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27th Regiment
New York Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

Organization and History of Co. H, 27th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.
This company of volunteers was organized May 21, 1861, at Mount Morris, consisting of seventy-five members. During its term of service its roll increased to one hundred and two men. The following have been its officers from its organization to its discharge, which occurred at Elmira, N. Y., May 31st, 1863:—
Cha's K. Martin, Captain, resigned and honorably discharged Feb. 10,1862.
Joseph H. Bodine, 1st Lieutenant, promoted to Captain Feb. 10, 1862; to Major July 24, 1862; to Lt. Colonel Oct. 4, 1862.
Oscar H. Phillips, 2d Lieutenant, resigned and honorably discharged Aug. 14, 1861.
Edward Williams, 2d Lieutenant, promoted from 1st Sergeant, Aug. 14, 1862; wounded June 27, 1862; resigned on account of wound Nov'r 28, 1862.
S. M. Seeley, 1st Lieut., transferred from "Sturgis Rifles," May 26, 1862; promoted to Captain March 9, 1863.
Wm. H. Swan, 1st Lt., Co. B., promoted to Captain July 24, 1862; resigned March 9th, 1863.
Edward C. Camp, 2d Lieutenant, promoted from 1st Sergeant Nov. 28, 1862, to 1st Lt. March 9, 1863.
Harvey R. Clarke, 2d Lt., promoted from 1st Sergeant, March 9, 1863.
William M. Nimbs, 1st L t Co. B., promoted from 1st Sergeant, Oct. 11, 1862.
July 5th, 1861, at Elmira, this company was equipped and sworn into the U. States service for two years, leaving on the 10th for Washington, encamping on 'Franklin Square.' Only a few days elapsed and they crossed the Long Bridge, and were engaged in the first Bull Run battle, July 21, 1861. Here they distinguished themselves, and with their Reg. gained high honors for their bravery, winning laurels for their gallant commander, Colonel Slocum, and receiving high commendations for their courage from Geo. Wadsworth.—The casualties of this battle were:—
Florence Sullivan, killed; Corporal Wm. Biggs, Privates James Donahoe, Charles H. Hunt, Joseph R. Johnson, Wm. Welch, W. Aplin, Harlan P. Boyd, and Wm. Garrett, wounded and taken prisoners.
They landed at West Point, Va., on the evening of May 6, 1862; that night they drove the enemy's skirmishers back into the woods, capturing a number of prisoners; on the 7th, supported batteries—no casualties.
The battle of Gaines' Mills, June 27, 1862, was the most terrific and disastrous this Co. experienced during their service. Their indomitable courage and heroic daring was nobly displayed in this engagement, going into the fight with forty men and coming out with only thirteen—twenty-seven killed, wounded and missing. They were under fire all day—crossed the Chickahominy at three o'clock P. M., went into action about five o'clock P. M. on the extreme right of Porter's command; drove the enemy from his position by a bayonet charge and captured a large number of prisoners. They held their position until after dark, when, after expending all their ammunition, the regiment was ordered to retire. The casualties in this regiment were about 200 and in this company the following:—
Killed—Wm. H. Chilson and Henry Lockwood. Wounded—Lieut. Edward Williams, Sergeants Edward C. Camp and E. R. Parker; privates George E Cady, James Driskcome, Willis Griffith, James H. Jones, Rob't McNeilly, Theadore Magee, Wm. B. Robertson, Lafayette C. Willis, W. H. Fasier, C. B. Wheelock, James I Scribner, R. Hammond, Alex. Howden, Squire Staples, Albert S. Tanner. Prisoners—Charles A. Martin, W. M. Ashton, Francis Flynn, Adam Miller, S. Roy, Thomas McNeilly, John Skelly.
June 30, '62, at Charles City Cross Roads, they skirmished and supported batteries.— Was in action at Malvern Hill July 1, 1862; was sent early in the action to the right of the army to prevent a flank movement of the enemy. During the entire seven days' fight before Richmond they were under fire every day.
At the second Bull Run battle, Aug. 30, 1862, they were thrown to the front to stop the advance of the enemy and to cover the retreat of Gen. Pope's army—only one man wounded.
Sept'r 14, '62, opened the fight of South Mountain, (Crampton's Gap,) as skirmishers. This movement was exceedingly dangerous, and so well executed as to elicit from Gen'l Franklin the warmest commendations for their bravery. It was exceedingly effective, but proved a serious loss to the company, killing Orderly Sergeant John Beggs, one of the bravest of the brave; wounding Lt. S. M. Seely, H. R. Clarke, John Kruhten, J. M. Magee, B. H. Tallman, Anthony Dunlava.
Engaged at Antietam Sept'r 17, 1862, supporting batteries under a heavy fire of artillery all day, but no casualties.
In Dec'r, 1862, first Fredericksburg battle, were in the first regiment that crossed the Rappahannock, in the left grand division, driving the enemy's skirmishers back from the river—under heavy fire for several days while across.
Second Fredericksburg battle, May 3d and 4th, 1863, engaged in the capturing of Marie's Heights, they were thrown to the front as skirmishers, covering the retreat of the 6th (Sedgwick's) Corps, and skirmishing until they reached the fortifications at Banks' Ford.—Although under a galling fire all day, only one man, A. S. Tanner, wounded.
The following members of the Co. have died of wounds—Joseph R. Johnson, C. H. Hunt, James Driskscome.
Disease—Wm.   Garrett, Wm.   Aplin, W. Griffith, Rob't Shannon, Jeremiah Coughlan,   Ira Hayes.
Discharged—John J. Kellogg, E. R. Parker, G. W. Bingham, G. W. Barney, Jr., A. V. Cothrell, John Dunn, D. A. Edsall, Geo. Heliker, John M. Nichols, W. H. Fasier, Ja's L. Scribner, R. Hammond, Alex. Howden, Squire Staples, Jesse D. White, Simon Roy, Samuel Wightman.
Absented and never reported themselves—Joseph W. Hanna, W. H. Abrams, Zimri Bush, Jerome Drew, Wm. Fitch, J. E. Havens, Philander Magee, O. Odell, C. Palmer, John Pendergrast, M. J. Reynolds, Lyman G. Reynolds, E. D. Rodgers, J. W. Jones, M. Lockwood, Richard Burk.
No regiment has a more glorious record than the 27th. Their courage and bravery was fully established at Bull Run, and continued through fifteen of the most perilous engagements of the war. All honor to the war worn veterans, their gallant deeds will go down to posterity as imperishable as they were daring and brilliant, and to the latest hour will it be the pride of Co. H to say, "We were members of the gallant and never faltering 27th of New York."

