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159th Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

Colonel Edward L. Molineux, formerly lieutenant colonel of the Twenty-third regiment National Guard, at the breaking out of the rebellion resigned his commission in that regiment, and succeeded, after great and untiring effort, in raising the Third Senatorial district regiment, afterwards known as the One Hundred and Fifty-ninth New York Volunteers. The regiment was ordered to the Department of the Gulf, where it has taken an honorable part in the many hard fought battles, including Sabine Cross Roads and pleasant Hill, at which letter the regiment was badly cut up and their colors destroyed. The officers and members of the Twenty-third regiment National Guard, remembering with pleasure their former connection with Colonel Miloneux, decided on presenting his regiment with a new stand of colors, to which was added a handsome sword to Col. Molineux. The following letters of presentation and acceptance will no doubt be read with pleasure, not only by the many friends personal friends of the Colonel, but also by the friends and relatives of the due regiment, which he commands.
Brooklyn, July 24, 1864.
Col. Edward L. Molineux, 159th N. Y. V., New Orleans:
It becomes my privilege, as president of the Council of Officers of the Twenty-third regiment N. G. S. N. Y., to convey to you the expression of regard and honor for yourself, as a patriot and soldier, which this regiment has recently caused to be prepared, for your acceptance.
With this will be forwarded a sword and equipments, together with a full stand of regimental colors, which I beg you to accept from the officers and men of the Twenty-third regiment, your friends and former associates.
May the triumphant day soon come when all shall rejoice in liberty, peace and a reunited country--the recompense for these years of war and sacrifice.
JAMES H. FROTHINGHAM,
President of the Council Twenty-third regiment N. G.

HEADQUARTERS, SECOND DIVISION NINETEENTH
ARMY CORPS, UNITED STATES TRANSPORT
CAHAWBA, AT SEA, AUGUST 20, 1864.
JAMES H. FROTHINGHAM, Esq., President of the Council,
Twenty-third regiment N. G. S. N. Y.:
I find some difficulty in expressing to you, the representative of the members of the Twenty-third regiment, my feelings of gratitude for the elegant testimonial of friendship and reward which my old comrades have in their kindness presented to me.
I can fully assure you that the splendid stand of colors will be nobly and bravely carried by the One Hundred and Fifty-ninth regiment, and I sincerely pray to God that strength may be given me in every trial to be worthy of your sword and your esteem.
EDWARD L. MOLINEUX,
Colonel 159th N. Y. V., commanding.

We are indebted to our neighbor of Gazette for the following:--
The 159th Regiment.
Colonel Edward L. Molineux, of the 159th Regiment, favored us with a call last week. He was badly wounded at the severe engagement at Irish Bend, Louisiana, on the 14th day of April, when so many gallant young men of Columbia County fell. While leading his Regiment on to a bayonet charge, and uttering a word of command, a rifle ball entered his mouth, taking off one-half of the upper jaw, and passed out at the center of his left cheek. His escape from death was miraculous, but bullets sometimes take mysterious freaks.
We are happy to announce that the Colonel has recovered from his injury, and left on Friday to join his regiment. He is a fine looking, athletic young man, of slight frame but large courage, and will be sure to win high distinction or an honorable grave.
Colonel MOLINEUX has furnished us an official list of the killed and wounded in his regiment during this engagement, which we give below. It is the only complete and authentic list that has been published:

KILLED.
Lieut. Col. Gilbert A. Draper.
Adjutant Robert D. Lathrop.

Company A.
1st Lieut. John W. Manley Private Reynolds, James
Private Connery, Patrick "  Snyder, Joseph
" Keily, John "  Winslow, Warren
" Kipp, Robert

Company
Private Houghtaling, Jas.  Private Riley, Daniel

Company D.
Private Halfas, Charles

Company E.
Private Boice, Richard Private Wolf, Henry D.
“  Silvernail, Peter 

Company F.
Private Eaton, Henry   Private Lawse, John G.
"  Flowers, Zebiuon

Company G.
2d Lt. Byron F. Lockwood Private Morrison, James
Private Murphy, John "  Sherrin, James N.

Company I.
1s Sergt. Baker, Mark M. Corpl. Hawse, William H.
Sergt. Boaher, Theodore

Company K.
1st Lt. Wm. R. Pinnkett,   Private Asbell, Andrew
2d "  Charles F. Price,  "  Miler, David
Total Killed.—Commissioned Officers 6
Enlisted Men 23
Total  29

WOUNDED.
Colonel Edward L. Molineux.
Quartermaster Sergeant John Charlott.

Company A.
2s Lt. Wm. F. Tiemann, Private Kinney, George
1st Sgt. Edward Tynan,  "  Keagan, Patrick
Corp. Higgins, John "  Mosier, Richard M.
Private Akin, Thomas  "  Maurrer, Solomon
" Brenzel, William  "  Tator, John D.
" Dennis, John "  Ward, Thomas
" Daley, Thomas" Winans, Charles I.

Company B.
1st Sgt. Gavin, Frank P.
Corpl. Lewis, Smith H.
Private French, Stephen
  " Kerron, John
  “ Corson, Thomas
  " Zeigier, Fredk. V.

Company C.
Private Calkins, William   Private Rider, John
  " Coons, Andrew  "  Scheneck, Adam
  " Rockfeller, Martin

Company D.
Sergt. Rose, Isaac L. Private Messinncok, Louis
Private Kilsler, Frank W.  "  Shook, Adam

Company E.
1st Sgt. Macy, Samuel B. Private Hart, William H.
Private Burnes, James  " Peterson, Chas. H.
"  Decker, James  " Miller, Jessie
"  Dorran, James  " Gyre, Francis

Company F.
Private Doyle, John   Private Tozer, Bart.
"  Kerren, Richard "  Miller, Aaron
"  McKay, Edward "  White, Thomas
"  McKay, Terrance

Company G.
1st Sgt. Tanner, Wesley Private Smith, Leonard
Corpl. Devlin, John "  Stickles, Cornelius
Private Forth, Michael

Company H.
Captain Wells O. Pettit, Private Bennett, James
Sergt. Kennedy, Wm. J. " Hopkins, Bryan
Corpl. Nefus, John  " Murphy, Michael
Private Adams, Wash'ton "  Roden, George

Company I.
Private Coons, Alvirus Private Reed, Joseph
"  Coons, Jacob

Company K.
Private Corcoran, Joseph, Private Hahn, Henry
"  Caughlin, John  "  Kelly, James
"  Carr, George " Kerron, James M.
"  Emmons, John
Total Wounded.-- Commissioned Officers 3
Enlisted Men 66
Total  69

MISSING.
Company A.
Private Funk, Morgan Private Junes, Justus
" Ferris, Joseph "  McGuire, John
" Jennings, Daniel  " Stephens, Geo. D.

Company F.
Private Carboy, Daniel Private Nichols, Floyd C.
"  Dewire, John  "  Mahone, Michael

Company K.
Corpl. Mills, Joseph Private Ashton, Samuel
Total Missing.—  Commissioned Officers 0
Enlisted Men  12
Total 12

Total Killed 29
  "  Wounded 69
  " Missing 12
Total Casualties 110

Letter from the 159th.
[Communicated for the Republican.]
NEW IBERIA, April 15, 1863.
DEAR ___: I write to inform you that our Regiment, (the 159th) was in the bloody engagement at a place called Indian's Bend, some thirty miles from Berwick Bay. The fight commenced on Tuesday, April 12th, at 6 A. M. The First Louisiana routed and drove the enemy, who left on a double quick. The next day our Brigade took the lead. The Twenty-Fifth Connecticut and the Twenty-Sixth Maine started after the enemy, while the Thirteenth Connecticut and our Regiment was held in reserve. At length the firing became very hot, when the order came for us to charge bayonet. It was obeyed with alacrity, though we were mowed down at a terrible rate.
The following is a list of the casualties to the Hudson boys as far as I have been able to ascertain: Col. Molineaux, wounded through the mouth, not dangerously; Lt. Col. Draper, shot through the heart, dead; Adjutant Robert Lathrop, of Stockport, shot in the breast, dead; First Lieut. Co. A., John Manly, shot dead; Second Lieut. Co. A. Frank Tieman, shot through the back of his neck, not dangerous; Orderly Edward Tynan, shot through his thigh, not dangerous; First Corporal John Higgins, may have too lose his leg; John Dennis, through his shoulder, not dangerous; Wm. H. Hollenbeck, through his arm, not dangerous; John Kelly was wounded and afterwards bayoneted by the Rebels while lying upon the ground, dead. Dangerously wounded—"Paddy Bush," Warren Winslow. Not dangerous—John Tator, in the leg; James Reynolds, in the head; Charles Winans, in the stomach; Joseph Snyder, Thomas Ward and Pat Kegan in the leg; Thos. Darling and George Finney in the foot; Thomas Aldus, in the arm; Robert Kipp, in the knee, bad; Richard Hosier in shoulder and breast, bad—all from Co. A. Lieut. Byron Lockwood, killed; Jas. Morrison was shot and died shortly after; Wm. H. Haws, shot dead through his left eye; Orderly Sergeant Baker, Co. I. shot dead; Orderly Macy, Co. E. wounded in the arm.
After the battle I went among the wounded and did all in my power to alleviate their sufferings. One poor fellow asked me not to blame him for his loud cries—that on the battle-field when he fell he had borne his sufferings like a soldier, in silence, but that the intense torture he then felt was too intolerable for any human being to bear in silence or with suppressed groaning. * * * I could do little but weep in silence over their wounds.
I came very near being shot myself, my overcoat which was rolled up around my neck receiving three balls—the only thing that saved me. We are driving the Rebels before us, taking a great many prisoners. We have followed them up over one hundred miles and have about driven them out of Louisiana, Old Columbia County's sons have done their duty bravely and like good soldiers, dying, where they have died, with their faces to the foe. T. B.

One Hundred and Fifty-ninth Regiment N. Y. Vols.—The Storming party—List of Killed and Wounded.
The following letter from Col. Molineaux, of the 159th Regiment, N. T. Vols., dated Donaldsonville, June 16, to the Committee of Correspondence of the War Fund Association, was received recently:
"In compliance with the request intimated in the circular, I have the honor to enclose a list of killed and wounded in the late engagement before Port Hudson, which will prove of interest to the citizens of Brooklyn. It is with great pride that I inform you the regiment not only fully sustained its reputation for firmness in face of the enemy, but won new honors. When volunteers were called for, the forlorn hope to lead the storming columns organized for the assault Which was to take place, but which was rendered  unnecessary by the surrender, the regiment furnished more by far than most other organizations, and as I think it may be of interest to your Committee,
I furnish a list of the names of the volunteers:
Capt. E. McD. Hart, Co. F; First Lieut. Duncan Richmond, co.H; Second Lieut. Alfred Greenleaf, co. B; Sergeant Michael Hogan, co. C; Corporal Edgar Hollenbeck, do; Private Christian Schrack, do; Sergt. James T.  Perkins, co. E; Privates John Thorp, co. E; Hugh McElroy, co. B; Amos Hart, do; George Hatfield, do; John Taylor, do; Sergt. G. S. Gullen, co. F; Privates Bartholomew Fozer, do; James Brazier, co. I; Geo. W. Scholefield, do; Sergeant Thomas Bergen, co. K.
At the time when the Volunteers were called for, the regiment had only 140 men and 10 officers fit for duty. I cannot refrain requesting your committee will assist as far as possible the families who apply for relief at the present time. The regiment has not been paid since January 1st, and probably will not be for some time, owing to the loss of regimental papers, &c, destroyed at the time Brashier city was recaptured by the rebels. The men have suffered from the loss of clothing, camp equipage, &c, left in depot at that place, but this can be in a measure rectified by the exertions of the officers, while the families, gentlemen, we must leave to your care."
The following is a list of the killed and wounded of the 159th Regiment New York State Volunteers in the different engagements before Port Hudson during the months of May and June, 1863:
KILLED.
Corporal James A. Race (color corporal), Co. A.
Private John Hannophy, Co. D.
Corporal Jacob H Christmas, privates John Maxwell, William Pugh and William H. Proper, Co. E.
Corporal John McCanley, Co. F.
Corporal John Ghallagher and private Harvey G. Pultz, Co. G.
Sergeant Thomas E. Crowell, corporal William Uggla, privates John Daley, James McCormick and Charles Rossiter, Co. H.
Private William Coon, Co I.
Private Edward F. Bridges and Albert C. Trumbull, Co. K. Total killed 17.
WOUNDED—COMPANY A.
Corporals George Maurrer, Jacob Sagendorph, Privates Silas H. Peary, John D. Taton, Thomas Akins.
COMPANY B.
Privates Alexander Irving, Thomas McCartney, Corporal William Roberts, Privates John Joy, Bothszer Wertz.
COMPANY C.
Sergeants William H. Spanbergh (Color Sergeant), Michael Hogan, Privates Joseph Patterson, Samuel A. Norman, William Teeter, Myers Statts, John Schemerhorn, Cornelius Van Valkenburgh.
COMPANY D.
Sergeant John T. Jennings, Corporal Alonson Pearsail, Privates Michael Furness, Thomas Kevins, David McKinley.
COMPANY E.
Privates John H. Myers, Robert Profer, Robt. Race, Robt. McCracken, Patrick J. Brian.
COMPANY F.
Sergeant Samuel O. Tompkins, Corporal John H. Furgerson, Robert R. Broker.
COMPANY G.
Corporals Silas H. Richmond and Andrew Gocia; Privates John C. Bollinger, Thomas Shea, John Lynch.
COMPANY H.
Privates Edwin Pettinger, Peter Miller, Edward McGreen, Thomas Barrett, David Jacobs. Neil Peterson.
COMPANY I.
Private Frederick Bogardus; Corporal Edward Cosgrove; Privates William Kellerhouse, Edward Vail.
COMPANY K.
Corporal Francis L. Van Degar; Private John Brush.
MISSING.
Sergeant John Cook, Co. I; Private Augustus Garholbt, Co. K.
Wounded, 48; killed, 17; missing, 2; aggregate, 67.

We make a few extracts from a letter received last week, from one of the noble wounded of the 159th Regiment, N. Y. V. Hoping that the perusal of these extracts will awaken all to the realization of the hardships and trials through which our own and other regiments have passed, and will still undergo, during the siege of, or attacks upon Port Hudson:

NEW ORLEANS, June 25th, 1863.
"One has no idea how difficult it is for wounds to heal in this climate. Those who have been wounded at Port Hudson, are dying off very rapidly; this is even the case with officers who receive the best care. I heard to-day, that there were many wounded down at t h e Levee, in an awful condition, their wounds not having been dressed in two days, were infested with maggots and worms, and their suffering intense and excruciating. It is awful, but such is the fate of war! There are many coming down from Port Hudson every day, affected with fevers and every kind of disease. There are over eight thousand sick and wounded at New Orleans, besides those at Baton Rouge, and in the different Hospitals elsewhere. Quite a large army!"
In view of this distressing representation of affairs, we would again call the attention of all our readers to the box which the Ladies of the Relief Society, hope, if possible, to send this week, to the sick and wounded of the 159th Regiment, anything which the exigencies of t h e occasion suggest will be gratefully received, Wednesday P. M., at the Reformed Dutch Church.
We would also call the attention of the ladies, to the Society under the auspices of which the box is to be sent. It meets Wednesday of each week, and there is always work sufficient for any number who may desire to attend.
The dawn of better days seems breaking. The sky looks brighter, but to ensure this brightness, the light of many homes has gone out in darkness, and bleeding and suffering ones still linger, in need of those attentions which benevolent and patriotic women can furnish.
Let not the call of our brave defenders fall unheeded on the ears of those, who in peaceful security, enjoy the blessings vouchsafed them by the Government, to the sustenance of which they have so cheerfully and so gloriously consecrated their energies—even their lives.

Sick and Wounded of the Third Senatorial Regiment.
The following list of sick and wounded of the 159th (Third Senatorial) Regiment, in New Orleans hospitals, August 9, 1863, was received at the headquarters of the War Fund Committee:
U. S. BARRACKS AND HOSPITAL—CONVALESCENT CAMP.
Geo. Rhodan, Co. H; Victor Contois, A; Peter Miller, A; John Gavils, C; James Howe, I; P. D. Shufeldt, E; Thos. White, F; John R. Broker, F; John H. Furguson, F; Sam'l C. Tompkins, F; Silas W. Richmond, G; Jas. Bronson, H; Wm. H. Fryer, H; Jas. Dennis, I; Patrick Kelly, K.
MARINE HOSPITAL.
John McCauley, Co. B; William Roberts, B; John Riley, C; Robt. V. L. Cameen, C; M. Foslin, D; D. McKinley, D; Levi Bowdish, D; Jesse Miller, E; Rushton Blunt, E; Samuel Wicks, F; Michael Mather, H.
CHARITY HOSPITAL.
E. Pynan, Co. A; C. J. Winans, A; ____ Mosier, A; D. Van Dusen, A; J. J. Brown, D; E, Webster, D.
ST. LOUIS HOSPITAL.
Edward Winans, Co. A; B. Wendiz, B; Myers Staats, C; Wm. Teetor, C.
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL.
Solomon Morey, A; Thomas Daley, A; P. Regan, A; S. French, B; Thomas McCarty, B; John Kahn, B; William H. Spannburgh, C; America Marozi, D; S. B. Macey, E; R. McCacken, E; Patrick O'Brien, E; John Doyle, F; Aaron Miller, F; Thomas Henny, F; James Bennett, H; Jacob Coon, I; John S. Campbell, I.
COTTON PRESS HOSPITAL.
Alsose Coon, C; Adam Schuck, D: Adam Klinsing, G; W. H. Knickkerbocker, I; William Mathews, K; Cornelius Myers, Cook; George Myers, Cook; J. Kelley, Cook; J. Conghlin, Cook.
ST. JAMES HOSPITAL.
O. B. Whitney, G; James Harrison, H; Edward Vail, I. In all 65.
With the foregoing list the following letter was received:

NEW ORLEANS, Aug. 8, 1863.
COL. MOLINEUX—Dear SIR—As I was one of the officers selected to distribute the articles sent on by the kind ladies of Kings and Columbia Counties for the sick and wounded of our regiment, and thinking that they, as well as yourself, would like to know how they were distributed and how received, I will try to inform you.
I would that the kind donors could have seen the poor soldiers when I gave them some little token or some remembrance of home. Eyes that were dull with fever, how they brightened when a clean shirt, a little jelly or a few sheets of writing paper were laid beside their beds; and know that for that day at least, the dull monotony of life in the hospital was enlivened by the thoughts of home. * * * "I found in visiting: the hospitals that the following articles were needed for fever patients, viz: Bandages, lint, sheets, pillow-cases, cotton shirts, cotton drawers, slippers, made of old carpet, jellies, socks, mosquitoe nett, writing paper, envelopes, pens, penholders and pencils. In the wounded and convalescent wards, smoking and. chewing tobacco and pipes made the time pass away agreeably, for after a man has counted all the rafters, spider webs, &c., &c., three or four times over, it is hard work to lie still and do nothing,—and then it is too that books of any kind are desirable. Hoping that I may often have such pleasant duties to perform for the sick and wounded of the 159th Regt. I remain very respecfully [sic] yours,
C. C. BAKER, Capt. Co. I,
159th Regt., N. Y. V.

