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22nd Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

THE TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT.
The Headquarters of the 22d Regiment, at Palace Garden, in Fourteenth street, was a scene of enterprise all day yesterday, the officers of the regiment being busily engaged recruiting their ranks to the full complement.
HEADQUARTERS, 22D NAIONAL GUARD, N. N. Y.
New-York, June 17, 1863.
GENERAL ORDERS NO. 21.—The Regiment will assemble to-morrow (Thursday) morning, June 18th, at 10 o'clock a. m., at Regimental Headquarters, prepared to march forthwith en route for Harrisburg, Pa.
All those members of the regiment and recruits unsupplied with knapsacks, haversacks, blankets, &c., will receive them at the armory this morning.
Field and staff will report to the Colonel at these headquarters at 9 o'clock a. m.; non-commissioned staff and field music will report to the Adjutant at the same time and place. Officers' baggage (limited to one small trunk) and company property will be at headquarters at 7 o'clock a. m.
These orders, emanating from the President of the United States, through the Governor of this State, are imperative; and it id the duty of every member of the command to report in conformity therewith.
The orders from General Headquarters, referred to in General Orders No. 20, having been published in public prints are not hereunto attached.
By order of Col. LLOYD ASPINWALL.
WM. J. A. McGrath, Adjutant.
Owing to an order from Gov. Seymour setting aside the red-tape practice, the door has been opened to the State wardrobe, and the soldiers are to receive their uniforms before leaving.

Captain Peabody.
We have the pleasure of welcoming home Captain O. D. Peabody, of the 22nd, and the brave men who have composed his command.
No body of men in the army deserve more commendation for bravery and good conduct in the field, and in no place have the returned soldiers been more heartily welcomed than in Kesseville. But one sentiment animates the whole, and that is, strict loyalty to the government under all circumstances.
We understand from Captain Peabody, that the larger portion of the regiment intend to re-enlist, and "for the war."
All honor to the brave men of the 22nd and to the members of company C.

RECEPTION.—The "Old Cambridge Volunteers," of the Twenty-second regiment, will have a grand reception in that place, to-morrow. According to the programme, which we find in the Washington County Post, the greeting will be a really noble one. The Volunteers will arrive by the train leaving Troy at 7.35 A. M., due at Cambridge at 8.30; when a procession will be formed in the following order, under the direction of the Chief Marshal and his Assistants:
Doring's Band.
Military companies, under Captains Wilson and Taylor.
Fire Companies from Salem and Union Village.
Staff and commissioned officers Twenty-second regiment.
Old Cambridge Volunteers.
Committee of Arrangements, Clergy, and invited guests.
Citizens generally.
The Rev. C. H. Taylor will make a welcoming speech, a dinner will be given to the soldiers and firemen, and the Volunteers will return to Albany.

Promotion of Lieut.-Col. Crane.
We are pleased to learn that Lieut.-Col N. M. CRANE, of the late 23d has been appointed Colonel of the 107th. In alluding to this appointment the Elmira Advertiser gives the Colonel the following merited complimentary notice.—"As a faithful and well tried officer, and a proficient in military drill, routine and discipline, he has few equals in the army. The 107th may congratulate themselves upon the accession of so worthy a commanding officer."

THE EXCURSION of the Twenty-second regiment, last Saturday, "up North," was a brilliant affair—enjoyed by the soldiers, and finely carried out by the citizens. At Fort Edward, Prof. King gave a capital speech; at Sandy Hill, Provost-Marshal Charles Hughes made some happy remarks. Charles Rodgers also spoke. At Glen's Falls, Senator Little introduced Rev. Mr. Fennell, who opened the exercises with prayer, and Isaiah Davis made a welcoming address. A splendid collation was then served. The road from Fort Edward to Glen's Falls was lined with spectators, and the soldiers said that they saw more people on Saturday, than they had set eyes on in all Virginia during two years.

Twenty-Second Regiment.
This regiment has been under positive marching orders since last evening, when Colonel Aspinwall ordered the men to assemble at the regimental headquarters, at Palace Garden, at 10 o'clock this morning, armed and equipped, and provided with rations to leave for Harrisburg, at the shortest notice. In pursuance of this order, about three hundred members of the regiment were at headquarters this morning by the hour designated.
Owing, however, to the fact that a quantity of uniforms and equipments had to be distributed among the men, it was found necessary to postpone the departure of the regiment for a few hours. A large number of the friends of the soldiers were present, among whom were many ladies. The line will be formed in Fourteenth street at two o'clock, when the regiment will march down Broadway to Pier l, North river, where it will embark in a transport for Amboy, en route for Harrisburg. The rank and file will number about five hundred men,

THE 22ND.—We understand arrangements have been made to give this regiment a suitable reception on their arrival at this place, and that a committee has been appointed to visit and invite the entire regiment to honor our village with a visit. If the whole regiment cannot be induced to accept the invitation, our own boys will be received in a manner which will convice [sic] them that their services are appreciated.

The Twenty-Second New York Volunteers.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
HEADQUARTERS, TWENTY-SECOND NEW YORK VOLS., IN THE FIELD, Sept. 10, 1862.
While you have given honorable mention of some of the other regiments of Hatch's brigade, who fought so bravely at Bull run in the late battles, you have omitted to say anything concerning the Twenty-second, which lost more officers and men than any other. We entered the field with twenty-six officers and six hundred men, and came off with two officers and one hundred and twenty men, the proportion of officers killed and wounded being greater than in any other corps engaged since this war commenced. Hoping that, with the justice that you have shown in noticing gallant conduct, you will not overlook this, I remain, respectfully, yours,
W. P. HUTCHINSON,
Surgeon, Twenty-second New York Volunteers.

THE 30TH AND 22D REGIMENTS.-- The Troy Whig says it is more than probable the 30th and 22d Regiment, N. Y. S. V., will be mustered out in that city. The fiends of the regiments in Troy have had interviews with both the Governor and Adjutant-General, in relation to the matter, and both officials have given their assent to the request--subject to the decision of the commanding officers of the regiments. We presume, however, the United States authorities will have something to say about the matter.

Arrival of the Twenty-Second Regiment.
The Twenty-Second Regiment arrived opposite this city this morning about 9 o'clock. They crossed the river about 11 o'clock, and proceeded to dinner at the Delavan House.
This regiment was organized May 14, 1861, under the command of Col. PHELPS, now about the oldest Colonel in the Army of the Potomac. Under the act of Congress authorizing the promotion by Brevet of one Colonel in each Corps to the rank of Brigadier General, Col. PHELPS has been recommended for that position. The regiment remained encamped in Troy until about the middle of June when it came to this city, remaining at the Barracks a few days, and then embarked for Washington, reaching that city about the first of July, and participating in the review on the 4th, along with many other New York regiments.
In March, 1862, it moved out to Upton's Hill, that place having been evacuated by the enemy, and afterwards marched out to Centreville, but soon returned. Soon after it again moved out, and down to Falmouth, reaching there on the 18th of April. On the occasion of the retreat of the forces under Gen. BANKS down the Shenandoah, they were moved up to Front Royal, but soon returned. On the occasion of a foraging expedition they had a skirmish with STEWART'S cavalry, repulsing it with considerable loss. The action was brought on by the surprise of their wagon in the rear in which they lost six or eight prisoners.
On the 10th of August the Regiment arrived at Cedar Mountain, having crossed the Rappahannock at Kelley's Ford. The army retreated about the 20th. On the retreat the Regiment held Warrenton three days, acting as Provost Guard. On the 26th they moved toward Manassas, and were under fire in the battles of Gaines' Mill, Groveton and Manassas Plains, August. 28—30, during which they suffered heavily. At Chantilly they formed a portion of the reserve, and afterwards with the rest of the army, retreated within the fortifications of Washington.
The Regiment started on the Maryland campaign September 6, and formed a portion of the right wing at South Mountain in which engagement they again suffered severely, but routed the enemy with great slaughter. Col. PHELPS commanded the Brigade in this battle, and has remained in its command since that time. The Regiment also participated in the battle of Antietam, September 16 and 17, suffering great loss.
From Maryland, the regiment returned with the army to Snicker's Gap, and finally to Falmouth, going into camp at Belle Plain. At the first battle of Fredericksburg the regiment was transferred to the extreme left, and participated in that fight—forming part of Franklin's corps. They were under fire three days, lost seven wounded, and returned to their old camp grounds.
With the exception of the "Mud march," they remained quiet until the battle of Chancellorsville, forming at first a portion of the extreme left. When the 11th Corps was driven back, their corps was transferred to the right in their place, making a forced march to attain their position. They were there kept as a reserve. There loss here was ten wounded.
Sunday night, before starting for their homes, the Regiment was highly complimented in an address by Gen. WADSWORTH, for their bravery and discipline. In every action they have been in, they have indeed covered themselves with glory.
The sanitary condition of the Regiment has been remarkably good, having lost but twenty by natural causes. In officers, they have lost eleven killed and one died a natural death; men, fifty-seven killed and nineteen a natural death; missing and never heard from, eight; wounded, about one hundred and sixty-five.
They left this city about 825 strong, and have received in the neighborhood of 300 recruits, many of whom, however, were discharged as unfit for service. Their aggregate now is 505 men, 419 with the regiment, and the rest in the hospital and elsewhere.
After dinner at the Delavan, the Regiment proceeded to the Capitol, where they were welcomed by Gov. SEYMOUR, Col. PHELPS responding in a few brief and appropriate remarks. The Regiment then proceeded to the
Barracks.
The following are the present officers of the Regiment:—
FIELD.
Colonel—Walter Phelps, of Glens Falls.
Lieutenant Colonel—Thomas J. Strong, of Sandy Hill.
Major—Lyman Ormsby, of Crown Point.
STAFF.
Adjutant—Malachi Weidman, of Cohoes.
Quartermaster—James W. Schenck, Jr., of Glens Falls.
Surgeon—Elias S. Bissell, Lancaster, Erie.
Assistant Surgeon—A. N. Holden, Glens Falls.
Chaplain—Rev. H. H. Bates, Glens Falls.
LINE.
Company A—Captain, Addison L. Estebrook; First Lieutenant, Thomas Calkins; Second Lieutenant, Patrick McCall.
Company B—Captain, James W. McCoy; First Lieutenant, William H. Hoysradt; Second Lieutenant, Charles Doubleday.
Comyany C—Captain, C. D. Peabody; First Lieutenant, G. T. Thomas; Second Lieutenant, James Valleau.
Company D—Captain, Lucius Wilson; First Lieutenant, Henry D. Cook; Second Lieutenant, Charles Akin.
Company E—Captain, Daniel Bardey; First Lieutenant, Warren Allen; Second Lieutenant, George Kingsley.
Company F—Captain, Fred. E. Ranger; First Lieutenant, James H. Merreil; Second Lieutenant, Salmon D. Sherman.
Company G—Captain, Duncan Cameron; First Lieutenant, Asa Berry; Second Lieutenant, ____ Bartlett.
Company H—Captain, Matthew S. Teller; First Lieutenant, Albert Holbrook; Second Lieutenant, Charles F. Duers.
Company J—First Lieutenant, Benjamin Wickham, commanding; Second Lieutenant, George Whitmore.
Company K—Captain, Edward Edgerley;  First Lieutenant, John J. Baker; Second Lieutenant, ____ T. Bellarny.

TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT.—This noble regiment, whose arrival at Albany was noticed yesterday, was organized on the 14th, of May, 1861, under Col. Phelps, now the oldest Colonel in the Army of the Potomac, who has been acting as Brigadier-General, and, will, no doubt be confirmed in that rank. It left Troy in June 1861, 825 strong, and has received about 300 recruits. The aggregate at present is 506—419 with the regiment—the remainder in hospital and on special service. Sunday night, before starting for home, the regiment was highly complimented in an address by General Wadsworth, for its bravery and discipline. In every action the officers and men have been in, they have indeed covered themselves with glory.
Efforts were made to have the Twenty-second mustered out of the service in Troy according to the wish of the officers and men, but in vain. Tomorrow the regiment will start for Fort Edward, Sandy Hill and Glen's Falls, at each of which places it will have a reception. The following is a list of the officers:
FIELD.
Colonel—Walter Phelps, of Glen's Falls.
Lieut.-Colonel—Thos. J. Strong, of Sandy Hill.
Major—Lyman Ormsby, of Crown Point.
STAFF.
Adjutant—Malachi Weldman, of Cohoes.
Quartermaster—James W. Schenck, jr., of Glen's Falls.
Surgeon—Elias S. Bissell, Lancaster, Erie.
Assistant Surgon—A. N. Holden, Glen's Falls.
Chaplain—Rev, H. H. Bates, Glen's Falls.
LINE.
Company A—Captain, Addison L. Estebrook; First Lieutenant, Thomas Calkings; Second Lieutenant, Patrick McCall.
Company B—Captain, James W. McCoy; First Lieutenant, William H. Hoysradt; Second Lieutenant, Charles Doubleday.
Company C—Captain, C. D. Peabody; First Lieutenant, G. T. Thomas; Second Lieutenant, James Valleah.
Company D—Captain, Lucius Wilson; First Lieutenant, Henry D. Cook; Second Lieutenant Charles Akin.
Company E—Captain, Daniel Bardey; First Lieutenant, Warren Allen; Second Lieutenant, George Kingsley.
Company F—Captain, Fred. E. Ranger: First Lieutenant, James H. Merrell; Second Lieutenant, Salmon D. Sherman.
Company G—Captain, Duncan Cameron; First Lieutenant, Asa Berry; Second Lieutenant, ____ Bartlett.
Company H—Captain, Matthew S. Teller; First Lieutenant, Albert Holbrook; Second Lieutenant, Charles F. Duers.
Company I—First Lieutenant, Benjamin Wickham, commanding; Second Lieutenant, George Whitmore.
Company K—Captain, Edward Edgerly; First Lieutenant, John J. Baker; Second Lieutenant Charles T. Bellarney.

Returned Regiments.—The 22d Regiment arrived here last evening and proceeded at once to Albany by the Hudson R. R. This regiment returns with about 400 men under the command of Col. Phelps. The 37th New-York Volunteers (Irish Rifles) regiment is expected to arrive directly with the 38th New-York regiment, organized by Col. J. H. Hobart Ward (now Brigadier-General.) The gallant General will probably return with the regiment. The 6th New-York Volunteers (Wilson's Zouaves) regiment is on its way from New Orleans, and will arrive here shortly.

THE 22D REGIMENT, N. Y. S..V., TO BE MUSTERED OUT IN TROY.—The Whig says : "In a letter received yesterday by Hon. James Forsyth, from Colonel Phelps, of the 22d Regiment, N. Y. S. V., the Colonel expressed a desire that his regiment should be mustered out of the service in this city. A committee left last evening for Washington, for the purpose of conferring with Col. P., and making all necessary arrangements for forwarding the regiment to this city. The Agricultural Society have consented to give the use of their buildings for the accommodation of the regiment. The regiment's term of enlistment will expire early the present month."

Arrival of the Twenty-Second Regiment.
This Regiment, Colonel Phelps in command, arrived here yesterday morning, about four hundred strong. After dining, as the guests of the city, at the Delavan House, they called upon Governor Seymour, at the Capitol, and were welcomed home by him in a few brief, eloquent remarks, in which he fully acknowledged their valuable services and complimented their heroic bearing on the battle-field. From the Capitol they proceeded to the Barracks, where the men were quartered for the night.—They will probably be mustered out to-day.
The following are the present officers of the Regiment:
FIELD.
Colonel—Walter Phelps, of Glens Falls.
Lieut. Colonel—Thomas J. Strong, of Sandy Hill.
Major—Lyman Ormsby, of Crown Point.
Adjutant—Malachi Weidman, of Cohoes.
Quartermaster—James W. Schenck, Jr., of Glens Falls.
Shurgeon—Elias S. Bissell, Lancaster, Erie.
Assistant Surgeon—A. N. Holden, of Glens Falls.
Chaplain—Rev. H. H. Bates, of Glens Falls.
LINE.
Company A—Captain, Addison L. Estebrook; First Lieutenant, Thomas Calkins; Second Lieutenant, Patrick McCall.
Company B—Captain, James W. McCoy; First Lieutenant, William H. Hoysradt; Second Lieutenant, Charles Doubleday.
Company C—Captain, C. D. Peabody; First Lieutenant, G. T. Thomas; Second Lieutenant, James Valleau.
Company D—Captain, Lucius Wilson; First Lieutenant, Henry D. Cook; Second Lieutenant, Charles Alkin.
Company E—Captain, Daniel Bardey; First Lieutenant, Warren Allen; Second Lieutenant, George Kingsley.
Company F—Captain. Fred. E. Ranger; First Lieutenant, James H. Merrell; Second Lieutenant, Salmon D. Sherman.
Company G—Captain, Duncan Cameron; First Lieutenant, Asa Berry; Second Lieutenant, ____ Bartlett.
Company H—Captain, Mathew S. Teller; First Lieutenant, Albert Holbrook; Second Lieutenant, Charles F. Duers.
Company I—First Lieutenant, Benj. Wickham, commanding; Second Lieutenant, George Whitmore.
Company K—Captain, Edward Edgerley; First Lieutenant. John J. Baker; Second Lieutenant, Charles T. Bellamy.

The Returning Regiment.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURES OF THE TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.,
The above regiment arrived in this city from the seat of war at five o'clock yesterday afternoon. On their arrival they proceeded to the Park Barracks, where a short stay was made in order to give the men refreshments after which they took the cars for Albany, where the regiment was raised. The Twenty-second numbered about three hundred men, and was under the command of Col. Phelps. This gallant corps has been in all the principal actions of the war, and everywhere conducted itself with bravery.
The following are the principal officers:—
Colonel—Walter Phelps, Jr.
Lieutenant Colonel—Thomas Strong.
Major— ____ Ormsbery.
Captains—McCoy, Peabody, Wilson, Burgee, Cammerson, Tiller and Edgerly.
On Saturday, when the two companies of the
22d New York Regiment, belonging to Gen. Keyes Brigade, advanced within a mile of Fairfax Court House, they ascertained from the inhabitants of that neighborhood that when the rebels retreated the condition of the roads was such that they were compelled to leave 6 pieces of artillery behind them, which remained there until Sunday, when the rebels in force returned and carried five away.

MORNING EXPRESS.
ALBANY, FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 1863.
Arrival of the Twenty-Second Regiment.
The 22d Regiment arrived opposite this city yesterday morning about 9 o'clock. They crossed the river about 11 o'clock, and proceded [sic] to dinner at the Delavan House.
This regiment was organized May 14, 1861, under the command of Col. Phelps, now about the oldest Colonel in the Army of the Potomac. Under the act of Congress authorizing the promotion by brevet of one Colonel in each Corps to the rank of Brigadier General, Col. Phelps has been recommended for that position. The regiment remained encamped in Troy until about the middle of June, when it came to this city, remaining at the Barracks a few days, and then embarked for Washington, reaching that city about the first of July, and participating in the review on the 4th, along with many other New York regiments.
In March, 1862, it moved up to Upton's Hill, that place having been evacuated by the enemy, and afterwards marched out to Centreville, but soon returned. Soon after it again moved out, and down to Falmouth, reaching there on the 18th of April. On the occasion of the retreat of the forces under Gen. Banks down the Shenandoah, they were moved up to Front Royal, but soon returned. On the occasion of a foraging expedition they had a skirmish with Stewart's cavalry, repulsing it with considerable loss. The action was brought on by the surprise of their wagon in the rear, in which they lost six or eight prisoners.
On the 10th of August the Regiment arrived at Cedar Mountain, having crossed the Rappahannock at Kelley's Ford. The army retreated about the 20th. On the retreat the Regiment held Warrenton three days, acting as Provost Guard. On the 26th they moved toward Manassas, and were under fire in the battle of Gaines' Mill, Groveton and Manassas Plains, Bugust [sic]  28—30, during which they suffered heavily. At Chantilly they formed a portion of the reserve, and afterwards, with the rest of the army, retreated within the fortifications of Washington.
The Regiment started on the Maryland campaign September 5, and formed a portion of the right wing at South Mountain, in which engagement they again suffered severely, but routed the enemy with great slaughter. Col. Phelps commanded the Brigade in this battle, and has remained in its command since that time. The Regiment also participated in the battle of Antietam, September 16 and 17, suffering great loss.
From Maryland, the Regiment, returned with the army to Snicker's Gap, and finally to Falmouth, going into camp at Belle Plain. At the first battle of Fredericksburg the regiment was transferred to the extreme left, and participated in that fight—forming part of Franklin's corps. They were under fire three days, lost seven wounded, and returned to their old camp grounds.
With the exception of the "Mud march," they remained quiet until the battle of Chancellorsville, forming at first a portion of the extreme left. When the 11th Corps was driven back, their corps was transferred to the right in their place, making a forced march to attain their position. They were there kept as a reserve. Their loss here was ten wounded.
Sunday night, before starting for their homes, the regiment was highly complimented in an address by Gen. Wadsworth, for their bravery and discipline in every action they have been in, they have indeed covered themselves: with glory.
The sanitary condition of the regiment has been remarkably good, having lost but twenty by natural causes. In officers, they have lost eleven killed and one died a natural death; men, 57 killed, and 19 a natural death; missing and never heard from, eight; wounded, about 165.
They left this city about 825 strong, and have received in the neighborhood of 300 recruits, many of whom, however, were discharged as unfit for service. Their aggregate now us 505, 419 with the regiment, and the rest in the hospital and elsewhere.
After dinner at the Delavan, the regiment proceeded to the Capitol, where they were welcomed by Gov. Seymour, Col. Phelps responding with a few brief and appropriate remarks. The regiment then proceeded to the Barracks.
The following are the present field and staff officers of the regiment:
FIELD.
Colonel—Walter Phelps; of Glens Falls.
Lieutenant Colonel—Thomas J. Strong, of Sandy Hill.
Major—Lyman Ormsby, of Crown Point.
STAFF.
Adjutant—Malachi Weidman, of Cohoes.
Quartermaster—James W. Schenck, Jr., of Glens Falls.
Surgeon—Elias S. Bissell, Lancaster, Erie.
Assistant Surgeon—A. N. Holden, Glen's Falls.
Chaplain—Rev. H. H. Bates. Glens Falls.

Arrival of the Twenty-Second Regiment.
The 22d Regiment arrived opposite this city yesterday morning about 9 o'clock. The crossed the river about 11 o'clock, and proceded [sic] to dinner at the Delavan House.
This regiment was organized May 14, 1861, under the command of Col. Phelps, now about the oldest Colonel in the Army of the Potomac. Under the act of Congress authorizing the promotion by brevet of one Colonel in each Corps to the rank of Brigadier General, Col. Phelps has been recommended for that position. The regiment remained encamped in Troy until about the middle of June, when it came to this city, remaining at the Barracks a few days, and then embarked for Washington, reaching that city about the first of July, and participating in the review, on the 4th, along with many other New York regiments.
In March, 1862, it moved up to Upton's Hill, that place having been evacuated by the enemy, and afterwards marched out to Centreville, but soon returned. Soon after it again moved out, and down to Falmouth, reaching there on the 18th of April. On the occasion of the retreat of the forces under Gen. Banks down the Shenandoah, they were moved up to Front Royal, but soon returned. On the occasion of a foraging expedition they had a skirmish with Stewart's cavalry, repulsing it with considerable loss. The action was brought on by the surprise of their wagon in the rear, in which they lost six or eight prisoners.
On the 10th of August the Regiment arrived at Cedar Mountain, having crossed the Rappahannock at Kelley's Ford. The army retreated about the 20th. On the retreat the Regiment held Warrenton three days, acting as Provost Guard. On the 26th they moved toward Manassas, and were under fire in the battle of Gaines' Mill, Groveton and Manassas Plains, August 28—30, during which they suffered heavily. At Chantilly they formed a portion of the reserve, and afterwards, with the rest of the army, retreated within the fortifications of Washington. ... Maryland campaign

The Regiment started on the ... September 5, and formed a portion of the right wing at South Mountain, in which engagement they again suffered severely, but routed the enemy with great slaughter. Col. Phelps commanded the Brigade in this battle, and has remained in its command since that time. The Regiment also participated in the battle of Antietam, September 16 and 17, suffering great loss.
From Maryland, the Regiment returned with the army to Snicker's Gap, and finally to Falmouth, going into camp at Belle Plain. At the first battle of Fredericksburg the regiment was transferred to the extreme left, and participated in that fight—forming part of Franklin's corps. They were under fire three days, lost seven wounded, and returned to their old camp grounds.
With the exception of the "Mud march," they remained quiet until the battle of Chancellorsville, forming at first a portion of the extreme left. When the 11th Corps was driven back, their corps was transferred to the right in their place, making a forced march to attain their position. They were here kept as a reserve. Their loss here was ten wounded.
Sunday night, before starting for their homes, the regiment was highly complimented in an address by Gen. Wadsworth, for their bravery and discipline. In every action they have been in, they have indeed covered themselves with glory.
The sanitary condition of the regiment has been remarkably good, having lost but twenty by natural causes. In officers, they have lost eleven killed and one died a natural death; men, 57 killed, and 19 a natural death; missing and never heard from, eight; wounded, about 165.
They left this city about 825 strong, and have received in the neighborhood of 300 recruits, many of whom, however, were discharged as unfit for service. Their aggregate now is 505, 419 with the regiment, and the rest in the hospital and elsewhere.
After dinner at the Delavan, the regiment proceeded to the Capitol, where they were welcomed by Gov. Seymour, Col. Phelps responding in a few brief and appropriate remarks. The regiment then proceeded to the Barracks.
The following are the present field and staff officers of the rgiment [sic]:—
FIELD.
Colonel—Walter Phelps, of Glens Falls.
Lieutenant Colonel—Thomas J. Strong, of Sandy Hill.
Major—Lyman Ormsby, of Crown Point.
STAFF.
Adjutant—Malachi Weidman. of Cohoes.
Quartermaster—James W. Schenck, Jr., of Glens Falls.
Surgeon—Elias S. Bissell, Lancaster, Erie.
Assistant Surgeon—A. N. Holden, Glens Falls.
Chaplain—Rev. H. H. Bates, Glens Falls.

SOLDIERS' RECEPTION AT CAMBRIDGE.—CO. D, of the 22d regiment, met with a glorious reception in Cambridge, Washington county, yesterday. The company, accompanied by Doring's Baud, arrived there about ten o'clock A. M. After marching through the principal streets of the town, escorted by two fire companies and the Home Guard, the soldiers sat down to a dinner which had been prepared by the ladies of the village in the public park. Addresses were delivered, sentiments offered, and everything passed off in the most creditable manner.
—The soldiers, with the Band, reached this city last evening. The former took the 9 o'clock train for Albany, there to remain until mustered out.

RECEPTION OF Co. A, TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT.—Waterford presents a gala appearance to-day, in honor of the reception of Co. A, Twenty-second regiment, which will have a cordial welcome. Elaborate decorations have been prepared and the streets of the village are lurid with bunting and patriotic emblems. On the corner of Broad and Second streets, a soldiers' tent has been erected, filled with equipments, and over the door is the inscription, "Walk into my shebang." The different hotels, Porter's news room and many private houses, are ornamented.
According to the programme, the company was to arrive from Albany, by the Saratoga railroad, at 1.40 P. M., to-day—when the bells would be rung, and the escort form in the following order:
Marshal.
Patten's Band.
The various Engine and Hose Companies of the village.
President and Trustees of the village.
Committee of Arangements [sic].
Clergy.
Citizens and strangers.
Waterford soldiers, discharged or belonging to other regiments.
After marching through the principal streets, the volunteers will be welcomed by John O. Mott, and partake of a collation at Morgan Hall, under the auspices of the ladies. C. Boughton is chairman of the committee of arrangements; T. Brisbin, secretary.

WATERFORD.—The reception of Co. A, Twenty-second regiment, at Waterford yesterday, did honor to the residents of that village and to the committee in charge of the arrangements. The procession which escorted the soldiers through the principal streets consisted of Knickerbocker Engine Co. No. 1, Hudson Engine Co. No. 2, Breslin Hose Company and numerous citizens. We have rarely seen such a universal decoration of buildings. At the Morgan House John O. Mott made a speech of welcome, abounding in patriotic sentiments. Lieut. Col. Strong made a rousing, soldier-like response. Mr. Mott stated that $6162 had been subscribed and $6145 expended in aid of soldiers' families in Waterford. A colation [sic] was then served at Morgan Hall, under the auspices of the ladies. After this reception, part of the soldiers proceeded to Cohoes, where another welcome was in store for them.

The 22d Regiment.
The 22d Regiment of N. Y. State Volunteers arrived in Albany on the 4th instant, their term of service having expired. After being formally mustered out and paid they will be wending their way home. A considerable number from the southern part of this county and Essex were members of this regiment.

To BE MUSTERED OUT IN TROY.—The Twenty-second regiment, Col. Phelps, will be mustered out of the service in this city, and the Fair Grounds will be used for this purpose. This regiment, it will be recollected, encamped in Troy before its departure for the war, where it has rendered honorable service.

THE TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT.—Several companies of this regiment visited Fort Edward, &c., receiving a warm greeting. They returned to this city on Saturday night at 11 o'clock.

ABSTRACT C.
COMPLETE REGISTER.
Of fatalities in the 22d. Regiment N. Y. S. Vols. from the time of its  organization to March 20. 1863.
Names.  Rank. Where.  Of What.  When.
Field and Staff.
Joseph B. Atherly,  Surgeon.  Falmouth Va. Typhoid Fever,  Aug. 12, ‘62
Gorton T. Thomas, Lieut. Col. Washington  Wounds,  Sept. 2, “
Co. A.
Timothy B. Vandecar, 3d. Sergt. Georgetown D. C.  Typhoid Fever, Sept. 26, '61
John H. Vanderworken, Private  Eckington D. C. " "  July 20, '62
Hiram Clute,  1st Lieut.  Washington D. C.  Wounds,  Sept. 28, "
John Murray,  Private.  Frederick Md. "  Oct. 23, "
Chauucey F. VanDusen, "  Bull Run,  Fell in action,  Aug. 30, '62
Leonard G. Fletcher, Corporal. " " " " " " "
Jonathan G. Porter,  Private.  South Mountain. " "  Sept. 14, "
John Wright, " " " " " " " "
Co. B.
William Baker,  Private.  Upton's Hill Va.,  Pneumonia,  Feb'y 11, "
Edward Cromwell,  Corporal. " "  Wounds,
Gurdon F. Viele,  Private. "
Robert E. McCoy,  Captain.  Groveton,  Fell in action,  Aug. 29, "
Charles E. Mills,  1st Sgt.  Bull Run, " " "  30, "
Patrick Mehan,  Private. " " " " " " "
Charles E. Stickney, 2d Sargent,  South Mountain, " "  Sept. 14, "
Oliver L. Lackey,  Private. " " " " " " "
Duncan Lendrum,  1st Lieut.  Bull Run,  Missing,  Aug. 30,"
Charles H. Reed,  Private. " " " " " "
Co. C.
Charles B. Piersons,  2d Lieut. Washington D. C., Wounds,  Sept. 7, "
Carlisle D. Beaumont, 1st "  Groveton,  Fell in action,  Aug. 29, "
James Murray,  Private. " " " " " "
Henry N. Dunckly, " " " " " " "
Joseph Pero, "  Bull Run, " " "  30, "
Henry W. Hathaway, 3d Sergt.  South Mountain, " "  Sept. 14, "
Co. D.
James Stalker,  Private.  Washington D.C., Inflamation of brain, July 17, '61
Charles J. Eaton,  3d. Sergt. "  Typhoid Fever,  May 18, '62
Henry S. Milliman,  Captain. "  Wounds,  Sept. 10, "
William T. Beattie,  Lieut.  Bull Run,  Fell in action.  Aug. 30, "
Co. E.
John M'Auley,  Private.  Arlington Va.,  Typhoid fever, Sept. 14, '61
Rollin F. Auston, "  Alexandria Va., " "  April 10, '62
Timothy Bradley, "  Smoketown Md., Diarrhea,  Oct. 15, "
Byron G. Charette, "  Washington D. C., Wounds,  Sept. 13, "
Charles Goolah, " " " "  22, "
Frank Aubin, "  Frederick Md., " "
Joseph Whitford, "  Hospital Field, " "
Jacob Ross, "  Smoketown, "  Oct. 14, "
Wilber F. Buswell, "  South Mountain,  Fell in action,  Sept. 14, "
Charles Cushing,  2d Lieut.  Antietam, " " "  17, "
Patrick Johnson,  Private.  Groveton.  Missing,  Aug. 29, "
Nelson Ross, " " "  Aug. 29, "
William T. Norriss, 1st Lieut.  Bull Run, " "  30, "
Co. F.
Emanuel Noel,  Private.  Georgetown,  Typhoid Fever,  Nov. 24, '61
Lyman Ward, "  Hospital,  Small pox,  Jany. 17, '62
Titus L. West, "  Alexandria,  Typhoid fever,  May 13, "
Rufus N. Barto, "  Col. Colt's Hosp., Wounds,  Oct. 18, "
John E. Benjamin, "  Fairfax Seminary, "  Sept. 11, "
Aaron Sherman, "  Frederick Md., "  Oct. 9, "
Dewitt C. Barton, "  Centreville Va.,  Killed,  April 5, "
Willard Combs, "  Bull Run,  Fell in action,  Aug. 30, "
Andrew LaPoint, " " " " " " " "
Daniel Pendell,  5th Sergt.  South Mountain, " "  Sept. 14, "
Benjamin F. Hendryx, Private.  Bull Run,  Missing,  Aug. 30, "
William O. Jackson, Corporal. " " " " " "
Archibald Ramsay,  Private. " " " " " "
Co. G.
Nelson Hastings,  Private.  Washington D. C., Consumption,  July 16, '61
Cornelius White, "  Upton's Hill,  Typhoid fever, Oct. 26, "
William Washburn, " " " " "  Dec. 13, "
John Constantino, "  Washington D. C.,  Wounds,  Sept. 15, '62
Rufus K. Verrill, " " " "  8, "
Ansel Taft, "  Alexandria, Va., " "
Thomas Whitton, " " " "
Lewis T. Johnson,  Corporal.  Bull Run,  Fell in action, Aug. 30, "
Thomas Moore,  Private. " " " " " " "
William Riley, " " " " " " " "
Lewis Fenix, " " " " " " " "
John Neeson, "  South Mountain, " "  Sept. 14, "
James Connell, "  Antietam, " " "  17, "
George F. Cleaveland, "  Bull Run,  Missing,  Aug. 30, "
Co. H.
Edward Blanchard,  Private.  Col. Coll. Hosp.,  Typhoid fever, Nov. 14, '61
Lyman Chamberlain, "  Bristol Station, " "  April 19, '62
Charles H. Bowen, "  Carver Hospital,  Pneumonia,  June 20, "
Stephen Podwin, "  Washington,  Wounds,  Sept. 3, "
James Wythe, "  Groveton,  Fell in action,  Aug. 29, "
Rollin C. Wyman, "  Bull Run, " " "  30, "
Selden L. Whitney, "  South Mountain, " "  Sept. 14, "
George W. Miner, "  Bull Run,  Missing,  Aug. 30, "
Co. I.
Edward Burge, Private.  Baltimore,  Killed,  June 30, '61
Thomas Crawford, 5th Sergt.  Bull Run,  Fell in action, Aug. 30, '62
Joseph W. Booth,  Private, " " " " " " "
Sylvanus A. Durkee, " " " " " " " "
Ephraim J. Smith, " " " " " " " "
James Dignan, " Antietam, " "  Sept. 17, "
Co. K.
Timothy D. Murray, Private,  Harwood Hospital,  Wounds,  Oct. 15, "
Henry Sumner, " Groveton,  Fell in action,  Aug. 29, "
Miles P. Cadwell,  Captain,  Bull Run, " " "  30, "
Daniel McCartey, Private, " " " " " " "
James Gleason, " " " " " " " "
James Evans,  3d. Sergt.  South Mountain, " "  Sept. 14, "
Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.

[Written for the Glen's Falls Messenger.]
Historical Sketch of the Twenty-Second Regiment of New York State Volunteers.
BY CAPT. A. W. HOLDEN.
Copy of a Report made to Lieut. Col. John M'Kie commanding 22d Regiment New York Volunteers.
Dear Sir:—Pursuant to your order I have prepared a brief historical sketch of the regiment now in your command, from its first organization to the present time, which is herewith respectfully submitted for your consideration.
A W. HOLDEN,
Asst. Surgeon 22d N. Y. Vols.
Camp near Sharpsburgh, Maryland,
Oct. 8, 1862.