APPOINTMENT TENDERED.—Col. Alex. D. Adams, of the late Twenty-Seventh Regiment, N. Y. S. Vols., has been tendered the Colonelcy of the Regiment of National Guards now being raised in the First Assembly District of this county. There is already an organized Company in this town, (Capt. D. L. Norton,) and another in Galen, under the command of Capt. John Vandenburg, of Clyde.

DEATH OF A SON OF COL. HOSMER.—A correspondent of the Rochester Daily Union announces the death of Charles A. Hosmer, of the 27th New York Volunteers, son of Col. Hosmer the poet. The young man was killed in the late battle near Fredericksburg. The sad tidings carry sorrow not only to the parents of deceased but to many citizens of Avon who knew him.

MONUMENT—THE LATE LIEUT. HOLMES.—We are informed that the monument which is intended to be placed above the remains of the late Lieut. Robert E. Holmes, formerly of the Twenty-Seventh Regiment, is completed, and will be set up in the Cemetery in this village very soon. The entire expense of procuring this costly token of respect for the gallant Holmes has been defrayed by his former comrades in Company B.

Funeral of Edmund O. Foster.
The funeral of Edmund P. Foster, took place in this village on Friday. His remains reached here on the 11.55 train, and were received at the depot by "Company B" of the late 27th Regiment, under Capt. White, and escorted to their final resting place.
Deceased was the youngest son of the late Reuben H. Foster, and enlisted in the 27th Regiment. He participated in the first Bull Run battle, and endured hardships and privations which enfeebled him to such a degree that he was discharged the service a short time afterwards. He was a young man of sterling worth and beloved and re-...