The Ladies of the Soldiers Belief Society gratefully acknowledge the following donations:
Mrs. R . I . Wells, $10,00; a friend, 6,00; Mrs. Gould, 2,00; Mrs. Wm. I. Traver, 1,00; Mrs. Charlot, $1,00; Mrs. Lambert, 1,00; Miss Gage, 1,00; Miss M. B. H., 1,00; a friend, 1,50; do. 0,50; Mrs. Winans, 0,50.
Per Mrs. Thomas Tynan: Father O'Sullivan, $2,00;  Miss R. A. Kena, 1,00; Miss Annie Nolan, 0,50; Mrs. O'Connor, 1,00; the Misses Murphy, 1,50; Miss Delaney, 0,50; Mrs. McShane, 0,50; Miss Mary A. McCrty, 0,50; Misses Mary and Kate Clancey, 0,50; Mrs. Ryan, 0,50; Mrs. Alcroft, 0,25; Mrs. Casey, 0,25; Mrs. Tynan, 1,00; total—$35,50.
Mrs. R. F. Clark, 1 dozen bottles currant wine; Mrs. Collier, dried fruit; Mrs. Bodurtha, dried apples; Mrs. Groat, wine; Mrs. Nichols, old clothes; Mrs. Wells, corn starch; Mrs. Cook, jelly; Mrs. Chamberlain, jelly; Mrs. Magoun, farina and corn starch; Miss Minna Miller, paper, pens and envelopes; Mrs. Hiram Morrison, jelly; Mrs. S. W. Tobey, jelly; Mrs. Mesick, jelly and dried apples; Mrs. Waterman, jelly; Mrs. Evans, 1 doz. lemons; Mrs. Winslow, strawberry preserves and currant jelly; Mrs. Philip Shufelt, dried apples and clothing; Miss Rowe, pickles and clothing; P. S. Wynkoop, Esq., paper and envelopes; Mrs Jesse Williams, 3 bottles wine and jelly; Miss Margaret Hogeboom, stationery and jelly; Mrs. John Gaul, J r ., jelly, sugar and corn starch; Mrs. George Storrs, jelly, preserves and 6 bottles shrub; Mrs. King, clothing; Mrs. John Burdwin, dried apples and corn starch; Mrs. Guernsey, farina; Mrs. Stephen J. Coffin, jelly; Mrs. Wm. H. Clark, 2 bottles currant wine; Mrs. E. A. Chapel, pickles and 4 dozen lemons; Mrs. Atwood, jelly; a friend, dried raspberries and tobacco, Mrs. Cadman, 3 bottles elderberry wine; Mrs. French 2 table cloths; Mrs. Bryant, 2 shirts, 1 bottle wine, 1 jar
dried currants, farina; Mrs. Wiesmer, jar preserved currants; Mrs. Barton, tea, coffee and tobacco; Mrs. Winters, pickles; Mrs. Wolfe, segars and coffee; Mr. Wm. H. Crapser, 1 bottle currant wine.
The above hospital stores were sent last week to the sick and wounded of the 159th Regiment N. Y. V.; also the following articles:
New shirts, 33; old do., 19; new drawers, 16; old do., 12; towels, 20; handkerchiefs, 30; pillow cases, 5; pillows, 2; old pantaloons, 2; cravats, 2; slippers, 2.

Carrolton, La., Aug. 7th, 1863.
Ladies of the Hudson Relief Association:
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of three barrels, containing wearing apparel, articles of food and many other luxuries, all of which our men needed sadly. These articles came through Col. Molineaux, who kindly transferred them to me. Only one barrel has been opened.—its contents have been distributed to the soldiers, and could you have seen the change in their appearance, and heard their exclamations of thanks to the fair donors, you would have felt fully rewarded for your kindness. It makes them feel happy to know that they are still remembered by those kind hearts so far away and I assure you, these articles will be prized by them more highly, than if they had purchased them, for they know that those things were made expressly for them, by kind friends; and like gifts of that kind, are always more esteemed. The men are not only cleaner and more comfortable, but they are also more contented, and I know it will assist me very materially in their recovery; and I, personally, feel much indebted to you for the assistance so rendered. Too much praise cannot be given for these generous offerings. Those who think of the cares and trials these poor fellows have passed through since they have been in active service, must feel amply remunerated for all care undergone and all trouble taken in thus supplying the wants of those who are sick or may have been wounded. Our regiment has probably suffered as much as any in this Department, and all must confess that it has nobly performed its duty. At some future time I hope to be able to furnish a correct list of all in our regiment who have been killed in battle, or died in hospitals. The sick are all now doing well. One barrel was left in New Orleans for the sick of our regiment in the General Hospital,—I will see that the contents are properly distributed. In conclusion let me thank you in the name of every man in the regiment, for all are liable to be taken sick, and the articles sent so kindly will all be required. All the officers I know feel their indebtedness, for it is gratifying to know that their sick are comfortable. Hoping that you will receive this slight acknowledgement,
I remain, your debtor, &c,
WM. Y. PROVOST,
Asst. Surgeon 159th Regt. N. Y. V.
P. S.—Since writing the above, Col. Molineux has handed me a letter from one of your number addressed to him. I was sorry that I had not seen it sooner, but as it is, I was right glad to see it, and let me give you the assurance of both Col. Molineux and myself, that everything sent will be distributed properly and carefully. I am very sorry and acknowledge that I have heard the same reports which have reached you. I am fearful it is too true, in some instances, to the shame of those who lower themselves by taking the advantage thrown in their way by kind and solicitous friends. I wish everyone of the friends of these poor fellows to know that as these articles were intended, they shall be given. As an officer, I pledge myself to use every means possible to accomplish it. Although our sick and wounded are scattered through every Hospital in the State, from what I learn, they shall be looked up and their wants supplied by the gifts sent to them. At some future time, If not now, I hope these assurances will satisfy their friends and all concerned.
I remain respectfully,
WM. Y. PROVOST.

Mr. WEBB:—The above letter the ladies feel will gratify the friends of our Regiment, and will, it is hoped, prove an incentive to all to care for and minister to the comfort of those who have gone out from our midst. Barrels are to be sent immediately to the 128th Regiment, and ladies will be at the Reformed Dutch Church, to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, to receive any thing which kind friends desire to send. Let all respond nobly, generously and patriotically.

Sick and Wounded of the 159th.
We are indebted to Col. Molineux for the following list of the sick and wounded belonging to the 159th Regiment, now in hospitals at New Orleans:
U. S. Barracks Hospital—George Rhoden, Co. H; Victor Coutors, Co. A; Peter Miller, Co. A; John Gairls, Co. C; James Howe, Co. I; P. D. Schufeldt, Co. E; Thomas White, Co. F; John R. Broker, Co. F; John H. Furguson, Co. F; Samuel C. Tompkins, Co. F; Silas W. Richmond, Co. G; James Bronsar, Co. H; William H. Fryer, Co. H; James Dennis, Co. I; Patrick .Kelley, Co. K.
St. Louis Hospital,—Edward Winans, Co. A; B. Wendtz, Co. B; Myers Staats, Co. C; William Lestor, Co. C.
Marine Hospital.—John McCauley, Co. B; Wm. Roberts, Co. B; John Riley, Co. C; Robert V. L. Cameron, Co. C; M. Foslin, Co D; D. McKinley, Co. D; Levi Bowdish, Co. D; Jessey Miller, Co. E; Rushton Blurt, Co. E; Samuel Wicks, Co. F; Michael Mather, Co. H.
Charity Hospital.—Edward Tynan, Co. A; C. H. Winans, Co. A; Richard Mosier, Co. A; D. Van Deusen, Co. A; J. J. Brown, Co. D; E. Webster, Co. D.
St. James Hospital.—O. B. Whitney, Co. G; James Hamesar, Co. H; Edward Vail, Co. I.
University Hospital—Sol Maurer, Co. A; Thos. Daley, Co. A; P. Keegan, Co. A; S. French, Co. B; Thomas McCartney, Co. B; John Kahn, Co. B; Wm. H. Spawnburgh, Co. C; America Nadozi, Co. D; S. B. Macy, Co. E; R. McCraken. Co. E; Patrick O'Brien, Co E; John Doyle, Co. F; Aaron Miller, Co. F; Thomas Henry, Co. F; James Bennett, Co. H; Jacob Coon, Co. I; John S. Campbell, Co. I.
Cotton Press.—Ambrose Coon, Co. C; Adam Schuck, Co. D; Adam Kliusing, Co. G; W. H. Knickerbocker, Co. I; Cornelius Myers, Co. K; George Myers, Co. K; J. Kelley Myers, Co. K; J. Conghlin, Co. K; Wm. Mathews, Co. K.
Total sick and wounded in New Orleans, 65.
The following letter has been received by the Ladies' Relief Society, and handed to us for publication:
NEW ORLEANS, Aug. 8, 1863.
As I was one of the Officers chosen to distribute the things sent on by the kind Ladies of Columbia and Kings Counties, for the sick and wounded of our Regiment, and thinking that they would like to know how they were distributed and how received, I will try to inform you. I would that the kind doners [sic] could have seen the poor fellows when I gave them some little token, or some remembrance of home. Eyes that were dull with fever, how they brightened when a clean shirt, a little jelly, or a few sheets of writing paper were laid beside their bed, and I know that for that day at least, the dull monotony of life in the Hospital was enlivened by the thoughts of home—and I thought then, could the one who sent a shirt, or pair of drawers, have put their names and a few words on a piece of paper and pinned it to the article, it would have added to the satisfaction. Some of the clothing had to be washed on account of the corks coming out of some of the bottles of Wine. They should be wired in.
The writing paper not going all around, I bought half a ream of paper and a box of envelopes. In U. S. G. Hospital, Ward 13, I found three of our boys—Esser of Co. H, one of Co. E, and Coon of Co. I, very low with typhoid fever, and as they wanted milk very badly, I made arrangements for three quarts. Pretty good price—but I thought I could make no better use of the money. Salt beef and sour Corn bread are not very tempting for sick men.
In the convalescent camp, I found that tobacco and writing paper are in great demand, which demand, thanks to you, I was able to meet. The books also came very acceptable. I found in. my visiting the Hospitals that the following articles were needed:
Bandages, lint, sheets, pillow cases, cotton shirts, cotton draws, slippers made of old carpet, jellies, socks mosquito bars 2 feet wide, 7 feet long and 3 feet deep, writing paper, envelopes, pens, pen holders and pencils.
In the wards for the wounded and convalescent, tobacco—smoking and chewing, and pipes, make the time pass away very agreeably; for after a man has counted all the rafters, spider webs, &c., &c., over three or four times, it is hard work to be still and do nothing. Then is the time that diversions of any kind comes in play. I have still some of the funds on hand, and will distribute as soon as I find those who are in need.
Hoping that I have done my duty as far as I have gone, and I can often engage in the performance of such pleasant, yet sad duties, and trusting that you will offer to the kind ladies of Columbia and Kings Counties the hearty thanks of the sick and wounded of the 159th Regiment, N. Y. Vols.,
I remain, very respectfully, yours,
C. C. BAKER,
  Capt. Co. I., 159th Regt. N. Y. V.
Col. Edward L. Molineux.

CAMP KEANRNEY, NEAR NEW ORLEANS,
August 9th, 1863.
I have just returned from Sunday inspection of hospital and the sick, and a more pleasing sight to a Commander could not be presented than that of every one in the Regimental Hospital clean washed, and with a neat clean shirt and drawers, furnished by the ladies, instead of the hot, dirty and uncomfortable army clothes.
I enclose Capt. Baker’s report. The hints he gives are worthy of notice. I send a list of the wounded and sick now in hospitals at New Orleans, and I think if your city newspapers would publish it that it would be interesting to their friends.
I regret that some of our friends from Hudson have been obliged by family reasons to resign,—Capt. Sliter and Lieut. Hubbel. I am sorry that we have lost their society and services. Yours truly,
E. L. MOLINEUX,
Colonel 159th N. Y. V.

List of Sick and Wounded of 159th Regiment in New Orleans Hospitals:
U. S. BARRACKS HOSPITAL.
George Rhoden, Co. H; Victor Contors, Co A; Peter Miller, Co. A; John Gairls, Co. C; James Howe, Co. J; P. D. Shufeldt, Co. E; Thos White, Co. F; John R. Broker, Co F; John H. Furguson, Co. F; Samuel C. Tompkins, Co. F; Silas W. Richmond, Co. G; James Bronsar, Co. H; William H. Fryer, Co. H; James Dennis, Co. I; Patrick Kelley, Co. K.
ST. LOUIS HOSPITAL.
Edward Winans, Co. A; B. Wendtz, Co. B; Myers Staats, Co. C; William Seetor, Co. C.
MARINE HOSPITAL.
John McCauley, Co. B; Wm. Roberts, Co. B; John Riley, Co. C; Robt. V L Cameron, Co. C; M. Foslin, Co. D; D. McKinley, Co D; Levi Bowdish, Co D; Jersey Miller, Co. E; Rushton Blunt, Co. E; Samuel Wicks, Co. F; Michael Mather, Co F.
CHARITY HOSPITAL.
Edward Tynan, Co. A; C. J. Winans, Co. A; Richard Mosier, Co A; D. Van Deusen, Co A; J. J. Brown, Co. D; E Webster, Co. D.
ST. JAMES HOSPITAL.
O. B Whitney, Co. G; James Hamisar, Co. H; Edward Vail, Co. I.
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL.
Sol Mauren, Co. A; Thomas Daley, Co A; P. Keegan, Co. A; S French, Co. B; Thos McCartney, Co. B; John Kahn, Co. B; Wm. H. Spaunburgh, Co. C; America Nadozi, Co D; S. B Macy, Co E; R McCracken, Co. E; Pat. O'Brien, Co. E; John Doyle, Co. F; Aaron Miller, Co. F; Thos. Henry, Co. F; James Bennett, Co H; Jacob Coon, Co. I; John S. Campbell, Co. I.
COTTON PRESS.
Ambrose Coon. Co. C; Adam Schuck, Co. D; Adam Klinsing, Co. G; W H Knickerbocker, Co. I; Cornelius Myers, Co. K; George Myers, Co. K; J Kelley, Co. K; J. Conghlin, Co K; Wm. Mathews. Co K.
Total sick and wounded in New Orleans 65.
We omitted to mention, that Lieut. E. G. Hubbel, of the 159th Regt, returned home last week, having resigned his position in the army. He has enjoyed excellent health and is now looking finely.

The Roll of Honor.
Colonel Edward L. Molineux of the 159th Regiment issued a circular from Camp Kearney, La., on the 18th of August, congratulating the Regiment on its heroic conduct during the arduous campaign in the Teche country and before Port Hudson.
Among the many who have faithfully performed their duty are the following:
Adjutant Robert D. Lathrop, killed at Irish Bend.
Quartermaster Sergeant John Charlotte, wounded at Irish Bend.
Second Lieutenant William F. Tiemann, woundrd [sic] at Irish Bend and Port Hudson.
First Sergeant Edward Tynan, wounded at Irish Bend.
Private Thomas Daley, wounded at Irish Bend.
Captain Charles Lewis, wounded at Irish Bend, Port Hudson.
Private Ambrose Coons, wounded at Irish Bend.
Captain William Waltermire, Irish Bend and Port Hudson. May 27 and June 14.
Lieutenant Byron Lockwood, killed at Irish Bend.
Private Harvey G. Pultz, killed at Port Hudson.
Corporal William H. Hawse, killed at Irish Bend.
Sergeant C. V. N. Coventry, Irish Bend and Port Hudson.
First Lieutenant William R. Plunkett, killed at Irish Bend.
Private James Close, Irish Bend and Port Hudson.
Upon the call of Major General Banks, seventeen members of the Regiment stepped forward and volunteered for the Forlorn Hope.
"Some" Onions.

A PRECIOUS TESTIMONIAL,—About a year ago, the War Fund Committee of the City of Brooklyn made provision to award medals of honor to officers or privates in Regiments composed wholly or in part of Kings County men, who distinguished themselves by some eminent service or act of bravery in the present war.
We are proud to say that one of these medals of honor have just been awarded to William H. Spanburgh, of this city, the Color Bearer of the 159th Regiment, who is eminently deserving of the honor. Spanburgh planted the Colors of his Regiment on the rebel ramparts at Port Hudson, La., and held them there with a firm hand, at the peril of his life, until severely wounded by rebel bullets.
We have the pleasure of presenting below the interesting correspondence which took place on the occasion of the award:
BROOKLYN, N. Y., April 21, 1864.
LIEUT. WM. H. SPANBURGH:
DEAR SIR:—The undersigned, members of the "War Fund Committee of the City of Brooklyn and Kings County," having heard with great pleasure, from your superior officers and others, of your good deeds and brave conduct as a Soldier of the Union, especially at the battles of Irish Bend and Port Hudson, La., where, at the latter place, you planted the Colors of your Regiment upon the rebel ramparts, and held them there at the peril of your life, until so severely wounded you could do so no longer, beg your acceptance of this medal of honor, as a token of their appreciation of your bravery in scenes of danger and death, and of the gallant manner in which you have stood up and battled with the enemies of our common country; for it is to you, and others like you, that we are indebted at present for a  government, and that measure of liberty which we enjoy.
But it is with deep regret that the committee have learned of the severity of your wounds, and that you will have to carry with you henceforth, in common with thousands of other brave men, the painful evidence of what it has cost to overcome those who are seeking the division and consequent destruction of our Union. We indulge the hope, however, that you may long live in comparative comfort, to enjoy those blessings of a free and united government, which you and your brave companions-in-arms have fought so nobly to perpetuate.
Hoping you will take as much pleasure in wearing this badge of your heroic conduct, as the undersigned experience in presenting the same to you, They are, very sincerely,
Your fellow countrymen,
L. S. Burnham,
Isaac H. Frothingham,
Geo. A. Jarvis,
Thos.T. Buckley,
Geo. B. Lincoln,
Medal Committee.

