run mountains, they made tracks for the Shenandoah Valley. At the foot of the Pine Ridge one of the captives (Crozier of Co. B. from Dansville,) gave them the slip, and after many adventures succeeded in getting back within our lines. One of the prisoners, Ed McGuire, belongs to Co. E. and is from Java.
We have lately had a new lot of promotions in our Regt., which are as follows:—Capt. Henry L. Arnold, Co. I. to be Major; Adgt. C. I I . Young, Captain; Sergt. Major Sill, 2d Lieut.; Tresser and 1st Sergt. Peck of Co. C. to be 1st Lieutenants; 1st Sergt. Lucien Smith, Co. G. 1st Sergt. Henry S. Lucas, Co. E. and 1st Sergt. Gad Parker, Co. H. to be 2d Lieutenants.
Before closing I want to say one word for the soldiers to their friends at home, in regard to voting and the candidates they will support this fall. With one voice we all say vote for no man no matter by what political name he may be called, who is not in favor of using any and every means that is in our power to use in putting down this rebellion. Vote for no man whose word does not prove him to be a true Union War man. Vote for no man who would compromise the smallest of the rights of our cause. We have been soldiers too long, we have sacrificed and endured too much on account of this cursed rebellion to talk of compromise, and we want none of our friends at home to talk of it for us. If you value our lives, and wish for our speedy return to you, vote only for men who are pledged to a vigorous prosecution of the war. L. O. S.

Wyoming Mirror
Warsaw, August 24, 1864.
FROM THE 136TH REGIMENT.
CAMP 136TH N. Y. V., NEAR ATLANTA, GA.,
August 7th, 1864.
EDITOR MIRROR:—We lay in camp from where I wrote you on the 12th July, until the 17th, which gave us a rest of ten days—picketing being the only duty we had to do. On the 17th we crossed the Chattahoochee, and the 20th we crossed Peach Tree creek. Our Division—the 3d of the 20th Corps—filling up a gap there was between Geary's Division the 2d of our corps, and Newton's Division of the 4th. As events proved we were none too soon in getting into position, for we were hardly formed before the rebels made a terrible onslaught on our lines. That they were repulsed with great loss in every charge they made, you already know. The 136th took many prisoners, and the colors of the 31st Mississippi (rebel) regiment. For the amount of fighting our regiment did, our loss was very slight indeed; two killed and nine or ten wounded will cover our entire casualties for the day.
But we have lost the services of one our bravest and most beloved officers in Capt. A. A. Curtiss, who was shot through the right knee, rendering amputation of the leg necessary. He was one of the bravest of the brave, and in battle or whatever danger be seemed to know no fear.—We all sincerely hope his life may be spared, and although he may never again be able to join his regiment, he will yet do his country service in some capacity.
Since the battle of the 20th we have been gradually closing in on Atlanta, and to-day we are lying within two and a half miles of the city. On a slight eminence a little to our left, Atlanta can plainly be seen, and there are batteries in position on each side of us that can burst every shell they choose, exactly in the city.
This is the ninety-eighth day of this campaign, and if any one thinks we have had an easy time of it, he had better come and try it for himself. He can have a chance in the 136th, for at present we number only a few over two hundred fit for duty.
The health of the regiment is good, considering the amount of hard work and fighting it has done. We have had weather so hot that it was almost insufferable; but most of the time we have had plenty of good water, and our Commissary has kept us plentifully supplied with army rations, so that we have not suffered from hunger or thirst.
I wish I could tell you when we will occupy Atlanta. We are going to have the city, but when and how we shall get there is contraband news, and I am not at liberty to state the precise movements that are now about being developed. After we have got the city, I will tell you all about it.
L. O. S.