Biographical.
SIDNEY A. MCKUNE died in Lisle, Broome Co.
May 19th, 1863, aged 23 years.
The life of Mr. McK. was brief, but eventful and highly interesting. His character was one of rare beauty and solid excellence. He enjoyed, in early life, that blessing without which few young men attain to real usefulness, an affectionate and pious mother. But he was doomed, while yet immature to see her guardian eyes closed by death. A beloved sister, too, was borne before him to a world of light and purity, for which, by Divine grace, she was well prepared. His father, also, was taken suddenly from both him and his younger sisters, ere he could w.. take upon him those cares and duties which fraternal love pressed him to meet. When, in the latter part of the winter of 1858, he was invited by the Rev. A. Brigham to seek and serve the Lord, he gravely said, "I do not know whether I am old enough to settle so great a question." But he was very soon enabled effectually to settle it, for both life and death. His experience, when seeking and first finding salvation, was deep; and, in its manifestation to others, even the skeptical, beyond gainsaying. His professions were extremely modest and unpretending, but his life and language were exemplary and to the Church gave great promise of a high useful future. It was often said of him, "Sidney professes nothing but what is real." It soon clearly appeared to the discriminating that the sacred work of the ministry lay before him. In a little more than a year after his conversion, he was made a censed exhorter. In this he saw the call of God confirmed beyond a doubt. After a brief struggle with the claims of fraternal duties, he set himself about laying a good foundation for ministerial usefulness in a thorough education. He found means, by the aid of his friends, to commence his studies in Binghamton, preparatory to a college course. But appreciating the call of his country as very few are capable of doing, he felt constrained to lay aside, for a time, his favorite pursuit, and first see the country safe. He volunteered bravely to peril all his cherished hopes for this world in her defence. In May 1861, he joined the 27th Regiment N. Y. Volunteers and hastened to meet the enemy in the field. Early in the unfortunate battle of Bull Bun, July 21st, the hottest of the contest, and while calmly ... faithfully doing his duty, he received a severe, and apparently mortal wound. He was carried from the field, but left to fall the next day into the hands of the enemy. For a long period he was believed by his friends to have died on the field. But he lived to suffer a long and painful captivity. Pent up with a hundred others, in a single room of an old tobacco factory in Richmond, he lingered out six months close confinement as a prisoner. From the effects of his wound and imprisonment he never fully recovered. In January, 1862, he was exchanged, and discharged as permanently disabled. On his return to his friends, his hopes and preparations for future usefulness in the ministry were renewed. Religiously he had suffered no loss during his eventful exposures; but, on the contrary, a still deeper experience, and a holier zeal, seemed to inspire him. His friends began to entertain lively hopes of his recovery. But during the last winter it became apparent to him and others that his sun must set in the morning. To few was life prospectively sweeter than to him. A numerous and warm circle of friends and loved brothers and sisters, and one still nearer these bound him to life socially. But more than in his own language, "that I might do good, he looked forward to the work of the ministry as embracing the greatest attractions of earth and yet he triumphed over these, and over all dreaded death. He often said during his last days, "Tho' I pass through the valley and the shadow of death, I will fear no evil.' Yes, the shadow of death, the the shadow," At one time, while his face shown with the joy of heavenly hope and love, he exclaimed, "I am happy because I am so near home.

'Jesus, lover of my soul,
Let me to thy bosom fly.'"

On being told of the very nearness of death to him, he exclaimed, "Praise the Lord! I shall see my beloved Jesus, my dear mother, and my sainted sister. He said in reply at the last, "He does sustain me. Bless the Lord." Soon he fell asleep, "as sleeps ....

Letter From Gen. Slocum.—Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum sent the following letter to the committee of arrangements at Binghamton, having in charge the reception there of his old regiment, the gallant 27th:
GENTLEMEN:—I have the honor of acknowledging the receipt of your communication of the 15th inst., informing me of the reception you propose giving to the 27th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers on its return, and inviting me to be present. I deeply regret my inability to accept your kind invitation.
I have witnessed on many fields the bravery of the men you propose to honor by a public reception. I have seen their patriotism and true soldierly qualities exhibited on all occasions when called upon, and I have long indulged the hope that I might return to their homes with them, and see bestowed upon them the reward which I know will be more gratifying to them than any other that could be given them—such a greeting by their home friends as shall convince them that their faithful services have been appreciated by their friends.
Please accept my thanks for your polite invitation and for the complimentary terms in which you have alluded to my connection with this noble Regiment.
I am very respectfully your obd't Servant,
H. W. SLOCUM, Maj.-General.