ARTICLE FOURTH—Concluded.
The men moved buoyantly forward down South street, to the exhilarating music of our band. As the head of our column wheeled into the avenue, dense crowds of anxious-looking people thronged the sidewalks, who hailed our advent with prolonged and repeated cheers. The bad news was just coming in from Bull Run. As we reached the eastern extremity of "the long bridge," we were directed to "halt," "stack arms," and "rest." While awaiting further orders at this point, scattering and fleet footed fugitives from the scene of conflict came cantering hurriedly across the bridge. Among the number was the famous correspondent of the London Times, quite extensively known by the sobriquet of "Bull Run Russell." Of his interview with our regiment at that time, he makes the following mention in his  published "Diary": "At the Washington end of the bridge, I was challenged again by the men of a whole regiment, who, with piled arms, were halted on the chaussie, smoking, laughing, and singing. 'Stranger, have you been to the fight?' 'I have been only a little beyond Centerville. But that was quite enough. Soldiers, civilians, and women, who seemed to be out unusually late, crowded round the horse, and again I told my stereotyped story of the unsuccessful attempt to carry the Confederate position, and the retreat to Centerville to await better luck next time. The soldiers along side me cheered, and those next them took it up, till it ran through the whole line, and must have awakened the night-owls."—After remaining about two hours, orders came, and the men in a very despondent, dissatisfied sort of a way, resumed their arms, and we retraced our steps in silence, and gloom, only broken by the monotonous tramp, tramp, of many feet. The next day was a gloomy one for the City and the Government. It rained heavily, and stragglers wet, dispirited and demoralized, thronged the thoroughfares, while the wounded came in like the waves of a flood-tide, filling up all the temporary makeshifts dignified by the name of Hospitals, which was the best that could be done at the, time, no doubt. The 2d New Hampshire Vols., whose camp adjoined ours, and whose tents had been left standing, suffered severely in the engagement, and all day long their wounded and stragglers came droopingly along by ones, twos, and threes—a sorry but impressive sight, enabling us all to appreciate to some degree the terrors—the terrible realities of war. Fragments of Regiments but lately exultant with swollen rank and brave bearing, came creeping along to the slow tap of the drum, while knots and gangs of stragglers assailed every guard line and camp for food, shelter, and drink.—The army, in a general order was declared demoralized, and stringent orders were speedily promulgated, that all stragglers and soldiers without properly authenticated passes, should be arrested and sent to their respective command. It was not permitted to harbor or refresh them under penalty,—seemingly a harsh rule, but really just and proper; con­tributing largely to the restoration of disci­pline, and good order among them. It will also be borne in mind that with the few ex­ceptions of sick and lame, it is the poorest, and most cowardly, and not the bravest and best soldiers, who straggle away from their commands.
Another respite was thus afforded to us which was improved in the constant practice of drills and the manual of arms. We had at length found that our Colonel was not only a superior tactician, but a thorough disciplinarian, possessing administrative abil­ities of no common order. These qualifica­tions have served largely in gaining for the 22d Regiment its present enviable reputa­tion.

ADDENDA.
It was the 6th Massachusetts and one of the Pennsylvania Regiments that were attacked in Baltimore on the 17th of April, 1861; and to which, reference was made in article No. 3. By a very singular if not providential coincidence, one of the Massachusetts men killed on that occasion, was a lineal descendant of one of the Patriot few who were among the earliest Martyrs to Liberty at the battle of Lexington, on the very day and month in 1775 of which this was the anniversary. Baltimore was the Lexington of the present struggle.
N. B.—The following abstracts are published at this time more for the purpose of preservation, and to get them off my hands, than because they belong properly in this place, although it is, strictly speaking, immaterial to the main thread of the narrative, at what time or in what connection they are published. I thought it best to obtain the facts while I could.

Mr. JOSEPH HARRIMAN, who enlisted as a private in the 22d Regiment New York Volunteers, and lost an arm at Bull Run, August 29, 1862, under Gen. POPE, has been appointed Postmaster at Waterford, in this State, in place of CHARLES E. PICKETT, deceased.

Arrival of the Twenty-Second Regiment.
This Regiment, Colonel Phelps in command, arrived here yesterday morning, about four hundred strong. After dining as the guests of the city, at the Delavan House, they called upon Governor Seymour, at the Capitol, and were welcomed home by him in a few brief, eloquent remarks in which he fully acknowledged their valuable services and complimented their heroic bearing on the battle-field. From the Capitol they proceeded to the Barracks, where the men were quartered for the night.—They will probably be mustered out to-day.
The following are the present officers of the Regiment:
FIELD.
Colonel—Walter Phelps, of Glens Falls.
Lieut. Colonel—Thomas J. Strong, of Sandy Hill.
Major—Lyman Ormsby, of Crown Point.
STAFF.
Adjutant—Malachi Weidman, of Cohoes.
Quartermaster—James W. Schenck, Jr., of Glens Falls.
Surgeon—Elias S. Bissell, Lancaster, Erie.
Assistant Surgeon—A. N. Holden, of Glens Falls.
Chaplain—Rev. H. H. Bates, of Glens Falls.
LINE.
Company A—Captain, Addison L. Estebrook; First Lieutenant, Thomas Calkins; Second Lieutenant, Patrick McCall.
Company B—Captain, James W. McCoy; First Lieutenant, William H. Hoysradt; Second Lieutenant, Charles Doubleday.
Company C—Captain, C. D. Peabody; First Lieutenant, G. T. Thomas; Second Lieutenant, James Valleau.
Company D—Captain, Lucius Wilson; First Lieutenant, Henry D. Cook; Second Lieutenant, Charles Alkin.
Company E—Captain, Daniel Bardey; First Lieutenant, Warren Allen; Second Lieutenant, George Kingsley.
Company F—Captain, Fred. E. Ranger; First Lieutenant, James H. Merrell; Second Lieutenant, Salmon D. Sherman.
Company G—Captain, Duncan Cameron; First Lieutenant, Asa Berry; Second Lieutenant, ____ Bartlett.
Company H—Captain, Mathew S. Teller; First Lieutenant, Albert Holbrook; Second Lieutenant, Charles F. Duers.
Company I—First Lieutenant, Benj Wickham, commanding; Second Lieutenant, George Whitmore.
Company K—Captain, Edward Edgerley; First Lieutenant, John J. Baker; Second Lieutenant, Charles T. Bellarny.

A GALA DAY AT WATERFORD.—Our neighbors at Waterford enjoyed a holiday, yesterday.—The occasion was the reception of Company A, of the Twenty-second regt., several of the members of which claim a home in that place. From early morn, many of the principal citizens were engaged in decorating and beautifying their residences, and making preparations for the reception of the "boys." The streets during the day presented a gay appearance—bunting and patriotic emblems being everywhere visible. The out door decorations, were of an elaborate description, and in many instances were truly magnificent.
A few minutes before two o'clock, the Company arrived at the depot of the Albany division of the Rensselaer & Saratoga Railroad. The procession was already formed and in waiting, and as soon as the Company arrived, the following line of march was taken up: From Albany Depot, down Broad street to First street; down First to South street; up South to Second street; up Second to Hudson street; up Hudson to Third street; down Third to South street; up South to Fourth street; up Fourth to Division street; down Division to First street; down First to Broad street; up Broad street to the Morgan House.
At various points on the route, the soldiers were greeted with cheers and waving of handkerchiefs. The procession moved in the following order:—Sullivan's Band; Engine Cos. Nos. 1 and 2; Breslin Hose Company;  President and Trustees in carriages; Committee of Arrangements in carriages; Dompany [sic] A, Capt. Estebrook and Lieuts. Calkins and McCall. The Company numbered between thirty and forty men.
Arriving in front of the Morgan House, the Company was drawn up in line, where an address of welcome was delivered by John O. Mott, Esq. He referred in complimentary terms to the noble record of the Company, and closed by thanking them in behalf of the citizens of Waterford, and welcoming them to their homes.
Lieut.-Col. Strong, of the Twenty second, replied in behalf of the soldiers, in a spirited and patriotic address.
The Company were then entertained with a collation in Morgan House Hall, under the auspices of the lady members of the Committee of Arrangements.
The Hall was handsomely decorated, and the ladies were unceasing in their attentions to the guests.
Here terminated the exercises of the day. At six P. M., a portion of the Company, accompanied by Capt. Estebrook and Lieut.-Col. Strong,  proceeded to Cohoes, where they were publicly received and entertained.
The Company returns to Albany to-day.

GLEN’S FALLS MESSENGER.
GLEN’S FALLS, WARREN CO., N. Y.
FRIDAY, JUNE 5, 1863.
OUR TERMS.—Village subscribers, served by the Carrier, $1 75 per annum, in advance, or $2 00 if paid at any other time. Mail subscribers, and those taking their papers at the office, $1 50 in advance, if not paid in advance, $2 00 will be charged, without any deviation.

TO ADVERTISERS.
ADVERTISERS will bear in mind that the GLEN'S FALLS MESSENGER is the most advantageous medium through which to make known their wants, as it is the largest, neatest, cheapest, and
HAS THE LARGEST CIRCULATION!
in Village and County, of any paper published in the County!

Fling out the old banner—rally around it once more,
And swear to stand by it till all danger is o'er;
Be true to yourself, to your country be true,
And give three times three cheers for the red,
white and blue."

The 22d Coming To-morrow.
The Twenty-second Regiment, over four hundred strong, will arrive at this village tomorrow (June 6th) about noon, with their arms, equipments, &c. The Regiment will march from 'Fort Edward to this place, the Fire Companies of the different villages acting as special escort. All the military organizations and civic societies of each place are invited to join the procession. Brief addresses will be delivered at each village, on the arrival of the Regiment at Sandy Hill a lunch will be provided by the ladies of that place, and at Glen's Falls a dinner will be given them, at the close of the formal reception.
The Regiment arrived at Albany yesterday, and dined at the Delevan House as the guests of the city authorities.

The Sandy-Hill Herald.
TUESDAY MORNING JUNE 9, 1863.
Arrival of the 22nd Regiment.
This Regiment arrived at Albany on Thursday last. The regiment was organized May 14, 1861, under the command of Col. Phelps, now about the oldest Colonel in the Army of the Potomac. The regiment remained encamped in Troy until about the middle of June, when it went to Albany, remaining at the Barracks a few days, and then embarked for Washington, reaching that city about the first of July, and participating in the review on the 4th, along with many other New-York regiments.
In March, 1862, it moved out to Upton's Hill, that place having been evacuated by the enemy, and afterwards marched out to Centerville, but soon returned. Soon after it again moved out, and down to Falmouth, reaching there on the 18th April. On the occasion of the retreat of the forces under Gen. BANKS, down the Shenandoah, they were moved up to Front Royal, but soon returned. On the occasion of a foraging expedition they had a skirmish with STEWART'S cavalry, repulsing it with considerable loss. The action was brought on by the surprise of their wagon in the rear, in which they lost six or eight prisoners.
On the 10th of August the Regiment arrived at Cedar Mountain, having crossed the Rappahannock at Kelley's Ford. The army retreated about the 20th. On the retreat the Regiment held Warranton three days, acting as Prevost Guard. On the 26th they moved toward Manassas, and were under fire in the battles of Gaines' Mill, Groveton and Manassas Plains, August 28--30, during which they suffered heavily. At Chantilly they formed a portion of the reserve, and afterwards with the rest of the army, retreated within the fortifications of Washington.
The Regiment started on the Maryland campaign Septemper [sic] 6, and formed a portion of the right wing at South Mountain which engagement they again suffered severely, but routed the enemy with great slaughter. Col. PHELPS commanded the Brigade in this battle, and has remained in the command since that time. The regiment also participated in the battle of Antietam, September 16 and 17, suffering great loss.
Frow [sic] Maryland, the regiment returned with the army to Snicker's Gap, and finally to Falmouth, going into camp at Belle Plain. At the first battle of Fredericksburg the regiment was transferred to the extreme left, and participated in that fight—forming part of Franklin's corps. They were under fire three days, lost seven wounded, and returned to their old camp grounds.
With the exception of the "Mud march," they remained quiet until the battle of Chancellorsville; forming at first a portion of the extreme left. When the 11th Corps was driven back, their corps was transferred to the right in their place, making a forced march to attain their position. They were there kept as a reserve. Their loss here was ten wounded.
Sunday night, before starting for their homes, the Regiment was highly complimented in an address by Gen. WADSWORTH, for their bravery and discipline. In every action they have been in, they have indeed covered themselves with glory.
The sanitary condition of the Regiment has been remarkably good, having lost but twenty by natural causes. In officers, they have lost eleven killed and one died a natural death; men, fifty-seven killed, and nineteen a natural death, missing and never heard from, eight; wounded, about one hundred and sixty-five.
They left Albany about 825 strong, and have received in the neighborhood of 300 recruits, many of whom, however, were discharged as unfit for service. Their aggregate now is 505 men, 419 with the regiment, and the rest in the hospital and elsewhere.
The Regiment was hospitably received in Albany and entertained at the Delivan [sic] House, where they were welcomed by Gov. Seymour in brief and pertinent address, which was happily responded to by Col. Phelps. They left Albany on Saturday morning to respond to an invitation of the citizens of Fort Edward, Sandy-Hill and Glen's Falls, to visit those places, and arrived at Fort Edward by the 10 o'clock train, where they were received by the citizens Band and Fire Companies and escorted to the centre of the village, where they were addressed by Prof. King in his usual felicitous style, which was replied to by Col. Phelps in a brief and appropriate address. After partaking of the hospitalities of the citizens of Fort Edward, the Regiment was escorted to this place by the Fire Companies of the three villages, the Fort Edward, Glen's Falls and Sandy-Hill Cornet bands and a large procession of citizens and strangers. Arriving at this place, they were greeted with shouts, the firing of cannon, ringing of bells, and other demonstrations of a joyful welcome.—When they reached the Park they were welcomed by a brief address from Hon. Charles Rogers, after which the Sandy Hill Band played "Sweet Home" better than we ever heard it played before.—Mr. Rogers then introduced Hon. Charles Hughes, who gave the soldiers a welcome worthy of the men and the occasion, which was replied to by Col. Phelps in true soldier style. After which the Soldiers, Firemen and every body else were invited to partake of the bountiful collation prepared by the ever ready hands of the Sandy Hill Ladies.
Dinner over, and friendly greetings having been exchanged between soldiers and citizens, the Regiment took up the line of march for Glen's Falls, where they were received in a manner which most have convinced the brave men that their services had been appreciated.—Late in the afternoon the regiment returned to Fort Edward, and were soon on their way to head quarters.
An immense crowd of people were present at each place visited by the Regiment, all eager to look at the men who had so nobly defended their country in the hour of its peril. The meeting between relatives was truly touching, causing many to shed tears. All passed off pleasantly, and the day will long be remembered by every person present, as an event to be recalled after many years.
Doct. A. W. Holden, of this village, formerly Assistant Surgeon of the 22d Regiment, N. Y. S. V., has been appointed Assistant Surgeon in the regular U. S. army. He is to be stationed in hospital at Baltimore. Doct. H. is well qualified for the position, and his many friends will be pleased to learn of his new honors.
It is proposed to publish a history of the 22d Regiment N. Y. V., whenever a sufficient sum shall have been guaranteed by subscription to warrant the undertaking.—The work is to be edited by Dr. A. W, Holden, and will when completed form a duodecimo volume of about 450 pages.
Subscriptions to the work will for the present be received at the Messenger office.

The soldiers of the 22d Reg't who were mustered out without being paid the $100 bounty, can have it collected by applying to the publisher of this paper.

THE COUNTY POST.
Friday Morning, June 12, 1863.
RECEPTION OF CO. "D," 22d REG'T.
Speeches, Toasts, &c.
The reception of Co. "D," Capt. Wilson's, in this village on Tuesday last, resulted in one of the most successful demonstrations ever witnessed by the citizens of "Old Cambridge." The day, the occasion, and every thing pertaining to the completeness of the welcome extended to our brave and gallant heroes, were eminently auspicious. The Committee of Arrangements having the matter in charge had been untiring in their efforts and zeal to render the occasion not only one of interest, but to make it a joyous and perfect welcome. Neither time nor expense had seemed to thwart them in the execution of their elaborate and well designed preparations. Were it not invidious we would gladly make mention of the honorable and persevering efforts put forth by a few of the Committee, who had for the past week devoted almost their entire time in the development and execution of such plans as were designed to reflect honor not only upon the officers and soldiers themselves, but upon those who were about to extend the hand of welcome to the brave. Suffice it to say, "Old Cambridge" had determined to honor her noble and war worn sons with an expression that should cheer their spirits and intensify the fires of patriotism which glows in the bosom of every loyal citizen; in other words, to demonstrate to our returned heroes that their absence from us, engaged as they were in the defence of our country's freedom, had only seemed to increase our interest in their welfare and endear them to our sympathies.
Leave having been secured from the authorities at Albany, before their arrival at that place, to detach Co. "D" from the regiment for the purpose of allowing them to visit Cambridge under their Captain, a select committee was appointed, consisting of Hon. Peter Hill, Messrs. J. M. Stevenson and J. J. Gray, to escort them from Albany to this place. Invitations had also been extended to the Salem and Union Village Fire Companies to join us in the ceremonies of the day.  Notwithstanding the inauspicious indications received from the ''clerk of the weather" the day preceeding [sic] the reception, "fortune finally favored the brave," and as the morning sun broke in upon us, the threatening clouds were gently folded up as if purposely lain aside for the occasion; so that, with the exception of an occasional threat from the aforesaid "clerk," the weather proved delightful. The showers of rain had effectually quieted the dust in the streets, and the air was at once purified and exhilarating.
The Salem Fire Company, numbering about fifty men, attired in their new and beautiful uniforms, arrived here by the A. M. train, and were duly received by the Committee preparatory to being formed in line. The Union Village Fire Companies, numbering something over sixty men, arrived at the Blakeley House not far from the same time, and after being duly received, together with Co. A, 30th regiment, (Capt. Wilson,) who were in waiting, at once proceeded to the depot to await the arrival of the train. By this time citizens and, strangers from the surrounding towns were seen pouring in upon us like an avalanche, and our village from one extreme to the other was soon filled with the vehicles and presence of the beautiful, the patriotic and the brave, who had come hither to honor their brothers and friends fresh from the field of strife.
All eyes were now anxiously turned to the arrival of the 8 30 train from
Troy, which was to bear to us our returning heroes. Just previous to its arrival Col. Robertson, Acting Grand Marshall, mounted on the beautiful horse of Lieut.-Col. McKie, of the 22d, whose health did not permit him to perform the duties assigned to him for the day, under the escort of Co. A, 30th regiment, Home Guards, formed the Fire Companies in line on the depot grounds, preparatory to the reception of the Volunteers. The arrival of the train was soon announced by the firing of cannon, and as the train approached the depot and the sweet strains of music from Doring's unrivalled band fell upon the ears of the assembled host, a shout went up from the multitude that made the welkin ring. The excitement and the enthusiasm for the moment as the war-worn vetrans [sic] came forth from
the cars, bearing with them that same old flag whose proud folds had been pierced through and through by the bullets of the enemy, seemed perfectly electrifying, and for a time a still, solemn silence pervaded the assemblage that spoke louder than words, and as friend grasped the hand of friend in brotherly greeting, the scene became one of profoundest interest.
The procession, under command of Col. Robertson, then formed, and took up the line of march in the following order:—
1. Doring's Band.
2. Military Companies under Capts. Wilson & Taylor.
3. Fire Companies from Salem and Union Village.
4. Staff and Commissioned Officers 22d Regt.
5. Old Cambridge Volunteers.
6. Committee of Arrangements, Clergy and Invited Guests
7. Citizens Generally.
The procession proceeded to the beautiful green in front of Rev. Mr. Shortt's church, where a magnificent collation had been provided for them by the ladies connected with the Soldier's Relief Society of "Old Cambridge." Before partaking of the refreshments the formal ceremonies of the day were proceeded in, intersperced with the eloquent music of the band. The reception speech, delivered by Rev, C. H. Taylor, was exceedingly appropriate, concise and eloquent, and was listened to with breathless attention by all who were within the sound of his voice. Mr. Taylor spoke in substance as follows:
He began by expressing the satisfaction we all felt in seeing them home again, and by heartily welcoming them. An allusion was made to the scene at the depot when we took leave of them two years ago, the fervid enthusiasm of the volunteers, and the proffered sympathy and regard of their assembled friends. He then briefly reviewed their military career, the tedious period of preparatory discipline, the fatigueing [sic] march, the cheerless bivouac, the many battles through which they passed, and in all which they had exhibited the highest traits of the true soldier. One particular, which had been given him by an officer, he could not retrain from relating. In the darkness of Friday night, at the second battle of Bull Run, the enemy, by his accustomed guile, had even penetrated the ranks of the gallant 22d under the guise of friends, and, learning the name of the Regiment, demanded its surrender. The memorable reply was given, worthy to be written in letters of living light and preserved as a sacred tradition among the descendants of these brave men, and among the sacred records of our State glory,—"The 22d N. Y. never surrenders!" They did not surrender, but fought their way out of the enveloping enemy, leaving behind them many a gallant fellow among the dead and wounded.
The change that had come over them was then noted. The ruddy glow that was on their cheeks was gone, and they were bronzed by the sun and exposure to the Southern clime. They bare honorable scare, the badges of patriotic nobility. Their ranks were thinned. Many a brave and stalwart comrade was sleeping in a soldier's grave. The speaker paid a glowing and deserved tribute to Capt. Milliman, Lieut. Beattie and the nameless heroes of the ranks whose deeds and whose blood deserved so well of their country. Nor were those disabled through disease, who now are languishing upon beds of pain, or dragging their enfeebled frames down to a premature grave forgotten. Their services might be less conspicuous, but no less real or deserving.
Some might ask, what has been accomplished by all your suffering and labor? We answer, more, far more than superficial observers might suspect. It is only the unthinking who give the last stone from the catapult the credit of bringing down the battlements; the blow from the first is as important and effective as the last.—You have not participated in the final victories that shall assign this rebellion to eternal infamy, but you have given those blows from which it is now staggering; the point of your sword opened the veins from which its life blood is now ebbing.
We, therefore, bid you welcome, thrice welcome home. If you fix your dwellings in our vallies [sic], or on our hillsides, we will, when passing your doors, tell our children the story of your heroism, and say, "There lives one of the gallant members of Co. D."
Citizens of the old town of Cambridge, we owe it to ourselves no less than to these brave men to give them a hearty welcome. Let us show them how we appreciate their services, and how glad we are to see them by giving them three rousing cheers. (The cheers were given with a will, and the band played "Home, Sweet Home")
At the conclusion of Mr. Taylor's speech, and music from the band, Capt. Wilson responded as follows:
MR. TAYLOR, CITIZENS OF CAMBRIDGE, WHITE CREEK AND VICINITY:—On behalf of the officers and men of the returned company of volunteers, I thank you for the honor you have done us by this spontaneous, cordial and kind "welcome home." We have looked forward to this day, when we should greet our friends, with anticipation of pleasure, and I must say that our fondest anticipations are being more than realized by this magnificent, spontaneous and cordial reception. We love our homes, and it was this love that expanded into love for our country induced us to go forth at the first call of our President, to fight in their defence. We return with the same love and patriotism, and with the gratification of knowing that during our absence we have tried to do our duty; how well we have succeeded I leave for history to make known. Ours is identified with that of the old 22d regiment, old "Iron Brigade." Our thinned ranks, however, show too painfully of the service we have seen. We have left many of our near and dear companions behind in the bloody battle trenches of Maryland and Virginia. It is true we have undergone many trials on the tedious march, suffered from privations in bivouac and dangers of the field, but through all not for an instant has our confidence been shaken or our patriotism wavered. We believe in our cause, and that victory will soon crown our arms and bring us to an honorable peace.
I thank you again for this kind welcome. We will remember this day as one of the happiest in our lives. Accept the heartfelt thanks of soldiers for their kind remembrance.
These exercises completed, and the companies formed a hollow square around the tables that were fairly groaning under the pressure of the ladies munificence. The ladies will pardon us when we say that we felt proud of the skill, energy and taste displayed by them in the arrangement of this splendid collation, and we could scarcely determine which, in the eyes of our hungry soldiery caused the greater attraction on that occasion—the collation itself, or the smiling faces and sparkling eyes of those whose fair hands were busy in distributing food to the veterans of Co. "D." The unanimous verdict of soldiers and firemen was that such a feast was not only food for the body, but also for the soul; and what is more, we understand that this verdict was concurred in by the clergy themselves. We counted not less than sixteen beautifully arranged boquets [sic] on the table, some of them evidencing an artistic display of arrangement that we have never seen surpassed. In this beautiful collation, as well as by their inspiring presence on that day, the ladies of "Old Cambridge" have added another proof of their fidelity to the Government, and given further assurance that the soldiers have no better friends than they.
The collation finished, and the following toasts were announced to be in order by the Chairman of the Committee, J. M. Stevenson, Esq., which were read and responded to as follows:
1. Our Army and Navy—The hope of our Country.
Response by Capt. Wilson and Rev. Dr. Lambert.
2. The Union established by our Fathers—Their Sons will perpetuate it.
Response by Rev. H. Gordon.
3. The Soldiers of the Revolution and the Soldiers of to-day—The former fought to reestablish our Government—the latter to perpetuate it.
Response by Rev. Mr. Newton, seconded by Dr. H. C. Gray.
4. The American Flag—though soiled and rent—it is the only hope of human liberty.
Response by Rev. C. W. Palmer, at whose request the color bearer with the battle-scarred colors of the Regiment was called upon the stand. After a few remarks and three cheers for the glorious flag, Mr. Palmer closed by singing "The Star Spangled Banner," accompanied by the band and the assembled multitude in singing the chorus. This was one of the most beautiful and affecting scenes of the whole day.
5. The memory of the gallant dead—They fail not who die in a good cause.
Dirge by the band.
6. Co. D, 22d Regiment—The pioneers of Old Camridge.
Response by Capt. L. E. Wilson.
7. Our Southern Brethren—In the Union, friends—out of it, enemies.
Response by Rev. Mr. Brigham.
8. The Loyal Ladies—Their contributions to the wants of the sick and wounded have greatly advanced our cause.
Response by Rev. Mr. Taylor.
9. The Clergy—They honor their profession by loyalty to the Government and defending the right.
Response by Rev. H. Gordon.
10. The Ladies of the Old Town of Cambridge—Their patriotism is as pure and holy as their hospitality on this occasion is munificent.
Response by J. J. Gray, Esq., who  gave—
"The 22d Regiment and its officers here present to-day."
Major Ormsby, Capt. Cameron, Lieu-tenants Duers, Billamy and Berry. Col. McKie, Capt. Wilson and Lieuts. Cook and Akin were all called to the platform, and Mr. Gray's toast responded to by three rousing cheers.
Hon. Peter Hill gave the following volunteer toast:"
The widows and orphans of those soldiers who have fallen in the service of their country—May they have all the sympathy and aid which they should have in the day and hour of their need. Responded to by the Rev. Mr. Gordon with a few appropriate remarks.
Subsequently the procession was reformed and took up the line of march laid down in the published programme. They were greeted at frequent intervals with the cheers of our citizens throughout their entire march. Never did veteran soldiers returning home from the battle-field receive a more hearty and enthusiastic welcome than did Co. "D." on that day. The scene during the entire march was grand in the extreme. The sweet strains of music of the baud, occasionly [sic] relieved by the soul stiring [sic] music of the fife and drum, seemed to awaken the dormant patriotism of the soul, while the profusion of flags, the endless and tasteful decorations of the buildings along the entire march, the patriotic mottoes and overhanging arches, gave an inspiration to the whole affair and lent enchantment to the scene.
The march completed, the various companies were escorted to the hotels designated for their entertainment, where the inner man was sumptuously provided for. The dinner furnished them by our excellent landlords, Messes. Allen, Ellis and Houghton, was truly splendid and bountiful, and reflects much credit upon their patriotism, skill and good judgment. During the afternoon Co. "D" were exercised in the drill to the intense delight of the spectators; their evolutions being executed with precision and great celerity. Captain Wilson and his men seem perfectly at home in their exercises. Doring's Band are deserving of great credit not only for the superior excellence of their music, but for the disposition they manifested to contribute all in their power to the interest of the occasion. The several companies were finally formed in line again under the command of Col. Robertson, assisted by his aids, Messrs. Gray and Judson, for the purpose of escorting Co. "D" to the train. The time for the train having arrived, the procession moved to the depot grounds when the parting leave was taken, and our honored guests took their departure for Albany amid the shouts of the multitude, the waving of handkerchiefs, and the soft and eloquent strains of music that lingered upon the breeze. The Salem and Union Village companies were then dismissed with a hearty return of thanks from the committee.
We here take occasion to remark, that the dignified and manly bearing of the officers of the several companies, and the courteous and soldier-like conduct of the men, are worthy of our admiration and praise. Our neighbors have reason to feel proud of their fire companies.
It was highly gratifying to see so general an observance on the part of our citizens of the request made by the committee to decorate their dwellings and business places for the occasion. Had it not been for the rain the day previous, we have no doubt that it would have been even more general. Our main street presented one vast panorama of decorations. The following private houses in addition to every business place on the line of march was tastefully and appropriately decorated with evergreens, mottoes, lanterns flowers, &c., &c: M. D. Hubbard, Mason Prentiss, Warren Norton Jr., Rev. _. H. Taylor, R. K. Crocker, Mrs. J. Harrell, James Thompson, Col. J. S. Crocker, E. B. Hoyt, E. Higgins, John Watkins, Mrs. E. Rich, Dr. Tefft, Mrs. Du_ton, H. Eldridge, L. Wells, Edward McKie, A. P. Beals, C. McClellan, John Newman, Mr. Miller, Henry Ackley, D. Pollock, Thos. Livingston and probably others that we failed to see. Four splendid arches spanned main street as follows: one opposite the Blake House, one opposite the store of B.
Crocker, one opposite C. Porter's store, and a double arch on Dr. Gray's corners spanning the forks of the two roads. These all bore appropriate mottoes and were erected with much taste. The stars and stripes floated proudly in every direction.
Want of space forbids us to make mention in detail of the highly appropriate and expressive mottoes that were here and there to be seen entwinded among the wreaths of evergreen. We will not be accused of partiality when we make mention of one of the best conceived and most beautifully designed wreaths that we have ever seen that had been suspended over the highway by a cord, extending from the Blakely House to the Cambridge post office. This elegant wreath, dedicated to the memory of the gallant Captain Milliman, was composed of evergreens festooned with crape and ornamented with flowers, and in the center of which was the following inscription:

"THE LAMENTED DEAD."
"CAPT. MILLIMAN."

This received three hearty cheers from the returned soldiers as they passed along. Allusion was also made to the gallant dead in a tastefully arranged motto on the front of Robinson & Walker's store, which read as follows:

"For the dead a tear,
For the living a cheer."

But we have not the space for further details. The entire programme passed off without a discordant note to mar the pleasure or the harmony of the occasion. Everybody and his neighbor were there, and all seemed pleased. Capt. Wilson and his men, as also the officers who accompanied them, expressed their most unbounded satisfaction in the cordial and hearty welcome they had received, and if we are not greatly mistaken, the Fire Companies from Union Village and Salem went away impressed with the fact that Old Cambridge hospitalities are on a par with their patriotism. It is due to Capt. Wilson and his noble company to say, that their conduct while here was worthy of all praise, for while they were not permitted to "go dry," they had the good sense not to disgrace themselves. All honor to the gallant heroes of Co. "D," and our earnest hope is that Old Cambridge will ever show her patriotism by honoring the men who go forth from among us to fight the battles of our country.
—At a meeting of the Commiitee [sic] of Arrangements, held on Wednesday
evening last, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee be cordially tendered to the ladies of the old town of Cambridge for the bountiful and splendid collation fur­nished by them to the Old Cambridge Volunteers, Capt. Lucius E. Wilson and their escort, on the occasion of their welcome home, on the 9th inst., and that this mention, attested by the Chairman and Secretary, be published in the village papers.
Resolved, That the thanks of the Committee be also tendered to Capt. L.
M. Wilson and the Cambridge Valley Guards, for the gallant manner in which they received and escorted their "companions in arms" on the above mentioned occasion.
JOHN MCKIE, Chairman,
James Thompson, Sec'y.

ABSTRACT D.
Report of aggregate strength for duty, and the killed, wounded and missing, on the 14th and 17th of September and the 13th of December, 1862, according to Regimental reports.
 A  B  C  D  E  F

100  6  12  Sept. 14.
14th N. Y. S. M.  80  9  15  Sept. 17.
382  1  4  Dec. 13.

 126 12  25  Sept. 14.
22d N. Y. Vols.  67  2  24  Sept. 17.
210  5  Dec. 13.

135  1 23  Sept. 14.
_4th N. Y. Vols.  57  3  15  1  Sept. 17.
159  1  1  Dec. 13.

137  4  6  Sept. 14.
_0th N. Y. Vols.  53  4  11  1  Sept. 17.
406  2  8  5  Dec. 13.

498 23  66  Sept. 14.
Brigade Total.  257 18  65  3  Sept. 17.
1057  3  18  6  Dec. 13.

A. Regiment.
B. Strength present for duty.
C. No. of killed, according to Regimental Report.
D. No. of wounded, according to Regimental Report.
E. No. of missing, according to Regimental Report.
F. Date.

It will be seen that this report differs from the statement above. This however has the advantage of being official.

Song of the 22d N.Y. S.Vols.
BY A. H. BLANCHARD.

We're the Twenty-second Volunteers, from New-York State we came;
We've had some valiant officers—I will not speak their names;
We've been to meet our country's foe—to them we ne'er would yield;
We were bound to gain some victory, or die upon the field.

We rallied round that good old flag, and fought beneath its stars;
We were not afraid of rifle balls—no not ashamed of scars;
We poured into the rebel ranks a storm of iron hail,
And swept them from the battle field like chaf before the gale.

Dear, loving wife, mourn not for me when from you I am gone,
For I'm fighting for my country's honor, and not for my own.

If we're to die upon the field, this is our last request:
Dress us in full uniform and lay us down to rest,
And on the headboards of our graves let this inscription be—
Here lies a Union Volunteer who died for his country.

We started from New-York—it was a sad and gloomy day—
And got on board the ferry boats which took us 'cross the bay,
We landed in Perth Amboy in the middle of the night,
In time to take the Jersey cars to take us to the fight.

We arrived in Philadelphia at the dawning of the day;
The ladies gave us breakfast to cheer us on our way.
We next arrived in Baltimore in time to take the cars,
Which took us to the Capital of Freedom's States and stars.

From there we went to Corcoran on Old Virginia's side,
Where rolls the mild Potomac in all its former pride;
But on that pleasant hillside we had not long to stay,
For valiant General Burnside soon ordered us away.

We went unto Annapolis where ships awaiting lay;
We got on board the Fulton and went steaming down the bay.
Our voyage on the water I will not tell in rhyme,
But we next arrived in Newbern, in North Carolina's clime.

The rebels held that place, but they will never hold it more,
And in the place of seven stars now float the thirty-four.
We had a chance to fight them, we showed red, white and blue,
And give them bloody greeting from our rifle cannons true.

But now to Captain Milliman, one word for him I'll say,
He never liked to have his men misused in any way;
But this war will soon be over, and to our homes we'll go,
And health to Captain Milliman from many a cup will flow.

Now when this cruel war shall cease, and peace shall reign once more,
We'll bid adieu to Dixie's Land, and seek our Northern shore;
And may our sweethearts of the North true to us soldiers be,
For we left our homes and firesides to fight for liberty.

THE TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT AT WASHINGTON—ACCIDENT.—A correspondent of the press writes from Washington, July 1:
"The 22d Regiment, Col. Phelps', arrived here early this morning. Col. Phelps, in behalf of the regiment, expresses his gratification at the manner of reception in Baltimore, and exonerates the citizens from all blame in connection with the death of Edward Burge, a private from Pottersville, Warren county, who was killed accidentally at the Camden depot."

We are saddened by the report of a fatal accident which happened to Edward Burge, from Pottersville, one of the Volunteers from this county, a member of Captain Ormsby's Company of Schroon. He was shot through the head by a gun from the roof of the depot, Baltimore, the ball entering the upper part of the forehead, passing through, and coming out low down on the back of the head. He was buried at Washington with military honors.