The Republican. GENESEO, N. Y.
THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 26.
Letter from the 136th Regiment.
LOOKOUT VALLEY. Tenn.,
November 4, 1863.
Mr. EDITOR.—In a recent issue of the Republican you remarked that the Regiment had left the army of the Potomac, and would now probably see some active service. We are quite disposed to agree with you in this, but at the same time think we have already seen some "active service." Our brigade accomplished a nice little bit of service last Friday morning, of which your readers may be glad to hear.
On Monday, the 26th ult. the Regiment being stationed at Anderson, guarding the Nashville and Chattanooga Rail Road, was relieved and ordered to rejoin the brigade at Bridgeport. On arriving there the brigade had marched across the river, so the Regiment camped at Bridgeport that night, and proceeding across the pontoons next morning rejoined the brigade at Shellmound. The force under Gen. Hooker, composed of one Division of the 12th Corps and two Divisions of the 11th Corps, then commenced its work of establishing communication on this side of the river between Bridgeport and Chattanooga—a measure highly necessary to the welfare of the troops at Chattanooga, as their supplies were very scanty, and the only way of conveying rations to them was by wagons and pack mules over bad roads on the north side of the river. The distance from Bridgeport to Chattanooga on the north side of the river is 60 miles; on the south side but 25 miles.
Leaving Shellmound the force reached Brown's Ferry about three miles from Lookout Mountain, at sunset of 28th Oct. The advance had some skirmishing with the enemy near Wahatchie, but no force was met large enough to dispute our progress. Late that night an attack was made on Geary's division, of the 12th Corps, who had encamped about 3 miles in our rear. Gen. Howard ordered the 11th Corps to return to the aid of Gen. Geary. The men turned out promptly and the brigade was soon on the road. When within one and one-half miles of Geary's camp, it was found that the rebels had taken possession of a hill, at the base of which the road passed on which our troops were marching. It was considered important that the rebels should be immediately driven from that position, and Gen. Von Steinwehr assigned the task to the 2d brigade. The hill is near two hundred feet high, and ascends sharply from the road at an angle of more than 45 degrees; the crest is six yards wide. You may believe it was no easy job to charge up this hill at 2 o'clock in the morning and dislodge a large force at the top. The courage and gallantry of our men was equal to the task, however, and accomplished it in a manner that won the commendation of our commanders.
Arrived at the base of the hill the regiments were formed in battallion lines and started up the ascent. The 33d Massachusetts and 73d Ohio, returning the fire of the enemy were repulsed with considerable loss; but rallying, they again essayed the task and succeeded in reaching the crest. Col. Wood, who displayed the utmost coolness and courage, and has won the respect and admiration of the Regiment, ordered his men to reserve their fire; the rebels thus failed to get a range upon the men, and their bullets harmed only the trees and branches above the heads of the steadily advancing line. On reaching the crest the 136th poured in their volley, and advancing with a tremendous yell drove the miserable subjects of King Jeff. from their position, and scattered them in all directions. The frightened enemy in their flight left the hillside behind them strewn with hats, caps haversacks, guns and other articles of equipment. Prisoners taken say that the hill was occupied by Laws' brigade of Longstreet's Corps. Five regiments were on the crest and one regiment held in reserve. Six hundred will cover the number of the dislodging force. Our loss was 2 killed: N. Gurgan, Co. B, and H. C. Gardiner, Co. A. Albro and Sergt. Coleman, Co. A, Russell and Corporal Huggins, Co. F, wounded.
Our men feel very proud of this victory—which if the dislodgement had been attempted in the daytime they would not have won so easily. In their ascent in the dark, through tangled underbrush and over fallen trees, they did not notice the heighth and steepness of the hill, and reached the crest in good wind and free from fatigue. The possession of this hill is essential to uninterrupted communication between Bridgeport and Chattanooga. Our brigade have thrown up breastworks on the crest and are encamped behind them.
The enemy occupy Lookout Mountain, contrary to the newspapers, from which they amuse themselves by throwing shot and shell at our trains, camps, and fortifying parties.—Their missils have done us no harm yet, though occasionally striking in disagreeable proximity. Men and officers are quite satisfied with each other. “Old Hooker” has won our confidence by his evident ability and his perfect fearlessness and coolness when in danger. I enclose a copy of the general Order of Col. Smith, Brigade Commander. Rejoicing, as you probably do, that the regiment has done so well, and escaped so fortunately, I remain,
Yours truly, M.

Headquarters 2d Brigade, 2d Division, 11th Corps,
Lookout Valley, near Chattanooga, Oct. 31, ’63.
GENERAL ORDERS.
The Colonel Commanding in adding to the testimony of others to the valor of his troops, renews his thanks to the officers and men under his command for their heroic conduct on the afternoon of Oct. 28th, and the morning of the 29th.
The splendid deeds of that memorable morning need not to be recounted. The glory of the living and the dead is complete, and sufficient for the most ambitious. To those brave comrades of all grades who so gallantly responded when called to breast the wall of fire from two thousand muskets he cannot be too grateful. Yours is the credit—yours the fame. Let its brilliant lustre never be tarnished, either upon the field of battle or in the more quiet routine of duty.
You are above jealousy of others or sinister discussions about the appropriation of praise. Your greatest satisfaction will be derived from the consciousness of a perilous duty heroically done.
You have won the title of Gallant Soldiers, add to it that of honorable and upright men and your fame shall be perfect, and the most precious legacy you can bequeath to your loved ones at home. Let us sympathize with the suffering wounded and cherish the memory of our fallen comrades.