Reinstated.
Louis Adams of Co. B., 27th Regiment, whose name was "dropped from the rolls in pursuance of General Orders," was fully reinstated to his former position before the Company was mustered out of the service. His name was dropped through a misunderstanding.
Lafayette Sherman, also of Co. B., was put down in the Muster Out Roll of the Company as a deserter, and was published. We are glad to learn that he too, was reinstated, and received his pay and bounty.—His absence from the Company arose from the fact that he was taken prisoner.

RECEPTION OF RETURNED VOLUNTEERS.—Co. K of the 27th had a warm reception at Albion. They were received by the Firemen and welcomed by a speech from GOV. Church and Mr. Seager.
The 28th had a grand reception at Lockport yesterday. The whole population of the town gathered at the Depot and gave the volunteers a most hearty welcome.
The companies of the 27th which went home to Lima and Mt. Morris were warmly welcomed.

 

PERSONAL.—Dr. Barnes, formerly Surgeon of the 27th N. Y. V., left for Albany last evening. At the expiration of two years faithful and effective service, he was mustered out with his regiment, but will doubtless be recommissioned as soon as he returns to Washington.
John Parsons, late Commissary of the 26th N. Y. Battery, is recruiting for Capt. McPherson's company, Sprague cavalry, in West Avon, and is meeting with good success. His office is at West Avon.

DISCHARGED AND PAID OFF.—On Saturday morning the member of company K, 27th Regiment, passed through this city for Albion, having been mustered out and paid off at Elmira. Company B.
Capt. White's Company, 27th Regiment, was mustered out of the service on Tuesday last, at Elmira, and the members have returned to their homes. The boys were compelled to pay their own fare home from Elmira, the Government refusing or neglecting to furnish transportation. The soldiers who had served two years received the $100 bounty, while those who enlisted after the company was mustered into the U. S. Service were held to have no claim to it. Reception of Co. G, 27th Regiment, at Lima.
Yesterday was a notable era in the history of Lima. Co. G, 27th Regiment, New York Volunteers, which went out two years since from the village in question, came home again at the time named above, and received such an ovation, and such honor, as must have compensated in part, at least, for the many dangers, toils, and hardships, incident to their experience as soldiers. A telegram informed the citizens of the place, only twelve hours previous, that the Company would be at Avon at 7 a. m. of the 21st inst., and at an early hour of that morning plenty of teams were in readiness, and on the way to the cars, from which the boys were to embark. At about 11 o'clock a. m. the cavalcade returned with banners flying, music in abundance, and amid the ringing of bells, shouts of congratulation, and such shaking of hands and personal exhibition of joy and gladness as will never be forgotten by those who witnessed the scene.
The Company and immense escort of citizens marched to the M. E. Church, and the brave boys being seated in the central portion of the edifice, were at once overwhelmed by hosts of parents, brothers, sisters, wives and little ones, who came, or were brought in, to embrace those they loved so much and had seen so little of late. Order being finally restored the venerable Dr. Barnard returned thanks to the preserver of all for the privileges then transpiring; and so eloquent and feeling were the utterances of this good man, that very many in the audience responded in amens that were very far from meaningless.
Rev. Senator Goodwin made the welcoming address, in a few short, eloquent and appropriate sentences, and was listened to with evident delight by the vast audience present. Dr. Nettleton, of the M. E. Church, Rev. Mr. Bailey, of the Universalist, and President Reid, of Genesee College, also, each of them, made short addresses, and were all very happy in the line of discourse chosen, and the language used in expressing their deep-felt emotions.
Lieut Rock responded in behalf of the company in a style of soldierly frankness and modesty, which well became him, and satisfied all who heard, far better than would a set speech, got up for the occasion. But it being now near noon, and the ladies having intimated a desire to see their friends in the basement of the church,—and the boys not having breakfasted—a move was made in that direction, in which the guests, of course, had the place of honor and precedence. And here was fully realized the idea of "groaning" tables. It seemed as though the whole arcana of nature had been searched for rare and nutricious antidotes to hunger,—and, all the affection and cunning of the female soul largely taxed, to make the feast acceptable to those who were about to partake of it. Solids, fluids, sweet, tart, fish, flesh, and fowl; cereal and vegetable, orchard and vine, the earth and the air, all had contributed their quota, to lend expression to the greatful [sic] emotion which the patriotic self-sacrifices of the heroes present had begotten in the public heart. And like Haidee when she had rescued the youthful Juan from the sea, and watched in pleased wonder while he ate of her hastily prepared meal, did matrons and maidens present wait upon their late imperilled guests, and rejoice to see them appropriate the comfort so freely devoted to their momentary, but most urgent, corporal exigencies. The receiver was inexpressibly happy—but the giver discovered an entirely new sensation in the blessedness there was in giving—at this particular time.
Several after-dinner speeches were made by soldiers and citizens, and the services throughout were enlivened by such drum and fife practice, as is seldom heard in either town or country. The entire affair passed off with great satisfaction to all parties, and the event will long remain a conspicuous headland in the current history of a very delightful locality of our common country.
Although but two years in the service, this regiment and company have seen and been part of much that has constituted the war, thus far. It went out—Company "G"—about one hundred strong,—participated in battles at Bull Run, first and last, West Point, Mechanicsville, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg twice, and at three or four other places, and return now decimated about one-half, yet with no stain upon their escutcheon,—as brave, patriotic and hopeful, as when they advanced to the defence of their country and its institutions.

