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18th Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

The 18th, Col. MYERS, (Albany) arrived in New York this morning, and will reach the city some time to-morrow—the hour is not yet definitely known.
The Eighteenth Regiment—It will Arrive This Morning.—It will be seen by the following despatch, which we received from New York last evening, that the Eighteenth Regiment had taken its departure for this city in a special train on the Hudson River Railroad. It may therefore be expected at an early hour morning:
The 18th N. Y. V., commanded by Colonel Myers, arrived this P. M. The men numbered nearly 500, of whom about 200 are original members. The majority of the recruits for shis [sic] regiment were permitted to join for the unexpired term; hence the so nearly full ranks.—The 18th has been in eleven important battles, beginning with the first Bull Run, and ending with the last Fredericksburg conflict, it being of Gen. Sedgewick's Corps. The regiment is expected to depart this evening on the Hudson River Railroad, for Albany.
Pay of the 18th Regiment.—On Saturday morning Major Richardson paid Company G, of this Regiment, Lieut. Chesnure, commanding. The other rolls are now in we understand; and the remainder of the regimeut [sic] will be paid at the Arsenal to-morrow morning, commencing at 9 o'clock.

RESIGNED.—The Rev. A. A. Farr has returned to this city, he having resigned the Chaplaincy of the 18th Regiment, on account of ill health. He endeavored to get a furlough to come home in order to recruit his health. This was refused, and the old gentleman, in order to save his life, sent in his resignation. His loss to the regiment is deeply regretted.
Jeremiah Ryan, a member of the 18th Regiment, was taken in for making a great noise in the street. Committed for further examination.

OUR FIRE DEPARTMENT.—The praise of the Department is on every lip. But for the self-sacrificing patriotism of those who compose it, the returning Regiments would have had no escort. The 25th Regiment, we are sorry to say, are not in escort trim.

THE FISHKILL AND PORT JERVIS BOYS.—The Eighteenth Regiment, to which belonged the first companies raised in Fishkill Landing and Port Jervis for two years' service, has been at Albany and mustered out of service the past week. Company G was paid on Saturday morning, and on Tuesday morning the balance of the regiment will he paid at the Arsenal, commencing at nine o'clock; and by Wednesday or Thursday at the farthest, it is probable the gallant boys will be home again and enjoying the generous reception which their friends in their respective villages have made extensive arrangements to give them.

ANOTHER NEW REGIMENT FORMING.—Six companies are under way, with a view of forming a new regiment in this city. Two companies have already been mustered in. Among the names mentioned in connection with the Colonelcy, we hear those of Franklin Townsend, Frank Chamberlain and Col. Young, formerly of the 18th Regiment.

THE FISH...
The reception of Co. C—Thursday of last week was indeed a gala day for the inhabitants of this village and vicinity. After it had been found that the intended programme of reception of the First Company of Fishkill Volunteers could not be carried out in the manner at first proposed, the Committee were at a loss what course to take. It was decided, however, on Wednesday evening, to have the reception come off the ensuing day, inasmuch as the Company could then be more easily gathered together than if the affair should be put off to a later day. It was decided that the reception should take place the next afternoon, and everybody must agree that for such short notice, it was very brilliant and successful.
Early Thursday morning, preparations were being made, and everything betokened that the people were to turn out in full force to receive the Volunteers. At three o'clock in the afternoon, the Volunteers and a large concourse of citizens met in the yard of the Reformed Dutch Church. The military and fire companies, with two brass bands and a drum corps, soon after arrived. Before the forming of the procession, the following officers of the day were elected:
President—JOHN P. DEWINT.
Vice Presidents—D. W. GITCHELL, Matteawan, CHARLES DUBOIS, Fishkill Landing, H. F. WALCOTT, Fishkill Village, and JOHN ROTHEBY, Matteawan.
Secretaries—L. S. FORMAN, Matteawan, J. W. SPAIGHT, Fishkill Landing.
The procession then formed, and moved in the following order: Newburgh Brass Band; Committee of Arrangements; Denning Guard, Capt. H. H. Hustis; Co. C, 18th Regiment, Capt. Mitchell; Drum Corps; Protection Engine Co. No, 3, Matteawan; Protection Engine Co. No. 1,
Fishkill Village; Fishkill Cornet Band; Excelsior Engine Co. No. 4, Fishkill Landing; citizens in general.
The procession having formed, passed through Fishkill Landing to Matteawan, going through the principal streets of that village, when it returned, and entered the grounds surrounding Mackin Hall, where a temporary platform had been prepared for the speakers. Addresses were made by Rev. JOSEPH KIMBALL, of the Reformed Dutch Church, of this village, and Rev. J. H. SUYDAM, of Philadelphia, who was in attendance at the General Synod, then in session at Newburgh. At the conclusion of the addresses, the companies re-formed, and passed into the Hall, where two long tables had been filled with refreshments, provided by the liberality of the citizens for the occasion. The collation was got up under the superintendence of Mr. J. E. MEMBER, who sustained his reputation as an excellent caterer for the wants of the inner man. The tables were decorated with numerous bouquets of flowers. The gallery, and the portion of the hall near the doors, were filled with ladies, who had turned out in large numbers to greet the gallant soldiers. At the conclusion of the entertainment, the companies again formed, and repaired to their respective places of rendezvous, when they were dismissed [sic], and thus ended the reception of Co. C, of the 18th Regiment New York Volunteers.
Great credit is due Mr. JAMES HIGGINS, to whose indefatigable efforts we are indebted for the fine display and excellent manner in which everything passed off.—But for his strenuous endeavors, it is doubtful if the reception had passed off with half the eclat that marked it as a grand demonstration.
Co. C left this village a little over two years ago, under command of Capt. HENRY WILTSIE, who died in Washington last spring. It returned under command of Captain MITCHELL, of Schenectady. The company has been in all the battles of the army of the Potomac, and has been engaged with t h e enemy no less than twelve times. Fortunately but few of them have either been killed or wounded. Of the seventy-eight which left this village two years ago, fifty-two were mustered out at Albany, six have been taken prisoners, six have been wounded, and but two killed.

A BOLD THIEF.—On Saturday afternoon, Daniel M. Sullivan, a member of the Eighteenth Regiment, in passing by Cook's clothing store, on Broadway snatched a coat that was hanging in front of the place and made off up the street. One of the salesmen in the store witnessed the act and pursued the thief. He was overtaken at maiden lane; but before the salesman, whose name is Schwirtz, had a chance to secure him, he was knocked down by Sullivan. A crowd collected around, and Officer Martin coming along, and ascertaining the cause arrested and took him to the station house. The coat was found in his possession. He was locked up for the night, and yesterday morning, after an examination before Justice Cole, he was committed to jail on two charges. Sullivan is looked upon as a desperate fellow.

