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175th Regiment Infantry
New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

The following is taken from New York in the War of the Rebellion, 3rd ed. Frederick Phisterer. Albany: J. B. Lyon Company, 1912.

TROY COMPANY.—The Troy Whig says: "The Corcoran Company, organized in this city, it is understood, will be attached to the Regiment now in the course of formation at Albany by Col. Bryan This being the first full Company it will have the right of the Regiment—a decided advantage.

RETURN OF VETERANS.—The veterans of the Cayuga County Regiment, which left here as infantry, and were known as the 175th, returned to this city on Sunday evening, having, during their sojourn in the South, been converted into a cavalry regiment. They are now quartered at the Barracks. The regiment when it left here numbered fully 1000 men, but its ranks are thinned down to 250 or 300 men, all of whom have re-enlisted for the war. The Regiment has done good service in Florida and Louisiana, and embarked at New Orleans for home. Upon reaching New York the Regiment was given a new uniform, and their appearance in our streets elicits much commendation. They have returned home on a brief furlough. It is now officered as follows:
Colonel—Robert B. Merritt.
Lieutenant. Colonel—William Babcock.
Major—L. E. Carpenter.

Exciting News from the 175th (Col. Bryan's) Regiment N. Y. S. V.
The New York Post publishes a letter from its New Orleans correspondent, containing exciting rumors in relation to officers of the 175th (Col. Bryan's) Regiment, which the correspondent says lack confirmation. The writer states that it is reported two Lieutenants, who were captured on the march from Brashea city to Washington, had been hung by guerillas, and that Major John Gray, formerly captain of the Worth Guards of this city, had been taken prisoner. We trust these reports may prove to be unfounded.

LETTER FROM COL. BENEDICT.—The following is an extract from a private letter from Col. Lewis Benedict, of this city, detailing the part taken by the late Col. Bryan and other Albanians in the attack on Port Hudson:
PORT HUDSON, June 12.
On Sunday, 14th inst., we had a battle along the right and left of our lines enclosing Port Hudson. At 12 o'clock Saturday night the, orders were given. I was put in command of the 2d Brigade of Dwight's Division. It was composed of my Regiment, 162d New York 175th New York, Col. Bryan, 28th Maine and 48th Massachusetts. The order did not reach the 28th Maine, so I had three regiments, the 48th only 100 strong.
The attack was begun by the 1st Brigade, under Col. Clark, 6th Michigan. I was ordered to support him, and to march in column of companies. As we issued from behind the woods where we formed, we were saluted by bullets, shot and shell, but the column advanced firmly amidst a terrible iron rain, and presently to a point where the rebels had us under a cross fire of artillery.
On this advance I lost Col. Bryan, shot through both legs. He fought as the brave only do, and so died, at 11 o'clock. Also, Maj. Bogart, struck by a shell, which tore away his sword hilt and carried it through his left hip. He lived but a few minutes. It being impracticable to convey his body to Baton Rouge, he was buried at the foot of a tree, which is marked and a board put up. Col. Blanchard was not hit, though exposed to all the fire. Capt. Hineford was touched on the hand, slightly. Lieut. Neville was badly wounded. Several brave men of the 162d were killed outright; about twenty-four wounded, some mortally. The 48th Massachusetts had two killed and twelve wounded.
The 175th lost heavily, our medical attendance is good, and the wounded are well cared for.
Being without aids, I was compelled to retrace the road to report to Gen. Dwight, and was mercifully permitted to go and return without receiving a scratch, though I was a target for the enemy. We were so close to them that their sharpshooters kept us under cover all day after the attack ceased, and we removed our wounded under the darkness of night.
The following letter, written by Surgeon O'Leary, of the 175th regiment, to the Reverend Father Wadhams, of this city, gives the manner of the death of the gallant Col. Bryan:
NEW ORLEANS, June 18.
Reverend SIR: It becomes my very painful duty to inform you of the death of Col. M. K. Bryan, of your city. He was killed in an engagement before Port Hudson on Sunday morning, 14th inst. He received two shots—the first, supposed to be a round shot, grazing the skin and fracturing both bones of the lower left leg; the second, a grape shell, mangling the flesh and bones of the right leg, below the knee. As near as I can learn, he lived about an hour after receiving his wounds. He seemed to feel conscious of his approaching end, and died like one going to sleep. I have just arrived in this city with his remains, and shall send them home at the earliest opportunity. Connected as I have been for the last two years with the military career of the departed, it was a crushing blow to see him laid in the cold embrace of death. A nobler man never lived. A braver soldier never wielded a sword. A truer christian never knelt before his Maker. He has left this earth of discord and strife for the bright home of the saints and angels. Let us hope that his reward will be as great in Heaven as his noble services were underrated on earth. May God have mercy on his poor family and support them in this their dark hour of trial.
Believe me, dear father, to be your very humble servant. C. B. O'LEARY,
Surgeon 175th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.

THE 175TH REGIMENT AND WILSON'S ZOUAVES—HEALTH OF THE OFFICERS AND DISCIPLINE OF THE MEN—THE DEMONSTRATION OF PORT HUDSON—TERM OF ENLISTMENT SOON TO EXPIRE—MELANCHOLY DEATH IN THE 175TH.—We take the following extracts from a letter received from Major John Gray, of the 175th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., dated Baton Rouge, La., March 22d:—
" Col. Bryan and the officers of the Regiment from Albany are quite well. Capt. Brice has been sick, but he has entirely recovered."
" We lost one of our best men last night. He was on guard at the Baton Rouge Penitentiary, and was relieved. He soon after laid down on the top of a large well, some sixty feet deep, when he fell asleep, and rolling over towards an opening in the top, he fell in and was drowned. His body was recovered about an hour after the occurrence, but all efforts to recusitate [sic] him proved fruitless. His name was James Dempsey. He was attached to Co. B, Capt. Kane, and was enlisted by Lieut. Thompson. He belonged in Albany."
" The 175th Regiment accompanied the troops in command of Gen. Banks in their demonstration on Port Hudson. All, however, have returned, except two brigades, which were sent across the river to go up as far as possible and keep up communication with the boats that had passed the batteries.
" The army, on returning to Baton Rouge, brought with them an immense quantity of cotton. All is quiet here at present. What the next move is remains to be seen.
" A large portion of the troops under Gen. Banks are nine months and two 'years' men, whose term of enlistment will soon expire, and they have already commenced counting up and fixing upon the days when they are to be mustered out of service and go home. It is a pity to lose their services, now that they are fairly in the field and in condition to fight."
" The 6th N. Y. V., (Wilson's Zouaves) are here, and they are a fine regiment. I have not seen a regiment in the Department that can exhibit any better order or discipline than Billy Wilson's. They may all talk as much as they like about their being a hard crowd, &c.; I say they are not any worse than many of the Regiments I have seen, both here and in the Army of the Potomac. I was quite surprised to see them march and drill in the manual of arms. I have not seen a Regiment that can do any better."

ATLAS & ARGUS.
MONDAY MORNING, JUNE 29, 1863.
Another Repulse at Port Hudson.
On the 14th instant the brave troops under General BANKS, were repulsed at Port Hudson, for the third time. On each occasion our loss has been heavy, but this last repulse seems to have been most disastrous of all. The movement upon the enemy commenced at daylight, and the assault was continued until about eleven o'clock, our troops obeying the orders to attack with alacrity and signal bravery to the last, notwithstanding company after company was cut down almost to a man, by the murderous fire of the enemy, who suffered little or nothing.
We have looked in vain through our files of New Orleans papers for details of the disaster. In that city, as in the North, there are Press Censors, and nothing is permitted to be published that is not favorable to the Government; so that we must turn to the correspondence of Northern journals for the particulars of the defeat. It seems certain that our loss on the 14th did not fall much short of 2000 killed, wounded and captured, for it appears that while the assault was in progress, five companies on picket duty, only about a mile from General Banks' Headquarters, were captured by a detachment of Rebel cavalry.
The natural defences of Port Hudson are considered by many even stronger than those of Vicksburg, and as its defenders have been allowed, unmolested, time enough to strengthen them to their own satisfaction, it is now one of the most formidable strongholds in the world. What engineering has done for it, is thus described: First, an abattis of felled trees for a distance of one hundred yards, then a ditch forty feet wide and filled with water to the depth of from four to six feet, then a glacis twenty feet high, sloping gradually to the parapet, on which is a protection for the sharpshooters, and behind all this is the main line of works on which is mounted field and heavy artillery. Against these entrenchments behind which stood veteran soldiers, our troops were hurled, but none ever got beyond the ditch. There they were met by an enfilading fire that is described as perfectly withering.
If the reports are correct, our own city has suffered many and serious losses in this sad disaster. Two Albany Regiments --the 91st, Col. Van Zandt, and the 175th, Col. M. K. Bryan--are known to have been engaged in it, and there is reason to believe that the 10th Militia, Col. Ainsworth, also took part in the assault.
Only a small list of the killed have yet reached us, but among these are the names of COL. BRYAN and Capt. HURLBURT.
No city in the Union has responded more promptly than Albany to the calls of the Government, and few have made greater sacrifices. Many of her best and bravest young citizens have yielded up their lives to the cause of their country, with a heroism that cannot fail to endear their memories to Albanians for all time; and the loss of these gallant spirits overshadows our city with sadness—and that sadness is deepened by the conviction that with wiser management the result would have been different.

COL. BRYAN'S REGIMENT.—By A letter from New Orleans, the Albany Knickerbocker learns the following particulars in regard to the losses sustained in Col. Bryan's regiment, of which Capt. McCarthy's company forms part; "While some two regiments, one the 175th, was coming through Franklin with a large train of mules, horses, &c., Major Gray, Lieut. Walsh, Lieut. Dunn and Lieut. Ramsey, all of the 175th remaining in Franklin to take some refreshments; were surprised by guerillas, and all taken prisoners. We trust they are held and will ultimately be exchanged; but great fears are entertained that the reports we hear of the fate of our other officers are correct. Acting Adjutant Roberts and Lieut. Hayes, who were going up to Opelousas (with the mules and quite an amount of money), to overtake the regiment, after they had left for the front, were taken prisoners and hung. This loss of six officers falls heavily upon Col. Bryan, as they are considerable cut down as to numbers.