The Gallant Returning Regiments—What is said of them in Washington.
[Correspondence of The Evening Express.]
Washington, May 18, 1863.
The Twenty-seventh and Thirty-third Regiments N. Y. S. V., passed through this city on their way home on Saturday last. Like the old Thirteenth these Regiments have done for two years the work they were enlisted to do, nobly, and should receive wherever they go a like recognition. Rochester has her interests in these Regiments, and on the return on the men will not fail to receive them with such demonstrations of welcome as brave men are entitled to. The Thirty-third Regiment, Col. Taylor, bring with them three hundred and sixty men in the ranks, and a large number of the wounded from the battle of Fredericksburg. This Regiment was one of the first in the entrenchments, and one of the last to leave the fated ground. Our friends here are jubilant over the conduct of this Regiment, and their brave Colonel during this trial. None were more cool and determindly brave than the gallant Colonel, and he was well sustained by his officers and men. They are spoken of with admiration and praise by the whole corps. Amid the shower of grape, canister and minie balls, they stood without flinching. Nor did they give way until the order was given to fall back. The Thirty-third took four hundred and forty-six men into the fight, and of that number two hundred and thirty-six were either killed or wounded. Let patriots grasp these men by the hand, wherever they find them! Let them, too, remember, with deep seated affection, the fallen brave of the Thirty-third!
The Twenty seventh have been more fortunate. They take with them to their homes five hundred and forty men. In the late battle they lost three killed and thirty-four wounded. This is a fine regiment and gallantly have they done their duty. They were first engaged in the Bull Run battle, where their gallant Colonel (now Gen. Slocum) was severely wounded. Since that time they have been in active campaign service, and participated in most of the fights of the Potomac Army. The citizens of Rochester have a large interest in these brave men and their officers. Major Wanzer, Surgeon Barnes, and the other officers will return with honor to those who gave them up to all the vicissitudes of this bloody war.
The officers of these regiments ought not to be allowed to remain idle spectators of this contest. With the experience they have already acquired, and the courage and capacity they have exhibited, every effort should be made to induce them to accept commands in future regiments, or encouraged to recruit the same men and retain the same numerical position they before occupied. One such regiment is worth two new ones, with new and inexperienced officers and men. These men have become hardened in muscle and nerve, and wherever they are placed can be relied on; they will suffer less in camp or field than those who know little or nothing of camp life and its hardships.
Patriotic men do not feel discouraged in the least at what appears as a reverse on the Rapahannock. On the contary [sic], they were never so much encouraged as at the present time. Our success in the West and South, and the known good condition and fine feeling which are exhibited by the Army of Virginia, give encouragement that this great and wicked rebellion will receive its death blow during the coming summer.
Your correspondent had the pleasure of taking Capt. Morrison, of the 89th, by the hand on Saturday last. The Captain is as enthousiastic [sic] for vigorous measures as ever, and will not be found wanting wherever he can strike a blow for his country, whether it be at home or in the field. He has been engaged lately in some sharp work on the Nansemond and won new laurels in his encounter with the rebels.
The weather here is very warm, the thermometer often standing at 85° and 90° in the shade. Winter clothing is at a large discount.