MESSRS. BURNHAM, FROTHINGHAM AND OTHERS:
GENTLEMEN—It is with no ordinary feeling of gratitude that I acknowledge the receipt of the beautiful medal honor, so generously and so unexpectedly conferred upon me, by you, as members of the "War Fund Committee of the City of Brooklyn and of Kings County."
As a testimonial of your appreciation of my feeble, efforts, cheerfully made in behalf of our common country, I shall always esteem it as among my most valued treasures.
Would that my wounds had been less severe, that I might have hoped to recover from them sufficiently to enable me to remain in the service until this terrible war shall be brought to a happy and triumphant termination. Providence, though so very merciful to me, willed it otherwise, and with deep regret I felt obliged, to leave my noble Regiment, which has unflinchingly and victoriously endured the battle test.
While sorrowfully, yet proudly remembering those who gallantly fell in their first campaign—while sympathizing with those who will always bear, like myself, the marks of the bitter fray—I shall regard with the keenest interest the future career of my old comrades, and their respected officers; and though mourning that I could not continue with them to the end, shall ever be glad that I was once of the men of the brave 159th Regiment, N. Y. V.
Accept then, gentlemen, my sincere thanks for the medal, and for the touching manner in which you have presented it to me. I shall ever wear it with feelings of honest pride, and with grateful remembrance of you; and shall ever rejoice that my short career as a soldier, in which, with countless brave men, I did my duty, has been deemed worthy of commendation by my superior officers and others.
Regarding with hope the promises if the future, and trusting that the untold sacrifices of our noble soldiers will establish and perpetuate the Union, for whose integrity they have fought, bled, and died, I am
Your obliged fellow countryman,
WM. H. SPANBURGH.
We are requested to say that this medal will be on exhibition at W. W. Hannah's Jewelry store, for a few days.
(Feb. 14, 1864)

HUDSON GAZETTE.
A Company for the 159th.
Capt. Reynolds and Lieuts. Elmer and Van Deusen hare completed their company organization, and will immediately leave for New Orleans, to be attached to the 159th Regiment, of which EDWARD L. GAUL is now Lieutenant-Colonel. The Company is composed of as fine a body of young men as have left our city since the first call for soldiers. Many of them have seen active service in the field, and now enlist as veterans. Captain Reynolds and Lieut. Elmer were members of Co. K, 14th Regiment, and served through their period of enlistment with honor. This noble accession to the 159th will be joyfully welcomed by the remnant of that Regiment which has survived the severe conflicts it has passed through. Below we give a complete list of officers and men composing the new Company:
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Captain—JAMES S. REYNOLDS, (veteran.)
1st Lieut,—E. SPENCER ELMER, "
2d "  —PETER VAN DEUSEN.
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant—Egbert E. Covey, (veteran) Hudson.
2d Sergeant—Geo. W. Bristol,  " "
3d  “ —Jennings J. Covey,  “ “
4th  “ —Frank A. Kertz, “ “
5th  “ —Wm. H. Messick,  “ Stockport. 
1st Corporal—Robert C. Bruce,  “ Hudson.
2d “ —Henry C. Van Deusen, “  “
3d “  —David Post,  “ Stockport.
4th  “  —George Rettig, “ Hudson.
5th  “  —Nicholas R. Shults,  “ Stockport.
6th  “  —Lotan Fuller,  “ Hudson.
7th  “  —Jordan Shults,  “
8th  “  —Charles Root,  Claverack.
MUSICIANS.
Geo. W. Loomis,  Hudson.
Geo. Helms, “
PRIVATES.
Bernard Allen, Hudson.
Thomas Abbey, “
James H. Coe, “
Edward Fitzgerald,  "
Charles H. Howes,  "
Spencer Helms, "
Lewis H. Heermance, "
William Kennelly,  "
Henry Kercher, "
Lewis M. Lebrie,  "
Ghas. A. Michael,  "
Wm. Martin, "
Henry A. Perrigo, "
James Pitts, "
Elliot Rowlison,  "
Henry Seism, "
Henry Sherman,  "
Dennis Shehan, "
Saber S. Spaulding, "
Henry H. Steele,  "
John Shaughnessy,  "
David C. Smith, "
Fidel Wise,  "
Thomas Dawson, "
Abram Brent, Greenport.
Roland Brooks,  "
Charles Bennet,  "
Patrick Lee,  "
Elias Van Deusen,  "
Martin Day,  "
Alexander Day "
Jacob Hollenbeck,  "
Franklin Perry,  "
Robert R. Butts, Ancarm.
Lodi Kitchell, Copake.
Daniel Laine, "
Russel Van Deusen, "
Peter Murphy, Claverack.
Daniel B. Osborn,  "
Wm. A. Stickles,  "
John Toomy,  "
Luzerne Stewart,  "
John S. Bishop,  Ghent.
Joseph Eldridge, Ger'ntown.
Caleb Brady, Livingston.
John Burke,  "
Dennis Caliigan,  "
John M. Darkins, "
Patrick Guilfoil  "
Michael Kirby, "
Oscar Lewis, "
Warren H. Miller, "
George McBain, "
Thomas Murnan,  "
Wm. Moore, "
Peter W. Reynolds. "
Silas Smith, "
Wm. H. Shultis,  "
C. E. Van Valkenburgh,  "
Milton Weaver, "
Jeremiah Meagher,  "
Simeon Morris, "
Charles E Shultis,  Taghk'c.
Franklin Miller,  "
Martin Hagan,  Gallatin.

THE REPUBLICAN.
City and County Intelligence.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1864.
The 159th Regiment in Battle.
Letters have been received in this city from officers in the 159th, with some particulars of the engagement near Halltown, Va., on the 25th in which it had a prominent part. From one of these letters we extract the following:
On Wednesday some six or eight Regiments of the 19th Corps were thrown out as skirmishes. Our Regiment (the 159th) was the first engaged. Being on the left of the line our Company (G., Capt. Reynolds,) had to deploy through an open lot in plain sight of the enemy, and within easy range of their guns. We advanced about a quarter of a mile and took our position behind a rail fence—rather a poor shelter, but the best we could get—where we remained some two hours, and busy hours they were. A continual storm of bullets rained in and around, but the boys stood up nobly to the work. If there are not fewer live rebels in our front to-night than there were this morning, then I am mistaken.
We held our position until the object was accomplished. The rebels then threatened to turn our right flank by superiority of numbers, and we were ordered to retreat. This we did under a heavy fire to the shelter of the woods. The reb's were within twenty feet of the right of our Company when we fell back.
We were unfortunately obliged to leave on the ground Corp. Nicholas R. Shultis, who was wounded through the left leg, above the knee. He thought the bone was not injured. he was supposed to have been captured, but subsequently came in and is now doing well as could be expected.
Sergeant Covey had a ball pass through the side of his pants, another cut his bayonet sheath in two, still another stripped his haversack off his shoulder, and the fourth wounded him slightly on the arm. Rather a "close call" for one man!
Sergant Frank A. Kertz was wounded through the ankle. The Dr. thinks he will have to lose his foot.
Private Russel Van Deusen (son of Peter Van D.) was wounded in the shoulder. The bullet was extracted and he was sent to the General Hospital at Harpers' Ferry. He will probably get a furlough home.
The Senior Capt. of the Regiment, W. O. Pettit, of Brooklyn, is supposed to be mortally wounded. There were in all ten wounded in the Regiment. The rebels were dressed in the Federal uniform, and thus deceived a good many of our men until close upon us.
Capt. Reynolds writes that the boys behaved nobly on the occasion.

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-NINTH N. Y. VOLS.
Sergeant Augustus Wendt, C, killed; Corporal Jno. D Carter, A, do; Dalbert Van Dusen, A. do; P Fitzpatrick, D,do; H E Lander, H, do; Lt H Smith, Adj, wounded; Captain J G McNutt, I, do; Lieut Henry M Howard, D, do; Lieut Edward Duffy, C, do; Corporal Henry A Osborn, A, do; Corporal J  Hollenback, G, do; Daniel Jennings, A, do; S Richmond, B, do; F Laurence, R, do; S Loughton, B, do; Sergeant Jonas Killerhouse, C, do; Eugene Edwards, C, do; Frelen Wheeler, C, do; James Fitzgerald. C, do; Myers Statts, C, do; John W Olmstead, E, do; Corporal F Mackey, F, do; W Collagham, F, do; F C Nichols, F, do; Conrad South, D, do; Corporal David Smith, G, do; James Cox, G, do; Anthony Michaels, G, do; Dennis Shellan, G, do; John Torney, G, do; Sergeant Martin Traver, H, do; Wash Adams, H, do; Wm H Fryer, H, do; Rbt Hurley, H, do; Augustus Jenkins, H, do; Chas Powell, H, do; Benj Lemmond, H, do; Walter O Houck, L, William Wagner, I, do; Eugene A Corey, I, do; Christian Smack, C, do; A Gailor, C, do; J Schamerhorn, C, do; Isaac Morris, D, do; Robert Crober, E, do; Frank Kisters, D, do; James Decker, E, do; Wm Coyles, E, do; Geo A Berrey, E, do; Thomas Ward, A, prisoner; Corp Hatfield, B, do; Grosvenor Smith, C
do; Dorr Dewitt, C, do; Joseph Frietlaine, D, do; Sgt. Dewitt McNiel, E, do; Capt. Bartholomew Toser, F, do; Chas M W Mott, F, do; Jeremiah Meagher, G, do; Edward Brothy, K, do; John Coughlin, K, do; Henry Hohen, K, do; Geo A Hoffman, K, do; John Kane, K, do; John McKewen, K, do; Wm D Tanley, K, do; Capt Wm Frieman, A, prisoner; Corp Silas W Perry, A, do; Henry Sherman, G, prisoner; Saler Spaulding, G, do; James Brady, G, do; George Millen, H, do; J L Longes, H, do; Thomas Scott, I, do; Barney Dolan, K, do; Timothy Dolan, K, do; Andrew Cessa, K, do.
A correspondent in the 159th, furnishes us with the following list of killed, wounded and missing, in that Regiment during the engagement of the 19th of September near Winchester, Va. He adds that there are more to be recorded in the list of casualties, but at the time the mail left he was unable to obtain the names:

Lt. H. Smith, Acting Adjutant, wounded.
Company A.—Capt. W. F. Tieman, Prisoner. Corporal John Tutor, Delbert Van Deusen, killed. Daniel Jennings, wounded. Thomas Ward, Henry Osborn, Silas W. Peary, prisoners.
Company B.—Private C. W. Richmond, Frederick Lawrence, wounded.
Company C.—Lieut. Edward Duffy, wounded. Orderly Sergt. Augustus Wendt, killed. Sergt. Jonas Kellerhouse, Private Eugene Edwards, wounded.
James Fitzgerald, wounded and missing. John Gaylor, John Schermerhorn, Christian Schnack, Freelin Wheeler, Myers Statts, W. J. Shufelt, Dorr  DeWitt, wounded.
Company D.—Lieut. H. M. Howard, Private Isaac Morris, Conrad Smith, H. W. Kiester, wounded. Patrick Fitzpatrick, killed.
Company E.—Sergt. Dewitt McNeill, prisoner. Private Hubert Proper, William Coyles, George Benzy, John Almsted, James Decker, wounded. Company F.—William Colligan, F. C. Nichols, wounded.
Company G.—Caleb Brady, Saber Spaulding, Henry Sherman, prisoners. James Coe, Corporal Jacob Hallenbeck, David Post, wounded, Jerry Meagher, Prisoner.
Company H.—Private William Landus, (killed) John Adams, Charles Powell, Augustus Jenkins, William Frier, Robert Hurley, Sergt. Martin Traver, wounded.
Company I.—Capt. J. G. McNutt, Private Eugene Carey, Walter Houck, wounded.
Company K.—George A. Hoffman, Edward Brophy, Barney Dolan, William D. Tanner, John Kane, John Corcoran, Stephen Laughlin, Henry Hand, John McEwen, wounded.

THE REPUBLICAN.
City and County Intelligence.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1864.
Our Home Regiments in Battle.
The 128th and 159th Regiments, forming a part of the 19th Army Corps under General Sheridan, have participated in the severe and successful engagements in the Shenandoah Valley.
Below is a full list of the losses in the 159th Regiment in the battles of the 19th, for which we are indebted to late Lieut. Col. E. R. Gaul, of this city:
Lt. H. Smith, Acting Adjutant, wounded.
Company A.—Capt. W. F. Tieman, Prisoner. Corporal John Tator, Delbert Van Deusen, killed. Daniel Jennings, wounded. Thomas Ward, Henry Osborn, Silas W. Peary, prisoners.
Company B.—Private C. W. Richmond, Frederick Lawrence, wounded.
Company C.—Lieut. Edward Durfy, wounded. Orderly Sergt. Augustus Wendt, killed. Sergt. Jonas Kellerhouse, Private Eugene Edwards, wounded. James Fitzgerald, wounded and missing. John Gaylor, John Schermerhorn, Christian Schnack, Freelin Wheeler, Myers Statts, W. J. Shufelt, Dorr  DeWitt, wounded.
Company D.—Lieut. H. M. Howard, Private Isaac Morris, Conrad Smith, H. W. Kiester, wounded. Patrick Fitzpatrick, killed.
Company E.—Sergt. Dewitt McNeill, prisoner. Private Robert Proper, William Coyles, George Benzy, John Almsted, James Decker, wounded.
Company F.—William Colligan, F. C. Nichols, wounded.
Company G.— Caleb Brady, Saber Spaulding, Henry Sherman, prisoners. James Coe, Corporal Jacob Hallenbeck, David Post, wounded.
Company H.—Private William Landus, (killed) John Adams, Charles Powell, Augustus Jenkins, William Frier, Robert Hurley, Sergt. Martin  Traver, wounded.
Company I.—Capt. J. G. McNutt, Private Eugene Corey, Walter Houck, wounded.
Company K.—George A, Hoffman, Edward Brophy, Barney Dolan, William Tanner, John Kane, John Corcoran, Stephen Laughlin, Henry Hand, wounded.

From the 159th Regiment.
It appears that this Regiment took a prominent part in the skirmish near Halltown, Va., on the 25th of August. A letter from an officer in the Regiment, giving particulars of the engagement, says:
"We were unfortunately obliged to leave on the ground Corp. Nicholas R. Shultis, who was wounded through the left leg, above the knee. He thought the bone was not injured. He was supposed to have been captured, but subsequently came in and is now doing well as could be expected.
Sergeant Covey had a ball pass through the side of his pants, another cut his bayonet sheath in two, still another stripped his haversack off his shoulder, and the fourth wounded him slightly on the arm.
Sergeant Frank A. Kertz was wounded through the ankle.
Private Russell Van Deusen (son of Peter Van D.) was wounded in the shoulder. The bullet was extracted and he was sent to the General Hospital at Harper's Ferry.
The Senior Capt. of the Regiment, W. O. Pettit, of Brooklyn, is supposed to be mortally wounded.
There were in all ten wounded in the Regiment.

The 159th Regiment.
Reports as to the whereabouts of the 159th are too conflicting to speak definitely at present. It is probably at Savannah by this time, and may be expected home in a few weeks at most.
The Savannah Republican of a late date, makes the following mention of the battle flag of the 159th: "Having occasion to visit Col. Waltermire's office yesterday, we were shown a flag carried by that celebrated regiment, of which he is the popular Colonel, and which for workmanship has scarcely, if any equal. It does not show to much advantage now, having been through the dust and smoke of many battles, and bears the marks of having been very near the opposing forces, as several bullet and cannon ball holes will attest.
"Col. Waltermire has succeeded in bringing this regiment to a degree of perfection in drill and discipline, rarely if ever excelled.
"It is worth while to see the flag alluded to above, as such workmanship as that which is upon it, is scarcely ever put on flags intended for military in active service."
This beautiful flag was presented to the Regiment on the eve of their departure for the field, by the City of Brooklyn.

The 159th to be Mustered Out.
A dispatch from Albany yesterday states that the 159th Regiment had left Hilton Head for Syracuse, where they were to be immediately mustered out of service. No Regiment from this State has made a more brilliant record than the 159th. It has seen much service in the past two years, being engaged in the following battles:
Irish Bend, La., April 14th, 1863; Port Hudson, 1st assault, May 27th, 1863; Port Hudson, 2d assault, June 14th, 1863; Manassa Plains, May 16th, 1864; Halltown, Va., August 24th, 1864; Berryville, Va., September 3d, 1864; Opequan, Va., September 19th, 1864; Fisher's Hill, Sept. 22d, 1864, and Cedar Creek, October 19th, 1864. In all of these battles the regiment distinguished itself, but more especially at Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek.
How effectually this record gives the lie to the base insult perpetrated upon them by the Columbia Republican on the occasion of their departure for the seat of war. On the 30th of October, 1862, that self-constituted "loyal" sheet, in speaking of the departure of the 159th, used the following infamous language:
"It is notorious that the men were deserting faster than they were being recruited—ONLY THOSE REMAINING IN CAMP WHO WERE TOO LAZY TO RUN THE GUARD."
Unless the Republican folks make a public apology for this insult, with what face can they meet those brave boys with their tattered banners and thinned ranks, on their return? We shall see.

