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21st Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE PARADE OF THE  21ST.—The undersigned Committee on the Parade of the 21st Regiment, respectfully report that the whole number of tickets sold for that occasion were 985, amounting in all to....................$246 25
Of these 619 were returned, amounting to.....................$129 75
Bills paid amounting to………………………..................... 9 00
 Total..................................................................................$138 75—138 75
Showing a balance of.........................................................$107 50
which has been paid over to the Ladies Aid Society for the army.
The thanks of the public are due to the proprietors of the Commercial Advertiser, Morning Express, Daily Courier and Evening Post, for generously donating their bills for advertising, and also for giving liberally of their colums [sic] in furtherance of the proposed benefits. Also to C. F. S. Thomas for donation of bill of printing. Also to the proprietors of the Driving Park for the free use of the grounds. In connection with the above the Committee are authorized to say that Colonel Fox very generously proposes to give a Battalion Drill of the 74th Regiment, shortly, for the benefit of the Ladies' Aid Society, and that any unredeemed tickets, bought for the proposed parade of the 21st, will be good on that occasion.
I. T. HATHWAY,
GEO. N. BROWN,
J. M. JOHNSON,
CHAS. J. WING,
WM. FISKE,
C. F. S. THOMAS,
May 25th, 1863. Committee.
Received May 25th, 1863, of Wm. Fiske, Esq., Treasurer, one hundred and seven 50-100 dollars, proceeds of sale of tickets for parade of the 21st Regiment.
MRS. JAS. P. WHITE,
Treasurer of the Aid Society.

THE 21ST REGIMENT—We find the following in The N. Y. Tribune of Monday:
On Saturday morning the 21st (Poughkeepsie Regiment), N. Y. S. M., arrived in this city. This regiment is made up of the best material Dutchess county can afford, and that is great praise. Lieut Worden is a Dutchess county man. Such men as Col. Wright, Lieut.-Col. Kent, Adj. Schram, Quartermaster Marshall, and others interested in starting this famous corps, know what they are about, know how to choose the men who will be a credit to the county, aye, an honor to the State and nation. We happen to know the chaplain of this regiment, the Rev. Mr. George M. McEckron, pastor of the First Reformed Dutch Church in Poughkeepsie. A few years ago, the small pox broke out in a family in Poughkeepsie. The disease appeared in the most malignant form. At this crisis Dr. McEckron visited the patients, administered medicine to them, watched by their bed-side, and never flinched for an instant. Such men make good soldiers.

SUPPER TO THE 21ST.—The Field, Staff and Line Officers of the 21st regiment, received a delightful welcome last evening from the members of Eagle House 2. An elegant collation was spread in the parlor of the carriage house, to which the officers were welcomed in an appropriate speech by Mr. H. H. Clapp, the Foreman of the Company. Col. Rogers responded with much eloquence and feeling, returning thanks in the name of the regiment for the generous compliment paid them. After three rousing cheers for Col. Rogers and Eagle Hose 2, a direct and most effective attack was made upon the multitude of good things which provokingly invited a foray. We are sorry to say that a vast jourm of punch, prepared by Pete Diehl, was so vigorously assaulted that, after a spirited resistance it was surrounded by the enemy and compelled to surrender, unconditionally. Toasts innumerably to the glorious dead and the not less glorious survivors of the 21st, were drank, and  responded to with deep feeling by Col. Rogers, Surgeon French and others. The whole affair was indeed a delightful one, and such as to convince the brave soldier guests, of the high honor and esteem in which they are held by the firemen as well as the other citizens of Buffalo.

Military.--The Poughkeepsie Eagle is informed that the 21st Regiment N. Y. S. N. G. will be drilled in field exercises in that city on the 25th inst., to perfect them in military drill. Under the management of the officers the Regiment has at present, it cannot fail to make one of the crack regiments of the state. It now numbers between 400 and 500 men, divided into ten companies, which are distributed as follows: Po'keepsie six—A, B, D, F, I, and G; Fishkill two—H and L; Hudson one—C; and Rhinecliff one—E.

PERSONAL.—Ex Captain Byron Schemerhorn, of the gallant 21st (Buffalo) N. Y. V., was in town yesterday on business. Capt. S. is sound on the Union, and says that the "worst enemy to the country's cause, are the northern traitors." The rebel foe are no source of alarm to our boys in the army. He says they are a unit for the war and confident of victory.
Lieut. Orson Pope, formerly of the 8th cavalry, arrived in town yesterday, on leave of absence, and put up at the Waverly. Lieut. Pope is Acting Quartermaster of Col. Davis' Cavalry Brigade. He enlisted as a private.

THE TWENTY-FIRST.—The work of mustering out and paying off the members of the Twenty-first regiment was almost completed last night, only the captains being left undischarged. Most of the men received pay for two months service; but some who were in hospital or otherwise absent from the regiment at last pay day, had six or eight months pay in arrears.
Capt. Sturgeon is under orders to go to Lockport, as soon as the mustering out is finished here, for the purpose of performing the same ceremony [sic] with the 28th regiment, which is expected home to-day.

THE 21ST ABROAD.—The N. Y. Commercial of Sunday, has the following complimentary notice of the 21st: "This regiment, which has done gallant service during the last two years, returned to Washington from Aquia Creek on Friday, en route for New York, their time of service having expired. This was the favorite regiment of Gen. Patrick's old brigade, and participated in some of the hardest battles of the campaign. They go home crowned with laurels, and two-thirds of them have determined to reenlist for the war."

Return of the Twenty-First.
The 21st volunteers reached Buffalo yesterday, afternoon, and were received with immense enthusiasm. There was a large show of military in the procession, including the Continentals under ex-President Fillmore. The fire department and civic societies also turned out in large force. The streets were crowded with people. After the reception the boys partook of a collation and dispersed to their various homes.

MORNING EXPRESS.
Local, Literary and Miscellaneous.
BUFFALO, TUESDAY, MAY 12, 1863.
Lines Suggested by the reception of a bit of the Flag borne by the 21st Regiment, N. Y. V.
BY MARY A. RIPLEY.
Here is a piece of the flag we gave,
When the Twenty-first regiment marched away,
And we charged the boys to be true and brave,
Nor listen to what the cravens say.

Why should it make my eyes so wet,
More than another silken shred?
No blood lies thick on its threads, and yet
I know it has fluttered above the dead.

Four of my brothers they say have been shot—
All of the soldiers are brothers to me—
Cruelly killed for the flag, but would not
Yield to the rebels the stars of the free.

No! no blood; but 'tis battle stained;
'Tis not, so bright as in that first May
After the traitors at Sumter gained,
And the North was awaking to join the fray.

Another May has gone by since then;
Hundreds are sleeping in Southern graves;
Over a handful of war-tried men,
The tattered flag in its glory waves.

Another May is coming, and they
Shall march in triumph along the street;
Let the bells peal out and the cannon play,
And a loyal welcome the soldiers greet.

Central School, March, 1863.

Welcome to the Brave.
RETURN OF THE GALLANT 21ST REGIMENT.
—A GLORIOUS RECEPTION.—Yesterday was the most memorable day in the history of our city. The remnant of the gallant band of patriots who left us amid prayers and tears, two years ago, to purchase with the heart's blood of many of them, the restoration of our glorious Union, returned to us the sun burnt brave of many a hard fought field, to receive our heartfelt blessings and thanks.
The time in which to make the preparations was so brief that tears were entertained for the success of the reception. That the event proved them to be groundless, the thousands who witnessed the magnificent and admirably conducted procession and the imposing ceremonies will unanimously agree.
At an early hour in the morning the signs of active preparation were everywhere to be seen. Banners were flung to the breeze from over two hundred mast heads and countless flag staffs, and our citizens were busily engaged in decorating their stores and residences along the proposed line of march.
A special meeting of the Common Council was called at 10 1/2 o'clock, at which the following preamble and resolutions, offered by Ald.  Dubois, were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, The 21st Regiment of N. Y. S. Volunteers, recruited mainly in this city and county, has completed its term of service, and is this day to return to be mustered out; and
Whereas, The citizens of this city have reason to be proud of the regiment; therefore,
Resolved, That this Council hereby tender its thanks to the officers and men of the regiment, for their devotion to the cause of the Union, the Constitution and the enforcement of the laws; for their brave and heroic conduct in the field; for their sacrifices in behalf of the cause of national unity and national life.
Resolved, That while deploring the absence from the ranks of those who have lost their lives in battle or have died in hospitals, we, as the representatives of the municipal government of the city, do cordially join in the joy of our citizens in the cordial welcome. to the surviving members of the regiment, emphasizing [sic] the assurance that, whether they resume their place as citizens of a State that has never faltered in the support of the government, or again take up arms to aid in suppressing the rebellion and restoring the Union "as it was," they have earned the lasting respect and esteem of all patriotic men.
Resolved, That this Council, as a token of their regard to men who have periled their lives in defense of constitutional liberty, do now adjourn, for the purpose of taking part in the public exercises which a grateful people have improvised to show, in some degree, their appreciation of gallantry in the field and uniform soldier-like deportment.
THE DECORATIONS OF THE STREETS.
It is impossible to describe the decorations of Main street in detail—they were too profuse and universal. There was hardly a front upon either side of the line of march, from Exchange to Court street, whose hard visage was not smiling with gay festoons of tri-colored drapery, flags and evergreens, or articulated its hearty welcome in emblazoned words. The scene which the whole city presented, with the innumerable and excited happiness to which a thousand tokens and manifestations contributed, by far surpassed anything which Buffalo had ever exhibited before.
Before the hour for the formation of the line of procession had arrived, the streets were filled with a vast concourse of people. The roofs of many buildings were crowded, and every window on Main street affording a point of view was occupied by ladies and children.

ORDER OF PROCESSION.
The line of procession was formed on Niagara Square as follows, and moved at half-past two o'clock, up Niagara street to Main, down Main to Swan, down
Swan to Chicago, down Chicago to Exchange, up Exchange to Main, where the right of the line rested, awaiting the arrival of the 21st.
Marshal of the city, Col. Horace G, Thomas.
Assistant Marshals, Col. W. C. Alberger, Capt. J. H. Canfield.
Miller's Band.
Union Continentals, commended by Hon. Millard Fillmore.
Buffalo Tigers, Capt. W. T. Wardwell.
A squad of the Sprague Light Cavalry on foot.
FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Chief Engineer J. B. French and Assistants John Spaulding and Jacob Kimberly.
Hook and Ladder No. 1, Walter Savitz Foreman, and 31 men.
Taylor Hose No. 1, John B. Sage Foreman—25 men.
Perkins' band of Rochester, a very fine band of 15 instruments, leading
Eagle Hose No. 2, H. H. Clapp, Foreman—38 men.
The hose carriage bore the following inscription,
OUR BAND OF PATRIOTS IS UNBROKEN.
Eagle Hose 2, it is proper to mention here, sent 8 member with the 21st, all of whom are living, and whose photographs were also displayed upon the cart in handsome gilt frames.
National Drum Corps.
Neptune Hose No. 5, W. S. Sage, Foreman—25 men.
The handsome hose cart of this company was tastily decorated with garlands of flowers.
Niagara Hose No. 7, Andrew Cable, Foreman—29 men. The cart bore the inscription:
WELCOME TO THE 21ST.
Hydraulic Engine Co. No. 9, John Breter, Foreman—48 men.
Columbia Hose CO. NO. 11, H. O. Dee, Foreman—40 men.
Steamer C. J. Wells, drawn by 4 white horses, and decorated with evergreens and flags.
Steamers Niagara, Seneca, Huron and Perry decorated with flags.
Carriages containing the Mayor, the Common Council and Reception Committee and invited guests.
American Express Company's wagon, drawn by six horses and containing Teachers of Public Schools.
Sengerbund Society—Ernst Besser, President—50 members.
Two vans, each drawn by four white horses, containing 34 young ladies of the Central School, representing the thirty-four States, and costumed in red, white and blue.
75th Regimental Band.
65th Regiment, Col. Jacob Krettner—500 men, as follows: Cavalry company, Capt. John Kann, advance guard of column; Co. B, Lieut. A. Graff; Co. F, Capt. Irlbacker; Co. D, Capt. Geyer, Co. A, Capt. Seeber, Co. E, Capt. Becher; Co. G, Lieut. K. Retel; Co. C, Capt. Candy, Co. K, Capt. Scheaffer.
74th Regimetn [sic], Col. W. A. Fox, 300 men.
Cavalry company, Lieut. Peterson.
Drum Corps.
Co. C, Capt. Wayland; Co. G, Capt. Kester; Co. A, Lieut. Nagel; Co. D, Capt. Baker; Co. F, Capt. H. Sloan.

A FINE OPPORTUNITY TO VOLUNTEER.
—G. T. COOK, late Lieutenant, 21st N. Y. V., known as the Buffalo regiment, has opened an office on Water-st opposite Nick's tobacco store. Lieut. C. is recruiting now for Wheeler's Light Battery. Its chief officer, Capt. A. M. Wheeler, Served in the 21st, and has the reputation of being a brave and capable commander. The Battery is nearly full and is composed largely of members of the 21st (PATRICK'S old Brigade.) This is an easy and pleasant branch of service. Bounty for veterans, $552; for recruits $175. A rare opportunity is here offered.

DEATH OF A GALLANT SOLDIER OF THE 21ST REGIMENT.—We publish, with pleasure, the following merited tribute to a brave drummer boy of our 21st Regiment, who, after nobly serving his country, returned home to die of disease contracted in her service. We know, from intimate acquaintance, that he was a true patriot, a good soldier and one of nature's gentlemen, and we are gratified to learn that he was interred with fitting honors in the beautiful home of the dead at Lewiston:
DIED.—In Lewiston, N. Y., on the morning of June 4th, 1863, JOHN McMILLAN, late private in the 21st Regt. N. X. V., aged 23 years.
His remains were honored with military ceremony, and followed to the grave by a large concourse of citizens, composed of the loyal and true, and Vallandighamites. How glorious the death of this young man, who, having served his country for two years, and passed through all the vicissitudes of the camp and battles, comes home with the remnant of his regiment to die among true friends. How beautiful his course—an orphan, without family or property, going forth to serve his country—a compared with many Copperheads of this section, remaining at home, cheering for Jeff Davis, wearing copperhead badges, having property, for the safety of which this young man has laid down his life. Shame on those Democrats who (as Hon. J. Ganson and Judge Clinton say have given the government hearty support) for openly wishing the soldiers would all be killed or never return. Let there be an inscription upon his grave stone that in after years will remind those Copperheads, old and young, of their disloyal conduct during this great Democratic Pro-slavery rebellion. Peace and honor to his ashes. C.

THE TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT AND THE GOVERNMENT BOUNTY.—We are surprised and sorry to learn that a considerable number of the enlisted men of the Twenty-First Regiment find themselves, upon being mustered out, refused the government bounty of one hundred dollars, which they were led, when they enlisted, to expect at the conclusion of their term of service. The Paymaster decides that he has authority to pay this bounty only to those who have served the full term of two years, and that those who have been recruited for the regiment since its organization—a large number, and some of them so soon after the organization that their service has been but a few days less than the full term—are not entitled even to a proportional part of it. Whether this decision is according to the bounty law, and therefore necessary, or not, it is manifestly a grievous wrong to the soldiers; and we do not wonder that a bitter feeling among them is the consequence. This bounty was held out to them as an inducement when they enlisted. Morally, they contracted for it, when they joined the regiment, and, morally, somebody is under obligations to pay it to them. If those who have served one year, or eighteen months, or twenty months, are not entitled to an equal bonus or bounty with those who have served two years, they are, at least, entitled to a proportion according to the length of their service.
The matter is one in which our citizens must interest themselves. If the decision of the Paymaster cannot be reversed—if the law is too positive and stubborn to permit the government to do justice to these soldiers of ours—we must do it as a community. To allow the wrong done them to go unredressed would be a disgrace to the city and county which must not be permitted.