SURGEON N. S. BARNES.—This gentleman returned to Rochester yesterday on a brief visit. His regiment, the gallant 27th N. Y., is about to be mustered out of service, but we learn that he expects to return to the army after enjoying a few days' rest and recreation, having been requested to do so by the chief officers of the Medical Department. During two years of active service, Dr. Barnes has achieved a reputation for skill and faithful attendance to duty equal to that of any medical officer in the service, and we are glad that the country is still to have the benefit of his professional experience and ability. The value of a good surgeon is well known in the army, which has been cursed by too many worthless pretenders in that department, and government does not willingly part with those who have exhibited capacity and a desire to be useful. Dr. Barnes has not been absent from the scene of his duties for a single day since the 27th Regiment went out, except for a few days last winter, when he was granted leave of absence for a brief period.

Meeting of Citizens.
At a meeting of the citizens of Albion, held at the Court House, Saturday evening, May 16th, for the purpose of making suitable arrangements for the reception of our brave soldiers, whose term of service is soon to expire. Dr. Wm. Noble was called to the Chair, and Thomas Bell was chosen Secretary. H. D. Tucker addressed the meeting, and after paying a handsome tribute to our noble soldiers, moved the appointment of a Committee to visit Elmira, and escort Co. K, 27th N. Y. Reg't, to Albion. The following named gentlemen were appointed—H. D. Tucker, C. G. Beach, J. G. Sawyer, H. J. Sickles, Dr. Wm. Noble, Geo. W. Bedell, R. P. Bordwell, C. A. Harrington, H. Hannington, Henry Lyons, Capt. Thomas Bell.
Ezra T. Coann moved the appointment of a Committee of Arrangements, to consist of ten members. The following named gentlemen were appointed—Ezra T. Coann, H. L. Achilles, H. A. King, F. Foster, K. L. Burrows, J. M. Cornell, W. Joslyn, J. N. Proctor, S. E. Church, Noah Davis, Jr. W. Mattinson moved the appointment of a Committee to visit Lockport and escort Co. G, 28th N. Y. Reg't, to Albion. The following named gentlemen were appointed—W. Mattinson, Dr. Dolley, H. A. Bruner, M. Pinney, J. Bailey, C. A. Harrington, H. Abeel, Geo. Hutchinson, Carl Foster, Nelson W. Butts, Geo. H. Owens. The Committee of Arrangements desire to make this reception of our brave volunteers, one long to be remembered. The ladies of Albion and vicinity are cordially invited to participate.
Meeting adjourned, subject to call of Committee of Arrangements.
THOS. BELL, Sec'y W. NOBLE, CH'N.

THE 27TH REGIMENT.—The 27th, Col. Slocum's old regiment, arrived at Elmira on Tuesday. It numbers nearly 500 men. Two of the best Generals in the Volunteer army—Slocum and. Bartlett—graduated from this regiment. Gen. Bartlett is with it.

Return of the 27th.
The gallant 27th having nobly served out her two years, has returned, as we before announced. Never were boys more warmly welcomed. Lieuts. ROBERTSON and ROCK are now in town receiving the congratulations and kind wishes of their hosts of friends. They have acquitted themselves like true patriots and soldiers, as they are, and are worthy of all the flattering testimonials that we are pleased to know are being bestowed on them.