FROM CAPT. MCCARTHY'S COMMAND IN LOUISIANA.—We have before us three full and interesting letters from a Captain of the 175th regiment, a native Trojan. The first is dated Donaldsonville, Louisiana, July 16th, whither they had went from Port Hudson, after the surrender, on a report that a large rebel force had collected at the former place, for battle, in order to continue the blockade of the Mississippi, and as a natural result of the withdrawal of the federal force stationed there in consequence of the drunkenness of the colonel in command, Col. Morgan, 90th New York. From this blunder resulted the ordering down of all the available troops at Port Hudson and other points. Prior to the war Donaldsonville must have been one of the most beautiful and wealthy towns of the South, but on arriving in it a scene at once impressive, instructive and destructive suggested itself. It is about 75 miles above New Orleans, on the West side of the river, on an elevated plain. At present it is a ruin—its most costly and magnificent buildings and beautiful residences are leveled with the ground, and their debris scattered in wide disorder over the site on which stood many comfortable houses and tasty gardens. The place has been shelled on two occasions by our gunboats, and the confused intermingling of brick, mortar, burnt timber, barren walls, and isolated chimnies [sic], speaks in language not to be misunderstood, and with what terrible effect! Its condition reminded me forcibly of the appearance of Troy subsequent to the great fire of the 10th of May, 1862. The place was a sort of headquarters of the rich planters and moneyed business men in this particular section of the State of Louisiana, and contained, I should judge, in the neighborhood of 6,000 inhabitants. There are left some public buildings of imposing appearance, as if to indicate the wealth and grandeur which once existed there. Such has been the fate of several similar places in the South. On our arrival the enemy had left—retreating on our appearance. From present appearances it would seem that our army is going into camp at some healthy locality near New Orleans.
The second letter is dated the 20th, from the same place. The time of the men was spent between scratching and hunting—it was so hot that one felt like taking off his flesh and setting in his bones. Captain McCarthy is commanding officer of the regiment (175th)—he has very easy times of it, and has nothing to do but ride out, read and write during the day. Many of the officers are sick, or pretend to be—they should never have left their mothers—none of the Troy boys or their officers are included in the "dead beat" list.—Many of the men of the regiment are sick with the fever and ague, and many of the others would be if they were not too lazy to shake,. Mails from the North are irregular and uncertain—we have not received a mail in a month. "I have grown two inches on the result at Port Hudson, Vicksburg and Gettysburg—were our immortal Twenty fourth participators in the glory?
The third letter is dated at the same place on the 22d. All the Cohoes boys, except Taylor, who died, are getting along finely, and will be all right. Corporal Cowden never lost a day's duty on account of the shock he received. Tom O'Donnell who I forgot to mention in a previous letter, is nearly well, and I expect to see him every day reporting for duty. As to the report that has been published of the blundering and bloody attack which took place on Port Hudson, on the 14th of June, ult., it is a matter of mirth and ridicule to all who are familiar with its details. If the correspondents who pretend to report for the 19th Army Corps, had leagued and formed a conspiracy against truth, they could not have misrepresented the facts more than they have done. To my certain knowledge there are men who have been arrant cowards on the field, who are praised for bravery on that occasion. But let it pass. True manhood shrinks with disgust from obtruding itself upon public notice. And as Pope says:
" More true joy Marcellus exciled feels,
Than Caesar with a Senate at his heels."
When I read of our regiment being "in Gooding's brigade, and attacking on the right," on that occasion, and of "the removal of Colonel Bryan's remains by our colored brethren, from the battle field," I felt as though if such men as those who reported such falsehoods for the Press were to speak well of me, I should feel guilty of some act of meanness and cowardice, unworthy of true manhood, and a disgrace to a soldier's reputation.—As far as I can learn, the reporters in this Department desire to do the fair thing, but they rely on the reports of ambitious Generals and conceited aids, who as a matter of course are not particular about stretching the truth when they can do so in their own favor. I could write you a volume on this subject if it were worth the powder, but it is not. As a sample, however, I will notice the correspondent of the Irish American, whom we all recognize as Capt. Edward Gorman of New York city, who resigned from the regiment and went home when there was fighting to be done, and than whom a more complete humbug and coward there does not exist on earth. Pay not the least attention to what you see in the papers in regard to army movements, and anything in relation to myself do not believe unless from myself or a member of the Company. My health is excellent, and we are enjoying exceedingly easy times here. The boys are all well.
N. B.—After the above was in type we received a fourth letter from the same correspondent dated at Doneldsonville the 25th. The writer appears to have been "sadly exercised" by the riots in New York, &c. He will feel better if he waits a little longer. So extravagant an idea did he have of our difficulties, that he implored his "big brother" to spend his evenings with his mother for safety.—He says his brigade is going to Baton Rouge before many days to summer quarters. "The fighting in this department is done. My health, as usual, is good. Some of my boys have the fever and ague, but that never killed anybody, and it doesn't scare us." There is in this letter no other news of importance.

FROM CAPT. MCCARTHY'S COMPANY.—PARTICULARS
OF THE DEATH OF COL. BRYAN.—By a letter from a member of Capt. Charles McCarthy's company, with the 175th New York regiment, in Louisiana, we have further particulars of the manner in which the lamented Col. Bryan, of Albany, met his death, and also some interesting information in regard to the condition, health, etc., of the members of the company. The letter is dated Donaldsonville, La., July 23d, '63. The writer thus speaks, regarding the rescue of Col. Bryan's body, after it was pierced with rebel bullets:—"I saw, recently, in a Northern paper, a statement to the effect that after Col. Bryan's death, his remains were carried off the field by four negroes. Of course it must be inferred from this, that none of his own command dared to perform the act. Now the true facts in the case are as follows: Early on the morning of the 14th of June, our division was ordered to make an attack on the right of the rebel fortifications. The job was an awful one, but was, nevertheless, cheerfully performed by all. Our little band marched forward—in fact, into the very 'jaws of death'—led by Benedict, of Albany, than whom there is no braver officer or private in the United States army. Our regiment (the 175th) was one of the three which composed Col. B's brigade—the whole numbering about 1000 men. Soon after advancing in front of the enemy's fortifications, Col. Bryan was struck with a grape shot below the knees, shattering both legs in a terrible manner. After suffering the most intense pain, he expired in about three hours. A large number of negroes were engaged, with the musicians, in attending to the wants of the wounded, removing the dead, etc., but not one of them could be induced to rescue the body of Col. Bryan, and it was not until three or four o'clock in the afternoon that his remains were borne off the field by a gallant fellow from New York city, named McMahon, a member of company C, of our own regiment. It was impossible to reach the point where the Colonel fell, without meeting with instant death. So much for a statement that was coined for the purpose of misrepresenting this regiment.
" By the way, I recently came in contact with Col. James C. Clark, of your city, who is about to be honored with the command of a negro brigade or regiment.
" Lieut. Dooley, of our company, is acting Quartermaster of the regiment—a very responsible and trying position.
" Yours, etc., F. C."

FROM THE 175TH N. Y. BATTALLION.—The following letter is from a Troy soldier now serving under Gen. Banks.
Morgangia, La., May 25, 1864.
I mentioned in my last letter that we were about to move, which we accordingly did on the 11th of May, at 2 o'clock, A. M., and proceeded down the Red River, encamping the following night upon a sugar field. Next morning we arose at 3 o'clock, and formed line of battle, expecting to bring on an engagement, as it was known to our generals, that the enemy intended disputing our passage to the Mississippi, thereby cutting off our retreat, if possible, or at least harrassing [sic] us, with the hope of demoralizing our army. During the day there was no appearance of the enemy. At nightfall the long roll beat, but still he did not appear. In a short time we unpacked our blankets and retired to rest, sleeping soundly during the night. The morning opened beautiful, and at 7 o'clock we resumed the march, making a distance of 15 miles under a broiling hot sun. While on our way some of our troops wantonly fired a number of residences, thus violating the rules of civilized warfare; and this not withstanding a reward of $500 was offered by Gen. Banks for the detection of persons who committed similar crimes when on the retreat from Grand Ecore. What good can result from such barbarism I am unable to determine, and can only see that it will have a tendency to exasperate the inhabitants, alienating them more and more, causing vindictiveness and retaliation in return.
But to resume my narrative. We were now on three-quarters rations, and towards evening we began an indiscriminate slaughter on all animals within our reach, and that night fared sumptuously. On the 14th we fell in with the enemy at 6 ¾ o'clock, and had a brisk skirmish with him. Gunboats now made their appearance, and the rebels fell back slowly, as was supposed, upon their entrenchments, but he finally retreated, and at 3 o'clock, P. M., we examined the rifle pits: where the enemy so lately blockaded the river. We then continued the march and came to his camp where we saw the remains of the mail which was captured.—The letters were taken out of the envelopes and read. Letters and envelopes strewed the ground. Here it was that our gunboats were captured and sunk. At night we encamped within about half a mile of the rebels, our light artillery shelling the woods. We slept soundly that night, and next morning marched under a broiling hot sun, feeling in consequence very much fatigued. Reports now reached us that cavalry were before us. We again formed line of battle and our cavalry in advance charged. They fired one volley and again fled before us. Our loss reported was three wounded. We now formed several lines in column by division, with cavalry skirmishing in advance.
On the morning of the 16th they made a stand on a level plain, called Mausurer, near the little village of Marksville, where an artillery duel ensued, which lasted three hours. At this juncture cannon balls fell in every direction, and what was to me surprising and almost miraculous, nobody was injured but one man, and he but slightly. At 1 o'clock they again fell back skirmishing with our advance. At 2 o'clock all quiet and we rest for the night. Next day opened with a dense fog, so we remained where we were, close to a small bayou, during a part of the forenoon, cooking and making preparations for the march. The fog cleared away and gunboats appeared in sight on the Atchafalaya river, or bayou. On the following morning we marched in a rain storm, with empty stomachs and half rations, until we arrived at Simsport, on the above named bayou, where we encamped. On the morning of the 18th heavy cannonading was heard, and the news soon reached us that Gen. Smith's forces, which were in our rear covering our retreat, were attacked. At this point the enemy seems to have got re-enforcements; as Gen. Smith was reported to have lost 600 men in killed and wounded. Toward evening I saw quite a number of wounded pass us on their way to transports on the Atchafalaya to which our camp was close. The same evening we crossed the bayou, marched a few miles, and encamped, leaving a bridge of boats for the passage of Gen. Smith's men. Next day marched back again to opposite Simsport. Counter marched, and at 12 o'clock encamped for the day and coming night close to the bayou. On the 19th bound for the Mississippi, distant about 12 miles. I will here interrupt my narrative with a short discription [sic] of the Atchafalaya:
It leaves the Mississippi three miles below Red River, and pursues a southern course till it falls into Atchafalaya bay on the Gulf coast. It is the largest of the Mississippi bayous. Its banks are beautifully wooded, its waters excellent, abounding with fish, which are caught with the hook weighing as high as from 30 to 40 lbs.
On the 19th we continued the march, but nothing of interest occurred. On the 20th rested all day. The 21st arrived at the "Father of Waters," and in the night marched several miles in advance of our main body as picket. Next day resumed the march, and all soon arrived at Morgangia, where we now are awaiting transportation. In all we marched over 100 miles; several died of "sunstroke" and numbers were prostrated. Our whole loss since we had the first battle at Mansfield is not far short of 10,000 men, about 200 wagons, 14 transports, 2 gunboats and some 20 pieces of cannon. The expedition has proved an entire failure and the campaign, for the present, is over. It is supposed that our brigade will be now turned into a river marine or police to serve on boats running between Vicksburgh and Baton Rouge. More anon.
ROBERT GASS.