—Doering's Cornet Band, of Troy, were sworn into the service of the United States, at Albany, Friday. They are to be attached to Col. Jackson's (18th) Regiment.

WASHINGTON.—Monday evening the Provost Guard arrested three soldiers without passes—one named Underhill, member of the 18th New York regiment, (Col. Jackson,) attempted to escape, and, being ordered to stop, was shot and fell dead instantly. As he wore his proper dress, a Zouave uniform, it is thought he intended to go home with the Zouaves.

FROM ALBANY.—Col. Wm. A. Jackson has been elected Colonel of the 18th Regiment of N. Y. Volunteers, and has resigned his position as Inspector General N. Y. S. M. The appointment of Major Patrick to the   vacancy, has already been announced. The Major enters upon the duties of his office to-morrow.

—The Surgeon General has appointed Mason F. Cogswell, M. D., Inspecting Surgeon to the Albany Depot—New York State Volunteers—in place of Dr. A. H. Hoff, who has accepted the position of Surgeon in Colonel Townsend's Regiment.

Arrival of More Two Years Men.
New York, May 15th.
The 18th N. Y. Volunteers commanded by Col. Myers arrived this P. M. The men numbered nearly 500, of whom about 200 are original members. The majority of the recruits of this regiment, were permitted to join for the unexpired term, hence the so nearly full ranks. The 18th has been in eleven important battles, beginning with the first Bull Run and ending with the last Fredericksburg conflict, it being of Gen.  Sedgewick's corps. The regiment is expected to depart this evening on the Hudson River railroad for Albany.

THE EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT.—IT WILL ARRRIVE THIS MORNING.—It will be seen by the following despatch, which we received from New York last evening, that the Eighteenth Regiment had taken its departure for this city in a special train on the Hudson River Railroad. It may therefore be expected at an early hour morning:
The 18th N. Y. V., commanded by Colonel Myers, arrived this P. M. The men numbered nearly 500, of whom about 200 are original members. The majority of the recruits for shis [sic] regiment were permitted to join for the unexpired term; hence the so nearly full ranks.—The 18th has been in eleven important battles, beginning with the first Bull Run, and ending with the last Fredericksburg conflict, it being of Gen. Sedgewick's Corps. The regiment is expected to depart this evening on the Hudson River Railroad, for Albany.

More Regiments Coming.
The 18th, Col. Myers, formerly commanded by the lamented Col. Jackson, of this city, left Washington yesterday and is expected to arrive here this morning.
The 24th will arrive here to-day, or to-morrow.
The 3d Regiment Col. Alford (Late Townsend's) was expected yesterday, but it did not arrive. It will doubtless be here to-day.
They all deserve and we hope, will receive a welcome that will gladden their hearts.

.....and Reception of the 18th, Colonel Myers.
From the Evening Journal of Saturday.
The 18th arrived this morning at 6 o'clock, and were provided with a sumptuous breakfast at the Hotels.
After breakfast, the regiment proceeded to the Arsenal, to await their formal reception. The veterans look strong and healthy, although bearing the marks of exposure and fatigue. They marched compactly and in admirable order. Being mostly an Albany Regiment, they were accompanied in their every movement, by large numbers of happy friends.
At 11 o'clock, under escort of the ever ready Fire Department, they marched through the principal streets to the Capitol, where they were (with the 28th) welcomed in a brief, but eloquent and appropriate address, by the Governor, and from thence proceeded to the Barracks.
Mayor Perry introduced His Excellency to the regiments, who addressed them substantially as follows:—
SOLDIERS OF THE 18TH AND 28TH REGIMENTS:
I welcome you to the State of New York, as I have welcomed your gallant comrades in arms who have returned to their homes within the past few days. But with this welcome are mingled emotions of sadness; for all who went forth with you, have not returned.
We mourn the noble Jackson, who was stricken down in the prime of life, and the brave Donnelly, who fell while fighting the battles of his country. Some of you have struggled for the cause of the Union along the sluggish Chickahominy, others on the banks of the Potomac, almost with in sight of the Nation's Capital, others still in the valley of the Rappahannock, and along the skirts of the Blue Mountains.
Wherever your services were required, there have you achieved renown for yourselves, done honor to the State of your residence, and conferred lasting benefits on your country. Whether you shall decide to return to the peaceful pursuits of life, or to re-enlist for the defence of your country, I shall pray Almighty God to bless and protect you, for your zeal, your valor, and your devotion to the cause of the Union.
And now, soldiers, let me give a kindly word of advice. You will soon be paid the bounty which you have earned by risking your lives for our common country, and unprincipled men will follow you to persuade from you the result of your toils. Let me beseech of you not to do yourself such injustice; but to treasure it up for the benefit of yourselves and those who are dear to you.
Once more, soldiers of the 18th and 28th, as Governor of the State of New York, and Commander of its Military, I welcome you back to its midst.
Col. Brown, on behalf of the 28th, thanked the Governor for his cordial welcome and kindly advice.
Col. Myers presented to the Governor the tattered banner of the 18th— which they had all loved and protected.
His Excellency responded, accepting it as a memento of their fidelity to the nation, stating that the Legislature had provided a place for the preservation of these relics, and for the recording of the history of her gallant volunteers while in the army of the Union.
The Eighteenth Regiment was organized in this city 800 strong, and was composed of four Albany companies, two from Schenectady, and one each from Ogdensburg, Middletown, Canandaigua and Fishkill. It was mustered into the United States service May 7, 1861, under command of the lamented Col. William A. Jackson, left Albany the 18th of June, and camped at Alexandria the 9th of July. At the first battle of Bull Run it formed a part of Miles' Division of Reserves. Col. Jackson died the 9th of November, and was succeeded by Lieut. Col. William H. Young, who served acceptably until his destroyed health compelled him to resign. He was succeeded by Col. Myers, who went out with the regiment as Major.
The regiment remained encamped near Alexandria until the advance on Manassas, in March, 1862, and was transferred with Gen. McClellan's army, to the Peninsula, forming a part of Gen. Franklin's Division. At the battle of West Point, May 7, 1862, it was assigned the duty of skirmishers and performed that duty so well as to receive special commendation from Gen. Newton, Brigade Commander. Its loss in the engagement numbered about twenty.
Its next engagement was at Gaines' Mill, where it maintained a hotly contested portion of the field for three hours, and until it was compelled to retire, which it did in good order, but not until the right and left had been driven back. The loss of the regiment in this engagement was one hundred and twenty killed, wounded and missing. It likewise took part in the skirmishes and battles of the seven days' retreat.
With the army the regiment again returned to the banks of the Potomac, and took part in the Maryland campaign. At Crampton's Pass it led a successful charge up a steep and rocky bank, driving the Rebels from their position behind a stone wall and capturing a regiment of North Carolinians, under command of Lamar. They lost here about seventy men, among whom were two valued officers, Capt. Horsefall, and Lieut. Daley (wounded). At the battle of Antietam they formed a part of the Reserve, supporting Smith's Division.
The regiment participated in both the battles of Fredericksburg. At the last one, their Brigade crossed the river on the night of the 9th inst., in a dense fog, secured the other bank, threw across the pontoons, and in five minutes, and before the Rebels had time to form, were all over. The skirmishers flanked the rifle pits, capturing one Lieutenant Colonel and several privates belonging to a Louisiana regiment, doing picket duty.
The regiment returns from the war with a glorious and honorable record. It has lost about two hundred and fifty men in action and twenty by sickness leaving its strength now between five and six hundred men.

