New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center - Unit History Project
     Unit History Project  
  Home
  About the Museum
  Contact Us
  Articles
  Armories & Arsenals
  Events
  Education
  Flags
  Forts
  Heraldry
  Links
  Pictures
  Press
  Research
  Unit History Project
    Conflict:
   - Revolution
   - Civil
   - Spanish American
   - Mex. Border, 1916
   - WWI
   - WWII
   - Korean
  Veteran's Oral History
  Search
   
  DMNA Homepage
  NYARNG
  NYANG
  NYG
  NY Naval Militia
  Friends

185th Regiment Infantry
New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

DAILY JOURNAL.
TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 13, 1864.
THE NEW REGIMENT.
Commissioned Officers of the 185th Regiment N. Y. V.
The following is a nearly complete list of the commissioned officers of the new Onondaga and Cortland regiment, the 185th N. Y. Volunteers, as the field, staff and line officers have been designated:
FIELD AND STAFF.
Colonel—Edwin S. Jenny.
Lieutenant-Colonel—Gustavus Sniper.
Major—Frank D. Wright.
Adjutant—Byron T. Mudge.
Quartermaster—William Gilbert.
Chaplain—Rev. Mr. Hawley.

LINE OFFICERS.
Captain—Stephen O. Howard.
First Lieutenant—Ephraim F. Bauder.
Second Lieutenant—William A. Brooks.
Captain—Henry D. Carhart.
First Lieutenant—John T. Hostler.
Second Lieutenant—Charles G. Rector.
Captain—John Listman.
First Lieutenant—William A. Rapp.
Second Lieutenant—John Herron.
Captain—Daniel N. Lathrop.
First Lieutenant—Theodore M. Barber.
Second Lieutenant—Henry L. Kingsley.
Captain—David Crysler.
First Lieutenant—S. S. Jordon.
Second Lieutenant—Stephen Hitchcock.
Captain—Robert P. Bush.
First Lieutenant—Herbert C. Rorapaugh.
Second Lieutenant—Pembroke Pierce.
Captain—Allen H. Barber.
First Lieutenant—Hiram Clark.
Second Lieutenant—Daniel Minier.
Captain—John W. Strowbridge.
First Lieutenant—Andrew J. Lyman.
Second Lieutenant— ____ Given.
Captain—Stephen T. Abbott.
First Lieutenant—H. W. Clark.
Second Lieutenant—Jacob M. Doran.
Captain—Abram Spore.
First Lieutenant—Cyrus A. Phillips.
Second Lieutenant—Lewis Edgar.
The adjutant gives notice to commandants of companies, to assemble their men at the camp ground to-morrow morning at 11 o'clock, for company muster.
—The equalization of the credits among the towns and wards, which has been completed, shows an excess of twenty-two men in the Congressional District. The town of Manlias had the largest excess of any town or ward.
—The 185th regiment will be immediately mustered into the United States service, and will be paid the county bounty in a body. The men will be sent forward as fast as possible. Some fifty or sixty will go to Elmira in the morning.
—The county bounty had been paid to one hundred and ninety-six men up to this morning.
—A part of the new regiment took dinner for the first time at the camp ground this noon. A considerable number of the men will go into camp to-morrow.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
The Trip from Syracuse to New York--Incidents on the Way--Death of Geo. Murphy--Comfortable Quarters in New York.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
NEW YORK, Sept. 25, 1864.
We left home, as you know, about five minutes before twelve, Friday, all  shipped in complete order in fine open cars, furnished by the Provost-authorities, in order to facilitate our advance to the front, and also for our comfort and convenience,—they assuring us that full and complete arrangements had been made for our transport on arrival at Binghamton. We went with lightning speed, after bidding our friends goodbye, arriving at Binghamton at 4:20 P. M., making good time, as you will observe. On our arrival, the Colonel proceeded to the Erie depot to see the agent, and asked if our transportation was ready for New York, when he was told that no arrangement whatever had been made, and thereupon read two communications by telegraph, dated the day before, informing the authorities that no transportation could be furnished by the Erie road for our regiment, and hearing nothing further, as was claimed, they made no preparation. But enough of this. Some one is responsible, and the regiment understands quite well who it is.
We were unable to obtain cars of any kind, and finally got permission to run our own convenient train to New York, if an engine could be obtained; so we set about telegraphing all night for an engine to "run us through," and finally succeeded, after the Colonel gave the agent notice that, unless we had an engine furnished by one P. M. on Saturday, he should seize every train that came along, until he had a sufficient number to transport his men through to New York; and at the appointed time the long-sought-for engine came, blowing as though mad, hitched on, and we started at 2:20 for our destination.
In the afternoon after our arrival, a very pleasant occurrence took place between the Colonel and Lieut. Colonel, and the officers of the regiment. An order was given by the Adjutant for the officers to appear at a certain point to receive some instructions from the Colonel, as to their duty for the night; as we had nowhere to stay but in the open cars. When so assembled the Colonel proceeded to perform said duty, and finished to the satisfaction of all present. As he was about leaving, Adjutant Mudge stepped forward and suggested that there was a duty he had to perform at the request of the officers, whereupon he proceeded to present to Col. Jenny a beautiful gold and silver mounted revolver, with pearl handle, in a very appropriate speech, which was responded to by the Colonel in like manner. He then proceeded to perform the same duty to Lieut. Col. Sniper, by presenting him with a like present, which was responded to by our modest Lieut. Colonel in his usual modest style. The presents were examined by the recipients and they seemed very much pleased.
We left Binghamton at 2:20, leaving one man sick at the residence of a friend of his, and about twenty-three deserters. There were four or five others who were sick and were attended by Septor Smith, who rendered valuable aid, and the patients all seemed to improve under his treatment. Dr. Palmer, a private from Cortland, also assisted in taking care of the sick after re­gaining his strength somewhat, he also having been sick for a day or two. The names of the others I did not learn. The occasion of sick­ness, I think, was caused by eating of all kinds of fruit to excess.
We arrived at Jersey City this morning at 3:30, after enjoying a comfortable ride in a cold night down the Valley where the sun only shines about six times a year, I should judge. On our arrival the Colonel put the Lt. Colonel in command of the regiment, and then crossed the river for New York, to see what arrangements could be made for the reception of the regiment—feeding them, &c., as they had had no rations from noon of Saturday. He walked for a long time in search of the different quarters and offices, but failed, and so let the matter rest until daylight, when the Colonel succeeded in finding the Battery Barracks and the messhouse connected with it, in a condition to enter. He at once ordered breakfast for 1,000 men, and returned to the Astor House, where we had taken quarters for the officers of the regiment. Breakfast was to have been ready about ten, but it was somewhat later, nearly twelve. We marched through the town in full uniform, up Chambers street to Broadway, and then down Broadway to the Battery, making quite a show, at least so the New-Yorkers say. The men were furnished with good quarters and we returned to our Hotel at about 1 P. M.
On our return the Quartermaster's Sergeant brought the sad intelligence of the death of George Murphy, attorney-at-law, who had enlisted as a private in Capt. Lathrop's Co. He had been left with the other sick, at the cars in Jersey City, while the regiment was being quartered, in charge of men detailed for that purpose. The sick were to be brought over in ambulances as soon as they could be furnished. While there, and soon after the regiment left, Murphy managed to escape and pass the guards and went to the river and jumped in undiscovered by any one except a small boy. He was soon missed, and search made, when his body was found floating in the river, life being extinct.
We have to-day made arrangements to secure our arms and tents to-morrow, and shall perhaps get away at night. Our destination is not yet certainly known, as there is some talk here of changing the order and have our regiment join an expedition, the whereabouts being kept a secret. We go by steamer at all events, on the "Broad Atlantic."
Capt. Crysler now, at this moment, reports all the sick men better and doing well. Willie Van Cleeck, Mr. Field's son and Elder Brown's son have been detailed by the Quartermaster for his service, and are said to be very good boys.
We are all feeling well and enjoying ourselves first-rate. Yours, G.

Letter From the 185th.
MR. EDITOR:--The following extracts from a letter of a soldier in the 185th regiment N. Y. V., now in front of Petersburg, may be interesting to your readers: G.
"Seated on the ground, with a cracker box for my desk, I proceed to fulfill my promise of writing you a long, if not interesting letter, hoping it may find you all in enjoying health and prosperity, mingled with all the pleasures that a happy home and grateful country can bestow. Our journey here was not as pleasant as I could have wished, but under the circumstances I do not complain. We arrived in Binghamton on the afternoon of the 22d, and remained there until the next day noon, when we started for Jersey City by the New York and Erie Railroad, and arrived at Jersey City early Sunday morning.
On our way across the ferry one of my company was drowned, Mr. Murphy, of Syracuse. The particulars of his death I cannot state.—  
We were marched down Broadway to the Battery, where we were put under double guard.—But on Monday I managed to get into the city   and had a pleasant time, if I never have another. On the 27th we were embarked on board of the steamship Arago, and had a pleasant voyage to Fortress Monroe, a distance of three hundred miles. There we changed vessels and started for City Point a distance of eighty miles up the James river, and the present base of supplies for Grant's army. We arrived at City Point on Friday, the 29th, just one week from the time we got on the cars at Syracuse. This was getting to the scene of conflict rather quicker than I expected when I enlisted. But such is the fortune of the 185th.
The James river is a broad and muddy stream, with many splendid edifices upon its banks, but they have mostly been deserted by the chivalry [sic], and all is now going to wreck and ruin, or becoming the friendly shelter for the Union soldiers from the north. City Point is on the left bank of the river, eight miles above Harrison's Landing, and was nothing before Grant occnpied [sic] it. Now, it is quite a city, filled with immense store houses and munitions of war of every kind. The harbor is large, and filled with all kinds of vessels, and United States troops are crossing faster than they can be sent to the front by Railroad. I thought I had some idea of this war, but after seeing the immense preparations making here to subdue Lee's army I have concluded that I knew nothing about it.—We remained at City Point only a few hours, when we were again put upon the cars and started for the front. This Railroad is a great work. It runs from City Point direct to the front, in rear of Grant's whole line of works, so that all of our troops can be supplied with provisions or thrown from one point to another with all possible dispatch, thus dispensing with long marches and the tedious way of supplying a large army with wagon trains.
We are now holding the point on the Weldon Railroad where the bloody fight of the 18th took place, and all around us are to be seen the effects of that bloody battle. Shot and shell, broken guns, equipments, trees riddled with grape and cannister, dead horses and innumerable graves, pointing out to the passer-by the spot where the conflict was the most severe.
Yesterday, the rain poured down in torrents and we had not a tent or a place to put our heads, to shield us from the storm. But the boys bore it like veterans, lying down in the mud of Virginia with their wet blankets wrapped around them and their rifles by their sides, soon falling asleep, dreaming of home and friends they may never see again.
We are considerably to the left of Petersburg, I should judge, for after we had rode ten miles we could see distinctly the spires of the city. But they took us to the end of the road, eight miles further, where we can see nothing but pine trees, and our spies in the tops of them about three-fourths of a mile. The cracking of rifles and the booming of cannons in nearly all directions, tells us too plainly that we must soon take our chances with the rest, and I don't care how soon, if we are only successful and can bring this unnatural rebellion to a close. I just wish they would let us all go in and have one big fight, kill them all and then let what is left of us go home.
Rumors are circulating here of battles and great successes on our side, and I see many wounded coming in from the front, and some officers killed. I have not seen a paper in four or five days, but I conclude that Grant is trying to get possession of their last Railroad, still further to our left, which will compel them to evacuate Petersburg and fall back on Richmond. And while I am writing cannonading is going on ten miles to the left. The rebs are only one mile in our front, and we are watching them, expecting an attack every hour.
Our regimental officers, many of them, are men of no experience, and our men are all green in military tactics, and I cannot say how they will stand fire, but I hope they will be no disgrace to Onondaga and Cortland counties.
A large majority of the soldiers will support Lincoln, and no soldier who thoroughly understands the position will do otherwise. Mack's friends are the sneaks, skulks and roughs of the army, so blinded with prejuqice [sic] and party as to overlook the interests of the country.

Later.--A letter from a member of the 185th regiment, dated Oct. 5th, received yesterday, says that the regiment has not been in battle or skirmish, that the officers and men are generally in health, and that all are in good spirits, read for what may come.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
The Regiment in the Front—Initiatory Experiences—Pluck of the Men—The Rations, &c.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
CAMP OF THE 185TH N. Y. VOLS., NEAR WELDON
RAILROAD, VA., Sunday, Oct. 2—Night.
We are nearly in the battle-field, where the roar of cannon and musketry has been going on all day. As morning appeared there was an attack on our left, which was repulsed and an advanced position taken and held by our troops. The result of the day's work has been satisfactory along our whole line of about twenty miles.
The 185th Regiment is assigned to the Second Brigade, Third Division of the Fifth Army Corps. It is in the field and ready for action, having at once been marched to the front, where the men are lying on their arms, ready for and expecting an attack. At this writing our men are in the front ranks, before the enemy, with only a line of pickets in advance of them. This is bringing them to the work at once. There is no faltering, except in a very few cases of faint hearts, as there always will be. But a braver set of men, in my opinion, never went into a battle. There is no murmuring either by men or officers, because they are at once led into the front ranks.
I have been told since arriving here that a general officer who came up with us from Fortress Monroe to City Point, reported to Gen. Baxter, our Brigade commander, that the 185th New York was the best regiment he ever saw, and that he liked the appearance of the officers and men so much that he thought they would do to put into the field at once, and that he (Gen. B.) need fear no bad results from putting our regiment in the front. The same night the regiment was sent for to advance at once to its present position, and on it came that night. I followed in the morning (Saturday) with the stores. It rained all day long and up to midnight. The mud was "some" deep, but to-day it is fair again and the mud is drying up fast.
I have to-day about finished the issuing of utensils, clothing, &c., to the men and shall turn over what I have left to the Government.
We are situated on the Weldon Railroad, where every inch of ground has been contested gallantly. My tent is within the breast-works erected in August last on the spot where there was so hard a fight for possession, our forces at last taking the road and tearing up the track for almost four miles. There is a strong battery of artillery directly in the rear of the Division in which the 185th has a place.
The friends at home would doubtless like to see a photograph of "Our Circle" to-night, as we sit around our camp-fire, each man with a sea biscuit in one hand, in the other a tin cup of coffee (made in a camp kettle, and sweetened with the brownest of sugar,) and a candle sitting on a box. The cooking of our mess is done by an old sailor, who possesses both taste, judgment and discretion. You can judge of our fare when I give you the "bill" for dinner to-day: Bean soup, boiled pork, hard tack, fried onions and coffee, which we eat with a relish in the open air, by our camp-fire, while seated on boxes, boards and whatever else the boys could find.
Yours truly, W. G.

Up the James and to the Front—Virginia Rain and Mud--Firing to the
Right and Left--Sickness.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
BREASTWORKS BEFORE PETERSBURG,
MONDAY, Oct. 3, 1864.
This is what we call the front, and a muddy, gloomy place it is. We arrived here Saturday morning, having come up the James River Thursday to within five miles of Wilson's Landing, (where Battery "H" of the 16th N. Y. Heavy Artillery is stationed under Capt. H. C. Thompson,) where we anchored till daylight, when we came up to City Point and landed. We took possession of an evacuated cornfield where we lay until about midnight, when we were ordered to pack up to march to the front. We packed up very suddenly, as we had nothing to pack save three or four sea biscuit each, and marched to the railroad, when we embarked for the front. Gen. Grant has got a queer railroad down here. It is built without grading—running over knolls and through hollows, with lots of beautiful curves. Saturday morning we landed at Gen. Warren's headquarters, in a regular Virginia rain. All day, till about four o'clock, we squatted on our knapsacks, surrounded by pools of milk-colored water, when we moved to our present quarters, and about dark received our day's rations and shelter tents. It is unnecessary to mention how thankfully they were received.
We have been ordered out twice since here and formed in line of battle, in expectation of an attack. We were not attacked, but somebody was, judging from the firing on our right and left. As to what is going on around us, I refer you to the telegraph reports; that is where we obtain our news. When we get into a muss, I will, provided I come out with a whole skin, give you the details.
There are quite a number of sick men in the regiment—the change of water being the probable cause of most of it.
We are assigned to the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fifth Corps. Who our Generals are we do not know, save Maj. Gen. Warren who commands our Corps.
I must close—cause: "Fall in for rations!"
Will write more anon,
DRAUGTHGILSIVAD,