OBITUARY.—Under the appropriate head will be found the death of Edward Winans, a member of Co. G, 136th Regiment, who died December 11th, at Athens, Tenn., from over exertion in marching. The deceased was a son of T. E. Winans, Esq., of Avon, N. Y. He enlisted in Col. Wood's regiment in the autumn of 1863, and had passed through five or six hard fought engagements. He stood in fine repute for his bravery and perseverance, and his early death is sadly lamented by a large circle of relatives and friends.

THE 135TH REGIMENT.—In the Warsaw Mirror of last week we find a letter from this Regiment. We give an extract or two:
The 136th took many prisoners, and the colors of the 31st Mississippi (rebel) regiment. For the amount of fighting our regiment did our loss was very slight indeed; two killed and nine or ten wounded will cover our entire casualties for the day.
But we have lost the services of one of our bravest and most beloved officers in Capt. A. A. Curtiss, who was shot in the right knee rendering amputation necessary. He was one of the bravest of the brave, and in battle or whatever danger he seemed to know no fear. We all sincerely hope his life may be spared, and although he may never again be able to join his regiment, he will yet do his country service in some capacity.
Since the battle of the 20th we have been gradually closing in on Atlanta, and to-day we are lying within two and a half miles of the city. On a slight eminence a little to our left, Atlanta can plainly be seen, and there are batteries in position on each side of us that can burst every shell they choose, exactly in the city.
This is the ninety-eighth day of this campaign, and if any one thinks we have had an easy time of it, he had better come and try it for himself. He can have a chance in the 136th, for at present we number only a few over two hundred fit for duty.

Our Wounded in the Nashville Hospitals.
From the Wyoming County Mirror we clip the following communication from Horatio Seymour, Esq., of Buffalo. It will be interesting to those having friends in the Western Army to know how they may procure information concerning them if they be sick or wounded:
Buffalo, June 10, 1864.
LEVI TRUEWELL, ESQ.—Dear Sir:— I was a few days since at Nashville, by the bedside of Lieut. Hall, of your place, (136th Regt.,) seeking to relieve his sufferings,—but when the lockjaw set in, that terminated his life, little could be done for his relief. He had every attention, but death ended his pain that night. I learn his remains have reached his home.
It occurred to me that the friends of other soldiers in the Regiment would be interested in knowing their whereabouts.
I enclose a list of those I found in Hospitals at Nashville. If you will have the same published in Livingston and Wyoming counties, it would perhaps be well.
You may know that parties wishing further information as to these in hospital, can obtain it by inquiries through the Ladies Aid Society, Branch of Sanitary Commission at this place.
The wounded, generally, are doing well and have excellent treatment in well regulated hospitals. Yours respectfully.
HORATIO SEYMOUR.
Of Buffalo.

List of Soldiers of 136th Regt., N. Y. S. V. in Hospitals, at Nashville, Tenn:
Company A—Aaron S. Gee, Samuel Green, William C. Hall, Jonah Traite, Abraham Turner.
Co. B—George B. Knapp, James Moon, Amos J. Vanderhoff.
Co. C—Charles Hannah, Asahel Horton, Thomas Mooney, S. P. Pierson, G. H. Sanger, J. A. Shaylin, A. Sherwood.
Co. D—Wm. Henry Brassy, Geo. Baker, Wm. S. Blakesdale, Wm. Claskey, Alonzo Camp, Geo. W. Jones, J. S. Laffiwell, Thomas Maskey. Jonah F. Putney, Aaron Walker, Hosea Webster, John H. Bower, G. R. Smead.
Co. E—Lewis Skinner.
Co. F—Samuel Yanson, M. H. Patterson.
Co. G —Lieut. John Millen, Peter Acker, Amos Blair, Christopher Fisher, Henry Fanning, R. F. Griswold.
Co. H—Lorenzo A. Curtis, C. P. Dutton, Peter Degasper, Wilson Hickley, J. B. Isenhow, Patrick King, Geo. W. Lawton, Felix Managhan, Elias Morgan, A. C. Smith, Patrick Sullivan, Alonzo White, E. Yost.
Co. I—Wm. Eagan, Daniel G. Wamhold, J. N. Philhawer, Peter Nittsa, R. F. Goodman, P. F. Clayton.
Co. K—Hugh Braston.
These names were taken hurredly, and some may be mis-spelt.