F I E L D OFFICERS.
Colonel—George R. Myers. He succeeded Colonel Young, August 14, 1862; was Major upon the organization of the regiment.
Lieutenant Colonel—John C. McGinnis. Originally Captain Co. D.
Major—W. S. Gridley. Originally Captain Co. A.

STAFF OFFICERS.
Adjutant--E. Nott Schemerhorn. Originally Orderly Sergeant.
Quartermaster--R. S. Vedder. Originally a private.
Surgeon--N. P. Rice.
Assistant Surgeons--Drs. Mattimore and Bartholff.
Chaplain--A. A. Farr.

LINE OFFICERS.
Company A--(Schenectady)--First Lieutenant H. E. Munger commanding; Second Lieutenant, Joseph Strunk.
Company B--(Albany)--Captain, Robert Malone; First Lieutenant, W. B. Purdy; Second Lieutenant,
Company C--(Fishkill)--Captain, A. Mitchell; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, A. C. Barrett.
Company D--(Middletown)--Captain, Roswell M. Sayre; First Lieutenant, John S. King.
Company E--(Schenectady)--Captain, John Vedder; First Lieutenant, Alfred Truax.
Company F--(Albany)--Captain, M. H. Donovan; First Lieutenant, John M. Dempsey; Second Lieutenant, W. Farr.
Company G--(Canandaigua)--First Lieutenant, Alfred M. Chesmore, commanding.
Company H--(Albany)--Captain, John C. Mooney; First Lieutenant, Thomas S. Lane.
Company I--(Albany)--Captain, Thomas S. Radcliff; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, James Chalmers.
Company K--(Ogdensburgh)--Captain, F. F. Huntington; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, A. M. Grant.
When the procession reached the Female Academy, the young ladies pelted the regiment with oranges! They thus disposed of several boxes. They were, of course, vociferously cheered and Col. Myers made them a pretty speech. It was a very interesting incident.

MONUMENT TO CAPT. WILLIAM HORSEFALL.
—A beautiful Italian monument, to be placed over the remains of the late Captain William Horsefall, who fell at the battle of South Mountain, Maryland, has just been completed by our fellow townsman, William Manson, will be forwarded to Shenectady [sic] to adorn the Cemetery at that place.
The monument is made of the finest Italian marble, and is beautifully and artistically cut and engraved. The front represents a projecting shield, with three stars upon it, backed by a sword and spear, and entwined together with a wreath of evergreens.
Beneath this in projecting letters, is the following:

"Captain William Horsefall,
18th Regiment, N. Y. S. Volunteers.
Born April 7th, 1816;
Died September 14th 1862.
On the base is the following:--
"He died in the defence of his county."

On the opposite side, engraved upon the stone, is the following:--

"He fell cheering his men in the gallant and successful charge made by Gen. Slocum in the Battle of South Mountain, near Burkettsville, Frederick Co., Maryland, Sept. 14th, l862.”

The monument is surrounded with a fatigue cap, hewn from the stone, on the foot of which is a shield, with initials, in old English letters, N. Y.
It is certainly a monument choice and beautiful in design and reflects great credit upon the maker as a work of art.

Westchester Chasseurs.
The Eighteenth Westchester Chasseurs arrived here last night, and go on to-day to Baltimore. They number 300 men, and are under the command of Col. Ryder.

RECEPTION AT FISHKILL.—The first company of Fishkill volunteers, Capt, Mitchell, had a fine reception on their return at Fishkill Landing on Friday last. The military and fire companies of Matteawan and Fishkill Landing, with bands of music, formed in front of the Dutch Reformed Church, and after receiving their guests escorted them through the principal streets of the two villages to Union Hall, where a collation was served. Speeches were delivered by Rev. Joseph Kimball and Rev. J. H. Suydam.—The returning company has been in all the battles of the army of the Potomac, and has engaged the enemy twelve times.

To the Returned Soldiers of the 16th and 18th N. Y. Infantry.
HEADQUARTERS 1ST BATTALION 18TH NEW YORK
CAVALRY, LYCEUM HALL, OGDENSBURGH.
SOLDIERS—In order to receive the extra bounty offered you on enlistment, it is necessary you enlist on or before the 21st of this month, as the thirty days during which the extra bounty is paid expires on that day. A number from each regiment have already re-enlisted in my battalion. I am desirous of forming one entire company from your regiments, giving you the privilege of re-enlisting your own officers. Henry E. Davis, Jr., will be your Colonel, he has been in the field during the past two years and has won for himself and his command (the Harris Light Cavalry) a name of which the most ambitious might be proud. You can enlist with any of my recruiting officers who will grant you a furlough until July 6th enabling you to celebrate the 4th of July at home. Sub offices are open at Potsdam, Malone, Canton, Gouverneur and Watertown.
G. W. LOCKOOD,
Major 1st Battalion.

Capt. J. W. Paine will receive recruits for this organization, at the Woodruff House, Watertown, on the 20th and 21st of June. All enlisting will be equipped and sent to the field without delay.