Letter From the 185th.
IN ENTRENCHMENTS,
NEAR THE WELDON R. R.
Oct. 3, 1864.
DEAR STANDARD:—It is now more than a week since the 185th N. Y. V., (Onondaga county's sixth regiment in the struggle that is now, and for the past three years has been going on for the preservation of our beloved country) left the City of Salt, and in that short time the regiment has experienced more of the life of a soldier than most other regiments have done in as many months as we have seen days in the service.
As you have doubtless learned ere this, the 185th embarked on the splendid steam transport Arago, captain Gadsden, on Tuesday, the 27th ult., at about noon, and, after a delightful passage, arrived in Hampton Roads, at midnight of Wednesday, and anchored off Fortress Monroe. Early Thursday morning the regiment was transferred from the Arago to two vessels of smaller size--the Promethius and James S. Green,--six companies of the regiment going aboard the former, and the remaining four companies, together with the stores and baggage aboard the latter.
The weather was splendid and nothing happened to mar the pleasure of the trip. The men were somewhat crowded and perhaps not as well provided with the means of subsistence as they had been accustomed to, but nevertheless there was but little complaining. On our way up the James river we passed Wilson's Landing. Captain Henry S. Thompson, who you will remember, raised a company in Syracuse for a heavy artillery regiment, last winter, commands the post, the garrison consisting, I hear, of his own and another company of the regiment. We also passed Harrison's Landing, McClellan's base of operations after the Seven Days' Fight before Richmond, more than two years ago. This pace was an object of considerable interest to many of us, as the Old Twelfth regiment was encamped within a few miles of the landing during the stay of the army at this place—there being several members of the old regiment connected with the 185th. It was here also, (on the opposite bank) that soon after the arrival of the army at this place, that the enemy came down one fine night and opened a brisk and destructive artillery fire on our forces massed on the north bank of the river. Would not a careful and thougtful [sic] general have guarded against such an emergency by throwing out a picket line on the opposite side of the river as soon as he halted his forces on the banks?
The regiment disembarked at City Point at about noon Thursday, and were marched a mile or so from the landing, when the men were ordered to bivouac in rear of their stacks.
At 12 o'clock the same night, the order came to fall in and prepare to take the cars for the front. In an hour or so the regiment was on board the train, and under way for the main part of the army of the Potomac. We had not proceeded far, however, when the train was switched on a side track and waited till daylight for a train that was to pass us before we could proceed. We arrived near Warren's headquarters about eight o'clock and were marched inside of a line of breastworks built by the rebels, and captured by our forces when Warren took up his position on the Weldon Railroad.
A drizzling rain now set in, which soon increased to a heavy shower. In an hour or two we were ordered to the right, and took up our position in rear of a regiment of colored troops, belonging to the ninth corps, posted behind very strong earthworks. The rain now came down in good earnest; (and did not cease till the following morning,) the men having no shelter to protect them, till along in the evening, when Quartermaster Gilbert succeeded in getting up a sufficient number of shelter tents to protect them from the pitiless rain. In a few minutes the men had their tents pitched and made themselves as comfortable as the circumstances would permit.
Next day the regiment was moved close up to the breastworks, the colored troops above mentioned having been ordered to some other position. We are now holding these works. A half mile to our right is a fort of formidable appearance, and a little more than the same distance to the left is another, so that you see the rebels would have a "nice old time" in storming the position we occupy.
Monday morning, abont [sic] 2 o'clock there was a lively little fight a short distance to our right.—Our regiment in a few minutes were in line of battle, and were prepared to give the "Johnnies" a warm reception, should they make a demonstration in front of us. But there was no occasion to fire a shot as all remained quiet in our immediate front.
It was really gratifying to all having an interest in the regiment, to see how promptly the boys responded to the call, fall in, and showing soldierly bearing while expecting the enemy to make their appearance. My word for it, the regiment will be an honor to the counties from which they came.
There has been more or less fighting every day since we arrived at City Point, with what success you at home are better acquainted than we are. It is the general opinion of all with whom I have conversed since we arrived here, that the movement now under way will be a grand success. Never have I seen such confidence displayed in this army as at the present time. The heavy rain of a day or two past may have the effect of delaying operations, but when the weather permits, I have no doubt the veteran army of the Potomac will accomplish all that can reasonably be expected of it.
The health of the 185th is very good, considering the severe weather the boys have been exposed to since leaving home. I am sorry to say that Captain Lathrop is quite unwell, and his company is at present in command of Lieutenant Barber, as good and efficient an officer as the regiment possesses.
The weather to-day is very fine, and the boys have got their tents pitched in regular order and our camp presents a very fine appearance. Colonel Jenny and the other field officers of the regiment are doing all in their power to make the regiment a good one, and Quartermaster Gilbert is supplying the boys with as good rations and clothing as can be procured under the circumstances.
I understand 185th has been assigned to the 5th corps, and will be attached to either the 1st or 3d divisions. You will remember that the Old Twelfth regiment was attached to the 1st division of the 5th corps, and it appears to be gratifying to our boys to be in the same corps that the old regiment was connected with.
Persons writing to our regiment will be sure of their letters reaching their destination by directing them to the person, stating the letter of company and number of regiment, Washington, D. C.
You may expect to hear from me again as soon as opportunity affords.
Yours for an undivided country, Lew.

ANOTHER LETTER FROM THE 185TH.—
A friend has handed us the following exracts [sic] from a member of the 185th, dated Oct. 3d,:—
"Seated this beautiful evening in my small but pleasant quarters, with a tin plate on my knee for a table, I have concluded to write you a few lines to let you know that I am still in the land of the living. Time will not allow me to give you a detailed account of my experience as a soldier up to the present time, but suffice to say that in Binghamton and New York a "bully time" is no name for it.
On Our arrival at City Point we were immediately sent to the front, in the 6th corps, under General Warren. We are now in the works to the right of the Yellow Tavern, and holding the Weldon Railroad. The field where the battle of the 18th of August was fought is directly in our front. It was one dense forest before Grant advanced to this point, but now hundreds of acres are cut down, and heavy earthworks built making one continuous chain from here to the river, is all one can see. The negroes that charged the works under Burnside are in our rear, and for drill the discipline they are not inferior to any other regiment in the line that I have seen.
Grant has swung his left still further around, and away in the distance heavy cannonading has been heard all day, heavy trains of wounded and dead are coming down, but I don't believe there has been a general engagement.—The object, with his left, if successful, is to cut their last railroad, thus compelling them to come out and fight, or fall back on Richmond. The camps are wild with rumors, and I have talked with many from the scene of operations, and they say we have captured two lines and many guns. How true this is I do not know.—One thing I do know, is, that Grant has an immense army, and the soldiers have confidence in all his operations. I cannot immagine [sic] how this thing can be conducted by one man; the magnitude of this campaign is beyond ordinary conception; all of our supplies come to our camp by rail, and we hare not marched two miles; yet we are within one short mile of the rebels. In coming up here on the train I saw distinctly the spires of Petersburg from the different points, yet we are away to the left of it, 18 miles from City Point. How soon we will go into a fight depends on the Johnies. Our look outs are hradly [sic] three-fourths of a mile from us in the tops of the tallest pines watching their operations. If they attack us they will get slaughtered. We sleep on our rifles, and one would imagine that a general fight was all the time in progress, for the Artillery and Infantry on picket are constantly firing.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
At the Front in One Week from Syracuse—Points of Interest—The Regiment's Position—Politics in the Army.
CAMP OF THE 185TH. N. Y. V.,
NEAR REAM'S STATION, Va., Oct. 5, 1864.
John R. Chedzoy, Esq.:
Dear Sir.—Our trip here was rather hurried, and not as pleasant as I could have wished, but under the circumstances I cannot complain. Just one week from the time we got on board the cars in Syracuse we landed at City Point. We remained there but a few hours, when we were again on the cars hurrying toward the front. City Point is upon the left bank of the James, eighty miles from Fortress Monroe. It is Gen. Grant's headquarters, besides the base of supplies for his army. Before our army occupied it I should think that it was just no place at all, but now it is filled with immense store-houses and munitions of war of every description. A railroad runs from the dock direct to the front, and in the rear of our whole army, carrying up the troops as fast as they land, and supplies to any spot where they are wanted; thus dispensing with long marches, and the slow process of supplying so large an army with wagons. Besides, the troops can be thrown from one point to another in case of an attack, with all possible dispatch. This road is eighteen miles long, from City Point to the Weldon road; but now, as Warren has swung his left around, threatening the South Side road, it will of course be extended as fast as we advance.
The 185th is guarding the line of works near Ream's Station, and directly in front of where the battle of the l8th of August was fought.
On our way up I saw distinctly from two points the spires of Petersburg, but this place is more to the left and in a country thickly wooded with lofty pines, so that one can see but little.
The works are our main line and the most extensive and formidable that I ever saw or heard of, extending from the James in the form of a half-circle, to near Poplar Grove Church, a distance of about thirty miles. The timber is all cut down for about one mile in front and felled with the tops toward the Johnny Rebs; the limbs are all sharpened, so that it is impossible to get through. The works are built of huge pines, about ten feet high, and a bank of about twenty feet thick of earth in front, making a ditch that if they succeeded in getting into, they would never get out of. Every eighty rods is a bastion built out from the works for a battery of artillery, so that in case of an attack twelve pieces of artillery and eight to ten thousand infantry could play on every half mile, getting two cross fires on them at once. So they will never attempt to attack us if they know how we are situated.
The Rebs are only a little over a mile in our front and the firing between the pickets is continuous; upon the right and left the cannonading has been terrific, but I don't know the result. Many wounded and dead are continually coming in from the front. And how soon it will come our turn I cannot tell, but when we do go in, I think Onondaga will not be ashamed of us.
Last night we were routed out and stood in line about two hours, anxiously waiting for the chivalry [sic] to come out, but they failed to even drive in our pickets, although the firing was very severe at one time.
A colored regiment joins our right, and one of those that charged on the works after Burnside's mine exploded. In drill and discipline they are not inferior to any regiment I have yet seen on the line, and I have seen a good many.
With regard to politics, I have taken a good deal of pains, and have had a very good chance to see and hear the soldiers' sentiments. And I assure you "Little Mac" is far below par, except with a certain class, and they are the sneaks, cowards and "bummers" of the army, so blinded by prejudice and buried in ignorance that they have lost all consistency, reason, and discretion. But this class of men,—thank Providence,—forms but a small portion of this army; and all that I want is to see the returns of the Army of the Potomac, and McClellan men will hold their noise forever.
Truly yours, DAVID HAMILTON,
Co, C, 185th N. Y. Volunteers.

From the 185th—Its Position—Two-thirds of the Soldiers for the Union Ticket—Opinions of Veterans.
185th N. Y. Vols., Near Poplar Grove
CHURCH, Va., Oct. 15, 1864.
To J. W. Yale, Esq., Syracuse:
We (the 185th Regiment) are near the extreme front, the noise of musketry and cannonading we have grown quite familiar with. We haven't had a smell of gunpowder yet, but expect to soon; we have been ordered to be in readiness to march at a moment's notice, three or four times.
We all like our Colonel first rate, and we will see the twenty-four year old boy through. We are in the First Brigade, First Division, Fifth
Corps, which has a good reputation, as you know, and we will do the best we can to maintain it. I thought I had got a pretty good idea of the magnitude of this war from newspapers at home, but I find my idea of the thing was altogether too small.
Mr. Farnham has just arrived to carry back our votes. We are going to give the Union ticket two-thirds of the vote of our Regiment, at least. I have seen a good many veterans who have fought under him, say they like and would support Little Mac, but they don't like the Chicago Platform, and can't go Pendleton.
I hope you will attend to this thing at home, and I will guarantee the army all right. We don't want to hear that Syracuse has gone back on the soldier boys.
I have seen something of the hardships of war, (but haven't experienced any yet,) but I don't think I would come home to morrow if I could. I haven't seen enough of this abolition war yet.
Yours Truly, W. L. WINSLOW,
185th N. Y. V.

From the 185th—An Eventful Day—The Political Feeling of the Troops—False Reports of Disaster.
IN CAMP NEAR WARREN'S STATION, VA.,
October 14, 1864.
To the Editor of the Syracuse Journal:
This day has been somewhat eventful in the life of a soldier. First, at 10 o'clock this morning, a soldier who had deserted from a Maryland regiment, was shot within forty rods of our camp. The 185th were allowed to witness the execution, and a salutary effect it had on all who witnessed it.
At noon, Mr. George L. Farnham made his appearance, and you can be assured he was made welcome both as a friend and the agent of the County Committee, who sent him to look after the soldiers' vote.
The next incident was the arrest of a deserter from the 198th Pa., who was on the reserve picket; he went to the advance picket and gave him sixty-five dollars to exchange positions with him, and then started to run to the "Johnnies." His comrade saw the movement and started to arrest him and brought him in. He is now in camp close by us, in irons. He, also, must furnish us an example.
I hear from home stories of disaster to our regiment They are all false. There has been no casualty in our regiment, except the drowning of poor Murphy at Jersey City.
There are a few sick, but none dangerously. All are in as good spirits as could be expected of men who have left good homes for a life on the tented field. A few are home-sick, and they are to be pitied; but the most feel that the l85th owes more to the country than any other regiment that has gone out, and they are determined to discharge the obligation faithfully.
Capt. D. N. Lathrop, of Co. D, has been very sick, but he is better now, and will soon be with his company again. As an instance of the feeling of the boys of this regiment, I will state that he was to-day offered a sick-leave of thirty days, which was refused by him, he preferring to stay with his company to going home and then returning.
Politically, our regiment only reflects the sentiment of the Army of the Potomac, which is largely for Father Abraham, all stories to the contrary notwithstanding. I have heard men that came out for "Little Mac" now say they have heard the "Johnnies" cheer for McClellan on the picket line and that was enough for them. They will vote for Abraham.
Yours, for the country, H. W.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
The Late Raid on the Weldon Railroad—Incidents of the Expedition—
Conduct of Officers and Men —New Winter Quarters.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
HEADQUARTERS 185TH N. Y. V., CAMP NEAR
PARK STATION, VA., Dec. 19,1864.
Every soldier experiences a feeling of rest that the pen cannot portray, when he gets the order to go into winter quarters. The 185th were happy in the belief that they were thus situated, when, on the 5th inst., orders came to pack up to move. With many regrets and evident sorrow on the part of many, and a considerable ripping on the part of others, the men removed their tenting from the neat and comfortable houses they had just finished, and prepared for the march.
On Wednesday morning, t he 6th, we marched at daylight and continued till 8 P. M., when we reached the Nottoway River, where we halted till 3 o'clock on the morning of Thursday. Gen. Gregg's Cavalry led the advance, and cleared the way of all obstacles in the shape of "rebellious chivalry [sic].” At the last-mentioned hour we took up our line of march (it wasn't a very light one, for it rained luxuriantly,) and crossed the Nottoway on a pontoon bridge, and kept on about three miles to Sussex Court House, where we halted for breakfast. After a short repast (that word sounds home-like) of coffee, hard-tack and pork, we started, marching through Sussex Court House. There was at this point considerable skirmishing, on the part of Gen. Gregg's Cavalry, and I must say that the gallant fellows did their duty well, for we met none of the "advocates of unlimited State rights." Our march was continued until about 2 P. M. of Thursday, at which time we arrived within about four miles of the Weldon Railroad. Here we had supper, which was slightly improved over our last meal, by the addition of pigs, turkeys, chickens, a lean cow or two, and other et ceteras which go to make up a Southern larder. About 5:30 we received orders to fall in and march to the railroad. We marched about half a mile, when the lively skirmishing on the part of the cavalry, and the flames arising from the railroad bridge, which was fired by the same, told our commander that it was time to prepare for action, and accordingly we were halted, and in a moment every musket of the 185th had embedded in its bosom a minie ball, cal. 57. About a mile further on, and we reached the railroad, which we found already destroyed by another division, and we kept on following the line of the road till near 11 o'clock P. M., when we reached the front, at which the destruction of the track ended. Here four companies under Capt. Spore, were deployed as skirmishers, on a turnpike crossing the railroad at this place. We were withdrawn at 12, midnight, and deployed on the line of the railroad, where we lay about an hour, when we were again withdrawn and encamped near the road. At 8:30 A. M. we took up line of march following the railroad till noon. After dinner we returned to the road, and our brigade, under Gen. Warren, in person, was drawn up in line by the side of the road, and at a given signal, the whole brigade seized the track, and in five minutes a full mile of it was capsized, assisted by Gen. Warren's own hands, and accompanied by one of the most exultant yells that was ever heard. Then followed the burning and twisting process. That night we went into camp a very tired but thoroughly satisfied set of men.
On Saturday morning at daylight we started, right in front, on our return, and at 9 o'clock P. M. we had accomplished twenty-one miles, in the most inclement weather, with the mud reaching above army shoes. On Monday noon we arrived in our present camp, having on Sunday burned Sussex Court House, and during Monday forenoon experiencing the hardest march of the campaign. The incidents of the raid were numerous and exciting.
On the march down our boys discovered at Sussex Court House, three men belonging to Gregg's cavalry, thrown into a well with their throats cut. This so incensed Gen. Warren, that on the return march, he ordered everything destroyed in the shape of property, and the hanging of three guerrillas, captured at Sussex Court House, which was done in a thorough and expeditious manner.
Regarding those to whom special praise is due for the careful performance of their duties, I cannot speak too well. Col. Jenny did everything that an officer could do for the comfort and safety of his men. This the men know, and are open in their acknowledgments of the fact. His next in command, Lieut.-Col. Sniper, was everytime to be found in the right place. Too much praise cannot be accorded these officers for the excellent manner in which they handled the command. To our Commissary Sergeant, John J. Morey, the boys are under many obligations, not particularly for the promptness with which he performed his duties upon this occasion, but all the time since the regiment arrived in the field. He is a man who knows what right is, and will see it done, so far as his department is concerned. Our regimental property was under the charge of Quartermaster Gilbert, and his assistants, in the rear, and, as is unusual in such cases, everything was returned to the regiment in good order.
Chaplain Hawley was vigilant and faithful in the performance of his charge. He was ready upon every necessary occasion to grant, not only spiritual, but material relief to the weary and worn. He has made himself a warm place in the hearts of the men. And I wish I could relate the numerous compliments paid to Adjutant Mudge. But all who know him, know that he is capable of executing all confided to his charge.
I might mention others, but I refer your readers to Gen. Warren's congratulatory address for the way in which all executed their allotted duties.
We are now building new winter quarters, in which we hope to remain till settled weather in the spring.
Wishing you a "Merry Christmas," I am, truly yours, T. S. M.