DEATH OF LIEUTENANT MULLIGAN.—It is with deep regret that we announce the death of Lieut. Jas. S. Mulligan, formerly of Co. I, 21st Regiment, who expired this morning, at the residence of his mother in Park Place, at the age of 23 years. Lieut. Mulligan was severely wounded at the second battle of Bull Run, on the 30th of August last, having received a musket ball though the shoulder near the neck, from the effects of which he has suffered very severely ever since. He bore his sufferings, however, with patience and fortitude, until death came to his relief. Lieut. M. was a young man of whom too much could scarcely be said in praise. Honorable, high-minded, courteous and brave, he was respected by all who knew him, and his untimely death will be deeply and sincerely mourned.
The funeral will take place from the residence of his mother, No. 2 Park Place, on Friday afternoon, at two o'clock. At the request of the family, we understand, the funeral will be a private, one, without military display.

THE FUNERAL OF LIEUT. MULLIGAN.—The funeral of Lieut. James Mulligan took place yesterday afternoon at two o'clock from the residence of his mother, Park Place. The first intention of the family to conduct it without any of the accustomed military ceremonies was overcome by the desire of the comrades of the lamented young officer to pay their tribute of sincere affection to his remains. The obsequies, however, were attended with but the slightest degree of military parade. A single company—"B," Spaulding Guards—constituted the escort with the Union Cornet Band timing its slow steps with solemn dirges. The following late officers of the 21st Regiment, acted as bearers: Lt. Col. Thomas, Capt. Gardner, Capt. Clinton, Capt. Doyle, Capt. Adams, Capt. Wheeler, and Lieut. Cook. Lt.-Col. Sternberg and some other former members of Co. B, marched in the ranks.
The funeral precession moved directly up Delaware street to Forest Lawn. The services at the grave were brief, simple and affecting. At their close, a volley was fired over the dead young hero's grave, and he was left to his last sleep.

COL. ROGERS AND THE 21ST REGIMENT.—Col. Rogers calls upon his old command, the 21st, to turn out with him on the 4th, and we hope the brave boys will respond cheerfully to his call. We have yet to hear of an instance in which a soldier of the 21st has not, when mentioning his regimental commander, spoken of him in terms of admiration and respect; and in no more fitting manner can they now demonstrate the sincerity of their professions of esteem than by a prompt and cheerful compliance with his request. A platoon of the old regiment will be detailed after the formation of the procession, to proceed with the band to the residence of Col. Rogers, where they will receive the bullet-riddled banner under which they fought with him. The flag will be borne in a prominent position in the procession, and it is to be hoped that every member of the 21st who can possibly do so, will avail himself of the opportunity to march once again beneath its folds.
The members arc requested to report themselves at the armory of the Tigers, corner of Main and Eagle streets, tomorrow evening.

THE REVIEW OF THE TWENTY-FIRST.—
The Twenty-First regiment, Col. W. F. Rogers, will be reviewed at the Race Course this afternoon at 3 o'clock, by Major General Randall and staff, after which will be a battallion [sic] drill. We trust all the members of the Twenty-first will turn out on this occasion and gratify their friends with a sight of the perfection in drill which has made the regiment almost as famous as for its fighting qualities. The object is most praiseworthy—to aid the sick and wounded soldiers in the field and hospitals. Most soldiers know how effective the Ladies' Aid Society has been in mitigating suffering, and no true soldier will begrudge an afternoon for the benefit of their comrades in the field. That the review and drill will be interesting, the vast assemblage at the course this afternoon will prove.
RECEPTION OF THE 21ST REGIMENT.—The various committees appointed to make arrangements for the reception of the 21st Regiment are requested to meet at the Mayor's office at 7 1/2 o'clock this evening.
C. BECKWITH, Chairman.

WELCOME HOME--Mr. John Duggan of Castile, one of the first two years' volunteers for the war, who enlisted with the 21st regiment from Buffalo has returned after serving the full term of his enlistment. The warm greetings of his family and a numerous circle of friends and acquaintances was tendered him. CASTILE.

HEADQUARTERS 21ST REGT., N. Y. V.,
BUFFALO, May 20, 1863.
The officers and men of the 21st Regiment, N. Y. S. Vol's, are requested to meet at the Arsenal to-day at one o'clock P. M., in light marching order, for the purpose of attending an exhibition drill for the benefit of the Ladies Aid Society, to be held on the Race Course, at Cold Spring.
WM. F. ROGERS, Col.
SAM. P. GAIL, Adjutant.

THE NOBLE TWENTY-FIRST.—Both officers and men most readily return to the duties and privileges of citizenship. We congratulate the veterans on such peaceable and pleasant relations as they now enjoy. We do not forget that they have braved the foe and perilled [sic] life amid the blood and carnage of the battlefield.--Buffalo Advocate.

CHRONICLES OF THE TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT.—With what pleasure will the citizens of Buffalo learn that a complete and elaborate [sic] history of the brave Twenty-first Regiment is to be written— is being written—is even now, indeed, partly in print for public reading! We judge their satisfaction by the delight which we ourselves experienced yesterday upon having the first number of a serial publication of that history laid upon our table. It was a surprise to us and one more welcome we never had. We have often entertained the wistful thought, how pleasant and how just it would be to have such histories written—to have the heroes of this war, and more especially our own heroes, so memorialized, and their glorious deeds all embalmed in library print—but we scarcely dared to hope that the wish would be exactly realized. But here the work is begun, and now we may safely anticipate that our other regiments will find their historians as well as the twenty-first.
The "Chronicles of the Twenty-First Regiment, of N. Y. S. V.," are being prepared by a disabled soldier of the regiment, Mr. J. H. Mills, and the sample of his projected work that we have before us, testifies to his admirable competency for the undertaking. He has gone about the work like an accomplished historian. His plan is large, comprehensive, and well degested [sic], his gathering of material pains-taking and thorough, and he wields a vigorous yet graceful pen in his composition, his work as projected will make a large folio volume of over four hundred pages. It is to be published in twenty parts at twenty-five cents each .... subscribers only. It will contain portraits of ... officers of the regiment, besides other illustrations of scenes in its history, from the pencil of the author. The first number presents an excellent lithograph of Col. Wm. F. Rogers. The printing of the work by J. M. Johnson, is very neat. The city, we believe is now being canvassed for subscribers. We should be ashamed to urge our readers to patronize the work, for we feel sure that every one will be eager to obtain a copy.

CHRONICLES OF THE TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT.—We have omitted heretofore to notice the reception of the first number of the "Chronicles of the 21st Regiment N. Y. S. C.," which has recently been issued. This work is compiled by Mr. J. H. Mills, a disabled soldier of the regiment, and will, according to the announcement, embrace a full history of the "21st" from the enrolling of the first volunteer in Buffalo, April 15th, 1861, to the final mustering out on the 18th day of May, 1863. The work is most tastefully gotten up, and will, when completed, constitute a volume of which every member and friend of the noble old regiment may justly feel proud. It will be completed in twenty semi-monthly parts, each part to contain from one to eight portraits. The number before us contains a life-like lithograph of Col. Rogers, as he appeared in the field.
All communications should be addressed to J. Harrison Mills, Box 4,628, Buffalo.

CHRONICLES OF THE 21ST REGIMENT.—On Saturday was issued the first number of a serial of great local interest, entitled "Chronicles of the Twenty-First Regiment," by J. H. Mills, a well known member of that organization. The history is taken up at the time when the earliest movement was made in the city to raise troops for the government, and the number issued covers the memorable "day of glory and tears," when the regiment marched from the city. Mr. Mills is well qualified for the work he has undertaken, particularly as regards his skill with the pencil. Our readers have doubtless seen in the Art Gallery some specimens of his genius as a draughtsman, and the "Chronicles" will be illustrated in a manner which give them surpassing value. We trust the serial, which is finely gotten up typographically, will be liberally patronized by our citizens. The history of the Twenty-first will always form one of the most interesting and important chapters in the annals of the Queen City.

YESTERDAY.—We are yet to hear of a single accident yesterday, and this, when all things are considered—the crowd, the rush and the jam occasioned by the movements of thirty thousand people through the streets—is somewhat remarkable. The Chief of Police and his men seemed everywhere present, and deserve all credit for their untiring exertion?
A disturbance took place on Exchange street, near Michigan, before the arrival of the train, by the headstrong devilishness of a man in cavalry uniform, who knocked down and ran over a woman with his horse. When spoken to by some of the police, he drew his sabre on them and came near creating a serious disturbance. He is not, we understand, a member of any city company, but belongs to the army, having volunteered for the occasion. He subsequently provoked another difficulty at the Arsenal, when the police were again obliged to interfere. A warrant was to have been issued for his apprehension today.
The members of the 21st are enjoying themselves today in visiting and receiving the congratulations of their friends. They "go about the streets," but not by any means in the garb of "mourners," and are the lions of the day.
Mallary.—At the first regular meeting of Company K, 21st Regiment N. Y. N. G., held at the Village Hall in this village on Monday evening last, the following named persons were elected officers of said Company: Charles R. Owen, captain; Samuel Bowne, 1st lieutenant; DeWitt C. Smith, 2d lieutenant; James Weeks, 1st sergeant; J. H. Dingee, 2d sergeant; Anthony J. Edwards, 3d sergeant; Jarvis W. Cary, 4th sergeant; Lewis H. Ladue, 1st corporal; Nathaniel Travis, 2d corporal; Martin Roe, 3d corporal; Henry Niver, 4th corporal. We understand that the Company now numbers about forty members.

HOMEWARD BOUND.
The 21st left Washington for home on Saturday morning, and was greeted at every stopping place along the route with the greatest enthusiasm; the fame of the regiment having preceded it. The New York Commercial Advertiser says: "This was the favorite regiment of Gen. Patrick's old brigade, and participated in some of the hardest battles of the campaign. They go home crowned with laurels, and two thirds of them have determined to re-enlist for the war."
At Williamsport, on Sunday, the gallant fellows met with a most generous and considerate welcome from the fair ladies and the warm hearted .... Rogers had telegraphed to the proprietors of one of the hotels, requesting that dinner might be prepared for the officers of the regiment. The dispatch was announced in the various churches during the morning service, and the congregations at once determined to provide as ample a repast as the brief time for preparation would admit of, for the whole regiment. Being dismissed by their pastors they hastened home, and before the train arrived, assembled by hundreds at the depot, bringing with them an ample supply of viands of all kinds.
The surprise and gratification of the tired and hungry recipients of this unexpected hospitality at meeting with such a noble reception from a strange community, can be better imagined than described. After partaking of the many good things prepared for them, their gratitude found expression in stentorian cheers, for the ladies and citizens of Williamsport, which were returned with interest by their patriotic entertainers, and continued till their delighted guests were out of hearing, on their homeward way.
They reached Elmira at 6 o'clock on Sunday evening, where they were met by, the discharged members of the 21st, the Committee of Reception, and the Union Cornet Band from this city. Their reception at this point of their journey is said to have been a perfect ovation. The streets were completely blocked up with vast crowds, who rent the air with cheers, and in their eagerness to catch a glimpse of the returning heroes, crowded upon them in such numbers that it was found impassible at times to move the column.

AT HOME.
At 5 o'clock—railroad time—as the train appeared far down the tracks the vast crowd cheered lustily. The artillerists began firing, and amid the long familiar booming of cannon, and the welcome cheers of old friends, the train came to a stop, and the Veterans were once more at home. No words can convey an adequate impression of the tumult of joy that swept through the bosoms of both the welcomers and welcomed. It broke forth in shouts, from ten thousand throats, and mingled the hoarse cheers of strong men with the voices of women and children. The procession had drawn up on Exchange street, and was faced southward, awaiting the formation of the 21st, which regiment formed in the depot in a marvelously brief time, and directly the sound of martial music proclaimed to the expectant host that the veterans were in motion.
The bronzed heroes marched steadily out, and although doubt his yearning to clasp friends and loved ones to their hearts, no swearing or faltering in the regularity of the march was discernible, and as firmly as if going into battle the column moved up Exchange street, the military presenting arms, and the civil societies and people cheering tumultuously. Such wild enthusiasm was never before witnessed in Buffalo. If anything could have added to the general gratification it was the splendid appearance of the 21st, from Col. Rogers to the last man in the ranks. They looked bronzed and travel stained, yet erect and strong and stern. The old battle flag was borne proudly, and all eyes looked gratitude and pride as they turned towards its tattered and bullet torn folds. The eagle that once adorned the staff was gone—shot away at Bull Run. Many a one looked vainly for those "whose bodies lie buried in Virginian graves." Yet a feeling of joy overtopped all other emotions and it was the pride and pomp of war, as well as devout gratitude that animated all hearts.
When the 21st had reached the head of the column it halted, and the procession faced to the right and marched past the 21st, again greeting it with every evidence of welcome. The 21st then fell in .... rear and the procession took up its line of march, proceeding up Main to Court, down Court to Deleware [sic], up Delaware to Johnson Park, around the Park, up Delaware to Tupper, through Tupper to Main, down Main to Clinton, through Clinton to Washington, up Washington and down Batavia street to the Arsenal.
All along the route every available space in the street, doors, windows and yards, was crowded with people endeavoring to express, in every conceivable manner their joy at the return of the Regiment. Cheers that had a taste of tears, and silent gestures of welcome greeted the troops at every point. The eye met everywhere banners, and flags and colored festoons as the column proceeded up Main street. Probably so large a concourse of people never before assembled upon any occasion in this city, nor was there ever such enthusiasm, patriotism and gratitude offered, or more worthily bestowed than yesterday.
The most affecting scene of all—the most touching we ever witnessed, was that when, as the head of the procession turned into Johnson Place to move around the Park, Lieut. J. S. Mulligan was brought out upon the balcony of his residence to give his welcome to his old comrades, from whom he was separated after the second battle of Bull-run by severe wounds. As the long cortege passed by, greeting the gallant young soldier with silent salutes and hearty cheers, his emotion was profound, but his eyes eagerly looked for the old flag and the familiar forms of his old associates. When the 21st had passed, saluting as it went, his emotion overcame him, and his bowed head was the best evidence how the compliment had touched him.
There was no lack of incidents of a poetic and pathetic character. Many of the brave fellows received boquets of flowers from fair women, whose eyes had shed a heavenly dew upon the blossoms. No doubt the aroma of those flowers was grateful to the weary veterans. Women marched hand in hand with their restored husbands and sons, and wept with overpowering joy, as they had scarcely wept with grief when they sent them forth to battle for the Union.