A CARD.—In contradiction of a paragraph in the Democrat of Monday, Jan. 18th, in reference to the capture of a patrol guard of the 22d N. Y. V., I hereby contradict the statement, as being false and also giving disgrace to any man in the United States service while on duty. I was ordered to take charge of a patrol guard by my commanding officer, to patrol the city of Rochester and take up any men belonging to the regiment who were absent without leave. I did so. And while on that duty, a policeman by the name of Green came up to me on Mill street where I had left a guard, under command of Sergeant Moore, and two prisoners. While in the act of calling out the guard from Mr. Duffy's, Green insisted on taking one of the men I had under my charge as a prisoner. I told him he could not have him as he was under my charge; he then took hold of me, saying he would take me to the Watch House. I brought my men to attention, at the same time giving them orders to charge on any person who might try to rescue the prisoners under my charge. I also contradict the statement of any revolver having been drawn by either parties, until we met again on South St. Paul street. When we were on our way to camp we were met by some fifteen or twenty policemen, who I considered were armed with clubs and revolvers, while we had only four muskets without a charge in any one of them. As regards helping ourselves to any of the things which is made mention of in Mr. Duffy's saloon is another false statement, which can be proven as such by Mr. Duffy himself or half a dozen other respectable persons if required. There is more which I would contradict if I thought they were worthy of it, but for the present I will decline, as they will hear from me again.
Sergeant A. M. BRADY, 22d N. Y. V.

TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, NEW YORK.
Absent Without Leave.
Daniel Bogart, Co. F. Philip Pitcher, Co. F.
Silas E. Chandler, F. John Pell, I.
George Dunbar, C. G. W. Worthington, E.
John Maybia, G.

[Written for the Glen's Falls Messenger.]
Historical Sketch of the Twenty-Second Regiment of New York State Volunteers.
BY CAPT. A. W. HOLDEN.
Copy of a Report made to Lieut. Col. John M'Kie commanding 22d Regiment New York Volunteers.
Dear Sir:—Pursuant to your order I have prepared a brief historical sketch of the regiment now in your command, from its first organization to the present time, which is herewith respectfully submitted for your consideration.
A. W. HOLDEN.
Asst. Surgeon 22d N. Y. Vols.
Camp near Sharpsburgh, Maryland,
Oct. 8, 1862.

ARTICLE FOURTH.
Never, probably, since the tolling of the bell at "Independence Hall," whose cracked alarum heralded to the world that amid the agonies and throes of a great revolution, an infant Republic had been ushered in to existence, had our National natal day dawned upon so many startling, stirring, and weighty events as now. The dark, portentous storm of sectional rivalry and animosity, which had long been hovering so threateningly over the political horizon, had at length burst with the fury of a tropical tornado upon us. Eleven States by the grave acts of large deliberative and representative bodies had declared that the bonds of affiliation which held them in affinity as an integral portion of the United States, were at once and irrevocably severed forever. Nor was this the high handed act alone of the delegated few, as opposed to the will of the many, as so many of the north then fondly hoped, and blindly deluded themselves to believe. Never in the history of Revolutions had so general and unanimous a revolt of an entire people been heard of. The revolution of the old colonies scarcely furnishes a parallel to it.(1) Kentucky by the voice of its Executive had declared that "the dark and bloody ground of the Revolution must be respected as neutral soil in the impending contest, and hints were not wanting of an "armed neutrality" to enforce the proclamation. In Maryland, as already indicated, "apiat se pugnac" was the prevailing mottoe, and the presence of an over whelming aimed force, alone prevented a popular uprising, while the arrest of quasi and constructive traitors at the very door of the legislative halls in Frederick alone prevented the passage and adoption of the ordinance of secession. In little Delaware too, the same hostility to coercive measures prevailed, and she only awaited the action of her more opulent and powerful neighbor, to lend her little light toward the formation of a new National Galaxy. In Missouri, the "argumentum baculinum, so logically potent through the Kansas difficulties, was again in full force, and midnight assassinations and arson were but the frequent neighborly acts of those who had hitherto lived in the closest relations of intimacy; while daily robberies, and personal, out rages of a nameless character, were but the fitting deeds of those desperadoes, the votaries and disciples of "Judge Lynch," whose bloody brutality and ferocious performances with the revolver and bowie knife, have made the name of "border-ruffian" a synonym for pirate, as well as the terror and execration of the civilized world. The sturdy, steady North had as it were but just awakened from its apathetic slumber to a sense of the "impending crisis," and now "like a giant refreshed with wine," was slowly stretching its torpid limbs, by way of testing its hitherto untried strength. Indeed there were many, very many among the still loyal and true, who listened fascinated and calmly to "the siren songs of peace," and hugged with enervating fondness, "the delusive phantoms of hope"; and these too among those who were not onlythe supporters but the exponents of the administration.(2) It is a question of grave doubt if even the councils of the National Cabinet were not at this time divided,(3) as it was also a moot point, whether the Congress which was to convene to-day, would deter-mine to prosecute a war of invasion to re-cover the lately "lost pleiads." Indeed, the moving spirit of the Administration, "the power behind the throne" had semi-officially imparted so much of the arcana imperii,as was embraced in the idea, that with the imposing display about to be gathered at Washington, the Southern States would be over-awed, and return to their fealty without a trial of the ordeal by arms.(4) It seemed next to impossible to impress upon the North the belief that the rebellious fraction of the old federation was really earnest, thoroughly awake, and almost to a man united in hostility against the General Government.(5) It was confidently asserted by those supposed to be informed, that a large, wealthy, influential, and conservative, though inert (6) and undemonstrative mass at the South, were opposed to hostilities, and would hail with delight the protective aegis of the Stars and Stripes. (7)
The people, as well as the Government, notwithstanding the tremendous enthusiasm and undoubted patriotism that pervaded the entire North, were slow in apprehending the very colossal proportions of the undertaking before them.
The day had been designated for the opening of a special session of Congress,--and there were representatives present, whose fidelity to their constitutional oaths was more than questioned. Up to this time, the policy of the Administration was only foreshadowed by the inaugural address, and such acts as were needful for the protection of the National Capitol. The importance of the special session could not well be over-estimated, for upon its action depended the prosecution of the war,(8) the provision for its enormous expenditures, and the multitudinous preparations necessary, and contingent upon the new and unusual slate of affairs. This fourth of July was the first in the memory of the living when South had not answered to North with responsive paeans, in the celebration of the honored anniversary of our national freedom. Now the effort to maintain the venerable usages of the day on the very verge of rebeldom, with the echoes of their artillery reverberating through our Congressional Halls, furnished a bitter contrast to the swiftly crowding memories of those pleasanter, happier days of the past, when our only strifes had been those of the forum and the ballot-box;—when we were all united as one great, powerful, harmonious, irresistible whole. The occasion was seized for the exhibition of a military display on a somewhat extended scale. The huge number of the New York levies, part of whom were three months' troops whose time was nearly out, and the remainder consisting of the newly arrived Volunteer forces, then encamped in and about the Federal City, afforded an unusual opportunity for a little glorification and sight-seeing, amid all the grave cares and weighty responsibilities which pressed heavily upon our chief magistrate. At an early hour in the morning, the streets and avenues were filled with regiments all hurrying forward in the direction of the Park opposite the While House. At 8 o'clock the 22d was drawn up in line, and with overcoats rolled, knapsacks packed and slung in heavy marching order, moved out into the road and to the inspiriting music of our band marched briskly down South street and off in the direction of Georgetown, until we reached the masses of troops, resting in the vicinity of the place of review. The entire force for this special occasion was assigned to the command of Maj. General
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Note 1.—"The utter contempt and loathing for the Stars and Stripes, the abhorrence of the very words United States, the intense hatred of the Yankees, on the part of these people, cannot be conceived by any one who has not seen them. I am more satisfied than ever that the Union can never be restored as it was, and that it has gone to pieces, never to be put together again, in the old shape, at all events by any power on earth. —My Diary North and South, by William Howard Russell; Harper's Pamphlet Edition; Letter of April 17, 1861, P. 46.
2.—"Assuredly, Mr. Seward cannot know any thing of the feeling of the South, or he would not be so confident as he was that all would blow over, and that the States deprived of the care and fostering influences of the General Government, would get tired of their secession ordinances, and of their experiment to maintain a national life, so that the United States will be re-established before long."—[Id.; Letter of April 18, P. 50.
3.—"When I arrived in Washington some members of the Cabinet were perfectly willing to let the South go." (He mentions Secretary Chase as one.)—[Id, l. 134.
4.—"I wonder what Mr. Seward will say when I get back to Washington. Before I left, he was of opinion—at all events, he stated—that all the States would come back, at the rate of one a month."—[Id., Letter of July 2d, P. 139.
5.—"Every where the Southern leaders are forcing on a solution with decision and energy, whilst the Government appears to be helplessly drifting with the current of events, having neither bow nor stern, neither keel nor deck, neither rudder, compass, sails or steam."—[Id., March 23.
6.—"The full impulses of National life are breathing through the whole of this people."—[Id., April 22, P. 53.
The following is quoted to show that the same persistent hostility now exists:
"Prof. D'Almieda, of the University of Paris, three months ago went south from Washington upon a pass, and traversed the entire chain of Rebel armies from Richmond to Grenada, Miss.—He arrived here on Sunday last, across the Rappahannock. Though he presented a proper pass, and was a radical Anti-Slavery man and friend of the North, he was thrown into the Old Capital Prison. On the repeated representations and protest of the French Minister he was released yesterday.
"He says the Rebels consider Vicksburg their most valuable point, as they receive much of their subsistence from Texas. Of the capture of Vicksburg they are very apprehensive. They think that Charleston and Savannah, where the forts are iron-clad, can hold out against the gunboats. President Davis, he says, is very little talked of, and is held in much less esteem than many of the Generals. The suffering from the war is extreme, and has involved the whole population, almost every family being in mourning.
"The most unyielding fortitude, however, exists both in the army and among the people, extreme suffering, loss and privation being endured with patience; and the Professor says every man with whom he has conversed expresses the stereotyped determination to die rather than submit."
7.—"I have now been in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and in none of these great States have I found the least indication of the Union sentiment or the attachment for the Union which Mr. Howard always assumes to exist at the South.—[Id., P. 76, May 12.
8.—"On this day Congress meets. * * * * * By their action they will decide whether the Union can ever be restored, and will determine whether the States of the North are to commence an invasion for the purpose of subjecting by force of arms, and depriving of their freedom the States of the South."—[Id., July 4th, P. 142.
________

Charles Sanford of the first division of the New York Militia. None of the troops had as yet been assigned to Brigades, and some little delay necessarily occurred in the formation of the column, which at last moved forward at about 10 o'clock A. M. There were something like twenty  regiments in all, comprising a force of about twelve or fifteen thousand men, and the display of armed men was probably the largest seen in the city since the destruction of the public buildings by the British in the war of 1812—15. Suddenly, as the head of our regiment swung around the corner of the street above, we came unexpectedly in sight of a staging and platform temporarily erected at the entrance of one of the avenues leading to the White-House. Hither as we passed rapidly in review, many a furtive eye was for the first time cast at the leonine features of the gallant old chieftain who then had command of our armies, and the long, loose-jointed figure of the renowned "rail-splitter," whose head went reverently down at every salute of the National flag. Added to these celebrities were to be distinguished in the back ground the forms of several members of the Cabinet, and of the diplomatic circle. Altogether, the affair passed off very pleasantly. During the return to camp in the midday sun the men suffered extremely from the oppressiveness of their straps and the unaccustomed weight of the knapsacks.— Daily exercise in the manual of arms and battalion drill now became the monotonous routine for weeks and months. We had for neighbors in adjoining camps Blenker's N. Y. Vols. (German) regiment, the 9th Massa­chusetts and the 2d New-Hampshire which has recently (March 10, '63) been ordered home to recruit. All of these regiments have since greatly distinguished themselves in the field. The free and awkward use of fire-arms in the camps about us, was in more than one instance productive of serious re­sults, and although we luckily escaped their consequences, more than one "hair breadth 'scape" of those days used to be narrated subsequently with great unction around the camp-fires, and long watches of picket-guard. At this time General Mansfield, the brave old hero of South Mountain was in command of all the volunteer forces in and about Washington. Although the regiments with few exceptions were not brigaded the guard, picket and patrol duty were performed with as much vigilance as has ever been done since we were within the borders of an enemy's country. Grand Rounds were regularly made, and every night we were visited by a field officer of the day to see that the sentries were on the alert and the camps properly protected. The report to the Medical Inspector for July 5th, 1861, makes the following exhibit: Seventy-five sick with diarrhea and dysentery, twenty with coughs and colds, and twenty with eruptive diseases—one small-pox and the remainder with measles. For the number sick, the losses by death have been very small indeed, compared with the results in many other regiments; an exemption due in a great measure to the early attention paid to sanitary precautions and hygienic regulations.
The fortnight following the review was a busy time in Washington, for preparations were being actively made for an attack upon the rebel force assembled at Manassas plains.

COMPLETE ABSTRACT B.
Of the Field, Staff and Line Officers of the 22d N. Y. Vols., carefully revised and corrected to March 20th, 1863.
Names. Rank. Date of Apt. Remarks.
Walter Phelps, Jr., Colonel May 16, '61 On detached service in command of Brigade.
Gorton T. Thomas, Lieut. Col. May 16, '61 Died of wounds received Aug. 30, ’62.
John M'Kie, Major May 16, '61 Promoted vice Thomas died of wounds, Sept. 3, ’62.
John M'Kie, Lieut. Col. Aug. 30, '62 Resigned from wound and ill health, Feb. 13, ’63.
George Clendon, Jr., Major Aug. 30, '62 Promoted from Capt. (Co. E.) vice M’Kie promo’.
Edward Pruyn, Adjutant May 16, '61 Resigned Jan’y 18, 1862.
John S. Fassett, Adjutant Jan'y 18, '62 Transferred from Co. E, vice Pruyn resigned.
Henry D. Woodruff, Qr. Master May 16, '61 Resigned from ill health March 1, 1863.
James W. Schenck, Jr., Qr. Master Sept. 5, '61 Vice Woodruff promo’ on detached ser brig Q. M.
Joseph B. Atherly, Surgeon Aug. 12, '62 Died of Typhoid fever at Falmouth, Va., Aug 12, ’62.
William F. Hutchinson, Assis. Surg. May 16, '61 Promoted vice Atherly deceased.
William F. Hutchinson, Surgeon Aug. 12, '62 Dismissed the service Nov. 20, 1862.
Austin W. Holden, Assis. Surg. Aug. 24, '62 Transferred from Co. F, vice Hutchinson promo’.
Miles Goodyear, 2d Assis. Surg. Sept. 22, '62 Resigned from physical disability Jan’y 24, ’63.
Elias S. Bissell, Surgeon Nov. 20, '62 Vice Hutchinson dismissed.
Henry H. Bates, Chaplain May 16, '61

Non-Commissioned Staff.
John F. Towne, Serg't Major May 16, ' 61 Transferred and promo’ to 1st Lieu Co G Mar 1, ’62.
Jeremiah Fairbanks, 2 M. Serg't May 16, ' 61 Discharged.
Charles Bellamy, Coml Sergt. May 16, ' 61 Discharged.
David H. King, Hosp. Stew. May 16, '61 Discharged.
John Scott, Drum Major May 16, '61 Discharged by general order.
John Wright, Fife Major May 16, '61 Transferred to Band.
Malachi Weiedman, Serg't Maj. March 1, '62 Vice Town promoted.
Daniel Thomson, 2. M. Ser'gt Vice Fairbanks discharged.
Levi J. Groom, Fife Major Vice Wright transferred, resigned ill health.
George Crandell, Fife Major Vice Grooms discharged by general order.
Malachi Weidman, Adjutant Feb. 27, '63 Vice Fasset resigned.
Henry Barton, Serg. Major Marc. 22, '63 From Serg’t Co A, vice Bellamy promoted.
George Torrey, Comp Sergt. Marc. 22, '63 From serg’t Co B, vice Wiedman promoted.
Line Officers.
Co. A.
Jacob L. Yates, Captain May 8, '61 Resigned ill health, March 1st, ’63.
James H. Bratt, 1st Lieut. May 8, '61 Resigned Dec. 21, ’91 [sic]
Hiram Clute, 2nd. Lieut. May 8, '61 Promoted vice Brott resigned.
Hiram Clute 1st Lieut, Dec. 21, '61 Died Sept. 28, ’62 of wounds received Aug. 30, ’62.
Addison L. Estabrook, 2nd Lieut. Dec. 21, ’61 From 1st Serg’t vice Hiram Clute promoted.
Addison L. Estabrook, 1st Lieut. Sept. 28, '62 Vice Hiram Clute deceased.
Amos T. Calkins, 2nd Lieut. Sept. 28, '62 Vice Estabrook promoted, from 1st Serg’t.
Co. B.
Robert E. M'Coy, Captain May 10, ' 61 Killed in action Aug. 29, ’62.
Duncan Lendrum, 1st Lieut. May 10, ' 61 Missing, probably killed in action Aug. 30, ’62.
James W. M'Coy, 2nd Lieut. May 10, '61 Promoted.
James W. M'Coy, Captain Aug. 29, '62 Vice Robert E. M’Coy, killed in action.
William H. Hoysradt, 1st Lieut. Aug. 30, '62 Vice Lendrum missing, from 1st Serg’t.
Charles H. Doubleday, 2nd Lieut. Nov. 16, '62 Prom. and transferred from Co. H, vice M’Coy pro.
Co. C.
Oliver D. Peabody, Captain June 1, '61
Carlisle D. Beaumont, 1st Lieut. June 1, '61 Killed in action Aug. 29th, 1892. [sic]
Charles B. Peirsons, 2nd Lieut. June 1, '61 Died Sept 7th of wounds received in action Aug 30
Gorton T. Thomas, 2nd Lieut. Sept. 7, '62 Vice Piersons died of wounds.
Gorton T. Thomas 1st Lieut. Feb'y 1, '63 Vice Beaumont killed in action.
James Valleau, 2nd Lieut. Feb'y 1, ’63 From 1st Serg’t vice Thomas promoted.
Co. D.
Henry S. Milliman, Captain June 1, '61 Died Sept 10 ’62 of wounds rec. in action Aug 30.
Thomas B. Fish, 1st Lieut. June 1, '61 Discharged on Surgeon’s certificate Oct. 22, 1862.
Robert A. Rice, 2nd Lieut. June 1, '61 Resigned Dec. 14, 1861.
Wm. T. Beattie, 2nd Lieut. Dec. 14, '61 From 1 Serg’t vice Rice resigned, killed in action Aug. 30th, 1862.
Lucius E. Wilson, Captain Sept. 10, '62 Trans. From Co G, vice Milliman died of wounds.
Henry B. Cook, 1st Lieut. Oct. 23, '62 From 1st Serg’t vice Fish discharged.
Charles H. Aiken, 2nd Lieut. Aug. 30, '62 From 2d Serg’t vice Wm. T. Beattie killed in act.
Co. E.
George Clendon, Jr., Captain May 7, '61 Promoted to Major Aug. 30th, 1862.
John Fassett, 1st Lieut. May 7, '61 Transferred to Rag’l Staff Jan’y 8, ’62.
G Horton Gayger, 2nd Lieut. May 7, '61 Resigned Oct. 3d, 1861.
William T. Norriss, 2nd Lieut. Oct. 3, '61 Vice Gayger resigned.
William T. Norriss, 1st Lieut. Jan'y 8, '62 Vice Fasset trans, missing and probably killed in action Aug. 30, ’62.
Charles Cushing, 2nd Lieut. Jan'y 8, '62 Vice Norris killed, fell in action Sept. 7th, 1862.
Warren Allen, 2nd Lieut. Sept. 18, '62 Vice Charles Cushing killed in action, from 1st Serg’t
Daniel Burgev, Captain Feby 25, '62 Trans, and prom, from Co I, vice Clendon prom.
Co. F.
Austin W. Holden, Captain May 18, '61 Transferred to Medical Staff Aug. 16, '62.
William H. Arlin, 1st Lieut. May 18, ’61 Resigned Jan'y 8th '62.
Orville B. Smith, 2nd Lieut. May 18, ’61 Promoted to 1st Lieut., vice Arlin resigned.
Orville B. Smith 1st Lieut. Jan'y 8th, '62 Promoted to Captain vice Holden transferred.
Fred. E. Ranger, 2nd Lieut. Jan’y 8, ’62 Vice Smith promoted.
Orvill B. Smith, Captain. Aug. 24, '62 Vice Holden transferred, Resigned Nov. 5th '62.
Fred. E. Ranger, 1st Lieut. Aug. 24, ’62 Vice Smith promoted.
James H. Merrill, 2nd Lieut. Aug. 24, ’62 From 1st Serg't vice Ranger promoted.
Fred. E. Ranger, Captain, Nov. 5, '62 Vice Smith resigned.
James H. Merrill, 1st Lieut. Nov. 5, ’62 Vice Fred. E. Ranger promoted.
Salmon D. Sherman, 2nd Lieut. Nov. 5, ’62 From 2d Serg't vice Merrell promoted.
Co. G.
Benjamin Mosher, Captain. June 6, '61 Resigned Feb'y 28th '62.
Henry Hay, 1st. Lieut. June 6, ’61 Resigned June 12th '61.
Horace W. Lacca, 2nd Lieut. June 6, ’61 Resigned Feb'y 28th '62.
Duncan Cameron, 1st Lieut. June 15, '61 Vice Hay resigned.
Duncan Cameron, Captain. March 1, '62 Vice Mosher resigned.
John F. Town, 1st Lieut. March 1, ’62 Vice Cameron promoted, resigned July 23d, '62.
Lucius E. Wilson, 2nd Lieut. March 1, ’62 Vice Lucca resigned, from 1st Serg't.
Lucius E. Wilson, 1st Lieut, July 21, '62 Town resigned, promoted and trans', to Co. D.
Lester A. Bartlett, 2nd Lieut, July 21, ’62 Vice Wilson promoted, transferred from Co. I.
Asa W. Berry, 1st. Lieut. Sept. 11, '62 From 1st Serg't vice Wilson transferred.
Co. H.
Thomas J. Strong, Captain. May 8, '61 Discharged from Surgeon's certificate Aug. 31, '62.
William A. Peirson, 1st Lieut. May 8, ‘61
Matthew S. Teller, 2nd Lieut. May 8, ’61 Vice Pierson's resigned.
Matthew S. Reller, 1st Lieut. Aug. 31, '62 From Serg't vice Teller promoted.
A. Halleck Holbrook, 2nd Lieut. Aug. 31, ’62
Co. I.
Lyman Ormsbee, Captain. May 9, '61
Joseph R. Seaman, 1st Lieut. May 9, ’61 Resigned Feb'y 22d '62.
Daniel Burgey, 2nd Lieut. May 9. ’61
Daniel Burgey, 1st Lieut. Feby 22, '62 Vice Seaman resigned, Transferred to Co. F.
Lester A. Bartlett, 2nd Lieut. Feby 22, ’62 Vice Burgy promoted, Transferred to Co. G.
Benjamin Wickham, 2nd Lieut. July 21, '62 Vice Bartlett transferred, from 1st Serg't.
Benjamin Wickham, 1st Lieut. Sept. 3, '62 Vice Burgy transferred.
George Wetmore, 2nd Lieut. Sept. 3, ’62 From Serg't vice Wickham promoted.
Co. K
Miles P. Cadwell, Captain. May 9, '61 Killed in action Aug. 30 1862.
Edward F. Edgerly, 1st Lieut. May 9, ‘61
Clark W. Huntley, 2nd Lieut. May 9, ’61 Resigned in consequence of wounds, Feb'y 6th '63
Edward F. Edgerly, Captain. Aug. 31, '62 Vice Cadwell killed in action.
Clark W. Huntley, 1st Lieut. Aug. 31, ’62 Vice Edgerly promoted.
John J. Baker, 2nd Lieut. Aug. 31, ’62 From 1st Serg't, vice Huntly promoted.
John J. Baker, 1st Lieut. Feb'y 6, '63 Vice Huntly resigned.
Charles Bellamy, 2nd Lieut. Feb’y 6, ’63 From Com'y Serg't, vice Baker promoted.

Written for the Glen's Falls Messenger.]
Historical Sketch of the Twenty-Second Regiment of New York State Volunteers.
BY CAPT. A. W. HOLDEN.
Copy of a Report made to Lieut. Col. John M'Kie commanding 22d Regiment New York Volunteers.
Dear Sir:—Pursuant to your order I have prepared a brief historical sketch of the regiment now in your command, from its first organization to the present time, which is herewith respectfully submitted for your consideration.
A. W. HOLDEN.
Asst. Surgeon 22d N. Y. Vols.
Camp near Sharpsburgh, Maryland, Oct. 8, 1862.

ARTICLE FOURTH—Concluded.
The men moved buoyantly forward down South street, to the exhilarating music of our band. As the head of our column wheeled into the avenue, dense crowds of anxious-looking people thronged the sidewalks, who hailed our advent with prolonged and repeated cheers. The bad news was just coming in from Bull Run. As we reached the eastern extremity of "the long bridge," we were directed to "halt," "stack arms," and "rest." While awaiting further orders at this point, scattering and fleet-footed fugitives from the scene of conflict came cantering hurriedly across the bridge. Among the number was the famous correspondent of the London Times, quite extensively known by the sobriquet of "Bull Run Russell." Of his interview with our regiment at that time, he makes the following mention in his published "Diary": "At the Washington end of the bridge, I was challenged again by the men of a whole regiment, who, with piled arms, were halted on the chaussie, smoking, laughing, and singing. 'Stranger, have you been to the fight?' 'I have been only a little beyond Centerville.' But that was quite enough. Soldiers, civilians, and women, who seemed to be out unusually late, crowded round the horse, and again I told my stereotyped story of the unsuccessful attempt to carry the Confederate position, and the retreat to Centerville to await better luck next time. The soldiers along side me cheered, and those next them took it up, till it ran through the whole line, and must have awakened the night-owls."—After remaining about two hours, orders came, and the men in a very despondent, dissatisfied sort of a way, resumed their arms, and we retraced our steps in silence, and gloom, only broken by the monotonous tramp, tramp, of many feet. The next day was a gloomy one for the City and the Government. It rained heavily, and stragglers wet, dispirited and demoralized, thronged the thoroughfares, while the wounded came in like the waves of a flood-tide, filling up all the temporary makeshifts dignified by the name of Hospitals, which was the best that could be done at the time no doubt. The 2d New-Hampshire Vols., whose camp adjoined ours, and whose tents had been left standing, suffered severely in the engagement, and all day long their wounded and stragglers came droopingly along by ones, twos, and threes—a sorry but impressive sight, enabling us all to appreciate to some degree the terrors—the terrible realities of war. Fragments of Regiments but lately exultant with swollen ranks and brave bearing, came creeping along to the slow tap of the drum, while knots and gangs of stragglers assailed every guard line and camp for food, shelter, and drink.—The army, in a general order was declared demoralized, and stringent orders were speedily promulgated, that all stragglers and soldiers without properly authenticated passes, should be arrested and sent to their respective command. It was not permitted to harbor or refresh them under penalty,—seemingly a harsh rule, but really just and proper; contributing largely to the restoration of discipline, and good order among them. It will also be borne in mind that with the few exceptions of sick and lame, it is the poorest, and most cowardly, and not the bravest and best soldiers, who straggle away from their commands.
Another respite was thus afforded to us which was improved in the constant practice of drills and the manual of arms. We had at length found that our Colonel was not only a superior tactician, but a thorough disciplinarian, possessing administrative abilities of no common order. These qualifications have served largely in gaining for the 22d Regiment its present enviable reputation.

ADDENDA.
It was the 6th Massachusetts and one of the Pennsylvania Regiments that were attacked in Baltimore on the 17th of April, 1861; and to which, reference was made in article No. 3. By a very singular if not
Providential coincidence, one of the Massachusetts men killed on that occasion, was a lineal descendant of one of the Patriot few who were among the earliest Martyrs to Liberty at the battle of Lexington, on the very day and month in 1775 of which this was the anniversary. Baltimore was the Lexington of the present struggle.
N. B.—The following abstracts are published at the time more for the purpose of preservation, and to get them off my hands than because they belong properly in this place, although it is, strictly speaking, immaterial to  the main thread of the narrative at what time or in what connection they are published. I thought it best to obtain the facts while I could.

ABSTRACT C.
COMPLETE REGISTER.
Of fatalities in the 22d Regiment, N. Y. S. Vols., from the time of its organization to March 20, 1863.

Names. Rank. Where. Of What. When.
Field and Staff.
Joseph B. Atherly, Surgeon. Falmouth, Va. Typhoid Fever, Aug. 12, '62
Gorton T. Thomas, Lieut. Col. Washington  Wounds, Sept. 2, ‘62
Co. A.
Timothy B. Vandecar, 3d. Sergt. Georgetown D. C. Typhoid Fever, Sept. 26,
‘61
John H. Vanderworken, Private Eckington D. C . Typhid Fever, July 20, ‘62
Hiram Clute, 1st Lieut. Washington D. C. Wounds, Sept. 28, ‘62
John Murray, Private Frederick, Md.  Wounds Oct. 23, ‘62
Chauucey F. VanDusen, Private Bull Run, Fell in action, Aug. 30, ‘62
Leonard G. Fletcher, Corporal. Bull Run Fell inaction Aug. 30, ‘62
Jonathan G. Porter, Private. South Mountain, Fell in action Sept. 14, ‘62
John Wright, Private South Mountain Fell inaction Sept. 14, ‘62
Co. B.
William Baker, Private. Uptons Hill Va., Pneumonia, Feb'y 11, 62
Edward Cromwell, Corporal. Upton’s Hill Va. Wounds.
Gurdon F. Viele, Private. Upton’s Hill, Va. Wounds.
Robert E. McCoy, Captain. Groveton, Fell in action, Aug. 29, ‘62
Charles E. Mills, 1st Sgt. Bull Run, Fell in action, Aug. 30, ‘62
Patrick Mehan, Private. Bull Run, Fell inaction, Aug. 30, ‘62
Charles E. Stickney, 2d Sargent South Mountain, Fell in action, Sept. 14, ‘62
Oliver L. Lackey, Private. South Mountain, Fell in action, Sept. 14, ‘62
Duncan Lendrum, 1st Lieut. Bull Run, Missing, Aug. 30, ‘62
Charles Reed, Private. Bull Run Missing, Aug. 30, ‘62
Co. C.
Charles B. Piersons 2d. Lieut. Washington D. C. Wounds, Sept. 7, ‘62
Carlisle D. Beaumont, 1st Lieut. Groveton, Fell in action, Aug. 29, ‘62
James Murray, Private. Private Groveton, Fell in action Aug. 29, ‘62
Henry N. Dunckly, Private Groveton, Fell in action Aug. 29, ‘62
Joseph Pero, Private Bull Run, Fell in action Aug.30, ‘62
Henry W. Hathaway, 3d Sergt. South Mountain, Fell inaction Sept. 14, ‘62
Co. D.
James Stalker, Private. Washington D.C. Inflamation July 17, ‘61
of brain
Charles J. Eaton, 3d Sergt. Washington D.C.Typhoid fever May 18, '62
Henry S. Milliman, Captain. Washington D.C. Wounds Sept. 10,‘62
William T. Beattie, 3d Sergt. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
Co. E.
John M'Auley, Private. Arlington Va. Typhoid fever, Sept. 14, '61
Rollin F. Austin, Private Alexandria Va. Typhoid fever April 10, '62
Timothy Bradley, Private Smoketown Md. Diarrhea Oct. 15, ‘62
Byron G. Charette, Private Washington D.C. Wounds Sept. 13, ‘62
Charles Goolah, Private Washington D.C. Wounds Sept. 22, ‘62
Frank Aubin, Private Frederick Md. Wounds Sept. 22, ‘62
Joseph Whitford, Private Hospital Field Wounds Sept. 22, ‘62
Jacob Ross, Private Smoketown Wounds Oct. 14, ‘62
Wilber F. Buswell, Private South Mountain Fell in action Sept. 14, ‘62
Charles Cushing, 2d Lieut. Antietam Fell in action Sept. 17, ‘62
Patrick Johnson, Private. Groveton Missing Aug. 29, ‘62
Nelson Ross, Pribate Groveton Missing Aug. 29, ‘62
William T. Norriss, 1st Lieut. Bull Run Missing Aug. 30, ‘62
Co. F.
Emanuel Noel, Private. Georgetown Typhoid fever Nov. 24, '61
Lyman Ward, Private Hospital Small pox Jany 17, '62
Titus L. West, Private Alexandria Typhoid fever May 13, ‘62
Rufus N. Barto, Private Col. Colt's Hosp. Wounds Oct. 18, ‘62
John E. Benjamin, Private Fairfax Seminary Wounds Sept. 11, ‘62
Aaron Sherman, Private Frederick Md. Wounds Oct. 9, ‘62
Dewitt C. Barton, Private Centreville Va. Killed April 5, ‘62
Willard Combs, Private Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
Andrew LaPoint, Private Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
Daniel Pendell, 5th Sergt. South Mountain Fell in action Sept. 14, ‘62
Benjamin F. Hendryx, Private. Bull Run Missing Aug. 30, ‘62
William O. Jackson, Corporal. Bull Run Missing Aug. 30, ‘62
Archibald Ramsay, Private. Bull Run Missing Aug. 30, ‘62
Co. G.
Nelson Hastings. Private. Washington D.C. Consumption July 16, '61
Cornelius White, Private Upton's Hill Typhoid fever  Oct. 26, ‘61
William Washburn, Private Upton’s Hill Typhoid fever Dec. 13, ‘61
John Constantino, Private Washington D.C. Wounds Sept. 15, '62
Rufus K. Verrill, Private Washington, D.C. Wounds Sept. 8, ‘62
Anse Taft, Private Alexandria Va. Wounds Sept. 8, ‘62
Thomas Whitton, Private Alexandria Va. Wounds Sept. 8, ‘62
Lewis T. Johnson, Corporal. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
Thomas Moore, Private. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
William Riley, Private Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
Lewis Fenix, Private Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
John Neeson, Private South Mountain Fell in action Sept. 14, ‘62
James Connell, Private Antietam Fell in action Sept. 17, ‘62
George F. Cleaveland, Private Bull Run Missing Aug. 30, ‘62
Co. H.
Edward Blanchard, Private. Col. Coll. Hosp. Typhoid fever Nov. 14, 61
Lyman Chamberlain, Private Bristol Station Typhoid fever April 19,’62
Charles H. Bowen, Private Carver Hospital Pneumonia June 20, ‘62
Stephen Podwin, Private Washington Wounds Sept. 3, ‘62
James Wythe, Private Groveton Fell in action Aug. 29, ‘62
Rollin C. Wyman, Private Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
Selden L. Whitney, Private South Mountain Fell inaction Sept. 14, ‘62
George W. Miner, Private Bull Run Missing Aug. 30, ‘62
Co. I.
Edward Burge, Private. Baltimore Killed June 30, '61
Thomas Crawford, 5th Sergt. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, '62
Joseph W. Booth, Private. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
Sylvanus A. Durkee, Private. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
Ephraim J. Smith, Private. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
James Dignan, Private Antietam Fell in action Sept. 17, ‘62
Co. K.
Timothy D. Murray, Private. Harwood Hospital Wounds Oct. 18, ‘62
Henry Sumner, Private Groveton Fell in action Aug. 29, ‘62
Miles P. Cadwell, Captain. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
Daniel McCartey, Private. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
James Gleason, Private. Bull Run Fell in action Aug. 30, ‘62
James Evans, 3d Sergt. South Mountain Fell in action Sept. 14, 62
ABSTRACT D.
Report of aggregate strength for duty, and the killed, wounded and missing, on the 14th and 17th of September and the 13th of December, 1862, according to Regimental reports.
Regiment (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
100 6 12 Sept. 14.
14th N. Y. S. M. 80 9 15 Sept. 17.
382 1 4 Dec. 13.

126 12 25 Sept. 14.
22d N. Y. Vols. 67 2 24 1 Sept. 17.
210 5 Dec. 13.

135 1 23 Sept. 14.
24th N. Y. Vols. 57 3 15 1 Sept. 17.
159 1 1 Dec. 13.

137 4 6 Sept. 14.
30th N. Y. Vols. 53 4 11 1 Sept. 17.
406 2 8 5 Dec. 13.

498 23 66 Sept. 14.
Brigade Total. 257 18 65 3 Sept. 17.
1057 3 18 6 Dec. 13.

Strength present for duty
No. of Killed, according to Regimental Report.
No. of Wounded, according to Regimental Report.
No. of Missing, according to Regimental Report.
Date.

It will be seen that this report differs from the statement above. This however has the advantage of being official.