PAY OF THE 18TH REGIMENT —Major RICHARDSON paid this morning Co. G of this Regiment, Lieut. CHESNURE commanding. Up to this morning the roll of this Company only had been delivered to the Paymaster. The other rolls are now in we understand; and the remainder of the Regiment will be paid at the Arsenal on Tuesday morning, commencing at 9 o'clock.
The reception of the Walkill Guards (Company D, Eighteenth Regiment) by the citizens of Middletown, on Wednesday evening, the 3d, was a very enthusiastic affair. The reception speech was made by C. C. McQuaid, Esq., at the conclsion [sic] of whose remarks, Lieutenant
Colonel Mcginnis returned to the ladies the now battle-stained and torn flag which they had presented the company on its departure to the seat of war, with some appropriate comments. M. D. Stiers, Esq., responded in behalf of the ladies in a complimentary speech.
The Eighteenth Regiment was organized in this city, 800 strong, and was composed of four Albany companies, two from Schenectady, and one each from Ogdensburgh, Middletown, Canandaigua and Fishkill. It was mustered into the United States service May 7, 1861, under command of the lamented Col. WILLIAM A. JACKSON, left Albany the 18th of June, and camped at Alexandria the 9th of July. At the first battle of Bull Run it formed a part of MILES' Division of Reserves. Col. JACKSON died the 9th of November, and was succeeded by Lieut. Col. WILLIAM H. YOUNG, who served acceptably until his destroyed health compelled him to resigned. He was succeeded by Col. MYERS, who went out with the Regiment as Major.
The Regiment remained encamped near Alexandria until the advance on Manassas, in March, 1862, and was transferred, with Gen. MCCLELLAN'S army, to the Peninsula, forming a part of Gen. FRANKLIN'S Division. At the battle of West Point, May 7, 1862, it was assigned the duty of skirmishers, and performed that duty so well as to receive special commendation from Gen. NEWTON, Brigade Commander. Its loss in the engagement numbered about twenty.
Its next engagement was at Gaines' Mill, where it maintained a hotly contested portion of the field for three hours, and until all its ammunition was exhausted, when it was compelled to retire, which it did in good order, but not until the right and left had been driven back. The loss of the Regiment in this engagement was one hundred and twenty killed, wounded and missing. It likewise took part in the skirmishes and battles of the seven days' retreat.
With the army, the Regiment again returned to the banks of the Potomac, and took part in the Maryland campaign. At Crampton's Pass it led a successful charge up a steep and rocky bank, driving the Rebels from their position, behind a stone wall, and capturing a regiment of North Carolinians under command of Col. LAMAR. They lost here about seventy men, among whom were two valued officers, Capt. HORSFALL, and Lieut. DALEY (wounded). At the battle of Antietam they formed a part of the Reserve, supporting SMITH'S Division.
The Regiment participated in both the battles of Fredericksburg. At the last one, their Brigade crossed the river on the night of the 9th inst., in a dense fog, secured the other bank, threw across the pontoons, and in five minutes, and before the Rebels had time to form, were all over. The skirmishers flanked the rifle pits, capturing one Lieutenant Colonel and several privates belonging to a Louisiana regiment doing picket duty.
The Regiment returns from the war with a glorious and honorable record. It has lost about two hundred and fifty men in action and twenty by sickness, leaving its strength now between five and six hundred men.

FIELD OFFICERS.
Colonel--George R. Myers. He succeeded Col. Young, August 14, 1862; was Major upon the organization of the Regiment.
Lieutenant Colonel—John C. McGinnis. Origin ally Captain Co. D.
Major—W. S. Gridley. Originally Captain Co. A.

STAFF OFFICERS.
Adjutant—E. Nott Schermerhorn. Originally Orderly Sergeant.
Quartermaster—R. S. Vedder. Originally a private.
Surgeon—N. P. Rice.
Assistant Surgeons—Drs. Mattimore and Bartholff.
Chaplain—A. A. Farr.

LINE OFFICERS.
Company A—(Schenectady)—First Lieuten- [sic] H. E. Munger commanding; Second Lieutenant, Joseph Strunk.
Company B—(Albany)—Captain, Robert Malone; First Lieutenant, W. B. Purdy; Second Lieutenant, G. N. Goodnow.
Company C—(Fishkill)—Captain, A. B. Mitchell; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, A. C. Barrett.
Company D—(Middletown)—Captain, Roswell M. Sayre; First Lieutenant, John S. King.
Company E—(Schenectady)—Captain, John Vedder; First Lieutenant, Alfred Truax.
Company F—(Albany)—Captain, M. H. Donovan; First Lieutenant, John M. Dempsey; Second Lieutenant, W. Farr.
Company G—(Canandaigua)—First Lieutenant, Alfred M. Chesmore, commanding.
Company H—(Albany)—Captain, John C. Mooney; First Lieutenant, Thomas S. Lane.
Company I—(Albany)—Captain, Thomas R. Radcliff; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, James Chalmers.
Company K—(Ogdensburgh)—Captain, F. F. Huntington; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, A. M. Grant.
When the procession reached the Female Academy, the young ladies pelted the Regiments with oranges! They thus disposed of several boxes. They were, of course, vociferously cheered, and Col. MYERS made them a pretty speech. It was a very interesting incident.

DEATH OF COLONEL JACKSON.
The telegraph brings us the painful intelligence that Colonel WILLIAM A. JACKSON of the 18th Regiment, N. Y. V., died last evening at Washington, of typhus fever, after a short illness.
A false report of his death was prevalent in this city on Sunday, but on Monday news came that there had been a favorable crisis in his disease, and that he would probably recover. The hopes of his friends were raised, however, only to be utterly crushed by the sad tidings which reached here late last night, that he had indeed gone from earth.
The deceased, thus cut off in the prime of life, was a young man of no ordinary promise. Of an exterior remarkably prepossessing, frank, gay and genial in temperament, gifted with a bright and versatile intellect, eloquent both with tongue and pen, his early loss will be deeply mourned, and long felt by his numerous friends and acquaintances in this city.
He graduated with honor at Union College, (in which institution his father has for many years filled with distinction the Chair of  Mathematics,) in the summer of 1851, and soon after came to this city to pursue the study of law. After his admission to the bar he formed a law partnership with his relative General FREDERICK TOWNSEND, now Major in the United States army, which continued, until at his country's call, he abandoned his profession, and entered upon that of arms.
Appointed by Gov. MORGAN, at the commencement of the year, Inspector General of the State, he held that office until, on being elected Colonel of the 18th Regiment of volunteers early in the summer, he resigned it. He was immediately afterwards ordered to Washington with his regiment, where he has been ever since, actively engaged, until prostrated by his last illness, in the duties of his new position. At the battle of Bull's Run, he behaved with gallantry and credit to his State, and in the final retreat brought his regiment off the field in good order.
As a soldier, though not having the advantage of experience, he nevertheless rapidly won golden opinions. By the unwearied application of a quick and vigorous mind, and constant and unremitting attention to his duties as a commander of a regiment, both in the camp and on the field, he was fast learning to master all difficulties, and had already become a useful and accomplished officer.
To have died by the sword in battle, at the moment of victory, or while gallantly striving against defeat, like CAMERON and BAKER, rather than to perish by disease, would undoubtedly have been the wish of him who has departed, as it is the hope of every true soldier. Yet, the many mourners to whom he was so dear, by whom he was so admired, whose hopes so irradiated with brilliant coloring his future—in life will feel that his was no inglorious death. A victim to that terrible disease, which, in all ages and in all climes, seems ever to hang over the camp of the soldier, he died at his post—he died acting well his part, doing his duty, and sacrificing his best of soul, of heart and of strength, to his country's cause.
Let, then, his memory be cherished, and his name be recorded in history, as another and no obscure martyr in this our great National struggle.