THE WELCOME AT THE ARSENAL.
The admirable order which characterized the whole difficult affair, was particularly observable in the management of the proceedings at the Arsenal. Notwithstanding the presence of an immense and impatient crowd, the entire square was kept perfectly cleared by the police and a detachment of cavalry, until the arrival of the procession, and no difficulty was experienced in deploying it for the ceremonies. As the procession entered the square another salute was fired by the batteries.
The 65th and 74th Regiments were formed on the left of the square; the Fire Department on the right, the 21st moving up between in line of battle to the platform created against the north front of the Arsenal with the Independent Military Companies in the rear. The officers of the 21st then advanced from the line to the steps of the platform, when they were addressed by Acting Mayor Beckwith, as follows:
MR. BECKWITH'S SPEECH.
Welcome Colonel! Welcome Officers! Soldiers of the brave, the steady, the inflexible and now all glorious Twenty-first, the heart of a grateful people bids you welcome. The municipality of Buffalo hails your return with public thanks. A hundred thousand souls to-day exult together at your coming. The aged and the venerable amongst us approach with tearful pride to bless you. The young hasten with quickening joy to give greeting. The fair and the beautiful of the city are bearing garlands for the brave. The schools and public institutions come in bodies to make their offerings of gratitude and honor. The busy hum of industry ceases; the votaries of gain forget their worship; labor, for a season, unbends its exacting task; even august justice bars her temple to-day, to join in the universal homage due to men who have perilled [sic] their lives in the service of their country.
Soldiers, no triumphal entry of the most renowned conqueror of ancient Rome, ever equalled [sic] in moral grandeur that ovation of the heart which a grateful community renders you this day.
The remarkable exhibition of public pride and public respect which you here behold, honors you not merely as brave men, but as men brave in a noble cause; not as the obedient followers of some conquering hero, but as the self promoted heroes of nine contested fields where the fate of your country was sought to be decided; not as veterans of the battle-field alone but as men who, upon the perilous march, in the  performance of the irksome duties of the camp everywhere, upon all occasions, have covered yourselves with imperishable glory and reflected lustre .... name and character of the city of your origin. The cause in which you have been engaged is emphatically the cause of your country. When, two years ago, the tocsin tolled the alarm throughout the land that the noble fabric of constitutional liberty erected by your fathers was in danger, with an appreciative sense of the value of good and wise government you were among the first to rush to arms and to face the perils of war, not for any emolument for yourselves, but in the noble endeavor to preserve for posterity those institutions which the wisdom of your ancestors provided for you. This was noble action, this was heroic action. This is patriotism, this is genuine patriotism. In my humble judgment, to the reflecting mind, conduct like this attains unto the sublime. It is exalted conduct moving upon a principle; conduct which in all times, in every age, throughout the world, must attract the admiration and secure the approving judgment of universal mankind.
One reflection only clouds this glorious occasion. Among this vast concourse of people who surround you, stand many with mourning hearts, who vainly glance along your lines in search of familiar faces and familiar forms. Let us hope that those of your number who have fallen, whether upon the field of battle, or overcome by the enemy's chief ally,—that devouring Python which lurks in concealing cloud and vapor, amid the malarious swamps and along the deadly water courses of the South—the once friendly, now implacable South—have not died in vain. Let us trust that in the mysterious economy of an inscrutable Providence, their deaths may be consecrated to the attainment of that grand conclusion in the affair of our country, for which they braved the dangers of war, and surrendered, some of them, even in the charmed period of auspicious youth, their tenure upon life.
But soldiers you have returned not only to the reception of public honors, but to seek the communion of those near and dear to you. Even while I am addressing you, I know that hallowed voices are whispering to your hearts of home, wife, children, parents, kindred. I am admonished not to trespass by extended remarks upon the sacred demands of an hour like this.
Once more then, officers and soldiers of the noble Twenty First, in the name of the people of Buffalo, whom you have honored, I bid, you welcome. Welcome! Welcome! Welcome to the enviable reward of public respect and lasting public gratitude.
The feeling of the assemblage broke out in cheers at the conclusion of the address, and when these subsided, Col. Rogers made reply in substantially the following language, the pressure and tumult rendering it difficult to report his heart-felt words:
I have no words in which to express my gratitude for a reception so grand, so far exceeding my expectation as this. The magnitude of the demonstration has taken from me the power of speech. You have praised us for the service we have performed. We have only done our duty—a duty which every citizen owes to a government whose blessings he enjoys. When that government is in danger it is but just that those whom it has protected should go forth in its defence. Such was the position in which we placed ourselves two years ago. We have endeavored to do our duty, and now that it is ended we feel amply repaid for the toil of long marches, the hardships of the bivouac and the perils of the battle field, in the fact that at last we are at home and looking in the faces of those whom we love. It is sufficient for us that you have thus expressed, in so magnificent a manner, the joy you feel at our return, and that we are able to say to you that we have done our duty. In the name of the regiment I thank you all for this splendid reception. Three rousing cheers were again given for the Twenty-First.

THE RETURN OF THE FLAG TO THE CENTRAL SCHOOL.
The gloriously dilapidated old flag of the Twenty-First, torn, tattered, scarred and blood-stained, was now brought forward by Col. Rogers, and returned to its original donors, the young ladies of the Central School, who occupied the platform. It was gracefully received, in behalf of the school, by Miss Julia E. Paddock, who responded to the brief but eloquent speech of the Colonel as follows:
Miss Paddock performed her part in this .... ceremony with exquisite grace, and no incident of the reception was more happy in effect, She was appropriately attired to represent the Goddess of Liberty, and the company of young ladles surrounding her were all in white, with tri-colored scarfs upon their shoulders. Immediately upon the conclusion of the responsive address, the fair choir, under the leadership of Mr. Everett L. Baker, broke into singing "The Star Spangled Banner," and the vast crowd hushed its murmurings to listen. Cheers followed and the doors of the Arsenal were now thrown open to admit the tired heroes of the occasion to the feast prepared for them by the good ladies of the city.

THE COLLATION.
Busy hands had been at work all day making hasty preparations for refreshing the travel wearied regiment, and long tables were burdened with every imaginable delicacy, in abundance enough to have sated a thousand men, while a host of fair attendants were in waiting to serve the bountiful repast. When the regiment had entered the room and formed at the tables it was briefly and appropriately welcomed by Rev. Dr. Lord in behalf of the ladies. All ceremony then ceased, and the next half hour was delightfully spent in the enjoyment of the good things set forth upon the tables and in the exchanging of congratulations with friends. The warmth and earnestness of the greetings to be witnessed on every hand—the nervous hand claspings, and the fervent God-bless-yous—were deeply affecting. The subjects of it all were full to the brim with emotion; their bronzed faces shone with happy excitement, and their eyes glistened with a moisture which it seemed hard for them to keep from gathering into tears. Meanwhile a delightful accompaniment to the happy scene was furnished by the Continental Glee Club and the Union Cornet Band alternately playing and singing the national airs and patriotic songs.
When justice had been done to the ladies' collation, Col. Rogers dismissed the regiment with the welcome announcement, to men and officers, that they were at entire liberty for three days, but were required to report at the Arsenal on Thursday afternoon, at four o'clock, when, we presume, the formalities of mustering out will be gone through with.
So terminated the proceedings of an occasion more magnificent in its outward features, and grandee in its moral aspect, than Buffalo ever saw in all her previous history. We have but feebly depicted it—the thousand incidents which contributed to its sublime effect, and wrought the intense emotion connected with it, could not be caught by the reporting pencil, and cannot be preserved, as we wish they might be, for history.
We must not forget to mention, before concluding, that yesterday was the exact anniversary of the departure from Buffalo of the last of the companies out of which the 21st was organized at Elmira. The conclusion of the term of the regiment has been generously anticipated by the government about ten days.
We have obtained the Roster of the regiment as it returns to us, and give it below. We shall publish the roll of enlisted men as soon as we can secure a copy.
We do not know, as we finish our account of this glorious demonstration in honor of the first born regiment of Buffalo, how we can sufficiently compliment the admirable management of the affair by Lieutenant
Colonel Thomas, Marshal of the day, and his assistants. It is the theme of universal praise, and everybody agrees with us, we believe, in the opinion that there was never a procession in Buffalo so skillfully handled before, and never a crowd—though the crowd upon this occasion surpassed all former ones in magnitude—so perfectly kept in order. The praise for this achievement is mainly due to the police, under Chief Darcy. But all engaged in the affair are deserving of the heartiest thanks and congratulation of the public.

ROSTER OF THE TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT.
FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS--COL. ROGERS.
LIEUT.COL.—C. W. Sternberg.
MAJOR—E. L. Lee.
ADJUTANT—Sam'l Gale.
QUARTERMASTER—A. F. Ransom.
CHAPLAIN—J. E. ROBIE.
SURGEON—Seth French.
ASSISTANT SURGEONS—Chas. B. Fry, Thos. M. Johnson.
Co. A—Capt. Levi Vallier; 1st Lieut. John E. Rawson; 2d Lieut., Frank Myers.
Co. B—Capt. A. M. Wheeler; 1st Lieut., J. J. McLusk; 2d Lieut., J. W.  Daveck.
Co. C—Capt. Geo. L. Remington; 1st Lieut., Geo. Hurst; 2d Lieut., Geo W. Cook.
Co. D—Capt. B. D. Schermerhorn; 1st Lieut., H. C. Beebe; 2d Lieut., Jas. Gowans.
Co. E—Capt. C. M. Adams; 1st Lieut., Chas. E. Efner; 2d Lieut., H. H. Bridges.
Co. F—Capt. Geo. W. Clinton; 1st Lieut., Sam'l McMurray; 2d Lieut., ____ Jewett.
Co. G—Capt. Dan Myers, Jr.; 1st Lieut., Jacob E. Brgetold.
Co. H—Capt. P. C. Doyle; 1st Lieut., Fred Minnery; 2d Lieut., Jas. McCabe.
Co. H—Capt. R. A. Gardner; 1st Lieut., Jas. S. Mulligan; 2d Lieut., Gayer Gardner.
Co. K—Captain John M. Layton; 1st Lieut., H. H. Halsey; 2d Lieut., D. D. Blatchford.

NONCOMMISSIONED STAFF.
Serg't Major—Wm. H. Burt.
Quartermaster Sergeant—Benj. Williams.
Commissary's     "             John Brazil.
Hospital Steward—Wm. H. Gould.
Buffalo Commercial Advertiser.

BUFFALO COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER.
Tuesday Evening, May 12, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS
The Reception of the 21st—A Glorious Day.
Buffalo never saw such a demonstration as that of yesterday. It appeared as if the whole population, men, women and children, with one accord, had forsaken everything else, to join in welcoming the soldiers home. With out that time for prepartion [sic] and concert of action usual in such cases, each individual seemed to have resolved to exert him or herself to the utmost to enhance the joyousness of the occasion.
Early in the forenoon the city began to assume a holiday aspect. Many of the prominent buildings on Main street were literally covered with flags and streamers, and there was scarcely a tenement but showed something in the way of display. Mottoes, salutatory, congratulatory and complimentary were placed along the line of march, and banners were stretched across the street at various points.
The line of procession for the reception was formed about two o'clock and started up Niagara to Main, down Main to Swan, along Swan to Chicago, down Chicago to Exchange, up Exchange till the right had reached Main street. The line was composed as follows:
Marshall of the day: Col. H. G. Thomas. Assistants: Lt. Col. Alberger and Capt. Canfield.
Young's Band—18 instruments.
Union Continentals--commanded by Hon. Millard Fillmore.
The Tigers--Capt. Wm. T. Wardwell.
A squad of the Sprague Light Cavalry on foot.
FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Chief Engineer T B French, and Assistants Jon Spaulding and Jacob Kimberly, Jr.
Hook & Ladder Co No 1--Walter Savitz, Foreman, and 21 men.
Taylor Hose Co No 1--John B Sage, Foreman, and 25 men.
Perkins' Band from Rochester--a very fine band of 15 instruments, preceding
Eagle Hose Co No 2--H H Clapp, Foremnan, with 38 men.
The Hose Carriage bore the following inscription:--
"Our Band of Heroes is Unbroken." This Company sent eight members with the 21st--all of whom are living.
National Drum Corps.
Neptune Hose Co No 5--W S Sage, Foreman, and 25 men.
Their pretty blue hose .... garlands of flowers, and a beautiful flag.
Niagara Hose Co No 7—Andrew Cable, Foreman, and 29 men.
The cart bore the inscription, "Welcome to the 21st."
Hydraulic Engine Co No 9—John Brader, Foreman, and 48 men.
Columbia Bose Co No 11, with hose cart—H O Dee, Foreman, and 40 men.
Steamer C J Wells, drawn by four white horses, and the machine was decorated with evergreens and flags. Steamers Niagara, Seneca, Huron and Perry, decorated with flags.
Eight carriages containing the Mayor, Common Council and invited guests.
American Express Co's wagon, containing teachers of Public Schools and drawn by 6 horses.
Sangerbund Society, 50 members, Ernst Besser, President.
Two Vans, each drawn by 4 white horses, and containing 34 young ladies of the Central School, dressed in red, white and blue, representing the entire Union of States.
65th Regimental Band.
65th Regiment, Col Jacob Krettner—500 men in platoons, as follows:
Cavalry Co—Capt J Kann.
Co B—Lieut Graff, commanding.
Co F—Capt Irrlbacker.
Co D—Capt Geyer.
Co A—Capt Seeber.
Co E—Capt Becker.
Co G—Lieut Retel, commanding.
Co C—Capt Canty.
Co R—Capt Scheaffer.
Artillery, Capt. Philip Houck—the men with drawn sabres.
Lansing Zouaves—Capt W H Wells.
74th Regiment—Col W A Fox—390 men.
Cavalry Co—Capt A Sloan.
Drum Corps.
Co C—Capt J U Wayland.
Co B—Lieut G W Torrance.
Co G—Capt Kester.
Co E—Capt Clingen.
Co A—Lieut J C Nagel.
Co D—Lieut Baker.
Co F—Capt H Sloan.
The principal point of attraction was now in the neighborhood of the railroad depot, and the crowd there, for two hours previous to the arrival of the train, was so dense that it was almost an impossibility, with the combined efforts of the military and police, to keep the streets sufficiently clear to allow the passage of the procession. Housetops, sheds, windows and awnings were literally packed, and, in fact, every available inch of space was occupied.
The approach of the train was announced about half past 4 o'clock by a salute from the guns stationed on Michigan street, between the railroad crossing and the Hamburgh canal bridge, and as the train approached the depot, a long, loud shout of welcome went up from thousands of throats. When the fact became known that the "21st" had actually arrived, the excitement of the vast multitude around the depot was more strikingly manifested, and the rush was such as set at naught all efforts for the preservation of order. Persons of all sexes and ages having relatives and friends among the returned soldiers, pressed eagerly forward, in the vain endeavor to catch a glimpse of the faces of those for whose coming they had so long and anxiously waited. Men, women and children were jammed together in a conglomerate mess, and crinoline suffered severely.
Alighting from the cars and quickly forming, the 21st passed from the depot to the street, amid one long, continous [sic] shout of welcome. As they marched past the procession drawn up in line to receive them, the military escort presented arms, and the civic societies joined in the salutation. With sun-browned faces and dusty, faded uniforms of the members of the old, war-worn regiment, were in striking contrast with those of the citizen soldiery, and to ...stakable language, the nature of the duty in which they had been engaged; and the steady, even tread of the column as it filed past, fully equipped, showed that they were well used to the march and its fatigues. We were unable to obtain the precise number of the regiment—it having been variously stated at from 350 to 420. At any rate, those who marched up Exchange street, from the depot, yesterday, were all that remained of the eleven hundred men whose names have been borne on its roster. Except those who were discharged, the balance lie under the turf of Virginia. Peace to their ashes!
The following is the list of officers, field and staff:
Colonel—W F Rogers.
Lieutenant Colonel—C W Sternberg.
Major—E L Lee.
Adjutant—Samuel P Gale.
Quartermaster—A F Ransom.
Chaplain—John E Robie.
Surgeon—Seth French.
Assistants—Chas B Fry and Thos M Johnson.
Company A—Captain—Levi Vallier.
1st Lieutenant—John E Ransom.
2d Lieutenant—Frank Myers.
Company B—Captain—A M Wheeler.
lst Lieutenant—J J McLeish.
2d Lieutenant—J W Davock.
Company C—Captain—Geo L Remington.
1st Lieut—Geo Hurst.
2d Lieut—Geo W Cook.
Company D—Captain—Byron D Schermerhorn.
1st Lieut—H C Beebe.
2d Lieut—Jas Gowans.
Company E—Captain—A M Adams.
1st Lieut—Chas E Efner.
2d Lieut—H H Bridget.
Company F—Captain—Geo D W Clinton.
1st Lieut—Samuel McMurray.
2d Lieut—Jewett.
Company G—Captain—Dan Myers, jr.
1st Lieut—Jacob E Bergtold.
2d Lieut—M Clark.
Company H—Captain—P C Doyle.
1st Lieut—Fred Minnery.
2d Lieut—Jas McCabe.
Company I—Captain—Robert P Gardner.
1st Lieut—Jas S Mulligan.
2d Leut—Gayer Gardner.
Company K—John M Layton.
1st Lieut—H H Halsey.
2d Lieut—D D Blatchford.