Correspondence of the Glen's Falls Republican.
FROM THE 22D REGIMENT N. Y. STATE VOLUNTEERS.
We give below one of the communications which an officer of one of the Companies from this village has kindly consented to furnish us, and we trust that our readers will be favored with many more from the same source. The communication does not bear a very recent date, and was intended (as it is) as a continuation of a communication which appeared in the Republican several weeks since:
CAMP RATHBONE, TROY BRANCH,
ALBANY DEPOT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS,
May 31st, 1861.
THE RIVAL CAMPS.
When the echoes of the guns levelled [sic] against Fort Sumter were still sounding through the peaceful and quiet vales of the North, the city of Troy, loyal and enthusiastic, sprang forward with characteristic spirit and zeal, to raise a Regiment towards the quota demanded of the State of New York, by the president, for the suppression of the Insurrection at the South. Recruiting offices were opened at every corner and a branch depot after a great effort was secured at Troy. Volenteers [sic] were rapidly enlisted—appropriations by the common council, and subscriptions for the support of the families of volunteers were liberally made—contributions of money, clothing and hospital stores were poured in by the patriotic citizens in no stinted quantities, and every disposition manifested by all to facilitate the completion of the 2d Regiment of New York Volunteers, of which Troy's favorite son, Capt. Willard, of the U. S. Army, was to be the Colonel.—The command of this fine body of men has since been transferred to Col. Carr, of Troy, and the Regiment moved on to Fortress Monroe.
The popularity and success attending this undertaking, it seems, inspired others to kindred efforts, and a new site for a camp was hired; new contracts for subsisting State troops entered into with the Government; barracks erected, and wires pulled, by which some Companies, supposed to be favorably inclined to certain men, interested in the operation, for the prominent officers of a Regimental organization. It was loudly whispered in camp that these parties cleared over $100 per day by their contract; and then to assume, that because these companies were ordered to this camp, there was any violation of good faith in not voting for superannuated militia officers, to command a Regiment of young and vigorous men! This scheme was fully frustrated by the action of the northern Companies which had been represented in Convention at Fort Edward, some weeks ago, at which resolutions were adopted, favoring the organization of a Regiment from companies raised in Warren and Washington Counties. This has been the practical result of things, with substitution of Essex for Saratoga County. The result of this organization seemed to create at once, an embittered state of feeling towards the Glen's Falls Companies, on the part of the Troy and Lansingburgh Companies, who were known to favor the election of General Viele as Colonel. It would, no doubt, have been gratifying to the Trojans to have sent out two Regiments, to the service, commanded by Trojan officers; but it would be insulting the judgment of the better class of people, in Troy, to suppose that the Glen's Falls Companies were in any way reprehensible for not joining in the movement.

DRUMMING OUT OF CAMP.
The numerous desertions from the Glen's Falls companies, combined with a feeling on the part of the men that there was nothing really binding in the articles of enlistment, created a necessity for a signal example, to prevent any future occurrences of the kind. An opportunity soon presented itself in the person of John Allen, an "old soldier" from Caldwell, who had deserted from the Company, he was followed up to the foot of Sohroon [sic] Lake, a distance of over eighty miles, at an expense of about thirty dollars, and brought back to Troy, and who, after repeated violations of Camp discipline, and as numerous promises to reform, finally refused to take the oath of allegiance to the Government. By vote of the company it resolved was that he should be drummed out of camp. This process is already familiar to the readers of the Republican; but in this instance was varied by "flouring" the culprit and accidentally tripping him up. This unfortunate occurrence aroused the lively indignation of the Lansinburgh [sic] Company, composed of plug uglies, and "spoiling for a fight." A lively little skirmish ensued, which resulted in three or four of the Lansinburgh [sic] boys being thrown down, and the coat of one of our men being tore up the back. The parties were separated; but in half an hour a party of six or eight of the Lansinburgh [sic] boys attacked one of ours by the name of Hendryx, who threw one of their number over his head and knocked down two more, but was finally overpowered by superior numbers.
Thus ended an affair, about which so much pious indignation was exhibited by the Troy Times, whose acrimonious criticisms were colored by the strong feelings of partizanship for Gen. Viele, and which refused to give an authentic and correct version of the affair. The misstatements made by that sheet were 1st, That his head was shaved. This was not true; it was only close sheared, and no more so than a majority of the Regiment, is to day. 2d, That he was kicked and struck after he was down; a great mistake, for he had scarcely reached the ground before he was lifted up again, and he was not struck or kicked at all. That he had been promised a bounty of twenty dollars, which had not been paid him; an utter falsehood, as all of the members of the Company can readily attest. 4th, That his family had not been properly taken care of by the Relief Committee, agreeably to promise; when in fact, he had no family at all, having deserted his wife years ago, since which time she has supported herself by her own in …

... rest of the narrations themselves. The first of the series occurred on the route between Vera Cruz and the city of Mexico. In the regular diligencia running between the places just mentioned I had taken passage, and had passed through the beautiful city of Jalapa and entered the gloomy town of Perote without meeting with any unusual incident, though being continually warned to be on my guard, I ... the dangers of the road. At Pe-... Board consented to the organization of a Northern Regiment, and on the evening of the 10th of May, 1861, at Stanwix Hall, Albany, an election was held by the Commissioned Officers of the Glen's Falls, Fort Edward, Schroon, Keeseville, White Creek and Moriah companies, Brig. Gen. Rathbone presiding, which resulted in the election of Walter Phelps, Jr., of Glen's Falls, as Colonel; Gorton T. Thomas of Keeseville, Lieut. Colonel, and John Mc-..., Jr., of White Creek, Major. The election of this board was protested against by Capt.'s Yates of Cohoes and Waterford, and Boynton of Whitehall, but was finally confirmed by the Military Board, and these two companies compelled to acquiesce in the arrangement. The Whitehall Company, in consequence of some difficulty between its men and officers, was subsequently disbanded, and a new company formed upon the ground, from the surplus of other Companies, of which Capt. Mosher of Whitehall, was elected Captain, Duncan Cameron, of Glen's Falls, Lieutenant and _lacca of While Creek, Ensign.

THE RAIL ROADS,
which have always been noted for their liberality towards all public enterprises, have not been wanting in meeting the exigencies of this crisis. At first, while our State officials heavily staggering along in the deep ruts of party discipline, with hardly an idea beyond rewarding some partizan leader, who had been officious in carrying a wide awake lantern during the recent Presidential Campaign, the Rail Roads came promptly forward, and carried men and stores gratis toward the National Capitol, until its great pressing danger was passed. Subsequently after the War Department of this State had awakened to its great responsibilities, but from the youthful-ness and inefficiency of its officials, the several offices were made the agencies of scheming, wily, stock jobbing politicians; the rail roads continued to forward men and baggage at the risk of getting their pay back from the State at some future period. In this movement Mr. Davison, President of the Saratoga & Rensselaer Road, was prominently active; and had it not been for his kindness some of the Companies now in the 22d Regiment would never have been mustered into the United States service. In addition to this, his liberality in passing such men over the road, grant­ing excursion tickets to returning volun­teers, at half price, all deserve the especial gratitude of the North, and his pleasant face will long he remembered by the volunteers from Warren County.
Adieu in haste,
I hear we are ordered off to the Albany Barracks.
Yours &c., ALEPH.

CAMP GRAHAM, near WASHINGTON, D. C.,
July 3d, 1861.
Friend C--:You will observe by the above that we have at last arrived at the
Capitol, and, in accordance with your request, I take this, the first opportunity, of informing you as to the whereabouts and movements of the 22d Regiment of the New York Volunteers.
On Friday, the 28th day of June, we formed in line, at our Camp in the city of Albany, and marched to the wharf, where a steam tug and two barges were awaiting the embarkation of the Regiment. We found no trouble in embarking, as every man was anxious to be off, and consequently did his utmost to accomplish it. Steam was up, and we were soon sailing down the river which bore the first steam vessel, contrived by the genius of Fulton.
At West Point the Cadets were out on the Heights and gave us some hearty cheers, which were returned with a will by the Regiment, and by a salute from the Band. At about 2 o'clock P. M., we anchored at the mouth of New York Bay, where we lay till 7 P. M., when we embarked on board the steamer Red Jacket, and started for Elizabethport, N. J. The weather was fine and there was but just wind enough to make a light swell, not enough to cause sea sickness, for which I, for one, was very thankful. Arrived at Elizabethport, at 10 o'clock P. M., we marched into the Depot and took a hasty supper, consisting of bread and meat, which we had to take in our hands, as some of the men detailed for the purpose would take a handful from a large box and pass it around.
After having satisfied the more importunate cravings of the inner man we entered the cars and were soon en route for Harrisburgh [sic], Pa., at which place we arrived at 12 o'clock M. on Sunday, the 30th. Here we halted, got out of the cars, and marched up the street about one fourth of a mile to the Freight Depot, where we stacked arms and took dinner, which consisted of the remnants of our last night's supper, together with some sea biscuit. It "came tough," and no mistake, and there was considerable grumbling among some of the Companies. I am happy to state that Co. E. were more disposed to laugh, and enjoy what little they could get, than to spoil that and their digestion by growling.
So far, as we passed through the country, there appeared to be the greatest enthusiasm among the people, and here it was equally as intense as at any place through which we had passed. We saw boys ranging from 4 to 12 years of age, dressed in the Zouave uniform, cheering and shouting as we passed; and when we stopped a perfect crowd of the little heroes would rush into the cars to know if they could do anything for us; and when we would give them our canteens, away they would go, and soon return with them filled with nice cool water. As soon as we passed the line into Maryland, we began to pass the Picket Guard stationed along the whole line of the rail road, at a distance of 20 rods from each other, and here was the first place and time that I could fully realize that we were so near the "enemy's country." Before we arrived at Baltimore we had 6 ball cartridges given to each man, with orders to load our guns, but not to cap them until we should receive further orders. We saw but very little waving of handkerchiefs, and heard but little cheering after we crossed the Pennsylvania and Maryland line. We arrived in Baltimore at half past eight in evening, and as soon as we were out of the cars were ordered to fix bayonets cap our pieces. The Regiment then formed in line and stood at "place rest" for nearly half an hour, while the people thronged around us, the most of them, the ladies particular, conversing freely about the war, the chances of our Regiment having a fight, the news, &c. We then wheeled into column by platoons, and started for other Depot, which is situated on the opposite side of the city, at a distance of one and a half miles. As we marched, crowd followed along, very much after style of a crowd in any the Northern cities, giving occasionally a faint cheer for "the Union." I fancied that I could tell a secessionist whenever we passed one, as I could occasionally see a man standing aloof from the crowd, looking gloomily at us as we marched along, or turning his back and going into his house, shutting his door with a bang, which plainly spoke sentiment. When about half way from one Depot to the other, the feeling disapprobation began to be more strongly expressed, and there was occasionally to be heard a single cheer for Jeff. Davis, and that attracted no notice from the Regiment, they became emboldened, and managed to give, at one place, a pretty strong cheer for Jeff. Davis, followed by three groans for the Union. All the notice which this attracted from Regiment was three groans for Jeff. Davis, and they were given with a will, I tell you. But climax was reserved for our entrance the Depot. As the Regiment marched the Depot by sections of four, we thought that we were destined to pass Baltimore without trouble; but we were mistaken. Company E. was placed near the middle of the Regiment, and after we had got into the Depot and as the left or rear of the Regiment was just entering, I heard a single shot, followed in quick succession by two others, then by three or four more, and then by a running fire, which extended from the rear, clear to right the Regiment. As firing commenced, the Regiment halted came to the "about face," did not appear to know exactly what to do; as each Company fired, next one on the right would fire, and then next, so on through, most men firing right up to roof, without orders. A hundred different rumors spread like wild-fire through the Regiment; but no one appeared to be any better informed than his neighbor. The truth of the matter, as near as we have been able to ascertain, at the time and since, is as follows: The first shot fired was from the roof of the Depot, killing one of Company I's men instantly, the ball entering the top of his head and coming out at the base of the scull. Whether other shots were then fired from the roof and other parts of the building is impossible to tell. The men in the vicinity of the one who fell at the first fire, returned that shot, aiming at the place, as near as they could judge, from whence it was fired; other men seeing these few firing towards the roof, and receiving no orders, fired in the same direction. Others fired into the cars standing upon the track, and into the railroad ticket office. There were two of our men slightly wounded, beside the one killed, and wounded in such a manner as could leave no doubt as to the shots coming from some place other than the line of the Regiment; and quite a number of the men saw shots fired from different points in and about the Depot.—After the first round was fired the men stood to their arms awaiting orders, or some further demonstration; but as none were made, the order was given to "unxfix [sic] bayonets," and we got into the cars, and after waiting about an hour, were again on our way for Washington, having passed the Rubicon. The Regiment arrived in Washington between 1 and 2 o'clock on Monday morning, and were quartered in Old Trinity Church Chapel and two other buildings, and we betook ourselves wearily and supperless to sleep at 3 o'clock, A.M., upon the pews of the chapel and floor of the other buildings. In the morning we had for breakfast the scraps and crumbs which had been gathered up after every meal since leaving New York City, and all thrown into a large box. You can imagine that it was not over nice; but we ate it with the best grace we could summon and remained throughout the day at the same quarters and the same box provisions. We passed our time during the day as best we could, strolling about city, &c. The Capitol was open for any one who chose to visit, as were also grounds at the White House. The city is full to overflowing of Soldiers—Volunteers from nearly every free State, Regulars, numbering sixty thousand in city and within 3 hours' march of the same. Time passed rapidly and pleasantly till the next morning at 8 o'clock, when we formed in line, and at about noon we left city and marched out about 2 miles north from Washington, where we are at present encamped, awaiting orders. It seems, now, to me, like war in all its realities.
There are Regiments on sides of us, and the Picket Guards are picked off every night. Two were shot within sight of our camp the morning that came here, and we can often hear the sentinel's challenge, and occasionally the sharp ring rifle, as some of the sentinels see, or think they see something suspicious.—Last night we were aroused from our slumbers twice, by the sound of bugles and drums calling to arms, though it proved to be a false alarm in both instances. About 11 o'clock last night one of the sentinels of our Regiment, detected a man prowling about in the woods near our lines, and secured him as a prisoner, and as he could give no satisfactory account of himself we kept him over night. He had on a part of the U. S. uniform.
News has just arrived of a big fight over the river, in Virginia, to day; but we have not heard as to the result.
We have just received orders to hold ourselves in readiness to march to the battle field at a moment's notice, and the Adjutant told the men that he did not mean by that, 30 minutes or 20 or 10 but less than 2, and to have our arms in readiness to march to night, if called upon. If we are not ordered elsewhere before to morrow morning we are to march into the city to be reviewed by the President. But enough for the present. I shall write you again as soon as I have anything worth while to communicate.
H. H. J.

From "Our Boys."
CAMP GRAHAM, WASHINGTON, D. C.,
July 11th, 1861.
Editor of Glen's Falls Messenger:—
DEAR SIR:—Will you permit me through your columns to offer an explanation in relation to certain points contained in my letter of July 1st, and published in the MESSENGER of the 5th.
1st. That letter contained the following: "The Colonel would only let a favored few go ashore, of which I was not one favored."
In explanation of this passage, I would say, that since writing it, the following facts have come to my knowledge, which, of course, entirely exonerates the Colonel from any exhibition of partiality in the premises. The steamer and barges which brought the Regiment from Albany, reached New York about 2 o'clock, P. M., of the following day, and anchored in the middle of the river, off the Dey street wharf. A signal was immediately made for a small boat, and the Colonel went ashore to make his report to the Commandant of the Depot. Capt. Yates, an invalid, went forward by the Isaac Newton the night before. The Quartet-master and Capt. Strong had landed early in the morning at Newburgh, and gone to New York to make the necessary arrangements for the transportation and subsistence of the troops en route for Washington. As to the other officers who left the boat that day, I have since learned that it was by order of Lieut. Col. Thomas who sent them ashore for food and water.—With these exceptions no other officers were permitted to leave the boats.
The following in relation to the Regimental Quarter-master, I am happy to say is susceptible of satisfactory explanation:
2d. "The men begin to find their living pretty hard, and there is a strong feeling of hostility beginning to prevail against the Quarter-master in consequence of his neglect. While we were anchored off New York, the men were six hours without water, and Sunday, the men had only one meal, which consisted of dry bread and cold boiled ham. This neglect seemed wholly unnecessary."
In explanation to the above, the Quartermester [sic], as before stated, left the barges at Newburgh, early Saturday morning, and proceeded to New York, where, in the discharge of his multifarious duties, he obtained three day's rations for the entire force, and ordered them to be sent to the boats, but by some incomprehensible mistake, they were sent on board of the steamer, which, at nightfall, conveyed the force to Elizabethport, New Jersey. The want of water was purely the neglect of the officers belonging to the boat.
The reason why the men were not fed but once on Sunday, was that the baggage cars containing the provisions were locked and the Conductor would not suffer them to be opened until reaching Harrisburgh [sic].
It is hoped that these explanations may disabuse the public mind of any unfavorable impressions, relating to Quarter-master Woodruff. The letter, from which the extracts were taken, was a private one, never intended for publication when written, and from which, allowing its contents to be of sufficient interest to appear before the public, all personalities should have been carefully suppressed. The responsibilities and cares devolving upon the commandants of companies, are perplexing, and harassing, and as home correspondence is conducted at intervals snatched from pressing duties, it is not wonderful in the heat and worry of frequently disturbed attempts to write, an expression, or innuendo, or exclamation should find its way upon paper which should never appear in print. Editors will therefore please use discretion and govern themselves accordingly. The duties of the Quarter-master are immense, and under the most favorable circumstances when every facility is afforded for the supply of requisitions of stores, subsistence, army equipage, clothing and transportation, it is a first-class business man alone who is capable of fulfilling the varied offices devolving upon him with satisfaction to a force of 800 men, and many of those men too, of a class which seems to have thrown aside all sense of personal responsibility, and like children look to their officers for every possible help and aid for every want. When, therefore, we take into consideration that our Government whose routine for fifty years has been that of peace, is now arming, clothing and feeding a force of over 200,000 men, with every thing from a percussion cap to an overcoat, or from a soldier's cup to a Colonel's marquee, to be manufactured, to order; that soldiers are pouring in faster than they can possibly be supplied, it is not wonderful —indeed it would be wonderful were it otherwise,—if delays should occur in many directions, in providing the many things requisite for comfort in Camp life.
3d. It has been suggested that some misconception of facts might be inferred from my statement of the Baltimore affair. To relation to the breaking up of the lines, my remarks must be considered as only applying to my own command. [Some of the Companies, of which Co. E, (Glen's Falls Light Guards) was one, stood firm. The crowd that was in the Depot at the commencement of the firing, naturally sought refuge at a place the most distant from the point of danger, and consequently rushed in such throngs upon the first division (Companies A and F) of the right flank, that they were fairly carried along by the pressure. Frightened and defenceless women and children perfectly paralyzed with terror, clung to the men beseeching them not to shoot, and frantically endeavoring to drag themselves through the horrorstricken crowd, which, for the brief moment of suspense, remained packed at that end of the depot.
The Court of Investigation and Inquest connected with the Baltimore affair have, as yet, made no formal report, but upon consultation with a majority of its members, I learn that the. preponderance of evidence goes largely to show that private Burge of the Adirondack Rangers was killed by a shot from above; and I have just learned to-day for the first that the word was passed along the left flank, "they are firing on us from the roof."* It is, I know, the prevailing belief in Camp, that Burge was killed by a Baltimorean, and furthermore that his death was not unavenged.
I must hasten to close this long collection of errata.
The statement is current in Washington City to-day that the 22d and 34th New York Regiments are to be ordered next week to Cario, Illinois.
Yours, respectfully A. W. HOLDEN.

*Besides the shots from the roof, there were several shots fired from both sides of the Depot, several from the neighboring houses, and also at the cars during our progress out before reaching the bridge. It is positively stated too, that 18 men were killed upon the roof by our fire. The lights at one end of Depot were extinguished, and as afterwards appeared, the gas had been turned off at the meter. I saw over 30 shots fired from the side of the Depot towards our line. Oscar C. Vaughn, of my command, saw a man near the entrance of the Depot, deliberately draw his revolver and fire into us, and he as deliberately drew up his musket and returned the fire.

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, AUG. 27, 1861.
Friend Arnold:—Having a few leisure moments, and just returning from scouting and picket duty, perhaps a few lines would not be amiss to you at this time. Ten o'clock last Sunday, Co. E., Capt. Clendon, Co. F., Capt. Holden, and Co. C, of Keesville, marched to Ball's Cross Roads, to post themselves as pickets. After arriving there, we were dispersed in different roads, in fields, side of fences and in the woods, wherever our Major thought proper. Co. E., and part of Co. F. marched to Hall's Hill. Then we were divided into quads from ten to twenty, to go out scouting. Squad led by Lieut. Fasset and Smith, marched down through a piece of woods crossing a valley over to a railroad near the line of the rebel pickets. After they advanced a few rods beyond the railroad on side of a lone range of hills, the top of which is covered with woods, and where those vile assassins hide and shoot our soldiers wherever they see them, without warning, eight or ten shots were made at them out of these woods, but did not disturb any of them seriously. One's hat was hit and knocked off his head. They exchanged a few shots with the rebels and retreated. During this time I stayed at the residence of Mr. Hall. He is a Slave-holder—owning six or seven slaves. His residence is on a rising bill, overlooking a broad and beautiful landscape to the south. I went on top of the house and looked through a spy-glass to see the rebel pickets. Looking towards Falls Church, I could see their cavalry and a few men walking around in an orchard. At night I was placed out on picket in the edge of a piece of woods a short distance from the house. In the morning I was relieved and went scouting with a party of eight. We advanced until we reached a peach orchard and then halted. While picking peaches in a man's orchard, who is now a Captain in the secession army, we saw a party of our boys bringing off a person who had just been shot. We were pained to see that it was Theodore Reynolds of Glen's Falls. We took him to the house of the captain above mentioned. Here were a few negroes who showed all the kindness we desired. I have not time to write all the particulars about it. But our day's work was a good one, there was continual firing on both sides of the pickets all day, resulting in killing eight or ten of theirs, while only two on our side and perhaps not in the death of more than one. One they killed instantly and stabbed him three times in the neck, which shows their cruel and murderous disposition. He belonged to the Twenty-fifth Reg. N. Y. V.
He was shot last night. This morning I with six others, including two officers, went out and brought him in, which was considered very dangerous, but we were not molested, though alarm was given by one their pickets, and their cavalry was seen in motion. Last night was a lonely night—I was alone on one the outpost pickets, down in a piece of woods. The night was cool, and I had nothing but the canopy of heaven for my covering.—Strange thoughts occured [sic] while hearing the noise of creaking crickets, and that strange noise of the owl as if it was scared at Secesh. Then again thinking that I was on the enemy's soil, a soil that was once admired for its fertility, now laid waste, farms deserted, houses in ruins, and thinking perhaps soon but a short distance from where I am, will perhaps, be fought one of the most sanguinary battles ever witnessed.
We arrived in Camp this morning with good feelings and as a general thing had a good time—plenty of roast and boiled corn, peaches and apples, obtained from deserted farms, whose owners have been impressed in- to the rebel army.
August 31.
During three days past, I with thirty oth­ers of our Regiment, have been assisting Pro­fessor Lowe in his balloon reconnoissance:— We towed the balloon backwards and for­wards from Washington to Ball's Cross Roads, and let him up and down whenever he wish-ed. The object of it was to see what the rebels were about. Last night we let him up at Ball's Cross Roads—he made two ascen­sions, the last time when he came down, just after he stepped out of the basket, we heard the report of a cannon, and a ball came whizing [sic] through the air right in the direction of the balloon, which struck five rod from where we were, and soon another came whistling through the air and struck in the road but two rods from where I stood. We started the balloon on double quick, fell back a mile and a half. Professor Lowe was in good humor, said he knew he would fetch fire out of them. The shots were well directed and cut pretty close. When he was up he said the rebels all stood still and looked at him—that they are advancing this way, with a very strong force. He does not report publicly everything he sees, but one thing is certain--they have come this way from where I stood the other night. You may look for a fight soon. Yours, W. Smith.

Private Letter from the Army.
ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Va., Aug. 27, 1861.
I have just returned from picket duty. We went off on Sunday morning immediately after church service. About two hundred men were put under my command, comprising the two companies from Glen's Falls and a Keeseville Company. We took possession of a farm house for our head quarters, and then posted our pickets.—Our business was to watch the enemy and if he made an advance, fall back and report. We were not to make an attack, but to remain on the defensive as long as we could. Sunday passed without serious accident. On Monday Theodore Reynolds and Fletcher Lapham, while scouting, were fired upon; Reynolds was shot through the chest below the collar bone, Fletcher shot the Rebel and the two retreated until Reynolds became weak from loss of blood. More of our boys fortunately came up, and carried poor Reynolds out of the reach of the enemy's fire, amid a shower of bullets. They brought him to our headquarters where he was attended by Dr. HOLDEN. He is now in camp, and is much better than could, be expected. I hope he will recover, although of course it is very doubtful, the ball passing through his lungs and coming out under the right shoulder blade. We killed during the day four rebels certainly, and I think a great many more. They are a pack of barbarians; a man belonging to the 25th was shot yesterday morning; his body lay exposed, his comrades not daring to venture near the woods to carry him off. This morning John Fassett and a squad went and brought him in. We found that after his death the scoundrels had bayoneted him. I saw four stabs in his throat, that from their appearance had evidently been inflicted after death.
We executed our orders; and were it not for Reynold's mishap, there would have been nothing to mar our satisfaction. It will sound strange to you if I say we enjoyed ourselves, but it was so. The excitement and novelty of being shot at put new life into our boys. I cannot write more to night as I have not slept more than two hours since Saturday night.

Another Letter from the Army.
CAMP GRAHAM, ARLINGTON, VA.,
Tuesday Evening, August 27th, 1861.
From Sunday morning till to-day noon my company have been out on picket duty. During the night we lay on our arms, and what little sleep we got was out doors, guarding our posts. Our position was about four miles northwest of camp, at "Hall's farm," about a mile beyond "Bull's cross roads," in Alexandria County. The first day we had no adventures of importance, except the exchange of shots between the enemy's pickets and our own. The next morning after the pickets were stationed, several scouting parties were organized and started off in different directions, to make observations along the enemy's lines. In one of these parties, which approached too near the rebel outposts for safety, a man by the name of THEODORE REYNOLDS, a brother in law of ZENSHEIMER, at Glen's Falls, was shot through the lungs—the ball entering a little below the collar bone and coming out below the shoulder blade. The wound bled profusely. Strange to say, that after being shot he staggered on several rods before he fell. Before dressing the wound at every inspiration the air would gurgle and rush through the aperture. The appearance of the wound seems to indicate that it was made with a common round musket ball. I said that there was no occurrence of importance the first afternoon. I forgot to mention that one of Capt. CLENDON'S company, in approaching too near the enemy's pickets, was fired on, and in his hurry to escape he fell and lost his gun, and it was partly to find this that REYNOLDS made his unfortunate attempt. I happened to have plasters and bandages with me and I dressed the wounds as well as I could, and sent for an ambulance which brought him to camp. He is in the hospital tent now and really doing better than we had any reason to expect. My own duties were more immediately connected with the location and supervision of my own pickets, stretching over about a mile of the road, but not particularly exposed to damage, although some of my own men were shot at, and the enemy seemed to be lurking in every thicket and clump of woods. A continued interchange of fire was kept up yesterday between our scouts and the rebel patrols, and if all accounts are true which our boys tell, some 15 or 20 of the enemy fell before their shots.—FLETCHER LAPHAM thinks he killed one; G. H. Morse of my company says he is sure he killed one, and several others, both of Capt. CLENDON'S and my own companies, claim victims to their marksmanship. A lad by the name of Smith, belonging to the 25th Regiment N. Y. S. V., (from New York City,) was shot dead yesterday after­noon, and several ineffectual attempts were made to recover his body, but being cov­ered by a heavy ambush of the rebels, the undertaking was not successful. This morning Lieut. Fassett, with a guard from Company E., went down and obtained the body without any difficulty. The neck was mutilated by four bayonet thrusts, which were evidently made long after the body was cold in death. This exhibits the utter malignity of barbarism. Monday they caught one of our cavalry officers or men, and tied him to a tree, and in that helpless condition shot twelve balls through his body--then sent for a flag of truce to our pickets to come and remove the dead. Such are some of the horrible features of this worse than savage warfare. We had several alarms last night, but no harm done and this morning or about noon returned in safety to camp. We had hardly reached here, however, before intel­ligence arrived that all the pickets which had taken the places occupied by us the night before, had been driven in with a se­vere loss of 25 or 30 killed. The story is that several thousands of the enemy now occupy that post. Our entire regiment and all the regiments hereabouts are ordered to be ready to march at a moment's warning. While we were standing picket—our regi­ment with the others forming this brigade, were reviewed by the President, Gen. McClellan and Gen. McDowell. I can hear the long roll beating now towards the long bridge. Squadrons of Cavalry and regi­ments of Infantry have been pouring over the river all day. The prospects are serious for a heavy battle within the next 24 hours, I therefore write you while I can.
Wednesday morning.Our slumbers have not been greatly disturbed through the night, although the long roll has beaten several times in the camps about us. I can hear the steam whistle frequently this morning in the direction of our late pickets, which leads me to infer that the enemy are bringing up forces by the car load from the direction of Richmond and Manassas. I see also by this morning a Washington paper that the rebels are gathering a force at Chain Bridge, about twelve miles above us which would warrant the conjecture of a general attack upon our lines. I must close this immediately. I will write again soon if we are not ordered off.
A. W. H.

Camp Notes.
[From the Sandy Hill Herald.]
UPTON'S HILL, VA., JAN. 22, 1862.
Dear Baker— I had made arrangements to visit Sandy Hill and remain in that vacinity [sic] week or two with a sergeant, for the purpose of recruiting for our company; but unfortunately or fortunately, just as the time had arrived when Captain Ormsby and myself were to leave, an order from Gen. M'Dowell reached us, respectfully declining to permit us to go, and ordering that lieutenants, instead of captains, be hereafter detailed for the recruit service. So here we are yet, with a good prospect of remaining.
During the last two weeks, we have experienced the various phases of a regular Virginia winter. The first wintery weather came upon us just previous to the visit with us of D. J. Finch and E. H. Richards, Esqrs. from Sandy-Hill, who largely gratified us with their presence for two or three days.—Since then heavy frosts and a very little snow have been succeeded first by cold bleak winds, and next by two or three days of warm rains and dense fogs, rendering every road infinitely worse than you ever saw Mud Street in April. Three days ago the roads were as hard and smooth as a Vermont turnpike in June—now they are absolutely shocking.—The weather is gloomy enough, for the outdoor prospect presents nothing but rain, and mud and fog. I begin to fear that the most favorable period for the movement of troops is passed for the winter. Still, as the army was not ready, there is no use whining. It will not stir until everything is ready, though every highway were macadamized to urge and invite it; and it will march when complete preparation is signalized, though all the roads and pikes in Virginia present their stickiest protests.
Speaking of moving, I am forced again to believe that the day is certainly not distant when earnest work is to commence and the great columns of the Union Army will be on the march. There are many and marked indications of such proceedings. Gen. Burnsides Expedition is regarded as the pioneer movement, to be followed by the advance of the forces of northwestern Virginia, the match of Bank's division, and the co-operation with all of them of the army of the Potomac. Gen. Porter's division, which lies next north of us, is said to be under orders to move within a very few days, and they are packing their chests and getting their houses in order. The divisions of Franklin, Aeintzleman, and Hooker, are expected to move at the same time. They are south of us. It is predicted by many that M'Dowell's and Blenker's divisions, which are directly in front of Washington will remain where they are for the present. The divisions of McCall, Smith, and Stone above us, will start with Banks. Such is said to be the rough programme of the first movements. The first objects to be accomplished are also said to be the dispersion of all the rebel forces on the upper [sic] Potomac, and the cleaning out of the long hue of rebel batteries below Washington. How near the exact truth these rumors are, a little time will tell. I think they are not very wide of the mark.
I have suggested that it is thought our division may not break camp just yet, though the main armp [sic] may move very soon. Confirming this opinion by the officers of our brigade is the fact that they have just made arrangements to build a large concert hall for the purpose of having dramatic entertainments, lectures, &c., during the current winter evenings. About $800 have been subscribed by the commissioned officers of the brigade to put the thing through. As additional evidence that it is believed we shall stop where we are for the present, it may be mentioned that a number of the officers of our regiment have brought on their wives here so that we have quite a sprinkling of ladies with us. Col. Phelps has his wife here, as has Dr. Atherly, Capt. Mosher, Capt. M'Coy, Lt. Clute, Lt. Smith. Lt. Arlin, Lt. Fassett, Lt. Cameron, and others. These aids to the regiment add an air of civilization to the camp which is decidedly agreeable.  This is pretty rough weather to do picket duty, but it must be done, though It is midwinter.
One regiment went out on the 8th and remained until the 10th. Everything is peaceful along our picket front, the enemy having made no demonstration upon us since their attack on the 14th regiment. The preparation we constantly keep for them, probably deters any foray upon our lines. There will be little more fighting immediately in front of us, before the forces of the Union compel the enemy to a general engagement; and the time for that will be after Burnside has developed his plan of operations, and Buell, and Hallock, and Wool, and Sherman, and Banks, and Butler commenced their respective jobs.
Quite a number of civilians from your vacinity [sic] have visited our camp within a few days. Among them are B. F. Teller of Sandy Hill, who is still with us; L. L. Arms, and A. F. Cool, of Glen's Falls. Chas. Thompson of Schenectady; H. B. Henry and Jas. Mott of New York; and many others. It is a most infelicitous time, just now, to visit a camp in this part of Virginia; and there is little prospect that roads or camp quarters will present a very inviting aspect for weeks to come.—The 15th inst. was pay-day with us, since which time the ground has been so soft that no drills have taken place. It is about as much as the soldiers want to do to keep themselves comfortable during such inclement and disagreeable weather. Lt. Peirsons of our Co. is detailed for recruiting service for six months, and will leave this week.
Yours, T. J. S.

[From the Republican.]
Letter from the 22d Regiment.
Bivouac near Falmouth, Va.,
Friday evening, May 9th, 1862.
Friend Harris—One year ago to-day Companies "E." "F." and "I." of the 22d
Reg't N. Y. Vol's, commenced their military experience by marching from Glen's Falls to Fort Edward, forming part of the triumphal procession of a gala day,—with banners and flags and gay decorations, inspirited by cheers kindly words, and looks of sympathy from patriotic multitudes, moving proudly forward to the thrilling music of well remembered national airs:—waving handkerchiefs and clustering curls fanning the light breeze that bore on its elastic wings the sighs and sobs, the prayers and well wishes of bereft households, and to a few of whom this day has proved an anniversary of grief and sorrow and mourning; to more a day of thankfulness that they and theirs are spared from the calamities of war and pestilence, to look forward to a bright future of hope, whose horizon is ruddy with many a promise of joy. To-day finds us encamped upon the soil of a hostile State, whose scanty population are filled with a bitter malevolence—a diabolical hatred—against the accursed "Lincoln hirelings" who have invaded their homes and, in their estimation, violated the sanctity of their household gods. There are no faces or tongues here to ask or smile a welcome to us, save the poor blacks who are still treated in two many instances with a perverse hostility that finds no parallel in the world's history. Fertile fields and bustling commerce have given way to the desolations and devastations of war, and wreck and ruin with an iron scepter and a scourge of thorns reign paramount princes, with famine and pestilence for their prime ministers.
Our camp, which one week ago to-day was an open field with but here and there a shrub or bush, is, to use the slightly exaggerated and turgid metaphorical style of Barnum's show bills, one uninterrupted "bower of beauty," a "gem of purest ray serene" of verdure. Our Colonel, whose fastidious taste is rarely appeased without an effort to combine the picturesque with the useful, finding our first camp somewhat unhealthy, damp, and filled with the miasmatic odor of decaying vegetation, besides being a snake haunt where copperheads, adders, rattlesnakes, black snakes, vipers, ribbon snakes* and their cognate species, with true secession proclivities, banded together to our annoyance and discomfort, concluded to remove us from the grove which at first looked so pleasant and promising, to the meadow in front, where a camp was regularly laid out, and where one short week has made a change which almost realizes some of the marvels recorded in the Arabian Nights Entertainments. It is the old tale of Birham Wood coming to Dunsinane, only the boughs and branches and shrubs and evergreens have become permanent fixtures in long lines of shaded avenues and umbrageous streets, through which an occasional glimpse of a tent top may be seen, or a flutter from our regimental standard, to show passers by that a camp is near.

*Several of the boys in the Regiment have been not a little astonished when they came to shake out their blankets and make their beds in the morning, to find that their beds had been shared by a snake. Truly soldiering as well as politics makes strange bedfellows.