FROM THE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
Progress in Drill and Discipline—Fare of the Soldiers—The Vote of the Soldiers.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
HEADQUARTERS, 185TH REG'T., N. Y. V., SQUIRREL
LEVEL ROAD, Va., Friday, Oct. 21st, 1864.
Four weeks ago to-day we bade farewell to our friends in Syracuse, for a year, and, some of us, perhaps, forever. Four weeks ago we started for the field, the great majority of us totally unskilled in the duties which devolve upon men serving in that capacity, and to-day we sent out our first squad on picket duty; and thanks to the untiring energy and thorough discipline of Col. Jenny and Lieut. Col. Sniper, those men who left us this morning to guard our front are as well drilled as three-fourths of the forces in the field. There are some growlers—there always are some in every regiment—who complain because of the amount of drilling they have to do. And those men are the ones who are the slowest in acquiring a knowledge of military service. The greater portion of the regiment, however, are anxious to become skilled in the tactics, and they certainly will if Col. Jenny or Lieut. Col.-Sniper are permitted to drill them. Much, however, depends upon the company officers, who are all, to a man, doing their best to bring their commands to an efficient standard, and it is east to tell the companies commanded by veterans. Every soldier in the regiment is prompt in saying that no better selection of field officers could have been made; especially are the men indebted to Quartermaster Gilbert, for the perfect manner in which he conducts his department. And here let me observe that none at home need worry themselves about the fare the soldiers receive. There is plenty of it, and it is, with now and then an exception, of excellent quality. Complaints may reach home, on this point, but rest assured they are made by men who would complain if they were fed daily at banquet tables. Commissary Sergeant Mowry proposes to have all of every article of food that Uncle Sam allows him for the regiment, and so far he has done his duty well.
I was out on the picket line a few days ago and saw an exchange of papers between one of our boys and a Johnny. Johnny said he belonged to an Alabama regiment, and that there were two regiments in their rear guarding them, to prevent their desertion. He requested our pickets not to fire on them when they came in, and to say the same to the next relief, for come into our line they intended to do.
All along in our front are rifle pits and graves. I stood a long time by the side of five, who were killed on the 18th inst. I thought of Toodles's drunken words, "Not this feller, but t'other feller." There are also numerous monuments erected by the Johnnies to show the course of their march. They are constructed by burning houses, and leaving the chimneys standing
We are now lying in the advanced line of breastworks immediately in the rear of the Squirrel Level road, about a mile and a half from Warren's station. Our camp is splendidly located close behind the breastworks in a beautiful pine grove.
Mr. George L. Farnham left the regiment last Wednesday, having taken the vote of nearly all the electors with us. Company "D" voted 34 for Lincoln and 7 for McClellan. One of the latter gave as his reason for voting as he did the fact that, in pursuance of an order from Gen.
Meade, the men were obliged to put aside their boots and wear their army shoes,—about as much reason as any of them can give. Remember, the soldiers vote for Lincoln.
The JOURNALS, although they come like grape shot rather than scattering, are, nevertheless, very acceptable. The paper always bears a friendly look, which makes it doubly welcome. It is dinner-time.
Hungrily, yours, DRAUGHTGILSIVAD.

LETTER FROM THE 185TH REG'T.
NEAR PETERSBURG, Oct. 24, 1864.
Dear Standard: With your permission, I will furnish you with a few items of news as connected with the 185th Regiment, which may prove of interest to you and the readers of the Standard, knowing, as I do, that a word from "the boys" is always acceptable.
You have already been furnished with a very elaborate account of our journey from Syracuse, and of the movements of the Regiment up to the time of the occupation by us of the breastworks to the front and south of Petersburg, and I will not harras [sic] your readers with but a brief summary of the passing events.
The 185th is now doing picket duty, and which they have performed now for several days. The first detail from the regiment was made on Thursday, of last week. The number to be furnished by each company was of a proportion to make a force of ninety strong. This force, together with a somewhat smaller detail from the 198th Pennsylvania, (who are encamped alongside of us, and occupy a portion of the breastworks to the left,) makes a very strong picket line, and it is said by "vets" that the picket line in front of our works is the strongest that they have ever seen. Our boys seem to like this duty very much. In fact, the majority of them say they would rather stand on picket than perform the regular routine of drill, &c., in camp.
The first movement the "Johny's have made toward decreasing our numbers, is by taking several of our buys as prisoners. The facts as near as I can ascertain are these. To-day, (Monday, 24th) the 1st Lieutenant of company K, Cyrus A. L. Phillips, together with a private named Thedore Stickles, of the named Lester L. Hatch, went to the picket line for the purpose it seems, of exchanging papers with the Rebs. Before proceeding beyond our lines Lieut. Phillips had exchanged his clothes for a privates suit, so that no clue could be had as to his rank. The exchange was agreed upon by the parties, and both advanced for this purpose. They had no sooner met for the purpose of making the exchange, than a party of about a dozen Rebs sprang out from a piece of woods near to where the exchange was being made, where they had been concealed, and drove them into the Rebel lines at the point of the bayonet. Several exchanges had been made during the day, of newspapers, tobacco, sugar, &c., which had been consummated in an honorable and fair manner, but the honor, (if it may be so called) of the  infernal Johnny's could hold out no longer, and treachery took its place. The occurrence created quite an excitement in camp when the news of their capture reached us, and various rumors were in circulation in regard to it. After a short time the news was confirmed by the arrival of Col. Jenny, who, upon hearing of the occurrence immediately rode out to the picket line, which is about half a mile from camp, to ascertain the facts in relation to the case. No blame is attached to any one but themselves, Lieut. Phillips was well liked by the officers and members of his company, and by the regiment generally, and his absence will be felt by those who were intimate with him.
No particular movement at present is being made along our lines, but I doubt not that the 185th will have a chance to show her pluck 'ere long, but when she does, depend upon it, she will give a good account of herself. Compliments without number are lavished upon her, and I venture the assertion that she will prove herself worthy of them all. Commanded and officered by able and gallant men, she will always be found ready when duty calls.
Last evening (Sunday) our regiment was visited by the Rev. Mr. Fuller, of Syracuse, who delivered a very able discourse, and was listened to very attentively by the members of the regiment, who had assembled at the Colonels quarters, where the service was held.
The health of the Regiment continues very good. There have been some cases where it has been necessary to carry the parties to hospitals, but these are few.
The weather is very pleasant here now, it being quite warm, with the exception of nights and mornings, which are rather cool.
Our mail matter is received pretty regular, although there are some instances where it has been rather tardy in reaching us, but on the whole we have no reason to complain.
I believe this is all the news as connected with the regiment that I can furnish you with at present, but at no distant day you may expect to hear from me again. Yours, for our Glorious Union, E. W. F.

RELIGION IN THE ARMY.
The Christian Soldiers' league in the 185th Regiment.
IN CAMP NEAR PETERSBURG,
Oct. 25, 1864.
To the Editor of the Syracuse Journal:
At a meeting held last evening at the quarters of Co. K, pursuant to notice, it was unanimously agreed that we, members of the 185th Regiment, N. Y. Vols., having been made partakers of Christ, and the hope of eternal life, that is by Him and to the praise of the glory of His grace, unite to form a society which shall be known as The Christian Soldiers' League, by which we bind ourselves in an act of solemn worship to be faithful to God and each other—to watch over and pray with and for each other; as occasion shall present to admonish and reprove, and in all suitable ways to promote one another's usefulness and comfort in the things of religion. And whereas, profane swearing abounds among us, a sin abhorent [sic] alike to reason and t he moral sense, for which things' sake moreover, the wrath of God cometh on the children of disobedience, therefore, resolved that we will do all in our power, both by precept and by example, to discountenance the practice, and banish it from the midst of us; and whereas gambling prevails to a great extent in the army, casting down many mighty and tempting thousands of our young men to their temporal and and [sic] eternal overthrow; resolved, therefore, that we will religiously abstain ourselves from all games of chance, as they are called, and do what lies in our power to induce our fellow-soldiers to follow our example. Finally admonished that we are here in peculiar danger and that there may be but a step between us and death, resolved, that we will make it our duty to be always ready, and whenever one of our number shall fall, whether by disease or by the hand of the enemy, we will take such note of the event and forward such tribute to his memory as shall be befitting his character, and serve to alleviate the stroke which must fall upon the surviving relatives.
Resolved, that a copy of this League be sent for publication in the Syracuse JOURNAL, the Northern Christian Advocate, the Christian Watchman and Reflector, and the N. Y. Evangelist.
[Signed] H. S. REDFIELD, Prest.
Dr.C. E. Hill, Sec'y.

FROM THE HUNDRED AND EIGHTYFIFTH.
The Regiment Advances, and Returns—Not Engaged—Capture of Lieut. Phillips—Present to Col. Jenny.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
CAMP 185TH REGT. N. Y. V., SQUIRREL
Ere this reaches you your readers will have received news of the advance of the left wing of the army of the Potomac. Of the purpose of the movement, I can tell you nothing; the soldier is not supposed to know anything; but of the movements of the 185th I can speak positively. We marched Thursday morning at four o'clock to the left, about three miles, when our skirmishers met those of t he rebs, and slowly drove them back two miles further. We were finally drawn up in line of battle in the edge of a piece of thick woods, and ordered to lie down—the skirmish line keeping up a continual fire in our front. During the afternoon we erected temporary breastworks, and lay on our arms through the night, which was not as pleasant as might be, for it rained all night very hard. At daylight the rebel sharpshooters commenced sending their minnies into our lines at a rapid rate, and continued it all the forenoon; but none were injured, though there were some narrow escapes. At noon we were marched by the left flank back to our old quarters, arriving here at about three o'clock.
To-day we are resting. Rumor says our troops on the left of us were repulsed, which made it necessary for us to withdraw. But I cannot say whether such was the case or not. Should you hear any stories to the effect that the 185th has been "cut to pieces," set it down as a Copperhead falsehood.
I regret to announce that Lieut. Phillips of Co. K., in company with two men, was taken prisoner last Monday, while exchanging papers with the rebs on the picket line.
Chester Catlin, of Co. D., while lying on his arms yesterday morning, accidentally discharged his piece, the ball passing through the right foot near the toes, inflicting a slight flesh wound.
The regiment presented Col. Jenny with a horse and equipments a few days since, valued at $300. Maj. Leo made t he presentation,  accompanying the gift with the following words:—
"Col. Jenny:—I have the honor to present to you, in behalf of the officers and men of the 185th Regiment N. Y. V., this horse, as a token of the respect and esteem in which you are held by them as their commander. In the hours of battle may this steed never fail to bear its rider on to victory; and when the time arrives when the 185th Regiment is to be separated from you as its commander, may the Stars and Stripes proudly float over our now distracted country, and the Angel of Peace spread his broad wings over our land, united and happy."
The Colonel made a neat but brief reply, and the men retired, after giving three cheers for the Colonel.
Snoozingly, yours, DRAUGHTGILSIVAD.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH REGIMENT.
C a m p Life—The Late Reconnoissance [sic] Casualties—Fine Weather—Good Health of the Regiment—Voting—Good Things from Home.
CAMP IN THE FIELD, NEAR WARREN, VA.,
To the Editor of the Syracuse Journal: Oct. 30, 1864.
It is Sunday night 10 o'clock, and all is quiet. My camp-fire is burning in front of my tent, my horse tied to my tent-pole eating hay. Sternberg, Wiard and Willis have just gone to a soldier's bed, and I have set myself down to write a few words to the good old JOURNAL. How kindly that name sounds in my ears; God bless you in your labors in its publication.
Since my last writing I have been on the field with the regiment until within a few days, when I was ordered to City Point with the train on Wednesday night last, and the regiment ordered to move on Thursday morning at three o'clock to the Southside Railroad, where an attack was to be made by our forces. The Second, Fifth and Ninth Corps composed the forces which were to make the attack. On Thursday morning, after making preparations all night, we started for our destination with the train. We arrived at City Point about two P. M. Our anxiety for the regiment cannot be imagined, and what the result would be; but the next day to our great surprise we were back with our train to within about two miles of our old quarters. We arrived about eleven o'clock at night, and then obtained the result of the attack. Hancock made the attack on the left of our line and drove the rebels some distance, until they were re-enforced, when the fighting became severe and our forces were compelled to retreat. Our Corps was held in reserve, and consequently was not in the hardest of the fight. Our regiment was in line of battle and in front of the enemy, but did not suffer very much. Dennis O'Mara, of Co. B, was shot through the hand; Chester Catlin, Co. D, in the foot, not serious, and one whose name I did not learn, in the same company, was slightly wounded; a Mr. Patlin, of Co. F, received a slight wound in the hand. O'Mara is in the hospital at City Point. The 188th Regiment N. Y. V., suffered quite severely. It was a new regiment and had been here only a few days.
The rebels are very strongly fortified on the line of this road, and it will require a severe struggle to take it, the approaches being such that it is almost impossible to bring our artillery to bear. In fact, our artillery was not brought into use at all, on Thursday. But the time is not far distant when the rebels will be compelled to yield to the advance of our army. We have a large force on this line, and additions are made almost daily. Our regiment is now at its old quarters, about one mile from Warren Station, and in the best of spirits, ready to move at a moment's warning to do their whole duty. It is said that no better regiment went to the battle field, and when the order came for them to move, they set about the work without failure ready to do their whole duty as brave and good soldiers.
The weather here is very fine, no rain having fallen, except one night, since the 10th inst. Old Virginia has a fine climate, but all else is desolation, and it seems as though the very ground was cursed. But all it needs is the crushing of this rebellion, a little Northern enterprize [sic] after slavery shall have been wiped out, and Virginia will be one of the finest States in the Union. Nothing has kept Virginia from taking a position with the most flourishing States of the Union, but the blight of slavery.
The health of the regiment is generally good. The most serious case of sickness has been that of Capt. Lathrop, who is getting better and we expect he will soon be able to join his company.
The voting in our regiment has been finished, I think, and the result, I assure you, is satisfactory. There has been at least three out of four for the Union ticket, and it has been done without any electioneering or any influence, to induce any one to vote otherwise than they were inclined to from their own sense of right and duty to their country. Men who have heretofore voted the so-called Democratic ticket, have of their own accord voted the entire Union ticket, because coming to the threshold of this cursed rebellion, they see things in their true light and can more properly judge what their duty is; for it is inconsistent to enlist as a soldier and fight and sacrifice one's life in the battle-field, and at the same time use your influence and cast your vote with a party which, if successful, would increase the sacrifices and lessen the chances for a safe return to the comfortable homes they have left. The soldier who is honest and not bound down by party ties, sees this as soon as he goes into the army, and acts accordingly, and his friends who remain at home and have the right to exercise the election franchise on the 8th of November next, should act accordingly, if they have any interest at all in the welfare and life of their friends who have left all behind and entered the field to aid in closing up this wicked rebellion.
We soon expect a change in our Brigade commander, who it will be I know not; but if any change is made, I presume it will be Gen. Troop, who has been promoted. He was an officer in the 17th Michigan, and is said to be one of the best. He was formerly a Syracusan, and is a relative of D. S. Sternberg, Esq., of the Onondaga House. He is a young man only 26 years old, as I am informed, and a true Union man, and will not take much slang from the Cops, as some in Syracuse can bear witness on his recent visit there.
I will here state in this connection that the General brought a box of "eatables," sent by our friend, D. S. Sternberg, to his son, W. L. Sternberg, who is my Quartermaster-Sergeant, which the General delivered in person. It was opened by Will, and behold, what a sight! Everything that could be thought of in one year was in it. All the good things (and I speak from personal knowledge), that earth can afford were beheld as paper after paper was opened and one layer after another was taken out; we were completely overcome, and could not refrain from saying, "God bless the good family that sent it."
We had a jolly time in getting up a good meal, (I sat we, for Will said to myself, Wiard and Willis, this is for all of us, for after you have ben [sic] a soldier awhile your selfishness will vanish, and as long as you have a loaf you will divide it with your fellow-soldier.) The chickens' bones were picked, the good home-made bread and butter, the raisin cakes, cookies, eggs, pony dried beef, fruit, &c, were relished by us, and we felt as though we were remembered at home. The contents of this box are sufficient to last us several days, and we shall remember the donors as long as we live, and wish them long and prosperous lives. By the way, the Sergeant is a strong Union man, and is periling his life for his country. How is it with those he has left behind? Will they give their votes and influence for the Union, and aid at home in what he is trying to do here, and will they join him in the language of the poet,

"Nor by the clashing of the sword
Nor yet by cannons roar;
Like as the snow-flakes from above,
The Union ballots pour?"

Yours, truly, W. G.

Later—Presentation to Col. Jenny—The Rev. S. R. Fuller—Personal.
CAMP IN THE FIELD, NEAR WARREN'S
STATION, Va., Nov. 1, 1864.
To the Editor of the Syracuse Journal:
I omitted to state in my communication the presentation of a fine horse to Col. Jenny by the regiment a few days since, which was done by Maj. Leo. The regiment was drawn up in a square by Lieut. Col. Sniper. Also, that Rev. S. R. Fuller, formerly the pastor of the 1st M. E. Church of Syracuse, was with us a week ago last Sabbath and preached. He preached a very impressive sermon, and the regiment was very much pleased. We were very glad to see him, indeed, as many were well acquainted with him. Such a man would have a good influence in the army and do much good. He left with the best wishes of all for his future prosperity and long life. Our Surgeon and his assistants have arrived. Surgeon Crarey has made a good impression and he is well liked. He appears to be a whole-souled fellow, and well calculated to make friends wherever he goes. A man full of sympathy, and whose early religious training has had an influence to make him what it is always designed to do. Dr. Newcomb, the first assistant, and Dr. Bradford are both gentlemen, and well liked.          W. G.