LIEUT. EDWARD SILL.—This young soldier, son of Dr. Sill of Livingston county, and formerly a private in the 136th N. Y. V., is numbered among the missing. He was aide de camp to Maj. Gen. Butterfield and that officer has written to his father giving the particulars of the somewhat peculiar circumstances under which he was last heard from. He was suffering from an attack of neuralgia for some time but was on duty, and in the battle near Dallas on the 25th ult., was sent by Gen. Butterfield to direct the movements of a distant brigade. A fearful rain storm came on and darkness closed around the army so that it was almost impossible after nightfall to pass along the lines without getting lost. Lieut. Sill in returning to headquarters was last seen by the Colonel of an Indiana regiment from whom he inquired the way, and at that time seemed to be suffering much from pain in his head. He remarked that he had tied his horse a little to the right.—Next morning the horse was found but no traces of the Lieutenant. It is feared that he wandered into the rebel lines and was taken prisoner.
The illness under which he suffered renders anxiety on his account more acute. Lieut. Sill in rising from the ranks filled successively the positions of Sergeant-Major, Adjutant, and Adj. General to Col. Wood.
The long and kindly circumstantial letter which Gen. Butterfield has written speaks well for his goodness of heart, and for the esteem which his young Aide must have earned.

From the 136th Regiment.
The Warsaw Democrat extracts the following from a letter written by E H Owen, of the 136th Regt. and dated in "Lookout Valley, March 11th."
I was over to Chattanooga yesterday. It is about such a city as Batavia, or as near it as a Southern city can be compared to a Northern one, the latter being always compactly built, while the former are generally scattered, and cover much more ground.—Chattanooga at present has a busy appearance, as soldiers are coming in on every train from the North.
I am glad to see reinforcements coming in, for I think we shall need all we can get in the coming campaign, which some say is to commence very soon. The troops have all left Chattanooga except two negro regiments and a few provost guards.
The 11th corps is at present doing picket duty, and guarding the Railroad between Chattanooga and Bridgeport. The post is an important one, and we have the name of doing our duty well. On the 8th the 2d Brigade was inspected by General Steinwher, commanding the Division, and by General Howard, commanding the Corps.
The weather is very warm, and it seems like summer, and the few people who live around here have got their gardens planted. Potatoes were planted in February.