Letter from the 159th Regiment.
A member of the 159th Regiment, who left this city as a private, but has been promoted to a responsible position for his bravery and soldierly merits in the field, writes us from camp as follows:
"HEADQUARTERS 159TH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.,
Camp Near Baton Rouge, La.
"FRIEND GAZETTE:—I notice that the Republican, of your city, has of late become over-zealous as the friend of us soldiers, and will probably be shocked if any should vote against the Abolition measure to place the franchise of the army in the hands of a military despot.
"The hypocrisy of your Abolition neighbor is too transparent. When our Regiment left your city on the 30th of October, 1862, the Columbia Republican insulted us with the following language:
"IT IS NOTORIOUS THAT THE MEN WERE DESERTING FASTER THAN THEY WERE BEING RECRUITED—ONLY THOSE REMAINING IN CAMP WHO WERE TOO LAZY TO RUN THE GUARD."
"The base injustice of this slur has been most eloquently refuted by the gallant acts of the 159th on the field, and their heavy bill of mortality in battle.
"Your cotemporary seems too young a convert to patriotism to attempt to set himself up as a dictator to those who have been patriots from birth. Will the Republican apologize for its slanders on the 159th? It may have forgotten it, but the soldiers have not! We demand justice, but despise cringing sycophancy.
"Yours truly, H. T. N."

Editors Atlas & Argus:
In a late issue of your paper I noticed a communication signed by the officers of the 54th New York Militia, touching the state of the Albany Barracks, and the efficiency of Major E. L. Gaul, 159th N. Y. V., commandant of same.
I arrived here with 250 men from New York three days ago, and my men now occupy the same barracks spoken of in your paper of the 21st inst.
I did not arrive at the barracks until after dinner hour. I was met by Major E. L. Gaul, whom I found to be a polished gentleman and evidently a soldier. He immediately ordered dinner to be cooked for my men and officers. He then assigned quarters to us, and had issued at once clean new bed ticks, filled with clean straw, to each man and officer. I personally inspected the quarters and found them in excellent order. Major Gaul assigned excellent quarters also to my officers.
The rations we receive here are as good, if not better, than any I have ever seen issued.
The barracks, evidently, are kept in excellent order, and good discipline prevails. I consider it my duty to clear Major Gaul from the aspersions thrown upon his character, and I am sure that my officers will join with me in testifying to the excellent rations and quarters that have been assigned them and their men, and the uniform kindness and gentlemanly manner in which we have been treated by the Commandant, Major Gaul.
I am, sir, very respectfully yours, &c.,
Major DOUGLAS FRAZAR,
13th N. Y. Cav., com. Detach't.
(Signed) Capt. Sage, com. Company A.
"  Capt. Gondolfo, Acting Aide.
" Lieut. McDougal, Company A.
" Capt. Koehoe, com. Company B.
"Lieut. Prail, Company B.
"Capt. Powell, Company C.
"Lieut. Alphers, Company C.
"Lieut. Winslow, Company C.
" Lieut. Gray, Acting Adjutant.
Albany Barracks, July 24, 1863.

Assassination of a Federal Soldier.
The New Orleans correspondent of the Boston Traveler sends that paper the following account of the assassination of a Federal soldier:
As we reached Vermillionville Bayou on Friday, one of our soldiers, Corporal Appleton W. Rackett, of Co. A, 159th New York Regiment, went up to a well for the purpose of filling his canteen with fresh water. He was alone and nothing was seen of him for several hours, until soldiers belonging to other Regiments went up to the well for water, and found the Corporal lying dead upon the ground, when Dr. C. A. Robertson, surgeon of the 159th New York regiment came up, and examining the wound he became convinced that the soldier had been shot from the adjoining house. He knocked at the door and was met by a French Creole, who pretended he co'd speak no English. The surgeon inquired if he knew anything of the soldier's death, and he replied he had not. The Doctor determined to search the premises, and upon examination he discovered a shot gun, bullets and powder, the gun evidently having been used within a short time. He also found a complete Rebel uniform belonging to an orderly sergeant. The window fronting the well was open, and the evidence was so strong that the man was placed under arrest. The soldiers were so enraged upon learning the particulars of the murder that they gutted the house and set it on fire. A blackened pile of smoking ruins now marks the former dwelling place of this heinous traitor.
We presume the destruction of this murderer's house will be regarded by disloyal men as another piece of "wanton vandalism" on the part of our soldiers, calculated to repress the growth of Union sentiment among our "Southern brethren."

Return of Capt. Lathrop.
Capt. G. Lathrop, of Stockport, who proceeded to New Orleans soon after the battle of Irish Bend, to procure, if possible, the body of his son, Adjutant R. D. Lathrop, of the 159th, who was killed in that engagement, returned home on Saturday last. Although unsuccessful in his main purpose, he obtained information which will, it is hoped, enable the friends to reclaim the body of the brave officer at an early day. He was buried, with three fellow-officers, viz: Lieut. Col. Draper, of Brooklyn, Lieut. Byron Lockwood and Lieut. Manley, on the grounds of a Mr. C. T. Carlin, at a small place called Franklin, 28 miles from Brashier City. Capt. Lathrop was unable to reach the spot, but was fortunate in meeting an officer who furnished him with a diagram of the premises and the precise location of the graves.
He also learned that the bodies of Robert Kipp, of Greenport, Joseph Snyder and James Reynolds were interred at Brashier in separate coffins, but all under one headboard. Lieuts. Price and Plunkett, of Brooklyn, were also buried there. Sergt. Edward Tynan is in hospital at the same place.
Capt. Lathrop proceeded from Brashier up the Atchafalaya and Red rivers to Simonsport, above Port Hudson, and found the 159th stationed there, but within fifteen minutes after his arrival the Regiment had orders to move down the Mississippi. The interview was therefore very short, but long enough for the Captain to be recognized as "the Adjutant's father," by which affecting salutation he was greeted by the men.
After returning to New Orleans for a few days, Capt. L. again proceeded up to a point between Baton Rouge and Port Hudson, where many of our wounded were being brought, and, furnishing himself with a supply of lemonade, went among the wounded soldiers to minister to their relief, and, if possible, learn something more of the 159th. He remained here two days, during which time he met a number from that Regiment, and gained some further information. In addition to the previous list, it was ascertained that acting Adjutant John J. Wilkinson was wounded in the shoulder, and Capt. Geo. W. Van Slyck, of Valatie, in the head.
While at Baton Rouge, the remains of Col. Cowles passed on the way to New Orleans.
During his interview with the 159th, Capt. Lathrop saw and conversed with Quartermaster Wilbor, concerning whom there has been so much anxiety on the part of his friends. He was quite well and engaged in the active discharge of his duties.
The exposure and fatigue of the journey and his prolonged watchings among the wounded, brought on exhaustion and illness from which our venerable citizen, Capt. Lathrop, suffered severely on his return to New Orleans, and has not yet recovered.
At New Orleans, he met James Gilford, Esq., of this city, who had thus far been able to gain little further intelligence of his brother, Capt. Edward Gifford, but was waiting for the next assault upon Port Hudson, which was expected immediately. If successful, he hoped to be among the first to rescue him from imprisonment. The assault has since, been made, but we regret to say it was unsuccessful, and another terrible catalogue of killed and wounded has been added to our sacrifices. It is probable however none of the volunteers from this vicinity were engaged.
Capt. Lathrop brought with him the sword of the lamented Lieut. Lockwood, which was at the store of Mr. George Storrs on Saturday. That of Adjutant Lathrop had previously been forwarded home.
Sergt. John Chariot writes from New Orleans that he is rapidly improving.
Lieut. Edgar Hubbel is improved in health and is with the Regiment, we believe.

Army Correspondence.
We are unable to make room for several communications which have reached us from persons connected with the army. Mrs. "L. C. W." of New Orleans, will please accept our acknowledgments for a letter without date, and excuse us for its non-appearance.—A letter from Charley Ostrander, one of the REPUBLICAN boys in the 128th, says they "will have Port Hudson within one week from date." We are sorry to say the week has gone by and Port Hudson is certainly not ours yet. He acknowledges the receipt of cake and cigars from his friends, and adds that while he was smoking one of the latter on picket, "a rebel Minnie ball, came near cutting his finger off!" V. V. Elting, Surgeon in the 43d Regiment, army of the Potomac, writes that Gen. Hooker's plan is to keep in the rear of Lee's army and prevent retreat, while the Militia forces operate in front. His division was encamped on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, with orders to move at any moment. This was dated the 21st.
Lieut. J. V. Whitbeck, of Co. A, was sent to New Orleans on the sick list two days after the engagement at Port Hudson. He writes to his father by Capt. Lathrop that, in consequence of an attack of rheumatism the Surgeon has decided that it will not be prudent for him to sleep on the ground any more for some time to come. He has therefore been temporarily detailed for garrison duty at New Orleans.
Speaking of the death of David Plumb, of Co. A., Lieut. Whitbeck says: "I was beside him when he fell, and immediately obtained a stretcher and sent him off the field. A ball struck him behind and lodged in the groin. It could not be extracted, and he died the next day."
Of Capt. Gifford he writes: "He was acting Lieut. Col., and in his eagerness to accomplish the work we went to do, was too slow in falling back to us and was captured by the rebels. I have since learned that he is receiving kind treatment through the influence of the Folger boys, (sons of N. C. Folger,) and Abner Hammond, who are among the rebel forces at Port Hudson."
The letter closes as follows:
"Poor Col. Cowles; how we all mourn his loss; and it is a loss which can never be supplied to our Regiment. If Columbia County does not deeply deplore his death, it ought to be blotted from the geography of the State.—No better Colonel, no-more ardent patriot, no braver man ever lived" than Col. David S. Cowles.
Port Hudson is a tough nut which yet remains uncracked."

Death of Lieut. Bradley.
Another of Columbia's gallant volunteers has answered his last reveille and responded to the challenge of the Great Sentinel on high. Lieut. Wesley Bradley, of the 159th Regiment, a gentleman highly esteemed by our citizens, died at St. James Hospital, New Orleans, on the 9th inst. He was attacked with a fever at Brashier city while in active service on Gen. Banks' expedition, and died of congestive chills on the brain soon after being conveyed to New Orleans. He leaves a wife and three interesting children, besides hosts of friends, to mourn his loss.

Colonel Molineux addressed an affecting letter to Mrs. Bradley, announcing the sad particulars of her husband's death, and paying a high tribute to the bravery, devotion and efficiency of the deceased as a soldier and companion. He will be deeply mourned by the army, as well as by his dear friends at home. His was not a soldier's death upon the battle-field, but his epitaph will be as proud a one as if he had died beneath the folds of his country's flag and amid the shock of arms.
The following is an extract from a letter received by Mrs. Lieut. Bradley, from Capt. Waltermire of the 159th Reg't.

BATTLE FIELD BEFORE PORT HUDSON,
June 25TH, 1863.
MRS. LIEUT. WESLEY BRADLEY:—Your note concerning the death of your kind husband has been received by me.
I last saw Lieut. Bradley at Brashear City, he was quite sick, I packed his valise and bade him goodbye; I started in pursuit of the enemy, and he for the Hospital. Never did I part with a friend with more respect. He was my chief dependence in the discharge of duty, which was very arduous. An associate whose society was courted by all who love the ways of wisdom, piety and virtue. Too much cannot be said of the good character he possessed. None so well as myself knew of his devotion to his country and his God.
I never had the pleasure of enjoying your acquaintance, yet his thoughts of his family, so often expressed, gives me the assurance that war has destroyed the hopes of another family, whose future was unclouded while our country enjoyed the blessings of peace.
But while penning you these lines, the report of hostilites [sic] is sending to thousands of families the same sad news that husband, father, son and brother have fallen while defending their country against the rebellious foe.
We sadly mourn the loss of all those brave officers and men, who have fallen by the sword and disease, yet we cannot at this moment give way to our feelings. We must necessarily put off the day of mourning and press forward to the day of victory and peace, which, through the mercy of God, we hope to enjoy in conversation with the friends of those who have fought and died by our side.
Yours, respectfully,
WILLIAM WALTERMIRE,
Capt. Co. G, 159th Reg't. N. Y. S. V.
ALBANY, June 2, 1863.

MRS. BRADLEY:—It has been with unfeigned sorrow that I have learned of the decease of your husband and my esteemed brother officer, and I feel it my duty to tender you my heartfelt sympathy, in this your hour of trial and suffering, thus adding my humble tribute to the worth of him, who though dead, still lives in the memory of his many warm friends.
Brought together by the fortunes of war—starting out side by side to fight the battles of our country—exposed alike to danger and privation, and linked together as it were by social and 'brotherly" ties—the friendship I formed for Wesley Bradley, was no ordinary one. Knowing him but a for a comparatively short time. In that little time I learned to respect him as a man, honor him as a christian, and love him as a friend. I can hardly realize that he is gone, and that I shall never again grasp his strong hand or look upon his manly form, animated with life and health.
Let us be comforted with the hope that what is our loss, is his gain; that he is not dead, but gone before, to that Heavenly home, where the "wicked cease from troubling, and the weary are at rest."
In him, our country has lost a strong defender; you a dear and beloved husband; I a cherished friend. Let us mourn together and together drop silent tears o'er the turf which covers his new made grave.
I would, that I could express to you the feelings which fill my breast, but words are powerless, I can only tell you of my deep and sincere sorrow, and entrust you to the care of Him "who doeth all things well." Dark as life may seem, there is a "silver lining to every cloud," and that you may be comforted and sustained, in this storm of affliction, is the earnest prayer of
Your true friend, E. L. GAUL,
Major 159th Reg't., N. Y. V.

Col. E. Molineaux, of the 159th Regiment (2d Dutchess and Columbia Regiment,) which suffered so severely at the battle of Irish Bend, La., has returned to his home in New York. He was severely but not dangerously wounded, and returned for the purpose of receiving proper surgical treatment.

DEATH OF ANOTHER VOLUNTEER.—John Higgins, of this city, a corporal in Co. A, 159th Regiment, who was wounded in the skirmish at Indian Bend, on the 13th of April, died at Mechanic's Institute Hospital, New Orleans, on the 18th of May. He was a son of Morris Higgins, and at the time he enlisted was employed as moulder in the foundry of Hunt & Miller. He was 19 years of age.—Gazette.

Death of another Volunteer.
John Higgins, of this city, a Corporal in Co. A., 159th Regiment, who was wounded in the skirmish at Indian Bend on the 13th of April, died at Mechanic's Institute Hospital, New Orleans, on the 18th of May. He was a son of Morris Higgins, and at the time he enlisted was employed as moulder in the foundry of Hunt & Miller. He was 19 years of age.

—Col. E. L. Molineaux, of the 159th 2d Dutchess and Columbia Regiment, which suffered so severely at the battle of Irish Bend, Va., has returned to his home in New York. He was severly [sic] but not dangerously wounded, and returned for the purpose of receiving proper surgical treatment.

ALBANY BARRACKS—CHANGE OF OFFICERS.—Capt. Rice, who has long had charge of the Albany Barracks, has left for active service in the field. He is succeeded by Major Gaul, of the 159th New York Volunteers.

Maj. E. L. Gaul, 159th Regiment N. Y. V., for some months past Commandant of the Albany Barracks, has been promoted to the Lieutenant Colonelcy of the same regiment, vice Lieut. Col. C. A. Burt, resigned, and will proceed to join his regiment in a few days. Capt. Dodge, of the Invalid Corps, is to take his place.
[Albany Atlas & Argus.
We do not know exactly the ground upon which Gov. SEYMOUR bases this promotion, but we are bound to presume that it must be upon the score of "military order and merit"—that being the case, as the Union assures us, with all the promotions made by His Excellency. The officers and men of the 54th Regiment N. G. will appreciate the point, we presume.

The 159th Regiment.
A Sergeant in the 159th writes us from Washington, August 2d, stating that the Regiment is now posted there. The men are in good health and delighted with the change to the invigorating air of the North. The Regiment arrived at Fortress Monroe July 24, Lieut. Col. Waltermire in command, and proceeded to Bermuda Hundreds. After the assault on Petersburg the Regiment was ordered to Washington, and reached there on the 2d. Information should be addressed to the Reg't. 2d Division, 19th Corps, Washington, D. C.

Obsequies to Lieut. Bradley.
The remains of Lt. Wesley Bradley, of the 159th Regiment, who died at New Orleans last May, reached this city last week, and were interred on Sunday with appropriate and impressive ceremonies. They were deposited beside those of Col. Cowles, in the section of ground appropriated by the city for deceased soldiers.

From the 159th Regiment.
A private letter has been received from Lieut. Colonel EDWARD L. GAUL, dated at Alexandria, La., April 11th. The Regiment was comfortably quartered at that post, and in excellent health and spirits.
Colonel MOLENEAUX had been temporarily detached to organize the "Louisiana Scouts," an independent organization, composed of "loyal men of New Orleans." Lieut-Colonel Gaul was in command of the Regiment, and President of Court Martial.

Lieut. Wesley Bradley.
The remains of the late Lieut. WESLEY BRADLEY, of the 159th Regiment, were bro't to this city last week and interred on Sunday, from the Methodist church. The Masonic order and a large number of citizens were in attendance. The funeral discourse was delivered by Rev. Mr. Chatterton, of Poughkeepsie, from the text—"The righteous hath hope in his death." The flags of the city were at half mast during the day.
Lieut. Bradley died some months since in the hospital at New Orleans. He left a wife and two children in this city, where they now reside. He was a most worthy man and devoted soldier.

From the 159th Regiment.
A letter was received in this city on Tuesday,. from Lieut. Col. EDWARD L. GAUL, of the 159th Regiment, dated at Simmsport, La., May 17th. The whole army had reached that point on its way to New Orleans, after a fatiguing march of over one hundred miles, which was accomplished with extraordinary alacrity.
The friends of the 159th will be glad to learn that the members of the Regiment were in excellent health, and no serious casualties had befallen them through their "blockade" at Alexandria, and subsequent long march.

PROMOTED.—We are glad t o make mention that Capt. Wm. Waltermire, attached to the 159th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., who was promoted last Winter to Major, has now been favored with another advance, which is no less than Lieut.-Colonel, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of the late Lieut.-Col. Edward Gaul. We wish the Colonel hearty success in his new "posish."

For the 159th Regiment.
Capt. Wm. H. Sluyter, just returned from the 159th Regiment, will send on a liberal sized box to Co. G, of that Regiment next week. Any packages left at this Office on or before Saturday next, will be promptly forwarded, free of expense.

PROMOTIONS.—Major Charles A. Burt has been promoted to Lieut. Colonel in the 159th regiment, vice G. A. Draper, killed in battle. Capt. Edward L. Lane was promoted to Major, vice C. A. Burt.