FROM THE 175TH N. Y. BATTALLION.—We received, yesterday, the following interesting letter from a well informed member of the 175th N. Y.
Battalion, in which are several well-known Trojans:—
MORGANZIA, La., May 29, 1864.
Editor Troy Whig—Sir: Here we are at Morganzia, awaiting transportation. Regiments are leaving daily for various points along the river, all ambulances are turned in, and trains are being moved as fast as possible. In a short time our large army, which at the commencement of the campaign numbered about 35,000 men, will be divided, covering a space of several hundred miles along the Mississippi.
There is not much probability of a campaign during the Summer months as the heat here is intense, and, another thing, the condition of our army since the late battles is of such a nature that it requires recuperation.
Maganzia [sic] was once a place of some note, possessing as it does a fine landing for boats, and having a number of large plantations contiguous; but, like most of Southern towns, it is, or rather was small, it having been destroyed about a year ago by our gunboats. At the North it would be scarcely called a hamlet. To this place it was that General Herron, commanding the Tenth army corps, fell back last year on his return from Red River.
The river is now rising, and its broad and turbid waters, as it winds its dangerous course to the Gulf, presents a scene at once imposing and magnificent; yet, from the vast levelness of the surrounding scenery the charm is soon over and we turn in imagination to our own beautiful Hudson, with its clear, silvery, and comparatively placid waters--with its Highlands, its Catskills, its Palisades, its numerous flourshing [sic] towns and villages, and the white canvass dotting its smooth and polished surface. However, the thoughtful cannot but reflect upon the probable changes which time will effect upon this, as yet undeveloped country.
If you were here you would discover that ill fortune depressed our army but little. The song, the jest, and the various games of the camp are as rife as if victory had crowned our efforts. Every evening the bands of various regiments discourse excellent music. The health of our troops is good, and" all goes merry as a marriage bell."
Of late there has been a great improvement made in our hospital boats. Comfortable bunks are arranged for our sick and wounded, and taken all together they will now compare favorably with quarters in Baton Rouge and New Orleans.
Considerable ill feeling exists between the Thirteenth and Nineteenth army corps, in relation to the affair at Pleasant Hill, the former, who are Western men, casting reflections upon the latter, depreciating their services, when it is well known that the Nineteenth corps saved our whole train from immediate capture. The above reflections led to the issuing of a statement by Gen. Emery, commanding the Nineteenth corps, to be read before the men of his command, setting forth the valuable services rendered by them during the Red River expedition.
Every precaution is being taken to protect ourselves and prevent surprise, while we remove trains, army stores, &c. We are converting the levee—which is readily done—into a breastwork, with embrazures for cannon, which are already mounted to the distance of two miles, pointing to the woods in our rear. Our camps are on the river side of the levee, which space is covered during high water. It is composed of fine sand, and as a camp is very disagreeable.
A brigade of cavalry went out this morning to reconnoiter the woods, and discovered a force of the enemy, amounting to about 7000; but I do not think that there is any probability of their making an attack upon us while in our present position. We are too convenient to the gunboats--the universal dread of rebeldom. Yet we know not what they may attempt. Their late successes may have emboldened them to that degree that they will act with rashness; or they may have crossed the Atchafalaya in force, and as we have at present not more than 12,000 men here they may risk an engagement with the hope of capturing military stores.
An order has been issued making a river marine or police of the Nineteenth army corps (to which our battalion belongs) to serve on boats running up and down the river, and landing whenever it becomes necessary to attend to guerrillas, who may attempt to interrupt its navigation. There is nothing more of interest occurring here at present. Should anything of importance take place I will not fail to apprise you of it. R. G.

FROM THE 175TH BATTALLION N. Y. V.—
The following interesting letter from a former Trojan reached us yesterday:--
MORGANZIA, La., June 15, 1864.
Editor Whig—Sir: Movements of such great magnitude occurring in Virginia may so eclipse our movements here that any information I may send you will be skipped over as unworthy of a passing glance, and, perhaps with justice, as there is certainly nothing transpiring that will compare, in the remotest degree with the unparrelled [sic] events which are now reddening the soil of the Old Dominion with blood. But, while I an fortunately unable to depict great battles causing immense human sacrifices, there is left to me the more pleasing task of penning a few sentences on southern life and manners.
It may be thought by many persons of the North that the negro is treated by the white population of the South as a being little superior to the brute; but experience has taught me that quite the reverse is the fact. This erroneous idea, no doubt, arises from a consideration of the abject condition of the slave, which supposes him to be shut out from all commingling and association with the whites. Now in contrasting them in this respect with the colored population of the North I find that, while at the North the prejudice against them is so intense that white persons will not associate with them in the street, in the Church, nor dwell with them in the same house, here at the South they do all these, and, in addition, publicly live together as man and wife, raising in many instance large families, without occasioning any remarks from their neighbors. The negro maid is the young southern lady's confidante in matters of love, and any person who may wish to take the trouble can see in the large towns the mistress and servant sitting side by side in the same carriage engaged in familiar and agreeable conversation, without any display of pompous dignity on the part of the Southern lady. To be sure morality stands not so high as with the rigid puritan spirit of the North, nor is the condition of marriage thought so sacred; but still there is less of that degraded licentiousness which we meet in every street and at every turn of our northern cities. In consequence of the above intermingling of the whites and blacks, persons are to be met with here of every shade of color, making it in some instances difficult to determine where the negro ends or the white begins. Northern miscegenationists have a practical illustration of their system here, at least in the towns, the negroes on plantations being generally purely African.
Frankness and affability are prominent traits of the Southern character, and a few gentlemanly, spoken words is enough to make a southerner your friend, which friendship he denotes with an ardor of expression unknown to more sterile climes.—Hospitality too is exercised to that degree that I have known it to be extended to enemies, as in the case of our "drummer boys " who, straggling behind, were on more than one occasion kindly brought into the houses on the road-side by the inmates who, beholding their youth kindly caressed them, pitying their condition and loading their haversacks with, to them, rare delicacies.
I do not know but my remarks will be construed by your readers into "sympathy for the South," and that I will be called "Copperhead" or some other such unmeaning name, but truth compels me to state facts as I find them, and however much I may condemn the act of secession, I may surely be permitted to give the result of my observations.
The women here are generally very independent and as regards the "rebellion" quite out-spoken. They do not conceal their aversion to Yankees, nor despair of the final triumph of Dixie; yet they are courteous, affable and polite, but steadfast in their opinions, even though in some instances they depend on our army for support. They generally keep within doors, and are seldom seen promenading the streets of the towns, and seem to avoid, as much as possible, coming in contact with soldiers.
I have just returned from a general review of the troops here, which now amounts to about 20,000. They were reviewed by Gen. Sickles. He looked odd enough in the saddle with but one leg, yet his general beauty of form makes one regardless of this defect Tall, graceful and commanding, he appears every inch a soldier.
In a former letter I stated that an order was issued making the 19th Army Corps a river marine or police. For some reason unknown to me this has not been done as yet. A fort is in progress of construction, commanding a road leading from here to Mobile, and it is thought by some, when finished, our corps will leave; but my opinion is, judging from the augmentation of our forces here we will not remain idle. These reviews are significant and a suspicion comes over me that Gen. Sherman may need re-enforcements. Well, our men are now in tolerable condition, having recovered from the effects of fatigue occasioned by the late campaign.
I learn by private letters received in camp that quite a number of Trojans fell in the late battles before Richmond. Poor fellows, many a word of commisseration [sic] was murmered [sic] as the sad intelligence spread among us,--but such is war!