Casualties in the 136 N. Y. V.
The 136 N. Y. V., a Livingston Co. Regiment was in the battle near Resaca, Ga. and suffered considerable loss. It went in with 339 men and lost 83, and it speaks well for the regiment that none were missing.
Lieut. Col. Faulkner sent the Dansville Advertiser a list of casulties which are published in an extra. We copy below:
ADVERTISER OFFICE,
Friday, May 26th, 5 o'clock P. M.
We are indebted to Lieut. Col. Faulkner, Commanding l36th, N. Y. for the following accurate list of casulties in that regiment, at the Battle near Resaca Ga., Sunday, May, 15th:
KILLED.
Co. A.—Sergt. A. T. White.
Co. B.—Private James F. Littles.
Co. C—David Lockwood.
Co. D.—1st Sergt. Wm. R. Dudley.
Co. E.—1st Sergt. G. J. Franklin, Privates Chas. Gath, Charles Welton.
Co. F.—Private A. W. Palmer.
Co. L—Sergt. William Lawn, Private David Close.
Co. K.—Sergt. W. O. Church, Private Evert Voorhies.
WOUNDED.
Co. A.—Sergt A. L. Gee, thigh, severely; Private Samuel Green, shoulder, severely.
Co. B.—Privates John Foot, right breast, severely; A. J. Vanderhoff, left arm, severely; James Moore, left shoulder, severely; Henry King, hand, slightly.
Co. C—Capt. W. S. Chapin, head, slightly; Corp. G. A. Sanger, wrist, badly; Privates H. A. Dayton, thigh, badly; Charles Hanna, side, slightly; Asahel Horton, thigh, slightly; Thomas Mooney, side, slightly; John Osgood, foot, badly; Ammi Perkins, abdomen, badly, (since died); O. O. Sherwood, thigh, badly; J. A, Stavline arm, slightly.
Co. D.--Corps. H. H. Blakesley, arm, slightly ; Aaron Walker, leg, slightly; J. F. Putney, leg, badly; Privates George Baker, hand, slightly; W. S. Blakesley, arm, badly; J. H. Bowen, arm, badly; Alonzo Camp, wrist, badly; Harvey Carpenter, knee, badly; Wm. Cluchy, leg badly; J. S. Leffingwell, breast, slightly; Thomas Markey, head, badly; H. E. Pond, groin, badly; Hosea Webster, foot, badly; Geo. D. Knapp, leg, badly.
Co. E.—Capt. Frank Collins, forehead, slightly; Privates Peter Asher, foot, badly; Charles Carrol, side, badly; Chistopher Fisher, arm, slightly; H. M. Mathews, side, slightly; A. Stewart, side, slightly; W. C. Smith, thigh, slightly; H. I. Schrauder, left breast, badly; Charles Smith, groin, slightly; John Tait, arm, slightly; L. P. Skinner, leg, slightly.
Co. F.—B. F. Drunnon, forehead, slightly; Wm. H. Peterson, hand, slightly.
Co. G.—1st Serg't J. Miller, right arm, badly.
Co. H.—Corp. J. S. Wallace, side, badly, (supposed mortally;) Private L. B. Curtis, hand, slightly; Peter De Casper, side, badly; Patrick King, thigh, slightly; Patrick Sullivan, finger, slightly; A. C. Smith, hand, slightly; G. T. Worden, abdomen, mortally; (since died;) Geo. Washeight, arm, slightly; Ignatz Yust, arm, slightly; C. P. Dutton, hand, slightly; Francis L. Head, hip, badly.
Co. I.—Corp. R. P. Westcott, hip, slightly; Privates Jerome Cheesbro, right leg, amputated; Emery Cheesbro, hip, slightly; P. P. Clayton, foot, slightly; R. H. Gordon, knee, slightly; Peter Nettler, thigh, badly; Isaac N. Philhower, hip, slightly; Daniel E. Wambold, hand, badly.
Co. K.—1st Lieut, W. C. Hall, heel, severely; Privates Patrick Russell, breast, arm and leg, badly; A. C. Matthews, knee, slightly; Peter Conner, foot, badly; Huger Bradden, both thighs, badly; George Clapp, face, slightly.
Enlisted men killed, 12
Enlisted men wounded, 67
Officers wounded, 3
Missing, none.
Total, 83

Capt. Chapin remained on the field throughout the action. The dead were all buried east of the Dalton and Resaca turnpike, and their graves marked with name, company and regiment. The wounded were all found, taken to hospitals and well cared for. Number of guns remaining in regiment, 260. The regiment went into the light with 339 guns.
LESTER B. FAULKNER,
Lieut. Col. Commanding,
The following casualties occurred since the action of May 15th, in skirmishing with the rear guard of the retreating enemy:
May 18, Private F. M. Allen, Co. K, left side, not dangerous.
May 19, Private Joshua Sanford, Co. B, left leg, painful but not dangerous.
Private E. F. Herdendorf, right arm, severely, bone broken near the shoulder.
Private Charles N. Finch, Co. A. flesh wound in thigh.
Col. Wood is well, ditto Pratt and Baily.
L. B. F.