WE REGRET TO HEAR that Adjutant Robert D. Lathrop, of the 159th, was killed in one of the recent battles with the Rebels in Louisianna [sic]. Lieut.
L. was son of Capt. Lathrop, long connected with the Hudson River and Lake Champlain steamboats, and now a resident of Stockport, Columbia county. He was a nephew of Archibald Dunlop, Esq., and a young man of excellent character and great promise. He was but 24 years of age, and went out originally as a private in the 14th, in which he was promoted to 1st Sergeant, and from which regiment he was transferred to the 159th. He was in the seven days' fighting before Richmond, and evinced the highest courage.

AT A SPECIAL MEETING OF COMPANY I One Hundred and Fifty-ninth Regiment, N. Y. S. V., held at their company quarters Saturday April 11, 1863, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, the grief-inspiring announcement has been made to us that our late brother and comrade in arms, Olderly [sic] Sergeant Charles H. Caldicott, demands from us an expression of the deep feeling of sorrow engendered in our hearts by this lamentable event—and reminds us of our duty to place on record our humble, but most sincere tribute to the memory of our deceased brother. Therefore be it
Resolved, That in the death of Orderly Sergeant Charles H. Caldicott, his company has been bereft of one of its most valued and respected members, the company of an ardent supporter, and his family brought to anguish in the loss of its beloved object,
Resolved, That while we keenly feel the overwhelming sorrow this event has caused in our midst, yet we yield with humility to the Giver of every good and perfect gift, whose every desire is for our good.
Resolved, That to his beloved family we tender our warmest sympathies, and beg to assure them of our condolence in this, their hour of affliction.
Resolved, That these resolutions be published in the SUNDAY MERCURY, Brooklyn Eagle, and New York Herald, also a copy to be sent to the family of the deceased.
Nineteenth Army Corps, headquarters One Hundred and Fifty-ninth Regiment, N. Y. S. V., Third Brigade, Grover's Divison
JOS. AUG. HATRY, Capt
H. M. HOWARD, Sec'd Lt.
F. H. DOREMUS, Act. Ord'y. Committee.
W. E. PALMER, Jr., Corp'l.
THOS. McEVOY, Private.
BRASHER CITY, LA., April 11, 1863.

Returned Home.
Capt. William H. Sluyter and Lieut. Edgar G. Hubbel, of the 159th Regiment, have returned home. They tendered their resignations, which were accepted, and they have been honorably discharged from the service. Notwithstanding the hardships they have encountered, they are looking remarkably well. We are under obligations to them for the files of New Orleans papers. They represent the Regiment as being in a good state of discipline, and the Officers are honored by every man in the line. The 159th is considered the best drilled Regiment in the Department of the Gulf.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.
ALBANY, N. Y., NOV. 27, 1863.
MR. EDITOR: In behalf of the soldiers at the barracks, the undersigned begs leave to return his sincere thanks to those citizens of Albany who were so thoughtful and generous as to contribute to the Thanksgiving dinner on the 26th inst., and to remind them, that although each perhaps gave but a little of their substance towards the liberal feast prepared, the whole made up a bounteous repast, and sent joy to the heart of many a poor fellow who has been, or is about to go forth, to fight the battles of the Republic. The kindness thus displayed will ever be a green spot in memory to the recipients.
E. L. GAUL, Major 159th Regt., N. Y. V.,
Officer in charge Albany Barracks.

ution as it Is—The Union as our Fathers framed it.
Hudson, Thursday, October 5, 1865.
Reception of the 159th Regiment.
CITIZENS' MEETING.—A meeting of citizens is called to assemble at the Common Council Committee Room, in the City Hall, on Saturday evening, to make preliminary arrangements for the reception of the 159th Regiment, which is expected soon to arrive in this city.

History of the 159th Regiment.
We have received from Lieut. EDWARD DUFFY a full and complete record of the doings of the 159th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., from the time it was mustered into the United States service, Nov. 1st, 1862, to the 1st day of September, 1865, which we shall publish next week. It will be found to possess a general interest as furnishing a history of that portion of the war in which the gallant 159th was engaged, compiled from a daily journal, kept by one of its active and vigilant members. Persons desiring extra copies should send their orders to this office as early as Monday morning of next week, in order to secure a supply.
As an introductory to this history, we publish the following statistics from Lieut. DUFFY'S diary:
List of Field, Staff and Line Officers of the 159th Regiment at date of muster into the United States service,
November 1st, 1862:
HOMER A. NELAON, Colonel, discharged.
EDWARD L. MOLINEUX, Lieutenant-Colonel, promoted to Colonel, breveted Brigadier General, discharged.
GILBERT DRAPER, Major, promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, killed at Irish Bend.
ROBERT LATHROP, Adjutant, killed at Irish bend.
CHARLES A. ROBERTSON, Surgeon, discharged.
WILLIAM Y. PROVOST, First Assistant Surgeon, promoted to Surgeon, discharged.
CALEB C. BRIGGS, Second Assistant Surgeon, promoted to Surgeon.
MARK D. WILBER, Quarter-Master, discharged.
EDWARD L. GAUL, Capt. Co. A, promoted to Major and Lieutenant-Colonel, discharged.
EDWARD ATWOOD, First Lieut., discharged.
WESLEY BRADLEY, Second Lieut., died of fever.
A. J. DAYTON, Capt. Co. B, discharged.
HARRY TIEMANN, First Lieut., discharged.
ALFRED GREENLEAF, Second Lieut., discharged.
ARIEL M. GAMWELL, Capt. Co. C, discharged.
CRAWFORD WILLIAMS, First Lieut., discharged.
EDWARD HUBBEL, Second Lieut., discharged.
JACOB HATTRY, Capt. Co. D, discharged.
LAWRENCE LORETTE, First Lieut., discharged.
JOHN MANLY, Second Lieut., promoted to First Lieut., killed at Irish Bend.
WILLIAM WALTERMIRE, Capt. Co. E, promoted to Major, Lieutenant-Colonel and Colonel.
NATHAN S. POST, First Lieut., discharged.
ROBERT TRAVER, Second Lieut, discharged.
ROBERT McD. HART, Capt. Co. F, promoted to Major, killed.
WILLIAM BURTIS, First Lieut., discharged.
GEORGE W. HUSSEY, Second Lieut., promoted to Capt.
WILLIAM SLITER, Capt. Co. G, discharged.
CHARLES LEWIS, First Lieut., promoted to Colonel of the 176th Regiment.
BYRON LOCKWOOD, Second Lieut., killed at Irish Bend.
WELLES O. PETIT, Capt. Co. H., promoted to Major.
CHARLES C. BAKER, First Lieut., promoted to Captain.
GEORGE R. HERBERT, Second Lieut., detached.
EDWARD WARDLE, Capt. Co. I, discharged.
John W. SHIELDS, First Lieut., discharged.
JACOB FINGAR, Second Lieut., discharged.
JOE B. RAMSDEN, Capt. Co. K, discharged.
William Plunkett, First Lieut., killed at Irish Bend.
DUNCAN RICHMOND, Second Lieut., promoted to Captain, killed.

Promoted from the Ranks.
William F. Tiemann, to Captain.
John H. Charlot, Quartermaster.
Edward Tynan, First Lieutenant.
Barzilla Ransom, "  "
Henry M. Howard, " "
Christopher Branch, "  “
Alfred Bruce, "  "
Lambert Dingman, "  "
Andrew Rifenburgh, "  "
Edward Duffy.  "  "
E. Parmley Brown,  " "
John Day,  " "
John A. Tiemann,  " "
M. A. Dunham,  " "
William Spanburgh, Second Lieutenant.
Charles P. Price,  “ "
Herman Smith,  "  "

List of Battles and Skirmishes in which the Regiment was engaged.
IRISH BEND, La., April 14th, 1863, killed, 6 officers, 23 enlisted men; wounded, 4 officers, 69 enlisted men; prisoners, 12. Total loss—112.
BEFORE PORT HUDSON, La., May 26th, 1863, killed, 4 enlisted men.
PORT HUDSON, La., first assault, May 27th, 1863, killed, 21 enlisted men; wounded, 38. Total loss—59.
PORT HUDSON, second assault, June 14th, 1863, wounded, 12 enlisted men.
MANSURA, La., May 16th, 1864. No casualties.
HALLTOWN, Va., August 24th, 1864, killed, 1 enlisted man; wounded, 1 officer, 10 enlisted men; prisoners, 1 enlisted man. Total loss—13.
BERRYVILLE, September 3d, 1864, killed, 1 enlisted man; wounded, 2 enlisted men. Total loss—3.
OPEQUAN, Va., September 19th, 1864, killed, 5 enlisted men; wounded, 4 officers, 56 enlisted men; prisoners, 1 officer, 20 enlisted men. Total loss—86.
FISHER'S HILL, Va., September 22d, 1864. No casualties.
CEDAR CREEK, Va., October 19th, 1864, killed, 2 officers, 2 enlisted men; wounded 1 officer, 10 enlisted men; prisoners, 5. Total loss—20.

General Officers under whom the Regiment served during the war.
Generals Banks, Grover, Auger, Reynolds, Emory, Birge, Sherman, Schofield, Terry, gilmore, Thomas, Sheridan, Steedman, Wright, Canby, Birney, Molineux, and King.

List of Cities and Towns the Regiment has visited in the line of military service.
LOUISIANA—Baton Rouge, Donaldsonville, Carrollton New Orleans, Algiers, Terra Bone, Thiladuex, Brashar City, Bayou Bueff, Berwick City, Franklin, New Iberie, Vermillionville, Washington, Bears Landing, Opolosus, Chaneyville, Simsport, Bayou Sara, Port Hudson, Clinton, Alexandria, Pineville, Patersonville, Mansura, Williamsport, Morganza, Point Coupee, Teunice Bend, and Jefferson.
VIRGINIA—Bermuda Hundred, Leesburgh. Suickerville, Castle Burough, Berryville, Charlestown, Halltown, Harper's Ferry, Winchester, Kernstown, Newtown, Middletown, Strasburgh, Edenborough, Newmarket, Mount Jackson, Harrisonburgh, Mount Crawford, Centerville, Stephenson Station, and Burseville.
GEORGIA—Savannah, Alexandria, Waynesborough, Allen, Green, Bashaw, and Augusta.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA—Washington, Georgetown, and Tenallaytown.
NORTH CAROLINA—Willmington, and Morehead City.
SOUTH CAROLINA—Hilton Head, and Charleston.
MISSISSIPPI—Fort Adams.
MARYLAND—Baltimore.

River Transportation during the War.
Name of Boat  From To
  1863.
St. Mary Baton Rouge Donaldsonville.
Empire Parish  Donaldsonville  Talbadaux.
Laurel Hill Brasher City Irish Bend.
Empire Parish  Symsport  Bayou Sara.
Laurel Hill Port Hudson  Donaldsonville.
Gen. Banks  Carrollton  Algiers.
1864.
James BartletAlgiers Alexandria.
Ohio BelleMorganza Fort Adams.
Lancaster No. 3., Morganza New Orleans.
Wynonah Bermuda Hundred. Washington.
1865.
Clifton Warsaw River  Savannah.
U. S. Grant Savannah Hilton Head.
H. M. Wells U. S. T. New York Morehead City.

Sea Voyages of the Regiment during the War.
Name of Boat From To
1862.
Northern LightNew York  Baton Rouge.
1864.
Cohola New Orleans  Bermuda Hund.
1865
Suwo-Noda  Baltimore Savannah.
New York Hilton Head Morehead City.
Star of the South  Morehead City Savannah.

List of Field, Staff and Line Officers now in command of the Regiment.
Colonel—WILLIAM WALTERMIRE.
Major—WELLS O PETIT.
Acting Adjutant—GEORGE B. STALEY.
Surgeon—CALEB C. BRIGGS.
Acting Quarter-Master—E. SPENCER ELMER.
Company A.—Capt. WILLIAM F. TIEMANN.
  " B.—First Lieut. JOHN DAY.
  " C.—First Lieut. BARZILLA RANSOM.
  " D.—First Lieut. E . PARMLEY BROWN.
  " E.—First Lieut. ANDREW RIFENBURGH.
  " F.—Capt. GEORGE W. HUSSEY.
  " G.—Capt. JAMES S. REYNOLDS.
  “ H.— ____ ____.
  "  I.—First Lieut. EDWARD TYNAN.
  " K.—First Lieut. E. SPENCER ELMER.
Such is the record, in brief, of the Regiment whose departure from camp three years ago the Columbia Republican announced in these words:
"It is notorious that the men were deserting faster than they were being recruited. ONLY THOSE REMAIN IN CAMP WHO WERE TOO LAZY TO RUN THE GUARD."