From the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth Battalion N. Y. V.
Correspondence of the Troy Daily Times.
MORGANZA, La., June 22, 1864.
A reconnoissance consisting of the Second division of the Nineteenth army corps left this place on the 19th inst., and proceeded up the Mississippi as far as Junica Bend. Next morning portions of the force landed on both sides of the river—those on the East side sending out cavalry scouts. During the day those on the West side crossed the river and joined the force there. About 7 o'clock P. M. the scouts returned, after having rode out from the river fifteen miles. They reported no appearance of the enemy and accomplished nothing aside from the burning of a bridge and the capture of a few suspected persons. We then proceeded farther up, and next day, the 21st, arrived at Fort Adams, a small village in the State of Mississippi, containing a forwarding house, two churches, a store or two, and a few dwellings. There is a fort there which was built by the Spanish previous to the war of the revolution. This place was particularly interesting to us in consequence of high bluffs or hills rising from a plain a short distance from the river. After long months of viewing nothing but a monotony of levelness, you will not wonder that these hills, or, as they are inappropriately called here, "cliffs," miniatures of ours though they are, produced an enlivening sensation better imagined than described. The Hudson of our distant home was recalled to mind, and we wandered once more beneath the cooling shades of its wooded banks. At 12 o'clock M., we went on board the boats and proceeded a short distance down the river, landed again and awaited the return of the scouts. On their discoveries rested our future movements. Here our battalion were under some wide-spreading shade trees, surrounded by a richness of verdure unsurpassed. In front lay level cultivated fields; in the back ground rose the bluffs with their abrupt and diversified slopes. A solemn stillness prevailed, disturbed only by the songs of birds, the hum of insects and the gentle whisper of the winds passing through the shades of those tall and majestic Mississippi trees. 'Twas a time for reflection—what would come next we knew not; but we are now so accustomed to meeting the enemy that his presence affects us but little; so we carelessly jested the time away, save here and there a countenance which showed by its fixed gaze unconsciousness of the presence of comrades. These were no doubt dwelling upon scenes of the past, picturing to their minds the happy hours spent with those far away. At 6 o'clock P. M. the division returned to the boats, bound for Morganza, no enemy having been found. While at Fort Adams the inhabitants informed us that the confederates had generally left for Virginia. We arrived at Morganza about 12 o'clock, and marched to our old camps. R. G.

FROM CAPT. MCCARTHY'S COMPANY-LIEUT. HAYES NOT CAPTURED.—For some days past, it has been rumored about town that Lieut. Matt Hayes, of Capt. McCarthy's company, 175th N. Y. Vols., had been captured by guerillas in Louisiana. The following is an extract from a letter written by Lieut. P. J. Dooley, and as no mention is made of Lieut. H.'s capture, it is more than probable that the rumors were unfounded. That it may so turn out, we sincerely hope will prove true. The following is the extract:
NEW ORLEANS, June 2.
I am going to Port Hudson to-day. The regiment arrived there two days ago. We arrived here from Washington, La., four days since. While the regiment was on the journey, the guerillas fell upon our rear, and captured about twenty or thirty stragglers, together with Major Gray, Lieuts. Wash, Rumsey and Dunn. We were near Franklin, when we met with this misfortune.

COL. BRYAN KILLED,—Another Albanian has fallen. Col. Bryan was killed at Port Hudson on the 14th. He was an accomplished soldier and a brave man. He was universally known by our citizens as the commandant of the 25th, which served for three months, at the outbreak of the war, and again, for the same period, after the Manassas repulse.
On the return of the Regiment from its last service, Col. Bryan accepted the proffer of a Regiment in the Corcoran Brigade. It was speedily organized; but instead of remaining with the General, near Suffolk, he was sent to New Orleans to join Banks's forces, where he has proved himself one of the most efficient, courageous and enterising [sic] officers in the service.
Col. Bryan has fallen where a soldier desires to fall—leading his brave followers against the foe. He will be mourned by his fellow citizens.

COL. M. B. BRYAN.—The above gallant officer, who was killed at Port Hudson, was formerly Colonel of the 25th N. Y. S. Militia, at Albany. His remains are expected to arrive here in a few days, when they are to be received with honor, and escorted to Albany.
A meeting of friends of Colonel Bryan, was held at the Park Hotel Thursday afternoon, at which were present Captains Gorman and Hildebrandt, of the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth; Captain Hogan, of the Irish Brigade; Captains Kirker and Breslin, of the Irish Legion; Aldermen Tracy and Johnson, of Albany (who were sent down as a committee from that city to receive the remains), Mr. Barnes, and several others. A committee was appointed to look after the interests connected with the matter, which is to meet at the Park Hotel at eleven o'clock this morning. Alderman Farley patriotically offered a resolution in the Board of Aldermen yesterday, asking an appropriation of two hundred dollars for the reception of the remains, which was unanimously passed. The committee which was appointed yesterday afternoon will, of coarse, act in accordance with the wishes of Alderman Farley in the matter. The officers at present in the city, of General Meagher's brigade, and the Corcoran legion, as well as several other Volunteer organizations, will undoubtedly turn out to escort the remains. The body will lie in state in the Governor's Room, at the City Hall, in order to give the public an opportunity of paying their respects to the inanimate clay of the deceased hero.

THE LATE COLONEL BRYAN.—The N. Y. Times, speaking of the death of the lamented Bryan, says: At the action at Port Hudson, in which he was killed, Col. Bryan exhibited dauntless bravery; always at the post of gallantry and danger, he set an example which his brave men enthusiastically emulated. He fell in the prime of life and the midst of usefulness for a cause he devotedly loved. A noble-hearted, intelligent man, a valuable and accomplished officer, he offered himself to his country, with the premonition that he was giving his life. It is well that the authorities and citizens of Albany should, as they design to, pay all honor to the memory of the gallant Bryan.

THE LATE COL. MICHAEL K. BRYAN—FUNERAL OBSEQUIES.—The remains of the late Col. M. E. Bryan, who was killed before Port Hudson on the 14th of June arrived here yesterday morning in the steamer Hendrik Hudson, in charge of the committee of the Common Council and a committee of the 25th Regiment.
They were received at the steamboat landing by the Worth Guards, and escorted to the residence of the family of the deceased, in Hudson street, where they will remain until this morning, when they will be removed to the Capitol and remain in State until o'clock, at which time the funeral ceremonies will take place.
The funeral cortege, which will consist of the 6th Wisconsin Volunteers, Col. Allen, the 25th Regiment, N. G., Col. Church, the Fire Department and the several Civil Associations, will move down State street, through North Pearl street to the north bounds of the city.
The remains are to be taken to the Cemetery, where they will be deposited in the vault.
It is requested by the Common Council Committee that all places of business be closed during the obsequies, and that our citizens display such emblems of mourning as might be deemed appropriate and suitable.

Arrival of the Remains of Col. M. K. Bryan in New York.
The remains of the lamented Col. M. K. Bryan, arrived in New York Friday from New Orleans, and, as we learn from the Times, of that city, were immediately taken in charge of by the city undertaker, Mr. Carroll, removed to the Governor's Room, City Hall, where they were laid in state, and were to remain until two o'clock this afternoon, when they were to be delivered to the Committee of our Common Council, and, with appropriate honors escorted to the steamer Hendrik Hudson, to be brought to this city. The honors paid to the gallant dead in New York, are under the supervision of the Committee on National Affairs of the Common Council, and the Times says:—"will be such as are due to one of the most gallant and thorough officers this State has furnished the country." A meeting of friends of the deceased, in New York was held at the Park Hotel, Friday afternoon, and arrangements were made to participate in the funeral ceremonies to-day.

THE RECEPTION OF THE REMAINS OF THE LATE COLONEL BRYAN.—The necessary steps are being taken for the proper reception of the remains of the late Colonel M. K. BRYAN. We learn from the N. Y. Tribune that they are expected to arrive there to-day. Preparations have been made by his friends there to testify their respect for the merits of the deceased soldier. Capt. EDWARD GORMAN, who fought under Col. BRYAN in the recent battles in the Attappas country, has issued the following call:
All officers of the 175th Regiment, at present in this city, as well as the friends of the late Col. M. K. Bryan, who fell while nobly leading his regimen in the attack on Port Hudson, are requested to meet at the Park Hotel, on Thursday, July 2, at 3 o'clock p. m. to make preparations for the reception of his remains.
The remains will be taken in charge by the committee appointed for that purpose by the Common Council, and will be immediately brought to this city.

COL. BRYAN'S BODY RECOVERED BY NEGROES.—
A cotemporary, writing of the death of our lamented townsman and friend, says:
Colonel Bryan, of Albany, died like a hero. His regiment broke in a charge. Instantly, he put himself at its head and dashed forward under a storm of missiles. A rifle bullet passed through his right leg. With perfect coolness, he ordered the senior Captain to take command. While a handkerchief was being bound around his wound, his left leg was shattered, and he lived but a few minutes. After dark, four negroes crawled to the spot where the body lay, and recovered it. It was borne inside our lines followed by hundreds of his weeping comrades.

COL. BRYAN'S REMAINS.—A correspondent writing from Mount Pleasant, near Port Hudson, under date of Aug. 17th, says: A few days since I saw William Wallace, Col. Bryan's son-in-law, who informed me that he had been making an effort to have the remains of the lamented Colonel forwarded North, but as yet had not succeeded.—He was in hopes that he would be able to start on the first transport. That may be ours. There is little probability that the remains of Col. Bryan will get home before the time specified by me in a previous letter—some time in September.

THE REMAINS OF COLONEL M. K. BRYAN.
Surgeon C. B. O'Leary has charge of the remains of Colonel M. K. Bryan, who will forward them by the next steamer. It was supposed that the body arrive on board the steamer Cahawba on Tuesday last, but it has since been ascertained that they will be sent forward on board of the next steamer from New Orleans. As many friends of Colonel Bryan are anxious to know when the remains will arrive in this city, it is announced that Captain E. Gorman, of the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth, will inform them of the fact through the press when such is the case.