Fresh incidents are continually coming to publicity connected with the battle of Falmouth, for so this brief skirmish has been dignified by the Governor of Pennsylvania, who has ordered the word Falmouth to be inserted upon the cap fronts and the regimental standard of the first Pennsylvania Cavalry, belonging to McCall's Division, but transferred for the time being to the command of General Augur. Lieut. Col. Kilpatrick, commandant of the Harris Cavalry, a graduate of West Point, and represented to be fearless as a lion, caught sight of the Col. of the Rebel Cavalry (Lee) and with drawn sabre made for him. The latter declined the mute invitation for a hand to hand conflict. Both being splendidly mounted, then commenced an exciting steeple chase, which has had but few equals even on this fox hunting soil. It continued for a distance of over five miles, through forests and cleared land, meadows and brush-heaps, over fences and ditches, across brooks with log flying leaps, up hill and down, each straining every nerve, goading their animals with both whip and spur,—it was literally a chase of life and death.—Col. Kilpatrick, who is an accomplished swordsman, said afterward. that he had no other feeling or desire than to cut down the flying traitor with his sword. At length Lee reached a wide brook whose precipitous banks only admitted of one mode of transit, and straining on the bit his well trained horse, took it with a flying leap. He now thought himself secure from further pursuit, and he turned himself in his saddle, only to find his pursuer but a short distance behind and gaining upon him at every bound. At this juncture Col. Kilpatrick's horse became unfortunately entangled in a grape-vine.—Each of the riders drew their revolvers and emptied all their barrels at each other, one shot only taking effect in the knee of Col. Kilpatrick's horse, thus effectually preventing further pursuit.
The next morning, while advancing upon the barricade, of which previous mention has been made, a regiment of Rebel Infantry was discovered to the left, drawn up in line of battle. Calling his most reliable officers to his side he formed them abreast, placing himself in the center, then ordering his regiment to follow, they all dashed forward at a band gallop and as they pressed rapidly forward, the Rebels gave back in dismay, broke and fled, and did not rally again until the Rappahannock was safely interposed between us.
It turns out after all that the Harris Cavalry suffered the greatest loss and was most exposed to the enemy's fire. None of the Infantry regiments were under fire, but all were straining forward at their best speed to participate in the expected struggle, and I cannot see why all are not entitled to equal credit for the exertions made upon that memorable march.
After we had been in camp a day or two, rumors began to be brought in by stragglers of the capture of some of our troops who had lagged behind [sic]. These stories at length obtained sufficient credence to induce Gen. Auger to detail Lieut. Norris, of Co. E. 22d Reg't, to return and assertain [sic] the particulars. He was furnished with a squad of five cavalry as an escort from Capt. Buell's Co. of the Harris Light Cavalry, which is now acting as Gen. Auger's body guard. The missing men from thir [sic] regiment were ten in number, namely: 5 from Co. C., Keesiville [sic]; 2 from Co. G., Whitehall; 1 from Co. H., Sandy Hill, named Chalk; 1 from Co. K., Port Henry, and 1 from Co. E, Glen's Falls, named Fort Brott. Lieut. Norris retraced the line of our march to the house where our regiment had halted for supper the night before reaching Falmouth, a distance of about 12 miles to the rear. The place was occupied and owned by a Mrs. Croppe, who stated that her husband had been impressed and forced off against his will into the Rebel army. She had been left behind with four
small children and two or three slaves to take care of and run the place, and I will just state here, par parenthese, that Lieut. Norris while there called for dinner, and all that she had to give him was bacon and hoe cake. She apologized by saying that the Rebels had consumed and carried off everything else she had to eat in the world, and that they were shut out from market entirely. Her account was substantially as follows, and fully corroborated by one of the salves named John Bird: The night of the 17th, after orders had been given for the Brigade to resume its march, ten or twelve men fell out, (it being then quite dark) and under the representation that they were all worn out and exhausted, sought and obtained such lodgings at the house as could be obtained upon the naked floors. The tenor of their conversation was that they couldn't see any necessity for killing themselves by walking any further that night. They seemed to think themselves perfectly safe and secure, and gave themselves little care for the present and none for the future. This self-confidence and reliance continued until nearly noon of the next day—the party leaving their arms and equipments scattered about the piazza and leaning up in corners of the rooms, and wandering about the place themselves as though war and its concomitants was the furthest thing possible from their thoughts. About noon, the 18th, the negro servant being outside the house and near a barn belonging on the place, saw seven soldiers rapidly approaching the house from the direction of the fields to the rear. He at first thought nothing of it, supposing them to be "Union" soldiers; but as they approached nearer and when too late to give an alarm, he discovered that they were Rebel soldiers. When near the house they divided their force, part going one side and part the other. Both parties when reaching the front of the house sprang upon the piazza, and with their pieces at a "ready," demanded the surrender of the entire party, which of course yielded, as our boys were taken wholly unprepared and by surprise, The reason for supposing this party to contain the missing members of the 22d is, that a part of them were seen to go in there by some of the boys connected with the regiment, which coupled with their declaration that they would march no further that night, makes it highly probable that these were our boys. As they entered the house, Mrs. Cropps, supposing in the confusion of the moment that it was a party of Union troops, sent back to take those left behind, and that they were about to fire upon them, caught up her little babe that was crawling on the floor near their feet, and made her escape to the negro quarters near by; this was the last she saw of our boys. The prisoners were immediately ordered to put on their knapsacks and equipments, and move along. This they refused to do on the score of inability. A negro lad belonging to the place being near by with a wagon and oxen, was speedily impress into the service—the arms and equipments loaded up, and the party marched off. The leader of the Rebel party inquired the way to Kelleyville, which is supposed to be up the river and on the other side. About three-fourths of a mile to the rear is a house owned by a Mr. Embury, where two more Federal soldiers were taken prisoners. The entire party then followed a by-road running nearly parallel with our route of march hither going north. When about five miles distant they discovered a party of our troops approaching on the other road, whereupon the boy was ordered to unload, throwing everything over the fence, and made to return home. This last order was complied with literally, the fellow running off at the top of his speed, leaving oxen, wagon and everything in the road. Three days afterwards he had to retrace steps in search of them, and was fortunate enough to find and return them home in safety. The knapsacks, guns, &c., were missing, and it is supposed that the prisoners were compelled to carry them off. This is the last known respecting them, and some painful apprehensions exist that they may have been taken in to the woods and butchered in cold blood, as so many of our men have who have been so unhappy as to be made prisoners by the accursed miscrecants [sic] who call themselves Secessionists. Sunday 10 o'clock p. m.
We have had an exciting afternoon. First came in the tidings by the way of yesterday's papers of our success at Williamsburgh [sic].—Then a rumor that the Rebels were advancing in great force along the Bowling Green road towards Fredericksburgh [sic]. At dress parade an orderly came running up to the Colonel almost breathless with haste with orders to get his regiment into line in light marching order as quickly as possible. This looked quite like work, and with prolonged cheers the men sprang gaily to the labor of preparation. In less than twenty minutes the whole Brigade was formed and in motion.—We had scarcely advanced forty rods on our way when the order was countermanded.—The reason of this sudden movement we were afterwards told was, that our pickets had an engagement with the enemy, in which we took several prisoners. An effort on the part of the rebels to recover their lost position resulted in a Cavalry charge by our troops, and several of our men were killed. Fearing a repulse, reinforcements were sent for, but before we had fairly started the Cavalry had finished the work. Later in the evening an official announcement was received of the capture of Norfolk, the destruction of the Merrimac, and that our glorious McClellen is within twenty miles of Richmond, still driving the flying rebels before him. The boys are jubilant, the air vibrant and tremulous with the shouts and cheers of thousands from camp after camp, stretching each way from us in the distance. Regimental Bands are playing National airs in every direction, and all seem exultant with joy and exuberant with patriotic emotions.—Yesterday Patterson's Division came in.—Among the number belonging to it are the 26th and 104th New York and National Guards of Philadelphia.
These Regiments belong to Gen. Rickett's Brigade. Fresh troops seem to be pouring in upon us every day. There must be from sixty to eighty thousand troops in the Department of the Rappahannock alone, including the Division of the Rosekrans [sic] up the river. Last week there was quite a skirmish with guerrillas between this and Cattlet's station, in which several Federal soldiers were killed. On Friday night a squadron of the first New Jersey Cavalry, reconnoitering near our picket lines about eight miles down the  river, came in contact with some of the rebel cavalry and had quire a sharp skirmish, in which we lost one man killed and twenty-three wounded. The enemy's loss is not known.
A.

[From the Republican, Jan. 20.]
THE SANITARY COMMISSION.—Our friend, Doct. A. W. HOLDEN, Assistant Surgeon in the 22d Regiment N. Y. S. V., after a brief sojourn here at home, on sick leave, started for his regiment last week with recruited health, which had been much impaired by the very arduous and exacting professional duties which were thrown upon him on the bloody fields of Bull Run and South Mountain. At Antietam exposure and exhaustion had done their work, and he was glad to secure the asylum of a hospital, as a patient.
It would seem that he intended to call on the Sanitary Commission, in Washington, for hospital supplies to carry to the 22d, and in anticipation, on the 3d inst. wrote to the Steward for advice as to what was most needed. Since his departure, the answer has come, and we are requested to publish it, both to show the commendable care which some of the Army Surgeons exercise for the sick and wounded under their charge, and to illustrate the great practical benefits of the Sanitary Commission:
HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT 22D REGIMENT,
Camp near Bell Plain, Va.,
Jan. 9th, 1863.
DR. A. W. HOLDEN—Dear Sir:—I am this day in receipt of your favor of the 3d ins., and I hasten to reply—for I must say that our boys are sadly in need of many things which come only by the hand of those angels of joy to poor sick and wounded soldiers—viz: The Sanitary Commission. Many, very many times, while I, after the battle of Fredericksburg, was issuing shirts, drawers and socks to the poor wounded and in one instance legless patriots, I was pleased to notice the very pleasant smiles beaming upon their haggard countenances, and in many cases an audible "God bless the Sanitary Commission." And when I see the amount of good they are doing, the first thought that comes into my mind is, God bless them! and prosper them in their good work.
But to my business: You tell me not to be bashful in asking, but I shall ask for no more than is actually necessary. We are in need of the following: 12 good Quilts, 12 Sheets, (double,) 12 Wool Shirts, 12 pairs Drawers, 12 pairs Socks, some Towels, some Handkerchiefs, Dried Fruit, Concentrated Milk, Prepared Meats, a few bottles of Whiskey, Brandy and Wine, Chocolate, Tea, Corn Starch, Farina, and anything else you may see and think best to get.
My regards to any who may enquire, I have that photograph of Capt. MCCOY you desired me to send for, and I will enclose it.
I have no more to write you. All is quiet in the Army of the Potomac. We shall expect to see you in a few days. And I remain, yours Fraternally,
DAVID H. KING,
Hospital Steward 22d Reg't. N. Y. V.

The Iron Brigade.
OUR WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENCE.
WASHINGTON, June 2, 1863.
What It Has Done During a Two Years Campaign—Regiments Composing the Brigade—Their Return Home—Colonel Phelps, of the Twenty-second, and His Military Career—The Brooklyn Fourteenth, &c., &c.
The old "Iron Brigade" is no more. One by one its Regiments have passed through Washington to their homes. Yesterday its commander left, and now, of that ..odly number who one year ago dashed down upon the Rappahannock, but a single regiment remains. Its career has been marked by brilliant deeds, and its path on the ..ld can be traced by the mounds above its sleeping heroes at Falmouth, Rappahannock Station, Sulphur Springs, Groveton and Gainesville; at Manassas Plains, ..uth Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. Its work has been accomplished. With tattered banners and decimated ranks it once more turns to the pleasant paths of peace; but the spirit that is in its soldiers will not permit them to tarry long from the field, and we shall soon see old familiar faces, with the new, coming down to swell our armies. In 1861 the brigade encamped at Upton's Hill. General Keyes commanded it for a time, and then stepped higher up, turning over the command to General Andrew Porter. Then General Augur took it, captured Fredericksburg, and left them for a division, under Banks. Colonel Sullivan, of the Twenty-fourth New York regiment, succeeded General Augur; then came General Hatch, and lastly Colonel Phelps.
Last winter the Second United States Sharpshooters were detached from the brigade and assigned to duty with another corps, leaving the Fourteenth New York State Militia, Twenty-second, Twenty-fourth and Thirtieth New York Volunteers. The Twenty-fourth and Thirtieth left several days since, and their departure and reception at home have been already chronicled. The Twenty-second passed through Washington last night, and the Fourteenth remains alone, but will probably be attached to some other brigade during the week.
Colonel Phelps assumed command of the brigade on the 14th of September last, led it in the brilliant charge at South Mountain, and in all the battles fought by the Army of the Potomac since that time. At Antietam the brigade suffered very heavily, the command passing over the same ground five times, driving the enemy and being repulsed by superior numbers. At Fredericksburg it was exposed to a terrible enfilading fire, and by its intrepidity won the encomiums of every general officer present. It was proposed some time since that Colonel Phelps should take the Fourteenth Brooklyn regiment to New York and recruit a new brigade. This was strongly urged by many of the commanding generals, but for some reason the request was not granted, and as a result the First brigade of the Army of the Potomac has passed out of existence. Every general of the corps has recommended Col. Phelps to the President for promotion. These recommendations were endorsed by Gen. Hooker in flattering terms, and, but for the fact that that brigade was composed of two years troops, Colonel Phelps would undoubtedly have been appointed brigadier general. He expects to return to the field, however, and will probably ere long receive his well earned star. Capt. Tillman, has Assistant Adjutant General, Brigade Surgeon Murdock and Lieut. Becker, A. D. C., leave the service with him. Captain Cranford, Brigade Commissary and Quartermaster Schenck will probably be assigned to duty near Washington, D. C.
Upon parting the officers of the staff were each presented with a beautiful badge of gold, bearing the names of the several regiments composing the brigade, and the names of battle fields upon which they have fought.
The reverse bears in the centre the inscription:—
PRESENTED TO
(Officer's name.)
SANS PEUR ET SANS REPROCHE.
May 1, 1863.
The names of the regiments are engraved upon the extremities of the cross.
The Fourteenth Brooklyn regiment has applied for permission to visit New York for recruiting purposes; but so far the application has met with little favor. The regiment is one of the best in the field, and would no doubt be able to raise an efficient brigade if allowed to go home at this time. The following are the rosters of the Twenty-second regiment:—
ORIGINAL ROSTER.
Field and Staff Officers—Colonel, Walter Phelps, Jr.; Lieutenant Colonel, Gorton T. Thomas; Major, John McKie; Adjutant, Edward Pruyn; Quartermaster, Henry D. Woodruf; Surgeon, Joseph B. Atherley; Assistant Surgeon, Wm. F. Hutchinson; Chaplain, Henry H. Bates.
Company A—Captain, Jacob L. Yates; First Lieutenant, James H. Brott; Second Lieutenant, Hiram Clute.
Company B—Captain, Robert E. McCoy; First Lieutenant, Duncan Lendrum; Second Lieutenant, James W, McCoy.
Company C—Captain, Oliver D. Peabody; First Lieutenant, Carlisle D. Beaumont; Second Lieutenant, Charles B. Piersons.
Company D—Captain, Henry S. Milliman; First Lieutenant, Thomas B. Fisk; Second Lieutenant, Robert A. Rice.
Company E—Captain, George Clendon, Jr.; First Lieutenant, John Fasset; Second Lieutenant, G. Horton Gager.
Company F—Captain, Austin W. Holden; First Lieutenant, Wm. H. Arlin; Second Lieutenant, Orville B. Smith.
Company G—Captain, Benj. Mosher; First Lieutenant, Duncan Cameron, Second Lieutonant, Horace W. Lacca.
Company H—Captain, Thomas J. Strong; First Lieutenant, Wm. A. Pierson; Second Lieutenant, Matthew S. Teller.
Company I—Captain, Lyman Ormsbee; First Lieutenant, Joseph R. Seaman; Second Lieutonant, Daniel Burgey.
Company K—Captain, Miles P. Cadwell; First Lieutenant, Edward F. Edgerly: Second. Lieutenant, Clark W. Huntley.

PRESENT ROSTER.
Field and Staff Officers—Colonel, Walter Phelps, Jr., on detached service in command of brigade for the past nine months; Lieutenant Colonel, Thomas J. Strong; Major, Lyman Ormsbee; Adjutant, Malachi Weidman; Quartermaster, Jas. W. Schenck, Jr. (Acting Brigade Quartermaster); Surgeons, Elias S. Bissell, A. W. Holden; Chaplain, Henry H. Bates.
Company A— First Lieutenant, Addison L. Estabrook, in command; Second Lieutenant, Amos T. Calkins (Acting Quartermaster.)
Company B—Captain, James McCoy; First Lieutenant, Wm. B. Hoysradt; Second Lieutenant, Chas. H. Doubleday.
Company C—Captain, Oliver D. Peabody; First Lieutenant, Gorton T. Thomas; Second Lieutenant, James Valleare.
Company D—Captain, Lucius E. Wilson; First Lieutenant, Henry B. Cook; Second Lieutenant, Chas. H. Aiken.
Company E—Captain, Dan. Burgey; First Lieutenant, ____ ____; Second Lieutenant, Warren Allen.
Company F—Captain, Fred. E. Ranger; First Lieutenant, James H. Merrill; Second Lieutenant, Salmon D. Sherman.
Company G—Captain, Duncan Cameron; First Lieutenant,
Asa W. Berry; second Lieutenant, Lester A. Bartlett.
Company H—Captain, Matthew S. Teller; First Lieutenant, A. Halleck Holbrook; Second Lieutenant, Marshal A. Duer.
Company I—First Lieutenant, Benjamin Wickham, in command; Second Lieutenant, George Wetmore.
Company K—Captain, Edward F. Edgerly; First Lieutenant, John J. Baker; Second Lieutenant, Charles T. Bellamy.
Henry D. Woodruff, Quartermaster, was appointed Division Commissary on General Augur's staff; Second Lieutenant Lester A. Bartlett, Aid-de-Camp on General Wadsworth's staff; First Lieutenant Joseph R. Seaman has been transferred to the One Hundred and Eighteenth New York.

[Correspondence of the Republican.]
CAMP NEAR BELLE PLAIN, VA.,
Monday evening, June 6, 1863.
GOING HOME.
"Two mouths more at the farthest, and our time will he out." This is the frequent gratulation with which the boys of our regiment salute each other. This desire to go home is in nothing wonderful or out of the way. Neither can it be truthfully alleged that this feeling is any reproach or disparagement to their loyalty or patriotism. Two years' endurance of hardships and self-denials, of which the bar-room brigadiers and oyster saloon patriots of the North have little conception; two years of exposures and fatigues, exhaustive, trying, terrible, the bare narrative of which would excite a half incredulous shrug, and half uncomfortable shudder from those who have always enjoyed the ease and comforts, the delights and luxuries of home; to the sum of these add the exciting dangers, the bloody horrors, the din, the shrieks, the cheers, the shouts, the strife and struggles, the flaming, panting, palpitating realities of the battle-field which even school-girls, as well as sanguinary politicians have learned to talk about in tripping accents and with flippant jest, at home, have not then fairly earned the rights and blessed privileges of rest, home, and a re-union with what to each man of them is all that is lovely, and beloved of earth? "In camp the roughest man idealizes his far off homeland every word of love uplifts him to a lover."*
Once home, however, the long looked for, much dreamed about, and written of visit made, and many, perhaps a majority of them would become tired of "the piping times of peace," and after lounging about the many old familiar haunts in fruitless efforts to find enjoyment in unoccupied idleness, would be ready and eager to enlist again for the war, if need be. In view of this, if the war is to continue, and there is as yet no blue sky of hope in the horizon, it seems pitiful that all these tried and true men, these gallant and disciplined soldiers, be driven about and the regimental organizations broken up, where the country is loudly calling for more troops. While the "iron brigade" exists, there will be a charm in the very name to win back to its ranks every man who has ever served under its shot-riddled standard. A swelling emotion of pride -will animate each heart that ever fought, or rallied, or stood by its firm lines that won imperishable glory in the campaigns of 1862.**
_______
*From an article entitled "A call to my Country-women, in Atlantic Monthly for March, 1863.
** As Gen. Hatch, then in command of King's division, rode up in the thick of the fight at South Mountain, he exclaimed, "My God! See how my straggling Brigade fights."

Among many other probable results of the war will be the unfitting of many men for the useful and industrial pursuits of life. To abandon all of a sudden the free, jolly, rollicking ways of a soldier for the steady going, straight-laced, hard working exemplar of a model household, is asking a little too much of frail humanity. A soldier's life, though by courtesy "always gay," is a compound of strange vicissitudes, and on the whole it is useless to deny, a very vagabondish one withal; a dreamy, unreal sort of existence, mingling with its roughness and toils, its asperities and dangers, much that is wild, fascinating, and attractive. Days of hard, exhaustive marching and work, are often succeeded by weeks of rest, in which a few hours of drill and police work are daily alternated with long siestas, boisterous play-spells, of foot ball, base ball, long ball, leap frog, or quoits—the exciting hazard of "five cent ante" and "draw poker," with evenings passed in relating side-splitting anecdotes and tough, interminable yarns. Miscellaneous as these amusements may seem, they are mingled with the frequent love freighted home correspondence, and the well read, dog eared, greasy, well thumbed novel.
These are staple indoor stormy-day occupations. We must not forget the occasional noisy, hilarious break-down, when half a dozen shining-faced contrabands contribute with high glee to the evening's sport; nor the, songs, mostly patriotic, which swell out in rattling noisy chorus on the nightly air. It was a great mistake abolishing the regimental bands. Their music was a perpetual bond of union, their nightly serenades, a renewal of the oath of allegiance, their inspiriting melodies a perennial spring of life, health, youth and vitality, more real and tangible than those fountains of youth sought by Ponce de Leon and his chivalric companions over three hundred years ago, amid the tangled everglades of Florida. Compare the mortality record of the regiments which came out with full bands of music, with those which have entered the service since the ukase which cut them off from this recreation as well as appropriate warlike appendage. A writer in the Musical Review says, "in my opinion it was a mistake, dismissing the bands from the service.—
The great lack of a soldier's life appears to them to be recreation or amusement. A constant round of the same duties with no variations, makes life dull and insipid. The thought of comfortable houses and firesides comes up, making men homesick, and this preys directly on their spirits, and consequently their health. Now it seems to me that a good military band in each regiment would go far to correct this." The following extract from monograph "N." on scurvy, published by the Sanitary Commission, contributes its testimony to the same opinion: "The regimental bands, however, are the most important means for conducing to cheerfulness in a command. Their usefulness in this respect cannot be, overestimated, and it is to be hoped they will not be abolished. We have never seen an intelligent soldier who did not take pleasure in the music the bands afforded." It cannot be doubted that it was a very poor economy—a miserable, driveling [sic], catch penny, clap trap legislation that cheated the poor soldier out of the music which was the soul, the spirit, the etherialization of his patriotic emotions.

THE WEATHER.
Winter still "lingers in the lap of Spring," whose "etherial mildness" and "shadowing roses," of which Thomson wrote so plaintively, have thus far failed to connect.

"Winter oft at eve resumes the breeze,
Chills the pale morn, and bids his driving sleet
Deform the day delightless."

A fierce hurricane of three days' duration ushered in on Saturday night, a
tremendous snow storm, which lasted till about noon on Sunday. Although the snow was partly melted by the steaming ground as fast as it fell, the earth was wrapped in its white, chilling mantle as far as the eye could reach, while at midday drifts over a foot deep lay across the pathways of our regimental avenues and streets. Last night one of those Virginia rain storms of which we have had such vivid experience, whose

"---- deepening clouds on clouds, surcharged with rain,
That o'er the vast Atlantic hither borne
In endless train, would quench the summer blaze,
And, cheerless, drown the crude, unripened year,"

set in, mingled with sleet and fierce blasts, weaving and twisting our frail tents about like sheeted phantoms dancing a ghostly minuet upon a haunted brain. To-day, under the still continued tempest of wind, the roads are rapidly drying, but in the hollows and dug-ways the still treacherous seas and tremulous masses of mud will for some days present an insurmountable barrier to the advance of the army. In the meantime "Fighting Joe" is constantly engaged in reviewing and inspecting the troops, the camps, the ambulances, the transportation service, the ordnance, the pack mule trains and everything else pertaining to the army, preparatory to an active campaign, whenever the propitious skies shall smile upon the undertaking. In the interim of hard work, of which the Commander in Chief performs his full share, encouragement is given to feats of personal daring, by the institutions of hurdle races and offering prizes for skillful feats of horseman-ship. The best of feeling prevails through the army, and if there is not yet the fullest confidence in Hooker, there is the fullest disposition to stand by him, and try him to the utmost of his ability in the path of loyalty to his country and war with treason and rebellion. As yet no man has assumed command who has so unqualifiedly possessed the enthusiastic, unflinching, whole hearted good will and faith of the rank and file as McClellan, notwithstanding the powerful political combinations and misrepresentations which have been brought to bear against him. Hooker is a disciple of ZACKARY TAYLOR, whom he resembles in many particulars. He is eminently a man of the people; puts on no airs, has less of the West Point exclusiveness and sovereign contempt for the volunteer service which have made so many of our officers disliked by the men. He roughs it over the country in all weathers, faring but little better than a regimental, field or line officer, and evidently puts his whole soul in the work. His acceptance of the position, with a full appreciation of its enormous responsibilities, and of the fate which attends unsuccessful Generals, is an earnest of his good intentions, if nothing more and in proportion to his success will he be rewarded with that hero worship which is the coveted reward of great military chieftains.
[CONCLUDED NEXT WEEK.]

From the 22d Regiment.
The following is a private letter, but we publish it, thinking it will prove of interest to our readers:
WASHINGTON, JULY 1,—I avail myself of a chance moment of leisure, which presents itself to me after a day's arduous duties. I wrote you on Saturday our experiences while on board the barges and steamboats which conducted us to New York, and, by the bye as a conclusion to that brilliant episode to a soldier's life, I would beg to say that we had boiled ham and bread for supper, breakfast dinner, and supper again without variation, and to enhance its agreeabilities, the Colonel would only let a favored few go ashore, of which I was not one favored. He was, however, kind enough to call upon your brother who came aboard and saw me—and was very kind, and says that his whole heart is in the matter, and that though he could not go himself, he was willing to pay for those who did. Saturday night we shipped on board a steamer from Jersey City, for Elizabethport, New Jersey, which place we reached about midnight. At the station we were fed on Government rations, and embarked about midnight on board of the cars, and started on our way southward. Sunday morning found us in one of the most fertile regions of the State, and from that period until we crossed the Pennsylvania border, the entire border presented the scenery of a fairyland, its richness, fertility, air of thrift and prosperity had never found a parallel in my experience. Every village and hamlet was a renewed scene of ovation and triumphal progress from Elizabethport to Harrisburgh [sic].—After crossing the borders of Pennsylvania into Maryland, however, the difference of public sentiment became rapidly apparent. We became rapidly apparent. We found the railroad extending from the State Line to Baltimore, in the possession of a picket guard, consisting of four regiments of Pennsylvania troops. Every river and brook crossing had been burned or destroyed since these troubles commenced, and had been either wholly rebuilt or partially repaired out of the burnt ruins of the former structures. Over these bridges the cars moved slowly, and at either end we found a strong guard posted. At one point we were saluted by a Regimental Band, and at most of the stations the inhabitants exhibited their patriotism by waving flags and handkerchiefs, and receiving us with salvos of cheers. Occasionally, however, a sullen and morose face exhibited itself to show that we were leaving enemies behind us. Soon after leaving Harrisburgh [sic], a painful accident occurred, which caused a feeling of great depression through the entire Regiment until our arrival in Baltimore. Two of the men belonging to Capt. Peabody's Company from Keesville, were determined, notwithstanding several admonitions from the Conductor, to stand on the top of the train of cars. Passing under a bridge, while at full speed, both were knocked from the cars—one of them stunned, and the other had his scalp cut open about 3 inches by 2 in length and width, with a depression of the skull which argues anything but a favorable termination of the case. In consequence of this accident we were delayed on our arrival into Baltimore until after dark. On reaching the Monumental City, the Regiment debarked from the cars, and the guns, which had all been loaded with ball cartridges after leaving Harrisburgh [sic], were carefully capped and although in the dark, it was afterwards shown that the work was well done. After reaching New York on Saturday morning, a rumor reached us that Col. Frisby's Regiment, the 30th, N. Y. S. V., had been attacked on leaving Baltimore, and our Regiment seemed to be animated with the thought of, revenge as well as self-protection. The 30th had been encamped with us at Troy and Albany. Our Regiment was divided into sections, and preceded by the Band, was marched through the city. The streets, from beginning to end, a distance of over two miles, were thronged with women and children, and comparatively a few men. As we passed through, there was here and there a shout for the Union, but on the whole there were more cheers for Jeff Davis, and a great many remarks and comments as we passed along, disparaging the Union. On reaching the depot our men were ordered into line, and as my Company was the first from the right flank of the Regimental line—or the second in line—it brought us to the extreme right of the depot. I had hardly got my men in line, and the guns at the position of "order arms," when I heard one single shot, followed by three or four double shots, apparently from pistols at the extreme left of the line. Turning to see from what source the shots came, I saw a repeated volley of fire arms on the left, and the crowds which lined the depot, rushed forward upon our lines and broke them up for a moment. My Company, however, rallied in less than a moment and made a gallant stand. The balls whistled like nail around our heads, but the affair soon cleared over. One of the men belonging to the Schroon Company, (Burge, by name,) was instantly killed, and one of the privates of the Sandy Bill Company, received a ball in the hip. Some 14 of the Baltimoreans were wounded, as I am informed; but it was currently reported here to-day that about 18 were wounded. I have no doubt, myself, that the firing commenced with the Baltimoreans, and that under the cover of night, a sad havoc might have been inflicted upon our troops had it not been providentially ordered otherwise. The balls whistled around my head in every direction. Our men seemed perfectly wild, and under the impression that an organized attack was being made upon them from the citizens, fired their muskets indiscriminately at the crowd and at the troops. There were great numbers of women present besides the crowds of men who thronged the depot, but when the firing commenced the crowd rapidly dispersed. After the affair quieted down, the acting Chief of Police came around and urged us to hurry off as soon as possible, or an attack would be made upon us. The men were accordingly hurried into the cars and the train started. Between the depot and bridge some 12 to 18 shots were fired at the cars, but no harm done. We arrived in this city about 1 o'clock the same night, and at the depot found the corpse of a sentry who had been shot but a short distance off while doing duty as a picket guard. The Regiment was divided into two parties, and quartered at a carriage house and church. The men begin to find their living pretty hard, and there is a strong feeling of hostility beginning to prevail against the Quarter Master in consequence of his neglect. While we were anchored off New York, the men were six hours without water, and Sunday, the men had only one meal, which consisted of dry bread and cold boiled ham. This neglect seemed wholly unnecessary. Ben. Butler is with us, and yesterday conducted an examination into the circumstances connected with the death of Burge, who, by the bye, was a native of Pottersviile, Warren Co. The top of his head was blown, completely off. I have not learned the result of this Court of Inquiry. The city is filled with troops. Little is to be seen here but soldiers. They are coming in rapidly at the rate of four or five Regiments per day, and nearly all in a tough, hardy condition. Whatever the papers may say about the Union feeling in Baltimore, I do not take the stock. As we passed through, there were several hearty cheers for Jeff. Davis, and groans for Abe Lincoln. There was but little of the patriotic cheering, etc. which we had experienced in Troy, Albany, Harrisburgh [sic], and elsewhere. While the firing was going on in the depot, I saw the flashes of
shots from the crowd which lined the sides of the depot, which I have no doubt were from revolvers, at all events the shots in that quarter did not proceed from the troops, and I could swear to over 30 of such flashes. In less than half an hour the troops at Fort McHenry were aroused, and the streets were traversed by two Regiments. My own feeling is, that Baltimore is a hot bed of secesion [sic] and treachery, and the sooner a signal example is made there the better. There are about 60,000 to 75,000 troops within easy call of Washington. In about an hour, on Tuesday morning, we marched from the city to camp, a distance of about four miles, where we are to pitch our tents, and form a regular Regimental encampment. Now, for the first, will commence our experience of military life proper. The camp is to be built on the north side of the Potomac, within full view of Arlington Heights.
A. W. HOLDEN.

LETTER FROM COL. PHELPS.
CAMP IN MARYLAND,
13 MILES NORTH OF WASHINGTON, SUNDAY,
SEPT. 7, 1862, 4 1/2 O'CLOCK P. M.
DEAR E—:—I wrote you last night from Upton Hill, and now we are 20 miles away. Just as we received orders to move, Col. Sullivan made his appearance and being senior officer took command. It was a great relief to me, although the brigade is but a wreck comparatively speaking. It is true we have lost but 800, but that is very heavy; and a great many are sick, and after the labors and trials of the past few weeks they require rest; but it seems we are to be kept on the move. I received your letter of Friday, written in Troy, last evening. I assure you it really made me unhappy to think that anyone would call in question the necessity of my remaining in Washington. Your letter has troubled me more that I supposed such a letter could. I did not suppose even my construction upon my remaining in Washington; but thank fortune I have it in my power to show both friends and enemies that I have done my duty and that I used every exertion to join my regiment. I left Glen's Falls on Monday the 25th ult., my leave of absence expired Monday, Sept. 1st, just one week from that day. When I left home you will recollect I told you I expected to be with my regiment on Thursday or Friday, which would be three or four days before the expiration of my leave of absence. I was detained one day in New York, waiting for Hiram Van Desen, and consequently did not reach Washington until Thursday afternoon. (This ordinarily would have been in time to reach the regiment the next day at Culpepper, and which would have been three days before the expiration of my leave of absence) I reported immediately to Gen. Wadsworth and requested a pass to my regiment. He told me I could not go at present as the rebels were in the rear of Pope, and no officers or citizens were allowed to go to the front. I told him of my anxiety to rejoin my command, but was assured by him that all officers returning form leave of absence were obliged to report to him, and that all were in the same situation. He said he could not allow me go and that I must remain in Washington and until circumstances would admit of my going out. I applied to Secretary Stanton on Friday, and expressed my great anxiety to be with my regiment.—He said he was sorry to have me away at that time, as Pope's army was fighting on that day, but that I could not go out at present, and referred me to Gen. Wadsworth for orders. I went again to Gen. Wadsworth on Friday, after seeing the Secretary of War, and he told me decidedly, after urging him to give me a pass, that I could not go out.—This was in presence of Hiram Van Dusen. On Friday night or late in the afternoon of Friday, an order was issued by Maj. Gen. Halleck, that all officers of the army of Virginia, returning to Washington from leave of absence or from hospital, should report to Gen. Casey for orders. I thought of course that my troubles were over and that I could get a pass and permission to go to my regiment at the front, and reported to Gen Casey immediately after breakfast. I stated to the General how I was situated and that I was anxious to get to my regiment immediately, more particularly so, as I knew Pope's army was engaged the day before and thought my regiment might possibly be in the fight. He said I could not go to the front, and took down a book and entered my name, regiment &c., &c., also my boarding-house (Mrs. Duvals), and said I must wait for orders from him. (Recollect this was Saturday.) In the afternoon Hiram and myself went down to the river to hear the cannonading, and I finally got so nervous, about going out, that I went up again to Gen. Casey's. He replied to my urgent request to be permitted to go out, that I had received my orders. Nothing was left me but to obey. He then ordered me to report to him every morning for orders, and said he might detail me for drilling some of the new regiments for a few days or until he gave me orders to join my regiment. I knew the necessity of obedience to the orders of superior officers, and consequently reported Sunday and Monday morning, with the same result. (In the meantime our wounded commenced coming in, and I was busily engaged every minute in looking after their comfort.) On Tuesday afternoon I reported to Gen. Casey's headquarters. The General did not happen to be in, and I prevailed upon his Assistant Adjutant General to give me a pass to the front. This was too late in the afternoon of Tuesday to start, and I made the arrangements to leave the next morning (Wednesday). On this morning Lt. Col. Thomas died, and Gen. King sent me a note (Gen. King happened to be in town, sick) requesting me to remain in Washington over Wednesday and attend to sending Lt. Col. Thomas' remains home, &c. (I had called that morning at Kirkwood House, upon the General, and told him I was going out to me regiment on that day.) As soon as he heard of the Colonel's death, he wrote me this note I refer to. But as Lt. Col. Thomas had several relations and many friends in town, I left the matter in their hands, and started for the regiment Wednesday morning. At that time they were at Upton's Hill.
Now I propose to do this, when I go to Washington--not please or satisfy my enemies, but to gratify my friends,--viz. to get a letter from Gen. Wadsworth, bearing testimony to the truth of the statements made in this letter; one from Gen. Casey, showing that I was compelled under orders from him to do just as I did do, and one from Gen. King, showing that it was under all the circumstances impossible for me to join my regiment any sooner than I did. I will also get one from Gen. Hatch, stating that he is perfectly satisfied that I joined my regiment at the earliest possible moment. I think all these or any of them should and would be conclusive. I do not know when I shall go to Washington, but I shall get there when I do go, if it is not in eight months. I will not attempt to tell you how unpleasantly your letter made me feel; it has embittered every moment since its receipt; but I am happy in a consciousness of having done my duty to the very best of my ability, and that the full explanation I have given above will satisfy my friends. I rely upon the other documents to satisfy my enemies. It is unfortunate that I went home at all, although it has proved of great benefit to me; but I am very sensitive on some points, and when my courage is called in question and my motives and actions misrepresented, particularly in this cause in which I have experienced so much pride, and in which I have always possessed a fixed determination to distinguish myself, I am affected more unpleasantly than one not as intimately acquainted with me as you are, would suppose. As I feel now, I think I would let my bones rot rather than leave the regiment again and go among those I have considered my friends, under any circumstances whatever. This may be wrong, but I cannot help it. I have been terribly, wrongly abused. I have given my life to the cause; and I have been so proud of my regiment, its reputation was as dear to me as my own life, and an insinuation that I would desert it is more than I can bear. I tell you, E____, I will never forgive to my dying day those who have whispered ought against my name in connection with my regiment. Their foul aspersions rankle deeply in my breast. I would ten thousand times rather be in Lt. Col. Thomas' place than be suspected of cowardice or dishonarable intentions towards my regiment. Enough of this. You may depend upon receiving the documents I have referred to as soon as I can procure them
We left Upton's Hill last night at 11:30; marched to Washington and out ...
13 miles beyond the city. As the letter indicates, we are now in Maryland, 13 miles north of the city. The brigade is now awaiting orders. We may move to-night, or may possibly bivouac here until to-morrow. As I write, I hear heavy cannonading, apparently in the direction of Harper's Ferry. I do not know our destination. I do not think Gen. Hatch knows it. It is possible, however, we may be going to Harper's Ferry. Another day will undoubtedly develop our plans. The forts at Upton's Hill were all dismantled last night, and I think there are no troops now beyond Arlington, unless it be Cavalry Pickets. I shall put this letter in my pocket and send it the first opportunity I may have. It may be a week before it reaches Washington, or even more than that. You speak in your letter about the Surgeons and Clerks going out to the battlefield. A large number were called for by the Secretary of War. They left Washington Saturday night, reached Alexandria, and then found there was no transportation provided for them. Some left in the cars sometime Sunday, but most became disgusted and returned to town. Those that went by railroad could only reach Fairfax and then not until Monday. I think a great many staid there twelve hours and then returned to town. But some more persevering and patriotic than the rest, walked out to Bull Run, some 18 miles. (Recollect they suffered for food on the way. I had the statement of one who went to the battle-field.) Quite a number of them were taken prisoners. Some of their ambulances were fired into, but escaped. If I had gone out with them and taken the same route, I would not have met my regiment at all. It appears that after Sunday, Gen. Casey must have known that King's Division was ordered to Upton's Hill, that it would probably be their the middle of the week, and that that would be the best place for me to meet them. So you see it was all for the best. Gen. Hatch frankly told me he was glad under the circumstances I did not get to my regiment in time to participate in the engagements. The Quartermaster is very well. He may possibly go to town to-morrow. It is uncertain however.—You have no ides how reduced the regiment is in numbers and everything else. There is nothing left of it. By the way, Gen. McDowell has been relieved from the command of this Army Corps. The officers and men seemed to be pleased with it. I know you will be. We are now under Gen. Hooker. You need not expect me home again until the term of service of the regiment expires—at all events I do not expect to go. I have not the slightest inclination.
I hear nothing from Capt. Clendon and Lieut. Norris. I fear the worst. I have not a single Captain doing duty with the regiment, and only three Lieutenants. Dr. Holden is Assistant Surgeon, and Dr. Hutchinson Surgeon. Officers and men all say that Hutchinson did remarkably well. Col. Frisby's body has not yet been recovered. A party have gone out for it and have not returned. I hope Mrs. McCoy, Mrs. Clendon and Mrs. Norris, may be reconciled to their sad bereavement. There is a possibility, but only a slight one, that the two latter may be alive, but prisoners. Good bye. Direct as usual. Yours,
Walter Phelps, Jr.