Hudson Gazette
Hudson, Thursday, October 12, 1865.
HISTORY
Of the 159th Regiment,
N. Y. S. V.,
COMPILED FROM THE DIARY OF LIEUT. EDWARD DUFFY.
List of Field, Staff and Line Officers of the 159th Regiment at date of mister into the United States service November 1st. 1862:
HOMER A. NELSON, Colonel, resigned.
EDWARD L. MOLINEUX Lieutenant-Colonel, promoted to Colonel, breveted Brigadier General, resigned.
GILBERT DRAPER, Major, promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, killed at Irish Bend.
CHARLES A. BURT, from the 91st Regiment, promoted to Major and Lieutenant Colonel, resigned.
ROBERT LATHROP, Adjutant, killed at Irish Bend.
CHARLES A. ROBERTSON, Surgeon, resigned.
WILLIAM Y. PROVOST, First Assistant Surgeon, promoted to Surgeon, resigned.
CALEB C. BRIGGS, Second Assistant Surgeon, promoted to Surgeon.
MARK D. WILBER, Quarter-Master, resigned.
EDWARD L. GAUL, Capt. Co. A, promoted to Major and Lieutenant-Colonel, resigned.
EDWARD ATWOOD, First Lieut., resigned.
WESLEY BRADLEY, Second Lieut., died of fever.
A. J. DAYTON, Capt. Co. B, resigned.
HARRY TIEMAN, First Lieut., resigned.
ALFRED GREENLEAF, Second Lieut., resigned.
ARIEL M. GAMWELL, Capt. Co. C, resigned.
CRAWFORD WILLIAMS, First Lieut., resigned.
EDWARD HUBBEL, Second Lieut., resigned.
JACOB HATTRY, Capt. Co. D, resigned.
LAWRENCE LORETTE, First Lieut., resigned.
JOHN MANLEY, Second Lieut., promoted to First Lieut., killed at Irish Bend.
WILLIAM WALTERMIRE, Capt. Co. E, promoted to Major, Lieutenant-Colonel and Colonel.
NATHAN S. POST, First Lieut., resigned.
ROBERT TRAVER, Second Lieut, resigned.
ROBERT MCD. HART, Capt. Co. F, promoted to Major,
killed at Cedar Creek.
WILLIAM BURTIS, First Lieut., resigned.
GEORGE W. HUSSEY, Second Lieut., promoted to Capt.
WILLIAM H. SLITER, Capt. Co. G, resigned.
CHARLES LEWIS, First Lieut., promoted to Colonel of the 176th Regiment.
BYRON LOCKWOOD, Second Lieut., killed at Irish Bend.
WELLES O. PETIT, Capt. Co. H., promoted to Major.
CHARLES C. BAKER, First Lieut., promoted to Captain.
GEORGE R. HERBERT, Second Lieut., resigned.
EDWARD WARDLE, Capt. Co. I, resigned.
JOHN W. SHIELDS, First Lieut., resigned.
JACOB FINGAR, Second Lieut., resigned.
JOE B. RAMSDEN, Capt. Co. E, resigned.
WILLIAM PLUNKET, First Lieut., killed at Irish Bend.
DUNCAN RICHMOND, Second Lieut., promoted to Captain, killed at Cedar Creek.
During the latter part of October, 1862, negotiations were made by which the 167th Regiment, Colonel HOMER A. NELSON, in Camp at Hudson, was consolidated with the 159th Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel EDWARD L. MOLINEUX, in Camp at Brooklyn. The consolidated Regiment was designated the 159th, Colonel NELSON retaining command. The Regiment left "Camp Kelly," Hudson, on the 30th day of October, proceeded on board the steamer Connecticut, arrived in New York next morning, and marched to Park Barracks. Remained there until November 1st, when we were mustered into the United States service by Lieutenant R. B. Smith, U. S. A. Left Park Barracks and marched to Castle Garden; from there proceeded by steamboat to Staten Island, and went into Camp at New Dorp. Next day pitched our tents and had things very comfortable.
Colonel Nelson having been elected to Congress from his District, Lieutenant-Colonel E. L. Molineux was appointed Colonel, and took Command of the Regiment, which he virtually had from the first.
November 24th the Regiment broke Camp and was placed on board U. S. steam transport Northern Light, pier No. 3, North River, and remained at the wharf until December 2d, when we hauled into the stream. Early on the morning of the 4th weighed anchor, and the 159th Regiment put to sea. On the 13th we reached Ship Island, in the Gulf of Mexico, having enjoyed a tolerable good passage for the season of the year, being more fortunate than other ships of the expedition, some of them having suffered considerable from rough weather off Cape Hatteras.
December 14th reached New Orleans, and anchored in the stream over night.—The following day pursued our course up the river to Baton Rouge, and arrived there on the 17th. The enemy, learning of our approach in force, concluded to evacuate, while our monitors gave them a parting salute, and the same day the Stars and Stripes were hoisted to the breeze from the Capitol, amid the shouts and cheers of the gratified soldiers.
Now the work began of making thorough soldiers of men, the greater portion of whom never used fire-arms before, at least not in the manner required by the service. Squad, Company, Battalion, and Brigade drill, with any quantity of discipline considered essential to fit men for the campaigning and hardships visible in the distance, were gone through with.
Perhaps few in the volunteer service, none of whom could boast of very much practical experience, were better adapted than Colonel Molineux for this severe task; very quick, energetic, ambitious to do his own duty and to keep every man in his command busy, was the true secret of his success as a disciplinarian.
For nearly three months the men were kept steadily under instruction, and became quite proficient in the use of the musket, and all the essential discipline to make an effective army.
On the 13th of March, 1863, broke camp, and the army moved up to the rear of Port Hudson. Colonel Molineux having command of a provisional Brigade with Nims' Massachusetts Battery, went up the Clinton Road, while the main army proceeded down the Port Hudson Road about eighteen miles, skirmishing the Rebels the whole way, driving their pickets and scouts as they advanced.
At this time Port Hudson was strongly manned, there being from 23,000 to 25,000 men in that natural stronghold. Manoeuvred about this quarter until the 20th, when we again joined the main body of the army on the Port Hudson Road, returning to Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
This movement was made to attract the attention of the enemy, and enable Admiral Farragut's boats to proceed up the river past the fort that here impeded his passage. This was a bold but brilliantly successful move, that only an "iron Farragut" could have accomplished. This blind enabled General Banks to more successfully pursue his future designs, as the enemy had been led to suppose by the formidable movements around Port Hudson that a general attack was to be made at once to reduce the place. Subsequent events exhibited the picture in a different light.
From the 20th to the 28th of March we were kept in readiness to move at a moment's notice. Finally, the suspense was removed and we proceeded on board the transport ship Laurel Hill, to Donaldsonville, La., where we landed in a drizzling rain, about 10 o'clock, P. M., with mother earth for a couch and the broad, moist sky for a canopy. Active campaigning was now fairly inaugurated.
On the 31st of March the troops moved for Thibodeaux, La. The 159th was detailed in charge of supplies and Regimental property, and proceeded by boat up the Bayou Lafourche, arriving at Thibodeaux April 1st. On the 3d we moved to the Railroad Station at Terra Bone, taking the cars for Bayou Bueff, where we arrived on the 4th. Remained here until the 9th. Arrived at Brasher City, La., on the 11th, in company with the 13th Connecticut, 26th Maine, and a detachment of Cavalry. Boarded river steamer Laurel Hill, and proceeded up Berwick Bay, into Grand Lake, accompanied by Grover's Division, numbering about 8,000 men. Had with us three small gun-boats, moving cautiously. Reached the Bend without disaster, the gun-boats shelling the woods and cov­ering the landing of the troops, which took place on the morning of the 13th. Skirmishing lines were thrown out immediately.
The Lake is three or four miles wide at this place, and is called Shell Bend. Having all ashore and every thing in good order, the enemy in sight, we retired for the rest we needed, little realizing the hard fight before us. Lay in skirmish line all night. A few of our men were wounded.
At early dawn of the 14th of April, the lines advanced without breakfast, marching about a mile and a half. The enemy was strongly posted in a wood at a bend in the Bayou. Covered by the gunboats, the 25th and 13th Connecticut and 26th Maine, commanded by Colonel Birge, were skirmishing briskly in front. Colonel Molineux was ordered to take his Regiment, the 159th, and advance and charge the woods.
We advanced in good style over a plowed cane-field in line, passing over the 26th Maine who were lying down. Passed the skirmish line of the 25th Connecticut who were under cover of the cane on our right. Several of our men fell in the advance. Reached within pistol shot of the fence and wood where the enemy was concealed. Scarcely one could be seen while they poured a most effective fire on us, but we steadily advanced 'till ordered to lay down. At this time the men were nearly exhaust­ed, marching at double quick over rough ground with heavy knapsacks; it took a little time to catch fresh wind and unburthen ourselves of our heavy load. We could not have stopped at a more uncom­fortable place, for the enemy gave it to us hot and sweet, while we did not have a chance to see them. They came out of the wood through the cane to the rear of our right flank, and right on top of us. We no doubt would have layed there 'till every man of us was shot had not the order come to fall back to the left. Several of our men were taken prisoners, the enemy rushing upon us while rising up from our position, and poured a most deadly fire into us with fearful effect. The 91st N. Y. S. Volunteers coming down to our aid, the rebels skedaddled, but not without some loss and a number taken prisoners.
Colonel Molineux was severely wounded in the mouth, Lieut-Colonel Draper and Adjutant Lathrop were killed; the Colonel, Lieut-Colonel and Adjutant were nobly doing their duty in the advance, leading their men. No officers could have done better or been more brave. They were picked out by the enemy's sharp shooters posted in the trees near by.
The victory was ours, though the Regi­ment paid dearly for this, their maiden fight. Second Lieutenant Lockwood, of Company G, was killed while nobly lead­ing his Company. Lieutenants Plunket and Price were mortally wounded. Lieu­tenant Manley, of Company A, was killed, and Lieutenant Tieman and Captain Petit were slightly wounded. Our total killed wounded and missing amounted to 112, viz: 6 officers, 23 men killed; 2 officers, 69 men wounded, and 12 men prisoners. Major Burt, who was on General Grover's staff, now assumed command of the Regiment.
The 91st N. Y. S. Volunteers were to have advanced with us on the right, but misunderstanding the order, they failed to advance, causing us to be flanked and receive a heavy enfilading fire by which we suffered so much.
Our Division was to fall on the rear of the enemy, when they were driven from their entrenched position, at Bislin, south of Franklin. The strong resistence [sic] at Irish Bend was to make good their escape, which they effected at the loss of a large number of prisoners.
April 15th, marched up Teche 18 1/2 miles, the main column, under General Banks, in advance. Arrived at New Iberia, where Mills and Ashton, of Company K, who were taken prisoners at Irish Bend, joined the Regiment, the enemy having paroled them.
Arrived at Vermillion Bayou, and finding the bridges burned, had to reconstruct them. The Regiment was now detailed to collect cattle through the prairie and drive them to Berwick City. We collected about three thousand head.
A detachment of the Regiment left us to gather up cotton and other property laying about loose. Arrived safely at Berwick City, and returned in charge of a wagon train which we left at Opolosus, and reported to the Division Commander at Barrie's Landing, on the Teche, eight miles from Opolosus.
May 5th broke camp and Marched to Little Washington, La., and from there to Welles' Plantation, where we went into camp. Left Welles' Farm and marched to Simsport, a distance of eighty miles, where we arrived on the 18th, and crossed the Mississippi, landing at Bayou Sara, on the night of the 21st.
The 24th day of May brought us close to the enemy's outer works in front of Port Hudson, after marching the distance of eight hundred miles from the 28th day of March to the 24th day of May.
Our position now placed us under a heavy fire and shelling from the fort. The enemy well knowing the Road we were obliged to advance on, poured an accurate fire upon our line. But few casualties occurred, although some narrow and hairbreadth escapes happened.
On the 25th of May, skirmishing all day. Result, four of our men killed. At noon our men were relieved from picket, and the Regiment ordered to the right of our Division. A general movement was made along the lines, and our Regiment was selected to attack a portion of the enemy's works, and storm it. The 25th Connecticut Volunteers was consolidated with us, commanded by Major Burt. It was necessary to make a circuitous route three miles through the woods to the right, to reach the position to be attacked, exposed the whole way to a continued and terrific fire of shot and shell; but our boys unflinchingly pressed on through ravines, over felled trees, and all sorts of intricacies natural and artificial. The final assault was to be made upon an almost perpendicular slope. "Forward!" was the word, and persistently we advanced, reaching just under and near the parapet, but the fire was like hail; the Color Bearer was shot dead and the color staff shot from his hands, but it was again secured and brought off. We lay in this position for some hours unable to advance or retreat; it seemed almost impossible for one to escape under such a fire. A number of our men remained in this position until after dark, when the firing ceased. Shortly after midnight, the enemy supposing we still lay close to their works, sallied out and poured a heavy volley into the position from which we had been very prudently removed but a short time previous. We captured one Captain and eight sharpshooters in ambush outside the works; this was but little, yet it furnished some satisfaction for our loss. This was in advance of any previous attack, several of which were made during the day. Our loss on this eventful day was 21 men killed and 38 wounded. From this time until June 14th we were almost continually in the rifle-pits.
June 14th was selected for a general assault. The advance stormers, led by the gallant Colonel PAINE, of the 4th Wisconsin Volunteers, who had been acting Brigadier General for some time previous, pressed on under the most severe fire. A number succeeded in penetrating the enemy's works, but owing to the obstructions we were obliged to pass over, the advance could not be supported with the necessary rapidity for the success of the scheme. Colonel Paine being severely wounded early in the action, materially injured the success of the enterprise. The wounded Colonel lay in such a position that he could not be removed until after dark; several attempts were made but the parties were either killed or wounded in their noble efforts. It was in this engagement that the gallant Colonel Cowles, of the 128th, lost his life while leading his men to the assault.
Shortly after midnight we left the pits where we had been for several days, to join the column of attack coming up at daylight, having to defile through the woods several miles. General Grover's Division support­ed the advance. The 159th advanced under a severe fire through a ravine and over obstructed ground to a commanding posi­tion, a knoll overlooking the enemy's works; here we lay in position until be­tween three and four o'clock, p. m., the enemy firing a continuous volley over our heads. No thanks to them that our craniums escaped. It was contemplated to make a second assault, and we were ordered to the left, some distance over clear and ex­posed ground to join the forces in waiting for this purpose. We remained here until after dark, and the firing having ceased, further attempts were deferred, and we moved back to the position we gained in the morning, and were set to work fortifying, but were soon relieved by colored entrenchers, and returned to our quarters in the woods, which we reached in the small hours of the morning, greatly fatigued. Our loss on this occasion was not severe; 12 men wounded.
To reduce the place was the work assigned, and it must be accomplished. General Banks issued an order on the 15th of June, congratulating the troops for their behavior and close investment of the stronghold, and calling for 1,000 Volunteers from the forces to form a storming column or "a forlorn hope." Soon more than the required number were on hand, and formed into two Battalions, to be commanded by General Birge. It did not become necessary to make this assault. General Gardner hearing of the fall of Vicksburg, capitulated on the 8th of July.
Every thing being satisfactorily arranged, our forces, preceded by the storming party, entered the fortification and filed past 6,000 brave but discomfited "Gray Backs;" freedom's emblem, the Stars and Stripes, was soon hoisted, saluted by a discharge from the guns which had so recently belched forth death against our lines.
On the 11th of July we proceeded down the river to Donaldsonville on board the steamer Iberville. The enemy a few nights prior to the surrender, made a desperate attack on a small garrison in the fort at this place, but were repulsed with severe loss. The garrison numbered not more than four hundred; more than 300 of the enemy were seriously wounded. The enemy was posted just behind the town; batteries were placed along the levee at numerous places; several boats had been destroyed, and the transportation of supplies was getting; quite precarious, but the surrender of Port Hudson put a stop to their amusement. We landed at night, slept on our arms, and woke up in the morning close to the enemy's pickets.
On the 14th a Brigade commanded by Colonel Morgan, of the 90th N. Y. Volunteers, advanced upon the Bayou about four miles, driving the enemy before him. The 159th was on his right flank doing picket duty, and the Company I belonged to was on the outside post in command of Captain William H. Sliter. Colonel Morgan came up to us and ordered us to go with him. The Captain told him he would not leave his post, a most important one, that the whole Brigade depended upon.
On the 15th the enemy made a stand under cover of a thick wood, protected by heavy artillery. Finding our forces not very formidable, the enemy advanced in force on our left flank, taking a number of prisoners. Reinforcements at this time came up, and the enemy fell back West of the Atchafalya River.
July 16th the 159th was detailed to guard wagon trains on the West side of the Mississippi. Arrived at Carrolton, where we were allowed to rest, remaining until the last of August, when we were sent to Thibodeaux, La., via. Algiers.
September 1st, reached Thibodeaux. General Birge was in command of the District of Lafourche. Our Regiment, with the 13th Connecticut, was detailed to do provost and picket duty, while the other troops were distributed over the District.
Colonel Molineux was appointed on General Franklin's Staff on the 24th of September. We remained at this position until March 18th, 1864. Quiet prevailed during our advent here, only a few night alarms occurring, causing the long roll to beat and the men to turn out, but they amounted to nothing serious.
January 1st, 1864, Lieutenant-Colonel Burt took command of the Regiment at Thibodeaux. Colonel Molineux was relieved from duty on General Franklin's Staff, and assigned to command the Lafourche District, in place of General Birge, relieved on furlough.
On the 7th, Lieutenant-Colonel Burt resigned his Commission, on Surgeon's certificate, and was honorably discharged, and the command devolved on the senior officer, Captain Mart. His reign, however, was short. Major Gaul, who was on detached service at Albany, N. Y., was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel, vice Burt, and Captain Waltermire made Major. This arrangement was highly satisfactory to the whole Regiment.
February 25th, Lieutenant-Colonel Gaul reported for duty and took command of the Regiment.
A new Company of 64 enlisted men arrived from Hudson, N. Y., under command of Captain James S. Reynolds, First Lieutenant E. Spencer Elmer, and Second Lieutenant Peter R. Van Deusen. Old Company G. was broken up, the men distributed through the Regiment, and the new Company installed in their place.
On the 19th of March we broke camp for the spring campaign, having been here nearly seven months. On the 21st took cars for New Orleans. Arrived at Algiers on the 24th. Embarked on board the James Battel and arrived at Alexandria, La., via. Red River, on the 27th of March.
Marched to west side of the river to Pineville while the dam was being built to enable the gunboats to pass down the river. Colonel Molineux was relieved from command of a recruiting party which he had been in charge of, called the "Louisiana Scouts," but the Regiment nick-named them the "Jay-hawkers." The gunboat having safely passed the dam, the army commenced moving back on the Mississippi.
May 11th, the 159th, with some artillery and cavalry, were placed in charge of Alexandria and defences, under Colonel Molineux, and remained there while Gen­eral Banks moved on Shreveport.
The engagements of Grandecore, Sabine Cross Road and Cane river, occurred while we were here. General Banks not being able to keep up his supplies, as the gun­boats could not pass up in consequence of the rapid falling of the river, was obliged to fall back.
On the 16th, while passing through Marksville, the enemy made considerable show of resistance. The union forces deployed in line, making a grand and imposing appearance, extending for several miles over an almost level plain. The artillery on both sides belched forth for some hours. The casualties were light, and the enemy driven back. This is called the "Battle of Mansura."
On the 19th, reached Simsport; this was our second advent here.
The enemy continually harrassed [sic] us from the time we left Alexandria, from across the rivers and Bayous, and on our flanks and rear, but accomplished but little damage.
Crossed the river on the steamer Cumberland, and reached Morganzi, La., on the 22d. This terminated the "Red River Expedition" of 1864.
June 19th, General Grover's Division proceeded up the river as far as Fort Adams, and scoured the banks on either side for guerillas, who were numerous, firing into all boats passing on the river. Captured a few prisoners and returned. July 2d, Lieutenant-Colonel Gaul resigned, on account of disease contracted in the campaign, and Major Waltermire was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.
July 3d, took steamer Lancaster, and arrived at Algiers, opposite New Orleans, at 6 p. m., July 4th.
July 17th, went on board the U. S. Transport Cahawba. At 12 o'clock that night moved down the river and arrived at the Rip Raps and Fortress Monroe, on the 24th. Received water, and on the 25th proceeded up the James river, arriving at Bermuda Hundreds at 5 p. m. Move up to the entrenched position, and were kept continually moving about while there.
August 1st, went on board the steamer Winona, and arrive at Washington, D. C., the next day. Put baggage on cars for Harpers Ferry, but orders  countermanded before we got off. Marched through Washington to Tenallytown. Remained there until the 14th, when we started to join General Sheridan in the Shanandoah Vally, through Snicker's Gap. Crossed Chain Bridge and encamped at Owl Run, Va., that night. Arrived at Leesburgh on the 17th; passed through Hamilton, and within four miles of Snicker's Gap. Here a dispatch notified us that the enemy was hurrying to cut us off at the gap. This notice was timely, and saved us a serious disaster. Immediately moved on, forded the Shenandoah river, marched nearly all night, and reached Sheridan's forces on the morning of the 18th, having marched about forty miles the previous day and night.
Fighting had been going on in that vicinity for some time before we arrived.
Were ordered to throw up temporary breast-works, which was quickly accom­plished.
Early in the morning of the 21st, heavy artillery firing was heard on our right. The 6th and 8th Corps were engaged in a heavy battle that day, and late in the after­noon our Division was moved to the right of the 6th Corps and in front of Charlestown. In this engagement the loss was heavy on both sides.
General Sheridan then drew his forces back to the rear of the defences of Harper's Ferry, at Halltown, the 19th Corps covering the movement. Our Regiment was put on picket duty behind Bolliver Heights, and a constant picket firing was kept up on both sides.
On the 24th, our Regiment, with the 22d Iowa and 11th Indiana, under command of Colonel McCauly, advanced on the skirmish line to reconnoiter the enemy. Drove them back some distance, advancing in good style under a heavy fire, and maintained our position until ordered to retire. We were under a heavy artillery fire for about two hours, and our Regiment lost one officer and twelve men.
Two officers and sixty picked men were selected to join others to advance for the purpose of bringing on an engagement, but news came that the enemy had retired. The cavalry followed them, and occupied Charlestown.
A grand advance was ordered, and on the 3rd of September we started off with four days' rations in our haversacks.
Advanced to near Berryville, where heavy artillery firing was heard in front, soon followed by musketry, gradually growing more rapid. The enemy had gained a slight advantage on the left of the 8th Corps. The 19th Corps moved quickly to their support, when the enemy fell back, but firing continued until after dark.
On the morning of the 5th, three lines of rude breastworks were thrown up in double quick time—hand, feet, bayonets, tin cups, old shoes, every thing was brought into requisition to accomplish the work, which was completed during a heavy rain.
On the 6th, the enemy fell back to the Opequan Creek.
On the 7th our Regiment proceeded to the Opequan, reconnoitered the enemy, and returned the same day after accomplishing our objects.
On the 11th captured the 8th South Carolina Regiment, with all its officers.
September 17th, General Grant made a short visit to "Little Phil," which was set down as indicating hard work ahead, in which supposition we were not disappointed.
At 1 o'clock, A. M., on the 19th, a general movement of the whole army began. Skirmishing towards Opequan Creek became more and more brisk, till it assumed all the proportions of a fierce battle, lasting the whole of the day. Alternately the opposing forces were repulsed in turn, either side contesting for the superiority with the most dogged persistency. Only the ability and determination of the gallant "Little Phil." could have secured success. We had 5 men killed, 4 officers and 36 men wounded, and 1 officer and 20 men taken prisoners.
The enemy was closely followed up to Fisher's Hill, behind Strausburg, a well fortified and naturally strong position.—Gaining the point we desired on the 22d, it was determined to force the enemy up the valley, and occupy this stronghold.
The 6th Corps was thrown around to the left and rear of the enemy by the base of the mountain; this movement took almost all day. The 8th Corps was on the left, and the 19th in the centre. When the 6th Corps reached sufficiently near a grand movement was made, our boys forcing the centre. This action took the enemy by surprise and they retreated up the valley in tall style. About a thousand were not able to carry out their intentions, and it devolved on us to pilot them to the rear.
The chase was kept up all night, and we reached Woodstock the next morning. We suffered no loss on this occasion. It was indeed a cheap victory. We captured a number of horses and wagons, artillery, and any quantity of small arms, which our Regiment was detailed to take charge of and convey to Winchester, with the prisoners.
We left Woodstock at five P. M., and delivered the property and prisoners at Winchester, and on the 25th started for the front again, in charge of a supply train.
On the 27th, at three P. M., arrived at the front at Harrisonburg, having marched over one hundred miles in less than four days.
On the 30th, the 6th and 19th Corps advanced to Mount Crawford, the enemy showing some disposition to interrupt the Cavalry. Nothing serious being discovered, we fell back to Harrisonburg. Remained here until October 6th, when we moved back to New Market, and on the 9th arrived at Woodstock. Marched 'till 9 a. m., arriving a short distance south of Fisher's Hill. The enemy finding us falling back, closely followed after. We were thrown into line on either side of the road, ready for what might occur. A little skirmishing with the rear guard was the only demonstration, and at four P. M. we were back in front of Fisher's Hill, our old position. On the 9th, General Rosier, with his artillery and cavalry, hovered about our rear, being closely watched by our cavalry. He came a little too near, however, and our cavalry dashed at him and captured seven or eight guns and a number of prisoners.
On the 11th of October, marched back to the north side of Cedar Creek, which we commenced fortifying. The enemy brought heavy Batteries and shelled the 8th Corps camp on the left. The trains were sent to the rear, and the troops placed in line ready for action, but the enemy appeared to be reconnoitering, and fell back to Fisher's Hill.
All remained quiet until the morning of the 19th of October. Early had received large reinforcements from Richmond, and now made a last desperate effort to redeem his lost laurels in the valley. It was a well executed and daring move, and for a time promised success. He moved his men during the night around our left flank by the base of the Blue Ridge, in single file, many not even carrying their canteens, fearful that the least noises would be made. In this manner they succeeded in reaching Middletown, a mile and a half in the rear of our breastworks; before daylight a feint was made on our right to attract our attention in that quarter; a short time after a volley or two of musketry was heard on our left, the enemy dashing on the 8th Corps in desperate fury, completely surprising them. So sudden was the attack that many were captured before they had time to leave their tents or seize their muskets. On pressed the successful mass, shouting and yelling in the wildest manner.
The 8th Corps, badly demoralized, poured back on the rear of the 19th Corps, closely pursued by the enemy. Our Division was going out to reconnoiter, and were in line, but from their position could do but little, the enemy being in our rear, so that not a shot could be fired without danger to our own men. The 1st Division, 19th Corps, was sent to support the 8th Corps early in the morning, and suffered severely, meeting the first onslaught of the enemy. Our Division (the 2d) took position in front of the breastworks, but being of no service there, we filed to the right and fell back to the rear where we could be re-formed and occupy a position in front of the enemy.
The enemy steadily pressed us back four or five miles. Matters began to look blue, when the dashing "Little Phil." came up as fast as his noble black steed could carry him, leaving his attendants far in the rear. The noise of the battle had reached him at Winchester early in the morning. The appearance of Sheridan immediately instilled new vigor, energy, and determination into the men. He passed along the whole line amid the most marked enthusiasm, telling the men they would quarter in their old camp again that night.
The broken lines were speedily re-formed, the General passing along hat in hand, encouraging the men. This was sufficient, and from this dates the last advent of Early in the valley.
It was now our turn. The enemy charged us, and for the first time were repulsed. We pressed on determined to win. The success of the morning turned to a most irretrievable and disastrous defeat to the enemy. They were completely routed, suffering a terrible slaughter. Twenty-four guns captured in the morning were retaken, besides a large number of prisoners, and most of the enemy's artillery, numbering over fifty pieces. Our Regiment took 16 officers and 34 men as prisoners, in this engagement. We lost Captain Richmond, one of the best officers in the Regiment, and a brave, noble fellow. He was shot in the afternoon, when success began to turn on our side. None braver paid the penal­ty of death for his country. We had 2 privates killed, 10 wounded, and 5 taken prisoners.
The cavalry pressed the beaten foe until horse flesh could do no more, taking a large number of prisoners and all sorts of war impliments [sic] and materials. Thus was this long day spent in fighting and running, advancing and retreating, now one side victorious, then the other, when finally success crowned our efforts.
Major Hart, of our Regiment, on General Grover's Staff, was wounded and taken by the Rebels. He was not attended to in time, and lost so much blood as to cause his death.
On the 20th, the forces moved about three miles up the valley, overlooking
Strausburg, the cavalry continuing the pursuit to Harrisonburg, capturing more artillery and wagons. On the 21st moved back to our old position on Cedar Creek.
From this time until the 1st of January, 1865, the men were engaged in erecting breastworks, preparing Winter quarters, frequently moving and occasionally skirmishing with the enemy along the lines.
The 24th of November was observed in camp as Thanksgiving Day, and all duties were stopped that could be dispensed with. Thanks to our kind friends at home, we were provided with a bountiful feast of turkeys, chickens, pies and other luxuries, and if they could have witnessed the satisfaction of the men on that occasion, it would have been ample reward for their generosity.
January 6th, 1865, moved to Harper's Ferry. Arrived in Baltimore next morning, and quartered in Barracks on Carrol Hill. On the 11th Colonel Waltermire took command of the Regiment, and we embarked on board the steamer Sua-Noda, for Savannah. General Grover and Staff, the 128th N. Y. S. Volunteers, and the 24th Iowa were on the same vessel.
On the 18th cast anchor in Warsaw Sound, eight miles from Savannah; and on the 20th the Regiment went up to the city on river boats, and were quartered in the Central Railroad Depot.
On the 26th, were moved out to the fortifications, on the West side of the town.
February 1st, fresh bread was issued with our rations, which was a luxury to the boys so long kept on "hard tack." February 19th, fired a rousing salute on hearing of the occupation of Charleston by the Union forces. On the 22d, celebrate Washington's Birth-day in a becoming manner.
March 9th, were ordered on board the Tug boat U. S. Grant, which conveyed us to Hilton Head, where we went into Barracks.
On the 15th, were taken on board U. S. Transport New York, a splendid new ship, and arrived at Charleston, S. C., at one A. M., on the 16th. On the 17th took on board the 52d Pennsylvania, a detachment of the 54th New York, and the 28th Iowa, in all about 1,600 men. Weighed anchor on the 18th at ten and a half o'clock A. M., and moved down the harbor. This gave us an excellent opportunity to see the dilapidated city and its approaches, forti­fications and defences; the latter of which were exceedingly formidable, and might be considered impregnable from the water side.
March 19th, anchored off Fort Fisher, at nine o'clock A. M., when we received orders to report at Morehead City, N. C. Reached that port on the 20th, landed on the 21st, and awaited orders.
April 5th, intelligence reached us of the evacuation of Richmond and Petersburg, which caused great rejoicing throughout the camp. This was followed by the more encouraging news of Lee's surrender on the 9th. While these great victories were being celebrated, the sad intelligence of the assassination of President Lincoln reached camp, and cast a deep sadness over those who had been jubilant but the hour before.
May 3d, ordered to report back to General Grover, at Savannah. Break camp, and embarked on board steamer Star of the South. On the 7th, after an eventful trip, disembarked at Savannah, and found the City remarkably [sic] improved in appearance since we left it.
May 11th, ordered to proceed to Augusta. Took up our line of march in a heavy rain storm, and made twelve miles that day through the woods. Next day we accomplished over twenty miles. On the 14th an Orderly from General Molineux's Headquarters reached us, to hurry up our march. The 159th, 128th and 131st N. Y. S. Volunteers in advance of all, to make Wainsborough and take the cars. Reached Augusta on the 17th, pretty well used up from fatigue.
June 7th, a general review of all the troops by General Molineux, on which occasion he issued a congratulatory order to the soldiers, complimenting them for their excellent discipline, and the services they had rendered.
Here the Regiment virtually closed its campaign, nothing further of note occurring up to the present writing, beyond the usual routine of camp life in the city.