From the 185th Regiment.
ED. STANDARD:—The following extract from the letter of a soldier of the 185th Regiment may be of interest to your readers. The letter is dated "Headquarters 185th Regiment, N. Y. Vols., Front of Petersburg. Va., October 30th, 1864:"
"Nothing of much importance has transpired since my last letter, beyond the ordinary transactions of a soldier's life in an active campaign. Our Regiment has been doing picket duty in the front for the past two weeks without a single accident that I have as yet heard of,  with the exception of Lieut. Phillips, of Co. K, and two privates, who allowed their curiosity to get the better of their judgement [sic], and went over to the Rebels for the purpose of exchanging papers with them, but so soon as the Johneys had them snugly inside of their lines, they very modestly informed them they were prisoners, papers and all.
So you see the chivalry [sic] have not lost all their boasted honor. But it is the first of us, and I think I can say with safety that it will be the last of this regiment they will get withont [sic]  knowing how they came by them. In my last I told you I thought we would shortly move in some direction, and imagined the South Side Railroad would be the most likely to engage the attention of Gen. Grant. And on the morning of the 27th, at 4 o'clock, we started, knapsacks packed and five days' rations, in that direction, but what the move was intended for I am unable to say.
After marching about two miles to the left, we filed through our works at a point known as Fort Cummings, and started gaily across the fields in the direction of the South Sole Railroad. Our skirmishers here drove the Rebel pickets about two miles, when we were drawn up in line of battle, and ordered to lie down. The bullets were now whistling quite lively over our heads, with occasionally a shell tearing through the trees, one of which burst nearly over our left wing, but doing harm to no one.
We did not remain long in that position before we were at work, and in a very short time had erected quite a formidable line of breast works, behind which we waited patiently for the advance of the Johnny's, but none made their appearance. We were not allowed to build any fires to cook our coffee, and the rain was just pouring down in torrents. So we pitched our tents to shield us a little: but no sooner had we got them snugly up than orders came to take them down; so every one made himself as comfortable as he could. Your humble servant spread his tent upon the ground, rolled himself in his over-coat, and with his rubber blanket for a covering, went to sleep. But I think I could have enjoyed myself just as well at Syracuse about this time. In the morning I was aroused by a rapid discharge of musketry, and imagined they were contemplating an advance, but our skirmish line was heavy and it kept them in their holes.
We were soon ordered back at double-quick, as the enemy was trying to turn our left. We fell back about two miles, and was formed in line of battle in the edge of a piece of woods. After remaining there about half an hour we had orders to fall back and we continued to do so until we arrived at our old camp ground, where we started from, with all the regiment safe, excepting two or three slightly wounded, and all in good spirits. We found our beautiful grove of pines all cut down and lying in all directions through our camp. This was done as a precautionary measure in case of attack.
The country through which we marched was almost one dense forest of thick underbrush, mostly pine and oak, with occasionally a little cleared field with an old rickety house, and chimney only equalled [sic] by some of our largest salt blocks in Salina. How a people can live in this enlightened age of the world, so far behind in everything, is to me a mystery I cannot understand."
Another letter from a member of the regiment, dated the 31st. has been handed us. It contains a similar account of the affair as the above, and says "there was one man in our regiment got a slight wound in the hand; and another by carelessness shot himself through the foot."
It also says that the general health of the regiment is good, but that Warren Winslow is sick with fever, in hospital at City Point.
Speaking of politics, the soldier boy says: "I wish some of those sneaking whelps of copperheads would come down here and stay about a month: if he could have the face to go home and vote for McClellan then, he could do most any mean trick. I was surprised when I first came here to see the confidence and unity of feeling displayed by all classes of soldiers. They all spoke well of Mc. but denounce his platform. They are bound to go in for Old Abe and a speedy close of the war. I don't think there is one man in twenty in the Army of the Potomac that will vote for Mc. Our regiment is almost unanimous for Lincoln."

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
Position of the Regiment—The Assault upon Mr. Wiard--Lieut. Hitchcock's
Case--Lieut. Phillips's Capture—The Sick, &c.
HEADQUARTERS 185TH N. Y. V.,
SQUIRREL LEVEL ROAD, Va., Nov. 7, 1864.
To the Editor of the Syracuse Journal:
Pursuant to my promise to write you, at this late hour, I snatch a few moments from the multiplication of duties to indite a few items of news, which I hope will prove of interest to the friends at home.
We are now lying in the same camp we occupied before the late reconnaissance [sic], and are making ourselves comfortable houses to protect our unacclimated selves from Virginia rains and fogs. The health of the regiment is good, compared to that of new regiments in general. There have been several cases of fever, two of which terminated fatally. Eben Somers on the 2d, and Ross Corey, on the 3d insts., both members of D Co. Of the officers there are only three in the hospitals, Maj. Leo, Capt. Lathrop, D Co., and Lieut. H. W. Clarke, I Co. Capt. Lathrop is improving.
I see by the Courier that Mr. Hiram Wiard has "been reduced to the ranks" from the position of Quartermaster Sergeant. Possible! We don't see it here. Mr. Wiard enlisted as a private, has so far served as a private, and so far as I can learn, has never had any objections to "shouldering a musket." He certainly has always had his musket ready to shoulder—and never has been Quartermaster Sergeant, nor has he ever acted in that capacity. The following paragraph from a recent Regimental Order explains itself:
"HEADQUARTERS 185TH REG'T N. Y. V., &c,
November 6, 1864.
"Order No. 32.]
"III. Private Hiram Wiard, of Co. D, is hereby detailed as Quartermaster's Clerk. * * *
He will be present at all company reviews and inspections."
By command of
EDWIN S. JENNY,

Col. Commanding 185th Reg't N. Y. V."
Col. Jenny issued the following order on the 5th inst.:
"Order No. 31.]
"Private S. R. Hitchcock, of Co. H, acting Second Lieutenant in this regiment, after a fair trial, with every encouragement and advantage, has proven himself an utterly incompetent and worthless officer, and has manifested no disposition to either learn or do his duty.
"The Colonel commanding the regiment considers it would be an act of injustice to the Government, which has paid this man an enormous bounty for his services, to allow him to leave the service or to send him before a Board of Examination, to be discharged by reason of incompetency.
"Acting Second Lieutenant S. R. Hitchcock is therefore relieved from duty as Second Lieutenant in this regiment, and returned to duty as a private soldier.
"He is transferred from Co. H to Co. D, and will immediately report for duty to First Lieutenant Theodore M. Barber, commanding Company.

Letter From the 185th.
CAMP 185TH N. Y. VOLUNTEERS.
BREASTWORKS NEAR PETERSBURG, NOV. 7, 1864.
EDITOR STANDARD:—Having a few leisure moments, I will improve them, with your permission in giving a few facts connected with the 185th, which may prove of interest to your readers. The general news is not of a very exciting character, yet, believing that a few words concerning the state of affairs in the regiment, will prove of interest to the readers of your valuable sheet, I take the liberty of intruding for a few moments upon its space.
I was somewhat surprised at reading in the Courier of a late date, an article from the pen of the Local Editor of that scurrilous sheet, commenting on a letter in the Journal, from Lieut. C. A. Phillips. There is not a word of truth in what is contained in said article, and were it not that some of the friends of Mr. Phillips might possibly be led into a wrong impression as to his motives at the time of his capture, (as other motives than those of loyalty have already been advanced by a few of his enemies in the 185th,) I would not waste the time or intrude on your columns. But it behooves me, as a friend and fellow officer, and knowing as I do, that he is possessed of none but gentlemanly qualities, and withal as sound a Union man, and hater of this wicked Rebellion as ever raised a hand against its overthrow, to say a word in his defence. The Courier says: "Lieut. Phillips is now probably in Richmond where all traitors of his class belong." To say that Mr. Phillips is a traitor, let me assure you, is a falsehood of the deepest dye, in proof of which let me assure you that he voted for "Old Abe," in fact the whole Union ticket. And the statement of Lieut. Phillips, that "the 185th nearly all voted for Old Abe," is as true as that our honest Uncle will occupy the Presidential Chair for another term. The Courier adds: "Not only is that not true, but it comes with a poor grace from an officer whose company is largely Democratic as we know he is." I would like to ask the local of the Courier where he got his authority for his statement. Certainly not from any very reliable source. Company K, to which Lieut. Phillips was attached, voted nearly to a man, for Old Abe, there being but about six who cast their votes in favor of "Little Mac." The Courier, after giving a description of the manner of the capture of Mr. Phillips, together with the other two (the Courier says three) who were taken prisoners with him, goes on to say that "Will Tyler, one of the party, but who was not captured, "gobbled a rebel horse, and rode into camp with flying colors, and turned the horse over to the Colonel." Will Tyler says he has no knowledge of turning any such kind of an animal over to the Colonel.—The last we saw of "Will" this afternoon, instead of "cracking his jokes and advocating Democracy," he was abusing the few copperheads who are connected with the 185th, and hurrahing for "Old Abe." The members of the 185th are highly indignant at the article which appeared in the Courier, and consider it an injustice to both themselves, and Lieut. C. A. Phillips.
The health of the regiment still continues in very good condition. There has been but two deaths as yet; Ross Corey, of Otisco, a member of Co. D, died in hospital at City Point; and Eber Summers, of Brewerton, also a member of Co. D. died at New York, while on his way home on a sick furlough.
The weather for the past few days has been very disagreeable. It has rained a good share of the time for several days, and the roads are getting quite muddy.
Everything is quiet along the lines at present, but how long things will remain so is not certain. All are anxious to know the result of the election, which is to take place to-morrow, yet all entertain the highest hopes.
More anon, Yours, A. H. S.

DAILY STANDARD
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE CITY.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1864.
WILL IT RETRACT?—The Courier some time since seemed to take special pleasure in publishing a scurrilous report that "Quarter master Sergeant" of the 185th had been reduced to the ranks for reasons which it did not choose to put forth. The truth is Mr. Wiard, has been nothing bnt [sic] Quartermaster, Clerk, which position he now holds; and Quartermaster Gilbert writes the Journal, he performs its duties to entire satisfaction [sic]. The following is part of an order by Col. Jenny that should bring a fair acknowledgement from our morning cotemporary.
"HEADQUARTERS 185th REG'T N. Y. V., &c.,
November 6, 1864.
"Order No. 32.]
"III. Private Hiram Wiard, of Co. D, is hereby detailed as Quartermaster Clerk. * * *
He will be present at all company reviews and inspections.
"By command of
EDWIN S. JENNY,
Col. Commanding 185th Reg't N. Y. V."

Col. Jenny issued the following order on the 5th inst.:
"Order No. 31]
"Private S. R. Hitchcock, of Co. H, acting Second Lieutenant in this regiment, after a fair trial, with every encouragement and advantage has proven himself an utterly incompetent and worthless officer, and has manifested no disposition to either learn or do his duty.
"The Colonel commanding the regiment considers it would be an act of injustice to the Government, which was paid this man an enormous bounty for his services, to allow him to leave the service or to send him before a Board of Examination, to be discharged by reason of incompetency.
"Acting Second Lieutenant S. R. Hitchcock is therefore relieved from duty as Second Lieutenant in this regiment, and returned to duty as a private soldier.
“He is transferred from Co. H, to Co. D, and will immediately report for duty to First Lieutenant Theodore M. Barber, commanding Company.
"By order, &c.,

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1864.
Presentation of a Flag to the 185th
Regiment by the D. L. G.
Yesterday afternoon the Davis Light Guards paraded the streets, bearing the beautiful flag which they were to present to the 185th Regiment. Ghem's band headed the Company playing some of their best airs, to which the soldiers stepped light as if a pleasant duty was in hand. A large audience assembled at the City Hall in the evening, and at half past seven the D. L. G.'s entered, stacked arms inside the Council railing and placed the flag back of the Mayor's chair.
Mayor Powell was called to preside, and introduced Geo. N. Kennedy, Esq., whom the D. L. G. had commissioned with the duty of presentation. L. W. Hall, Esq., had been designated on the part of the friends of the regiment to receive the flag, to whom Mr. Kennedy remarked in substance as follows:
SIR: I have the honor to present, in behalf of the Davis Light Guard, to their countrymen and brothers in the field, composing the 185th Regiment of New York Volunteers, this banner, the emblem of the united sovereignty of the State.
A little more than four years have passed since a body of bad men, who had fitted themselves a long period of culture for the nefarious purposes they had in view, raised the standard of revolt against the government of their fathers and ours. The hum of peaceful industry emenating from an happy and prosperous people, presided over by the Angel Peace--God's own child--was suddenly changed to the harsh, discordant note of war and civil discord.
The great people of the North, loyal by nature, and taught to revere the rich legacy of a free Republic, which their father had committed to their keeping to be transmitted unimpaired to future generations, had not learned to think that any man who had realized the great benefits of a government that granted all and exacted nothing but fealty from its children, would dare to raise a fratricidal hand against its life. Yet, even while they were pursuing their peaceful occupations, and the nation through them was marching on in all the grandeur of unparalleled success toward the goal where was centered the full fruition of the patriot's hopes, the startling intelligence was borne to us that treason ran riot through the land and had even dared to seize the pillars of the State preparatory to its overthrow. The swift winged lightnings, man's messengers from the Almighty's store-house, was not quicker in the execution of its commission, than the patriots of the North in rushing to the rescue of the imperiled country.
First and foremost among noblemen who thus moved on, was the heroic 12th from Onondaga. Theirs was a noble result, and while the red blood of its members had moistened many a well fought field, and the bodies of many lay buried in distant and perhaps unknown graves, their history is given to our keeping, and God willing, we will in all the future preserve their memory green.
Quick, in the moment of the citizen-soldiery in this holy war, men threw aside the implements of a peaceful life, and in their stead sized the sword and musket, and rushed to the front.
With these we gave the country our own 122d, whose deeds of heroic daring in this holy cause will be treasured by their children as the rich legacy of a father's fame.
When the history of the great rebellion shall be written, and the story of its marches, its sieges and its battles shall be sung, the one fought in this great struggle for all humanity, above the clonds [sic], away up near to God, will challenge the noblest efforts of poetry and song; and highest among the heroes and the martyrs there will stand the sons of Onondaga, the men of the glorious 149th.
The time will come, aye, it even now presses hard upon us, when peace shall be once more heralded to this distracted nation,—when the soldier for liberty and human rights, returned from the tented field, will reap the rich reward of all his sacrifices, in the plaudits of victory; but for the illustration of that unyielding patriotism —sublime beyond the comprehension of the highest philanthropy of the old world, which, in spite of the burthens of a massive debt, in the midst of a cruel war such as mankind has never witnessed, with the prospect of other drafts upon their love of country, has induced the solemn verdict that this war shall never end until the cause of its beginning is blotted out, and every man owing allegiance to the government shall bow in submission to the majesty of the law.
Take this banner to Col. Jenny and the boys there; tell them it is the gift of loving friends at home—tell them our eyes will follow it and them upon the battle field—admiring country, and the consciousness of a duty well performed—among those who will add new lustre to our local fame, will be found the brave young men who left their homes, their friends, their all, to aid in striking the last and crowing blow for freedom and the integrity of the great Republic of the West. And we may all hope that when the last and final struggle comes, first among the patriot soldiers moving where the shot and shell fall thickest, will be found the last, though not the least, of Onondaga's heroic men—the gallant 185th.
And while we see it borne in the thickest of the fight, our prayers shall ascend to the throne of Almighty God, that victory may perch upon its eagle, and that he may throw his protecting arm over and around its brave defenders. And when they bear it back to us, let it come riddled with shot and torn with shell, if it must be, but let it not come polluted by the touch of a traitor hand.
God save the boys from the perils that surround them now.
To which Mr. Hall responded as follows:
A few weeks ago, in response to the call of the President of the United States, a band of noble, gallant young men, known as the 185th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers, was assembled at the camp ground adjoining our city, on the eve of its departure for the Army of the Potomac. At that time their hearts were gladdened by receiving from the hands of one of the fair daughters of Syracuse a National Flag.
The gift was by them most highly prized, not alone from the fact that it was costly of fabric, beautiful of design and perfect in execution: nor because it assured them that woman's heart, ever overflowing with sympathy, went forth with them to the contest; but, in addition to all this, there were emblazoned upon its ample folds the Stars and Stripes—the ensign of our nation's sovereignty.
To-night there comes to them another gift.—Another flag is committed to them to guard and keep. Unlike the former flag, it bears upon its folds the proud emblems and arms of our own glorious State. And yet there is no antagonism between the two. The power and the glory of the State of New, which are ever typified on flags of the character of that which is this day presented by you, derive additional strength and shine out with brighter lustre from their association and connection with those emblems which represent a nation's greatness and a nation's glory.
While the former flag will ever serve to remind them that the highest allegiance of all due to the form of Government which embraces in its protecting care all the States of the Union, every one of which is represented by a star shining out from the azure which surrounds it; seperate [sic] indeed, but nevertheless forming one glorious constellation. So this flag serves to remind them that our own State—the Empire State of the Union—has ever a claim to their allegiance and support, which shall secure for all who dwell within its limits the blessings and privileges guarantied by its Constitution.
And again, as that former gift, coming as it did, from one of that sex where virtues and where tenderness have illustrated and adorned each successive page in the history of this war, will ever serve as it glorious folds, are streaming over them to remind them of the interest and devotion of woman in this struggle, as it will assure them of their constant readiness still to provide all those gentle ministrations for the sick and wounded that woman's heart so well knows how to bestow. Even so, this gift which now in the name of the 185th Regiment, I receive at the hands of the Davis Light Guard of the City of Syracuse, will serve to remind them that warm hearts, brave hearts at home companions in arms doing duty under the Laws of the State of New York, stand ever ready to defend the honor and glory not of our state alone, but that of the nation.
And now, knowing as I do the officers and the men that compose that regiment, I can with entire confidence assure you that this Flag will never be disgraced while upborne by them, and that when this war is over, and the gallant band shall return to the homes they have left, it will come back still more glorious than ever, still more precious, even though it shall be rent by the wild storm of the battle, or stained by blood of its defenders.
During the delivery of both speeches the audience gave the most strict attention,—one could have almost heard a pin drop in the room, so still was it—except when allusion was made to the gallant heroes of the "Old 12th," the 101st, the 122d, and the boys above the clouds, the 149th—the mention of any of which brought out marked approval. So, too, of the 185th, but it was remembered that she has to make her reputation—and we have no fears but that she will do it on the first opportunity.
The flag is one of the prettiest we have ever seen, a State flag.—on one side the State arms, with the words "God and the right" on the other, "Presented by the Davis Light Guard to the 185th New York Volunteers." The whole was of the best material, and elaborately adorned, but we have not time this marning [sic] to more fully describe.
We feel it due to say, that to the liberality of the Hon. T. T. Davis, are the D. L. G. and the 185th largely indebted for this plesant [sic] and beautiful memento of New York State and Home.