A Union Officer's Experience in the "Libby Prison" at Richmond; as communicated by him to Capt. A. W. Holden of the 22d Reg't N. Y. V.
BAPTIST CHURCH HOSPITAL,
ALEXANDRIA, Va., Dec. 4, 1862.
Eds. Messenger:—
GENTLEMEN: The subjoined communication embodies the experience of one of "Pope's officers" who enjoyed the hospitalities of the celebrated "Libby prison" at Richmond during that dark period of history, embraced in the interval between the battle of Slaughter's Mountain and the forcible expulsion of the rebel horde from "Our Maryland," by the gallant McClellan and hi veteran forces'.—The author, Capt. G. B. HALSTEAD, A. A. Gen'l upon Brig.-Gen. Augur's staff, was well known and endeared to every member of the old "iron brigade." His fearless advocacy of the soldier's rights, his ever manful hostility to the rebellion, his uniform devotion to the interests of the Union, during the experiences of a long campaign, had won for him the regards of all who knew him. Democratic in all his antecedents, he was equally ready to deprecate those radical tendencies which on the one hand are inclining to drift the Nation to a monarchy,—on the other to adarchy [sic] and confusion. With Tom Hood he was ready to exclaim,

"Of all the spirits of evil fame,
That hurt the soul, or injure the frame,
And poison what's honest, and hearty,
There's none more needs a Matthew to preach
A cooling, antiphlogistic speech
To praise and enforce
A temperate course
Than the evil spirit of party."

Capt. Halstead is a descendant of an old Revolutionary family whose sires upon the plains of Monmouth and Long Island did battle for the country, even as we are now battling for it, and the maintenance of its integrity, as well as the defense of the same great principles of liberty so fearlessly set forth by Jefferson—so manfully endorsed by Hancock and his illustrious compeers. A graduate of Princeton College, a man of refined tastes and culture, he was always and everywhere a man of the people. Brave and daring to a fault, to the oppressed bondsmen who sought passes from him to the land of liberty, he was tender, kind and considerate, ever bearing in mind that for every slave that was freed, one more knife was thrust into the heart of the rebellion; "not that he loved Caesar less, but that he loved his Country more."
I must he pardoned in the indulgence of this brief eulogium; for many pleasant hours of intercourse with him have lightened the tedium of camp life, and made me not only the more appreciative of the intense wrong and wickedness of this rebellion, but also of its gigantic proportions, which our government has been slow to comprehend, as the entire population of the North has been to understand the deep inimical feeling of the Southerners towards us.
Time has been perhaps, when the South would have been contented with separation and a boundary line. Now it is with us a war for National existence. We must conquer or die; we must be the armed rulers, or the tributary and subsidized provinces of a despotism terrible with intelligence drawn from the oppressions of History, and the crimes which Time has consecrated to infamy.
Capt. Halstead was one of the gallant band who went out with Com. Goldsborough in that expedition which, in the capture of Fort Hatteras and the footing since retained upon the soil of North Carolina, did so much towards inspiring confidence in the great Northern heart during one of the darkest periods in the campaign of '61. One little episode of his life I will here relate as showing his discernment and discrimination of character. While our Division was lying in the Massaponax valley last summer, six miles south of Fredericksburgh [sic] in Virginia, a clergyman presented himself as brigade headquarters for a pass. Several privates who saw this fluant [sic] minister of the gospel, testified that they had frequently met him before on our advance from Briston Station. Some had seen him at Catlet's station; others had seen him hovering about the front of our lines on our advance to Falmouth; and others still had seen him at Fredericksburgh [sic] ...

Notwithstanding all this, he had obtained at headquarters "a pass" to go beyond our picket lines, in opposition to the suggestions and advice of Capt. Halstead. Four days afterward the same man was shot while endeavoring to enter our picket lines from the South. He was a spy.
Capt. Halstead was no partisan [sic]; his sentiments were unconditionally for the Union, as it was, for the Constitution as it is. The following views of Zachary Taylor, once President of the United States, were but a reflex of his own.
"Attachment to the Union of the States should be habitually fostered in every American heart. For more than half a century, during which kingdoms and empires have fallen, this Union has stood unshaken. The patriots who formed it have long since descended to the grave; yet still it remains the proudest monument to their memory, and the object of affection and admiration with every one worthy to bear the American name. In my judgment, its dissolution would be the greatest of calamities and to avert that should be the study of every American. Upon its preservation must depend our own happiness, and that of countless generations to come."
Of the regret at parting between Gen. Augur and his staff and the "iron brigade," it remains yet to be written. The adieux were plentiful and the cheers were inspiring, as the General and his Staff rode by and the word was taken up from regiment to regiment. Since that time Gen. Auger was wounded and Capt. Halstead a prisoner, but none the less remembered by the few survivors of the bloody fields of Manassas, South Mountain and Antietam, who feel a soldier's brotherhood for those who have endured the hardships and exposures,--the sufferings and self denials of a soldier's life and a soldier's fate. Respectfully yours,
A. W. H.

(CAPT. HALSTEAD'S LETTER.)
NEWARK, NEW JERSEY,
November 3, 1862.
DEAR SIR:—I am sure I have had no greater pleasure, if I except the sight of near relatives on my safe return from the Libby Prison at Richmond, than your very welcome letter dated Seminary Hospital, Georgetown, D. C., Oct. 29, 1862, gave me. Yet I must say the sad news therein contained of the killed and wounded of the gallant Twenty-Second, in the fights in Virginia, casts a deep shade over my pleasure. I recognize in all of them, names and faces familiar as household words, and find no consolation for their early though gallant and patriotic deaths, except in the fact that the Government we fight to sustain from disruption by the Traitors Jeff Davis & CO. at the South and their (shame that I could say it) secession sympathisers [sic] at the North, is worth all the sacrifice though it include, kind friend, our own lives before the war is terminated. I yet cry as strong and sincerely as when I had the high honor of making one of the "Iron Brigade" (composed of the2d, U. S. Sharp-shooters, 14th N. Y. Militia, 22d, 24th and 30th N. Y. Vols.). "Down with Treason and Traitors," and hail with joy every new step taken by President Lincoln to carry on the war. You remember my views, and remember well that you were not far behind me in the intensity of your hatred to them. I have been trying to perform my duty as a citizen at home while my sword is tied in its sheath by my parole; and in every way in which I could hope to influence my fellow citizens, it has been my desire to carry them up to the importance of the contest and the advantages which would accrue to the Government by diverting the slaves from the uses continually made of them by their traitorous masters. I have ignored all party lines, except to inquire which party was ready at all times, and under all circumstances to support the present Administration in all efforts which it may deem necessary or advantageous to crush the Rebellion: with that party I am friendly, with the other at enmity. Enough, I hear you say, of politics. I will give you some of the incidents of my capture, imprisonment, &c.
Late in the afternoon of August 9th, at the battle of Cedar Mountain, General Augur was wounded through the stomach. I met him in the main road, going to the rear, as I was returning to join him from another part of the battle field whither I had been with orders. He told me he was wounded, ordered me to go and find an ambulance, into which he was soon safely placed, Assts. Shaw, Cutting, and Woodruff, having by this time joined him. As the General was about riding off the field toward Culpepper, I asked him what I should do. He replied, "Go back to Brig.-General Prince" (the next in rank, as Brig. General Geary had been wounded early in the fight,) "tell him I am wounded, that he is in command of the Division, and stay with him." I immediately turned my horse, rode up the main road, on the right and left of which our troops had been fighting, and going up nearly to the wheat-field(1), I was looking for a place to get through the fence to the left, to cross the corn-field(2) in the direction of Slaughter's Mountain where I had last seen Gen. Prince. Coming to a short, steep hill in the road, I brought my mare to a walk, as she was blown. As I mounted the crest of the hill, to my surprise I found myself in the presence of a crowd of Rebels, where I had lately left friends. With guns leveled they ordered me to surrender, and it took me very little while to see escape was impossible. There were too many and too near; I should have been riddled with bullets if I had turned. I therefore told them I yielded; asked if an officer was present (for it is difficult to distinguish officers and men by dress alone in the Rebel army), when

NOTE 1.--The "Wheat-field" referred to lay upon the right of our line. It was there our infantry suffered terribly. Three times they were led forward in the face of a destructive and murderous fire, and as many times repulsed; the field itself being literally sown with the bodies of our dead, which we're afterwards stripped of their clothing by the ghouls and vampyres of the rebel army, whose rags and tatters formed windrows on the edge of the woods where they were concealed.
Note 2.--The "Corn-field was about the center of the line. It was upon this point that the rebel batteries played almost incessantly, and the ground was ploughed up in long ridges and furrows in every direction. The abundance of fragments of exploded shell, the murderous relics and the long trenches of the buried dead, were sufficient evidence of the hot contest which had taken place there but a few brief days before one, a captain, stepped forward, to whom I yielded my sword, my large pistol being claimed by one of the privates, who protested—he first caught my bridle; it was given him; and in his charge as my guard, I was sent to the rear, passing all the way through rebel regiments, insulted, by officers as  well as men, with epithets not to be recorded for ears polite, and in addition promised hanging in Richmond—not a very pleasant prospect for one who was conscious of having done no wrong to this Government, unless to be ready to fight for it, be imprisoned in the Libby, and if necessary, die for it, be wrong. I was able, by a little firmness and some diplomacy, appealing occasionally to my guard to protect me, to ride my horse to the rear. I I was soon made to realize that the Rebels had a confiscation act, for they took horse, saddle, and pancho (my pocket pistol had been taken from me by an officer as I passed down the lines to the rear), I only saving my blanket, which I begged as hard for as if it was theirs and not mine. About 10 o'clock, nearly 200 officers and men started on foot, under an escort of cavalry, for Orange Court House, 16 miles, where we arrived about 7 o'clock the next morning; and here we had other evidence of the bitterness of the hatred of men, women and children towards "Yankees," for we were insulted by all three—and here I could not resist the inclination to tell the traitors the great difference between the Northerners, "Mudsills" though they call us and the high-toned and Chivalric (heaven, save the mark) Southern Rebels and Traitors. They liked my criticisms as little as I did their brutality, but thought best for the nonce to keep a little more civil tongue in their head when I told them I was an officer on board the Minnesota, August 28th and 29th, 1861, which took 678 Rebel prisoners, officers and men, from Fort Hatteras to New York, treating them so kindly that they were ready to pass resolutions of thanks. I told them a man at the North who would insult a prisoner of war, would be disgraced, and any one who would was a coward.
From Orange Court House, where they gave us some hard biscuit and raw bacon, we went by railroad to Gordonsville, where we passed the balance of the day, receiving about dark another allowance of hard bread and raw bacon, and then took cars for Richmond, arriving at day-light, going immediately from the Depot to the Libby Prison, first undergoing examination for arms, &c. Finding nothing on me, one of the attaches took off my spurs, which, valuing some, I claimed from the Captain then in command, who promised me their safe return, as "they respected private property" which I found out to be the case—they respected it so much that I could never get them to give my spurs back; and I was cognizant of many other cases, similar, proving their high respect for private property,—especially when, a few days after our imprisonment; they gathered all our canteens, 3 with promises to bring us some water, a little more palatable than the warm James River water, and left us to whistle for canteens and water both. Nearly all our fellow prisoners had some tale to tell, illustrating the Rebels' love for and respect of private property and rights; and I can assure you Pope's officers have no desire for compromise or conciliation, and many, who went in, imbued with a desire to crush the Rebellion and preserve the peculiar institution intact, came out rank abolitionists, and hailed with joy the Proclamation of President Lincoln, which I contend to be, next to our armies in the field, the most effectual weapon of offense against Jeff Davis and his traitorous crew, their aiders, abettors and sympathizers. If I had any doubt in my own mind, that doubt would be dissipated when I hear the roar of exasperation which comes up from Rebeldom, and the harsh and ungenerous criticisms made against it. I know what pleasure that step gave to my former companions of the "Iron Brigade."
You will no doubt expect some few incidents of prison life in Richmond. You must know that we found ourselves "Pope's officers," already as far as Traitors' proclamations could avail (which were nothing to me) reduced from all rank as, officers, and called Felons, and reserved for hanging if anything occurred under the administration of Gen'l Pope not acceptable to the Traitors. To carry out this proclamation they placed us in a room already over-crowded with about 140 prisoners of all degrees; we adding about 60 to this company; and now commenced an acquaintance with company and companions which it will take many, many years to forget. But worse than all was an early exhibition of fiendishness on the part of our captors and their guards, which I never can term less than barbarian. I refer to the shooting of prisoners for the trifling offense of looking out the windows,—I mean putting the head beyond and outside, though nothing in the world could be seen which would be of use to prisoners or our Government. Such a prison rule with such a penalty for its

Note 3. Capt. Clark, of the 1st New Jersey Cavalry, was taken Prisoner near Front Royal in the early part of the Summer and confined upon the second floor of the Libby Prison during the period of Capt. Halstead's  imprisonment. His experience related to me at length during the tedium of long days passed in Hospital together, corresponds in almost every respect, including the theft of his canteen, to that endured by Capt. Halstead.

infraction, can not be the emanation of other than semi-barbarous minds. A few days after our incarceration, early in the morning one of the officers (whose bunk was near one of the windows), after washing himself, stepped on his bed to hang his towel on a nail on the inner edge of the window-sash, no part of his body; not even the hand, being beyond the windows. The eager-eyed sentinel on the side-walk below, could not let this opportunity slip. We heard the musket go off. I saw the start of the officer, and immediately heard him say "I am shot,"—and in truth it was so, having been struck in two places: first on one of his ribs near the heart, from which the ball glanced and struck the right arm near the wrist. Yet, in the innocent act of hanging up the towel, the aim was good at the heart. The accident of striking a rib, instead of passing between them, saved the life of the officer. For this the sentinel was commended, and we did not wonder at seeing them often standing with musket cocked, watching the windows of our prison, in hope to get a shot, with as much eagerness as you have, when a boy,  watched for the chance to shoot a birch or squirrel on the tree.
Not long after this miraculous escape from death of our fellow-prisoner, we heard from the ominous sound of the musket from the side-walk below, and immediately over our head the sound as of a heavy body falling and I can assure you, it required no gift of prophecy to tell what had occurred. We could only hope no fatal result had followed the discharge of that musket. Our hopes were soon dissipated, when word was passed from room to room that a man had been shot and was dying. He, poor fellow, was at least eight feet from any window, not dreaming of violating a prison rule, and much less thinking of receiving a death-dealing musket ball, and that far away from the battle field. The watchful traitor sentinel had caught sight of game in a window of the second story, he missed his man, but was quite as well satisfied with his shot which penetrated through the floor of the third story, shooting, the poor man eight feet at least from the window, in the breast, killing him almost instantly. One other was wounded during the 24 days we were in Richmond.
On my return to Washington, I related these cases and said I had no doubt that the Rebels had killed and wounded patriot soldiers, in Richmond prisons alone, at an average rate of three in six weeks since they had taken prisoners. A very respectable looking old gentleman standing by, interupted [sic] me by saying "I think sir, you are, too low in your estimate. I was a prisoner there not much longer than you, and seven were shot to my knowledge during my stay."
Respect for eyes and ears polite, compels us to suppress the recital of the many inconveniences to which we were subjected, yet we could not if we would shut our noses to the knowledge that horses occupied part of the cellar room immediately under us, nor could our eyes escape the sight of the daily deposit, for a longer or shorter time, in the same large room below us (until coffins were made ready,) of our fellow sufferers from disease as well as imprisonment, who had shuffled off this mortal coil in the hospital next to us. The dead-house was no pleasant reminder of what our fate might be if our captors thought fit at any unpropitious or even false news from Pope's command, to select some of us for execution; yet had the worst come, I am proud to think that band of officers would not have disgraced themselves or their Government, and would only have asked that by a fit and terrible retaliation, that system of warfare might have begun and ended with them. We had indeed a noble leader in Brigadier-General Henry Prince, and all we asked was that we might be able to suffer imprisonment, and if needs be, worse, with the same firmness, gallantry and resolution with which he endured his imprisonment, as he would have the worst the traitors could have inflicted.
I am taxing your patience, I fear. "From the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh." I am no better than I was when with you, and shall not change while Treason rears its horrid front in the land. The change in public opinion, (as shown by the results of the recent elections,) is I think the result of dissatisfaction that with all the men and means given, so little has been accomplished in Virginia, and the people call for a change. We both have aften [sic] deplored the kid-glove policy which has been so much in vogue through Virginia. Action, action, action, is what we want not delay, delay, delay, which has been the moth which has eaten up the army east. We cannot or ought not if we could sacrifice armies such as the world never saw before, in all the qualities to make fighting soldiers. They only want leaders and they will do the rest. They do not like camp life. They have not gone from home to learn the trade of War. They have gone out to punish traitors and crush out Rebelion [sic] by every means, and then they want to return to their homes and repose under the shade of the noblest form of Government the sun shines on.
I must say good bye. I shall always be glad to hear from, or see you. At present I am waiting exchange, at home in Newark, N. J. If any of our old companions in arms are near you, remember me kindly to them. With great respect,
GEORGE B. HALSTEAD,
Capt. and Assist. Adjt. Gen. U. S. Vols.
*Capt. Halstead is a nephew of "Pet Halstead" whose name has been so conspicously [sic] brought before the public in connection with the celebrated Kearney letters. It is supposed that he has been exchanged and is now on duty with the Banks expedition at New Orleans.
Note 4.—Capt. Clark verifies in every particular the foregiing [sic] accounts, and mentions the case of still another Union Soldier who was shot while lying in his bed in the third story of this prison, totally unconscious of his coming fate, the ball being aimed at some one in the second story, he therefore being killed by "mistake."

Glen's Falls Republican.
GLEN'S FALLS, N. Y.
Tuesday Afternoon, July 16th, 1861.
Letters from Camp.
Through the kindness of a friend we are permitted to copy the following private letters from camp:
CAMP GRAHAM,
WASHINGTON, D. C., Sunday, July 7, 1861.
____ ____: Your highly prized letter reached me day before yesterday, and I should have answered it sooner if I had not been so occupied with night and camp duty that all my leisure has been devoted to sleeping. Until my departure from Albany I hardly realized to its full extent my separation from home and family, for the reason that we were within easy communication. Now, however, the case is vastly altered, and therefore every word of news from home is as refreshing to us poor "sodgers" as was the olive branch borne by the dove to the weary occupants of the ark.
Judge WAIT and U. G. PARIS, Esq., are here and the larger Hotels are crowded with an influx of visitors, office seekers, &c., ---the usual concomitants of an opening session of Congress. Our camp is about two miles north from the city, on 7th street, on the east side of the road. By referring to my large map of the United States, you will find an outline of the city of Washington, and will be enabled to trace out our entire location and route. We are encamped in tents and so far, I am much better pleased with it, than in barracks. Our tent is very comfortable indeed , and I find it much more cleanly than I have been able to keep heretofore. My tent is shaded with green boughs, and we have a bough house to eat in, separate from the tent.
In regard to the affair at Baltimore; since I wrote you before, we have had reliable information that from fourteen to eighteen secessionits [sic] were killed upon the roof of the Depot by the fire from our regiment. The fire came from the roof originally, and both the man that was killed and the man that was wounded, it is since ascertained, were hit with pistol balls instead of musket balls. In addition to this, some of our men overheard some of the Baltimoreans saying "damn them, they have discovered our plot," as much as to say that there was a regularly laid plan for an attack in the depot. Since that night, the city has been regularly occupied by the military forces from Fort McHenry, and four regiments of troops have been stationed in different parts of the city to keep the citizens in check. A large majority of the people of that city, including most if not all its influential citizens, are rank and bitter secessionists.—During our march through the city at different points repeated cheers were given for "Jeff. Davis," and groans for "Abe Lincoln."
It is said that our band was the first one that has played through the streets of Baltimore, and several remarked that we were a bold and saucy set of fellows any how.
Practically speaking, we are now within an enemies' country. There are secessionists all around us. Not a night has passed since being in this camp without an alarm of some kind. We have one regular chain of sentries all around the camp. In addition to this, picket guards are thrown out every night with instructions to shoot every suspicious person that comes within their beat. Two scouting parties were sent out yesterday, and two more will go to morrow. On the 4th of July 24 of the New York Regiments (including ours) passed in review before the President and General SCOTT, and other distinguished persons.—The column embraced over 20,000 soldiers and was four hours in passing by the President's stand. It was by far the most imposing military display I ever witnessed, although the eye could not embrace at any one time more than three or four regiments. I got a sight at LINCOLN—the only one of the magnates I was able to identify. I have visited the Capitol and seen most of the public buildings here. They are magnificent structures, spacious in extent, elegant in design, costly in finish and imposing in effect. Beside these everything else in Washington looks tame and cheap.
There are 5 regiments encamped on the east of us, 7 regiments to the west of us, 3 to the north, and in the direction of the city the force is innumerable. It includes Zouaves, Cavalry, Dragoons, Sappers and Miners, Artillery, Rifles and Infantry. I have seen the Light Artillery practice twice, and their evolutions are perfectly splendid. These regiments are now being moved as fast as provisions can be found for maintaining them across to the Virginia side, and I expect we shall be moved in eight or tens days. It looks to me now as though there was to be a great battle by or before the 20th of this month, somewhere in the neighborhood of Richmond. Of course we have now no means of knowing where we shall go to. We are getting accustomed to the music of musket balls. Scarcely an hour passes but what they are whistling around, in consequence of careless firing from the regiments quartered about us. A. W. H.

The following letter is from one of "the bone and sinew" of the country; and written with the freedom of brotherly confidence and without the expectation of even seeing it in print. The author demonstrates how cruelly and shamefully some of our brave cruelly and shamefully some of our brave fellows are treated in regard to their rations; but the fault as he seems to think, is not with the Government, except as it tolerates in the service such needy adventurers, as the officer of the 22d Reg. N. Y. S. Volunteers, whose business it is to provide the troops, the good and sufficient rations, for furnishing which the Government pays him, although the men who are to fight our battles get nothing but "hard crackers and fat pork," in niggardly measure at that. Who ever heard of this speculating officer here? nobody knows him in these parts:
WASHINGTON, CAMP GRAHAM,
22D Regiment,
July 7th, 1861.
DEAR BROTHER:—I thought that I would write a few lines to let you know where I was. I am encamped one mile from Washington. The rebels are very thick about here—they trouble us some nights. The Regiment next to us has had some men shot. We had some trouble coming through Baltimore—we were fired upon in the Depot and one man was shot dead. Palmer ... through the hip, but not bad,—He is in the Hospital in the city. (I had to laugh at Palmer; when he was shot he clapped his hand on the wounded spot and screamed out "I am shot, I am shot, I am shot!) He was shot by a pistol. The last I heard from him he was getting along very well. We expected an attack, so we loaded our muskets before we left the cars. We marched through the city until we came to the Depot, when there was some pistol shots discharged. The first company was ordered to fire, and as soon as they fired the whole Regiment made a general display of fire works. The roof of the Depot was covered with rebels and we killed eighteen of them. They had a cannon planted on a bend of the road to give us—I suppose, when the Union police caught them.
"Sojering" is poor business, and if I was free again I would not enlist for all York State; not that I am afraid of being shot, but hard crackers and fat pork is hard living. I have not had enough to eat since I left Albany, nor do I expect to until I return. We all went to the city the 4th; Old Abe thought we were the best lot of men he had seen. I thought that we should look a sight better if we had enough to eat. They have got more soldiers now than they can take care of, and Gen. Scott has called for 400,000 more, to starve them, I suppose. Some of our men were said to be sun struck on the 4th—I think that they were hunger struck. Poor folks at the North have fine times to what they have here. This is a fine country here but I would rather be North. The weather is very hot and the niggers are very thick.

Glen's Falls Republican.
GLEN'S FALLS, N. Y.:
Tuesday Afternoon, Ooctober 15th, 1861.
Letter from Camp.
CAMP KEYES, UPTON'S HILL, VA.,
Sunday night, Sept. 29th, 1861.
____ _____: It has been said by some philosopher, and truly too, that it is not great misfortunes, or seemingly overwhelming calamities, that tries our spirits most; it is the petty annoyances and smaller trials which, with their continual attrition, like the constant dropping of water upon a stone, that wears and frets the mind until the chafed spirit fairly seeks escape from the prison house of mortality.
The published accounts of battles—the progress of armies—the splendor and display of military parades—"the pomp and circumstance of war"—convey to the mind no idea of suffering, trial, hardship, or fatigue. When States and Nations are riding upon the convulsed billows of the stream of time, the historian cannot descend from his lofty pedestal to note such trifling particulars as the deprivations experienced by soldiers on the march; the hunger and thirst too often suffered by armies while, like the fabled Tautalus, they are surrounded by plenty and abundance. To one "who is at ease in his possessions," a single night's bivouac in this land of cold nights and heavy dews, might serve to quench out the thimble full of patriotism, which may possibly animate his sordid soul. To lay down upon the damp hillside, with the glittering stars staring coldly down into his eyes, while paralyzed imagination tries to conjure up a picture of home comfort from its gelid depths, and lull exhausted nature to a chilled and shuddering slumber, will prove quite as much of a trial—perhaps more—than to "face the imminent, deadly breach," or "the cannon's opening roar." Then to be aroused in the grey dawn of the coming day, and amid the smouldering camp fires to toast his bit of raw bacon on the dry bread from his haversack, and a drink of cold water from his canteen, to make out with chattering teeth the matutinal meal, might possibly prove a greater act of self denial than to subscribe a few hundred dollars out of an opulent abundance towards a soldier's relief fund.
The sunshine of the morning found many visitors from our camp inspecting the "nigger-work" trenches and rifle pits on the hill above us, (Upton's.) What from one side appeared to be formidable entrenchments, proved to be shallow ditches of the most shiftless kind. The embankment in front was nothing but a pile of rails, partially covered by the earth from the ditch behind. We then rambled off to Mason's hill, about one and a fourth miles distant, which we found in the possession of a detachment from the 37th N. Y. Volunteers. Here we found another of the rebel rifle pits, with the same kind of embankment and the same class of work as that on Upton's hill. The fort on the hill as of a somewhat superior character—was of a somewhat superior character—the embankment being formed of barrels filled with earth and laid up about 5 feet high and 4 feet thick. The exterior face presented the appearance of a very solid, durable embankment. The whole was surrounded by a shallow ditch, barely deep enough to afford concealment to a man when lying down upon his hands and knees. Nothing if the shape of artillery was to be seen, and probably had never been there. A length of stove pipe, mounted upon wheels, (probably the same one captured from the 4th Michigan Reg't by the "Secesh" cavalry,) was the only approach discovered towards artillery. A further walk of about 15 minutes brought us to Munson's Hill, where the fort and its surroundings were found to be of the same unsubstantial and deceptive character, almost as "Baseless as the airy fabric of a dream."
At the latter place, logs of wood, painted on the end to represent heavy ordnance, were to be seen laying around "loose" in the ditches and on the parapet, which in some places was not over a foot thick.--The sight of the broad folds of our country's banner floating from this rebel outpost, was truly exhilarating, and was hailed with exultation by thousands that were eagerly watching it that day from the National Capitol. On our return to camp, skirting the forest, stretching at intervals along the by-way leading from Munson's to Throgmorton's hill, was piled an abattis of fence rails, some two feet high, behind which the rebel pickets had secreted themselves while engaged in the diversion of firing upon our outposts. It was no doubt constructed with a reference to the use of a rifle corps, in case of an advance by the Federal forces. What "strategy" can be embodied in the erection of even such feeble fortifications, occupying as they did such commanding elevations and at such a cost of labor, to be abandoned without a show even of defence or resistance, it is difficult to understand, unless the rebel Generals think to lure us on to another Bull Run affair. If so, they will undoubtedly be disappointed. Many of the buildings in the vicinity—indeed I may say most of them—had been abandoned by the former occupants, and had latterly been used by the rebel outpost. A visit to one of them—Throgmorton's—lately occupied by their reserve, was well worth the trouble as a literary curiosity. The walls were covered with "charcoal sketches" and inscriptions, of which the following were examples: "Death to the Yankees,"—"Yankee Doodle is at last played out,"—" We will all die before we will come back into the "Union,"—and an ingeniously depicted gallows, from which was suspended a lively caricature of our honored President, beneath which was written, "the very way we will serve Old Abe, when we catch him." These were variously signed by members of the 1st Maryland, 9th South Carolina and 7th Virginia volunteers. These memoran­da, together with the sight of an orifice where a 12 pound rifled cannon ball from a rebel battery had plunged through the side of the house, after cutting in two a tree about 10 inches in diameter, perforating two partitions and making a clean exit, without deviation from the line of direction, through a heavy brick chimney, after cut­ting a smooth hole through a sheet iron fire screen —brought to one's mind a vivid realization of the present and "impending crisis," with plenty of "helpers" on both sides.
I had hardly arrived in camp before we saw the bursting of flames from an adjacent farmhouse, whose magnificent peach orchards, numerous outbuildings and well constructed fences, affected the opulence of its owner. This was the first of a series of incendiary acts which was kept up the entire day. The smoke of one building had hardly ceased sending its sombre columns heavenward, before the kindling flash in some other direction bore witness that the red hand of ruthless warfare was doing its busy work. In the first of these cases the boys of the 14th New York Militia, in their explorations, found a lot of hams so strongly poisoned with strychnine that the surgeon estimated that one mouthful would have produced certain death. This so enraged the boys that they fired the building. Another building was burned because but a short time since its owner, Major Nuts, a fiend in human form, inveigled one of the boys belonging to the 25th N. Y. Reg't within the range of the rebel pickets, who fired upon and killed him. Still another was burned because its rebel owner refused some of our pickets a drink of water. Who can calmly and dispassionately look upon this state of things and foresee the result? The embittered, venomous hatred which can descend to such acts of barbarous diabolical malace as the poisoning of meat, thrusting bayonets through the bodies of the dead, making living targets of prisoners on the one hand, and the wanton, unnecessary wholesale destruction of property on the other, do not argue largely for a peaceful solution of our difficulties.—Whatever may be the result of this unnatural fratricidal strife, one result is certain: in the language of the prize ring, Virginia will be badly punished. The face of the landscape is every where changed by the invading army. Forests, groves, and orchards are hourly levelled [sic] before the stalwart arms of our backwoods axmen. Hill-tops which were but lately the site of pleasant residences, ancient manor-houses, or summer retreats, are now bristling with long rows of wide-mouthed cannon, which loom out grimly from the green sodded perapets and embrasures of forts so massive and substantial in their structure that they promise to endure for centuries. ... silent, solitary, yet mutely speaking chimney stacks, whose hearth stones were but lately consecrated to domestic happiness, now stand up amid the debris and ashes of many a Virginia home, pointing like ghastly finger posts to the memories of the past for a "habitation and a name" for alas their glory has departed.
Herds of frightened kine, grown half wild with neglect, roam the hill sides like hunted deer, but no longer find a shelter or a home. The rifles of the Northmen will soon terminate their career. Fences destroyed, division lines obliterated, roads filled up, new highways constructed of a width and finish hitherto unknown in the country, and finally the total abandonment of the conquered territory by its former oc­cupants, make up a picture for the "old Dominion,"—"the mother of Presidents"— that, with all her love for the peculiar institution," she will not care to sit again for a century.
This (sunday) afternoon we were visited by General SCOTT, who thereby manifested his interest in the movement of the army, and his presence with us served as a tacit pledge of his watchful supervision over us, to guard against any more disasters or calamities in the shape of defeat.
The glorious MCCELLAN, too, was here with his body guard, with his eagle eye overlooking, superintending, revising everything. With the supervision of these able Generals there can be little doubt of our success, and an onward progress as soon as may be compatible with safety to the army. The scene is active and imposing; a battery in front of us; to the left the brigade of General WADSWORTH; to the right the balance of our own brigade, while right and left regimental bands are playing in the woods, showing that we are not alone in the advance. Adios,
A. W. H.