THE LATE COL. MICHAEL K. BRYAN—Funeral OBSEQUIES.—The remains of the late Col. M. K. Bryan, who was killed before Port Hudson on the 14th of June arrived here yesterday morning in the steamer Hendrik
Hudson, in charge of the committee of the Common Council and a committee of the 25th Regiment.
They were received at the steamboat landing by the Worth Guards, and escorted to the residence of the family of the deceased, in Hudson street, where they will remain until this morning, when they will be removed to the Capitol and remain in State until 1 o'clock, at which time the funeral ceremonies will take place.
The funeral cortege, which will consist of the 6th Wisconsin Volunteers, Col Allen, the 25th Regiment, N. G., Col. Church, the Fire Department and the several Civic Associations, will move down State street, through North Pearl street to the north bounds of the city.
The remains are to be taken to the Cemetery, where they will be deposited in the vault.
It is requested by the Common Council Committee that all places of business be closed during the obsequies, and that our citizens display such emblems of mourning as might be deemed appropriate and suitable.

THE REMAINS OF THE LATE COL. BRYAN.—The remains of the lamented Col. Bryan, of the 175th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., arrived in New York on Friday, from New Orleans. They were taken charge of by Mr. Carroll, the undertaker, and laid in state at the Governor's Room, City Hall, where they will remain until this afternoon at 2 o'clock, when with appropriate honors, they will be escorted to the Albany boat, and delivered over to Alderman Rodgers and the Committee from this city. They will reach here to-morrow morning at an early hour, and will be received at the boat by a guard detailed from the 25th Regiment.
The remains will be escorted to the late residence of deceased, where they will remain until Wednesday morning, when they will be taken to the Capitol and remain in state until 2 o'clock, when the funeral exercises will take place.
The Fire Department, Military and Civic Associations will assemble at their respective places of meeting at 11 o'clock Wednesday morning, and proceed to the Capitol at 1 o'clock P. M. The procession will then be formed and the remains escorted to the Rural Cemetery.

ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE FUNERAL OBSEQUIES OF THE LATE Col. M. K. BRYAN.—A meeting was convened at the City Hall, on Saturday evening, by a call from Aldermen Tracey, Johnson and Rogers, the Committee of the Common Council, to arrange for the reception and burial of the remains of the late Col. M. K. Bryan, who fell at the siege of Port Hudson. Alderman Tracey presided, and Col. Walter S. Church was appointed Secretary.
The 25th Regiment, N. Y. S. N. G., Fire Department, and St. Andrew's Society, were represented.
On a motion of Chief Engineer McQuade, the 25th Regiment was instructed to detail an escort and guard of honor, to receive and take charge of the remains of the late Col. Bryan, on their arrival in this city.
On motion, it was ordered that one band of music be engaged for the military, and two for the Fire Department and Civic Associations.
On motion of James Rice, Colonel Walter S. Church was appointed Grand Marshal.
On motion of Alderman Johnson, Colonel Church was instructed to invite the pallbearers.
On motion of Alderman Johnson, the Marshal was instrusted [sic] to invite the Governor of the State, his staff, and the State Officers.
On motion of James H. Kelley, Chief Engineer McQuade was directed to invite the Greenbush Fire Department.
On motion of Adjutant Kimball, it was resolved that all military officers and their commands, in this city, without further invitation, be requested to take part in the ceremonies, and report their intentions to the Marshal, on or before Tuesday, the 22d, that they may be assigned proper places in the procession.
Captains Dodds and Brandenburgh, and Lieut. Vance, were received as a delegation from the 177th Regiment, and after a short and impressive statement from Capt. Dodds, of the relation their regiment stood in towards Col. Bryan, having been in the same action in which he fell, received his remains and aided in his burial, all the officers of the regiment were invited to attend, and to be assigned a position by the Marshal.
It was also resolved that 20 cars be provided to transport the procession home from the Cemetery.
It was also resolved that the Grand Marshal and Chief Engineer of the Fire Department decide upon the line of march of the procession.
JOHN TRACEY, Chairman.
Walter S. Church, Secretary.

ORDER OF ARRANGEMENTS of the Funeral Obsequies
OF THE LATE Colonel M. R. BRYAN,
TO TAKE PLACE On WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 1863.
ORDER OF PROCESSION,
Police, under command of Chief Johnson.
6th Wisconsin Volunteers, Col. Allen.
Schreiber's Band.
25th Regiment National Guard, S. N. Y., Col. Church.
HEARSE.
Flanked by Worth Guards as Guard of Honor, Captain Ryan.
Relatives of Deceased.
Officers of the 177th Regiment N. Y. V.
Governor and Staff.
State Officers.
Mayor and Common Council.
Brigade Band.
Fire Department, under Chief Engineer.
Greenbush Fire Department.
Hibernian Provident Society.

The Procession will move at precisely 1 o'clock.
The Fire Department will be under command of Chief Engineer McQuade, Assistant Grand Marshal.
The Civic Societies, under Captain David Shanks, Assistant Grand Marshal.
By order of Col. W. S. CHURCH, Grand Marshal.
FUNERAL OF THE LATE COL. M. K. BRYAN IN NEW YORK.—The remains of the late Col. Michael K. Bryan, of the 175th Regiment N. Y. V., were taken on Monday afternoon from the City Hall, New York, and placed on board the Albany boat, en route to the city of Albany for interment. The body was encased in a coffin covered with cloth and studded with silver, bearing a plate with the following inscription:
COL. M. K. BRYAN,
175th New York Volunteers,
Killed in action before Port Hudson,
June 14, 1863,
In his 40th year.
A large number of persons visited the remains, which were laid in state in the Governor's room, guarded by Co. E, 66th N. Y. N. G. A delegation from the 25th Regiment of Albany (which deceased formerly commanded) was in attendance under Col. Friedlander. Messrs. Rogers and Johnson, of the Albany Common Council, were also present. At three o'clock the procession was formed in the following order:
Escort of Police, Band, 69th Regiment in reversed order, Hearse drawn by four white horses, surrounded by Co. C, 69th Regiment as guard of honor, and the following pallbearers:
Col. Allen, Col. Foster, Capt. Cox
Capt. German, Capt. Newman, Capt. Maguire
Capt. Rooker, T. Y. Cummings, Esq., followed by the carriages of the friends of the deceased.
The cortege moved in this order: Through Chatham street to the Bowery, up Bowery to Bond street, and Broadway, thence to the foot of Courtlandt street, where the boat was in readiness to receive the remains.
The remains arrived here yesterday morning in the steamer Hendrik Hudson, in charge of the Committee of the Common Council and a committee of the 25th Regiment.
They were received at the Steamboat Landing by the Worth Guards, and escorted to the residence of the family of deceased, in Hudson street, where they will remain until this morning, when they will be removed to the Capitol and remain in state until one o'clock, at which time the funeral ceremonies will take place.
The funeral cortege, which will consist of the 5th Wisconsin Volunteers, Col. Allen, the 25th Regiment N. G., Col. Church, the Fire Department and the several Civic Associations will move down State street, and through North Pearl street to the north bounds of the city.
The remains are to be taken to the Cemetery where they will be deposited in the vault.
It is requested by the Common Council Committee that all places of business be closed during the obsequies, and that our citizens display such emblems of mourning as might be deemed appropriate and suitable.

FUNERAL OBSEQUIES OF THE LATE COLONEL BRYAN.—The funeral obsequies of the late Col. M. K. Bryan, of the 176th Regiment, N.
Y. S. V., which took place yesterday afternoon, was one of the most imposing spectacles witnessed in this city in many years. The Capitol, where the remains were placed early yesterday morning, was thronged with spectators up to the hour of the funeral. Shortly after 1 o'clock p. m., the Military, Fire Department and Civic Associations assembled at their respective places of meeting, and proceeded thence to the Capitol. At precisely 2 o'clock the line of march was taken up, the procession moving in the following order:
Police, under command of Chief Johnson.
5th Wisconsin Volunteers, Col. Allen.
Schreiber's Band.
25th Regiment, N. G. S. N. Y., Col. Church.
HEARSE.
Flanked by Worth Guards as Guard of Honor,
Captain Ryan.
Relatives of Deceased.
Officers of the 177th Regiment, N. Y. Vol.
Governor and Staff.
State Officers.
Mayor and Common Council.
Brigade Band.
Fire Department, under Chief Engineer.
Greenbush Fire Department.
St. Andrew's Society.
Citizens.
The procession moved down State to Pearl, up Pearl to its terminus at the Patroons and thence to the Rural Cemetry [sic], where the 25th Regiment fired three volleys over the body previous to its being deposited in the vault. This over, the participants got aboard of a special train, and returned to the city, reaching here at 6 o'clock.

ORDER OF ARRANGEMENTS.
OF THE FUNERAL OBSEQUIES
OF THE LATE
COL. M. K. BRYAN,
TO TAKE PLACE On
WEDNESDAY, September 23d, 1863.
ORDER OF PROCESSION.
Police, under command of Chief Johnson.
6th Wisconsin Volunteers, Col. Allen.
25th Regiment National Guard, S. N. Y., Colonel Church.
HEARSE.
Flanked by Worth Guards as Guard of Honor, Captain Ryan.
Relatives of Deceased.
Officers of the 177th Regiment N. Y. Volunteers.
Governor and Staff.
State Officers.
Mayor and Common Council.
Brigade Band.
Fire Department, under Chief Engineer.
Greenbush Fire Department.
Hibernian Provident Society.
St. Andrews Society.
Citizens.
Col. Allen will form his Regiment in State street, right resting on Eagle street.
25th Regiment will form in Eagle street, left resting on right of Col. Allen.
Military Mourners will form in Washington avenue, right on Park Place.
The Fire Department will form on Washington avenue, left of Military Mourners.
The Hibernian Provident Society will form on Washington avenue, left of Fire Department.
The St. Andrew's Society will form on Washington avenue, on left of Hibernian Provident Society.
The Military and Civic Organizations will report to the Grand Marshal, at the Mayor's Room, at 12 o'clock.
The Procession will move at precisely 1 o'clock.
The Fire Department will be under command of Chief Engineer MCQUADE, Assistant Grand Marshal.
The Civic Societies, under Capt. DAVID SHANKS, Assistant Grand Marshal,
By order of
Colonel W. S. CHURCH, Grand Marshal.