Arrival and Reception of the 18th, Col. Myers.
The 18th arrived this morning at 6 o'clock, and were provided with a sumptuous breakfast at the Hotels.
After Breakfast, the Regiment proceeded to the Arsenal, to await their formal reception. The veterans look strong and healthy, although bearing the marks of exposure and fatigue. They marched compactly and in admirable order. Being mostly an Albany Regiment, they were accompanied, in their every movement, by large numbers of happy friends.
At 11 o'clock, under escort of the ever ready Fire Department, they marched through the principal streets to the Capitol, where they were (with the 28th) welcomed in a brief, but eloquent and appropriate address by the Governor, and from thence proceeded to the Barracks.
Mayor PERRY introduced His Excellency to the Regiments, who addressed them substantially as follows:—
SOLDIERS OF THE 18TH AND 28TH REGIMENTS: I welcome you to the State of New York, as I have welcomed your gallant comrades in arms who have returned to their homes within the past few days. But with this welcome are mingled emotions of sadness; for all who went forth with you have not returned.
We mourn the noble JACKSON, who was stricken down in the prime of life, and the brave DONNELLY, who fell while fighting the battles of his country. Some of you have struggled for the cause of the Union along the sluggish Chickahominy, others on the banks of the Potomac, almost within sight of the Nation's Capital, others still in the valley of the Rappahannock, and along the skirts of the Blue Mountains.
Wherever your services were required, there have you achieved renown for yourselves, done honor to the State of your residence, and conferred lasting benefits on your country. Whether you shall decide to return to the peaceful pursuits of life, or to reenlist for the defence of your country, I shall pray Almighty God to bless and protect you, for your zeal, your valor, and your devotion to the cause of the Union.
And now, soldiers, let me give you a kindly word of advice. You will soon be paid the bounty which you have earned by risking your lives for our common country, and unprincipled men will follow you to persuade from you the result of your toils. Let me beseech of you not to do yourself such injustice; but to treasure it up for the benefit of yourselves and those who are dear to you.
Once more, soldiers of the 18th and 28th, as Governor of the State of New York, and Commander of its Military, I welcome you back to its midst.
Col. BROWN, on behalf of the 28th, thanked the Governor for his cordial welcome and kindly advice.
Col. MYERS presented to the Governor the tattered banner of the 18th—which they had all loved and protected.
His Excellency responded, accepting it as a memento of their fidelity to the Nation, stating that the Legislature had provided a place for the preservation of these relics, and for the recording of the history of her gallant volunteers while in the Army of the Union.

DEATH IN THE BARRACKS.--George Sterns, a member of Company H, Eighteenth Regiment, died in the barracks on Saturday, after a short illness. Previous to enlisting, deceased resided in Saugerties.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
ARRIVAL AND RECEPTION OF THE EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT.--Another gala day for the citizens of Albany was that of Saturday, which witnessed the return of the Eighteenth Regiment New York State Volunteers, under command of Colonel Myers. The regiment arrived at an early hour in the morning, and was escorted to the Delavan House, where breakfast was provided. About 8 o'clock the Regiment proceeded to the Arsenal, and stacked arms. The formal reception took place at 11 o'clock, when the Fire Department arrived at the Arsenal. The procession moved in the following order:
Platoon of Po1ice.
Brigade Band.
Chief McQuade and Assistants Fayles, Lightfoot and Campion.
Tivoli Hose Co. No. 1.
Putnam Hose Co. No. 3.
Phoenix Hose Co. No. 4.
Mountaineer Engine Co. No. 5.
Eagle Engine Co. No. 7.
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 2.
Relief Engine Co. No. 11.
Americus Engine Co. No. 13.
Common Council Committee in Carriages.
Schrieber's Cornet Band.
Eighteenth Regiment.
Drum Corps.
Twenty-Eighth Regiment, Colonel Brown.
The procession moved up Eagle to State, down State to Pearl, down Pearl to Lydius, down Lydius to Broadway, up Broadway to State, up State to Pearl, up Pearl to Van Woert, down Van Woert to Broadway, down Broadway to Columbia, up Columbia to Pearl, down Pearl to State, up State to the Capitol, where the regiments were drawn up in line, and addressed by his excellency Governor Seymour in an eloquent manner. At the conclusion of his remarks, Col. Myers presented to the Governor the banner of the Eighteenth, which had passed through many battles, and never been dishonored. His excellency accepted the flag as a memento of their fidelity to the Union, and made some well-timed remarks.
After giving nine hearty cheers, the line of march was again taken up, and the regiment escorted to the barracks.
The Fire Department—somewhat fatigued after their long march—returned to the city and was dismissed.

Arrival of the l8th Regiment in New York.
NEW YORK, April 15.
The 18th N. Y., Volunteers commanded by Col. Myres [sic]; arrived this P. M. The men numbered nearly 500, of whom about 200 are original members. The majority of the recruits of this regiment were permitted to join for the unexpired term, hence the nearly full ranks. The 18th has been in eleven important battles, beginning with the first Bull Run and ending with the last Fredericsburg [sic] conflict, it being of Gen. Sedgwick's corps.
The regiment is expected to depart this evening on the Hudson River railroad for Albany.

HOME MATTERS.
NOTICE.
Subscribers changing their place of residence on the 1st of May, will please give notice at the TIMES & COURIER Office, or to the Carrier.

Arrival and Reception of the 18th, Col. Myers.
The 18th arrives here on Saturday morning at 6 o'clock, and were provided with a sumptuous breakfast at the Hotels.
After breakfast, the regiment proceeded to the Arsenal, to await their formal reception. The veterans look strong and healthy, although bearing the marks of exposure and fatigue. They marched compactly and in admirable order. Being mostly an Albany Regiment, they were accompanied, in their every movement, by large numbers of happy friends.
At 11 o’clock, under escort of the ever ready Fire Department, they marched through the principal streets to the Capitol, where they were (with the 28th) welcomed in a brief, but eloquent and appropriate address by the Governor, as follows:
SOLDIERS OF THE 18TH AND 28TH REGIMENTS: I welcome you to the State of New York, as I have welcomed your gallant comrades in arms who have returned to their homes within the past few days. But with this welcome are mingled emotions of sadness, for all who went forth with you have not returned.
We mourn the noble Jackson, who was stricken down in the prime of life, and the brave Donnelly, who fell while fighting the battles of his country. Some of you have struggled for the cause of the Union along the sluggish Chickahominy, others on the banks of the Potomac, almost within sight of the Nation's Capitol, others still in the valley of the Rappahannock, and along the skirts of the Blue Mountains Your Where your services were required, there have you achieved renown for yourselves, done honor to the State of your residence, and conferred lasting benefits on your country. Whether you shall decide to return to the peaceful pursuits of life, or to re-enlist for the defence of your country, I shall pray Almighty God to bless and protect you, for your zeal, your valor, and your decision to the cause of the Union.
And now, soldiers, let me give you a kindly word of advice. You will soon be paid the bounty which you have earned by risking your lives for our common country, and unprincipled men will follow you to persuade from you the result of your toils. Let me beseech of you not to do yourself such injustice; but to treasure it up for the benefit of yourselves and those who are dear to you.
Once more, soldiers of the 18th and 28th, as Governor of the State of New York, and Commander of its Military, I welcome you back to its midst.
Col. Brown, on behalf of the 28th, thanked the Governor for his cordial welcome and kindly advice.
Col. Myers presented to the Governor, the tattered banner of the 18th--which they had all loved and protected.
His Excellency responded, accepting it as a memento of their fidelity to the Nation, stating that the Legislature had provided a place for the preservation of these relics, and for the recording of the history of her gallant volunteers while in the Army of the Union.
The 18th left here on the 7th of May, 1861, ... strong. It has lost about 250 men in action and 20 by sickness. They participated in the battles on the Peninsula, lost 120 at Gaines Mills, and about 70 at Crampton's Pass. They were also at Antietam, forming part of the reserve, and in both battles of Fredericksburg. Their record is glorious.