Halting on Main street, the escort moved passed the regiment and took up its position on the right, and the long array resumed its march, through the   densely packed streets. One of the most touching incidents of the day, perhaps, occurred as the regiment passed the residence of Lieut. Jas. S. Mulligan, on Johnson Place. Seriously wounded at the second battle of Bull Run, Lt. M., since his arrival at home, has been unable to leave the house. As the procession appeared, he was brought out upon the balcony of his residence, dressed in uniform, and his feeble response to the silent recognition of his old companions in arms was a sight to touch the heart of the most callous.
The Arsenal now became the great point of attraction, and thither the crowd eagerly began to flock. By the exertions of the police and a squadron of cavalry the large open space in front was kept clear, though the three sides were fenced with a dense wall of human beings. A substantial and extensive platform had been erected on the north front of the Arsenal, and the building was bedecked with evergreens, while over the main entrance appeared a shield with the inscription
"GALLANT 21ST—WELCOME HOME."
While awaiting the arrival of the cortege, we availed ourselves of the kind invitation of one of the members of the committee, and stepped inside to vie w the refreshment tables which were spread in the large drill room. The ladies of the committee, of which Mrs. W. G. Fargo is President, cannot be too highly praised for the manner in which they acquitted themselves in the good work so kindly undertaken and so successfully carried out by them. The tables—which were ingeniously arranged with a view to the accommodation of the greatest possible number—literally groaned beneath the weight of good things piled upon them. Everything which could tempt the appetite was there in profusion, and the good taste with which the repast was arranged reflected the highest credit upon all concerned.
As the head of the procession made its appearance in front of the Arsenal grounds, the excitement appeared to increase, and it seamed almost a matter of impossibility to keep back the crowd. The 74th and 65th regiments formed on the west side of the square, and the Fire Department on the east. The 21st was formed in line in front of the Arsenal, while the Tigers, Continentals and ... were drawn up in their rear. And then, indeed, a ... was presented, the 1ike of which is seldom seen.—...oming all restraint—but manifesting nothing quarrelsome or unruly—the crowd rushed into the square, and the whole area was quickly packed with a ... so dense that it seemed as if one might walk over the sea of heads. The officers of the 2lst being called to the front, the regiment was welcomed by Ald. Beckwith, Mayor pro tem as follows:
Welcome Colonel! Welcome Officers! Soldiers of the brave, the steady, the inflexible, and now all-glorious 21st, the heart of a grateful people bids you welcome! The municipality of Buffalo hails your return with public thanks. A hundred thousand souls today exult together at your coming. The aged and venerable amongst us approach with tearful pride to bless you. The young hasten with quickening joy to give you greeting. The fair and the beautiful of the city are bearing garlands for the brave. The schools and public institutions come in bodies to make their offerings of gratitude and honor. The busy hum of industry ceases; the votaries of gain forget their worship; labor for a season unbends from its exacting task; even august justice bars her temple today to join in the universal homage due to the men who have periled their lives in the service of their country.
Soldiers! no triumphal entry of the most renowned Emperor of ancient Rome ever equalled [sic] in moral grandeur that ovation of the heart which a grateful community renders you this day.
The remarkable exhibition of public pride and public respect which you here behold, honors you not merely as brave men, but as men brave in a noble cause; not as the obedient followers of some conquering hero, but as the self prompted heroes of nine contested fields, where the fate of your country was sought to be decided; not as veterans of the battle-field alone, but as men who upon the perilous march, in the performance of the irksome duties of the camp, everywhere, upon all occasions, have covered themselves with imperishable honor and reflected lustre upon the name and character of the city of their origin. The cause in which you have been engaged is emphatically the cause of your country. When, two years ago, the tocsin tolled the alarm throughout the land that the noble fabric of constitutional liberty erected by your fathers was in danger, with the appreciative sense of the value of a good and wise government, you were among the first to rush to arms and to brave the perils of war, not for any emolument for yourselves, but in the noble endeavor to preserve for posterity those institutions which the wisdom of your ancestors provide for you.
This was noble action; this was heroic action. This is patriotism; this is genuine patriotism. In my humble judgment, to the reflecting mind, conduct like this attains unto the sublime. It is exalted conduct moving upon a principle; conduct which in all times, in every age, in all lands, throughout the world, must attract the admiration and secure the approving judgment of universal mankind.
One reflection only clouds this glorious occasion—Among this vast concourse of people who surround you, stand many with mourning hearts who vainly glance along your lines in search of familiar faces and familiar forms. Let us hope that those of your number who have fallen, whether upon the field of battle, or overcome by the enemy's chief ally—that devouring Python which lurks in concealing cloud and vapor amid the malarious swamps, and along the deadly water courses of the South—the once friendly, now implacable South—have not died in vain. Let us trust that in the mysterious economy of an inscrutable Providence their deaths may be consecrated to the attainment of that grand conclusion in the affairs of our country for which they braved the dangers of war and surrendered many of them, even in the charmed period of auspicious youth, their tenure upon life.
But, Soldiers, you have returned not only to the reception of public honors, but to seek the communion of those who are near and dear to you. Even while I am addressing you, I know that hallowed voices are whispering to your hearts of home, wife, children, parents, kindred. I am admonished not to trespass by extended remarks upon the sacred demands of an hour like this.
Once more, then, Officers and Soldiers of the noble 21st, in the name of the people of Buffalo, whom you have honored, I bid you welcome, welcome, welcome! Welcome to the enviable rewards of public respect and lasting public gratitude.
Mr. Beckwith's address was enthusiastically received. When the applause had subsided, Col. Rogers made a brief reply. He was unable, he declared, to find words in which to return his thanks to the citizens for the reception which he and his regiment had met. The demonstration was so grand, and so far exceeded his expectations, as to render him powerless to speak. He declared that the members of the regiment, in going forth to battle, had only performed the duty which every citizen owes to his country and government when menaced. The regiment had striven to do its duty, and the demonstration of the day amply repaid them for all they had endured—the toil of the weary march, the hardships of the bivouac, and the perils of the battle-field.
The flag of the regiment—that precious relic—stained with smoke and pierced with balls, was then brought forward by the Color Sargeant [sic], when Col. Rogers remarked that though it appeared tattered and mutilated, it had never been stained by dishonor. The flag was received by Miss Paddack, who spoke as follows:
Soldiers and Friends—You need no public demonstrations to assure you of our welcome. You know that we are happy to have you among us again—that we are proud of the honor you have achieved.
Two years ago, in the beautiful spring time, when the trees were budding, the birds singing, the flowers bursting into bloom, you left us with the flag of our country in your hands—the love of that flag in your hearts. How nobly you have sustained your principles—how bravely you have defended that flag, your war-scarred visages, your decimated ranks, and many a kindly face and noble heart lying on the battle-fields of Antietam and Bull Run, bear evidence. Soldiers of the Twenty-First—we are proud of you as a regiment; we honor and respect you as men. You have proved yourselves actors, not talkers, when your country and duty called you.
There are proud hearts and glad hearts in this assemblage today; but there are sorrowful hearts also. Many of our young men went forth to the battle fields, but few have returned. We sincerely mourn the loss of our gallant dead, but there is consolation mingled with our sorrow. Voluntarily they laid their lives upon their country's altar. God accepted the sacrifice ... early and honorably their career has closed. ... recorded as lovers of their country. The victory shall be sacredly preserved among us. .... Queen City of the Lakes is proud of her honor... God's own beautiful day smiles down upon us, and ... Erie ripples out gladness and welcome on every ... far better, than all—you have within your ... consciousness of a duty well performed, to ... your country and your God. You have re... the old flag. We feel assured that you will .... and revere it. It could remain in no worthier hands.
At the conclusion of Miss Paddock's address, the flag was recommitted to the hands of the Color Sergeant, and cheer after cheer went up from the multitude around the stand. After the singing of the "Star-Spangled Banner" by the Misses of the Central School, the regiment, officers and men, were escorted to the supper table.
Previous to the commencement of the repast, Rev. Dr. Lord addressed a few words of welcome to the soldiers on behalf of the ladies; and then the men, with perfect decorum, having relieved themselves by stacking arms and throwing off their knapsacks, "fell to," as only tired and hungry soldiers, whose "board," perhaps, has been none of the best, know how to do. During the meal, the Continental Society, under the lead of Mr. Blodgett, favored the company with the fine song, "Honor to the Soldiers," which formed a very pleasing addition to the exercises.
At the conclusion of the collation, Col. Rogers addressed a few remarks to the men of his command; and declared the "parade dismissed" till Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock, when the regiment will meet at the Arsenal, and will probably be mustered out of the service, as we understand that the necessary papers have been received by Capt Sturgeon.
—And then, as the soul-stirring strains of "Home, Sweet Home" were heard from the Union Cornet Band, the men were dismissed, and received the greetings and embraces of the longing friends and relatives who were waiting so impatiently for them. In a short time the ground which had been so rife with excitement and bustle was comparatively deserted.
An invitation to attend the theatre tonight was extended to the Regiment by Manager Meech, in reply to which Col. Thomas publishes the following:
ATTENTION, 21ST.—In compliance with the invitation of Mr. John H. Meech, the officers and members of the 21st Regiment are requested to meet at the Arsenal this evening, at 7 o'clock, for the purpose of attending the Metropolitan Theatre in a body.
H. G. THOMAS.

CORPORATION PROCEEDINGS.
[SPECIAL MEETING.]
IN COMMON COUNCIL,
BUFFALO, Monday May 11th, 1863.
At 11 o'clock, A. M.
Present—James B. Dubois, President pro tem of the Council, and Alderman Ambrose Bangasser, Clark, Colie, Crowder, Dayton, Dubois, Flach, Goembel, Gates, Hanavar, Hopkins, Hoyt, Klink, R. Mills, W. I. Mills, Moores, Persch, and Scheu.
Absent—Ald. Burgard, Sutton, Taylor, Walsh, Warren, and Yaw.
The reading of the minutes of the last meeting was dispensed with.
COMMUNICATIONS FROM HIS HONOR, THE MAYOR.
MAYOR'S OFFICE,
BUFFALO, May 11, 1863.
To the Hon. Common Council:
GENTLEMEN:—At the request of eight Aldermen presented to me, I called a special meeting of your Hon Body to take proper steps in honor of the return of the 21st Regiment.
C. BECKWITH, Mayor pro tem.
—Received and filed.
Whereupon Ald. DUBOIS offered the following: Whereas, The Twenty-First Regiment of New York State Volunteers, recruited mainly in this city and county, has completed its term of service, and is this day to return to be mustered out, and Whereas, The citizens of this city have reason to be proud of the conduct of the Regiment, therefore, Resolved, That this Council hereby tender their thanks to the officers and men of the Regiment for their devotion to the cause of the Union, the Constitution and the Enforcement of the Laws, for their brave and heroic conduct in the field, for their sacrifices in behalf of the cause of national unity, and national life, Resolved, That while deploring the absence from the ranks of those who have lost their lives in battle, or have died in hospitals, we, as the representatives of the municipal government of the city, do cordially join in the joy of our citizens and in their cordial welcome to the surviving members of the regiment, emphasizing the assurance that whether they resume their places as citizens of a State that has never faltered in the support of the government, or again take up arms to aid in suppressing the rebellion and restoring the Union "as it was," they have earned, the lasting respect and esteem of all patriotic men.
Resolved,—That this Council, as a token of their regard to men who have perilled [sic] their lives in the defence of constitutional liberty, do now adjourn, for the purpose of taking part in the public exercises which a grateful people have improvised to show, in some degree, their appreciation of gallantry in the field and uniform soldier-like deportment.
—ADOPTED.
Ald. FLACH then offered the following:
Resolved,—That the Chief of Police be and is hereby authorized, in his discretion, to keep the streets through which the procession escorting the 21st Regiment is to pass clear of all street cars, carriages or other vehicles, except those in the procession. Adopted.
On motion of Ald. HOPKINS, the Common Council then adjourned, to meet this (Monday) afternoon, May 11th, 1863, at two o'clock.

A SUGGESTION RELATIVE TO THE TWENTY-FIRST.
Mr. Editor:—Having been an humble observer of the magnificent reception of Monday, and witnessed that demonstration, the grandeur and pathos of which are not to be told, I cannot refrain from using my pen to touch a character of suggestion which it seems to me may at the present moment be appropriate. The career of the twenty-first Regiment in our national rebellion is closed. The termination of its term of service has given to our municipal history, a day which utterly without exaggeration we may name the proudest in its annals. Our city, but half a century old, has for the first time since it was a mere hamlet, received back the veterans whom it sent to battle. The regiment is now to be disbanded and hereafter will exist only in tradition of the deeds which its valor has performed. Few of us who have had the benefit of the current newspaper accounts would scruple to confess our obligation to one who should arrange, without literary color or embellishment, the experiences of our soldiers in their two years of service. An able pen has already given shape to the martial record of Buffalo, during her infancy, and our Historical Society has treasured with a fitting regard any, the most trifling relics of that early era. The archieves [sic] of this society are open for memorials which shall convey to another time the achievements of our soldier citizens.
There can be no want or seasonableness in entertaining this sort of consideration at this period. In the troubled times which are begun, and of which human intelligence cannot discern the end, no man can say what need there shall be in years to come of referring with patriotic pride to chronicles of local achievements [sic. A wise municipality will cherish a fame which twines inseperably [sic] with its own. The soldiers who went first from Buffalo to the field, who faced the enemy in nine engagements, who served faithfully their term, and a third of their original number, returned to meet a welcome the like of which had not been, are deserving of lasting memory.
The Twenty-first has been a fortunate regiment, fortunate in its material, in its services, in its happy dissolution; enlisted at the first stroke of alarm it contained that generous element of spontaneous patriotism which did not wait to be twice bidden; it was fortunate in officers who have borne a steady brain and hand to the end The adventures of the troops are now in fresh remembrance, the city has just taken off her flowers worn for those who came and those who came not, the public ear is quick to a tale that as yet is new, the Chaplain is a writer as well as soldier priest; there can be no reason why fun and careful preparation should not be given to an authentic narrative of exploits.
PUBLIUS.

RE-ORGANIZATION OF THE TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT.—The following orders have been issued:—
GENERAL HEADQUARTERS STATE OF NEW YORK, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
ALBANY, May 21st, 1863.
Special Orders, No. 242.
Lieut. Col. C. W. Sternberg is hereby authorized to re-organize the 21st Regiment, New York State Volunteers, to serve in the army of the United States for three years, unless sooner discharged.
The following named persons are appointed field and staff officers:
Colonel............................Chester W. Sternberg.
Lieut. Colonel.............................Edward L. Lee.
Adjutant Henry………………………H. Halsey.
Quartermaster...........................Albert F Ransom.
Colonel Sternberg will establish his Headquarters at the village of Elmira and proceed with the re-organization of the regiment in conformity with the provisions of General Orders No. 20, current series, from this Department, and such other orders and instructions as he may from time to time receive from these Headquarters.
By order of the Commander-in-Chief.
JOHN T. SPRAGUE, Adjutant General.

ANOTHER LIGHT BATTERY TO BE FORMED IN BUFFALO.—We are glad to learn that authority has been given to Capt. A, M. Wheeler, late of the 21st regiment, to recruit a Light Battery organization in this city. It is understood that this is the only authorization for adding to the artillery branch of the service that will be granted in the State at present. Capt. Wheeler is a favorite officer—one of the best in point of ability, and one of the most popular that Buffalo has had educated in the school of war; the Light Artillery service is a coveted one among soldiers—and on both accounts we anticipate an easy and quick accomplishment of the recruiting enterprise; Capt. Wheeler has opened an office in the Morning Express Building.
—The principal influence in the mutiny of the 21st (Buffalo) regiment was a lengthy opinion written by an ex-Judge of the Superior Court of Buffalo, to the effect that the men were entitled to a discharge at the expiration of three months, sent to his son, who had enlisted into the regiment as a private and wanted to get out, and industriously shown by him among the men. This opinion produced the most mischievous results. The discontent rose to insubordination, and finally to open mutiny on the 20th.

RECEPTION OF THE 21ST AT BUFFALO.—The people of Buffalo had a grand gala day yesterday, in receiving the 21st Regiment of Volunteers, whose time had expired under the two years' enlistment. Judging by the reports of the press, the reception and entertainment of the volunteers exceeded any display of the kind ever made in Buffalo.
The 21st has not been mustered out, but will be immediately.

—A pension of $8 a month has been granted to Wm. J. Cook, private, Company G, 21st New York, who received a gunshot in the right leg.

THE DAILY COURIER.
TUESDAY MORNING, MAY 12, 1863.
THE CITY AND VICINITY.
LOCAL MATTERS.—For additional local matters see second page.
RETURN AND RECEPTION OF THE TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT.
The brightest and most notable day in all our local history stands eclipsed by the glory that haloed the event of yesterday. It seemed as if the excitement of sorrow which has stirred the Queen City not seldom of late, when she has sent her sons to danger or received them from death, had its reaction yesterday in the tumultuous joy with which she welcomed back, from its two years of warfare, the noble remnant of the Twenty-first Regiment. We can remember no occasion in which the heart of the people so abandoned itself to the spirit of the time, and with such spontaneity, or so grandly, gave vent to its emotion. And this for the simple reason that never has the city been called upon to celebrate an event so truly impressive and moving.