Cassville, Ga., May 19, 1864.
The 136th Regiment.
This regiment, commanded by Col. James J. Wood, Jr., until he was appointed to the command of a brigade, and now under command of Lieut. Col. Lester B. Faulkner, was in the battle of the 15th of May, near Resaca,
Georgia. The regiment went into the action with 339 men, and lost 82 in killed and wounded. It speaks well for the discipline of the regiment and the conduct of the men that none are reported as missing. In the list of casualties we only notice the name of Lieut. John Millen, of this town, who was wounded in the arm, but not so as to endanger the loss of the limb. Letters from the Regiment state that the "boys" are in good health and spirits. We append an official list of the killed and wounded:
KILLED.
Co. A—Sergt. A. T. White.
Co. B.—Private James F. Littles.
Co. C—David Lockwood.
Co. D—1st Serg't Wm. R. Dudley.
Co. E—1st Serg't. G. J. Franklin, Privates Charles Gath, Charles Welton.
Co. F—Private A. W. Palmer.
Co. I—Serg't William Lawn, Private David Close.
Co. K—Serg't W. O. Church, Private Evert Voorhees.
WOUNDED.
Co. A—Serg't A. M. Gee, thigh, severely; Private Samuel Green, shoulder, severely.
Co C—Privates John Foot, right breast, severely; A. J. Vanderhoff, left arm, severely; James Moore, left shoulder, severely; Henry King, hand, slightly.
Co. C—Captain W. S. Chapin, head, slightly; Corp. G. A. Sanger, wrist, badly; Privates H. A. Dayton, thigh, badly; Charles Hanna, side, slightly; Asahel Horton, thigh, slightly; Thomas Mooney, side, slightly; John Osgood, foot, badly; Ammi Perkins, abdomen, badly, (since died); O. O. Sherwood, thigh, badly; J. A. Stayline, arm, slightly.
Co. D—Corp. H. H. Blakesley, arm, slightly; Aaron Walker, leg, slightly; J. F. Putney, leg, badly; Alonzo Camp, wrist, badly; Harvey Carpenter, knee, badly; Wm. Cluchy, leg, badly; J. S. Leffingwell, breast, slightly; Thomas Markey, head, badly; H. E. Pond, groin, badly; Hosea Webster, foot, badly; G. D. Knapp, leg, badly.
Co. E—Capt. Frank Collins, forehead, slightly; Privates Peter Asher, foot, badly; Charles Carroll, side, badly; Christopher Fisher, arm, slightly; H. M. Mathews, side, slightly; A. Stewart, side, slightly; W. C. Smith, thigh, slightly; H. I Schrauder, left breast, badly; Charles Smith, groin, slightly; John Tait, arm, slightly; L. P. Skinner, leg, slightly.
Co. F—B. F. Drunnon, forehead, slightly; Wm. H. Peterson, hand, slightly.
Co. G—1st Serg't J. Milieu, right arm, badly.
Co. H—Corp. J. S. Wallace, side, badly, (supposed mortally); Private L. B. Curtiss, hand, slightly; Peter De Casper, side, badly; Patrick King, thigh, slightly; Patrick Sullivan, finger, slightly; A. C. Smith, hand, slightly; G. T. Worden, abdomen, mortally, (since died); Geo. Washeight, arm, slightly; Ignatz Yust, arm, slightly; C. P. Dutton, hand, slightly; Francis L. Head. hip, badly.
Co. I—Corp. R. P. Westcott, hip, slightly; Privates Jerome Cheesbro, right leg, amputated; Emery Cheesbro, hip, slightly; P. P. Clayton, foot, slightly; P. H. Gordon, knee, slightly; Peter Neitler, thigh, badly; Isaac N. Philhower, hip, slightly; Daniel E. Wambold, hand, badly.
Co. K—1st Lieut. W. C. Hall, heel, severely; Privates Patrick Russell, breast, arm, and leg, badly; A. C. Mathews, knee, slightly; Peter Conner, foot, badly; Huger Bradden, both thighs, badly; George Clapp, face, slight.
Enlisted men killed 12
Enlisted men wounded 67
Officers wounded 3
Missing, none
Total 82
Capt. Chapin remained on the field throughout the action. The dead were all buried west of the Dalton and Resaca turnpike, and their graves marked with name, company and regiment. The wounded were all found, taken to hospitals and well cared for. Number of guns remaining in the regiment, 200. The regiment went into the fight with 339 guns.
The following casualties occurred since the action of May 15th, in skirmishing with rear guard of the retreating enemy:
May 18, Private P. M. Allen. Co. K, left side, not dangerous.
May 19, Private Joshua Sanford, Co. B, left leg, painful but not dangerous.
Private E. F. Herdendorf, right arm severely, bone broken near the shoulder.
Private Chas. N. Finch, Co. A. flesh-wound in thigh.