List of Battles and Skirmishes in which the Regiment was engaged.
IRISH BEND, La., April 14th, 1863, killed, 6 officers, 28 enlisted men; wounded, 4 officers, 69 enlisted men; prisoners, 12. Total loss—112.
BEFORE PORT HUDSON, La., May 26th, 1863, killed, 4 enlisted men.
PORT HUDSON, La., first assault, May 27th, 1863, killed, 21 enlisted men; wounded, 38. Total loss—59.
PORT HUDSON, second assault, June 14th, 1863, wounded, 12 enlisted men.
MANSURA, La., May 16th, 1864. No casualties.
HALLTOWN, Va., August 24th, 1864, killed, 1 enlisted man; wounded, 1 officer, 10 enlisted men; prisoners, 1 enlisted man. Total loss—13.
BERRYVILLE, September 3d, 1864, killed, 1 enlisted man; wounded, 2 enlisted men. Total loss—3.
OPEQUAN, Va., September 19th, 1864, killed, 5 enlisted men; wounded, 4 officers, 56 enlisted men; prisoners, 1 officer, 20 enlisted men. Total loss—86.
FISHER'S HILL, Va., September 22d, 1864. No casualties.
CEDAR CREEK, Va., October 19th, 1864, killed, 2 officers, 2 enlisted men; wounded 1 officer, 10 enlisted men; prisoners, 5. Total loss—20.

Promotions from the Ranks.
William F. Tiemann, to Captain.
John H. Charlot, Quarter-master.
Edward Tynan, First Lieutenant.
Barzilla Ransom, " "
Henry M. Howard, "  "
Christopher Branch, "  "
Alfred Bruce, " "
Lambert Dingman, " "
Andrew Rifenburgh, " "
Edward Duffy,  " "
E. Parmley Brown,  " "
John Day,  "  "
John A. Tiemann,  "  "
M. A. Dunham, "  "
William Spanburgh, Second Lieutenant.
Charles P. Price. " "
Herman Smith, " "

Officers now in command of the Regiment.
Colonel—WILLIAM WALTERMIRE.
Major—WELLS O. PETIT.
Acting Adjutant—GEORGE B. STALEY.
Surgeon—CALEB C. BRIGGS.
Acting Quarter Master—SPENCER ELMER.
Company A.—Capt. WILLIAM F. TIEMAN.
"  B.—First Lieut. JOHN DAY.
"  C.—First Lieut. BARZILLA RANSOM.
"  D.—First Lieut. E. PARML BROWN.
"  E.—First Lieut. ANDREW RIFENBURGH.
"  F.—Capt. GEORGE W. HUSSEY.
"  G.—Capt. JAMES S. REYNOLDS.
"  H.— ____ ____
" I.—First Lieut. EDWARD TYNAN.
"  K.—First Lieut. E. SPENCER ELMER.

City and County.
FRIDAY.......................FEBRUARY 19, 1864
COMPANY G, 159TH REGIMENT.—The above company, which left this city for the seat of war a few days ago to join the 159th (Duchess and Columbia) regiment, was composed of about one hundred stout and healthy young men from Columbia County. The officers, both commissioned and non-commissioned, have seen service before, and are well capable of taking charge of the men. The company goes to New Orleans direct. The following are the officers:
Captain—James S. Reynolds, (veteran).
1st Lieut—E. Spencer Elmer. "
2d " —Peter Van Deusen.
1st Sergeant—Egbert E. Covey,* Hudson.
2d " —Geo. W. Bristol,* "
3d " —Jenning J. Covey,* "
4th " —Frank A. Kertz, * "
5th " —Wm. H. Mesick,*  Stockport.
1st Corporal—Robert C. Bruce,* Hudson.
2d " —H. C. Van Deusen,*  "
3d " —David Post, * Stockport.
4th " —George Retting, * Hudson.
5th " —Nicholas R. Shultz, *  Stockport.
6th " —Lotan Fuller, *  Hudson.
7th " —Jordan Shults, "
8th " —Charles Root, Claverack.

CAPT. J. S. REYNOLD'S COMPANY.—
We are enabled to-day to publish the names of all those who have enlisted in independent company organization of Capt. Jas. S. Reynolds, to be immediately attached to the 159th Regiment, now in the field. Capt. Reynolds and Lieut. E. S. Elmer, (both members of Co. K, 14th Regiment) are entitled to much credit for the diligence with which they have labored to complete the organization. They go back to the service with the best wishes of a community which their faithfulness and bravery in one campaign has already honored. Most of the non-commissioned officers, as will be observed, are also veterans. The list is as follows:
Captain—JAMES S. REYNOLDS, (veteran.)
1st Lieut.—E. Spencer Elmer,  "
2d " —Peter Van Deusen

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Orderly Sergeant—Egbert E. Covey, (veteran) Hudson
2d Sergeant—Geo. W. Bristol, " "
3d " —Jennings J. Covey, " "
4th " —Frank A. Kertz, " "
5th " —Wm. H. Mesick,  " Stockport.
1st Corporal—Robert C. Bruce,  "  Hudson.
2d  "  —Henry C. Van Deusen, “ “
3d  "  —David Post, “  Stockport.
4th "  —George Rettig,  “  Hudson.
5th "  —Nicholas R. Smith, “  Stockport.
6th "  —Lotan Fuller, “  Hudson.
7th "  —Jordan Shultz, “ “
8th "  —Charles Root,  “  Claverack.

MUSICIANS.
Geo. W. Loomis,  Hudson.
Geo. Helms,  "

PRIVATES.
Bernard Allen, Hudson.
Thomas Abbey,  "
James A. Coe,  "
Edward Fitzgerald "
Chas. H. Howes, "
Spencer Helms,  "
Lewis H. Hermance "
William Kennelly, "
Henry Kercher, "
Lewis M. Lebrie,  "
Chas. A. Michael, "
William Martin,  "
Henry A. Perrigo, "
James Pitts, "
Elliot Rowlison, "
Henry Scism,  "
Henry Sherman,  "
Dennis Shehan, "
Saber S. Spauldingy "
Henry H. Steele, "
John Shaughnessy, "
David C. Smith,  "
Fidel Wise,  "
Thomas Dawson, "
Abram Brent, Greenport.
Robert R. Butts, Ancram.
Lodi Kitchell, Copake.
Daniel Laine, "
Russel Van Deusen, "
Peter Murphy, Claverack.
Daniel B. Osborn, "
Wm. A. Stickles,  "
John Toomy,  "
Luzerne Stewart,  "
John S. Bishop, Ghent.
Joseph Eldridge Ger'ntown
Caleb Brady, Livingston.
John Burke, "
Dennis Calligan, "
John M. Darkins,  "
Patrick Guilfoil,  "
Michael Kirby,  "
Oscar Lewis, "
Warren H. Miller, "
George McBain, "
Thomas Murnan,  "
Wm. Moore, "
Peter W. Reynolds, "
Silas Smith, "
Wm. H. Shultis,  "
C E Van Valkenburgh, "
Milton Weaver,  "
Jeremiah Meagher,"
Simeon Morris,  "
Chas. E. Shultis, Taghk'c.
Franklin Miller,  "
Martin Hagen, Gallatin.
Roland Brook,  "
Charles Bennet,  "
Patrick Lee,  "
Elias Van Deusen,  "
Martin Day,  "
Alexander Day,  "
Jacob Hallenbeck,  "
Franklin Perry, "

It is understood that the Company will leave Poughkeepsie, on its way to join the 159th, this morning.

THE REPUBLICAN.
City and County Intelligence.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1865.
The 159th—a Reminiscence.
The battle of Irish Bend, in which the 159th Regiment, suffered so severely, took place on the 14th of April, 1863. Among the killed was Adjutant Robt. D. Lathrop, son of Capt. G. Lathrop, of Stockport, in this County. Immediately on hearing the news, Mr. L. started for the scene, and it was while in pursuit of information of his son that Captain (now Colonel) Waltermire furnished the following written statement, which we publish
simply as a reminiscence:
While on the field after the battle, I was assisting Lieut. Price, who was mortally wounded. Adj. Lathrop heard my voice. He called out to me in a loud voice, "Capt. Waltermire; come here, Cap." I turned a trifle to the left, and saw the Adjutant lying wounded. I immediately went to his assistance.
He said to me, "Captain, I am hit in a bad spot. I am in great pain. Where is the Colonel?" I told him I had just returned from carrying the Colonel to the rear. He then asked for the Lieut. Col. I told him he was killed, also Lieut. Lockwood and Manly. He then expressed his sorrow for our brave officers and said, "My God! are we whipped in this battle?" He then said, "What cheering is that?" "It is the 91st, driving the enemy from our flank, and pushing them through the woods in front of us. We are not whipped, but badly cut up." He then asked to know how our Regiment behaved. I told him bravely. He said, "It's all right, if we conquer." I then asked him about his wound, which I saw was fatal. He said he wished to be turned over. I turned him and placed a shade over him, for the sun was shining very hot. I gave him to drink from my canteen and squeezed lemon juice on his lips, which were much parched. In the meantime I had sent for a stretcher, which now arrived. He asked me to look after his sword, which I did, and placed it on the stretcher with him, to be carried to the hospital flag. He then asked to know about Charley Lewis, and I told him I would send for him. He reached the hospital at the same time with the Adjutant, but too late to hear him speak. The Adjutant lived about an hour after being shot, and died a brave and much lamented  officer.
WM. WALTERMIRE, Capt. Co. E,
159th Regt. N . Y . S . V .