DAILY STANDARD.
OFFICIAL PAPER OP THE CITY.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1864.
Presentation of a Flag to the 185th
Regiment by the D. L. G.
[On account of several egregious blunders in our article of Saturday on the presentation of the flag to the 185th regiment, we republish it this morning, corrected.]
Friday afternoon the Davis Light Guards paraded the streets, bearing the beautiful flag which they were to present to the 185th Regiment. Ghem's band headed the Company playing some of their best airs, to which the soldiers stepped light as if a pleasant duty was in hand. A large audience assembled at the City Hall in the evening, and at half past seven the D. L. G.'s entered, stacked arms inside the Council railing and placed the flag back of the Mayor's chair.
Mayor Powell was called to preside, and introduced Geo. N. Kennedy, Esq., whom the D. L. G. had commissioned with the duty of presentation. L. W. Hall, Esq., had been designated on the part of the friends of the regiment to receive the flag, to whom Mr. Kennedy remarked in substance as follows;
SIR:—I have the honor to present, in behalf of the Davis Light Guard, to their countrymen and brothers in the field, composing the 185th Regiment of New York Volunteers, this banner, the emblem of the limited sovereignty of the State.
A little more than four years have passed since a body of bad men, who had fitted themselves by a long period of culture for the nefarious purpose they had in view, raised the standard of revolt against the government of their fathers and ours. The hum of peaceful industry, emenating from an happy and a prosperous people, presided over by the Angel of Peace—God's own child—was suddenly changed to the harsh, discordant note of war and civil discord.
The great people of the North, loyal by nature, and taught to revere the rich legacy of a free Republic, which their fathers had committed to their keeping to be transmitted unimpaired to future generations, had not learned to think that any man who had realized the great benefits of a government that granted all and exacted nothing but fealty from its children, would dare to raise a fratricidal hand against its life. Yet, even while they were pursuing their peaceful occupations, and the nation through them was marching on in all the grandeur of unparalleled success toward the goal where was centered the full fruition of the patriots hopes, the startling intelligence was borne to us that treason ran riot through the land and had even then dared to seize the pillars of State preparatory to its overthrow. The swift winged lightnings, man's messengers from the Almighty's store-house, was not quicker in the execution of its commission, than the patriot of the North in rushing to the rescue of the imperiled country.
First and foremost among the noble men who thus moved on, was the heroic 12th from Onondaga. Theirs was a noble record, and while the red blood of its members had moistened many a well fought field, and the bodies of many lay buried in distant and perhaps unknown graves, their history is given to our keeping, and God willing, we will in all the future preserve their memory green.
Quick, in the movement of the citizen-soldiery in this holy war, men threw aside the implements of a peaceful life, and in their stead sized the sword and musket, and rushed with eagerness to the front.
With these we gave the country our own 122d, whose deeds of heroic daring in this holy cause will be treasured by their children as the rich legacy of a father’s fame.
When the history of the great rebellion shall be written, and the story of its marches, its sieges and its battles sung, the one fought in this great struggle for all humanity, above the clouds, away up near to God, will challenge the noblest efforts of poetry and song; and highest among the heroes and the martyrs there will stand the sons of Onondaga, the men of the glorious 149th.
The time will come, aye, it even now presses hard upon us, when peace shall be once more heralded to this distracted nation,—when the soldier for liberty and human rights, returned from the tented field, will reap the rich reward of all his sacrifices, in the plaudits of an admiring country, and the consciousness of a duty well performed—among those who will add new luster to our local fame, will be found the brave young men who have left their homes, their friends, their all, to aid in striking the last and crowning blow for freedom and the integrity of the great Republic of the West. And we may all hope that when the last and final struggle comes, first among the patriot soldiers moving where the shot and shell fall thickest; will be found the last, though not the least, of Onondaga's heroic men—the gallant 185th.
And to-night it is not unfitting for me to say that the patriotic people of the Union rejoice, not over a party victory or political success achieved, but for the illustration furnished of that unyielding patriotism—sublime beyond the comprehension of the highest philanthropy of the old world, which, in spite of the burthens of a massive debt, in the midst of a civil war such as mankind has never witnessed, with the prospect of other drafts upon their love of country, has induced the solemn verdict of the people that this war shall never end until the cause of its beginning is blotted out, and every man owing allegiance to the government shall bow in submission to the majesty of the law.
Take this banner to Col. Jenny and the boys then; tell them it is the gift of loving friends at home—tell them our eyes will follow it and them upon the battle field. And while we see it borne in the thickest of the fight, our prayers shall ascend to the throne of Almighty God, that victory may perch upon its eagle, and that he may throw his protecting arm over and around its brave defenders.. And when they bear it back to us, let it come riddled with shot and torn with shell, if it must be, but let it not come polluted by the touch of a traitor hand.
God save the boys from the perils that surround them now.
To which Mr. Hall responded as follows:
A few weeks ago, in response to the call of the President of the United States, a band of noble, gallant young men, known as the 185th Regiment,
N. Y. S. Volunteers, was assembled at the camp ground adjoining our city, on the eve of its departure for the Army of the Potomac. At that time their hearts were gladdened by receiving from the hands of one of the fair daughters of Syracuse a National Flag.
The gift was by them most highly prized, not alone from the fact that it was costly of fabric, beautiful of design and perfect in execution: nor because it assured them that woman's heart, ever overflowing with sympathy, went forth with them to the contest; but, in addition to all this there was emblazoned upon its ample folds the Stars and Stripes—the ensign of our nation's sovereignty.
To-night there comes to them another gift.—Another flag is committed to them to guard and keep. Unlike the other flag, it bears upon its folds the proud emblems and arms of our own glorious State. And yet there is no antagonism between the two. The power and the glory of the State of New York, ever typified on flags of the character of that which is this day presented by you, derive additional strength and shine out with brighter lustre from their association and connection with those emblems which represent a nation's greatness and a nation's glory.
While the former flag will ever serve to remind them that the highest allegiance of all is due to that form of Government which embraced in its protecting care all the States of the Union, every one of which is represented by a star shining out from the azure which surrounds it; seperate indeed, but nevertheless forming one glorious constellation; so this flag serves to remind them that our own State—the Empire State of the Union—has ever a claim to that allegiance and support, which shall secure for all who dwell within its limits the blessings and privileges guarantied by its Constitution.
And again, as that former gift, coming as it did, from one of that sex whose virtues and whose tenderness have illustrated and adorned each successive page in the history of this war, will ever serve as its glorious folds are streaming over them to remind them of the interest and devotion of woman in this struggle, it will assure them of their constant readiness still to provide all those gentle ministrations for the sick and wounded that woman's heart so well knows how to bestow. Even so, this gift which now in the name of the 185th Regiment, I receive at the hands of the Davis Light Guard of the City o Syracuse, will serve to remind them that warm hearts, brave hearts at home, companions in arms doing duty under the Laws of the State of New York, stand ever ready to defend the honor and glory not of our state alone, but that of the nation.
And now, knowing as I do the officers and the men who compose that regiment, I can with entire confidence assure you that this Flag will never be disgraced while upborne by them, and that when this war is over, and the gallant band shall return to the homes they have left, it will come back still more glorious than ever, still more precious, even though it shall be rent by the wild storm of the battle, or stained by the blood of its defenders.
During the delivery of both speeches the audience gave the most strict attention,—one could have almost heard a pin drop in the room, so still was it—except when allusion was made to the gallant heroes of the "Old 12th" the 101st, the 122d, and the boys above the clouds, the 149th—the mention of any of which brought out marked approval. So, too, of the 185th, but it was remembered that she has to make her reputation—and we have no fears but that she will do it on the first opportunity.
The flag is one of the prettiest we have ever seen, a State flag.—on one side the State arms, with the words "God and the right." on the other, "Presented by the Davis Light Guard to the 185th New York Volunteers." The whole was of the best material, and elaborately adorned, but we have not time this marning [sic] to more fully describe.
We feel it due to say, that to the liberality of the Hon. T. T. Davis, are the D. L. G. and the 185th largely indebted for this plesant [sic] and beautiful memento of New York State and Home.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTYFIFTH.
An Army Movement on Foot—Speculations in Camp—A Virginia Rain-
Storm—Visitors from Home, &c.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
HEADQUARTERS 185TH REG'T., 1ST BRIG. 1ST
Div. 5th A. C., Sunday Nov. 20, 1864.
When I was a boy I enjoyed a Sunday ramble in the woods; but I cannot say that the one I have just returned from was a source of much enjoyment. I have just been over to the Brigade Commissary Department, where I am fortunate enough to have a friend, and after eating a huge plate of "mush," returned to my quarters, thankful that I am not obliged to be out to-day in a Virginia rain, tramping through Virginia mud.
It commenced raining yesterday, and the same operation has been kept up with a good degree of energy ever since. You ought to see our camp! We have a splendid location, but now it is intersected with a thousand young rivers, with innumerable bays, inlets and lakes, to say nothing of several first-class mud holes. The rain storms are of a class which, I think, are peculiar to Virginia. They remind me of a great, muscusnosed, touch-me-and-I'll-blubber boy, in ill humor. Such sour, drizzling, ill-natured rains I never saw, not even in——any place.
Gen. Grant has been making an extension to his military railroad. (By the way, I cannot conceive why they call it a "military railroad," unless it be because it resembles military life in its ups and downs in it.) This extension is about ten miles in length, and terminates in a sand bank, about sixty rods in our rear, which is called "Patrick Station."
There have been strange rumors in camp for the past few days, to the effect that a grand "move" is about to be made. Some say we are to act in conjunction with Gen. Butler in an attack upon Petersburg and Richmond, and that the large fleet of war vessels now lying in Hampton Roads are to move up the river and reduce Fort Darling, etc. Others say that we are about to move on Wilmington, running a race with Gen. Sherman. While the wise ones shake their heads, wink knowingly, and manifest silence. Gen. Grant has not furnished me with the programme of the movement yet, consequently I cannot give you the details. When the affair is through with, I shall be able to grant you the information, which is now so much sought after, provided our "Southern friends" do not place me in such a condition that I cannot.
Our Chaplain, Rev. Mr. Hawley, has joined the regiment. As yet he is almost a stranger to us. We hope, however, to become better acquainted with him soon.
We had the pleasure, last Wednesday, of greeting Dr. Goff, of Syracuse, and Mr. Silas Corey, of Otisco, and though their errand was a sad one, yet all were happy to see them. They came after the remains of Mr. Corey's son, Ross, and of Johnson Goff. They also had taken up and embalmed, with the other two, the remains of Mr. Neal, of K Co., who died last week. They left us this morning for home, bearing with them the sacred evidences of the patriotism of the people of Onondaga county. The deceased were all good soldiers and upright men, well-beloved and respected by their comrades. The news of the result of the election is reaching us, and, with a very few exceptions, nothing is heard but exclamations of joy and satisfaction. Those few exceptions constitute the "majority of several thousand in the 5th corps, which the Courier, in a late number, claims. Bah! Who believes that the old fighting 5th corps gave a majority for McClellan? We know better here. Well, good-bye till we get settled again.
T. S. M.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
Thanksgiving in the Army of the Potomac—The Kindly Acts of Friends at
Home Appreciated—How the New York Troops were Swindled.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
HEADQUARTERS 185TH REGIMENT N. Y. V.,
CAMP ON SQUIRREL LEVEL ROAD,
Monday, Nov. 28, 1864.
The pealing notes of a hundred trumpets and the rattling tones of a thousand drums poured forth their waves of sound upon the morning air, waking this "sojer feller" from dreams so pleasant—but never mind the sweet particulars. "Restored nature" and rough pine poles prompted me to rise and go forth." Forth I went, just as the red sun was topping the distant flagstaff of Fort Wadsworth with its blood-colored light, and, like Isaac, I "meditated." My thoughts were free, and every mental picture that presented itself for my inspection stood out before me in distinct relief, like a bouquet of jewels, framed in alabaster, upon a background of polished ebony. Home! sweet home! Every little object that had become endeared by the slightest association passed before me, panorama-like, lit by the crystalline light of memory's lamps. Back—back to the April days of life—to the hours when a now departed mother's hand smoothed the sunny locks of her first-born. Thence forward through mischievous boyhood, whose highest ambition was a pocket full of molasses candy and a saw to cut off a neighbor's wagon-tongue—then through the blissful, beardless days of Cupid's servitude (ah! first love!) to the final entanglement of the liberties of single-blessedness in the noose of matrimony, to the moment when the ebon-visaged, bloody-eyed demon of war confronted me in my rosy path of life. The conjurations of a Cagliostro never portrayed the pictures of imagination more clearly, than were those scenes of by-gone days brought forth for me, as I sat on a pine log in the midst of the "slashings" before the breastworks of the 185th. Prominent among the gems that I viewed and replaced upon the walls of the mystic hall of Memory, was a festive scene. (It was on Thanksgiving morning that I "meditated.") The broad table was loaded with the blessings of a bountiful harvest, and surrounded by the representatives of three generations. Happy every heart, and smiling every face. The picture was a genial one. But there was a "side scene" that made my heart swell with gratitude —with thanksgiving—that I was a soldier, and that I was born in New York State. Wide-mouthed boxes crammed with everything that gives the palate joy, surrounded by those angels in human form—women, with hands and tongues (of course) busily engaged, the former at stowing away nicely browned poultry; pies, whose flaky crust reminded me of foam on the ocean's wave; "nut-cakes," whose unctious "inwards" refused confinement and burst like the pouting lips of an Octaroon; huge loaves of bread, whose generous, bursting breasts betokened the sweets within; wide-mouthed jars, opaque bottles, and thousands of other souvenirs of the plentiful larders at home,—and the latter, dropping words of hope and prayer for the absent ones, for whom these munificent donations were intended. Beautiful was the picture! My pride was great that "I was one of them."
I returned to camp. The JOURNAL informed me that my dream was a vision to be fulfilled. Rumors, "like a wild deluge" came to my ears. Tens of thousands of those same boxes were on the road to us, prepared by those dear hands I had seen, and blessed by those dear tongues (excuse me) I had heard.
Well, they came—to City Point, then they come to Warren Station, then to Division headquarters, then to Brigade headquarters, then to Regimental headquarters, and then to Company headquarters. Out of over 30,000 barrels and boxes for the New York troops in the Army of the Potomac, the 185th regiment—one of the largest regiments in the Department—received about four barrels. I did not see the figures of the total amount turned over to the regiment, but below I give you the exact amount of the articles allowed to our company—Co. AE:
23 4-10 lbs. turkey, chicken and goose, smashed, torn, dirty and "busted."
4 lbs. biscuit, badly dilapidated.
3/4 mince-pie, with good crop of pin-feathers.
1 qt. apple-sauce, in good condition.
3 cucumber pickles—end bitten off of one.
10 lbs. apples, fair.
1 turnip.
There! I will make oath on the Army Regulations that the above is a correct invoice of the "things" received by our company from out the bountiful store sent us by the generous hearts at home, and no more was given to any company in the regiment, neither did any officer, either field or line, receive more than their share at the same ratio of dividend.
Now the question arises, where did all the things go? I am about to tell you, but you must keep it a secret. All the way from Washington to City Point the utmost carelessness was exhibited in the handling of the packages, extreme care being used to burst every box and barrel that would burst, and to "appropriate" every one that showed signs of dilapidation; consequently when they were thrown out upon the dock at City Point, the greater portion was badly injured. There everything lay, subject to the pilferings of any and everybody, especially the "reliable and trustworthy" contrabands employed there. Through the exertions of Quartermaster Gilbert, the portion assigned to this Brigade was shipped to Warren Station, and let me remark by way of parenthesis, that when it come to shipping the packages there were any number of individuals who were entrusted with them, and the result was, not one-fourth was sent that really belonged to us. At Warren's Station another chance was given to those whose stomachs had stronger claims upon the doings of their hands than their consciences had. Finally, when the provisions reached brigade headquarters we were astonished to learn that they had been and were to be distributed to Pennsylvania troops alike with those of New York. Such is the manner in which the affair was managed. I make no mention of hundreds of other regiments stealing what they were in no way entitled to.
To the good people of New York, we send our warmest thanks for the good things we did get, and for the thoughtful love which prompted the kind action. But to those who robbed us of that which would have been doubly dear to us, because it came from home, we say, may you never while in the army receive a thing from home, and when you return there, may you have the consolation of knowing that you are despised by every New York soldier in the Fifth Corps of the Army of the Potomac.
Everything in the regiment is going on finely, save that there is a great want of parchment here, not particularly for drum-heads, a large quantity could be acceptably and justly used for commissions. For the present, I am yours,
T. S. M.