Death of Col. M. K. Bryan.
At a regular meeting of the Albany Worth Guard (Co. C, 25th Regiment, N. G.), held at their Armory on Thursday afternoon, July 2d, 1863, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, Col. M. K. Bryan, of the 175th Regiment, N. Y. V., late commandant of the 25th regiment, and formerly Captain of this company, fell, while gallantly leading his regiment at the late attack upon the rebel works at Port Hudson, inciting others, by his fearless conduct and noble example, to deeds of unexampled valor; therefore,
Resolved, That we mourn his death, as a loss not only to the State and Nation, but to a sorrowing family, and a large circle of friends, to whom he was endeared by every quality which distinguishes the true man and brave soldier.
Resolved, That as, in the commencement of his fearful struggle for the perpetuity of the heritage of liberty transmitted to us by the fathers of the Revolution, he was among the first to offer his sword in the defense of the National Capital, and again in a subsequent time of imminent peril—so he has finally surrendered life itself in the sacred cause which commanded every instinct of his loyal soul.
Resolved, That his patriotic example, his glorious death, where a soldier most wishes to die—"in the front rank of danger"—serves to bind us still more to our country's cause; and we trust the day is not far distant when, a peace—with a re-united galaxy of States—his character and services will be remembered more fully than is perhaps possible amid the din of civil war.
Resolved, That we tender to his bereaved family our heartfelt sympathy; that our Armory be draped in mourning for thirty days; and that we will attend his funeral in a body.
Resolved, That a copy of these proceedings be transmitted to the family of the gallant dead; and that they be published in the daily papers of the city and duly entered upon the minutes.
Capt. M. RYAN,
Lieut. THOMAS DUNN,
Lieut. JAMES RICE,
WM. H. LANAHAN,
JOHN HOGAN,
JOHN RYAN,
Committee.
Honors to the late Col. M. K. Bryan.
From the N. Y. Times of yesterday.
The honors contemplated in this city to the late Col. M. K. Bryan, of Albany, under the auspices of the Committee on National Affairs, were paid yesterday.
The Governor's Room, where they laid in state, was visited by throngs of citizens until two o'clock p. m., when, under escort of the Sixty-Ninth regiment; the remains were taken to the Albany boat at the foot of Cortlandt-street, where they were formally delivered to Messrs. Jas. I. Johnson and L. W. Rodgers, a Committee on behalf of the citizens of Albany.
The procession moved from the Park to Broadway, Park-row, Chatham-street, Bowery to Bond. Broadway, Cortland-street, and thence to the boat. A body of Police in advance, the band, the Sixty-ninth in reversed order, hearse with four white horses, Company C, Sixty-ninth regiment, as guard of honor, and pall-bearers; the following officers and ex-officers of the Twenty-fifth regiment of Albany, of which deceased was some years since Colonel, following in carriages: Col. Harcourt, Col . Swift, Lieut.-Col. Bentley, Lieut. Col. Friedlander, Major McDonald, Capt. Mulholland, Capt. Woods, Lieut. Dunn, Lieut. Rider, Quartermaster James Dunn and Lieut. Grady.
A detail of the 175th regiment, of which deceased was Colonel, a company of the 66th, and a Committee from the Board of Aldermen, Messrs. Farley, Masterson, McCool, Hardy and Ottiwell, with a number of personal friends of the deceased, accompanied the remains to Albany, where the funeral will take place on Wednesday.
The friends of Col. Bryan, in this city, acknowledge their obligations to Alderman Farley and the Committee, of which he is Chairman, for the honors they have been instrumental in paying, as they do to William Carroll, who had charge of the remains, for the handsome manner in which he fulfilled his trust, and to George Roome, Keeper of the City Hall, for his most obliging and successful attention to all the necessary details.
The following are the resolutions passed yesterday by the Board:
Whereas, The late Col. M. K. Bryan, whose mortal remains are at present in our City Hall, was a valiant and faithful citizen of this State, and nobly gave his life at her call to defend our glorious Union and Wheras [sic], The City of New York is proud to honor the memory of the brave and good men from this State who have sacrificed themselves on the sacred altar of their country's cause; therefore
Resolved, That a Committee of Five Members from this Board be appointed, authorized and directed to proceed with the remains of Col. Bryan to Albany, and there attend the funeral.
Resolved, That Major General Sandford be respectfully requested to send one company of soldiers, from the military escort ordered to parade to-day at the funeral of Col. Bryan, to proceed to Albany, as a guard of honor, with the mortal remains of that gallant and faithful officer.

The Honors to the Late Col. M. K. Bryan in New York.
From the N. Y. Times of yesterday.
The remains of Col. M. K. Bryan were laid in state on Saturday at the City Hall, where they have been visited by a large number of citizens. They will so remain until 2 P. M., to-day. On their arrival from New Orleans they were placed in charge of Mr. Wm. Carroll, undertaker. It was found impossible to expose the body to view. He has handsomely inclosed [sic] the remains—the coffin covered with black cloth, with silver fastenings, and is elegantly and chastely ornamented. A large silver plate bears the following inscription:

Col. M. K. BRYAN,
One Hundred and Seventy-fifth N.Y. Volunteers,
Killed in Action before Port Hudson, La.,
June l4, 1863.
In his 40th year.

The coffin is draped with the American flag, over the plate is a wreath of immortelles, and at the foot is the sword and military hat of the deceased.
Yesterday a detail guard from the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth regiment, under command of Capt. John McGuire, were on duty at the Governor's Room, and were relieved in the evening by a squad from the Sixty-ninth regiment, N. Y. S. N. G.
The remains will be taken from the Governor's Room to-day at 2 P. M., under escort of the Sixty-ninth regiment, and conveyed to the Albany boat at the foot of Cortlandt street, where they will be delivered to the Committee of that city. At Albany the funeral will take place on Wednesday, the remains lying in state at the Capitol until that day, when the State and civil authorities will unite with the military in the funeral ceremonies.
The Committee on National Affairs, Alderman Farley, Chairman, have handsomely perfected all the arrangements for the honors to be paid in this city to the deceased.
The following orders, for to-day, have been issued by Gen. Sanford and Col. Bagley:
GEN. SANDFORD'S ORDER.
HEADQUARTERS, FIRST DIVISION N.Y.S.N.G.
NEW YORK, Sept. 19, 1863.
SPECIAL ORDER NO. 54.—The remains of the gallant Col. Michael K. Bryan, of the One Hundred and Seventy-fith [sic] regiment of New York Volunteers, who fell whilst leading his regiment in the attack on Port Hudson, have arrived from New Orleans, and are now lying in state in the Governor's Room, City Hall.
The funeral procession will take place on Monday next, the 21st inst., under the direction of the Committee [sic] on National Affairs of the Common Council.
The Sixty-ninth regiment New York State National Guard, Col. Bagley, will parade as the funeral escort, in front of the City Hall, at 2 o'clock P. M., with the usual badges of mourning.
Brig. Gen. Ewen will promulgate this order.
By order of
Major Gen. CHAS. W. SANDFORD.
J. H. WILCOX, Division Inspector.

COL. BAGLEY'S ORDER.
HEADQUARTERS 69TH REG'T N. Y. S. N. G.,
ESSEX MARKET ARMORY, Sept. 10, 1863.
In compliance with division and brigade special orders, the Sixty-ninth regiment N. Y. S. N. G., is notified to assemble at their headquarters, at 12 o'clock M., on Monday next, 21st inst., preparatory to parading as the funeral escort to the remains of the late lamented Col. MICHAEL K. BRYAN, who fell in the attack on Port Hudson, whilst gallantly leading his regiment, the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth New York Volunteers.
Company E, Capt. Dempsey, is detailed as guard of honor over the remains until 8. A. M., Monday, when Company C, Capt. O'Kent, will relieve Company E.
Officers will wear the usual insignia of mourning.
The field and staff will report to the Colonel at 11:30 A. M., at the headquarters, and the band and non-commissioned staff to the Adjutant at 11:35 A. M., at the headquarters. By order,
JAMES BAGLEY, Colonel.
B. GALLAGHER, Acting-General.
The pall-bearers are Gen. Chas. W. Sandford, Gen. T. F. Meagher, Gen. John F. Townsend, Hon. George Opdyke, Col. W. H. Allen, Col. J. A, Foster, Capt. Mark Cox, Capt. George Schwarzman, Capt. Edward Gorman, Capt. Lewis Newman, Capt. John McGuire, Lieut. Carroll, Thomas J. Cummins, David M. Barnes, Myron H. Rooker.