THE JOURNEY HOME.
The Twenty-first, as is already known, started from Washington on Saturday, eleven days in advance of the expiration of its legal term of service. About noon on Saturday it reached Williamsport. Col. Rogers had telegraphed in advance to have some refreshments provided. The telegraph was read in the several churches, and the people rose en masse to prepare for the arrival of the returning soldiers. A bountiful collation was set at the depot, and the regiment, after receiving the most enthusiastic demonstrations at the hands of the kind-hearted and patriotic Williamsporters, came on its way rejoicing.
About fifty of the discharged members of the Twenty-first left here Saturday night for Elmira to extend a fore-taste of welcome to their old brothers in arms and these, with a number of other citizens, were duly on hand when the train came in at 6 o’clock Sunday night. The reception there is described as having been most enthusiastic. The people turned out in such crowds that it was difficult for the regiment to march to the Brainard House, where it had quarters for the night. The ex-members of the regiment, many of them still suffering from the effects of wounds received in the service, wore a badge, including a small ambrotype of Col. Rogers, and bearing the motto: "Welcome Home, Old Comrades".
In the morning the journey homeward was resumed, and all along the road, crowds were at the depots to welcome the veterans, with cheers and other testimonials of their gratification. At Leroy, especially, the country seemed to be on fire with excitement, and a salute of artillery was fired as our brave men came into the depot. The train was delayed somewhat on account of a heated wheel, so that it was 5 o'clock, instead of 3 P. M., before the expectant multitude at the New York and Erie Depot, gave its initiative shout of welcome.

PREPARATIONS FOR THE RECEPTION.
With yesterday morning began the most active preparation for the event of the afternoon. Liberal contributions of eatables were sent in to the Arsenal; the committees of ladies and gentlemen were busily at work, with their several duties; flags were soon floating over every other building in the city, as well as from the throng of shipping in the harbor, and the decoration of Main street began. The latter feature was one of the noticeable things of the day. Standing at any point on Main street, the effect was singularly beautiful. Several of the largest blocks were tastefully ornamented with flags and bunting; the fronts of Hamlin & Mendsen's, Sherman & Barnes', and Howard & Whitcomb's establishments, being especially ornate. The Weed block was elegantly festooned also, as were the stores of M. H. Birge & Co., Blodgett & Bradford, and many others. The mottos "Welcome 21st," "Welcome Home," and similar expressions of the universal feeling were also plenteously displayed. Besides these, there were flags of every size—the red, white and blue in every form—fluttering from nearly every window up and down the street, the whole, lighted up by the May sunshine, making a coup d'oeil we have never seen surpassed in the city.

THE PROCESSION.
In the afternoon the City put on its fullest holiday attire. Work was suspended; the stores were closed, or kept open only for the accommodation of spectators; every available window along the route of the procession was filled and the side-walks were crowded from the depot to the Square. Between 1 and 2 o'clock, the various organizations began to form at their appointed stations in the vicinity of Niagara Square. At 2 1/2 o'clock the line was formed, and started up Niagara to Main, down Main to Swan, along Swan to Chicago, down Chicago to Exchange, up Exchange, till the right had reached Main street, at which time the left or rear rested at the depot. From the depot to Main, accordingly, was the length of the cortege, which was composed as follows:
Marshal of the Day. Col. H. G. Thomas. Assistants:
Lieut. Col. Alberger and Capt. Canfield.
Miller's Band—18 instruments.
Union Continentals—Commanded by Hon. Millard Fillmore.
The Tigers—Capt. Wm. T. Wardwell.
A squad of the Sprague Light Cavalry on foot.
FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Chief Engineer J. B. French and Assistants, John Spaulding, and Jacob Kimberly, Jr.
Hook & Ladder No. 1—Walter Saltz Foreman, and 31 men.
Taylor Hose Co. No. 1 J. B. Sage Foreman, and 25 men.
Perkins Band from Rochester—a very fine band of 15 instruments, preceding
Eagle Hose Co. No. 2. H. H. Clapp Foreman, with 38 men.
The Hose Carriage bore the following inscription:—
"Our Band of Heroes is Unbroken." This Company sent 8 members with the
21st—all of whom are living.
National Drum Corps.
Neptune Hose Co. No. 5 W. S. Sage Foreman, and 25 men.
Their pretty blue hose cart was tastily decorated with garlands of flowers, and a beautiful silk flag.
Niagara Hose Co. No. 7 Andrew Cable Foreman, and 20 men.
The cart bore the inscription, "Welcome to the 21st."
Hydraulic Engine Co. No. 9. John Brader Foreman, and 48 men.
Columbia Hose Co. N. 11, with hose cart. H. O. Dee Foreman, and 40 men.
Steamer C. J. Wells, drawn by 4 white horses, and the machine was decorated with evergreens, and flags.
Steamers Niagara, Seneca, Huron and Perry, decorated with flags.
Eight carriages containing the Mayor, Common Council, and invited guests.
American Express Co's Wagon, containing teachers of Public Schools, and drawn by 6 horses.
Sangerbund Society, 50 members, Ernst Besser President.
Two Vans, each drawn by 4 white horses, and containing 34 young ladies of the Central School, dressed in red, white and blue, representing the entire Union of States.
65th Regimental Band.
65th Regiment, Col. Jacob Krettner.—500 men in platoons [sic]—as follows:
Cavalry Co. Captain J. Kann.
Co. B Lieut. Graff, commanding.
Co. F. Capt. Irrlbacker.
Co. D. Capt. Meyer.
Co. A. Capt. Seeber.
Co. E. Capt. Becker.
Co. 6. Lieut. Retel, commanding.
Co. C. Capt. Canty.
Co. R. Capt. Scheaffer.
Artillery, Capt Philip Houck—the men with drawn sabres.
Lansing Zouaves, Capt W. H. Wells.
74th Regiment, Col. W. A. Fox—300 men.
Cavalry Co. Capt. A. Sloan.
Drum Corps.
Co. C. Capt. J. W. Wayland.
Co. B. Lieut. G. W. Torrance.
Co. G. Capt. Kester.
Co. E Capt. Klingem.
Co. A.Lieut. J. G. Nagel.
Co. D. Lieut. Baker.
Co. F. Capt. H. Sloan.

THE ARRIVAL.
The procession, on being halted, was faced to the south and by the exertions of the police, the middle of the street was kept clear. The crowd in the depot was held in position by a squad of the 65th regiment's company of cavalry, some of the members of which, if the truth must be told, rather overdid the thing by backing their horses promiscuously among women and children.—
One woman was knocked down in this manner, and officers Darcy and Kent were forced to interfere, in keeping one rampant cavalry man within bounds. About 3 o'clock the Lady Washington gun squad fired a salute, and the crowd addressed itself to wait a couple of hours with all the patience it could command. At 5 o'clock, railroad time, a salute of 34 guns began to be fired on Michigan street by the battery of the 65th; the expected train swept into the depot, and a long cheer welcomed the returned veterans as they halted in the middle of the vast assemblage. A car had been assigned to each company, and in a surprisingly short pace of time each was on its feet and in line.
Then began an indiscriminate mingling of soldiers, relatives and friends which no power on earth could repress. The complication of scenes defied description. Women rushed frantically through the crowd some with children some without, and threw themselves into the arms of their "bold, soldier boys" regardless of all appearances. There were mothers, German, Irish and American, who came to see their sons, and would not be comforted or held back, till they had pressed their lips against the bronzed and dusty faces they sought and found. Sydney Dobell's query—
"Where's my boy, my boy?"
was on many a lip, and shrill shouts were sent across the crowd for Johannes, or Michael, as the case might be. Sisters and sweethearts were there too, and many a throbbing bosom brushed the dust from many a weather-stained uniform in the first five minutes of the reception. "Where's the drummers?" shrieked a couple of little girls we noticed, as they rushed past to find a brother who had bravely beaten his parchment in Virginia for two years. No pen can describe the look of intense satisfaction that gleamed in the eyes of the brave fellows as they felt their feet again on Buffalo earth. They were tired and travel-begrimed, but joy was master for the time, and they shook hands with the hundreds that crowded round them, as if there was no such word as fatigue.

THE APPEARANCE OF THE MEN.
Horses had been brought to the depot for the Staff officers, and Col. Rogers gave the orders to fix bayonets, shoulder arms and march. The Union Cornet Band, which had gone down to Elmira on Sunday night, led the way out of the depot; then followed the discharged members, and lastly marched the brave Twenty-first, as steady and firm in its lines, as if it moved by machinery. As the Regiment filed out, the military of the procession presented arms and the firemen and civic societies also saluted them, the crowd on each side of the street sending up loud and long acclamations of welcome. The Twenty-first marched thus the whole length of the line to Main street, when it halted, and the procession then moved, giving the new accession to its length the position of honor in the rear. Enthusiastic admiration was the single sentiment that spoke on every lip, wherever the noble fellows came in sight. A look at them gave some idea of the grim duty they had been doing.—Their faces, brown with exposure, and uniforms stained and dusty with soldier life, told volumes of the toil and hardship and deadly peril they had undergone. They were in full equipment, having arms, knapsacks, canteens, &c., and looked, in all points, as if they had seen work—there was no humbug about them.
We regret that in consequence of the absence of the Adjutant we were unable to procure yesterday a complete roster of the Regiment. We shall publish, as soon as possible, the name of every one of the brave fellows who came so proudly back, but at present can only give the following list of—

OFFICERS, FIELD AND STAFF.
Colonel—W. F. Rogers.
Lieutenant Colonel—C. W. Sternberg.
Major—E. L. Lee.
Adjutant—Samuel P. Gale.
Quartermaster—A. F. Ransom.
Chaplain—John E. Robie.
Surgeon—Seth French.
Assistants—Chas. B. Fry and Thos. M. Johnson.
Company A—Captain—Levi Vallier.
1st Lieutenant—John E. Ransom.
2d Lieutenant—Frank Myers.
Company B—Captain—A. M. Wheeler.
1st Lieut—J. J. McLeish.
2d Lieut—J.W. Davock.
Company C—Captain—Geo. L. Remington.
1st Lieut—Geo. Hurst.
2d Lieut—Geo. W. Cook.
Company D-Captain—Byron B. Schermerhorn.
1st Lieut—H. C. Beebe.
2d Lieut—Jas. Gowans.
Company E—Captain—A. M. Adams.
1st Lieut—Chas. E. Efner.
2d Lieut—H. H. Bridges.
Company F—Captain—Geo. B. W. Clinton.
1st Lieut—Samuel McMurray.
2d Lieut— ___ Jewett.
Company G—Captain—Dan. Myers, jr.
1st Lieut—Jacob E. Bergtold.
2d Lieut—M. Clark.
Company H—Captain—P. C. Boyle.
1st Lieut—Fred. Minnery.
2d Lieut—Jas. McCabe.
Company I—Captain—Robert P. Gardner.
1st Lieut—James S. Mulligan.
2d Lieut—Gayer Gardner.
Company K—Captain—John M. Layton.
1st Lieut—H. H. Halsey.
2d Lieut—D. D. Blatchford.
The regiment contained on its arrival about 350 members, less than 250 of the original 800 being of the number.

A TRIBUTE OF RESPECT.
The procession took its triumphal march up Exchange to Main, up Main to Court, down Court to Delaware, up Delaware to Johnson's Park, the detour round the park being made for the purpose of paying a tribute of respect to Lieut. James S. Mulligan, of the 21st, who was terribly wounded at the second battle of Bull Run and is still invalid at the residence of his mother. The brave Lieutenant was placed on the balcony, dressed in his uniform, and although worn and emaciated with long suffering, he was able feebly to respond to the silent salute which his old comrades gave him as they passed. The incident was a very touching one, and we fervently trust it may have a reviving and beneficial effect upon the brave soldier and patient sufferer to whom the compliment was paid.

AT THE ARSENAL.
From the Park the procession proceeded up Delaware to Tupper, through Tupper to Main, down Main to Clinton, through Clinton to Washington, up Washington to Batavia and down Batavia to the Arsenal. Although the streets everywhere had been thronged with spectators, it seemed as if half the city had assembled at this stopping place. On the north side of the building a large platform had been erected, over which was an ornamentation of flags, &c., inclosing a shield with the inscription:—
"Gallant 21st—Welcome Home".
The two militia regiments formed at right angles to Batavia street on the west side of the open square; the Fire Department; on the east side. The Mayor pro tem, the ladies of the Central School, the Aldermen and other invited guests took places on the platform, while the Twenty-first formed in line directly in front, with the Continentals, Tigers and other organizations in parallel line in their rear. Mayor Beckwith then formally welcomed the regiment in the following eloquent address:—

MAYOR BECKWITH'S ADDRESS.
Welcome Colonel! Welcome Officers! Soldiers of the brave, the steady, the inflexible and now all glorious Twenty-First, the heart of a grateful people bids you welcome! The municipality of Buffalo hails your return with public thanks. A hundred thousand souls to-day exult together at your coming. The aged and venerable amongst us approach with tearful pride to, bless you. The young hasten with quickening joy to give you greeting. The fair and the beautiful of the city are bearing garlands for the brave. The schools and public institutions come in bodies to make their offerings of gratitude and honor—The busy hum of industry ceases; the votaries of gain forget their worship; labor for a season unbends from its exacting task; even august justice bars her temple to-day, to join in the universal homage due to men who have periled their lives in the service of their country.
Soldiers, no triumphal entry of the most renowned Emperor of ancient Rome ever equaled [sic] in moral grandeur that ovation of the heart which a grateful community renders you this day.
The remarkable exhibition of public pride and public respect which you here behold, honors you not merely as brave men, but as men brave in a noble cause; not as the obedient followers of some conquering hero, but as the self-promted [sic] heroes of nine contested fields, where the fate of your country was sought to be decided; not as veterans of the battle-field alone, but as men who upon the perilous march, in the performance of the irksome duties of the camp, every where, upon all occasions, have covered themselves with imperishable honor and reflected lustre upon the name and character of the city of their origins—The cause in which you have been engaged, is emphatically the cause of your country. When two years ago, the tocsin tolled the alarm throout [sic] the land, that the noble fabric of constitutional liberty erected by your fathers was in danger, with the appreciative sense of the value of a good and wise government, you were among the first to rush to arms and to brave the perils of war, not for any emolument for yourselves, but in the noble endeavor to preserve for posterity those institutions which the wisdom of your ancestors provided for you.
This was noble action; this was heroic, action. This is patriotism; this is genuine patriotism.—In my humble judgment, to the reflecting mind, conduct like this attains unto the sublime. It is exalted conduct moving upon a principle; conduct which in all times, in every age, in all lands, throughout the world, must attract the admiration and secure the approving judgment of universal mankind.
One reflection only clouds this glorious occasion. Among this vast concourse of people who surround you, stand many with mourning hearts who vainly glance along your lines in search of familiar faces and familiar forms. Let us hope that those of your number who have fallen, whether upon the field of battle, or overcome by the enemy's chief ally—that devouring Python which lurks in concealing cloud and vapor amid the malarious swamps, and along the deadly water courses of the South—the once friendly, now implacable South—have not died in vain. Let us trust that in the mysterious economy of an inscrutable Providence their deaths may be consecrated to the attainment of that grand conclusion in the affairs of our country for which they braved the dangers of war and surrendered many of them, even in the charmed period of auspicious youth, their tenure upon life.
But Soldiers, you have returned not only to the reception of public honors, but to seek the communion of those who are near and dear to you. Even while I am addressing you I know that hallowed voices are whispering to your hearts of home, wife, children, parents, kindred. I am admonished not to trespass by extended remarks upon the sacred demands of an hour like this.
Once more, then, Officers and Soldiers of the noble Twenty-first, in the   name of the people of Buffalo, whom you have honored, I bid you welcome, welcome, welcome! Welcome to the enviable rewards of public respect, and lasting public gratitude.