Glen's Falls Republican.
GLEN'S FALLS, N. Y.:
Letter from the 22d Regiment.
N. Y. S. Vol's.
Camp near Falmouth, Va.,
Thursday, May 22, 1862.
Friend Harris:—
I have just returned from a visit to one of the most picturesque views I ever saw. My attention was called to it by Captain WOODRUFF, of the Brigade staff, and with the Colonel's cheerfully awarded permission, I made it the subject of a morning's pilgrimage. Long anterior to the Revelution, near a bend of the river about a mile above the present village of Falmouth, was erected a forge, for the purpose of manufacturing iron from the ore abundantly furnished both from the hills and lowlands. The building was of stone, some sixty feet in length by forty in width, with a low steep roof. At that depressed period of our National history, when nearly all of our seaboard was in possession of the British armies, General WASHINGTON selected this place for security, and established an Armory in this building for the manufacture of small arms. Soon, as if by magic, a population of several hundred gathered at this place,—along row of shops were built below,—clusters of houses grew to streets and streets to a large village, and a stone grist mill was built up at the rear, whose massive overshot wheel and dark imported stones yet testify to its once useful pursuits.
There was then no village at Falmouth, and this settlement was known as "the ...." Of the dwellings nothing now remains but chimney stacks and ruins,—of the forge the roof and doors alone are wanting, and the walls are one continuous net work within and without of vines and parasites, whose interlacing twigs and tendrils have enveloped the entire ruin from gable end to end with a drapery of verdure. It realized many an ideal formed of English scenery. The ground within was a closely shorn carpet of grasses and wild flowers, and level as a house floor. I have not time to dilate upon the thrill of pleasurable emotion which, through association as well as the intrinsic beauties of the place, rewarded and gratified my curiosity.
On my return to camp I learned that Gen'l Shields, with his body guard, had just arrived. From that time till night fall, over six hours, his column of about twenty thousand men, consisting of infantry, whose banners are inscribed with the name of "Winchester," artillery, cavalry, baggage and cattle trains, have been briskly filing past on two roads, with scarcely an interval or intermission. The men look haggard, worn and soiled, and well they may after a ten days march which they have had in getting here. They are a fine, stalwart, noble set of men, and seem to be ready for a fight. Before this reaches you, our entire Army Corps will be on its way to Richmond, every step of which will be contested and every mile a battle field. Before going, however, I will try and fulfill the promise I gave to tell you what I saw in Fredericksburgh [sic].
Fredericksburgh [sic] Lodge No. 4 is one of the oldest organizations of the kind on the Continent. It was originally founded under a dispensation from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, but subsequently obtained a warrant from the Grand Lodge of Scotland, under which, following the ancient Scottish rite, it continued to work long subsequently to the revolution. It present work conforms nearly to that used generally through the United States, known as the "York rite," using the work known as "Cross's masonic chart."—Through the politeness of ROBERT HART, Esq., Chief of the Common Council of Fredericksburg, and Secretary of the Lodge for the sixteen years. I was enabled to visit the Lodge room, around which were clustered many venerable associations. The original Lodge room has been torn down long since, to give way to a spacious row of houses, and the Lodge itself was transferred to one of the public buildings near the Court House. I found upon entering, that the old Bible, the jewels, (square and com...) and the ancient archives of the Lodge had been carried away by the Master of the Lodge, who left the place about six weeks ago. All that was remaining of its fixtures to associate it with the name and memory of WASHINGTON was its high backed chairs, covered with masonic emblems and devices. These chairs, and possibly other furniture, was the property of the Lodge at the time that WASHINGTON was made a Mason.
The name of WASHINGTON was emblazoned in large gilt letters over the door of entrance into the Lodge. Emblazoned in large gill letters on a dark ground, within an escutcheon screened by drapery, at the rear of the Senior Warden's station, was the following inscription, viz:

"In memory of
BTOR. GEORGE WASHINGTON,
Born in the county of Westmoreland, State of Virginia,
February 11th, O. S., A. L. 5732, A. D. 1732. Died at
Mount Vernon, Dec. 14th, N. S., A. L. 5799, A. D. 1799.
A life how glorious to his country led,
Beloved while living, as rever'd now dead;
May his example virtuous deeds inspire,
Let future ages hear it and admire."

Within another escutcheon to the left of the Senior Warden's station and near the Lodge entrance, was another inscription in the following words:

GEORGE WASHINGTON, Initiated November 4th, 1752,
Passed March 3, 1753,
Raised August 4th, 1753."

At a later period of his life the illustrious hero became Master of the Lodge at Alexandria, Va. The bible now used by the Lodge is quite a relic of antiquity, although not the one in use at the time WASHINGTON became a member. On one of its fly-leaves is contained the following inscription:

"This Bible was presented to me by Tappahannock
Lodge 27th December 1760. CHAS. MORTIMER.
It's now presented to the Worshipful Lodge of Fredericksburgh [sic], as a Testimony of my Respect.
March, 1796. CHAS. MORTIMER."
This bible bears the imprint,
"Dublin, 1752."

The Lodge was founded by Scotchmen —men of abundant means and high blood, and like the fraternity at Dumfries, where the first Lodge in Virginia was established, whose membership was also composed of representatives from "the land o'cakes," have never exhibited that pecunious desire of enlarging its borders or increasing its membership which has proved so largely the bane of the order at the North. The result has been that the Lodge has always numbered in its affiliations the representative men not only of the city of Fredericksburgh [sic], but of the large extent of wealthy and populous country tributary to it. It would seem also that a large discretion and latitude had been followed in the work of the Lodge, which has never been the servile copyist of the dicta from any proposed model of that greatest of human science, speculative masonry. The walls and windows of the Lodge and ante-room were emblazoned with escutcheons and hatchments of all the members of the Lodge as late as 1806, many of which were graced with armorial bearings. They imparted quite a funeral aspect to the walls,—Among the names were noticeable many prominently associated with the political records of that Virginia whose great past and glorious deeds and giant minds have all become purely historical.
My conductors informed me that a large number of those hatchments were stowed away in the chamber connected with the Lodge. Some years since a Chapter worked in the same room, but for some reason it has latterly been given up. Another lodge holds its sessions in the same building with this, but it lacks the strong historic interest associated with this one.—My guide volunteered to inform me that, if the Lodge were now working, which it is not, that I should not be allowed to visit it on account of the unhappy dissensions among the brotherhood in our State!!!—When I apprised him that with a few insignificant exception's, referring to the illegitimate offspring of the Grand Lodge of Hamburg, all of these dissensions and difficulties were adjusted and healed, he replied that the Grand Lodge of Virginia did not recognize but one legitimate mode of healing, to wit: The initiation, passing and raising of the offending members.—They repudiated the doctrine that a Grand Lodge has power to legislate members out and in again, without following the time-approved formulae of our mystic rites. He also took occasion to deny the dogma which has found acceptance in our own State Constitution, namely: That a Grand Master has the right and power to make Masons at sight. For Rebels and Secessionists, who had repudiated their fraternal obligation, it occurred to me that the Virginia brethren were rather "putting on airs."
I did not have time to visit the home of WASHINGTON'S mother. It is described as a very old looking mansion, of the true Virginia type, with piazzas front and rear and a roof of red tiles, moss grown with age. I availed myself of the opportunity afforded to make a pilgrimage to the tomb of "Mary, the mother of Washington."—This is located near the suburbs, at the northwest part of the down, upon the estate belonging to the Gordon family, whose property embraced originally large tracts of land on both sides of the river, and on which the towns of Falmouth and Fredericksburg are now built. This monument was originated in a patriotic movement of the citizens of Fredericksburg about the year 1830, who contributed by subscription to its erection. It is built according to well established and commonly received tradition over the last resting place of the illustrious woman who had the honor of shaping the destiny as well as giving birth to one of the greatest and purest men the world ever saw. In 1832 the corner stone was laid by General JACKSON, who made a special visit to Fredericksburg for the purpose. It was during that visit, that he received that outrageous indignity from JOHN RANDOLPH of Roanoke, who, without provocation, assaulted and pulled the nose of the then venerable Chief Magistrate of the United States.* At that time a gentleman of wealth from New York city (and I extremely regret that I cannot recall his name,) volunteered to complete the monument at his own expense. In the financial crisis of 1837 this gentleman failed, and for a short time the work was impeded in its progress. It was again resumed when renewed prosperity enabled this gentleman to supply the means, and thus alternating with reverses and successes following the vicissitudes of trade, the work has progressed from time to time until another failure has driven the patron to California, from whence he has written, earnestly begging that no steps may be taken to complete it, as he hopes soon to be in a position to finish it. It was lately proposed by Gen. MCDOWELL to detail a special force of workmen from his army corps to finish the monument at once, but the citizens protested, that the right to finish it still rested with this gentleman, and that next to him it was their privilege to complete it. The monument is built upon a substantial base some eight feet square, and about the same height, with panel work faces of delicately veined white marble, once polished. Upon this was built the plinth of the column, slightly smaller than the base, with corners of polished marble, and on each side two fluted columns after the Doric order, behind which are recesses faced up with polished marble panels,—the whole surmounted by an entablature, now moss grown, sodded and rank with vegetation. The shaft, a pyrancidal column some 20 feet in length, it in its rough state as when first brought from the quarries, lies bedded in the earth at one side. The desecrating hand of violence is shown upon this monument, all of its angles being chipped and broken off, and each face marred, dented and broken by bullet and shot marks.—This mutilation the citizens are evidently ashamed of, and say that it was done by "boys." If so, the boys here must carry uncommonly large pocket pistols, holding remarkably heavy charges, and I may add my belief that they are animated by the spirit of their elder fallen brother, famil- *

* NOTE.—The following, taken from a recent (copy of the "Sunday Morning Chronicle," furnishes more minute details of this event:

MARY, THE MOTHER OF WASHINGTON. Nine-and-twenty years ago this week, President Jackson went to Fredericksburg, to lay the corner-stone of a monument to "Mary, the mother of Washington," which has never been finished. In that ancient town, on the north-west corner of Charles and Lewis streets, is the house in which Mrs. Washington passed the days of her life—where she had her last interview with her son George, after he had been elected President, and where she died, in the autumn of 1789. The Masonic Lodge room contains the original record of Washington's initiation into the mystic fraternity, and there are many other relics in Fredericksburg, of which it is to be hoped General McDowell will have good care taken, until my antiquarian friend, Lyon of Lyonsdale, can take charge of them.
It was while on his way to Fredericksburg, on the 6th of May, 1832, that President Jackson was brutally assaulted by Mr. Randolph, who had just been dismissed from the navy, while the steamboat was at Alexandria. Another Virginian exclaimed, "Sir, if you will pardon me in case I am tried and convicted, I will kill Randolph within fifteen minutes." No, sir," responded Old Hickory, "I cannot promise that. I want no man to stand between me and my assailants. Had I been prepared for this cowardly villain's attack, I can assure you that he never would have the temerity to undertake such a thing again."

iarly known as the "old boy." Near by is the burial ground of the GORDON family, surrounded by a high brick enclosure. Into this (being open) I wandered. One nicely sodded grave bore evidences of remembrance in the shape of a fresh bouquet of fragrant Spring flowers. From a marble tablet near by, I copied the following inscription:

"SAMUEL GORDON,
Born at Lochdougan, near Dumfries, in Scotland, October 15,1759.
Died at Kemore, near Fredericksburg, Virginia, January 16, 1843, aged 83 years 3 mo. 1 day.
This monument of Filial Piety was erected May, 1844.

"Kenmore" is the name of the Gordon estate, whose elegant and spacious mansion is embowered in shade within hailing distance of the monument, while on either hand similar residences dot the verdant lopes as far as the eye can reach. While there is nothing wild, grand or sublime in the scenery here, yet I think the view from this point one of the finest and most attractive that I have ever gazed upon.
Truly yours, A. W. H.

Glen's Falls Republican.
GLEN’S FALLS, N. Y.:
Tuesday Afternoon, August 5th, 1862.
Letter from the 22d Regiment.
N. Y. S. Vol's.
CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,
Monday, July 21, 1862.
Friend Harris:—This is the first anniversary of the battle of Bull's Ran, or, as it is now more generally called, of Manassas. One year ago this evening how many hearts were wildly beating with fears and apprehensions, as section and squadron, troop and platoon, horse, foot, and artillery came thundering over the "long bridge," in hurried, disastrous, disordered retreat. On the evening of that red, eventful day, the National Capitol itself, was, for frightfully anxious hours, supposed to be in imminent danger from the triumphant armies of the rebels. In the early dusk of that memorable night, while the populace of Washington fairly palpitated and throbbed upon the tiptoe of great expectations, awaiting momentary intelligence of the battle, our regiment had traversed its thronged streets, and for more than two hours awaited beneath the shadow of the Washington Monument, the anxiously hoped for order to march. During that interval of incertitude, while resting upon our arms, mounted orderlies and hurrying staff officers dashed by singly, or in squads, with here and there a citizen in wild disorder or frantic fear,—the advance couriers of disaster and defeat,—the unbidden messengers of a fierce struggle to be protracted through many a long and weary month—o'er many a bitter, bloody field.
The past and present are thus forced up in almost involuntary contrast, and the question, in many multiplied variations, is asked, with a pertinactity that will not "out" more than the "damned spot" that annoyed Lady Macbeth,—how much have we gained since, how much better are we off to day? It is true that we have gained a narrow strip of rebellious territory, still occupied by traitors ready to turn their arms and apply their means to our defeat. This little girdle of soil which, like a young moon, holds the heart of Virginia in its silver clasp, though slightly impoverished by the alternate occupancy of opposing armies, is still largely capable in means for our injury. This country, of which our troops are nominally in possession, with its broad meadows, its fertile fields, its wide reaching orchards, its teeming harvests, is one of the graneries and gardens of the South, to which, with our army as a huge, well disciplined, thoroughly organized police force, specially detailed for its safety and protection, the traitor hosts at Richmond have long looked for sustenance and support.—I remember a fable which was taught me in my early youth, whose simple narrative and very useful, practical moral might be applied with some benefit at this juncture of our National affairs. It was the story of an old man who found "a rude boy'' in one of his apple trees. The kind hearted one of his apple trees. The kind hearted. old farmer first tried to induce the young scamp to come down by reasoning with him; and the use of fair words proving of no avail, the old man somewhat indignant and out of patience, pulled up some tufts of grass and threw at the provoking youngster. This only served to excite his ridicule, and the intelligence that President LINCOLN had made a call for seventy-five thousand troops to put down the rebellion, was received by the Confederate Congress, then in session at Montgomery, Alabama, with shouts and roars of laughter. (I beg pardon, I must have got in part of another story.) So, the old man when he found that neither words nor grass would expel the insulting intruder, at length exclaimed, "I will try what virtue there is in stones." With the vigorous application of these hard heads the now repentant youngster hastened to get down and ask the old man's pardon. Moral: There is a large National orchard in and about Washington, whose trees bear Hesperian fruit, and whose boughs are bending to day with the traitor weight of many who are false in heart to their country, and whose flaunting wives and daughters are open mouthed in their support and admiration of rebellion. Moral No. 2: Having at length become "sufficiently amused" with that rose-tinted Tennysonian warfare which only recognizes open belligerants [sic] as enemies, it is suggested that we now adopt the old man's more energetic and efficient course to bring the contumacious and rebellious States to a sense of loyalty.
Thanks to the energy of our administration, this policy is about being adopted.—The recent orders issued by our spirited and gallant General (POPE) are an evidence that a new system is inaugurated, and an earnest that there is in this Department at least to be no more temporizing or dallying with treason or traitors. Thus, while on the one hand these orders are a source of unbounded satisfaction, infusing new life and courage among all ranks in the army, on the other, Secessionists within our lines are deprived of every argument and pretext for complaint, by the generous and more than chivalric policy which has been pursued by our Generals since our armies first crossed the yellow, turbid waters of the Potomac. With insignificant exceptions our army has been "gentle and kind" as "poor dog Tray," considerate and forbearing, tender of prejudices, and delicate in allusions to rebellion or the "peculiar institution," in all its intercourse with families, all of whose sympathies and interests were openly, avowedly, bitterly with and for the South. If it were possible to win the hyena hearted, diabolically debased devotees of the doubly damned DAVIS (who like the snake which leaves its poisonous, slimy trail on all it touches, has cursed with eternal infamy the God like name of JEFFERSON,) they would long ere this have been arrayed with shield and buckler, terrible as an army with banners, on the side of the Union, in defence of its constitution and laws. But attempts at conciliation are misconstrued. Our tender heartedness is credited to the score of fear—to the apprehension of some such terrible bugbear as the "black flag and no quarters,"—as though any thing would suit us better than a war of extermination.
To exemplify to some degree this state of feeling, I will relate a single incident which transpired in the neighboring village of Falmouth. Among the leading and prominent families of the town is one by the name of GREEN—Six or seven of whom are already connected with the rebel army. Among the number left behind, is a son who has been Mayor of the town, is owner of a cotton factory, a store and several neighboring farms. Previous to the Virginia ordinance of Secession, he was a strong Union man, and on one occasion even went so far as to take Major LACY (recently made a prisoner by our troops) by the collar and lead him from the stage where he was publicly advocating Secession. A short time prior to our advance upon Falmouth, he burned seven hundred bales of cotton, nearly his entire stock for running his factory. This was a pretty expensive proof of his devotion to the Confederacy, His mother, who resides in the village, being annoyed by the soldiers, asked the protection of a guard, which was assigned to her. This sentry instead of being offered a place or seat within the door yard or piazza, was directed to take his place on the sidewalk outside the fence; where exposed to the hot sun, he was expected to be continually on the alert to keep out the Yankee soldiers. At noon the soldier had his dinner brought out to him by a servant on a plate. When he asked if they hadn't a table that he could eat from, he was told that he couldn't be permitted in the house at all. The officer of the guard being apprized of the facts, threatened to draw in the guard, and the affair was finally compromised by the sentry being boarded at her son's house.—Other cases can be cited where guards obtained in like manner to stand sentry over, and watch and protect property, have been subjected to torrents of abuse and showers of insults from the female occupants of the mansions and grounds thus guarded.—Complaints of these indignities have met with no redress and it would seem that full sway had been given to their rebellious, unbridled passions, that they might the sooner fill to overflowing the great bowl of their iniquity. But, as I said before, a new system is now inaugurated, and we are all sanguine in our hopes for better things. Truly yours, A. W. H.

Glen's Falls Republican.
GLEN'S FALLS, N. Y.:
Tuesday Afternoon July 15th, 1862.
Letter from the 22d Regiment.
N. Y. S. Vol's.
BIVOUAC NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,
Sunday evening,. June 15, 1862.
Friend Harris:—Here we are again upon the old camping ground, made doubly attractive by associations of pleasant memories and hard-featured contrasts with the fatigues and self denials endured since we left this point. As a convenience for yourself, and a sort of diary for future reference, I will resume the narrative of our last excursion at the point when I left you in my last, to wit: at White Plains.
At this station we were delayed an hour or two to get the track cleared of obstructions and have the wounded carefully conveyed to the village of Rectortown, in our advance, where they might be furnished with suitable accommodations and attention. Another thunder shower during the night made the vegetation look fresh and vigorous, and as we moved slowly on by rail, fields upon fields, loaded with grain almost ready for the sickle, burst successively upon our sight, and it was quite difficult to realize that we were passing through a region which had devoted nearly all its male population to the Rebel cause; and at the same time raising food enough for a Rebel army. Screeching past a sharp curve in the road, we came to a sudden halt at the little village of Markham, where we came to a sudden halt and debarked from the cars. This place was the home of the traitor Colonel, Turner ASHBY, whose name, a tower of strength to the Rebel cause, is linked with so many fearful atrocities, for which he has since gone to give his final account. His house, a modest, white painted, wooden building, perched like an eagle's eyrie on the summit of an almost perpendicular hill, overlooked the little hamlet below, as the feudal castles of the Rhine once frowned above the cottages and vineyards of the subservient serfs in the vale below. Here, too, about half a mile distant across fields, was in days gone by, the home of JOHN MARSHALL, late Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, and the patriot recorder of the life of the illustrious Washington. Hard by, in an elegant cottage, resides a lady who has six sons in the Rebel service, and who, with her own hands, assisted by one or two servants, attempted to fire the railroad bridge, previous to our advance, which spanned a spanned a small brook in front of her house. This defiant and malignant spirit, more than anything else, makes it difficult to see one ray of hope for reconstruction in the future.
At Markham we were regaled with the distant echoes of heavy artillery, denoting an engagement, and all hands were elate with the near prospect of seeing the enemy at last face to face. This cannonading we afterwards ascertained to proceed from an attack by FREMONT'S advance, which had just passed through one of the mountain gaps, upon the rear of JACKSON'S force, then on its retreat from Winchester to Strasburgh. This engagement took place at Cottonville, about ten miles north of Strasburgh, and resulted in the capture of two hundred prisoners and a large quantity of stores, arms and baggage. At this identical moment, while this cannonading was going on—distinctly heard at Markham Station, some thirty miles away—SHIELDS' division (which had a day or two before been halted in its flying progress and paid off at Markham Station) was lying at Front Royal, only twelve miles from Strasburgh, which was directly in the line JACKSON'S retreat, while FREMONT was following hotly in his rear.
About noon we were re-embarked upon the cars, and to the exhilerating shriek of the steam whistle, and inspiring notes from our band, rattled gently forward to Front Royal. The dirt roads, which here ran nearly parallel with the rails, through the confined valleys and mountain gorges, were filled with troops, baggage wagons, squads of cavalry, trains of artillery and strings of stragglers, all wending their way, toilsome and dusty, in the same general direction as ourselves. We reached Front Royal about 5 o'clock p. M., just as the bright sun burst through the gloom of a dark thundercloud, whose fierce lightnings and impetuous torrents had burst upon us soon after we passed through the celebrated Manassas Gap. Here, for a long distance, the railroad twists and winds like a serpent in sharp recurrent curves, while its level bed rests upon the top of an embankment looking down, for many hundred feet, into the wooded vale below, and towering upon the opposite side the rocky summits, and beetling cliffs of a mountain frown grandly down, threatening imminent destruction upon the creeping train below, which, reduced by the grandeur of its surroundings seems let down to a snail's size as well as a snail's pace. This mountain gorge is situated in the Bull Run range of the Blue Ridge, among whose spurs and outlying hills we had been traveling since morning.
About two miles from Front Royal we came to the headquarters of MCDOWELL and near it we passed the large construction corps attached to his army. The village itself reminds me of the neat, freshly painted dwellings, and cleanly streets of Chester, in our own county. It is built up on an undulating level, within a basin created by the converging slopes of many lofty hills. Here we passed the scene of engagement which had taken place a few days before with the First Maryland Regiment. This affair was spoken of by the inhabitants of the place with whom I conversed in a very contemptuous manner.—They asserted that there was but little fighting and none killed; that the officers, animated by the spirit of the brave Colonel KENLEY, were the only ones that made a show of resistance; that the men threw down their arms without an attempt to defend their flag. The citizens also denied the atrocities and outrages charged upon the rebel troops in connection with that affair. In the evening, by permission, I visited the barracks containing the rebel prisoners, to the extent of three hundred or more, who had been captured by SHIELDS on his advance a day or two before. These buildings were large and comfortable, and capable of accommodating a large number of men. They had been erected for Hospital purposes by the Rebels while their forces were massed in the neighborhood of Manassas and Centreville. The elevated, airy and healthy locality favored its selection for sanitary purposes. In the apartment I visited, there were something like 80 or 100 prisoners, the most of whom were members of the 12th Georgia Vols. and the Louisiana Tigers, mostly the former, whose uniform was the universally recognized gray of the Rebel service. The latter were dressed with gray pants, red shirts, and the red fez cap worn by some of the Zouave regiments in our own service.—I conversed with several among them, but found only one who was willing to take the oath of allegiance. He, a Georgian by birth, had always resided within the state and expressed himself as heartily sick of the war, and desirous of getting North with his family, to live. All with whom I talked denied the barbarities attributed to the Rebel soldiery at Bull Run, Manassas and Centreville. Several admitted that the war had been brought about by designing politicians, but that when the issue came, they felt bound to go with their State. They seemed to think that reconstruction would be wholly out of the question without fresh guaranties for the perpetuity of the "institution," though I doubt if one out of their entire number ever owned a slave in his life.
We were favored with another thunder shower at dusk which lasted nearly all night. With the early morning, the cars were again in motion for Strasburg. The horses belonging to the field and staff officers of the Brigade were sent around by the dirt road to the same point under the charge of Chaplain BATES, of our regiment. A sudden check, a halt, a back up and delay, began to excite wonder, which suspense soon heightened to apprehension. Presently the word was brought that the bridge across the Shenandoah was burnt, and Gen. Augur soon after rode up and looking down the yawning abyss with a shudder, exclaimed, as he drew a long breath, "boys, the fun is up." There lay the 5 trains containing our Brigade, puffing and snorting at the head of a down grade, but with a few rods intervening between us and destruction. It is true that a guard was stationed at the bridge, but the conductors were unfamiliar with the road, and no system of railroad signals were adopted, all supposing the bridge to be in good running order from the fact that orders had been issued to move on by railroad to Strasburg as early as three o'clock that morning, although the bridge had been burned since JACKSON'S retreat nearly ten days before. "Some one had blundered," but fortunately without the frightful harvest of death and maimed limbs which attended that disastrous mistake the night before.
The brigade horses reached Strasburg just as FREMONT'S forces were coming in sight, and JACKSON had the start of him only by a two hours' march. Within two hours afterwards the report from the pursuing artillery was again heard through those mountain gorges; but it was once more too late. The advance of either SHIELDS' or KING'S Division to Strasburg by the dirt road twelve hours earlier, would have effectually intercepted and cut off JACKSON'S retreat. To use an expression quite common there, we should have "bagged him." The bag, unfortunately, had a hole in each end, and JACKSON walked right through it.
Respectfully, A. W. H.

Glen's Falls Republican
GLEN'S FALLS, N. Y.:
Tuesday Afternoon, August 19th, 1862.
Letter from the 22d Regiment,
N. Y. S. Vols.
CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,
Friday, August 8th, 1862.
Friend Harris:—The long threatening clouds have at length burst, and the storm of war is upon us. Events of starting interest are multiplying in every direction.
The recent orders of our Commander-in-Chief are already bearing prolific harvest.—Since the first dashing advance of the Harris Light Cavalry, which inaugurated a new policy in our portion of the field, not a day has elapsed which has not seen some part of KING'S Division, actively, and often daringly employed upon scouting parties, foraging expeditions or armed recconnoissances [sic]. One day a regiment of cavalry, the next a battery supported by a regiment of infantry, and the day following an entire brigade, have been on the move to assault the enemy on our front. Beaver Dam, Bowling Green, Spottsylvania Court House, Fredericshall, Guiney's Station and Orange Court House have been the scenes of our advance upon the enemy.
Last Monday, General HATCH, our new Brigadier, arrived, and assumed command of his brigade. Tuesday morning the entire command received directions to proceed to the front in light marching order, and with two days cooked rations. The regimental and brigade trains were ordered to accompany us. The weather, as it has been for a month, was intensely hot. As our new General rode down the lines, he was an object of curious interest to men who for a year had been under the immediate command of such Generals as KEYES and AUGUR. The regiments filed in on the line of march in the usual order, traversed the familiar interval to the bridge of boats across the Rappahannock, where our band, which had escorted us, left us and returned to camp. Passing through Fredericksburg, our force divided. Four companies of the 2d Reg't U. S. Sharpshooters, two sections of the 1st Rhode Island Battery, the 14th N. Y. militia, (Brooklyn,) and 24th N. Y. Vol's (Oswego) filed off to the right on the road leading to Spottsyvania
Court House. The Harris light cavalry, accompanied by the 21st N. Y. Vol's (Buffalo) of Gen'l PATRICK'S Brigade, preceded them on the same route that morning. The latter force succeeded in tearing up the Railroad track at Fredericks hall, blowing up a culvert and destroying a bridge, thus cutting off communication for several days between the rebels at Richmond and Gordonsville.
Our own line of march was down the "telegraph road," through the Massaponax valley. Our force consisted of four companies of the U. S. Sharpshooters, the 22d and 30th N. Y. S. Vol's, and one section of the 1st Rhode Island Battery (12lb howitzers, for shell, grape, canister, spherical case, and round shot.) That night we reached, and bivouacked near the banks of reached, and bivouacked near the banks of the Ny river, a distance of about ten miles from Fredericksburg. This is one of four streams each about the size of a northern trout brook, which unite a few miles to the east of this point and form the Mattapony river. Each syllable of this word beginning at the south is the name of one of these tributaries. The extremely warm weather made the march a trying one for us all.— Our company was selected to cross the stream and picket out in front for the night. The day previous to our advance Gibbon's brigade had preceded us on this route, and now lay encamped near Thornburgh, about five miles in our advance. His brigade was accompanied by the 3d Indiana cavalry, and the 4th regular U. S. battery, also armed with 12 lb. howitzers. Our bivouac was about four miles in advance of our old camp at Massaponax.
At four o'clock A. M. the bugles of the cavalry and artillery and the drums of the infantry sounded the reveille, and after a hurried breakfast the lines were again formed and the march resumed. At distance of two and a half miles we crossed Po, the second tributary of the Mattapony, where, later in the day, fifteen wagons and eighty live prisoners were captured by the enemy,—the wagon, teams and teamsters belonging to our brigade, soldiers to the 19th Indiana, from GIB BON'S brigade. From this point we proceeded as far as "Mud Tavern," a distance one a half miles, where our Regiment stacked arms. The 30th, with the battery, moved forward about a mile and a half further. Two companies our Regiment were detached to picket the flanks— company G. to the right, (looking South,) B. left, besides the usual regimental guard detail. For three or four hours the men were taking their rest, pre- paring their meals, and making themselves generally comfortable. During this period, baggage wagons of our train were returning homeward, some partly loaded and others empty, which it was designed should be loaded with grain at mills above. Among other conveyances was one quartermaster's wagon with two prisoners, accompanied by two guards. They were subsequently near being taken by rebels. As they were driving comfortably along a cavalryman came dashing up and demanded their surrender. At same moment, while his pistol was leveled at driver's head, one of the guards drew up fired at him—the bullet coming so unpleasantly near as make him turn rejoin his comrades at top his speed.
About noon, as I stood listlessly leaning on the fence looking northward on the route whence we had come, I heard a volley like that of carbines, in the distance, succeeded by wild tumultuous yells and shouts. As I was eagerly listening for more, a man, bareheaded running at the top of his speed, rushed in sight in distance, speedily followed by another and another, then in squads of two or three, and then an army wagon came dashing around the corner, followed by many, all driving frantically forward. By this time the order was given "fall in," and the men, some of them halt asleep, and others half dressed, rallied for arms, which they took possession in short order, and in brief time in good shape. We were moved from road to an adjoining field. Here we stood at rest, while Company E., and shortly after Companies H. and A., were detached under the command of Major McKie, with instructions to move forward rapidly and retake possession of the wagons which we had been informed were secreted in a barn near at hand. The remaining four companies were drawn off to the back of the field and rested for an hour, or nearly that, when word was brought that they were attacked, and Companies F., D. and I. detached to coyer their retreat. Up to this time the General could not be persuaded it was anything more than a guerrilla clash of 30 or 40 upon our rear. He now sent to General GIBBONS for reinforcements and called in the 30th and section of battery on the front. As our reserve was now pressing forward, we could hear scattering shots and volleys growing gradually more distinct. Our Lieutenant Colonel, brave as an old lion, and snuffing the scent of the battle afar off, stationed us with an oblique front to road commanding its approach with a raking fire. In meantime stragglers, foot and horse, continued to pour within our lines, and at last, as a squad of cavalry came dashing in upon us, a shell went hustling and whizzing through the air, and caused a throb of apprehension for the safety of our brave fellows ahead. After ascending the hid on the opposite side of the liver Po, Company E. was detached by the Major alone to advance and hold possession of the road, while Companies H. A. accompanied him in search of the wagons, which it is needless to say were not found. Company passing through an open field to the right of the road, crossed a piece of woods on the left, and in forest on the other side road found cover, where, for nearly an hour, they held the enemy at bay—skirmish assuming the character of an Indian fight; wherever an arm, head, hand or foot was exposed, it was sure to draw fire. Great risks were incurred in attempting to recover body of a mounted Orderly, sent with orders to call the Companies in, which had been shot on his way to reach Company E. The body was finally drawn into the woods Lieut. CUSHING and one of his men, who, with great gallantry exposed themselves to a sharp fire for this object. It was expected that a charge would be made by a squad Indiana cavalry, but their attention was called in another direction about this time. Major McKie now came up with Companies H. and A., and finally, as the shells and canister burst pretty freely around them, the Major drew them off, without the loss a man rejoined the regiment. It is believed that during this rifle skirmish enemy suffered severely. The behavior of Company E. was highly creditable to both officers men. They were under for more than an hour and acted with all coolness and self-possession of veterans.
The boys speak in enthusiastic terms Major MCKIE. Cool, self-possessed self reliant, brave without rashness, he has won the imperishable esteem of the whole line. On his return Gen. HATCH assumed command, and his manner once gave confidence in his abilities as a leader. He directed Col. THOMAS to deploy the regiment as skirmishers, saying "drive them out, and don't let them drive you out."— About time two companies of Sharp- shooters were also deployed as skirmishers, the line of which was soon extended two and a half miles in front. On the extreme right was Co. D., next I. and next C.; then came two companies of Sharpshooters, which constituted the right wing up to the road. Then came Companies A., E., H. and F., on the left under the command of the Major. Soon the roar of the enemy's battery was heard, which was soon replied to by our own battery, which now came thundering down the road, followed by Companies G. and B on the double quick. These were soon deployed to the left, and noted as reserve to the line of skirmishers. On the right wing, during this advance was opposed the enemy's line of skirmishers and the firing in advance was continuous. All the companies here engaged behaved with conspicuous gallantry, while the Colonel, impatient to get nearer to the enemy, rode along the lines, and urged forward their tired and lagging footsteps.—During this chase, winch was followed up about five miles, the infantry kept up with both artillery and cavalry. The extreme left in this advance was forced to swing around nearly a quarter of a circle to "close in," and made some tall marching through tangled brush, swamps, marshes and brooks, wading both the rivers Po and Nye, as of course did the whole line. It is believed that the enemy suffered considerable loss during their retreat by our artillery. One man was seen to be cut in two by a round shot, and three or four others fell at the explosion of a shell in their midst. Frank Warren, of Co. E. was taken prisoner with his team at the time the wagon train was first attacked. Two men from Co. D. are missing, two from Co. H. and one from Co. B., supposed to be taken prisoners. If so, it was caused by straggling from their companies.
There is no disposition to exaggerate this skirmish to the importance of a battle, yet as straws show which way the wind blows, enough has been seen to warrant a good account of the 22d if it ever gets into fight. The enemy is believed to have been Stewart’s celebrated Brigade of Cavalry, with part of a battery. They num­bered altogether something over two thous­and, and while operating in the woods were dismounted and acting as infantry. We could hear their orders distinctly, many of them identical with our own. Several kinds of arms were found dropped by them in their retreat—carbines, Colt's revolvers, 10 fowling pieces, sporting rifles, Reming­ton rifles, &c. They came in upon our rear near Massaponax creek, a few hours after our advance burnt the bridge across that stream, picked a load or two of sick returning to camp in ambulances and wagons, captured several returning wagons loaded with corn, and finally encamped only a couple of miles in our rear. After possessing themselves of our wagon train their chief aim was to get them off safely. To this end they made the artillery feint and attack upon our left, manuvering with a few men on our left in open sight of the picket post under Capt. Cameron, while in reality their main force was on our right. It is due to the Indiana cavalry to say that they made some most splendid charges upon the enemy's lines. The 30th and Gibbon’s brigade did not get up in time to participate in the skirmish.
Sunday Morning—1 o'clock. We are all packed ready for a start towards Culpepper Court House, at three o'clock, where it is expected that we shall join POPE'S army. It is not improbable that we shall have to fight on our way there.
BURNSIDE is here with 25 to 30,000 men to look after this point.
Truly yours, A. W. R.