Arrival and Reception of the 18th, Colonel Myers.
From the Evening Journal of Saturday.
The 18th arrived this morning at 6 o'clock, and were provided with a sumptuous breakfast at the Hotels.
After breakfast, the, regiment proceeded to the Arsenal, to await their formal reception. The veterans look strong and healthy, although bearing the marks of exposure and fatigue. They marched compactly and in admirable order. Being mostly an Albany Regiment, they were accompanied, in their every movement, by large numbers of happy friends.
At 11 o'clock, under escort of the ever ready Fire Department, they marched through the principal streets to the Capitol, where they were (with the 28th) welcomed in a brief, but eloquent and appropriate address by the Governor, and from thence proceeded to the Barracks.
Mayor Perry introduced His Excellency to the regiments, who addressed them substantially as follows:--
SOLDIERS OF THE 18TH AND 28TH REGIMENTS: I welcome you to the State of New York, as I have welcomed your gallant comrades in arms who have returned to their homes within the past few days. But with this welcome are mingled emotions of sadness; for all who went forth with you have not returned.
We mourn the noble Jackson, who was stricken down in the prime of life, and the brave Donnelly, who fell while fighting the battles of his country. Some of you have struggled for the cause of the Union along the sluggish Chickahominy, others on the banks of the Potomac, almost within sight of the Nation's Capital, others still in the valley of the Rappahannock, and along the skirts of the Blue Mountains.
Wherever your services were required, there have you achieved renown for yourselves, done honor to the State of your residence, and conferred lasting benefits on your country. Whether you shall decide to return to the peaceful pursuits of life, or to re-enlist for the defence of your country, I shall pray
Almighty God to bless and protect, you, for your zeal, your valor, and your devotion to the cause of the Union.
And now, soldiers, let me give a kindly word of advice. You will soon be paid the bounty which you have earned by risking your lives for our common country, and unprincipled men will follow you to persuade from you the result of your toils. Let me beseech of you not to do yourself such injustice; but to treasure it up for the benefit of yourselves and those who are dear to you.
Once more, soldiers of the 18th and 28th, as Governor of the State of New York, and Commander of its Military, I welcome you back to its midst.
Col. Brown, on behalf of the 28th, thanked the Governor for his cordial welcome and kindly advice.
Col. Myers presented to the Governor the tattered banner of the 18th--which they had all loved and protected.
His Excellency responded, accepting it as a memento of their fidelity to the nation, stating that the Legislature had provided a place for the preservation of these relics and for the recording of the history of her gallant volunteers while in the army of the Union.
The Eighteenth Regiment was organized in this city 800 strong, and was composed of four Albany companies, two from Schenectady, and one each from Ogdensburg, Middletown, Canadaigua and Fishkill. It was mustered into the United States service May 7, 1861, under command of the lamented Col. William A. Jackson, left Albany the 18th of June and camped at Alexandria the 9th of July. At the first battle of Bull Run it formed a part of Miles' Division of Reserves. Col. Jackson died the 9th of November, and was succeeded by Lieut. Col. William H. Young, who served acceptably until his destroyed health compelled him to resign. He was succeeded by Col. Myers, who went out with the regiment as Major.
The regiment remained encamped near Alexandria until the advances on Manassas, in March, 1862, and was transferred, with Gen. McClellan's army, to the Peninsula, forming a part of Gen. Franklin's Division. At the battle of West Point, May 7, 1862, it was assigned the duty of skirmishers, and performed that duty so well as to receive special commendation from Gen. Newton, Brigade Commander. Its loss in the engagement numbered about twenty.
Its next engagement was at Gaines' Mill, where it maintained a hotly contested portion of the field for three hours, and until it was compelled to retire, which it did in good order, but not until the right and left had been driven back. The loss of the regiment in this engagement was one hundred and twenty killed, wounded and missing. It likewise took part in the skirmishes and battles of the seven days' retreat.
With the army the regiment again returned to the banks of the Potomac, and took part in the Maryland campaign. At Crampton's Pass it led a successful charge up a steep and rocky bank, driving the Rebels from their position behind a stone wall, and capturing a regiment of North Carolinians, under command of Lamar. They lost here about seventy men, among whom were two valued officers, Capt. Horsefall, and Lieut. Daley (wounded). At the battle of Antietam they formed a part of the Reserve, supporting Smith's Division.
The regiment participated in both the battles of Fredericksburg. At the last one, their Brigade crossed the river on the night of the 9th inst., in a dense fog, secured the other bank, threw across the pontoons, and in five minutes, and before the Rebels had time to form, were all over. The skirmishers flanked the rifle pits, capturing one Lieutenant Colonel and several privates belonging to a Louisiana regiment, doing picket duty.
The regiment returns from the war with a glorious and honorable record. It has lost about two hundred and fifty men in action and twenty by sickness, leaving its strength now between five and six hundred men.

FIELD OFFICERS.
Colonel—George R. Myers. He succeeded Colonel Young, August 14, 1862; was Major upon the organization of the regiment.
Lieutenant Colonel—John C. McGinnis. Originally Captain Co. D.
Major—W. S.Gridley. Originally Captain Co. A.

STAFF OFFICERS.
Adjutant—E. Nott Schemerhorn. Originally Orderly Sergeant.
Quartermaster—R. S. Vedder. Originally a private.
Surgeon—N. P. Rice.
Assistant Surgeons—Drs. Mattimore and Bartholff.
Chaplain—A. A. Farr.