Letter from the 185th Regt.
CAMP, 185TH N. Y. Vols.,
Dec. 3rd, 1864.
DEAR STANDARD.—I have a painful task to perform, viz:—recording the death of an officer of our regiment—Captain H. D. Carhart, of Co. "C." About a week ago Capt. C. was taken down with that dreadful scourge of the camp, typhoid fever, and in a day or two his case having become alarming, he was moved to Division Hospital, where he could be better cared for.—
Since his removal there he has received every attention that can be afforded a sick man in the army, but all efforts proved unavailing, the disease could not be stayed, and early this morning the Captain breathed his last. I have not had the pleasure of a very long acquaintance with Capt. C., but what I had seen of him, in connection with the 185th, led me to form a very high opinion of him, both as an officer and gentleman. His death is deeply regretted by all connected with the regiment. I understand his remains are to be immediately sent home for interment. I am sorry to say that Major Leo of our regiment is seriously ill with the same disease that caused the death of Capt. Carhart, and has been for some two or three weeks at Division Hospital. This morning the Major was in a critical condition, and fears are entertained that he may not recover.
There are also a few others of our regiment at Division Hospital, but I hear of no other severe cases.
There has been very little of excitement here of late. The regiment is making rapid strides in discipline and drill, and I can assure you no pains are spared by the officers of the regiment to make it a good and effective regiment in every sense of the word. With the material that the 185th possesses, it is my firm belief that in a short time it will be second to none in the service, if indeed it is not now as good as the best.
Since the regiment has occupied its present quarters it has converted it into a very pleasant and comfortable encampment. When we arrived here the ground we occupy was a dense pine forrest [sic], with a thick undergrowth of bushes and vines; now the ground is laid out in regular order, the men have built some of the nicest and most substantial log-huts to be found in the army, the stumps have all been dug out and the company streets nicely graded, with a row of evergreen trees on either side, the whole presenting not only a pleasant appearance but affording healthy and comfortable shelter for the men of the regiment.
It has been very quiet in our immediate front lately. Our pickets have become very sociable with those of the enemy, and to within a day or two past, have exchanged newspapers, tobacco and coffee with each other quite freely. I understand that our men have lately received orders to stop communicating with the enemy.
Numbers of the enemy desert every night, and come into our lines. While on picket a few days ago among others a couple of Mississippians came over and gave themselves up. They said they had been in the service since the war commenced, had followed "Bobby" Lee through thick and thin, but they "couldn't stand four years more of war." There were eleven men, all told, in their company, before they left it, and that the remaining nine of them were coming over as soon as they could do so with safety.—And then it is somewhat gratifying to see that it is not only the rank and file of the rebel army that is tired of the war, as their officers are deserting them as well as their privates. There is not a day passes but more or less of them voluntarily come within our lines and give themselves up to our charge.
As I write this, orders are being received to prepare to march. I hear that the Sixth Corps has arrived within a short distance of us, and, as a natural consequence, there is much speculation as to what is to be done next. Whatever it may be, let us pray God it may result in good for our glorious cause. Yours, for a speedy and successful termination of the war.    LEW.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
The Expedition to the Weldon Railroad—Destruction of the Railroad—
Also, of Suffolk Court House—Preparations for Another Expedition.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
CAMP IN THE FIELD, NEAR WARREN'S STATION, VA., Dec. 12, 1864.
It is late at night, and I have just returned to my quarters from the regiment, which has returned from the expedition to the Weldon Railroad, upon which it started last Tuesday.
Up to this morning we had received no tidings from them since their leaving. A courier arrived, who informed us that they were on their return and would arrive about four in the afternoon, at which time the whole Corps arrived at the place from which they started on Wednesday morning.—one mile south of the noted Gurly House. The troops were weary, indeed, but in the best of spirits. None of the 185th had died, and all who went away returned, with one or two exceptions,—Dr. Palmer of Cortland and another, whose name I did not learn. It is supposed that they fell out on the first day's march, and they have not been heard of up to this writing.
There were a few of our Corps killed by the guerrillas. They had fallen out on the march near Suffolk Court House. Our men retaliated by capturing some of the guerrillas, and hanging them up without ceremony.
The result of this move has been entirely satisfactory, the object for which it was intended having been accomplished. It was the destruction of a large portion of the Weldon Railroad below Stony Creek, the destruction of stores, &c.
The line of march from here was to the Jerusalem Plank Road, running from Petersburg to Jerusalem, which they followed for some miles, then went to the Nottoway River, which they crossed, and then to the Weldon Road, where they arrived on Thursday after dark. Just before their arrival a very long train of cars passed towards Stony Creek, carrying a large number of soldiers. After they passed the work of destruction commenced. A long railroad bridge was first burned, and the track was then torn up. The manner of doing this was by taking up the rails, and then the ties were piled up three or feet high in square form, and the rails laid on the top, the ends resting on the ties. They were then set on fire, and the rails, soon became red hot by their own weight, bending and becoming entirely useless. In this manner about fifteen miles of the Weldon Road were destroyed. After having accomplished this object, the troops were ordered to prepare for the return march. On their return every village and building was burned and destroyed for a large breadth, and horses and cattle were captured, and a large number of negroes, men, women and children, was brought with the train.
Suffolk Court House was burned, and the entire town was destroyed. Thus the work of destruction has been done, and had this policy been pursued for the past two years or more by the Northern army, this rebellion would have been brought to a close ere this.
The boys are camped in a beautiful piece of woods, and will remain there for a few days only, as I have just received orders that four days' rations must at once be issued, and woolen blankets, shelter, tents and shoes be issued immediately on special requisition.
An order was also issued to Brigade and Regiment Commanders, to which it would be improper for me to give publicity. If this weather holds, you may expect to hear further from our regiment. The weather is now pleasant bur cold, and if it continues it will be favorable for army movements.
The health of the regiment is quite good, and much better than could have been expected after so severe a march. But the spirits of the boys have been first-rate, and they have had an opportunity of foraging through a section where the army had not been recently, and "you better believe" the pigs, hens, turkeys, geese, sheep, applejack, flour and grain of all kinds suffered severely, as many of the boys brought their trophies into camp.
I will close by saying that when there is another move I will inform you in proper season.
Yours truly, W. G.

Letter from the 185th Regiment.
CAMP NEAR PETERSBURG, VA.,
Dec. 13th, 1864.
Dear Standard:—The 185th regiment has returned within the Union lines, together with the entire force engaged in the late raid on the Weldon railroad. The extent of the damage done the Confederacy by this expedition, I am unable to state; but you will get the particulars of our operations before this reaches its destination, therefore I will not attempt to give them.
I think I stated in my last that our regiment had received marching orders. We broke camp the following day, the 13th instant, and marched a few miles to the right, near the Jerusalem plank road, where the fifth corps was being massed for the march into rebeldom. Wednesday morning, at an early hour, we started on our journey, together with the entire fifth corps and one division of the second corps, headed by a division of cavalry, under command of the gallant Gregg. The weather was rather unfavorable, a drizzling rain setting in shortly after we had got well underway. But we were all in good spirits and paid little attention to the rain.
I should like to give you a detailed account of the part we took in the raid, but I have not sufficient leisure, therefore hope you will excuse my brief allusions.
Thursday evening we reached the railroad, the cavalry in the advance, meeting with but slight resistance, and immediately set to work destroying it. It may be interesting to some to know how we accomplished the work. We were deployed along the railroad, stacked arms, and told that we were wanted to destroy the road. In less time than it takes me to write it the rails and ties along our entire front were lifted from their places and turned completely over. We next set to work and detached the rails from the ties, placing the ties in piles about three feet high, and laying the rails on top of them, with a heavy weight of some kind resting on both ends of the rails. A fire was then kindled under the ties, and in a very short time they were consumed and the rails nearly bent double. The boys worked with a will, and it was really surprising to see with what rapidity and how effectually the road was destroyed.
Saturday morning we started on our return. It had rained all the previous night and as fast as the rain fell it froze covering everything out-doors with a coating of ice half an inch thick. The roads were soon in a bad condition but it could'nt [sic] be helped, so homeward we trudged. We made some 22 or 23 miles that day, and were considerably fatigued when we bivouacked for the night near Sussex Court House. We continued the march next morning, and arrived where we are now located yesterday afternoon.
There are some ten or fifteen of our men that we cannot account for—they having been unable to keep up with the regiment on the march. I am fearful that some of them have fallen into the hands of the enemy, T. L. Carley, of company K, and Alec Goff were among those unable to keep up with the regiment on its march outward. I learn that they fell into the hands of guerrillas, were stripped of everything on their persons, with the exception of shirt and trousere, and left in a building on the road, with orders to remain there, until they were called for. As soon as the rascally guerrillas were out of sight Carley and Goff left the house and made off in the direction of our lines and succeeded in reaching them without further trouble. Carley had the misfortune to be kicked by a horse early in the day we started on the expedition, and Goff had not entirely recovered from an attack of fever, which accounted for their not being able to keep up with the regiment. I understand they are now in hospital at City Point.
I was not a little surprised at finding such fine country in Virginia as we passed through on our march. In fact, along the Jerusalem road it is beautiful—and the houses and outbuildings would compare with those of our northern country. They had the appearance of having been occupied by wealthy planter. We also passed several cotton fields, which were subjects of considerable interest to some of the boys.
There were a number of our men who had straggled from their regiments, found on our return, who had been murdered by the enemy, some having been shot, and two or three, that our boys saw, appearing as though they had been beaten to death with clubs. In retaliation for this brutal slaughtering of our men, Gen. Warren ordered the destruction of everything on our lines of march.
A good part of the country through which we passed had never been visited by our armies before, in consequence of which there was an abundance of forage, and provisions almost sufficient I should think to subsist our army if necessary. Our boys improved this opportunity of supplying themselves freely with poultry, fresh pork and mutton, together with all kinds of vegetables and not a little apple-jack.
We had supposed that we would be sent back to our old quarters after our tedious march of about a hundred miles, in all, but it appears such is not to be the case. We are now stationed in a dense pine woods, about a mile from Fort Hell, and the same distance from Fort Stevenson, two of our strongest fortifications, and are awaiting further orders.
On our return yesterday, we were pained to hear that Major Leo had died a day or two previous, in hospital. The Major had been sick for more than a month with typhoid fever. He was much liked and respected by the entire regiment, and all are sorry to lose such an energetic and efficient officer.
The 122d regiment, as you have learned ere this, are situated near us, and there are a number of their boys visiting our regiment to-day. As I write, Lieut. Wilkins is approaching me, looking as hearty as ever; also Sergt. Cutliffe. and others.
There are many little incidents connected with our late raid I should like to relate, but I have not the time to do so at present, as the mail-bag is about to be carried to City Point,  Yours, &c., LEW.

Letter from the 185th Regt.
TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 1864.
In camp near the Yellow House, Va., some 4 miles from our old camp ground in front of Petersburg.
DEAR BOTHER:—I hasten to inform you that I am alive and as well as conld [sic] be expected after seven days of hard marching.
On Wednesday the 7th inst., the 185th Regiment started at daylight with the whole of the 5th corps, marching east until we struck the old Jerusalem turnpike. We marched this day some twenty miles. It rained a little during the day, but it was warm. When it came night we were all very tired you may be assured. We here had orders to make a cup of coffee and rest, for probably we should move in about two hours. While we were resting, the rain came poring down in torrents. This soaked our blankets through, and made them so heavy that when we started on the march again, about 2 o'clock, we were obliged to throw them away. It was a very dark night, and the rain made the road quite muddy, and it seemed to me the officers were trying to asertain [sic] how many miles we could march in an hour. We kept up the march until about 7 o'clock in the morning, and then our Colonel ordered us to halt, and prepare ourselves some coffee. And all of us who were so fortunate as to have any of this beverage about us, willingly obeyed this order.
We had to be very sparing of our hard-tack, as we only started with five days rations, about enough to supply a hearty man two days. After resting about an hour, we were ordered to march. We halted again at 4 o'clock, and I had the satisfaction of seeing the boys cook some turkeys and pigs, that they had gobbled up on the march. And in addition to seeing, I also had the privilege smelling these dainties.
After resting a little the 185th regiment, in connection with the 189th Pennsylvania regiment, marched down upon the Weldon Railroad, a portion of which our cavalry had destroyed that morning, (which was the object of our movement). One company of our regiment was detailed to advance as shirmishers [sic] to hold the enemy in check till the main army came up.—We were marched across where the Railroad had been run into an open field, when pickets were sent out, and we threw up a temporary breastwork, formed of rails and dirt. Our boys who advanced upon the Railroad in the morning, had not been idle in the work of destruction, as the piles of ties all  on fire, with the rails thrown across them, plainly testified. After throwing up our breastworks, we collected a quantity of fuel, cousisting [sic] of rails, fallen trees, sticks, &c, and made some large fires, which were very comfortable. I went to a house with some other boys and found some small sweet potatoes. These I roasted and with a piece of pork that Capt. Abbott gave me, made me quite a supper.
I then retired for the night upon some corn stalks that I had gathered, but I had just fell asleep when I was aroused by an officer, and informed that the main army had moved on, and that we were some two miles in the rear.—So we had to take a quick step to overtake them.
We marched down the Railroad and tore up and destroyed the track as we went. That night we encamped in the woods. The night was very cold with a strong north west wind, and being destitute of blankets we suffered much with the cold. I hardly slept a minute that night. In the morning we continued our march destroying the Railroad and Depots, and in fact about every other building on the route.
That day we destroyed about twenty miles of Railroad, and at night encamped in an open field. All night there was a sharp north wind, with hail and rain.
I never slept a wink that night, and never suffered so much a night in my life. Being nearly exhausted from long marches, and having had but little sleep for a number of nights previous, this terrible storm of wind, hail and rain was awful to bear. But it was wonderful to perceive with what courage the brave boys who compose the 185th regiment, stood up against this storm, in some respects more terrible than a storm of bullets. No one of Gen. Warren's army will ever forget that dreadful night.
The next morning we were ordered to fall back and commenced our return march. On the way back, I got out of hard-tack and had to subsist one day on pop corn.
On our return, a fortunate accident happened. One of our store wagons broke down, and the Quartermaster was obliged to give the contents to the soldiers. Some of our soldiers gave 50 cents for a hard-tack, and I would have done the same if I had got a chance.
Lieut. Doran gave me three hard-tack one day, which was a kindness I shall always remember. Capt. Abbott did all he could for the comfort of our company, as did all our officers, but they could not control the elements.
This raid has cost us a great deal of suffering, but we accomplished our object, which was to destroy the Weldon Railroad.
We are now back in camp near our old camp ground, waiting our next move upon rebeldom.
Notwithstanding our fatigueing [sic] raid, the boys are all in good spirits, and desirous to continue their labors in the good cause.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
The Late Raid on the Weldon Railroad—Incidents of the Expedition—
Conduct of Officers and Men—New Winter Quarters.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
HEADQUARTERS 185TH N. Y. V., CAMP NEAR
PARK STATION, VA., Dec. 19, 1864.
Every soldier experiences a feeling of rest that the pen cannot portray, when he gets the order to go into winter quarters. The 185th were happy in the belief that they were thus situated, when, on the 5th inst., orders came to pack up to move. With many regrets and evident sorrow on the part of many, and a considerable ripping on the part of others, the men removed their tenting from the neat and comfortable houses they had just finished, and prepared for the march.
On Wednesday morning, the 6th, we marched at daylight and continued till 3 P. M., when we reached the Nottoway River, where we halted till 3 o'clock on the morning of Thursday. Gen. Gregg's Cavalry led the advance, and cleared the way of all obstacles in the shape of "rebellious chivalry." At the last-mentioned hour we took up our line of march (it wasn't a very light one, for it rained luxuriantly,) and crossed the Nottoway on a pontoon bridge, and kept on about three miles to Sussex Court House, where we halted for breakfast. After a short repast (that word sounds home-like) of coffee, hard-tack and pork, we started, marching through Sussex Court House. There was at this point considerable skirmishing, on the part of Gen. Gregg's Cavalry, and I must say that the gallant fellows did their duty well, for we met none of the "advocates of unlimited Sate rights." Our march was continued until about 2 P. M. of Thursday, at which time we arrived within about four miles of the Weldon Railroad. Here we had supper, which was slightly improved over our last meal, by the addition of pigs, turkeys, chickens, a lean cow or two, and other et ceteras which go to make up a Southern larder. About 5:30 we received orders to fall in and march to the railroad. We marched about half a mile, when the lively skirmishing on the part of the cavalry, and the flames arising from the railroad bridge, which was fired by the same, told our commander that it was time to prepare for action, and accordingly we were halted, and in a moment every musket of the l85th had embedded in its bosom a minie ball, cal. 57. About a mile further on, and we reached the railroad, which we found already destroyed by another division, and we kept on following the line of the road till near 11 o'clock P. M., when we reached the front, at which the destruction of the track ended. Here four companies under Capt. Spore, were deployed as skirmishers, on a turnpike crossing the railroad at this place. We were withdrawn at 12, midnight, and deployed on the line of the railroad, where we lay about an hour, when we were again withdrawn and encamped near the road. At 8:80 A. M. we took up line of march following the railroad till noon. After dinner we returned to the road, and our brigade, under Gen. Warren, in person, was drawn up in line by the side of the road, and at a given signal, the whole brigade seized the track, and in five minutes a full mile of it was capsized, assisted by Gen. Warren's own hands, and accompanied by one of the most exultant yells that was ever heard. Then followed the burning and twisting process. That night we went into camp a very tired but thoroughly satisfied set of men.
On Saturday morning at daylight we started, right in front, on our return, and at 9 o'clock P. M. we had accomplished twenty-one miles, in the most inclement weather, with the mud reaching far above army shoes. On Monday noon we arrived in our present camp, having on Sunday burned Sussex Court House, and during Monday forenoon experiencing the hardest march of the campaign. The incidents of the raid were numerous and exciting.
On the march down our boys discovered at Sussex Court House, three men belonging to Gregg's cavalry, thrown into a well with their throats cut. This so incensed Gen. Warren, that on the return march, he ordered everything destroyed in the shape of property, and the hanging of three guerrillas, captured at Sussex Court House, which was done in a thorough and expeditious manner.
Regarding those to whom special praise is due for the careful performance of their duties, cannot speak too well. Col. Jenny did everything that an officer could do for the comfort and safety of his men. This the men know, and are open in their acknowledgments of the fact. His next in command, Lieut.-Col. Sniper, was everytime to be found in the right place. Too much praise cannot be accorded these officers for the excellent manner in which they handled the command. To our Commissary Sergeant, John J. Morey, the boys are under many obligations, not particularly for the promptness with which he performed his duties upon this occasion, but all the time since the regiment arrived in the field. He is a man who knows what right is, and will see it done, so far as his department is concerned. Our regimental property was under the charge of Quartermaster Gilbert, and his assistants, in the rear, and, as is unusual in such cases, everything was returned to the regiment in good order.
Captain Hawley was vigilant and faithful in the performance of his charge. He was ready upon every necessary occasion to grant, not only spiritual, but material relief to the weary and worn. He has made himself a warm place in the hearts of the men. And I wish I could relate the numerous compliments paid to Adjutant Mudge. But all who know him, know that he is capable of executing all confided to his charge. I mention others, but I refer your readers to Gen. Warren's congratulatory address for the way in which all executed their allotted duties.
We are now building new winter quarters, in which we hope to remain till settled weather in the Spring.
Wishing you a "Merry Christmas,"
I am, truly yours, T. S.M.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
Preparations to Move--Camp Rumors--Colonel Jenny Still in Command—The Quartermaster Calumniated—Volunteers Wanted.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal:
HEADQUARTERS 185TH REGIMENT, N. Y. V.,
1st Brigade, 1st Division, 5th Army Corps,
Days and weeks roll by into that “dim rest which wraps our former years," and old Winter, so stern and rugged at home, so gentle and lachrymose here, is more than half gone, and still the Army of the Potomac and I survive. We are "one and inseparable," and the A. of P. proposes that we shall remain so, regardless of my wishes in the matter. Shortly after I arrived here I became convinced in my own mind that I was conscientiously opposed to fratricidal bloodshed. I manifested this feeling by expressing it in words to the A. of P., and that ponderous though extremely docile individual, sent me back, endorsed, "respectfully returned, disapproved." Determined to free myself from so repulsive an engagement, I immediately wrote my wife, inquiring anxiously regarding her health. I received an answer in great haste, requiring my presence at home forthwith, as my wife was lying at the point of death—cause nightmare; my uncle's wife's sister's boy had the meaales [sic], and was expected to die, leaving me a legacy of 500 shares in the Gowjum Oil Company. I made application for a furlough, basing my application on the distressing information contained in my letter from home. Again was I doomed to disappointment. Col. Jenny decided that if it was nightmare alone with which my wife was afflicted, the mare could easily be killed and thus save the life my suffering woman; and as far as my distant relative's legacy was concerned, he thought I could easily dispose of it to ex-Colonel J. B. Brown, by letter. So ended my last hope of cancelling [sic] this hateful obligation. Judging from what I see here, there must be an unusually large amount of sickness North this winter.
Last Wednesday, all the men and officers in the regiment unable to march, were ordered to the hospitals, and fifteen were sent direct to City Point. This of course indicated a move. Numerous rumors were flying through the camp, the principal one to the effect that the rebels had moved a large body of troops from our front south, towards Weldon. The next morning this was contradicted, and as no orders to pack up reached us, the excitement died away.
Colonel Jenny is yet with us, and although I see that you published an item to the effect that his resignation has been tendered and accepted at Albany, he yet retains command of the regiment. I never knew before that an officer in the United States service offered his resignation at Albany. Colonel Jenny's resignation has been tendered, and is now on the way to the War Department. The reluctance with which it has been approved at the various head-quarters above, manifests, in my opinion, a desire to retain so worthy an officer. I heard an old staff-officer say recently, that "Colonel Jenny was the only Colonel in the Fifth Corps,"—a compliment worth recording. You hit straight when you said that Lieutenant-Colonel Sniper would be Colonel Jenny's successor. Should any one else be placed in command, there would be mutiny.
Lieut. Gilbert, R. Q. M., arrived here, accompanied by Commissary Sergeant Mowry, last Wednesday evening By the way, Mr. Editor, who is Mr. J. S. Woodruff, of Clay? A man by that name wrote Gen. Grant about the first of January, to the effect that Q. M. Gilbert was defrauding the men of the 185th of their rations; that the men were making great complaints, and that Lieut. Gilbert had even charged men fifty cents each for hard-tack. When at home, the Quartermaster learned that Mr. Woodruff claimed that a man named John R. Walters had written him the above statements. Yesterday Lieut. Gilbert called up Mr. Walters and interrogated him in the matter. Mr. Walters says that Mr. Woodruff is "an out and out liar," and that he will tell him so when he gets home. Walters certainly don't look like a man suffering from want of food. Further than this, I know that there is not a man in the regiment who does not have enough to live upon. There are some who will growl anyway. If they could lick liquid honey from the lips bf angels, they would mutter because it wasn't candied, so that they could swallow it in chunks. In my opinion, Mr. J. S. Woodruff is one of that class of men.
There is a growing belief that we are soon to have peace. We hear that "Commissioners" from Rebeldom have gone to Washington. We hope they will settle the thing honorably. The soldiers in the army of the Potomac are not as much interested in the prolongation of the war as are army contractors, consequently are not in for a war of extermination, and all that.
About the draft. How we do pity those men who wanted $1000 bounty and couldn't muster courage enough to enlist with the 185th. It is too bad! We need a few recruits in this regiment, and those who wish to enlist—volunteer—we would like to see this way. But don't send us any substitutes, for the sake of our good reputation. Don't send us any conscripts either. But give us a few good, patriotic volunteers,—such men as we were—saying nothing about the $1000, and, we trust they will never be ashamed of the organization in which they serve.
Yours, T. S. M.