Meeting of Officers of the 25t Regiment, N. Y. S. N. G., to take Action Relative to the Death of Colonel M. K. Bryan.
At a meeting of the officers of the 25th Regiment National Guard, S. N. Y., held at the Regimental Armory on Tuesday evening, June 30th, 1863, at 8 o'clock, Col. James Swift called the meeting to order, and Adjutant J. M. Kimball was made Secretary.
Col. Swift said that he had ordered the meeting of the officers for the purpose of taking such action as the officers should deem appropriate and in accordance with their feelings, upon the death of Col. M. K. Bryan, their late associate and his honored and accomplished predecessor in command of the 25th Regiment. Col. Bryan fell at the head of the 175th Regiment N. Y. V., at the attack lately made upon Port Hudson, La., amid the raging storm of battle. He died at the post of duty, with honor. He died for our country; and in attempting to save from ruin that Government and Union, the matchless blessing of which every man of us have enjoyed so long, and to maintain which, I believe, we are ready, if need be, to peril our lives. Officers, you all have served at home and in the field under Michael K. Bryan—you know better than any words of mine can express, the increasing and entire devotion to duty that always marked his career as a soldier. You know well the dignity, the military knowledge, and the thorough discipline that he brought with him when he assumed the command of our Regiment, and which brought the Regiment to a high state of efficiency. You know all his good and noble qualities. O! his heart stricken family--God comfort them. To me the loss comes like the stroke of death upon my nearest and most intimate friend and adviser. I cannot speak more: you will please take such action as you deem proper on this sad occasion.
Lieut. Col. Friedlander spoke as follows:—It is a sad duty to me, Officers of the 25th Regiment, to join in a tribute of respect to the memory of our late Colonel. Any honor that we can bestow upon one, even a stranger to us, who has offered up his life for this glorious and good country, meets my approval; but especially am I pleased to do aught in my power to pay every respect to Col. M. K. Bryan, who was our commander so long, and ever did his duty so faithfully to those under his command, and to his country. Any measures taken to procure his remains, and to bestow upon them the last respects of soldiers to a gallant and lamented comrade, who has fallen in defence of the flag of our Union, I shall approve. I would move that the Field Officers, and several commandants of companies, be appointed a Committee to act in connection with the Common Council of Albany, to proceed to New York to receive the remains of Col. Bryan upon their arrival there.
Capt. Fredendall seconded the motion, and said: —Officers of the 25th Regiment, I know the loss, and irreparable loss we have sustained, in common with the nation, who has lost an able and brave officer. I know what he has done for this Regiment. Col. Bryan made the 25th Regiment what it was, and when he led it into the field, he proved himself fit for his post, and received the written thanks of his government more than once, for his distinguished services. He gained not only honor for himself but for our Regiment, and our city that they represented. He infused into those around him a military spirit, and the hundred and fifty officers for other Regiments in the field, that the ranks of the 25th Regiment have furnished, prove the great service rendered to the country by the discipline and efficiency of Col. Bryan,—who was so long the head of the 25th Regiment. The whole Regiment ought to go to New York to receive his remains, if possible. They cannot do too much to honor Col. Bryan. To the memory of such a true and noble officer they cannot pay too much respect.
After remarks from other officers, eulogistic of the deceased, the motion was passed unanimously.
The following resolutions, being read by Adjutant Kimball, were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, Colonel Michael K. Bryan, late Col. of the 175th Regiment N. Y. Volunteers, fell in the assault upon Port Hudson on the 14th of June, 1863, while gallantly leading forth his Regiment against the Rebel works at that place; and whereas, he formerly commanded the 25th Regiment National Guard, and twice led us to the field in defence of the flag of the country; and whereas, during his command of our Regiment we ever found him the accomplished and brave soldier, the true patriot, and the Christian gentleman, who ever sought the welfare and honor of his Regiment at home and in the field; therefore
Resolved, That we, the officers of the 25th Regiment, deeply mourn the loss of one so brave and true to all the duties of a citizen, soldier and a patriot, whose long association with us learned us to respect and love him.
Resolved, That in his death the State and Nation have lost one whom his superior officers ever found obedient and faithful, and whose conduct as a citizen and soldier commanded their respect and approbation.
Resolved, That in his death his beloved wife and little ones, and his venerable mother, have sustained the loss of one ever faithful to all obligations of a husband, father and son, which loss falls so heavily upon them that we can only give them our heartfelt sympathy, and commend them to be cherished in the memory of that country for which he so heroically died, and to that God in whom he ever trusted.
Resolved that a copy of the proceedings be sent to the family of deceased, signed by the officers of the meeting.
JAMES SWIFT, Colonel and Chairman.
J. M. KIMBALL, Adjutant and Secretary.

RECRUITING.—Major John Gray, late of the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth New York regiment, and Lieut. Hayes, companion in Texas, as prisoners, is recruiting companies in Albany for that organization, which is now reduced to a battalion [sic], commanded by Captain Charles McCarthy.—Major Gray is a splendid soldier, and a courteous gentleman, and Trojans desirous of serving their country, can make no beter [sic] selection than the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth. He is assisted by Lieut. P. G. Walsh, formerly of Troy, and Lieut. Dunn, both of whom were prisoners in Texas with him for fourteen months. He has already a large number of men enlisted, and only requires a few more. Capt. McCarthy's company being attached to the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth, Trojans will feel quite at home in joining it. Major Gray's headquarters are located in Down's building, corner of Broadway and State st., Albany. He pays the highest bounties. Troy boys about to enlist should give the Major a call.

SINGULAR ILLNESS OF LIIEUT. HILLMAN—HIS DEATH PROBABLE.—Last fall Lieut. Hercules Hillman, of the 175th (Col. Bryan's) Regiment, was obliged to resign from the service owing to an accident which, happened to him, and whereby he came near losing his arm from the bite of some poisonous insect while in Louisiana. Soon after his return home to this city, his arm was healed up and he was himself again. He continued to attend to business up to last Monday, when a singular itching was felt on one of his legs. It resembled the pricking of pins. After this sensation ceased he discovered that his leg began to swell. The swelling increased and traveled rapidly through his whole body. His skin turned black, and mortification has set in. Dr. Freeman was one of his attending physicians, and we understand that he has given it as his opinion that Lieut.
Hillman must die. His system is poisoned from the effects of the bite sustained last fall, and is now working its fatal effects. It was the general belief that Lieut. Hillman could not survive over a day or two at the moat.

THE LAST LETTER WRITTEN BY LIEUTENANT MATTHIAS HAYES.—The many friends of the late Lieut. Matthias Hayes, who was taken prisoner with Major Gray, and several Lieutenants of Col. Bryan's Regiment, and who died last fall in Texas while a prisoner of war, will peruse with interest the last letter that he ever wrote home. It is dated only ten days before his death. The expressions of friendship and kindly feeling are not less noteworthy than that part of the letter in which poor Matt. seems to have had a premonition of his fate, although he spoke of the future with so much hope:
CAMP GRACE, TEXAS, Oct. 6, 1863.
My Dear Father: It is now nearly six months since I received your last letter. Certainly you will think me dead. I am happy to inform you that such is not the case. On the contrary, my health was never better than at present. I had several severe attacks of fever—the last of which came very near finishing my mortal career; but God, who never deserts those who pray to Him for mercy, has spared me—for what purpose He only knows. I would like very much to hear from my mother. I hope her health still continues good. I want you to pay particular attention to the education of Nicholas, Maggie and Tom (here follow private family matters, displaying the most touching regard for “the loved ones at home.”) I would like very much to be exchanged, that I might join my company. I hear that Col. Bryan, Capt. McCarthy and a number of our officers were killed at Port Hudson. McCarthy was a good fellow. What will his poor mother do? God help her and all the mothers who have been so unfortunate as to lose such a faithful son as he was. I really believe there never was a man who loved a country and a mother as Chas. McCarthy did. May the Lord have mercy on his soul. When I reach our lines I will write you a long letter about Texas, its soil and climate. My love to all my friends, particularly * * * Direct your reply * *
Don't seal it. Be sure it contains nothing contraband. My politics are unchanged. Your affectionate son, TTHIAS HAYES.
2d Lieut. 175th Reg't N. Y. S. V., Prisoner of War.

INFORMATION WANTED.—A private in Co. D, 175th Regiment, named Nelson Birnell, was killed at Port Hudson on the 13th of June last, in the attack on that Rebel stronghold. At the time of his death there was found on his person $179 in money and a due bill for $10. Birnell enlisted in Troy, and possibly may have friends there. If so they can learn what disposition was made of his money, by addresing [sic] the editor of this paper.

DIED OF HIS INJURIES.—Robert Taylor, of Cohoes, a member of Captain McCarthy's Company, 175th Regiment, who was wounded in the engagement before Port Hudson, on the 14th of June, died from the effects of the same on the 16th, at Baton Rouge Hospital. A letter received from Captain McCarthy to his brother, speaks of him as a brave soldier.

SWORD PRESENTATION.—On Thursday evening, Capt. Mark Cox of Company E, 175th Regiment, N. Y. V., was the recipient of an elegant sword, belt, haversack, army valise and revolver. The presentation took place at the captain's residence, New-Brighton, Staten Island, where he was agreeably surprised by the donors. Speeches were made and the company passed a pleasant evening. After the presentation Messrs. J. & H. Crabtree distributed among the soldiers present several articles suitable for their comfort. Tribute to the Late Lieutenant James Williamson.
At a special meeting of the members of the St. Andrews' Society of this city, held on the evening on the 15th inst., the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, We have learned with sincere regret that Lieut. James Williamson, one of our members, fell in battle before Port Hudson on the 27th of May, 1863; and being desirous that some memorial expressive of our deep and lasting regard for him be entered on our minutes.
Resolved, That we bear our cordial testimony to the numerous excellencies of our deceased brother in public and private life, his integrity, his truthfulness [sic], his open and manly adherence to principle, the large and generous sympathies of his heart for the wants of the suffering and the wrongs of the oppressed, the purity of his character, the suavity of his manners and that fine combination of moral and Christian qualities which endeared him to those by whom he was intimately known.
Resolved, That we desire to express with feelings of admiration, his ardent devotion to his country which induced him, in the hour of his peril, to renounce the gains of a lucrative profession and the comforts of a loved home, at the call of patriotism, and feel that in the death of this gallant officer whose career has been thus briefly though honorably closed, the Nation has lost an ardent and devoted friend.
Resolved, That we record it with satisfaction, that though of foreign extraction, and always cherishing with a loving heart the land of his birth, he was, in the truest sense of the word, "an American;" affiliating himself in heart and soul with the Government and institutions of the land of his adoption, upholding them to the exercise of their functions, vindicating them when assailed and throwing himself at last with his characteristic enthusiasm into the contest when these were imperiled; and while we hallow his memory, we will resolutely defend that paternal government under which it is our privilege to live and to which we owe the enjoyment of all our social and civil immunities.
Resolved, That we tender our affectionate sympathy to the bereaved wife, supplicating in her behalf the support of religious consolation, and to the numerous relatives and friends of the deceased; and desire also that his early and lamented death may be blessed to the members of our society in gathering up those solemn lessons of duty which it is designed and fitted to convey.
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be transmited [sic] to the widow of the deceased, and that they be inserted in the daily papers of the city.
JAMES DUNCAN, President.
PETER SMITH, Secretary;