COL. ROGERS' RESPONSE.
The address of the Mayor was received with applause. Col. Rogers then responded, from his position on horseback in front of the platform, in the most feeling manner. He had no words, he began, in which to express his gratitude for a reception so grand, go far exceeding his expectation, as this. The magnitude of the demonstration had taken from him the power of speech. You have praised us, he said, for the service we have performed. We have only done our duly—a duty which every citizen owes to the government, whose blessings he enjoys. When that government's in danger, it is but just that those whom it has protected should go forth in its defense.
Such was the position in which we placed ourselves two years ago. We have endeavored to do our duty, and now that it is ended, we feel amply repaid for the toil of long marches, the hardships of the bivouac, and the peril of the battle field, in the fact that at last we are home, and looking in the faces of those whom we love. It is sufficient for us that you have thus expressed in so magnificent a manner, the joy you feel at our return, and that we are able to say to you that we have done our duty. In the name of the regiment I thank you all for this splendid reception.
The battle-worn and bullet pierced flag of the gallant regiment was then brought forward and placed by the Colonel in the hands of Miss Julia Paddock, the young lady of the Central School who, two years before, had presented it to the Twenty-first in behalf of her fellow pupils. She received it in the following beautiful address:

MISS PADDOCK'S ADDRESS.
Soldiers and Friends:—-You need no public demonstrations to assure you of our welcome. You know that we are happy to have you among us again—that we are proud of the honor you have achieved.
Two years ago, in the beautiful spring-time, when the trees were budding, the birds singing, the flowers bursting into bloom, you left us with the flag of our country in your hands—the love of that flag in your hearts. How nobly you have sustained your principles—how bravely you have defended that flag, your war-scarred visages, your decimated ranks, and many a kindly face and noble heart lying on the battlefields of Antietam and Bull Run, bear evidence. Soldiers of the Twenty-first; we are proud of you as a Regiment; we honor and respect you as men. You have proved yourselves actors, not talkers, when your country and duty called you.
There are proud hearts and glad hearts in this assemblage to-day; but there are sorrowful hearts also. Many of our young men went forth to the battle-fields, but few have returned. We sincerely mourn the loss of our gallant dead, but there is consolation mingled with our sorrow. Voluntarily thy [sic] laid their lives upon their country's altar. God seccepted [sic] the sacrifice and early and honorably their career has closed. Their names are recorded as lovers of the country. Their memory shall be sacredly preserved among us. Soldiers! the Queen City of the Lakes is proved of her honored sons.—God's own beautiful day smiles down upon us and even old Erie ripples out gladness and welcomes on every wave. Better, far better, than all; you have within your own hearts the consciousness of a duty well performed, to your manhood, your country and your god. You have returned with the old flag. We feel assured that you will protect and revere it. It could remain in no worthier hands.
The flag having been handed back to the Colonel, he spoke a few words of earnest gratification and thaaks [sic], and the young ladie's [sic]followed with a few stanzas of the Star Spangled Banner. This done and rousing cheers having been given for the regiment and its Colonel, the men were escorted to the drill room of the Arsenal when awaited.

THE COLLATION.
The ladies who had undertaken this most substantial part of the reception ceremonial, succeeded with their task beyond expectation, and the collatior assumed the proportions rather of a banquet. A range of tables along one side of the room was loaded not only with the substantials, but with delicacies of all, sorts, fruit pies, cakes, salads, &c., &c., included. Before the repast began, Rev. Lord made a brief address, welcoming the men in behalf of the ladies who had assembles to minister their wants. The tired and hungry soldiers threw off their knapsacks, sat down on them and fell to with a will. In the meantime the Continental Singing Society, conducted by Mr. Blodgett, sang an appropriate song, "Honor to the Soldier", and materially enlivened by the occasion. The ... tion over, Col. Rogers briefly addressed ... and gave them three days leave their orders being to report at the Arsenal on Thursday at 4 P. M. This announcement was received with tremendous cheering, the men being fairly wild with delight. The Cornet band struck up the ever-beautiful strain of "Home, Sweet Home", and in five minutes more the Twenty-first had scattered in all directions, each making his way, attended by a group of friends, to the place he loved best. And thus the reception of the twenty-first ended.
On Thursday, it is expected, the regiment will by formally mustered out of the service, by Capt. Sheldon Sturgeon, U. S. Mustering Officer, who has received the necessary blan.. for this purpose.

THE MANAGEMENT OF THE RECEPTION.
We do not remember a public demonstration in Buffalo which was arranged throughout with so much tact and success as that of yesterday. To Col. Thomas, the Marshal of the Day, too much praise cannot be awarded. His generalship was equal to the occasion at every point, and he was also well sustained by his assistants. The police arrangements also worked to a charm. With the exception of the slight excitement caused by to the zealous exercise of authority by the cavalry man before mentioned, we did not hear of a single incident to mar the good order and pleasure of the day. Chief Darcy has reason to congratulate himself on his successful maintenance of the peace throughout a long day of excitement, and his force deserve the hearty thanks of all who participated in the reception. The cavalry, too, apart from the circumstance already notice did efficient service in the streets.

THE 21ST.—Company B of the 21st had a meeting at their armory last Monday, in which by a unanimous vote the company expressed their readiness to march off at any time. Co. G held a meeting last evening.

MEMBERS OF THE 21ST will bear in mind that there is no cheaper or better place in the city to replenish their wardrobe than Robinson & Ball's Gents Furnishing Emporium, corner Main and North Division streets. my13c3t

21ST REGIMENT.—As the brave boys of the 21st have arrived, it will become necessary for them to replace the well-worn Fatigue Cap with a nice Dress Hat or a genteel Felt Hat, or Cap. The place to do it is at 202 Main street. Comstock will not only sell them good goods, but will sell them lower than his regular prices. He keeps a fall line of all kinds of Gents' Furnishing Goods. Be sure and remember the number—202 Main street. my12t18

We learn that James E. Schram, Esq. of this city, has been promoted from the Adjutancy of the 21st Regiment to be its Major.—This is a well deserved recognition of the merits of a good soldier. It is well known that but for the seal with which Mr. Schram worked to get the Regiment off, it is doubtful if they would now be in service.

ATTENTION, OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE 21ST REGIMENT.—You are hereby requested to meet at the Armory of the Buffalo Tigers, corner of Main and Eagle streets, on Monday evening, June 1st, at 7 1/2 o'clock, for the purpose of taking into consideration the organization of a military company under the new law of the State of New York.
WM. F. ROGERS, Late Colonel 21st Reg't.

ANOTHER LIGHT BATTERY.—We learn that Capt. A. M. Wheeler, of this city, formerly of the 21st Regiment, has received special permission to recruit a Light Battery, for immediate service. The terms of the permit are that the work shall be commenced immediately, and that the Battery shall be ready to take the field at an early day. Capt. Wheeler has commenced operations with a will, and we hope and believe his efforts will meet with success. He has proved himself to be a brave and efficient officer.

THE BUFFALO REGIMENT.—On Saturday last a requisition was made on the Springfield Arsenal for arms, on the Watervliet Arsenal for ammunition, and on New York City for accoutrements, for the Buffalo Regiment at Elmira. The ammunition has arrived, and the arms are expected daily. Yesterday the Regiment was formally mustered into the United States service.

THE BUFFALO REGIMENT.—The Buffalo Regiment, as now entirely organized, is officered as follows. We assume that the first lieutenants of Col. ROGERS and MAJOR DREW'S former companies will be chosen forthwith as captains:
FIELD OFFICERS:
Colonel—Wm. F. Rogers.
Lt.-Colonel—Adrian R. Root.
Major—Wm. H. Drew.
Adjutant—C. W. Sternburg.
Quarter-Master—H. P. Clinton.
Sergeant-Major—Geo. M. Love.
COMPANY CAPTAINS:
Captain Alberger, Captain Hayward,
Washburn Thomas,
Gaylord,   Layton,
Leo, Strong,
Clinton,  Gardner.

EXCITING RUNAWAYS.—Between two and three o'clock yesterday afternoon, a pony, belonging to DAVID BELL, and standing before a wagon in front of Pratt & Co.'s warehouse, on the Terrace, became frightened at the music of a band, and shot like a meteor across to the Western Hotel. Being driven back by a crowd, he started in zigzag direction, towards Commercial street, and fell upon his side in a gutter, near the United States Hotel buildings. He valiantly rose, however, dashed the wagon into kindling wood against a hydrant, and went down Commercial street, making extraordinary speed. He was finally caught near the bridge.
Another runaway occurred a few minutes afterward in the same vicinity, but no damage resulted.

THE BUFFALO REGIMENT.—The Buffalo Regiment at Elmira are reported to be in the best of health and spirits, by gentlemen who returned from this morning. The men were expecting to go into camp today. The camping ground is the finest that could have been selected, being a hollow clover meadow, situated about one mile west of the centre of the village. Twenty barrack buildings have been erected for the accommodation of the troops, each 16 by 90 feet in dimensions, and 12 feet high. At the rear of these stand the cook shops and other offices, all commodious and well arranged.

THE OFFICERS OF THE BUFFALO REGIMENTS.
—The New York Tribune has the following by way of a partial explanation of its statement in regard to the recent dismissal of officers of the 21st and 49th regiments. "We are assured by the friends of the officers named, that the list published on the 9th inst., of officers dropped by the War Department from the rolls of the 21st New York and 49th New York regiments, is incorrect. Col. Wm. F. Rogers, of the 21st Regiment, had leave of absence on account of sickness, is now with the regiment and is an able officer. The same is true of Col. D. D. Bidwell, of the 49th Regiment. Lieut. Col. H. G. Thomas, of the 21st Regiment, has been honorably discharged from the service, on account of wounds received in the second battle of Bull Run; his discharge is dated 5th December and signed by Surgeon-Gen. Clymer. Captain Robert P. Gardner, of the same regiment, was wounded at Antietam, and sent home to recover from his wounds. He has again reported for duty. It is due to the service that more care should be exercised in investigating these charges against officers, before holding them up to public odium.

REGIMENTAL SURGEONS.—We learn that Dr. C. H. WILCOX of this city, was yesterday appointed Surgeon to the Buffalo Regiment, and Dr. J. A. PETERS of Darien, Assistant Surgeon. Dr. WILCOX is fully competent to the post. He has long held a high rank, both as physician and surgeon, and has enjoyed an extensive hospital practice for years.
Dr. PETERS is also said to be an excellent physician. He was a student under Dr. P. H. STRONG in this city, and took his degree before the Medical Board of Albany.

CHAPLAIN OF THE BUFFALO REGIMENT.—Among the many clergymen who have been talked of for the Chaplaincy of the Buffalo Regiment, now quartered in Elmira, is the Rev. JOHN E. ROBIE, of the Advocate. Mr. ROBIE has, we understand, expressed his willingness to fill the post, and we know of none other more competent to its duties. The majority of the other applicants are not residents of the city.

DRUMMED OUT OF CAMP.—Two men belonging to Capt. Root's Company from Batavia were drummed out of camp at Elmira a few days ago, for refusing to swear allegiance to Uncle Sam. They were first confined forty-eight hours on bread and water, and, this treatment failing to convert them to loyalty towards the government they were drummed out of the regiment to the tune of the Rogue's March, and otherwise disgraced by a vigorous application of kicks and tobacco juice.

CHRONICLES OF THE 21ST REGIMENT.—Part VI of this interesting work has just been issued, and contains a fine lithograph likeness of Captain Peter C. Doyle, of Co. H. The interest of the "Chronicles" is admirably sustained in this number, and doubtless will be to the end. The author and artist Mr. Mills, has given over the business of publication to Captain John M. Layton formerly of the 21st, and the work will hereafter be delivered with more promptness than it has heretofore been. The next number will contain the portraits of the slain of the 21st.

FATHER AND TWO SONS VOLUNTEERS.—Among the volunteers who left the city yesterday, in Company A, Capt. DREW, was Mr. G. A.  HEWES, eldest son of Rev. C. E. HEWES, of Hamilton, who is himself a volunteer in another regiment. His second son is with the Illinois volunteers.

THE REGIMENTAL BANNER.—MR. EDITOR:—Can you inform me what disposition has been made of the Banner which the ladies of our city had prepared to be presented, as we understood, to the first Regiment or companies which should leave Buffalo for active service?

ONE INTERESTED.
We understood, one day previous to the departure of the last detachment of volunteers, that the banner was to be presented to the regiment now organized in Elmira. We know nothing of any subsequent decision. If we do not greatly err, the 74th Regiment, for which the flag was first made, will be in readiness to bear it to the wars before many weeks.

CHRONICLES OF THE 21ST.—We understand that Mr. Mills has succeeded in procuring the services of able canvasser for his valuable history of the doings of our first regiment, and all who wish to secure the work will now be accommodated.
Mr. Louis Otto has with the most unselfish motives, undertaken the task, and we commend him and the enterprise he is assisting, to the attention of the public. The work Mr. Mills has undertaken should not be suffered to lag for want of patronage. Thus far it has not been remunerative, and with his wounds unhealed, and other drawbacks consequent upon a lack of capital necessary in publishing, and the patronage, without which his labor is nothing, he has had a hard time of it. The work will now sustain itself, but to make it pay the author as it should, it still needs prompt assistance in the shape of additional subscribers. We hope this call will not be neglected and that the important work will be sustained by an appreciative public. There arc only about 300 copies yet to be disposed of, and no more will be issued. Therefore those who wish to procure a copy should be in time. Subscriptions are also received at the news depot of T. B. Wright, No. 235 Main street.

WARD WAR MEETINGS.
FIRST WARD.—A War Meeting will be held at Goodwin's Hall this MONDAY EVENING, at half past seven o'clock.
By order of the Committee,
M. HAGAN, Secretary.

A Mass War Meeting will be held in the Twelfth Ward on MONDAY EVENING, Sept. 15th, at the house of Lewis Larch, on Niagara street, commencing at 7 ½ o'clock. Come everybody, as but little time now remains to secure voluntary enlistments and avoid drafting.
Good speakers will be in attendance to address the meeting. By order.

IN TOWN.—Col. ROGERS, of the "Twenty-First," arrived in the city last evening, and was besieged, on his appearance this morning by a whole batallion [sic] of friends. He is in excellent health and spirits, and reports the condition of the regiment as very satisfactory. The men are receiving their knapsacks, canteens and other equipments today, when they will be in perfect readiness for service. The Colonel is quite confident of receiving orders to move next week, a faith that we sincerely hope may be well founded, as the boys are becoming very impatient.

THANKS.—We have received a note from H. K. Fullerton, a member of Company C, of the Buffalo Regiment now in Elmira, requesting us to say that the Alden boys of that company return their thanks to Miss S. REMINGTON, MRS. CHAS. ELK, Mrs. R. N. BUTLER, Mr. J. Krake, and other Alden ladies, for their kindness in preparing and forwarding to the said boys a large box, containing pie, cake, and other luxuries. The donors will ever be held in remembrance.

GEORGE M. BASSETT.—The Warsaw New Yorker speaks as follows of George M. Bassett, a member of the 21st Regiment, wounded in the late fight. George laid down his "stick" in this office to enlist in the ranks. He left with the best wishes of all, for during his sojourn here, he convinced all that he was a good printer and a "good boy," and he has since shown himself to be a brave man. He will nowhere meet with a heartier welcome on his return from the war—if, indeed, he be spared to return, as we sincerely trust he may—than here. "We were pained to notice in the list of wounded in the 21st Regiment the name of Geo. M. Bassett, of this village—formerly employed in this office. He was wounded in the forehead, in the great battle of Wednesday, wherein his regiment took honorable part and suffered severely.—Those who know him will not be disappointed in learning that he was wounded with his face to the foe."

CHRONICLES OF T H E 21ST REGIMENT.—
We are indebted to Capt. J. M. Layton, for Part IX of this interesting military history. The reading matter is, as usual, excellent and the number is embellished with correct portraits of Col. James C. Strong, 18th V. R. C., and Lieuts. J. McLeish, Gayer Gardner, W. H. Halsey and Geo. T. Cook.
The publisher of the Chronicles has, owing to the enormously increased price of printing material of all kinds, found it imperatively necessary to advance the price of each number ten cents. Thirty-five cents in ordinary times would not be an unreasonable price, and the public will, we are assured, recognize this fact, and sustain the "Chronicles" as liberally as heretofore.