LINE OFFICERS.
Company A—(Schenectady)—First Lieutenant H. E. Munger commanding; Second Lieutenant, Joseph Strunk.
Company B—(Albany)—Captain, Robert Malone; First Lieutenant, W. B. Purdy; Second Lieutenant,
Company C—(Fishkill)—Captain, A. B. Mitchell; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, A. C. Barrett.
Company D—(Middletown)—Captain, Roswell M. Sayre; First Lieutenant, John S. King.
Company E—(Schenectady)—Captain, John Vedder; First Lieutenant, Alfred Truax.
Company F—(Albany)—Captain, M. H. Donovan; First Lieutenant, John M. Dempsey; Second Lieutenant, W. Farr.
Company G—(Canandaigua)—First Lieutenant, Alfred M. Chesmore, commanding.
Company H—(Albany)—Captain, John C. Mooney; First Lieutenant, Thomas S. Lane.
Compuny I—(Albany)—Captain, Thomas S. Radcliff; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, James Chalmers.
Company K—(Ogdensburgh)—Captain, F. F. Huntington; First Lieutenant, vacancy; Second Lieutenant, A. M. Grant.
When the procession reached the Female Academy, the young ladies pelted the Regiment with oranges! They thus disposed of several boxes. They were, of course, vociferously cheered, and Col. Myers made them a pretty speech. It was a very interesting incident.

THE EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT.—The 18th Regiment, formerly commanded by the lamented Col. Wm. A. Jackson, now under command of Colonel Myers, is expected to arrive here to-day. This regiment is composed principally of Albanians, and should receive an enthusiastic welcome. It has been in many battles, and returns with diminished ranks and a record brilliant with heroic deeds. The Firemen will not fail to give them an old fashioned greeting.
P. S.—The 18th arrived at New York yesterday afternoon, under command of Col. Myers. The Regiment numbers about 500 men, of whom about 200 are original members. The majority of the recruits of this Regiment were permitted to join for the unexpired term, hence the nearly full ranks. The Regiment has been in eleven battles, beginning with the first Bull Run, and ending with the last Fredericksburg conflict, being engaged with Sedgwick's Corps. The Regiment was to leave New York last evening for this city, via Hudson River Railroad, and is expected here at an early hour this morning. We presume the reception will take place at 10 o'clock, or about that time.

RETURNING REGIMENTS—WHAT SHOULD BE DONE.—In a few days the old Third and Eighteenth regiments, which were recruited in this city, will be on their march home after an absence of two years. They return with decimated ranks, and many noble spirits missing. Now we desire to ask are those warriors to be permitted to reach this city, without meeting with an enthusiastic reception. We dare say no. Let us turn out en masse and give them a hearty welcome—let us show them that we appreciate their valor and patriotism. They have done duty nobly, and therefore should meet with due respect from our citizens. Let the bells of the city be rung, and the places of public business closed, so that every man, woman and child in the city may participate in the reception. Let the 25th Regiment turn out in force, and let the Fire Department join in the escort. There is no time to be lost. The Common Council Committee, no doubt, is actively engaged in perfecting the arrangements, and for that reason we throw out these suggestions, trusting that they may be acted upon.
By reference to an advertisement in another column, it will be seen that it is proposed to raise a battalion of cavalry to be attached to the 18th N. Y. V., for service in the State of Texas. The battalion will be known as the Jefferson County Battalion, and is to be commanded by officers who have been in service, who are experienced and capable. This movement presents a rare opportunity for those who desire to serve their country, to enlist. Recruiting offices, we are advised, will at once be opened in this and adjoining counties for the immediate filling up of the Jefferson County Battalion.
Texas will be a fine field for military operations. "When this cruel war is over," that State will be largely settled by the men who go thither to vindicate the honor of the "old flag," and to re-establish the authority of the Union. Young men who go out in this organization will have a good opportunity to explore one of the finest regions in the world, and select the most favored localities for future homes.
We understand that Capt. Mott, a distinguished soldier of the regular army, is raising a brigade for service in Texas, and that the regiment to which the Jefferson County Battalion is to be attached will be the 2d regiment in this brigade. This service will undoubtedly be a sort of frontier service, and just the service in which enterprising and brave soldiers can win laurels and distinction. Success to the Jefferson County Battalion!

PAY OF THE 18TH REGIMENT —Major RICHARDSON paid this morning Co. G of this Regiment. Lieut. CHESNURE commanding. Up to this morning the roll of this Company only had been delivered to the Paymaster. The other rolls are now in we understand; and the remainder of the Regiment will be paid at the Arsenal on Tuesday morning, commencing at ....

FROM ONE OF THE EIGHTEENTH.
ALEXANDRIA, AUGUST 27TH.
My Dear Parents—You see by the heading of this we are again back to the old town. We have had hard times since we started from Harrison's Landing to Newport News—a distance of eighty miles, which we accomplished in eight days. Six were used in getting over that distance, and two days the Chesapeake Bay and coming up the Potomac. This is Sunday. We have just marched through the town above named, and pitched tents, and are having a little rest.
I can't tell you the distressing sights to be witnessed on a long march under a burning sun. Our distresses mostly arise from want of water, blistered feet and other casualties. Our poor beasts—team horses and mules—drop by hundreds, drawing heavy artillery wagons. They are mostly splendid animals, but when they drop are doomed to be shot. I felt a solemn feeling creep over me this morning, while looking around, aware how many brave fellows that went out with us in anticipation of victory or returning conquerors, are now laying in their lonely swamp graves on the Chickahominy and Harrison's Landing. Many of the citizens of Alexandria, who knew us from our long encampment, grasped us by the hand and expressed all the joy that old acquaintances could have done, but looked for many in vain. The days are yet exceedingly hot. Nights we have cold dews. 'Tis wonderful how it is endured;—nothing to cover us up. Thus when marching, we throw ourselves down on the ground and snore away to dream of home and loved ones, or of sitting at the domestic board feasting on some imagined dainty, and waking at early dawn, cold and shivering, to find it's all a vision! Such is the romantic happiness of a soldier's life.
The new regiments are rapidly arriving. In a few days you will hear of our starting on our long and, may be, fearful fall and winter campaign. Our best new troops will be left to guard Washington, but no such lack for us. We are termed "veterans," and have indeed performed veteran labors, and are pretty well used to facing cannister [sic] and grape. Could you have any idea of the battle-field, you would not wonder at the trepidation that stole over me when first entering the field; trembling in my boots, and jaw bones working one hundred chatterings per minute. But not so now. We walk up to the scene of slaughter with a determined, steady tramp and serious pace, knowing there is no backing out.
A. C. BULLENT.