Glen's Falls Republican.
GLEN'S FALLS, N. Y.:
Tuesday Afternoon, June 17th, 1862.
Letter from the 22d Regiment,
N. Y. S. Vols.
CAMP ARMS, VALLEY OF THE MASSAPONUX,
Monday evening, May 26, 1862.
Friend Harris:—The army of the Rappahannock has broken camp, and we have made another advance, though mighty short, "on to Richmond." During the early part of the past week, our eyes were gladdened by the arrival of SHIELDS' Division, some sixteen thousand strong, which with its brave lion like leader, had been detached from Banks' column and sent to strengthen ours. The force was over half a day in marching past our camp, and part of the time advancing on two roads at the same time. The troops composed chiefly of Virginia, Ohio and Indiana volunteers, looked worn, wearied, travel soiled; and well they might, for they had been ten days on the continuous march, having traveled in that time from the mountainous region of Western Virginia, a distance of over one hundred and twenty miles by the circuitous rout they followed. Their flags were inscribed with the name of Winchester in golden letters—a memento of a victory of which the men were evidently proud.
On Friday our division was again reviewed by President LINCOLN and Gen'l MCDOWELL with his staff. We all of us then supposed that before this we should be on our way to Richmond—it being a current camp rumor that a council of war had been held that night at Gen'l MCDOWELL'S headquarters, at which it was decided to send this army corps to reinforce Gen'l MCCLELLAN. Our advance to this point had the effect of driving the enemy's pickets some twenty miles south of Fredericksburgh [sic].—The rebel force in this region was only one brigade, to which was attached a squadron of cavalry and a battery of light artillery,—the whole under the command of Gen'l FIELD, who retreated before us when we made our advance upon Falmouth. Our present camp is beautifully located within the border of a magnificent grove, looking out in front upon the undulating billows of a wheat-field, and skirted in the rear by one of the many graceful rivulets whose tributary currents unite to form the Massaponux, in the county of Spottsylvania.—It is situated upon the estate of "Fairview"
—the property of Mrs. ALLSOP, a widow lady, well advanced in years, but of strong secession proclivities, unless she is greatly belied by the negroes, to whom we are chiefly indebted for any correct information concerning either the country or its inhabitants.
Our advent here has been daily commemorated by the escape of troops and gangs of fugitive slaves, who are now promised a chance for that freedom for which they have hitherto hardly dared to dream of realizing. One party of three, whom I had the pleasure of escorting "on my own hook" through the lines of the guards, has been employed during the rebel occupancy in drawing ammunition and ordnance stores from Fredericksburgh [sic] to Acquia Creek and Cattlett's Station.—They told me that they had laid around in the woods for the last six weeks, waiting for a chance to get within our lines, and our advance had now for the first time offered them the golden opportunity. Virginia's loss in slave chattles and in the depreciation of slave property alone, is already great. This, with her other losses, will in the end make her regret ever having suffered the mailed arm of its gallant crest, (represented by its defiant legend, sic semper tyrranius) to be used as a catspaw to pull the badly burnt nut of secession from the ashes of a revolution,
Yesterday, while making preparations for breaking up camp, we were startled by a tremendous explosion in the direction of Fredericksburgh [sic]. We afterwards learned that it was one of those infernal machines with which our "chivalrous" foe cover their many "strategetic" [sic] retreats. Fortunately but one man was killed—a sentry standing near, who was literally blown to atoms!
On our route of march to our present camping place, we met SHIELDS' Division on their return to their old haunts among the mountains. There are rumors too of defeat and disaster to BANKS and FREMONT, in consequence of the withdrawal of SHIELDS' force from that region. Our army corps, broken up before the withdrawal of FRANKLIN'S Division, including the Brigade of the gallant KEARNEY, had but just been completed, when it is now again crippled by this retrograde movement. It
consisted of 1st. Shields' Division, comprising three brigades.
2d. Ord's Division, composed of Rickett's, Hartsoff's and Bayard's Brigades.
3d. McCall's Division, including Reynold's, Meade's and Seymour's Brigades.
4th. King's Division, embracing Augur's, Patrick's and Gibbon's Brigades.
To this force is to be added several reg­iments of cavalry, a large artillery force, a pontoon train, an engineer corps, a signal corps, telegraph operators, railroad em­ployees, &c., &c., making an aggregate force of over fifty thousand men,—an army of itself, capable, in the hands of a Napoleon, of shaping the destinies of the Na­tion. With this new direction of things, we are again afloat, and may be delayed for weeks before our reorganization is per­fected. All we can do is to wait and hope.
Yours, A. W. H.

GLEN'S FALLS REBUBLICAN.
GLENS FALLS, N. Y., TUESDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 13, 1862.
Letter from the 22d Regiment,
N. Y. S. Vols.
Bivouac near Falmouth, Va.,
Monday evening, April 28th, 1862.
Friend Harris: The sun, enveloped in a great, golden glory, has just sunk behind the amphiteatre of hills, whose verdant slopes and wooded ... enclose and girt the city of Fredericksburgh [sic], lying squarely to the front of our picturesque encampment which faces westerly. It is pleasant scene, rural and homelike, and suggestive of almost anything but war. It reminds me of fleeting railroad glimpses of scenery in the vicinity of Lansingburgh. My preconceived ideas of the country hereabout have been destined to a great change in seeing the reality. The surface of the land lying between this and Centerville is "rolling"--the greater portion of it under good cultivation; every undulation, ravine, or valley watered with perennial streams varying in size from a ripple to a river; the hill tops covered in vast instances with groves of second growth, or native forests, while in the distance ridge after ridge of green, receding hills, stretch their corrugated spines until lost in the far off summits of the Shenandoah and Alleghany mountains.
I started to describe the landscape now becoming hazy and indistinct in the orange twilight, while tones of blue and crimson blend in an array of beauty around the scenery, and the brilliant red could drapery of the west seem like a vast curtain looped upon stars and ... down between us and the departed ... Down in the valley before us, toward which trend the gently converging slopes on either side, winds the lazy Rappahannock, smooth and noiseless, its shallow current gliding stealthily past ..., of the lately destroyed bridge,  whose half-burned piles and blackened rembroken timbers ... are distorted in the gathering haze to resemble the ribs and skeleton of some ... monster. On the other side, stretching down to its very shores, come the terraced gardens, the graveled walks, the paved streets of the city of Fredericksburgh [sic], with its brown freestone mansions, and its still more numerous dingy, white washed dwellings. Conspicuously in front stands a massive stonemill, (the property of a rabid secessionist) through whose walls, a distance of about sixty feet apart, one of our shells went plunging, the morning of our advance.* On this side of river, in the compact and wealthy village of Falmouth, below us, or nestling in the midst of freshly budding groves, and far off through vistas leading down long avenues of stately trees, still glistening and ruddy with the expiring tints of day, may be caught glimpses here and there of aristocratic dwellings, filled with the luxuries of all lands and climates; the appliances and idols of hereditary grandeur, the ornaments and elegancies of educated tastes and refined associations,--all abandoned  and vacated by rebel owners,--and I wish I might be able to add, to make way for loyal occupants. Many of these habitations are fitted up, I am told, in the highest style of modern art, and a most regal magnificence.—Large brick and "brown stone front" mansions, whose wide-mouthed halls open upon landscape gardens and smoothly shaven lawns, ornamented with clipped clumps of dark odorous evergreens; or else emerging on cool verandahs, whose graceful columns and pilasters give an eastern air and classic elegance to the gratefully green Venetian blinds, which shut out the glare of the hot, noon-day sun and through whose interstices the summer breezes come, fanned to coolness by the fluttering leaves of the drooping foliage without. The lofty walls within decorated with choice works of art, or long rows of family portraits; book-cases filled with choice editions of standard literature and classics ; costly souvenirs of friendship, and rare old gems of reading; corners, mantels, niches filled and  covered with vases, sculptured ornaments, statuary and elegant, costly  rifles; lofty parlors with moulded cornices in arabasque, and cool, marble floors in mosaic

*The darkies say that our cannon balls of that morning were all rotten, "they fly all to pieces so, dat day make de Secesh scatter like the mischief." I had an opportunity this afternoon of witnessing a genuine burst of Negro enjoyment. One of our companies was deployed in front of the camp, going through the evolutions of the skirmish drill. This was a manifest novelty to our sable friend, and as he drolly watched their movements, extending their lines on the run, dropping upon the ground, loading upon their backs, rallying by fours, &c., his sense of fun overcame all the proprieties of the  occasion, and bursting out in a genuine negro cachination, he laid himself down upon the grass, and rolled and tumbled in frantic appreciation of what seemed to him "a high old time," exclaiming "hi!" "O de Lord," "yah, yah, yah." He said afterwards that the rebels had no such drill as that and he evidently thought the Yankees a great people.

below; rich window drapery shut out the garish light of day, ranges and furnaces below to send warmth in winter to each apartment; pipes conveying warm water and cold to marble basins and baths in each richly furnished dormitory; heavily carpeted chambers; luxurious ottomans, divans, lounges and sofas; quaint, carved furniture of the olden time, dark and massive, mingled in with the light, airy, architectural triumphs of northern workshops;—these are but dim word-pictures if all that is told me is true, or many a home in this aristocratic neighborhood which has been abandoned by  old Virginia families, educated for a generation to treason; and in a few instances, by half-way union and Northern men, whose Southern wives, hot headed, impulsive, implacable and unreasoning. have coaxed, driven and hetchelled into the terrible finality of treason; committing themselves in this late stage of the National tragedy, to an irrevocable hopeless cause.
One of these buildings, I am told, is now occupied as the head quarters of Gen'l KING, our Division commander. I am informed that there are many more of this class the other side of the river, for this is a favored and favorite spot of the F. F. V.'s of the Old Dominion, in whose shades and seclusion easy going merchants and traders of Norfolk and Richmond were wont to find that ease and retirement which more enterprising southerners had been in the habit of seeking at Saratoga, Newport and Niagara. These places and this property are carefully held intact, and guarded by our troops. Indeed our army seems now to be organized on the basis of a great National police force, whose chief business is to look after and protect the property of those who are either in arms against their country, or abetting treason by giving aid and comfort to its enemies. The most stringent rules are laid down and observed in relation to the army, while the utmost latitude and favor is extended to the inhabitants, many of whom are traitors of the blackest dye. Compare with this picture the following, taken from the National Republican of this morning:
SECESSION IMPUDENCE.—We learn that a gentleman by the name of Rice, who lived in Fairfax county, Virginia, where he owned a fine property, which he was obliged to leave after the battle of Bull Run, on account of his Union sentiments, returned to claim his property recently, when he found a man named Aiken in possession of his land and house, by authority of the Confederate Government, which had confiscated it. Rice demanded his property, but Aiken would give it up only on condition that Rice should take the oath to support the bogus, secesh Government. This, Rice refused to do, and has returned to this city, for the purpose of laying his grievances before the authorities.
It seems to me to be difficult for any right minded person to avoid coming to the same conclusion arrived at by the editor of that paper in the leading article of this morning's issue. The timorous policy of conciliation is making us a laughing stock and our country's honor almost a by-word and reproach to the nations of the earth. Instead of a refined and chivalrous foe, we have a bitterly hostile, barbarous, wily enemy, educated from infancy to look with intense disdain and malignant hate upon the "Yankees," whom they now term "Lincolnites," and often by the more approbrious and expressive epithet of "Abolitionists," than which nothing is more odious, hated and despised by slave-holding Southrons. The following is a portion of the editorial to which I have just alluded:
It will be impossible to reconstruct society at the South, and at the same time to leave the leading rebels in the possession of the property which has given them consideration and power. Hanging is a good remedy, and one approved in the practice of other countries. But nobody has ever yet been hung in the United States for treason; and when there is so much weakness in the conduct of affairs, nothing is more likely than that nobody will be hung for participation in this rebellion. It is easier to drive the guilty out of the country; and where confiscation does not effect that object, it will deprive those who remain of their principal means of doing mischief. Moderate penalties are more easy of enforcement than severe ones; and it is not now, when confiscation is met with the objection that it is cruel and inhuman, that we can be made to believe that the rebels are to be hanged, and that therefore it is unnecessary to punish them by taking their property, or by condemning them to pay pecuniary fines. We know well, that if there is not vigor enough in our institutions to take the property of the persistent leaders of the rebellion, they are in no danger of their lives, and that they will escape altogether, and with fresh courage for a new outbreak when circumstances may make success more possible.
I send you samples of Confederate money,—one, a five dollar Confederate note, which compared with the exquisitely finished and artistic productions of the U. S. Treasury Department, furnishes in itself alone a fine illustration of the capabilities of the opposing sections of the country. The day after our arrival in Falmouth I had occasion to make some purchases of a resident of that place, but who was formerly from the North. I gave him a five dollar Treasury note to change. It was the first he had seen, and, as he eyed it somewhat curiously he exclaimed: "Thank God, this looks something like money, compared with the stuff they have made us take here all winter. They know how to-do things up there, pointing to the North. This man, who is a blacksmith by trade, came here twelve years ago, and has been a staunch Union man all through, until things came to such a pass that it was worth a man's life to express his honest opinions, since when he has been as quiet as possible, and at the time of our advance had two conscripts hid away in his cellar, whom the rebel authorities were endeavoring to find and force away in their army. He has been obliged to work for the rebels all Winter and take Confederate script for pay, but about two days before our advance he was fortunate enough to be able to exchange his bundle of worthless rags for the remnants of a stock in trade of a Secession merchant, and these in turn have been disposed of to our men at round profits for good money.
Most of the people here—citizens, mechanics and shop keepers—decline taking our Treasury notes at all, but are perfectly willing to take the Fredericksburgh [sic], Winchester and other corporation shin-plasters, as also the notes of all the Virginia Banks at their full valuation. There is no silver at all in circulation here. What little is expended here by our officers and soldiers, is carefully hoarded up, to be buried with other treasures until the close of the war. It has been intimated to me that large amounts of specie had been buried about here, awaiting the pacification of our troubles for its restoration to light. The prices we are obliged to pay here are tremendous. While flour is retailing for five dollars a barrel across the river, we are obliged to pay ten cents a loaf (uncommon small at that) for domestic-made bread, and a levy a loaf for baker's bread at the sutlers; butter forty cents per pound, eggs thirty and forty cents per dozen; potatoes one dollar and a quarter per bushel; sugar and coffee not to be had at any price, except as they are drawn through the Commissary, upon whom we are also dependent for fresh beef, salt meat, hams, rice, salt and candies. The women here sell short biscuit for a. quarter of a dollar per dozen. Harper's Weekly and Frank Leslie's command fifteen cents each; the Herald, Tribune, and Times ten cents each, and the Washington papers, five cents apiece, and everything of the kind is bought up with avidity at that. The difficulty of making or getting change seems also to enhance the price of everything.—The butter, milk, beef, pork and hoe-cake here are all highly flavored with the garlic or wild onion, with which the fields, meadows, swamps and pasture lands so thoroughly abound that it is impossible for grazing animals to avoid eating it, and even the cattle driven along with the army have in some instances become so thoroughly [sic] flavored with it that the men fairly loathe the meat. With the other specimens of currency I have enclosed a one-dollar bill on "the Bank of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania." It was paid out here by our Paymaster, and is simply noteworthy for the following expressive, though rather inelegant and wholly illogical endorsement on the back:

" Black Republican
" currency
" A set of Thieves
" Whose only object is
"To Rob the People &
"destroy the Government."

The assumption and inferences to be founded on this morsel of Secession literature are of the most incongruous and entertaining nature. But when viewed in the light of history and compared with the acts of Davis, Mason, Yulee, Floyd, Wise, Yancey, Toombs, et id omne genus, there is a coolness about it that is certainly refreshing, and it is only to be regretted that its discovery could not have been reserved for the tropical warmth of the long days in the now rapidly approaching summer time. In the account contained in my last of our advance, I stated that the Brooklyn 13th ran by the side of the saddle girths of the Cavalry, until they reached their halting place. This I afterwards learned was slightly incorrect. Soon after we commenced driving the rebel pickets the line of march was modified. (I enclose you a diagram of the order of march, which will give you at a glance a better idea of the forces than a page of description.) All but two companies of the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry, were dispatched to the front, and its commander, Col. Bayard, seeing a trooper's horse hitched to a tree in the vicinity of a house to the left of our route, dashed out to make a capture,—but the rebel officer (for so it proved to be) who had stopped for a brief leave taking with a fair demoiselle, and who afterwards stood in the doorway as we passed, her pretty features distorted with a scowl of hate and defiance,—proved too nimble for the gallant colonel, jumping upon his horse and discharging his revolver at the officer, ball taking effect in the horses leg, which was immediately led limping to the rear. Soon afterward the Gen'l (AUGUR) requested the commandant of the Sharpshooters to hurry forward his battallion [sic] to the front as skirmishers, but that officer represented his force to be too much exhausted to undertake it, upon which the 14th Brooklyn, the next regiment in order, was invited, and volunteered to take the post of honor. Their knapsacks were thrown off, and after running a short distance by the stirrups of the Cavalry, the latter dismounted, and the Infantry rode awhile in their places, thus alternating and relieving, and resting each other, until about five miles of distance had been accomplished, when the entire force stopped in bivouac for the night. Up to this time the casualties h a d been five, all from the Harris Cavalry, Lt. DECKER being among the number. He was in hot pursuit of a rebel trooper, who seeing that he was likely to be overtaken drew his revolver and laying it across his left arm shot the Lieutenant as he rode up by his side. The entire Brigade, wagon train, cattle and provisions, came up and encamped in the neighborhood of the advance for the night. The early march of the following morning has already been narrated. The alternate gallant assault and charge of the Pennsylvania and Harris Light Cavalry, under the respective commands of Col. BAYARD and Lieut. Col. KILPATRICK, each of whom had a horse wounded under them in the attack, and the former of whom has already been rewarded for the events of that morning by a Brigadier Generalship. After the barricade was passed, the Artillery was planted at the top of the hill commanding the village of Falmouth and the city of Frederickesburgh [sic], and I have been told that it was at the urgent request of the gunners that the commandant finally consented that a few shells should be fired at the retreating foe; the only execution being done was the killing of one horse and making an ugly looking hole through the stone building already mentioned. For this also, Captain GIBBONS has been nominated as a brigadier general.
So far, no mention has been made of the 22d or other Infantry corps, except the Sharpshooters, and the Brooklyn 14th, who were deployed as skirmishers that morning, and neither of whom were under fire at any time, if I am correctly informed. All of that long weary march was made by the 22d with their loaded knapsacks, only ten stragglers being left on the way; and only two knapsacks lost, while the highway and fields all along were strung with the knapsacks, overcoats and other baggage of the Berdans and other regiments. This is not said in a spirit of reproach, for the march was exhaustive, and the entire brigade probably deserve equal credit for good behavior, on that occasion. One incident connected with the charge, as exhibiting ready resources and presence of mind, is worth recording. Lieut. Col. KILPATRICK, in command of the Harris Light Cavalry, after receiving the fire of the enemy at the barricade, turned round and sung out at the top of his voice, "Artillery to the right, Infantry to the left," though neither were within a mile of him. This so startled the rebels with the fear of being surrounded, that they hustled out of their concealment and made off as fast as they conveniently could. It is due to the rebels to say that with the force and means at hand they made a creditable defence, annoyed us all that lay in their power, fell back and made a stand at every feasible point, and exhibited a resolution and bravery worthy of a better cause.
The weather since our stay here has been cold, wet and rainy, disagreeable beyond precedent; having all the tears and "nary" smile for proverbially fluctuating unsettled, capricious April. It is undoubtedly "good for grass," but tends very little towards making our bivouacs comfortable or enjoyable. After all our open winter here, I should say that the season was not more than two weeks ahead of what it is at home. Last night we had a very hard frost, which it is feared will destroy all the fruit hereabouts, of which there has been up to this time such abundant promise. I think I have omitted to say that the first brush with the enemy was twelve miles from here, and the first regular charge was made ten miles back of Falmouth, and that the skirmishing of the first day occupied altogether about one and a half hours. It is rumored, with how much truth I am unable to say, that we are to entrench and throw up fortifications here. This story has some plausibility in the fact that fresh requisitions have been made for trenching tools. If this is the case, it may be months before we shall change our position here. Indeed we are now occupying the extreme southern bounds of MCDOWELL'S department, and unless its limits are extended, or the scope of his operations modified by some new order, I do not see how we are to get any nearer Richmond then we already are. If, as is conjectured by some that the rebels will come to see us, that will be a different affair altogether; still, unless the odds are overwhelming, I think we shall be both ready and willing to meet them. Adios, A. W. H.

LAWS OF NEW YORK —By AUTHORITY.
[Every law, unless a different time shall be prescribed therein, shall commence and take effect throughout the State, on and not before the twentieth day after the day of its final passage, as certified by the Secretary of State. Sec. 12, title 4, chap. 7, part 1, Revised Statutes.]
CHAPTER 243.
AN ACT Making further provisions relative to encroachments upon highways, Passed April 15, 1862, three-fifths beg present.
The People of the state of New York, represented in Senate and Assmbly [sic], do enact as follows:
SECTION 1. Upon the hearing before a jury, as provided in section one hundred and six of article fifth, title first, chapter sixteenth and part first of the Bevised [sic] Statutes, the justice who has issued the precept to such party shall preside at the final, in the same manner as upon the trial of an issue joined in a civil action commenced before him; six of the jurors summoned shall be drawn and impaneled [sic] in the same manner as upon a trial by jury in civil action before him, and he shall have the power and it shall be his duty to decide as to the competency of jurors, the competency and admissibility of evidence, and all other questions which may arise  before him, in the same manner and with the like effect as upon a jury trial in civil actions before him; and such justice shall adjust and determine the cost of such inquiry, and in case the jury shall find an encroachment, he shall render and docket a judgement [sic] to that effect, and for such costs against the person or persons who shall have denied such encroachment; in case the jury find no encroachment, he shall render and docket a judgment to that effect against the commissioners prosecuting the proceedings, and also for such costs, together with the damages, if any, which may have been fixed by the jury, and payment thereof shall be enforced by such justice, as in other cases of judgments rendered by him,
§2. The person or party against whom such judgment shall be rendered, may, within sixty days after filing the certificate of the jury, appeal from the finding and judgment to the county court of the same county; such appeal shall be made by the service, within twenty days after the docketing of said judgment, of notice of appeal upon the justice and upon successful party or parties, or one of them, stating the grounds of such appeal. It shall be the duty of such justice, in his return to such appeal, to embrace copies of all the papers made and served in the proceeding prior to issuing the precept for such jury and all the evidence and proceedings before him, together with the finding of the jury and judgment entered thereon. All the provisions to title eleven, chapters third and fifth of Code of Procedure are hereby extended to such appeals, so far as the same is applicable thereto.
§3. In case the decision of the jury finding an encroachment shall be affirmed by the appellate court, such court, in addition to the costs now allowed by law, may in its discretion order judgment against the appellant for the penalties provided by section one hundred and four of article one, title one, chapter sixteen, part first of the Revised Statutes aforesaid, for such period as shall intervene between the time fixed for the removal of fences, of provided by section one hundred and seven of the said article, title and chapter, and the decision of such appeal; and in case of the continued neglect or refusal of the occupant, after judgment, to make such removal, the court rendering judgment may, by order from time to time, enforce the additional penalties incurred, or may provide for the removal of such fences at the expense of the occupant, payment of such expense to be enforced by order.—Such applications to be made according to the usual practice of the court.
§4. This act shall apply to all proceedings now pending in relation to encroachment upon highways, where a hearing has not taken place, and all acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this act are hereby repealed, so far as proceedings had or continued under this act are concerned.
§5. This act shall take effect immediately. State of New York, Office of the Secretary of State. I have compared the preceding with the original law on file in this office, and do certify that the same is a correct transcript therefrom and of the whole of said original.

HORATIO BALLARD, Secretary of State.
TESTIMONY OF "HONEST JOE HOLT."—We make no apology for this wicked effort in the South to destroy the Government. We grant the necessity of suppressing it, but Abolition that produced it, must also be suppressed. Abolitionism and Secessionism must be buried in the same political grave."
—A juvenile sporter belonging to a primary school, boasted to his play-fellows the other day, that he would by and by become the fortunate possessor of an important article of youthful aspiration. "My father," said he, "has gone to the war, and if he gets killed I am going to have his fish line."
—The war has now been over a year in progress, and has been signalized by not less than a hundred distinct combats of greater or less consequence.
—The Troy Times says that Sam Todd, killed at Shiloh, is that brother of Mrs. Lincoln who wished that he could cut the throat of every Yankee bearing arms against the South. He deserved his fate.

GLEN’S FALLS REPUBLICAN.
GLEN’S FALLS, N. Y.:
Tuesday Afternoon, May 13th, 1862.
LARGEST CIRCULATION IN TOWN & COUNTY.
S. M. PETTINGILL & CO.,
No. 37 Park Row, New York, and 6 State-st., Boston, are our Agents for the REPUBLICAN in those cities, and are authorized to take Advertisements and Subscriptions for us at our lowest rates.

"I DEPRECATE WAR, BUT IF IT MUST
COME I AM WITH MY COUNTRY AND FOR
MY COUNTRY UNDER ALL CIRCUMSTANCES
AND IN EVER Y CONTINGENCY. INDIVIDUAL
POLICY MUST RE SUBORDINATE TO THE
PUBLIC SAFETY.—[STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS.

"I shall ... the enemy to the wall. [McClellan's dispatch of May 4th.
An English journal has very truly remarked that the United States was the most warlike nation in the world. But our trans-Atlantic neighbor was not then, and is not now, aware that we are almost a nation of Generals, —a people of vast military knowledge, but less experience. Every city, village and hamlet can boast of numbers of “civilian Generals,” who, although they "never set a squadron in the field, nor the division of a battle know more than a spinster," are eminently capable, in their own estimation, of directing the movements of a great army, without leaving their libraries or drawing rooms. A knowledge of the science of war gained by the perusal of city journals is limited indeed; but still there are men, with knowledge derived from no other source, who are so extremely far-sighted as to believe themselves qualified to judge when an army should advance or retreat, what disposition should be made or the forces, and what points first attacked; who would force their crude ideas not alone upon the public, but upon officers and military men whose whole life has been devoted to the study and practice of arms.
Blinded either by an over zealous desire to speedily throttle the monster rebellion, or a hatred of the commander of our forces, these "civilian Generals," before our troops were thoroughly armed or equipped, brought an overwhelming influence to bear upon the heads of the Departments, for an immediate advance upon the nest of traitors at Richmond, After witnessing the disastrous defeat of our army in what proved to be a too hasty advance upon the rebel lines, the chiefs of our army were for a brief period exempt from outside dictation. But the cry of "Advance! Advance!" was again sounded, and when they saw it unnoticed by the brave young General who had won laurels in Virginia before he assumed command of the Potomac army, he was charged with incapacity. Yet notwithstanding the clamor raised against him, General MCCLELLAN was firm to his purpose, and as his deliberately formed and gallantly executed plans were gradually unfolded, and the Federal arms were crowned with repeated and magnificent victories, his enemies unwillingly acknowledged that he was not entirely at fault.
Following the enemy from their abandoned entrenchments at Manassas to the more strongly fortified position upon the peninsula, a panic was made, when the clamor arose, louder than ever, for an advance upon Yorktown,—an attack, with the rifle and sabre, upon an enemy posted behind entrenchments, from which frowned guns of the heaviest calibre, Soon the news came speeding over the wires that the rebels had fled from Yorktown, abandoning their most strongly fortified position, with its implements of defense, and that the victorious were in hot pursuit of the fugitives. The last line of that despatch is now being literally fulfilled. Then came the news of a hard fought battle and complete victory—the evacuation of Williamsburgh [sic]—its occupation by our army—another retreat— the rebel army rapidly becoming panic stricken and demoralized, and General MCCLELLAN, with his disciplined troops, steadily advancing "On to Richmond." They are "pushing the enemy to the wall." The misguided men the South are now rapidly reaping the fruit of their rashness and folly, while those who, through prejudice or mistaken zeal, have found fault with MCCLELLAN, now generously acknowledge his merits.
Already the great national thoroughfare of the Mississippi is passing from the control of men who have set Federal authority at defiance. In the future, big with events which have been foreshadowed, they can see no gleam of hope for the success of their unrighteous cause—nothing but a just retribution for offences which can find no palliation. We can well rejoice at the success of our army and its noble commanders. A cause so just and holy, upheld by a united and loyal people, who count no sacrifice too great, in the support or a Government, the wisest and best in the world, must triumph. Its enemies, numerous and determined though they may be, are rapidly being "pushed to the wall;" their country ruined and despoiled by its professed supporters; their resources becoming crippled, and their jealously guarded institutions crumbling, unaided, before the onward march of an army which should meet with welcome but not resistance.

Fearful Fire in Troy.
The city of Troy has been visited with a frightful calamity. One third of the business part of the city is in ruins. About 12 o'clock on Saturday last, during the prevalence of the high wind, the railroad bridge across the Hudson caught fire from a passing engine, and almost immediately communicated the devouring element to the city. From that time until six o'clock P. M. the fire raged with unparalleled rapidity, destroying over five hundred buildings and laying waste a third of the business portion of Troy. Among the valuable buildings burned were the Fifth Street Baptist and Sixth Street Presbyterian Churches, the Union Depot, Orphan Asylum, Associate Presbyterian Church and Ladies' Home Mission, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy Academy and Troy City Bank.
The loss is estimated at three millions of dollars. Nearly a thousand families have been made houseless and homeless—many, worth ten, twenty or thirty thousand dollars Saturday morning, found themselves penniless before nightfall. Contradictory stories are told of the loss of life, which must have been considerable. Years will elapse before Troy can recover from the ruinous blow.

CAMERON, ADIEU!—The very dishonest Simon Cameron, late Secretary of War, now Minister to St. Petersburgh, with BAYARD TAYLOR, his Secretary, and their families, sailed from New York in the Persia on Thursday last. Meddlesome people will ask why this dishonest ex Secretary, covered with infamy as he is, is allowed to represent our interests and honor in Russia. Congress has censured him—an indignant and outraged people most heartily condemn his notorious thievery and corruption, and yet he is given a place of high trust and responsibility by President LINCOLN. We shall not ask if no honester or fitter man could be found for the position, as that would be finding fault with the Administration, and of course the rankest kind of treason!

DANIEL S. DICKINSON says of the efforts of the Republican leaders in shaping the bogus "Union" Address lately issued, they were "seeing how far they could depart from the Republican creed without missing it and how near they could come to the Democratic principle without hitting it." This is undoubtedly true, but don't "Scripture Dick" deserve to be kicked for uttering such sentiments? The Democratic element in the Republican party is rather unreliable, isn't it?

Halleck's army is represented at 160,000 strong. Before recent reinforcements it occupied a front of twelve miles and three miles deep, or 36 miles of surface, pretty thickly populated at that.—The population of Halleck's army is equal to that of Albany, Troy, Cohoes, West Troy, Utica, Hudson and Poughkeepsie combined!

R. LISTON GRAY, son of Dr. GRAY, of Washington Co., writes that the officer in command of the pickets through which Col. CROCKER and Maj. CASSIDY passed on the night of their capture by the Rebels, is under arrest for not informing them of their danger. This looks like desertion!

The Glen's Falls Bookstore has been removed to Benedict's Building, three doors south of the Glen's Falls Bank.

AN INCIDENT OF THE SIEGE OF YORKTOWN.—The Yorktown correspondent of the New York Tribune tells the following rather tough story, as a veritable incident of the siege of Yorktown:—
During the first day's skirmish on our right, two soldiers, one from Maine, the other from Georgia, posted themselves each behind a tree, and indulged in sundry shots, without effect on either side, at the same time keeping up a lively chat. Finally, that getting a little tedious, Georgia calls out to Maine, "Give me a showy," meaning step out and give we an opportunity to hit. Maine in response, pokes out his head a few inches, and Georgia cracks away and misses. "Too high," says Maine. "Now give me a show," Georgia pokes out his head, and Maine blazes away. "Too low," sings Georgia. In this way the two alternated several times, without hitting. Finally, Maine sends a ball so as to graze the tree within an inch or two of the ear of Georgia. "Cease firing," shouts Georgia. "Cease it is," responds Maine.—"Look here," says one, "we have carried on this business long enough for one day. 'Spose we adjourn for rations?" "Agreed," says the other. And so the two marched away in different directions, one whistling "Yankee Doodle," the other "Dixie."

"HERSPERIAN AMBROSIA."—We notice that a new and superior kind of Smoking Tobacco has sprung into being, which is meeting with decided success. We copy from the Albany Standard, as follows:
JUST THE THING.—D. O. Salmon of the Syracuse Tobacco Works has got up a new, rich and remarkable kind of smoking Tobacco, called "Hersperian Ambrosia," which is having a great run throughout the State for its delicious flavor and choice aromas. It is manufactured from the finest Havana tobacco, and wherein it excels all others beside flavor and fragrance, is that the oil and all deleterious substances are extracted, leaving the tobacco dry and rendering it so in smoking until it is entirely used up in the bowl of the pipe. A common clay pipe is just as good as a meerschaum in the use of this tobacco.
Major Ben. Runkle, in the battle of Shiloh, was hit seven times. Though minus seven teeth, a portion of his jaw and tongue, his great toe, a shaving from his heel, and with a hole through his cheek, and a brush on the shoulder, he is said to be doing well. There were strong grounds for the report that he was dead.

LATEST WAR NEWS.
ANOTHER GREAT VICTORY
Norfolk, Portsmouth and the Navy Yard Ours, without any Fighting!!
The Merrimac Blown Up!!
WASHINGTON, May 11.
The following was received at the War Department this morning. Fort Monroe—12 midnight. Norfolk is ours and also Portsmouth and the Navy yard. Gen. Wool having completed the landing of his forces at Willoughby's Point, about nine o'clock this morning commenced his march on Norfolk with 5,000 men.
Secretary Chase accompanied the General. About five miles from the landing place a rebel battery was found on the opposite side of the bridge over Tanner's Creek, and after a few discharges upon two companies of infantry that were in the advance, the rebels burned the bridge.—This compelled the force to march around five miles further.
At 5 o'clock in the afternoon our forces were within a short distance of Norfolk and were met by a delegation of citizens. The city was formally surrendered. Our troops were marched in and now have possession. Gen. Viele is in command as Military Governor. The city and Navy Yard were not burned. The fires which have been seen for some hours proved to be woods on fire.
Gen. Wool with Sc'y Chase, returned about 11 o'clock tonight. Gen. Huger withdrew his forces without battle. The Merrimac is still off Sewell's Point.
Commander Leger's expedition was heard from this P. M., ascending the James river.
Reports from Gen. McClellan are favorable. Fortress Monroe, May 11. To Hon. J. H. Watts, Ass't. Secretary of War:
The Merrimac was blown up by the rebels at two minutes before 5 o'clock this A. M. She was set fire to about 3 o'clock.—The explosion took place at the hour stated. It is said to have been a grand sight by those who saw it. The Monitor, Naugatuck and the gunboats have gone up towards Norfolk.
The U. S. war steamer Galena went up this A.M., and after brief engagement captured the rebel steamer Jamestown and sunk the steamer Yorktown. No particulars.

From Gen. McClellan's Army.
NEW KENT, C. I., Va., May 10
The pursuit of the retreating rebels by our troops, under command of Gen. Stoneman, has in every respect been successful. His headquarters are now here, 27 miles from Richmond, while the advance, consisting of the 81st Illinois cavalry, is five miles ahead. The enemy is in sight, but gradually falling back. The inhabitants have in nearly every instance, left, but from the best information that has been obtained the enemy will make a stand at Bottom Bridge, 15 miles from Richmond at the head waters of the Chicahominy river.
Gen. McClellan, with the main body of the army, is rapidly following up within a few miles.
Cumberland, a small town on the Pamevakey River, two and a half miles from here, was destroyed this morning by the enemy, and is now occupied by our forces. There are no rebels to be seen, as reported by scouts this side of the Chicahominy river, except on the direct road to Richmond. The force under Gen. Stoneman consisted of the 2d Rhode Island and 9th Pennsylvania regiments of Infantry, Capt. Robinson's battery of Light Artillery, the 6th Cavalry, under Major Williams.
The rear guard of the enemy, which remained here last night, and which our men had to drive before them, was Gen. Longstreet's division, consisting of ten regiments of infantry, two batteries and a regiment of cavalry, the 1st Virginia.
Our advance was this morning strengthened on ascertaining the force of the enemy by the 8th Illinois cavalry and two regiments of the 1st new Jersey brigade. The enemy on leaving here this forenoon fired two buildings containing Commissary and Quartermaster's stores.
The engagement yesterday between our advance and the enemy's rear, at Slater's Mills, 3miles from here, resulted in 14 of the enemy's cavalry being killed and several taken prisoners. They secured their wounded. The cavalry, which made a most, brilliant charge, had 3 killed and _ missing and 13 wounded.
Howell Cobb remained here last night and left with the rebels this morning;. The enemy's retreat has been most admirably accomplished, carrying almost everything with them in the shape of forage and provisions, the wagon trains in the day time and the troops at night. The enemy covered their retreat with a line of skirmishes stretched across the country, driving in their stragglers at the point of the bayonet.
—The better nations become acquainted with each other, the fewer will be their prejudices, and the more likely will they be to love and respect each other. Just so with Herrick Allen's Gold Medal Saleratu...—the more you know of it, the more you want to, and the more anxious you are to have your friends become its patrons. It not only makes the best Biscuit, Bread, &c., but it cures dyspepsia and strengthens weak stomachs. It has no equal. Most of the Grocers have it.
A weekly Journal it is said is about to appear in London, advocating the cause of the rebels. Its originators will have to make haste, or their will be no rebels to defend.
—It is related that at the battle of Shiloh, a federal soldier and a rebel volunteer were found dead, with hands clasped. It is supposed that they fell side by side, mortally wounded, and making friends died in peace. What a contrast to the spectacle around!
—The N. Y. Herald says it is decided that Welles shall retire from the Cabinet, the only question now is, what to do with him.
—Prisoners say the enemy have upwards of 80,000 men at Corinth, and will fight. They are busy entrenching and raising large guns.

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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