THE VOLUNTEERS.—The ranks of the volunteer companies we mentioned yesterday are now full. Company F, Capt. CLINTON, whose order for inspection came last Friday, was inspected yesterday morning at
Dudley Hall, by Gen. SCROGGS, and permanently organized. A re-election of officers was had, with the following result:
Captain—G. D. W. Clinton.
Lieutenant—Thomas B Wright.
Ensign—Chas. Darrow.
1st Sergeant—Samuel McMurray.
2d do —Albert R. Ransom.
3d do —Clark Dodge.
4th do —Dewitt C. White.
Corporals—Amige H. Bryant, Jasper S. Youngs, David A. Hasper, Derrick L Pomeroy.
CIVIC ASSOCIATION.
President—Warren Granger. Jr.
First Vice President—Howell Pixley.
Second "        "       —Wm. B. Jewett.
Secretary               —William Collis.
Satndard [sic] Bearer—Chas. L. Stevens.
The muster roll, containing nine names, was returned to Albany last night, and the company now awaits the order to march. Companies B, C, D, G and H received their orders for inspection this morning. Company B, Capt. GAYLORD, was inspected at nine o'clock this morning; Company C, Capt. Rogers, was inspected at one o'clock; Company D, Capt. ALBERGER, will be inspected at four o'clock; and Company H will probably be inspected this evening—all at the Arsenal, by Gen. SCROGGS. Company G, Capt. LEE, is full, and orders for its inspection are expected this evening or to-morrow. Company E, Wilkeson Guards, Capt. STRONG, has already been inspected and accepted at Head-Quarters, its roll being complete. Its officers are as follows;
Captain—James C. Strong.
1st Lieutenant—Henry P. Clinton.
Ensign—Thomas Sloan.
1st Sergeant—Wm. L. Whitney.
2d do —Peter Leggett.
3d do —Adam Rhem.
4th do —H. H. Bridges.
1st Corporal—C. C. McCready.
2d do—C. W. Stiles.
It is intended that all these companies shall be in readiness to leave by Wednesday, but they will probably not receive marching orders until Friday or Saturday. Capt. PLOGSTEAD is recruiting for a company out of the Sixty-Fifth regiment, which may yet be attached to the Volunteer Regiment.
N. B. We learn, since writing the above, that the volunteers will leave for Elmira to-morrow. The Mayor and Joint Committee, formally addressed Mr. COLTON, Ass't President of the Buffalo, New York and Erie Railroad, this morning, requesting to know at what time the troops could be most conveniently taken to the rendezvous. Mr. COLTON'S reply was as follows:
"HON. F. A. ALBERGER,
Sir:—This Company will transport the volunteers from Buffalo, by special train, on Wednesday, the 8th inst., leaving Buffalo at 5:30 P. M., Buffalo time.
Very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,
J. C. COLTON,
Assistant President."

Captains of Companies are requested to file copies of their muster rolls, before leaving, with the Joint Committee, in order that every arrangement may be made for the relief of the families of the men.

MILITARY FUNERAL.—Captain Muller's company, of the 21st Regiment, together with the various German organizations of this city, turned out yesterday to pay the last tribute of respect to one of their deceased members, Mr. Joseph Mayer. Mayer was a great friend to the German Schools of this city, and was much beloved by tutors and pupils. In the early part of the rebellion he joined the 20th N. Y. Turner Regiment under Col. Max Weber, and with it went to the seat of war, but his health failing he was compelled to return home where consumption gradually brought him to his end. He leaves a wife and one or two children to mourn his loss.

MUSICAL SOIREE OF THE TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT.--The musical soiree and social hop to be given under the auspices of the officers of the 21st Regiment, on Tuesday evening next, at American Hall, promises to be a fine affair, if we may judge from the preparations now being made. The programme embraces a variety of solos, duets and choruses by our home talent, and a number of selected pieces by the Union Cornet Band. Gariboldi, the favorite basso, is among those announced to take part in the concert, and Prof. Degenhard is to act as Musical Director.
The concert will be succeeded by a social hop, for which the Union Cornet Band will furnish the music; and a gala time may be expected. The officers of the regiment have determined to make the affair a select one, and to this end they will dispose of the admission tickets in person.
As we have before stated, the proceeds realized from the soiree and hop of the 21st are to be devoted to the further publication of "The Chronicles," now in the hands of Mr. J. H. Mills.

FUNERAL OF CAPT. HAYWARD.—The remains of Capt. Elisha Hayward, of the 21st regiment, were interred with military honors yesterday. The Spaulding Guard, Capt. Jewell, Citizens' Corps, Lieut. Avery, and Tigers, Capt. Wardwell, assembled at the Arsenal at the hour designated, and being joined by members of Neptune Hose Co. No. 5, and Eagle Hose Co. No. 2, marched to the residence of Capt. Hayward's mother, on the corner of Swan and Ellicott streets, and thence to the First Presbyterian church, in the following order:
Union Cornet Band.
Spaulding Guard, in Platoons, left in front
Pall Bearers.
Hearse.
Capt. Bailey,
Capt Cottier,
Quartermaster Wing,
Pall Bearers.
Adj't Johnson,
Adj't Ernst,
Capt. Heacock.
Officers 21st and 49th Reg'ts N. Y. V., and 74th Reg't N. Y. N. G., in twos, in inverse order of rank.
Light Guard.
Tigers.
Hose 5, in twos.
Carriages
The services at the church were solemn and impressive. The funeral discourse was delivered by Rev. Dr. Moore, of the Washington Street Baptist church, and was a feeling, eloquent and patriotic one.
At the conclusion of the exercises, the cortege took up its line of march to the High street burying ground, where the body was deposited in its final resting-place with all the honors due a brave and gallant young soldier
who died in his country's service.

Buffalo Commercial Advertiser.
Monday Evening, September 15, 1862.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
THE MEETING IN BEHALF OF THE 21ST.—The meeting at the Old Court House on Saturday night, in behalf of the 21st Regiment, was numerously attended.—The Union Cornet Band was on hand, and discoursed most eloquent music.
Chas. Gardner, Esq., was called to the Chair, and David Gray and P. Bender appointed Secretaries.
On motion of C. A. Waldron, a committee of five was appointed to present resolutions expressive of the sense of the meeting. The chair appointed as such committee Messrs. F. A. Alberger,C. A. Waldron, L. B. Smith, and Wm. Wilkeson.
During the absence of the committee, Lieutenants Myers and Hurst, of the 21st, were called upon, and modestly but feelingly and briefly addressed the meeting, giving some details in regard to the condition of the regiment, and expressing the hope that the citizens would do all in their power to prevent its threatened consolidation with any other.
Mr. Alberger, Chairman of the Committee on Resolution, presented the following:
The committee appointed to present resolutions expressive of the sense of this meeting, report:
That it is incumbent, and it is the duty of the citizens of Buffalo to recruit the ranks of the gallant 21st regiment to prevent it being incorporated with other regiments.
That in their opinion the proper way to accomplish this purpose is to request the Governor of the State to permit the 21st Regiment to fill with nine months men, or with men whose time of service will expire at the same time of the regiment.
That the Governor be requested not consolidate this regiment with others until the citizens have time to take action in this measure.
That the Governor also be requested to ask the War Department to delay the contemplated consolidation.
Mr. Alberger spoke briefly in explanation of the report, the course advised by which he thought calculated to attain the desired object.
William Williams, Esq., was called for, and addressed the meeting, expressing his conviction that, if properly managed, the work of filling up the regiment might be successfully carried out.
A letter was here read from Major Thomas, who was unable to be present at the meeting.
Several other gentlemen addressed the meeting, and L. B. Smith, Esq., offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Chairman appoint a committee of three, of which Mr. Alberger shall be Chairman, whose duty it shall be to communicate with the Governor, and take measures to carry out the object of this meeting in filling the ranks of the 21st Regiment.
Adopted, and F. A. Alberger, A. M. Clapp, and Wm. Williams were appointed by the Chair as such committee.
The meeting adjourned till Wednesday evening next, when it is expected the committee will be able to report some favorable action.

A PAROLED SOLDIER OF THE 21ST REGIMENT.
We had a visit on Saturday from private J. W. Pryor, of this city, a member of Co. K, 21st Regiment, who was taken prisoner by the rebels between Manassas and Gainsville on the 30th ult. Private Pryor was returning to a detachment of the regiment after having assisted a wounded soldier of the 2d Wisconsin to a place of safety, when six rebel soldiers suddenly made their appearance and gave him an invitation so pressing to accompany them that he could not resist it. He was detained three days in the rebel camp, during which time, as he avers, he had no morsel of food, except green corn and apples.—The prisoners were frequently taunted by the rebels. On one occasion, an American flag of which they had got possession, was trailed back and forth in the dust by a rebel soldier; on another, when the secession ladies cheered the stars and bars, and our boys responded by cheering for the stripes and stars, an officer threatened to hang some of them to a tree.
Private Pryor informed us, and says the statement will be sworn to by himself and scores of Union soldiers who were prisoners with him, if necessary, that an aid to the rebel General Lee remarked in their hearing that he would rather have Gen. McDowell continue in the position he then occupied than to take fifty thousand Union prisonrs [sic]; and that Gen. McD. "knew what he was about."
On being released, Pryor was presented with a document, of which the following is a copy:
"Sept. 1st, 1862.
To all whom it may concern:
"This is to certify that the bearer, private J. W. Pryor, member of Co. K, 21st Regiment, N. Y. S. V., was taken prisoner on the 30th day of August, 1862, by the Confederate States of America, and that he has been paroled by the said States of America by subscribing to the following oath:
"That he, J. W. Pryor, does solemnly swear that he will not take up arms or assist or serve, neither in garrison or camp against the Confederate States of America, until regularly exchanged.
("Signed,) "G. BAILEY,
"Lt. Col. 3d Regt. Ga. Vols."
Mr. Pryor speaks in the highest terms of Col. Rogers, Lt. Col. Root, [formerly of the 21st,] Maj. Thomas and others. He says that the regiment regard Col. Rogers, particularly, with feelings amounting almost to devotion.

NEW YORK CITY.
DEPARTURE OF THE TWENTIETH REGIMENT.
This splendid regiment, Col. Max Weber, left yesterday for Fortress Monroe. For days they have been almost sleeping on their arms in the expectation of speedily departing, and all rejoiced when all the arrangements were perfected.
Attending their departure was all the enthusiasm indigenous to the generous feeling—a long and noble train of escort, music, flag presentations, speeches and cheers, wild and tumultuous.
At 3 P. M. the regiment left their recent headquarters at Turtle Bay Park, and forming in line on Forty-second street and Second avenue, entered on their route of march. They went down Second avenue to Twentieth street, through Twentieth street to Broadway, and down Broadway to the City Hall. All along the route of march they were greeted with enthusiastic cheers and wild waving of handkerchiefs. Broadway presented the usual spectacle of windows, awning posts, and door steps compact with spectators. Attending the regiment, as escort, were several German societies—New-York Sangerbund, Gesang Verein, Fidelia, Helvetia, Maenerchor, New York
Rifle Corps, Old Turners, with various associations from Brooklyn, Williamsburg, and Bloomingdale. As immediate escort was the "During Zouaves," the right flank company of the De Kalb Regiment. Each society had its flag, the Old Turners carrying the original flag of the Turn-Verein. They all made a fine appearance with their flying banners and regimental band at the head. The escorting societies formed in line on Fourteenth street and Union Square.
There was a large crowd in front of the City Hall long before the arrival of the regiment.
As usual the esplanade was kept clear, with an attendant squad of police to preserve order. Here four flags were presented to the regiment—all the gifts of ladies. The first was a German flag, of silk; the second and third, American flags; and the fourth a regimental standard. On the last flag was inscribed the words,
BAHN FREI.
meaning, in English, "clear the track." Three speeches were made on the presentation, the first by Hon Samuel B. Ruggles; the second by Miss Rupp, and the third by Miss Sophia L. Beisel, to which Col. Weber responded. Mr. Ruggles spoke in English, and the succeeding speeches were in German.

ADDRESS OF THE HON. SAMUEL B. RUGGLES.
In behalf of Mrs. Charles Edward Strong, and other patriotic ladies of the city of New York, I present you this gift of a national flag, for your regiment, which they commit, with undoubting faith, to your brave and loyal keeping. To whom could they more properly intrust [sic] it than to you, the lineal descendants of the Germans of those buried sages who amid the verdant forests and sparkling waters of the fatherland, bravely battled for liberty and freedom against the cruel domination of imperious, slave-holding and all enslaving Rome?
Gallant Germans! friends and brethren! we hail you as fellow-countrymen and coequal heirs of our nation's destiny. The land of poetry, song and science; the birthplace of Schiller and Mozart and has given you to us to share our fortunes and our fate. This goodly western continent is not less yours than ours; upon its broad and teeming bosom we stand or fall together. Side by side we now battle for our nation's life.
For this very purpose it was that you sought this western world. You came here that you of the present generation might enjoy that long deferred but dearly-cherished object of every German heart—a comprehensive and united nationality. You left your native land, dismembered and disintegrated by long centuries of strife, that you might here breathe, in freedom, the invigorating air of one great, united, indivisible republic. You left without regret the rival and contending Hapsburghs and Hoherzollerns, that you and your descendants, through coming ages, might inhabit and enjoy the land of Washington; that you might lawfully inherit and peacefully occupy the one great continental nation of the globe, stretching, in unbroken expanse, from ocean to ocean.
Noble Germans! Will you now permit this goodly heritage to be rudely torn from you? Will you abandon, without a struggle, this, your magnificent domain, your own chosen land of refuge, to dismemberment and ruin? With the example, fresh in memory, of the fatherland, frittered by internal strife into dozens of principalities, can you now consent to dash down and demolish this majestic republic, a dominant power among the nations of the earth, to set up in its place, four-and-thirty rebel "sovereignties," falsely so called, all in a row?
Thanks to the excellence of your German schools, you are men of education. Have you not been taught, and do you not instinctively know that men in these modern days must live in nations, and can no longer live in tribes? But what is the present treasonable attempt, alike wicked and weak, to throw down the united, organic sovereignty of our nation, but an attempt to restore the ancient rule of chieftains and tribes—to substitute the rattlesnake for the eagle—to hold aloft not the immortal ensign of the republic, radiant with its united stars, but local emblems, suited only for Chickasaws and Chocktaws, the aboriginal and veritable inventors of "state sovereignty?"
Intelligent and patriotic Germans! You now go bravely forth to arrest this suicidal work of madness and ruin. Trebly armed with the justice of the cause, you march to battle to uphold the priceless boon of national existence—vital not alone to us, the natives of the soil, but to the hundreds of thousands of loyal German hearts thickly congregated in all our cities, and already counted by millions between our two great oceans.
From this, our city and state, you go forth to prevent dismemberment, not alone from the misguided South, but from all your brethren of the German race clustered around our wide-spread western waters—to preserve the national unity, not only of this great republic, but of your race itself.
In this flag, as the symbol, you carry with you the affectionate regards, the fervent prayers of the men and women of New York, invoking in your behalf the gracious protection of that All-Wise Being, the Great Architect of nations, to uphold and reward your bravery, patriotism and public virtue.
Colonel Max Weber responded that he would simply return his thanks for himself and his regiment for the honor conferred upon them. He was not a man of idle words, but his regiment would reply for themselves on the field of battle. [Cheers.] They would never disgrace the flag. They would bring it back with honor, or they would not come back at all [Cheers.]
The lady orators spoke with unabashed earnestness. Miss Rupp had been a nurse in the German revolution, and she expressed an eagerness to officiate in the same capacity in the present war.
The regiment was then reviewed by the municipal authorities. The following is a correct list of the officers in command:
Field and Staff—Colonel—Max Weber.
Lieutenant Colonel—Francis Weiss.
Major—Engelbert Schmepf.
Surgeon—Julius Hansen.
Assistant Surgeon—Fredrick Heiland.
Adjutant—Rudolph Kluckhuhn.
Quartermaster—Mr. Dingelstedt.
Commissary—George Muench.
Line Officers—Company A—Captain, Lorenz Meyer; First Lieutenant, Wm. Knecht; Second Lieutenant, Herman Stockel.
Company B—Captain, Anthony Bracklyn; First Lieutenant, Frank Munich; Second Lieutenant, Fritz Letzeiser.
Company C—Captain, Charles Hocklester; First Lieutenant, Otto Hoym; Second Lieutenant, Gustave Lorenz.
Company D—Captain, J. W. Einbugler; First Lieutenant, Phillipp Drackert; Second Lieutenant, Charles Coutrier.
Company E—Captain, K. O. Bernett; First Lieutenant, Henry Klober; Second Lieutenant, Carl Voelker.
Company F—Captain, Charles Semsey; First Lieutenant, Herman Bennecke; Second Lieutenant, Rud Bentler.
Company G—Captain, Wm. 8choen; First Lieutenant, Wm. Syring; Second Lieutenant, Jacob Pabst.
Company H—Captain, Wm. Von Doehn; First Lieutenant, Wm. Scheel; Second Lieutenant, Robert Merkle.
Company I—Captain, Henry Stumpf; First Lieutenant, Adolph Wilson; Second Lieutenant, Geoge Keonig.
Company K—Captain, Joseph Hoefling; First Lieutenant, Wm. Haffner; Second Lieutenant, Louis Krook.
The strength of the regiment is as follows:
Field and staff....................................................................7
Rank and file.................................................................770
Music corps.....................................................................17
Drum corps......................................................................10
Total...............................................................................804
After a little while the procession continued its march up Chatham street to the Bowery, through which it passed to Canal, thence through Varick, and down North Moore to the North River, where, amid the most enthusiastic assembly of spectators, they embarked on the transport Alabama. At 6 o'clock the steamer pushed out in the stream, the whole regiment singing a German song of battle and the piers alive with people. The Alabama sails this morning for Fortress Monroe.
(N Y World, June 14, 1861)