FROM THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH.
The Regiment Under Fire—Col. Jenny Commands the Brigade—A Gallant
Charge—Handsome Compliment—Losses—Col. Jenny's Departure.
Correspondence of the Syracuse Journal.
HEADQUARTERS 185TH REGIMENT N. Y. V.,
THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 1865.
Last Saturday, as I sealed my last communication to you, orders came to be ready to move the next (Sunday) morning at six o'clock, leaving camp equipage under guard. Promptly at that hour we started, with four days' rations. Taking the line of the Weldon Railroad to near Stony Creek Station, where we turned to the West, we marched till noon, when we reached the banks of the stream called Stony Creek, a distance of six or seven miles. Here we halted long enough to construct a rough bridge for the wagons to cross upon, and then proceeded. On the opposite bank was an earthwork which had been carried by assault by the Third Division of our Corps about an hour before our arrival. Thence we marched till sundown, and finally halted, and cooked our coffee. We remained upon our arms till near midnight, when we again started retracing part of our way, and diverging in a northeast direction, and finally reaching Hatcher's Run, the scene of our "first time under fire" last October, which point we reached about four o'clock A. M. We dropped down, weary and hungry, to freeze instead of sleep till daylight, when we received orders to move. But we did not move. Before nine o'clock skirmishing commenced in our front, and was kept up at intervals till about three o'clock, when our Brigade was ordered up to relieve the Third Brigade of our Division. For about half a mile we marched through lines of stretchers and ambulances with their bloody burdens, when we reached an open field, nearly a quarter of a mile in width. Here we formed in line of battle and advanced some forty rods to where the Third Brigade were engaged, behind a rail fence. No sooner had we arrived at this spot than we were engaged, the Third Brigade falling back through our lines. About the first volley, Gen. Sickels, commanding our Brigade, was wounded, and Colonel Jenny was ordered to take command and charge the enemy, who were behind the brow of the elevation and several farm buildings which stood on the line. The gallant officer waved his sword and shouted, "Forward," and forward we went with a yell that sent dismay to the hearts of the flying Johnnies, for they left in double-quick time for the woods. How far we should have followed the flying enemy there is no telling, had not Col. Jenny and Col. Sniper thrown themselves in front of the brigade, and, by almost superhuman exertions, halted us. When the line was again formed, which was speedily done, and in a masterly manner, we advanced about forty rods further and formed in a piece of woods and threw out skirmishers. Here we remained till dark, when we were withdrawn to the crest of the hill in the rear, and remained all night on our arms. Tuesday morning we were again advanced in line of battle, but before the enemy was reached, were relieved. This we very much needed. We were ordered into a line of breastworks near Hatcher's Run, which had been thrown up during the night, and which we occupy now.
I can say nothing of the movements upon other parts of the field. I only know what our brigade did, and that after the engagement through, Gen.  Griffin, commanding the division, complimented Col. Jenny for the successful manner in which he had conducted the affair.
The casualties were not heavy. As near as I can learn now, there was but one killed, A. Tugar, of Co. A, and nine wounded. Among the latter was Capt. J. Listman, severely, in the thigh. His leg was amputated, and I have since heard that he is dead. I have not had a chance to learn the names of the other wounded. There are eight missing, among the number Major Bush, probably taken prisoner. He was ordered out to charge the picket line, and undoubtedly lost his way and fell into the hands of the enemy.
To-day we learned with many regrets that Col. Jenny no longer commands our regiment. His resignation is accepted and he leaves us to-night. There was never a better officer in command of a regiment, and not one who ever displayed more bravery on the field. A general sadness pervades the regiment at his loss, and is only lightened by the hope that he will be succeeded by Col. Sniper. Col. Jenny has won the good will of the regiment almost to a man, and he carries with him the best wishes of the men whom he has taught to be soldiers, and bravely led into their first fight. May he prosper wherever he goes.
In speaking thus of Col. Jenny, I would not have it thought that I would disparage the conduct of any officer of the regiment. Every one acted admirably. Great praise is due Col. Sniper, Maj. Bush and Adjutant Mudge, for the manner in which they, in conjunction, handled the regiment after Col. Jenny took command of the Brigade.
Chaplain Hawley was upon the field as soon the fight commenced, assisting in caring for the wounded. He has a warm place in the hearts of the men.
We understand that we are to hold the line we now occupy, and rumor says that it is to be pushed to the Southside Railroad. I cannot say, till something further transpires. T. S. M.

Letter from the 185th,—The Engagement at Hatcher's Rum[sic]—Casualties of the Regiment, &c.
NEAR HATCHER'S RUN, VA.,
February, 9 1865.
DEAR STANDARD:—The 185th regiment has been tried and found itself worthy of all that has been predicted in its favor.
Sunday, the 5th inst., we broke camp, and together with the entire Fifth Corps, started through our lines in a direction due south. The roads during the early part of the day, were in a fair condition for travel, but when they commenced to thaw out it was anything but pleasant. Nevertheless all pressed forward with good cheer, and after marching some 12 or 13 miles, I should say, were halted and bivoucked [sic] in rear of our stacks, in a large open field. Near where we were resting was a large house, in which resided a man by the name of Chaplin. During the evening, one of our men brought one of Mr. C's negroes into our camp, the negro being desirous of going with us.—This conduct of darkey was disapproved of by Mr. C, and he started to recover his property.—Finding him, he was taking him off, when one of our men again rescued him. Mr. C at this became much exasperated, and was going to have darkey, even if he got shot in the endeavor. But all in vain; contraband thought he would rather go with the Yankees, and the old man was compelled to return to his house, minus darkey, who is now with one of our officers as his servant.
About midnight, we were ordered to fall in and move to the rear, and after marching some six or eight miles were halted near where we are at present located.
There had been some considerable fighting all the afternoon of Sunday, and Monday afternoon it broke out again, the enemy trying to drive us from the position we had taken. About four o'clock we, (that is our brigade) received orders to move to the left and front a short distance, where the enemy were apparently gaining ground on us. Moving about half a mile in this direction, (the wounded coming to the rear in large numbers, all the time,) we were formed in line of battle across an open field, and ordered to charge. With cheers that you at home who have never heard them, can form no idea of, our brigade moved forward at a double quick, forward, across a line-of-battle, that still held their ground but who had been hard pressed, and whose ammunition was near exhausted; forward through a perfect hail of bullets, nothing could stop them, until the enemy's fire slackened and we knew that they were flying, and it not being expedient to move too far ahead of the rest of our line we were halted on the edge of a piece of heavy pine woods. Such cheering! I wish it was in my power to convey the slightest impression of our feelings at that particular moment. It is impossible, so I shall not try. We had lost several of our number, but the enemy had been driven, and we were holding the ground they had occupied but a few minutes before, and we felt amply repaid.
A line of skirmishers were advanced in our front; a fresh supply of ammunition distributed among the men, and we rested in quiet for a short time, when we were moved a short distance to the rear, and laid on our arms for the night.
Our brigade, composed of our 185th regiment, of New York Vols., and the 98th Pennsylvania, a two battalion regiment, had driven two entire brigades of the enemy's (Mahon's Division,) and we received the highest encomiums from all of our general officers therefore [sic].
Tuesday at daybreak, firing again commenced in our front, and we were in line and in readiness for anything in a few minutes. But it was nothing more than the enemy's skirmishers feeling our position, and quiet was soon restored. In an hour or two we were relieved by a large force of cavalry, and moved to the position we now occupy, where we will no doubt stay for a short time.
The following is a complete list of the casualties:
Killed—A. Tuger, Co. A.
Wounded—Capt. John Listman, Co. B, gun wound, thigh, amputated; J. Trainer, Co. B., flesh wound, leg; Corp. J. Whitney, Co. D. right shoulder, spent ball; M. Thomas, Co. F. S. Van Worth, Co. H, scalp, slight; Corp. E. R. Lansing, Co. I; C. Wyman, Co. K, cheek, slight; T. B. Sweet, Co. K, shoulder, severe; J. A. Whiston, Co. K, ear; David Savage, Co. D, right arm, severe.
Missing—Major R. P. Bush; J. Blowers, Co. I; M. Ryan, Co. K.
As I said, before, the conduct of our men was splendid, all that could be desired. Maj. Bush, before he was taken prisoner, had his horse shot from under him. Col. Jenny, Lt. Col. Sniper, in fact all our officers acted nobly, and are worthy of much praise.
There were many narrow escapes, one especially worthy of mention. Serg't. Maj. Smith, was struck with a musket ball and knocked down. The ball had struck his blankets, which were rolled and slung across his shoulder, just where it covered the left breast, and penetrated the roll about three inches, and lodged there.—Had it struck above or below the roll, it would have killed him instantly.
Brev. Brig. Gen. Sickle, who commanded our brigade, had a ball pass through his clothing, grazing his thigh, and was compelled to go to the rear for a short time. During his absence Col. Jenny commanded the brigade, a position he fills equally as well as that of Colonel.
You remember I told you in one of my last letters that Col. Jenny had forwarded his resignation. It has been accepted, and this morning, the Colonel took leave of the regiment. We are sorry to have him leave us; but circumstances render it absolutely necessary that it be so.—Lieut. Col. Sniper, upon whom the command of the regiment falls, is a good and efficient officer, one who has been thoroughly tried, and there is no man we would rather have in command of us, now that Col. J. has gone.
It is my opinion that we shall hold the ground we now occupy, which is but a short distance from the Danville railroad, notwithstanding the objections of the enemy, and extend our works in this direction. Indeed we have large details already at work on a couple of new forts close by.
For want of time, I have been compelled to make this account of our operations rather brief, but may give you some of the details before long. Yours, &c., LEW.

From the 185th--Capt. Listman mortally Wounded--Eight Men Killed and Eight Wounded.
MAYOR'S OFFICE,
Syracuse, Feb. 12th, 1865.
Editors of Standard:
GENTS—I have just received a letter from Col. Jenny, an extract from which I hasten to place before your readers. They will all be interested in hearing from our gallant 185th, who received the first "baptism in blood" at the late battle of Hatcher's Run; and while we all sorrow over those who have yielded up their lives, we are yet consoled by the assurance that they met death boldly and manfully, while facing the enemies of their country.
Col. Col. Jenny writes as follows: "Captain Listman was mortally wounded, Adjutant Mudge slightly by contusion. Two men were killed, eight wounded and eight missing.
Major Bush was captured or killed (unknown) by the enemy on the picket line. The regiment behaved most gallantly throughout the battle." Then follows a few words in relation to himself: "I have just received unofficial information from Washington that my resignation has been accepted. I tendered it upon the 10th of January. The announcement in the papers of its acceptance was premature."
Very respectfully, yours,
A. C. POWELL.

LETTER FROM THE 185TH REGIMENT.
APPOMATTOX C. H., Va.,
April 11th, 1865.
DEAR STANDARD:—I wrote you but a brief account of the part the 185th had taken in the turning the enemy's right flank on April 1st, in my letter dated the 2d, expecting soon to have an opportunity to give you all the particulars, but our time has been so occupind [sic] in chasing and fighting the enemy since then that the present is the first chance offered, and now I have all I can do to inform you of what we have been doing since then.
I had but just concluded my last, when we were ordered to fall in and march to the front. It so chanced that our regiment led the advance and upon being deployed as skirmishers to prevent surprise, the column moved forward toward the South-Side Railroad, In less than an hour, after passing over another line of breastworks, we struck the road, the enemy's rearguard retiring as we advanced. We were undoubtedly the first troop that had reached the road, a fact in which we feel considerable pride.
We soon reached the Cox road, and the line was halted here for a short time. We were soon again moving forward, our skirmishers opening a scattering fire on the enemy's rearguard. We had but one wounded, however, in the regiment during the day—private Edward L. Beebe, Co. K, wounded in right arm. P-We now changed direction by the right flank, and moved on a line parallel with the railroad for a few miles, when we halted for the night.
Next day and the following one nothing extraordinary occurred, when upon reaching the Richmond and Danville Railroad, near Jetersville, we were halted and immediately set to work and threw up a strong line of works, the enemy being in the immediate vicinity.
We here were rationed up for three days more. About noon of the 5th a messenger reported to Gen. Bartlette, commanding our division, that Col. Avery, with two or three companies of the 10th New York Cavalry, had captured a number of prisoners, &c, and it was feared that unless the Colonel immediately received assistance, the enemy would recapture them. In a few minutes our brigade was marching to the Colonel's help, but had gone but a mile or so, when we met him and his troops, and escorted him safely into our lines. You have doubtless heard ere this the extent of the captures made by Col. A. on that occasion.
Thursday, the 6th inst., our regiment was again the advance guard. On this day we made the largest day's march of the campaign, but at night bivouacked but four or five miles from where we started in the morning. We had been trying to develope the enemy's position, but they eluded us in a roundabout way. Our regiment had the satisfaction, however, of capturing over two hundred stragglers from the enemy's ranks during the day.
On the 7th we struck the Lynchburg and Petersburg Railroad, some eight or nine miles above Burkeville Junction, and after crossing the Appomattox river, stopped for the night at Prince Edward Court House.
But on yesterday occurred the crowning glory of the campaign—the surrender of Lee's veteran army to Gen. Grant. As early as 4 o'clock our brigade was on motion. Soon after sunrise the fight commenced, but was confined principally to skirmishing until our infantry had been placed in proper position, when the line advanced in splendid style on the enemy, who at the same time opened a brisk artillery fire on us.
We were thus advancing, when to the surprise of all, a horseman with a white flag was seen galloping towards our line, at sight of which we were halted. It proved to be a messenger from Gen. Lee, soliciting an interview with the commanding general of our forces. It was soon announced that the enemy were about to surrender, and such deafening cheering never was heard before. It so happened that the officer carrying the flag of truce run into our brigade line of battle, and was received by Gen. Chamberlain, commanding our brigade. In a few minutes firing ceased along the entire lines, and all awaited anxiously to hear the result of the conference.
At 4 o'clock it was announced that Lee had surrendered, unconditionally, the Army of Northern Virginia. It was a time never to be forgotten by those who have taken part in this eventful campaign. The rebel force that had been such an obstacle to the advance of our army ever since the inauguration of this wicked rebellion had at last surrendered to the Union forces, and with it their most able generals.
There had been much suffering in our ranks during the campaign; we had lost many brave and true men, many more had been maimed for life, but not a word of complaint had been heard among our men; we felt confident that right would eventually conquer, and bore our losses and trials with becoming fortitude. Oh, what delight was experienced by every soldier in our army, when it was known that their efforts had been crowned with success. You at home no doubt feel highly elated at the result, but none but those who have taken an active part in the struggle, those who have faced the enemy in battle can thoroughly appreciate our feelings when we had become convinced that our enemy had been compelled to succumb.
But fate had destined that the 185th should lose another of its officers before the end. Lieut. Hiram Clark, of Co. G. was struck by a shell from a gun of the enemy's and killed instantly, the shell passing through his body and afterwards taking off a foot of a member of the 198th Pennsylvania Vols. Lieut. C. was an excellent officer, a perfect gentleman, highly respected by all who knew him, not only for his soldierly qualities but his genial spirit, never dampened—and his kindness to and care for those under his immediate command. It was one of the last shells fired by the enemy that caused his untimely end. The shell, which did not explode, has been found and is now in Capt. Barber's possession, who intends to retain it.
Since the surrender of the enemy, the men of both armies have mingled freely with each other, and it is plain to be seen that the rank and file of the rebel army are greatly pleased at the result of the campaign. All agree in the belief that the war is virtually ended, and that it is useless to hold out longer.
We are now encamped in plain sight of the rebel encampment, but will stay no longer than it will take to make the necessary transfer of rolls, and all warlike implements and material. It is rumored that the Fifth Corps will then go to Lynchburg, from which we are now distant some twenty-four miles, by rail.
We have received no mail matter from home since the opening of the campaign,—and are anxiously awaiting its arrival.
Yours, &c., LEW.