ARRIVAL OF THE EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT.
The Eighteenth Regiment New York State Volunteers arrived at Jersey City, on the steamer McDonald and ten barges, at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. A large number of citizens had assembled to see them, and as the boat hove in sight, literally fluttering with varying combinations of the red white and blue, they gave enthusiastic and repeated cheers.
This regiment is composed of 780 men, uniformed with light blue pants and jackets of dark blue flannel. They have the smoothbore musket, made at Springfield, and expect to change them for Enfield rifles on arriving at Washington.
The following are the officers of this regiment:
Colonel, W. A. Jackson; Lieutenant-Colonel, W. H. Young; Major, G. R. Myers; Adjutant, J. M. Russell; Surgeon, W. Van Ingan; Assistant Surgeon, ____ Edmondson; Quartermaster, ____ Horsball [sic]; Chaplain, J. Farr.
Company A, Captain Gridley; Company B, Captain Dunivan; Company C, Captain Wiltse; Company D, Captain McGuinness; Company E, Captain Fruex; Company F, Captain Dunavan; Company G, Captain Roach; Company H, Captain Hastings; Company I, Captain Radcliffe; Company K, Captain Bartlett.
The regiment has eight horses for the officers, camp-equipage, and several days' rations.
They left on the cars at 3 o'clock, intending to join General McDowell's division near Alexandria. (World, June 20, 1861)

The Eighteenth Regiment.
See advertisement of recruits wanted for the Eighteenth Regiment. It is one of the best in the service. Those who to enlist in it will have all the benefit of the experience of the regiment.

Promoted.
The many friends of Lieut.-Col. G. R. Myers, will be pleased to hear of his promotion to the Colonelcy of the Eighteenth regiment. His conduct in the late battles is highly spoken of, and letters say the manner in which he handled his regiment won praise from all.

THE REMAINS OF COLONEL WM. A. JACKSON.
Albany, Nov. 13, 1861.
The remains of Colonel Wm. A. Jackson arrived here at noon, and wrote received by the Zouave company, Captain Cuyler Van Vochten, and conveyed to the Capitol, where they lay in state. Formal funeral ceremonies will take place at three o'clock.
The funeral ceremonies of the lamented Colonel Jackson to-day were grand and impressive. The Twenty-fifth regiment of State Militia, Colonel Brien, and the Zouaves, of which the deceased, was formerly Captain, were in the procession. The remains were followed by Governor Morgan and Staff, and all the State officers.

DR. EDMONSTON, who went out as Assistant Surgeon with the 18th, but who is now Brigade Surgeon in Gen. FOSTER'S army, is in the city for a few days. Dr. E. has seen a great deal of hard service, on the Peninsula, at Antietam, South Mountain, Newbern, Kinston, &c., and has, in every position proved himself equally efficient and humane. He returns to Newbern or Port Royal in a few days, to be on hand ... the capture of Charleston, Wilmington and Savannah, ... that good fortune is in reserve for our armies.

DEATH OF A HERO.—Christopher G. Burn, late; a member of the 18th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., died in this city yesterday morning, of consumption, in the 24th year of his age. When the first call was made for volunteers from this city he, with a brother, united themselves with the 18th Regiment, then under command of the lamented Col. Wm. Jackson. He was in the first battle of Bull Run, and in all the battles up to the last battle of Fredericksburg, fourteen in number, escaping the perils of every engagement without receiving a scratch, although meeting with many hair breadth escapes. While in the service he was prostrated with typhoid fever, which so impaired his constitution as to induce consumption, which terminated his earthly existence. At the time he entered the service he was a member of Mountaineer Engine Co. No. 5, and Co. F, 10th Regiment. His funeral will take place at 3 o'clock to-morrow afternoon from Grace Church.
It is proper we should state that three brothers of the deceased were in service with the 10th Regiment, in Louisiana. We doubt whether it can be said of many families that five sons were in the service at the same time, and that all escaped the dangers of campaigning ...d the battle-field.

THE 18th REGIMENT IN THE LATE BATTLE.—A correspondent writes as follows, concerning the part taken by the gallant 18th in the late battle:
The 18th was in the terrific battle of yesterday, and came out covered with glory. Their gallant conduct whilst charging the all but impregnable position of the enemy, won for them the highest compliments. Friend and foe united in praising their gallantry. Old Albany may well be proud of the 18th, for no troops in the world ever acquitted themselves better than did her crack little regiment—not a man or officer faltered red. Our loss is 10 killed, 44 wounded and 3 missing. Yours, in haste, ALEX.
(Sept. 1862)

Our Boys.
Gen. McCLELLAN in his dispatch announcing the victory at Hagerstown, says that Gen. FRANKLIN was engaged on the left and was evidently driving the enemy. Our Sixteenth regiment and the boys of the Eighteenth are in FRANKLIN'S division, and of course will give a good account of themselves, as they always have. We know there are thousands of anxious hearts waiting to know the fate of friends and shall publish all the particulars we can get, at the earliest moment.

CHARGED WITH DESERTION—A NOBLE MOTHER.--Nathaniel Smith, charged with being a deserter from the Eighteenth Regiment, was arrested in Castleton, in this county, and brought to Albany a few days ago. He was placed in the hands of the Veteran Guard, until a hearing could be had. His mother, on learning that he had deserted from the old flag, burst into tears and said: "I have sacrificed four sons to my country—two minors; I have buried my husband and children; but I never knew what trouble and grief was before. To have one brought back as a deserter is more than I can stand. I do not blame the officers for doing their duty, but I do you for deserting. Go, my son; you are bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh. I would rather have seen you brought home a corpse than to find you alive branded as a deserter. But go, my son; do your duty as a man and a soldier, remembering that your mother's prayers are with you, and do not come home again until you can come as a man who has nothing to fear."

CASUALTIES TO ALBANIANS.—We learn from H. J. Hastings, Esq., who has just returned from the seat of war, that several Albanians were killed and wounded in the late Sanguinary battle before Richmond.
EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT.
Adjutant Russell, wounded; Captain Theodore Rogers, killed; Lieut. Horatio G. Goodno, mortally wounded; Sargeants [sic] Calder and Wiseman, Michael Looney, ____ Mullen, of this city, and Henry Stalker, of New Scotland, of Capt. Hastings' Company, are wounded, and privates Isaac Hall and Theodore Langdon are among the missing.

NARROW ESCAPE FROM DROWNING.—Louis Leach, a member of Co. I, 18th Regiment, narrowly escaped drowning in the Basin on Saturday night. He was returning from a visit to Greenbush about 11 o'clock, and when near the foot of State street broke through. He went in up to his arms, but after great exertion succeeded in drawing himself out. He remained in the water some ten minutes, and as the night was very cold, he was nearly frozen. No one heard his outcries for help, and his escape from death was a narrow one.

The 18th Regiment will be paid off at Albany this morning, and company K will probably arrive home to-night or to-morrow morning.

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