COL. WOOD.—We announced some time ago that Col. Wood had been placed in command of a Brigade in the Cumberland army, and as he is now the Senior Colonel, it is quite probable that he will be promoted. The Colonel has distinguished himself in the field, and his regiment, the 136th, is one of the best in the service. The Brigade is composed of the following Regiments:
138th N. Y. V. I, Lt. Col. L. B. Faulkner, commanding.
55th Ohio, V. I., Col. Charles Gambee commanding.
73d Ohio, V. I., Lt. Col. Richard Long commanding.
33d Mass. V. I., Lt. Col. Godfrey Rider commanding.
26th Wis. V. I., Maj. Fred. C. Wincler, commanding.
Col. Wood has issued the following order:
HEAD-QUARTERS, 3d BRIG.. 3d Div.,
20th Corps, LOOKOUT VALLEY, TENN.,
April 20th, 1864.
GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.
In compliance with Department Orders and assignment from Head-Quarters, 3d Division, the undersigned assumes command of the 3d Brigade, 3d Division. 20th Corps, Army of the Cumberland.
The following staff officers are announced:
Major. B. L. Hovey, 136th N. Y. Vols., Brigade Surgeon.
Capt. Campbell H. Young, 136th N. Y. V'ls Act'g Ass't Adj't General.
Capt. James P. Chipman, 33d Mass, Vols. Brigade Inspector.
Capt. Orange Sackett, Jr., 136th N. Y. Vols. Commissary of Subsistence.
Lieut. B. C. Taber, 55th Ohio Vols. Brigade Quartermaster.
Lieut. G. A. Morse. 33d Mass. Vols. Brigade Provost Marshal.
Lieut. C. Boeckh, 45th N. Y. Vols. Brigade Topographical Officer.
Capt. Edward H. Pratt, 136th N. Y. Vols. A. A. D. C.
Lieut. Edward E. Sill, 136th N. Y. Vols., A. D. C.
Lieut. B. H. True, 136th N. Y. Vols. Brigade Ambulance Officer.
They will be recognized and obeyed accordingly.
As Capt. C. H. Young is now absent on detached service in the State of New York, by order of the War Department, Capt. E. H. Pratt will discharge the duties of Assistant Adjutant General until the return of Captain Young, and will be recognized accordingly.
JAMES WOOD, Jr.,
Colonel 136th N. Y. Vols.,
Commanding Brigade.

The 136th Regiment.—O. B. Maxwell, Esq., has received a letter from Capt. Pratt, of the 136th, dated on the battle-field of Resaca, in Georgia, May 16th, from which we copy the following:—
" Terrible battle fought yesterday. Our brigade lost 365 killed and wounded. Our regiment 82. Co. B, (Capt. Pratt,) lost James P. Littles, shot through the head and killed instantly, Jno. Foote, shot through the lungs, lived a few hours; two wounded.
Our brigade, commanded by Colonel James Wood, Jr., behaved splendidly, and have been highly complimented in a written communication sent us by Gen. Butterfield. All our dead are buried and the graves distinctly marked, so that it will not be difficult to find them at any time.
Lieutenant-Colonel Faulkner is in command of our Regiment, and acquitted himself with great credit." [Dansville Herald.

THE 136TH REGIMENT.— Lieut. Col. Faulkner in command of the above regiment sends the Dansville Advertiser the following list of casualties up to May 19th, since the last report:
Co. C—Lieut. Bruce Luther, slightly in face.
Co. D—Private George A. Tilford, severely in left leg.
Co. E—Privates Edward Lynch, severely in right knee; James A. Dow, severely in left foot.
Co. F—Privates Andrew Clute, slightly in right knee; Ira W. Sherwood, slightly in face.
Co. G—Privates James Fanning, slightly in neck and breast; James S. Jones, severely in groin; William Green, slightly in back; Newton W. Neff, flesh wound in left leg; Dominique Neip, flesh wound in right leg.
Co. H—Private Mathias Eker, slightly in side; 1st Serg't John Bannon, slightly in left arm; Corporal Daniel B. Whipple, slightly in toe.
Co. I—Private Harrison T. Clemons, mortally in bowels, (since died.)
1st Lieut. Edward E. Sill, missing since May 25th
He also reports the following between the 19th of May, and the 20th of June:

WOUNDED.
Co. A—Private Francis B. Brown, breast, slight.
Co. B—Private John Lewis, right arm, severe.
Co. C—Corp. James M. Decker, hand, severe.
Co. D—Private James Decker, hand, slight.
Co. F—Private Peter Chapman, back, severe; Stephen Hayward, head, slight.
Co. H—Sergt. James M. Jones, side, slight.
Co. H—Private Seely T. Foote, left leg, flesh wound.
Co. I—Private William Close, breast, slight.
Co. K—Sergt. George Coon, breast, severe; Privates James McKee, right arm, severe; Leonard Pike, right leg, slight.

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: March 25, 2007
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/136thInf/136thInfCWN.htm

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