HUDSON GAZETTE
Hudson, Thursday November 2, 1865.
RECEPTION OF THE 159th REGIMENT.
OUR CITIZENS GIVE THEM A SPONTANEOUS OVATION.
Eloquent Addresses and a Sumptuous Repast.
The 159th Regiment having served three years, was mustered out at Hart's Island on Wednesday, October 25th, and arrived in this city by the Hudson River Railroad on Friday. The Regiment left in 1862 with full ranks, and now numbers about 250 men, and 13 Commissioned Officers.
It was not definitely known what time they would be here until the day before their arrival. But through the prompt action of the Committee of Arrangements, and the cordial and ready assistance given them by our citizens, particularly the ladies, the preparations for their reception were completed before the hour of their arrival.
Hanford's Cornet Band and the Claverack Band generously volunteered their services to perform escort duty. The Fire Department, at the suggestion of Chief Engineer Blake, the returned Soldiers in the city belonging to other Regiments, and citizens generally, turned out to join in the escort. Col. EDWARD L. GAUL, late of the 159th Regiment, was appointed Chief Marshal, and shortly after 11 o'clock all proceeded to the Depot to await the arrival of the train that bore the expected guests. They had not long to wait. The train soon arrived, and as the commanding figure of Colonel WALTERMIRE made its appearance, cheer upon cheer rent the air, the Bands struck up a lively tune, and a hearty and general shaking of hands and passing of "welcome" followed.
Children were there to greet their fathers, wives to greet their husbands, fathers and mothers to greet their sons, sisters to welcome their brothers, and blushing maidens to meet their lovers, after a three year's separation.
Many an eye was moistened with joy; but there were others yet whose hearts were rent with anguish, whose friends departed with the Regiment, but will return no more. The whole scene was impressive in the extreme, but it is being daily enacted all over the country.
The procession was formed in the order laid down in the programme, and the imposing line marched through our principal streets, greeted at every corner with loud and prolonged cheers.
Arriving at the City Hall, the soldiers were seated at the well filled tables by the ladies in attendance, after which the following interesting exercises were held:

THE MAYOR'S WELCOME.
Mayor ROGERS welcomed the Regiment to the hospitalities of the City in a brief and appropriate address, speaking substantially as follows:
Officers and Soldiers of the 159th Regiment.—In behalf of the citizens of Hudson, I welcome you home, and tender to you the hospitalities of the city. You have achieved a glorious record on the battle field. We are proud of your valor as soldiers and of your self-sacrifice as patriots. You have reflected honor upon the City and County by your noble deeds; and now, at the close of the war in which you bore so honorable a part, we gladly welcome your return to civil pursuits, to the joy of family ties, and to the happiness of peaceful vocations.
Many of your brave comrades have fallen in battle, and their graves are yet moist with the tears of sorrowing friends. We revere the memory of the dead, while we honor the valor of those who have been spared to return.
Again, Welcome! thrice Welcome! Survivors of the gallant 159th.
Rev. JOHN MCCLELLAN HOLMES then addressed the throne of Grace in fervent and impressive prayer.

ADDRESS OF JUDGE MILLER.
Hon. THEODORE MILLER, by invitation, addressed the Soldiers as follows: Col. Waltermire, Officers and Soldiers of the 159th Regiment
It is with much pleasure and satisfaction, as the representative of the public authorities and the citizens of Hudson, that I extend to you a heartfelt welcome, and a generous offer of hospitalities upon this interesting occasion.
Within a very few days three years will have expired since that portion of your Regiment which was enlisted here embarked from this city on its way towards the seat of war.
Almost constantly since that time t he service in which you have been engaged has been of the most arduous character, and of great difficulty, danger and trial. It has embraced a region of country almost as broad and extensive as the expanded limits of our beloved land, and has required energy, devotion, great powers of endurance, and the highest degree of firmness and courage.
On the march, in the camp and in the battle with the foe, amidst carnage and blood, with the dead and the dying around, you have ever proved faithful, true and brave, and at all times and upon all occasions, evinced a determination and gallantry worthy of soldiers and of the chosen sons of the Nation.
Your valor is established by the silent but speaking testimony of many terrible battle fields which drank the blood of some of the bravest, best and noblest of your gallant band.
The sanguinary conflict at Irish Bend, where many of your most distinguished officers and privates were slain, and many more of the members of your Regiment were numbered with the wounded and were prisoners, is a memorable example of valor, which reflects the highest credit and honor upon those who faced the enemy in that bloody fight.
Again, at Port Hudson thrice, you were in the fray, evincing that indomitable courage which never falters in the darkest hour of peril and danger.
After other signal exploits, you were transferred to scenes nearer to the National Capitol, where you were engaged in the most active, vigorous and bloody campaign of the war, and which was consummated by the prostration and destruction of the Confederate armies, by the collapse of the rebellion, and a restoration of peace.
Halltown, Berryville, Opequan, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek—many of them hard fought battles—abundantly testify that you have "done your duty well," and have an imperishable record of your glorious achievements, which will not suffer in comparison with that of any other Regiment which has been engaged in the service.
Not less than ten battles and skirmishes must be entered to your credit in the historic pages of this war. No Regiment has done more efficient service or can present a more brilliant and, I may add, a more bloody record of its deeds. A single fact will evince that yours has been no holiday employment—no idle pastime. Thirty-nine field, staff and line officers, originally [sic] constituted your organization, and were in command of your Regiment. Only thirteen officers remained in commission when your labors were ended.
Your thinned ranks are the most eloquent witnesses and mournful evidences, that your duty as soldiers of the Union, as true patriots and lovers of your country, has been most faithfully and religiously discharged.
You entered upon a bright and glorious career as a Regiment, full of stalwart men and brave hearts. You return greatly reduced in numbers, but more endeared to us on account of the sacrifices, hardships and sufferings which you have encountered and endured.
I congatulate [sic] you upon your return to your homes and firesides, and upon a happy re-union with your family and friends, whom you left behind upon your enlistment in t h e service of your country.
Many who with you went forth in the pride of manhood, health and strength, of stout hearts and noble forms, have been denied this great privilege. The brilliant records of the bloody conflicts to which I have adverted, will account for your missing comrades.
The bones of some of them are crumbling upon the distant soil of Louisiana, whitening the valley of the Shenandoah, or mouldering on the slopes of Virginia.
The memories of these gallant soldiers will ever be cherished by a grateful people, and their names will be enrolled among those martyrs to a sacred cause, who have sealed their devotion by their life blood.
We welcome you, their companions in arms, in behalf of that people whom you have served so well and so honorably, and invoke upon your heads the choicest blessings of Divine Providence, whose watchful eye has conducted you through so many hardships and perils, to a haven of rest and quiet, where the din of war shall temporarily cease, and you shall, for a season at least, enjoy the comforts of peace and repose.
You enlisted for the war, and it has been your great privilege to witness personally its final termination. You have seen the Union restored, and the noble flag you offered your lives to uphold and defend, waving in triumph over every inch of territory in a united country.
A generous Nation will not forget t he invaluable services you have rendered, and the noble deeds you have performed will be cherished in memory for generations to come.
You will return to the duties of civil life, fully prepared to discharge them with the same fidelity and honor which you have exhibited in the field,
In the pursuit of civil occupations, it will be a pleasing reflection that you have been instrumental in maintaining the Constitution and the Laws—in preserving that hallowed Union, which was purchased at the price of blood, and toil and suffering—in resenting the insult offered to our National emblem by the attack upon Fort Sumpter [sic], and in upholding our glorious flag against its enemies.
Again, in behalf of the citizens of this county, I welcome your return, and most heartily and cordially thank you for your patriotic services.

COL. WALTERMIRE'S RESPONSE.
Col. Waltermire responded in behalf of the Regiment as follows:—
Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen:
I am no speech-maker—that is not my business; but in behalf of the officers and soldiers of the 159th Regiment, I return you our most heartfelt thanks for your very kind and generous welcome.
The Regiment was then served with the good things of the table by the ladies in attendance, which the gallant boys partook of with a relish known only to fatigued soldiers. The board was supplied with everything that could be suggested for a bountiful collation, and it was a matter of general surprise that such a sumptuous repast could be provided in so short a time.
Great credit is due to the ladies for their active assistance in perfecting the arrangements, as well as to the citizens who so generously responded to the call of the Committee of Arrangements for material aid.
The Firemen are also entitled to thanks for the prominent part they performed in the ceremonies of the day; and to Hanford's Cornet Band and the Claverack Band the Committee tender their acknowledgments for their voluntary service on the occasion.
The Regiment looked in fine condition, notwithstanding the long period of hard service they have encountered, and the sad misfortune they met with at the burning of their Barracks at Augusta, Ga., on the eve of their departure for home, particulars of which we published last week. In passing the GAZETTE OFFICE they were greeted with a salute from our Four Pounder, "Little Mac." which the boys responded to with three hearty cheers. We acknowledge the compliment, which unquestionably expressed the true sentiments of their hearts. It is hardly necessary to say that the other newspaper offices were passed in silence. Soldiers have good memories!
The conduct of the soldiers throughout the day, and after their dismissal, was such as become gentlemen on any occasion. Not the least sign of disturbance, carousing, or dissipation was discovered, and the change from military to civil life was made as calmly as the advent from one day to another. The clamor of croakers who contended that the change from Military restraint to civil freedom could not be made without commotion, were thus most effectually refuted.
So closes the career of the 159th Regiment, whose deeds of valor and patriotism we have already recorded, and which will live as long as our country's history endures. We have followed them from their organization to their honorable disbandment, through all the varied fortunes of War, tracing many saddening recitals, as well as much that will be pleasantly and proudly treasured in memory.

THE REPUBLICAN.
City and County Intelligence.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1865.
THE 159TH REGIMENT.
Its Return Home—Reception at the City Hall—Enthusiastic Welcome by our Citizens—Address by the Mayor and Judge Miller—A Sumptuous Dinner, &c.
About one hundred and fifty of the brave soldiers composing the 159th Regiment, mostly from this county, returned home on Thursday and Friday last, having been paid off and discharged at Hart's Island. Col. WALTERMIRE, with several of the remaining officers and men, reached here at half past 11 on Friday, and were met at the depot by a large gathering of citizens, who gave them a most cordial greeting. The Mayor, Firemen, and reception committee were also present with the Hudson and Claverack bands. A large proportion of the soldiers who had previously returned were also present by invitation, and all formed in line and were escorted through the streets in a drizzling rain (a long and muddy march for a peace footing,) to the City Hall. Residences and places of business all along the route were thrown open, and the returning heroes were welcomed by cheers, salutes and the waving of handkerchiefs and flags at almost every step. It was a very interesting and impressive scene—one perhaps never to be re-enacted in the life-time of those who participated in it. The "boys" seemed highly pleased with the demonstration, and expressed their delight in a variety of select phrases.
On reaching the Hall the soldiers were met by a large company of ladies and invited to take seats at the tables which were spread with an ample feast. The officers of the day and bands passed upon the stage, and Mayor Rogers welcomed the soldiers home in a few appropriate words.
After music by the band and prayer by Rev. J. Mc. Holmes, the soldiers were addressed by Hon. Theo. Miller as follows:

COLONEL WALTERMIRE, OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE 159TH REGIMENT:
It is with much pleasure and satisfaction, as the representative of the public authorities and citizens of Hudson, that I extend to you a heartfelt welcome and a generous offer of their hospitalities upon this interesting occasion.
Within a very few days three years will have expired since that portion of your Regiment which was enlisted here left this city on its way towards the seat of war. Almost constantly since that time the service in which you have been engaged has been of the most arduous character, and of great difficulty, danger and trial. It has embraced a region of country almost as extensive as the expanded limits of our beloved land, and has required energy, devotion, great powers of endurance, and the highest degree of firmness and courage. On the march—in the camp—and in the battle with the foe, amidst carnage and blood, with the dead and the dying around—you have ever proved faithful, true and brave; and at all times, and upon all occasions, evinced a  determination and gallantry worthy of soldiers and of the chosen sons of the Nation. Your valor is established by the silent but speaking testimony of many battle fields, which drank the blood of some of the bravest, best and noblest of your chosen band. The sanguinary conflict at Irish Bend, where many of your best officers and men were slain, and many more of the members of your Regiment were numbered with the wounded and were taken prisoners, is a memorable example of valor, which reflects the highest credit and honor upon those who faced the enemy in that bloody fight. Again, at Port Hudson thrice, you were in the fray, evincing that indomitable courage which never falters in the darkest hour of peril and danger.
After other signal exploits, you were transferred to scenes nearer to the National Capitol, where you were engaged in one of the most active, vigorous and bloody campaigns which has transpired during the war, and which was consummated by the prostration and destruction of the Confederate armies; by the collapse of the rebellion, and a restoration of peace.
Halltown, Berryville, Opequan, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek—many of them hard-fought battles—abundantly testify that you have "done your duty well," and leave an imperishable record of your glo­rious achievements, which will not suffer in compar­ison with those of any other Regiment which has been engaged in the service. Not less than ten bat­tles and skirmishes must be entered to your credit, in the historic pages of this war. No Regiment has done more efficient service or can present a more brilliant and (I may add) a more bloody record of its deeds. A single fact will evince that yours has been no holiday employment—no idle pastime. Thirty-nine field, staff and line officers, originally constitu­ted your organization, and were in command of your Regiment. Only fourteen officers are now in commission. Your thinned ranks are the most eloquent witnesses and mournful evidences, that your duty as soldiers of the Union—as true patriots, and lovers of your country—has been most faithfully and religiously discharged. You entered upon a bright and glorious calling, full of stalwart men and brave hearts. You return greatly reduced in numbers, but more endeared to us on account of the sacrifices, hardships and sufferings which you have encountered and endured.
I congratulate you upon your return to your homes and firesides, and upon a happy re-union with your families and friends whom you left behind upon your enlistment in the service of your country.
Many who with you went forth, in the pride of manhood, health and strength—of stout hearts and noble forms—have been denied this great privilege. The brilliant records of the bloody conflicts, to which I have adverted, will account for your missing comrades. The bones of some of them are crumbling upon the distant soil of Louisiana, and are whitening in the valley of the Shenandoah and on the hill-tops of Virginia. The memories of these gallant soldiers will ever be cherished by a grateful people, and their names will be enrolled among those martyrs to a sacred cause, who have sealed their devotion by their life blood.
We welcome you, their companions in arms, in behalf of that people whom you have served so well and honorably, and invoke upon your heads the choicest blessings of that Divine Providence, whose watchful eye has conducted you through so many hardships and perils, to a haven of rest and quiet, where the din of war shall temporarily cease, and you shall, for a time at least, enjoy the comforts of peace and repose. You enlisted for the war, and it has been your great privilege to witness its final termination. You have seen the Union sustained, and the noble flag you offered your lives to uphold and defend, waving in triumph over every inch of territory of a united country. A grateful country will not forget the invaluable services you have rendered, and the noble deeds you have performed will be cherished in memory for generations to come. You will return to the duties of civil life, fully prepared to discharge them, with the same fidelity and honor which you have exhibited in the field.
In pursuit of the occupations in which you may be engaged, it will be a pleasing reflection that you have been instrumental in maintaining the Constitution and the Laws; in preserving that hallowed Union, which was purchased by the price of blood, and toil and suffering; in resenting the insult offered to that emblem of our Nation—the Stars and Stripes—by the attack upon Fort Sumter, and in upholding it against our enemies.
Again, in behalf of the citizens of this county, welcome your return, and most heartily and cordially thank you for your patriotic services.

Col. WALTERMIRE responded on behalf of the Regiment as follows:
MR. CHAIRMAN, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN OF COLUMBIA COUNTY:
I am no speech maker—that is not my business—but in behalf of the officers and soldiers of the 159th Regiment, I would return you our most heartfelt thanks for your very kind and hearty welcome.
Mr. Miller spoke in a very eloquent and feeling manner, and was listened to with good attention.
The soldiers were then waited upon by the ladies, and enjoyed a hearty repast, with tea and coffee, and dessert of choice fruit. Cigars were also freely distributed, and for an hour or two the boys had a "smoking good time." They were also entertained by a musical performance and patriotic song from Wagner's minstrels then in the Hall
The exercises were conducted by Col. E. L. Gaul, formerly of the 159th.
Col. Waltermire was introduced by the Marshal, and on stepping forward was loudly applauded by soldiers and citizens, but declined, Grant-like, to make a speech. He was overwhelmed with "attentions" during the day and evening. The "boys" of the Regiment regretted very much the loss of their colors and uniforms at Augusta, which compelled many of them to appear in citizens clothing. The flag upon which the battle-fields of the 159th are inscribed was displayed at the Hall, together with the returned colors of the 128th Regiment.
In common with all citizens, we welcome home the brave soldiers who have "fought a good fight" and helped to achieve the great victory which saves our nation from anarchy and ruin.
The Regiment was officered on its return as follows:
Colonel—WILLIAM WALTERMIRE.
Major—WELLS O. PETIT.
Acting Adjutant—GEORGE B. STALEY.
Surgeon—CALEB B. BRIGGS.
Acting Quarter-Master—E. SPENCER ELMER
Company A—Capt. WILLIAM P. TIEMANN.
"  B—First Lieut. JOHN DAY.
"  C—First Lieut. BRAZILLA RANSOM.
"  D—First Lieut. E. PARMERLY BROWN.
"  E—First Lieut. ANDREW RIFENBURGH.
“  F—Capt. GEORGE W. HUSSEY.
" G—Capt. JAMES S. REYNOLDS.
" H— ____ ____
"  I—First Lieut. EDWARD TYNAN.
“  K—First Lieut. E. SPENCER ELMER.

The 159th—Serious Loss.
Some three weeks ago, while the 159th Regiment was awaiting transportation at Augusta, a fire broke out in the barracks and before it could be extinguished several men were seriously burned and much property destroyed. A private named Kiesler is said to have been suffocated and burned to death, and Mr. John Reed, of Hudson, was so much injured that he had to be left in the hospital. The latter has a family here who have suffered much during his absence, and are in need of assistance. The Regimental Colors and battle flags, so highly prized by the men, were also destroyed, together with much of their personal effects. They have also to mourn the loss of their "pet bear," which had afforded so much amusement to the men in their wearisome round of duty.
A good story is told of this pet, which is said to have been presented to Col. Molineux, on the Red river expedition. On the occasion of a visit from Gen. Emory, the Col. Ordered a subordinate to send up the band. The orderly misunderstood him, and brought out the pet bear. Gen. Emory was pleased with the gentle manners of Bruin, and permitted him to have a "whisky ration." This so elated the animal that he became familiar, and as the General approached raised his forepaws and, in spite of military etiquette gave him a very cordial hug. It is hinted that the response of the General to this salutation would not appear well in print!

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: March 28, 2008
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/159thInf/159thInfCWN.htm

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