Letter From the 185th.
NEAR WILSON'S STATION, VA.,
April 25th, 1865.
Surgeon W. C. Crary, of the 185th N. Y. V., was a few days ago the recipient of a splendid gold watch and chain, valued at about $250—presented him by the officers and men of the regiment. Surgeon Crary, by his studious attention to the health of the regiment, kindness in caring for its sick and wounded, as well as by his social qualities has endeared himself to every man in the command. Shortly after the breaking out of the rebellion, the Doctor, who resided in Franklin County, N. Y., raised a Company for the 98th New York Volunteers, with which he served as its Captain, some fourteen months, when he was commissioned as an Assistant Surgeon in a New York regiment. At the time he was commissioned as Surgeon of the 185th he was Medical Purveyor of the 19th Corps.
The gift was presented in behalf of the regiment by Assistant Surgeon Newcomb, with the following remarks:
"Doctor:—In behalf of the officers and men of this regiment, I present to you this beautiful gold watch—a token of their esteem and regard for you. Coming as this does from those with whom you have been intimately associated in camp, as well as from those you have so well cared for on many battle-fields, I have no doubt you will esteem it a priceless gift. I trust, sir, that those of us who remain may ere long turn to our kindred and friends, with victory perched on every banner—the end at last fully come. By accepting this, I can assure you, you will ever be held in grateful remembrance by the officers and men of the 185th Regiment."
When the Doctor had recovered from his surprise at the unexpected gift, he thanked the donors as follows:
"Language cannot express my feelings upon receiving this valuable gift. I thank you; and as long as I live I shall be proud to say it was presented to me by the 185th N. Y. S. V.,—a regiment which by gallantry has merited the glorious encomiums that have been pronounced upon it. Coming among you, as I did, an entire stranger to both officers and men, and knowing that the regiment was composed mostly of men who had never seen service, it was with no little reluctance I accepted the position. But I soon found that my fears were groundless, for you have always aided me in my endeavors to discharge my duty, and the present occasion gives me the fullest assurance that my feeble efforts have been appreciated by you."

CITY ITEMS.
Saturday Morning, June 3, 1865.
THE 185TH REGIMENT.—The gallant men of this regiment, made up of Onondaga and Cortland county men, whose deeds stand proudly in the already glorious record of the soldiers from these two counties, are to reach here some time this morning. They were the last out from among us, having served but about nine months; but in that short time have won imperishable renown for themselves and honor for the localities from whence they went. Today we shall take by the hand some of the noble fellows, whom we respect as citizens and honor as soldiers; but others of their comrades we shall miss—they have fallen glorious sacrifices in the cause of country and liberty. Let us greet the living, and remember with affection the dead. A correspondent of the New York Herald sends the following to that paper:

THE ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIFTH NEW YORK
leaves with twenty two officers and five hundred and forty-four enlisted men, having come out with nine hundred and twenty-three men, including officers. They met with heavy losses, and likewise go away with a most brilliant record. It joined the corps on the 30th of last September, in front of Petersburg, and took part in all the fights in which the corps was engaged, up to the surrender of Lee's army at Appomattox Court House. In the battle on the 29th of March, Colonel Sniper led his regiment personally in a brilliant and successful charge, carrying the regimental colors after three color bearers had been shot down. The conduct of the officers and men have been of the most satisfactory character, and they are entitled to the greatest credit. The regiment was raised in Onondaga and Cortland counties, seven companies coming from the former, and three from the latter.
The following are the names of the officers:
Colonel—Gustavus Sniper.
Lieut. Col.—Theodore M. Barber,
Major—Robert P. Bush.
First Lieut. and Adjutant—Byron Mudge.
First Lieut., Regimental Quartermaster—William Gilbert.
Surgeons—Charles Crary; Assistants, Gilbert I. Newcomb and Wm. M. Bradford.
Comapny A—Captain, S. O. Howard; Second Lieut., Hiram Wiard.
Company B—Captain, John Listman; Second Lieut., John Herron.
Company C—Captain, Wm. A. Rapp; First Lieutenant, Henry H. Kelsey; Secons Lieut. Wm. H. Hamilton.
Company D—Captain, Daniel N. Lathrop; First Lieut., Pembroke Pierce; Second Lieut., Norman W. Smith.
Company E—Captain, John T. Hostler; First Lieut, H. C. Rorapaugh.
Company F—Captain, J. W. Strowbridge; First Lieut., Andrew J. Lyman; Second Lieut., Daniel L. Baker.
Company G—Captain, Alvern H. Barber; First Lieut., F. A. Schermerhorn; Second Lieut., John J. Isaacs.
Company H—Captain, David Crysler; First Lieut., Jerome C. Gates; Second Lieut., Chas. J. Rector.
Company I—Captain, Jared T. Abbott; First Lieut, H. Wadsworth Clarke; Second Lieut., A. A. Abbott.
Company K—Captain, Abram H. Spore; First Lieut, Lewis S. Edgar; Second Lieut., Joah W. Mercer.

CITY ITEMS.
Monday Morning, June 5, 1865.
ARRIVAL HOME OF THE 185TH.—This gallant regiment broke camp near Washington, at five o'clock on Wednesday evening, marched to the Depot, and "got off" homeward-bound by eight o'clock. At Baltimore they were delayed three hours waiting transportation, and then proceeded to Harrisburg by way of the Pennsylvania Central; thence by the Williamsport road to Elmira, where they arrived at seven Friday morning; thence immediately by rail to the head of Seneca Lake, and from there by two steamers to Geneva, where they arrived between seven and eight Friday evening; at which time the men had been without food thirty hours.—But they had scarcely landed in that pleasant village, when the general inquiry seemed to be "what do the returning soldiers need?" Senator Folger, the President of the village, and Mr. H. L. Suydam being foremost in supplying their wants. By the spontaneous liberality of the citizens, in which the ladies took active part, a substantial supper of meats, fresh bread and crackers, butter, cheese, coffee &c. was furnished every officer and soldier of the regiment. Even up to eleven o'clock at night the ladies continued to arrive with fresh baked biscuit, cake, dried meats, &c., pressing them to partake. On Saturday morning another excellent meal was furnished with the same warm hearted generosity. No wonder that officers and men are warm in praise of this open-handed hospitality on the part of the citizens of Geneva; and they desire us to express their gratitude for it to one and all, and especially to Mr. Suydan who was profuse with his fresh bread and crackers, and other fixins, and who accompanied them on their way home.
Cars sufficient having reached there, the regiment left Geneva shortly after ten o'clock Saturday morning and reached here at half-past one. Being telegraphed at Camillus at one o'clock, the City Hall bell began to ring, when there was a general rush for the Depot, where large numbers were already, and when the regiment arrived the crowd numbered thousands. The train stopped above Franklin street, and such a scene one seldom sees—up went the lusty cheers—it was almost impossible for the returning soldiers to land on terra firma, and when they did they were at once packed in with the crowd of anxious relatives and friends,—wives, mothers, sisters and daughters hugging and kissing the dusty, weather-beaten soldiers, and the sterner sex grasping them by hand with a warmth which spoke as eloquently as words.—Our feeble powers are inadequate to a description of the interesting occasion, so we waive any attempt. But amidst all the gladness, we could see the tears from many a manly eye as well as from fair maidens—now in joy, and again in sorrowful recollections.
After the first congratulations were over, the regiment was formed on Franklin street, headed by Dresher's Band, and a banner bearing the
words "Hatcher's Run "—"Quaker Farm"—“Five Forks "—"Appomattox"—the national salute being fired the while, and the City Hall bell giving forth its cheerful peals. Then came the Mayor, Senator White, Ex-Mayor Munro, and a few other prominent citizens preceding the regiment, which was soon thrown around on to Water street, and as soon as the officers' horses arrived the throng moved to Hanover Square. Many of the soldiers had boquets [sic] in their muskets, and on reaching Clinton street Col. Sniper was presented with a handsome boquet [sic], tipped out with a tiny staff upon which was some twenty tiny national flags, by Mrs. R. Wood.
Arriving at Hanover Square, the regiment was drawn up in line, when Mayor Stewart introduced Hon. Andrew D. White, who in earnest and feeling manner and distinct tones greeted them with the following
ADDRESS OF WELCOME.
Soldiers of the 185th—In the name of the county of Onondaga, in the name of the city of Syracuse, in the name of all men who admire bravery and adore heroic patriotism, I do most heartily welcome you.
This is no mere matter of form, it is no vain ceremony, it is the spontaneous outburst of joyful welcome coming from the depths of the people's heart. Most earnestly they said God speed when you left us; most earnestly do they now say welcome.
For they have watched you, and felt daily more and more honored by you. They remember how at the moment when a final death struggle with secession, treason and rebellion was at hand, which all men knew must be terrible, you plunged into the sacred arena, severing the dearest and nearest ties to rescue your country.
They saw you, too, when you marched through the streets of our great commercial Metropolis, and elicited applause from all who saw the excellence of your order and the thoroughness of your discipline. They saw you also at the bloody fields of Hatcher's Run, Five Forks and Petersburg; and above all when you entered the last bitter conflict before Richmond, and with your brave comrades ended strife forever.
We know well your history. Artists have already emblazoned one scene in it; and how you upheld the American flag is known to the whole Continent. There are other scenes well worthy of painter or sculptor, but it suffices us to know that you were thought worthy and found worthy to carry out the plans of our heroic statesman-soldier Lieutenant General Grant.
There are other sons of Onondaga, also reposing after victory, for whom also I feel warranted in thanking you, those brave soldiers of ours who were aiding in the triumphal march of Sherman. I know that thanks and congratulations must be mutual between you, and we all look forward eagerly to the day, happily not now distant, when Onondaga shall give all her sons who have done battle for her, a welcome together, a welcome in some slight measure worthy of your services.
Soldiers! in the name of County and City I also congratulate you, not merely on the return to your homes, happy though that be, but I congratulate you on Treason thwarted, on Secession destroyed, on Rebellion crushed, on the Republic saved.
You know well for what you have fought.—You know that you have not risked so much in a quarrel between mere sections—or in a struggle between factions. You know that wherever you have been you have presented an idea and a principle—the idea of the perpetuity of the Republic—the principle of the Supremacy of the People.
But you and your fellow soldiers have been looked upon not merely by a county, or a State, or even a great nation,—the world has watched you. Under every sky the lover of freedom for all men has been your friend—the hater of freedom for all men your foe. Supporters of despotisms have indulged in every form of malignant prophecy. Steadily you have brought the, all to naught. But one of their foul prophecies—the child of their ill will—still remains. They say that you never again can be good, law-abiding citizens. We know well that this, like the other aspersions upon you shall be proved untrue. Men who have perilled [sic] life to save law and order during their absence, will not destroy law and order at their return.
We have not forgotten those who have fallen at your side in battle. They, too, shall be held in remembrance forever. The sacrifice shall be recorded, so that it may be read of all men.
Soldiers, in the name of the citizons [sic] of county and city—of all who now are—of all who have been—of all who shall be—I thank you. All we hold dear—all that shall ever be held most dear in this land seemed trembling in the balance. You and your fellow soldiers, under God, have saved all. Your work has not been merely of destruction; it has also been a work of construction. You have built high the towers and battlements of the Republic. Shells greater and stronger than any ever dreamed for her—so high that every aspirant for freedom in every land worships her—so high that every enemy of freedom trembles as he beholds her.
And now welcome, thrice welcome, thanks once and again. Welcome, congratulations and thanks for sacrifices nobly made—for sufferings manfully met—for blows sturdily struck—for blows steadily received—for devotion to the flag and to what the flag symbolizes—for the honor you have gained for yourselves and for all of us —for the determined grapple which forever destroyed treason and saved your country.
At its conclusion hearty cheers went up from the multitude and the soldiers, and then the regiment marched down Genesee street, around Fayette Park, back up Genesee to Salina street, down Salina street and Cortland Avenue to the old camp ground, where tents were pitched.
We regret to be obliged to say, although the day was hot, and the streets dusty, and the soldiers had had nothing to eat since morning, precaution had not been taken to furnish them the food and drink they would have so much prized,—some good fresh biscuit and butter, and ham and coffee, &c.,—but they were obliged to fall back on the rations of hard tack, salt pork, &c., dealt out in due course at 5 o'clock—and with no wood to cook these so as to make them palatable. Thus it was till some spirited individuals took down a load to them at 11 o'clock at night, (which they used yesterday morning,) and another small supply yesterday afternoon. We have reason to believe that officers and men would have regarded a preparation for their comfort in this particular with much favor—as about the best reception that could have been given them. Having been so generously cared for by strangers at Geneva, it was mortifying to be forgotten on that particular by those from whom they had a right to expect more than an oversight. The mistaken arrangement for a general reception of all our regiments on the Fourth of July, knocked all practical ideas out of the heads of the committee and their advisors. A word from the committee in the morning, would have brought out a feast for double the number of such men by the time they arrived—hundreds of men and women would have been on hand with their baskets of substantials and luxuries.
There is time to remedy this mistake in part. It will take two or three days to compare the papers and pay off the regiment; and we cannot, at least ought not do less than see that the brave men of the glorious 185th regiment are feasted. [In another place a public meeting is announced to take place this evening.]
Saturday evening many of the officers and soldiers were down town on visit to family, friends, or places of amusement; and we are not going to swear that over half of the five hundred and fifty odd bunked in camp either that or last night.
Yesterday the old camp grounds presented a pretty spectacle, with its tents on the west slope of the field; those of the 185th to the extreme west; and to the south and a little east of the officers tents, the tents of two companies of Pennsylvania Bucktails, who have been here some days; and on a line with these to the north, those of two companies of the 12th Reg. Infantry, arrived Saturday night. Visitors were allowed free latitude, and it was enjoyed to a large extent the entire day.
Maj. McLaughlin, commandant of the post, arrived on the ground in the morning and commenced the necessary comparing of papers, which, with passing over the government property, getting the pay rolls and receipts ready, and paying off will probably occupy three days. At five o'clock in the afternoon Col. Sniper had the last dress parade of the regiment. Many of the men were absent, but yet it was an occasion of no small interest, and the command appeared finely. At this parade, by order of the Colonel, Acting Adjutant Edgar read the following complimentary letter from their late commanding General:
HEAD QUARTERS 1ST DIV. 5TH A. C.
May 30, 1865.
COLONEL:
As you are about to leave the military service of the United States with your regiment, I desire to tender to you the expression of my high appreciation of your character and services while you have been under my command.
In every engagement with the enemy since your regiment has been in the service, you have acquitted yourself with distinguished honor. At Watkin's Farm March 25th, at the Quaker Road March 29th, the White Oak Road, March 31st, at Five Forks April 1st, and at Church Road crossing on the Southside April 2d, your conduct and that of your command was in the highest degree commendable. At Appomattox Court House April 9th, your regiment was in the advance line when the flag of truce came in, and you lost the last man killed in this war before the surrender of Lee's army.
You may have the proud satisfaction of knowing that you have done your duty to your regiment, to the service, and so the country.
I part with you with regret, and shall ever take pleasure in the recollection of the noble record of the 185th New York and its commander in this closing campaign.
I am, Colonel,
Your friend and Servant,
J. L. CHAMBERLAIN,
Brig. Gen'1.
Com'd'g 1st Div.,
5th A. C.
Colonel GUSTAVES SNIPER,
Com'd'g 185th N. Y. V.
After the parade, visiting with friends was again resumed, and it was a continuous stream going and coming, of men, women and children, to and from the grounds up to dark.
Personally we are indebted to most of the officers, from the good natured Colonel down, and to many of the soldiers, for a right sociable visit. It does one good to renew old and make new acquaintances among such men.

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: August 14, 2008
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/185thInf/185thInfCWN.htm

Valid HTML 4.01!

 
Home | Contact Us | Language Access