THE CAPTURED OFFICERS OF THE ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT.—The following letter is from Lieut. Walsh, one of the officers of the 175th Regiment, captured in Louisiana, and taken to Texas, some time since. The many friends of Lieut. Hayes will learn of his illness with regret:
HOUSTON, TEXAS, June 12.
* * I was taken prisoner on the 25th of May, in the following manner:—Major Gray, Lieut. Dunn, Lieut. Curtiss and myself were detailed to the rear, for the purpose of driving up stragglers and preventing depredations on private property at Franklin by the negroes we were guarding. Immediately after the rear guard of our line had passed through the town, about fifty men of Sibley's Rebel brigade, under command of Col. Green, dashed up and pounced upon us. We had a pretty hard time getting here; it was a long journey, and took us two weeks to accomplish. We are now confined in a room of the Court House. Some people here would be kind to us, if allowed; but no one outside is permitted even to speak to us. * * About a month ago, our Adjutant was bringing a mail from New Orleans, when he was taken prisoner, and is now here. The mail was taken from him. As all letters are read by the Provost Marshall, and information concerning military affairs is tabooed, you will be careful not to write any. My address is—"Prisoner of War, Houston, Texas; care of Blockading Squadron at Galveston." * * We do not expect to be exchanged for a year, if at all, as it takes a long time to arrange such matters for this locality. So, we are in for a year's residence in Dixie. There are two officers of the United States gunboat Harriet Lane confined since the first day of January, and there is no prospect of an exchange for them. Tomorrow we are to be removed to a town called Hempstead, where they have a camp. I trust we will have more liberty to exercise ourselves; for, if we are confined in this manner much longer, I would not like to be held responsible for the health of our party. Lieut. Hays, of Troy, is sick in the hospital here. Lieut. Rumsey, of my company, who was taken at the same time is here also. * * We are in good health, and hope soon to hear from friends at home. P. E. WALSH.

Letter from Major Gray, of the 175th Regiment-Albanians Prisoners in Texas.
HOUSTON, Texas, June 12.
DEAR FRIEND—I regret exceedingly to have to inform you that I am at present a prisoner of war at this place. The particulars are as follows: After the battle at Fort Bisland and Franklin, our regiment was left at Franklin, while the army went on to Alexandria. We remained at Franklin some five weeks, when we were ordered to follow on and join the army. We had proceeded as far as Washington, or about half way to where the main army was, when we received orders to return to Berwick Bay, where we had started from previous to the battles of Bisland and Franklin. We had proceeded, on our return back, as far as Franklin, which place we passed through on the 25th of May, en route for Berwick Bay. We remained in Franklin until the rear guard of our forces had passed through the town, for the purpose of starting our men out of the place, which might remain behind the rear guard. This guard had scarce passed when a party of Texas cavalry came in and cut me off from our forces, taking me prisoner, together with Lieutenants Walsh and Dunn, of Albany, and Lieutenant Rumsey, of New York. Thus latter officer was sick and unable to keep up with the command, but Lieutenants Walsh and Dunn were with me. Lieutenant Curtis, of Albany, was also taken, and is with us. There are now seven officers of our regiment here prisoners of war, as follows:—Lieut. Roberts, of New York; Lieut. Hays, of Troy; Lieuts. Walsh, Curtiss and Dunn, of Albany; Lieut. Rumsey, of New York, and myself. We are all together, and have been well treated by our captors since we were taken, but when we will be released I cannot tell. We are all well with the exception of Lieut. Rumsey, who is in the hospital and well taken care of.
JOHN GRAY, Major 175th Reg't.

—ROBERT TAYLOR, of Cohoes, a member of Capt. McCarthy's Company, 175th Regiment, who was wounded in the engagement before Port Hudson, on the 14th of June, died from the effects of the same on the 16th, at Baton Rouge Hospital. A letter received from Capt. McCarthy to his brother, speaks of him as a brave soldier. He was a brother of John Taylor of this ...

COL. BRYAN.—We have a letter from Major JOHN GRAY, of the 175th, which give an account of the share which that regiment had in the recent battles under BANKS: We will publish it to-morrow. The Major says Col. BRYAN has been appointed Provost Marshal of Franklin, recently taken from the enemy.

Capt. McCarthy's Company Before Port Hudson.
The One Hundred and Seventy-fifth regiment was considerably cut up in the recent storming of Port Hudson. Capt. McCarthy's company escaped with only three men wounded. The following is an extract from a letter written by a member of the company, dated, "In the Field, Before Port Hudson, June 21st:"
We have been before this fortress nearly two weeks. Our regiment has been badly cut up already at this point. On last Sunday our brave Colonel was mortally wounded, and died on the field. We had two officers wounded, and some fifty killed and wounded. Our company came off very safe, although the color company, and, of course, was in an exposed position. Four members of our company were wounded--one of them a brave fellow from Cohoes, Robert Taylor. He is very badly wounded. Thos. O'Donnell, also from Cohoes, slightly; and John Many, from Troy, not seriously. He is one of the bravest soldiers I ever saw."

PERSONAL.—First Lieutenant John McGuire, of 175th Regiment, reached this city on Saturday from New Orleans. Lieut. Maguire is in the best of health, and reports all the Albany boys well. He has been sent on to take charge of conscripts. As soon as Lieut. McGuire reached here his commission was made out as Captain in the same regiment. "Johnny" is walking up. While in this city he was a private in the Worth Guards.

PERSONAL.—Colonel John A. Foster, of the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth New York Volunteers (to which Captain McCarthy's Company is attached) arrived in town yesterday, on a brief visit to a friend. He was wounded at the battle of Port Hudson, and came North to recruit his health. He speaks in the highest terms of the military proficiency and conduct of both Captain McCarthy and Lieutenant Dooley. The former is commanding officer during his (the Colonel's) absence, and the latter is Acting Quartermaster.—Colonel Foster will return in a few days. There is every probability that both our fellow townsmen will be speedily promoted.

THE SECOND ASSAULT ON PORT HUDSON.—In the assault and repulse at Port Hudson on the 14th instant, Col. M. K. Bryan, of the 175th N. Y. V., Major Stackhouse and Lieut. S. A. Shedard of the 91st N. Y. V., Col. Galway of the 173d N. Y. V., and Col. Smith, of the 114th N. Y. V., were killed. Whereabouts of Major Gray, Lieut. Walsh and other Officers of the l75th Regiment.
As many painful rumors have been afloat with reference to the fate of these officers, a few extracts from a letter received on Saturday will serve to dispel the anxiety of their friends in this city:—
HOUSTON, TEXAS, June 12.
* * I was taken prisoner on the 25th of May, in the following manner:—Major GRAY, Lieut. DUNN, Lieut. CURTISS and myself were detailed to the rear, for the purpose of driving up stragglers and preventing depredations on private property at Franklin by the negroes we were guarding. Immediately after the rear guard of our line had passed through the town, about fifty men of SIBLEY'S Rebel brigade, under command of Col. GREEN, dashed up and pounced upon us. We had a pretty hard time getting here; it was a long journey, and took us two weeks to accomplish. We are now confined in a room of the Court House. Some people here would be kind to us, if allowed; but no one outside is permitted even to speak to us. * * About a month ago, our Adjutant was bringing a mail from New Orleans, when he was taken prisoner, and is now here. The mail was taken from him. As all letters are read by the Provost Marshal, and information concerning military affairs is tabooed, you will be careful not to write any. My address is—"Prisoner of War, Houston, Texas; Care of Blockading Squadron at Galveston." * * We do not expect to be exchanged for a year, if at all, as it takes a long time to arrange such matters for this locality. So we are in for a year's residence in Dixie. There are two officers of the United States gunboat Harriet Lane confined here since the first day of January, and there is no prospect of an exchange for them. To-morrow we are to be removed to a town called Hempstead, where they have a camp. I trust we will have more liberty to exercise ourselves; for, if we are confined in this manner much longer, I would not like to be held responsible for the health of our party. Lieut. HAYS, of Troy, is sick in the hospital here. Lieut. RUMSEY, of my company, who was taken at the same time, is also here. * * We are in good health, and hope soon to hear from friends at home. P. E. WALSH.

Letter from Major John Gray, of the 175th Regiment—Albanians Prisoners in Texas.
HOUSTON, TEXAS, June 12, 1863.
DEAR FRIEND: I regret exceedingly to have to inform you that I am at present a prisoner of war at this place. The particulars are as follows: After the battle at Fort Bisland and Franklin, our regiment was left at Franklin, while the army went on to Alexandria. We remained at Franklin some five weeks, when we were ordered to follow on and join the army. We had proceeded as far as Washington, or about half way to where the main army was, when we received orders to return to Berwick Bay, where we had started from previous to the battles of Bisland and Franklin. We had proceeded, on our return back, as far as Franklin, which place we passed through on the 25th of May, en route for Berwick Bay. I remained in Franklin until the rear guard of our forces had passed through the town, for the purpose of starting our men out of the place, who might remain behind t h e rear guard. This guard had scarce passed when a party of Texas cavalry came in and cut me off from our forces, taking me prisoner, together with Lieutenants Walsh and Dunn, of Albany, and Lieutenant Rumsey of New York. This latter officer was sick and unable to keep up with the command, but Lieutenants Walsh and Dunn were with me. Lieutenant Curtiss of Albany was also taken, and is with us. There are now seven officers of our regiment here prisoners of war, as follows: Lieutenant Roberts, of New York, Lieutenant Hays, of Troy, Lieutenants Walsh, Curtiss and Dunn, of Albany, and Lieutenant Rumsey of New York, and myself. We are all together, and have been well treated by our captors since we were taken, but when we will be released I cannot tell. We are all well with the exception of Lieutenant Rumsey, who is in the hospital and well taken care of.
JOHN GRAY,
Major 175th Regiment.

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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