Departure of the Volunteers.
Of all the noble events that mark the history of the Queen City, not one can match with that of yesterday. Not one possessed so much of proud display, excitement and significance, or contained one-half its touching pathos.—The departure of the first companies of volunteers for the war of 1861, will be an ineffaceable memory in every heart among the throng that waved them adieu, and bade them God speed with ringing cheers.
According to announcement, the four companies under orders,—A, B, C, and D,—were ready for their march at three o'clock, P. M. The Old Guard, or Continentals, under command of ex-President FILLMORE, holding the rank of Major, turned out from their head-quarters at Kremlin Hall, a few moments previous to the appointed time, and marched down Niagara street to the Armory, to receive and escort the volunteers. As they passed along the thoroughfare, headed by the Union Cornet Band, an involuntary murmur of admiration swept along the dense line of spectators on either side. Without reservation, the procession was the most splendid and imposing we ever witnessed. It was composed of the grey-haired veterans of the city, including clergymen, judges, lawyers, merchants, bankers, politicians, and others of every class of honorable vocations. The venerable and honored commander, ex-President FILLMORE, marched, stately and erect, at the head of the column, wearing a sword and plume, and looking like an Emperor. The first Lieutenant, HERY W. ROGERS, Esq., strode a short distance in the rear. The Guard moved partially down Court street, meeting the volunteers a short distance this side of the barracks, where they immediately wheeled, and at the word, proceeded to Niagara Square, followed by Eagle Hose Company No. 2 then by the four departing companies, and lastly by Taylor Hose Co. No. 4.

NIAGARA SQUARE.
Upon the Square ran immense crowd, comprising nearly ten thousand people, had assembled, and at the side near the Central School grounds a platform was erected; upon which thirty-four girls of the School, attired in robes of red, white and blue, spangled with stars, were grouped in a circle. Near the front stood another young girl, Miss JULIA A. PADDOCK, draped in pure white, wearing a golden crown, and holding in her hand the staff of the beautiful banner made by the scholars for the volunteers. The staff was surmounted with a richly carved gilt eagle, and noosed with sumptuous cords of bullion. The flag itself was entirely of silk, army size, and floated shimmeringly in the light breeze that stirred the atmosphere.
After the escort had filed past, an avenue was opened through the concourse, and the volunteer companies marched in and ranged themselves before the platform.—Miss PADDOCK was then introduced by Gen. SCROGGS, and addressed them, still supporting the banner, as follows:
"The hour we have so long expected, has at last arrived. Our country calls for brave men, true men, men who will stand by their principles—men who will defend the right—to come forward and vindicate her cause. We feel proud that Buffalo has responded so nobly to the call. The ranks of volunteers before us, prove that the "Queen of the Lakes" is not devoid of that patriotism which strengthens ... and arm to deeds worthy of the spirit of '76. We ... scholars of the Central School, present this flag to you as a testimonial of our love of country and admiration for ... patriots. We feel assured that you will stand by the glorious old flag of our forefathers, that you will defend the stars and stripes, though it cost you your heart's blood. In the thickest of the fray, look up to this banner and think of the many hopes that center in your actions—of the many prayers hourly offered up for your cause—then do your duty as men and patriots, and may God speed ye and the Right."
The address was frequently interrupted by cheers from the attentive and appreciative soldiers, and on its conclusion, three times three were given with a will. Captain DREW received the flag in behalf of the volunteers, and Gen. SCROGGS briefly thanked the scholars for their gift and assured them that, so long as the life blood dwelt in the veins of the hardy men gathered around them, so long would the honor of the flag be maintained. They trusted, when the echoes of the war had died away, to return it, untarnished and untorn, to the city from whence they had taken it. He proposed in conclusion, three cheers for the young ladies around him. The response was enthusiastic, every man in the ranks raising his hat and swinging it wildly, while he shouted the hurrahs and a "tiger."—Cheers were afterwards given, for the different companies in turn, for Buffalo, for the Old Guard, and lastly for Dr. HUNT, Superintendent of Schools, who stood with head uncovered, on the platform. The Doctor came forward and gracefully acknowledged the courtesy. He excused himself from making an extended speech. His feelings had been so wrought upon by the scene that had just transpired, by the beautiful words of the young girl who had just addressed them, and who, he would vouch, was a fair representative of the scholars of Buffalo—by the throng of eager and earnest faces before him, by the noble enthusiasm that had manifested itself among those who were about to leave the city on the nation's errand, that he had no heart for words, He gave his blessing and his hope to cheer them. His name was enrolled beside their own, and in the same cause, and his heart and soul, and finally his body, would go with them wherever they went.
Following Dr. Hunt's remarks, another wave of enthusiasm rolled through the assemblage, and the patriotism of the men rose higher with every moment. The scholars struck up the "Star Spangled Banner," several members of the Glee Club, who were present, joining in the song, and at the last, the voices of others not upon the stand, swelled the chorus grandly. The soldiers then shouted a parting hurrah, and formed in ranks again behind their escort. The band began a National air, the order, "march," was sounded along the line, and the long procession moved up Court street to Main, followed, pressed upon and impeded by an overwhelming mass of people, interspersed with hacks, carriages and wagons.

ON MAIN STREET.
As it gained the principal thoroughfare, turned the corner and halted, by command, in front of the American Hotel, the sight was thrilling. The roofs, the sidewalks, doorways, and even the centre of the street, were jammed with humanity. Every window in, every building framed a picture of women, with white arms stretched beckoningly outward, waving flags, and scarfs, and handkerchiefs. Some tossed rosettes to the soldiers, who snatched them from the pavements with cries of joy, and some, standing near, spoke to them kindly and tenderly, as only woman can.
As soon as the whole line was brought to a halt, Gen. SCROGGS stepped upon a carriage, and made a short appeal to the patriotism of the volunteers. It was answered by the swinging of hats and tremendous acclamations. The procession was again set in motion for the third and last time.

THE MARCH TO THE DEPOT.
Flags flanking the streets like banners at a review.—Flags fluttering from balconies, and roofs and windows; flags swung by shouting pedestrians, and waved by adventurous boys, clinging to lamp-posts, and awning-frames and signs. A black and heaving ocean of men, women and children, moving on either side; street-cars blockaded by the throng, horses scared and trembling, drivers vexed and profane, little boys crushed and crying, babies staring, and everybody generally distracted. Ah! but press nearer to the ranks, and watch the faces of those who are close upon the volunteers, keeping pace and gazing with nervous eagerness at each visage as it passes by. Here are the fathers, mothers, sisters and brothers of those who within a few short minutes will be absent from their sight, mayhap forever. Here a sister is clasping a brother's hand, if he be upon the outer file, and there a mother bends in between the ranks and whispers little parting admonitions to a half-weeping, half-indifferent son. One old man totters feebly near the rear...
... and bidding him "Remember daddy, remember daddy, Jim, whatever you do." ... down the street, past the churches, while St. Paul's bells are chiming "Columbia;" past stores, draped from ... to hold to ... with festoons of the red, white and blue, past Dudley hall, where Company F, 74th Regiment, Capt. Clinton, are drawn up with presented arms; on, cheering, under a huge banner emblazoned with paintings of the battles of WASHINGTON; down Perry to Washington street, up Washington to Exchange, and along Exchange to the N. Y.& Erie Depot.

THE SCENE AT THE DEPOT.
The depot and the enclosure are well guarded by soldiers, so that the surging crowd cannot enter. The band, the Old Guard and the Hose Companies halt outside at the principal opening, forming a line through which the volunteer companies defile into the depot grounds, and form in a long line, two abreast. Then the band marches in, playing a salute, and followed by Eagle and Taylor Hose Companies. The latter raise their hats at a signal and utter three resounding huzzas for the soldiers, which the latter return as heartily. The Continentals now defile into the enclosure, form likewise, and ex-President FILLMORE, uncovering his white locks, and raising himself to his full height, cries, "Old Guard, attention! Three cheers for the Buffalo Volunteers!" Every head in the ranks is bare, every arm is lifted and every voice shouts a stentorian "hurrah! hurrah! hurrah!" Again the soldiers hoarsely respond—all but a few who, with faces turned from the scene, are soothing the sorrowful females who cling to their skirts, or are bidding "good bye" to friends. The Old Guard moves out. The line Companies stay behind to toss up three of their members for good will—Capts. THOMAS and HEYWOOD, and Lieutenant GARDNER, who are going with the rest. Then they march from the enclosure in turn, and the volunteers are ordered into the cars. Seven cars are provided, all of which are packed full within a few moments. And now comes the last scene. Red eyed women hurry along the outside of the train, looking in the windows for sons or husbands. One poor Irish woman, dressed in mourning, calls for her son. He is found at last, and descending from the platform with the consent of his captain, is hugged, sobbingly, to the woman's bosom, and gets as many kisses in as many seconds. She puts a Catholic Bible in his hands, and says, tremuously: "Keep it, Patty, won't you, always?" "I will, mother, I will, good bye!" and Patty then extricated himself, climbs the platform, and rams a cigar between his teeth in order to look unconcerned. An endless shaking of hands is going on at the windows, and sometimes women and little girls are lifted up for a parting kiss or whisper. "Good bye, Jim." "Good bye, Tom." "Take care of yourself, Johnny." "Oh," cries a voice from one of the windows, "I guess there ain't much need of taking care of a feller's self, down where we're agoing. They ain't very dangerous." "Kill 'em off, d--n 'em! and shoot a couple for me while you're about it," responds somebody in the crowd.
And thus the ten minutes previous to the starting of the train are spent. Incidents are constantly occurring and words are continually being uttered, the portrayal and transcription of which we cannot attempt. The whistle sounds at last, the bell clangs, a metallic rumble rolls from the locomotive on the rear platform, and the cars are in motion. A glimmering row of faces glides by, the engines in the vicinity shriek farewell! one long and glorious cheer breaks from the crowd without, faint responses are heard from the departing train, and the Buffalo volunteers are gone.

From the Twenty-first—The Battle and the Retreat.
We are permitted to publish the following letter to Col. Lansing, from his son Henry, of Co. "D," 21st Regiment:—
OUTMOST PICKET, VIRGINIA,
Tuesday, July 23,1861.
MY DEAR FATHER,—You will see by the heading of this that we are on duty as outer pickets of the federal army, and since the sad reverse of Sunday a portion of the 21st has been so engaged. You will have heard from the papers and telegraphic reports all about the retreat of Sunday night—let me tell you what I saw of it. All day long we at Fort Runyon heard the booming of cannon, and knew that on that beautiful Sunday a great battle was being fought. I was on guard at the outer gate of the fort, and about half-past twelve at night a courier of the New York Fire Zouaves came up on a horse at full speed. I challenged him, and he answered he did not know the countersign, but that he was sent from the field of battle by Gen. McDowell to Col. Rogers, and that he must see him immediately, as his dispatches were very important. It made my heart jump for joy as I thought he was the bearer of orders for us to advance on to the field of battle; but, oh! how disappointed I was, and how heart sick, when he said "our army is in full retreat on your fort, and my orders to Col. Rogers are to have his cannon loaded and ready." It was about an hour after that the men began to come in by threes and fours, without order and without arms; the latter they had thrown away, even their revolvers, and some even went so far as to throw away their shirts—officers and men, in one confused mass, came in on a run. Gen. Mansfield gave us orders not to let any able-bodied soldier pass, but to pass all the wounded and dead out of the fort and over the long bridge. The cries and groans of the wounded as they were driven by were heartrending and awful to hear. As fast as the ambulances came in we went up and gave them water; it was fearful to see how eagerly they drank the water. One man that I gave a drink to gasped out, "God bless you, stranger," and fell back dead. You at home can never form any idea of the horrors of that fearful retreat.
I will give you a description of a portion of the battle that I received from Mr. Horn, a New York Fire Zouave that I gave a good dinner to:
The battle commenced at half past seven in the morning and the retreat began late in the afternoon. The New York 71st was the first to advance on the batteries, and it was badly cut up. They stood and fired fifteen rounds, when they had to fall back on the New York 8th, and they, in turn, fell back upon the Fire Zouaves and the Massachusetts 5th. The Zouaves fought like tigers—but true grit and game could not prevail against overpowering numbers, and they had to retreat on to the Rhode Island 1st and 2d, which could not make good their position against the rebel batteries. At this time, two regiments near by began to fall back in disorder, when the panic seized our troops, as soon as the enemy saw that, they brought out their light artillery, and planted the guns on a hill that commanded the bridge over which a portion of our troops must pass and as our men rushed on, and were in a jam on and about this bridge, they opened fire and cut down our poor fellows in scores. It was here that Colonel Farnham was wounded, and Governor Sprague's horse shot under him. As our flying troops were passing along the raid, the farmers came out of their houses and fired upon them—the very farmers who only a day or two ago expressed themselves overjoyed that our troops were about to punish the rebel dogs.
During the fight the cry from the enemy's side was "no quarter to the Yankees." I made enquiry of sundry officers and men and they all say that the rebels would come out and bayonet our poor fellows as they lay upon the field. One man told me that as he was passing a wounded Zouave the poor fellow begged for a drink of water. His canteen being empty he went in search of some and took a full canteen from a dead soldier of the New York 84th, and before he could get back to the bleeding Zouave, he saw a rebel come up and pin the poor fellow with his sabre bayonet. A little way beyond he saw a rebel back up to a little drummer boy and shoot him through the head. Think of that, and tell me, if you can, what kind of people we are fighting—they cannot be men.
The Maine 3d brought into our fort four or five rebel prisoners, and it was as much as the guard around them could do to keep our men from hanging them.
Our Company "D" and Company "C" were last night, sent out to watch the motions of the rebels. We went up as far as Bailey's Cross Roads where we made our headquarters in an old blacksmith shop and divided up our little troop into squads of six each, and sent each squad to man pickets, and separated half a mile from each other. The Oswego Regiment also sent out pickets with us. We are the only federal troops on this line between our Fort and the enemy. Our Captain made us a speech—said that our duty was attended with danger; that we were liable at any moment to be picked off; that we must be vigilant and cautious, and if we saw any one sneaking around, we were not to challenge, but shoot at once. About half past 3 o'clock this morning the Oswego pickets came in and reported that a large body of the Black Horse cavalry were just behind them, and that they had fired but did not kill any. We all then fell back to the railroad about two miles, and then made a breastwork of logs and trees across the road and up on both sides of the bank. We had hardly got it finished when up came two guns from Greene's United Army battery, which we planted in our breastworks. You would be surprised to see how much can be done in a short time by willing and stout hands. I myself cut down two large trees in about half an hour, that at home would be a hard two hours' job. We are all now in our "Fort Alberger," and every moment expect to see the head of the rebel advance. Good Bye, H.G. L.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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