Reception of Co. K, 27th Regiment.
Co. K, 27th Reg., arrived here on furlough from Elmira on Tuesday evening and met a hearty welcome. The Brass Band, Fire Company No. 2, and a vast concourse of citizens assembled at the depot long before the train was due, and on its arrival escorted the boys to the Court House yard, where they were formally welcomed in patriotic speeches by Hon S. E. Church and Rev. Dr. Seager on behalf of the citizens. After the reception ceremonies were over, they partook of some refreshments served by the young ladies of Phipps Union Seminary, and then marched to the Harrington House, where supper was provided, of which nearly all partook. They then dispersed for their several homes.
The Company now numbers about fifty-five, we believe, of as hardy and tough looking soldiers as we ever saw. Their bronzed complexion tells plainly of the service they have seen and the exposure had in the camp and in the field. The Company is now in command of Lieut. Gaskill, of this village, who has shown himself a brave and efficient officer. The boys will return to Elmira to be mustered out of the service the early part of next week.
The following handsome notice of the 27th is from the Elmira Daily Republican of Tuesday morning:
The gallant 27th marched through our streets yesterday afternoon, escorting Brig.-Gen. Bartlett. Their marching was literally splendid--the very best we ever saw. This is indeed a magnificent regiment, worthy of all the honors it has so nobly won. Its torn and tattered flag was borne aloft on the march, and called forth the enthusiastic admiration of the people. God bless the 27th.
After escorting Gen. Bartlett around town it drew up in column in front of the Brainard House, and listened to some farewell remarks from their old commander, who was introduced to them in a few brief words by Col. Adams, saying that Major-General Slocum spoke to them his farewell on the banks of the Potomac some days since, and now Gen. Bartlett had left his command to come to Elmira to take his sad parting and bid them good-bye. Gen. Bartlett then stepping forward and addressing them as soldiers of the 27th, said, he was glad to see the fullness of their ranks, after the dangers, wounds and deaths through which they had passed, for their diminished numbers never came by desertion or shirking of duty. Their record had ever been an honorable one, and they too had also honored their commanders, making him what he was and advancing another to a still higher position, (alluding to Gen. Slocum.) Probably no regiment in the service had won a more desirable fame, and he hoped that after an interval of rest, to see, at least within sixty days, three-fourths of their number back again upon their old camp grounds commanded by the same officers; in that case, instead of their coming out to escort him, he would surely meet them in person ready to return the honor they did him on the present occasion. General Bartlett then withdrew, and the Regiment forming in order to march, proceeded to their barracks.

RETURN OF LIEUTENANT GASKILL'S COMPANY TO ALBION.—Company K, 27th Regiment in command of Lieutenant George S. Gaskill, arrived at Albion at 6:30 P. M. on Tuesday evening, and were welcomed by a concourse of over 1000 people. They were greeted with a band of music, and much enthusiasm. Eloquent and patriotic speeches were made by the Hon. Sanford E. Church and Rev. Schuyler Seager.—The reception was a creditable affair to the citizens of Albion, and highly gratifying to the brave boys of the 27th, who have by their bravery and heroism, done honor to the country which sent them forth two years since, to do battle for the Government and the National ….

The Elmira Advertiser of last Tuesday says: The gallant 27th marched through our streets yesterday afternoon, escorting Brig. Gen. Bartlett. Their inarching was literally splendid—the best we ever saw.—This is indeed a magnificent regiment, worthy of all the honors it has so nobly won. Its torn and tattered flag was borne aloft on the march, and called forth the enthusiastic admiration of the people. God bless the 27th. After escorting Gen. Bartlett around town it drew up in column in front of the Brainard House, and listaned [sic] to some farewell remarks from their old commander, who was introduced to them in a few brief words by Col. Adams, saying that Major Gen. Slocum spoke to them his farewell on the banks of the Potomac some days since, and now Gen. Bartlett had left his command to come to Elmira to take his sad parting and bid them good-bye. Gen. Bartlett then stepping forward and addressing them, soldiers of the 27th, said he was glad to see the fullness of their ranks, after the dangers, wounds and deaths through which they had passed, for their diminished numbers never came by desertions or shirking of duty. Their record had ever been an honorable one.

Tribute to Company E, 27th Regiment.
The bare announcement that the "Old Bloody 13th" were homeward bound filled all hearts with joy. To them was extended a welcome which must in a measure, have been a recompenss [sic] for the deprivations and sufferings they had endured. Thousands crowded the streets, Mothers were there with tear-dimmed eyes, rejoicing that other hearts were refolding their treasures, yet sorrowing as they thought of their own loved ones, still doing battle for our rights and our liberties. Sisters and wives hoping, yet scarcely daring to hope, that this was but a true prelude to their own brave. Flags proudly waved, bells merrily rang out their sweet toned welcomes. But the bells gave forth no sweet sound over the carnage and waste of many a battle field. No stars and stripes wafted a welcome to the brave little band who came to us with the same, yea and with added laurels, that graced the old 13th. Wearily home they came after two years of hard toil; but no eloquent voice was raised in their behalf, and the boards so lately groaning beneath their weight of luxuries, were bare. The thousands were all at home, and only the faithful few who mistake not partiality for patriotism, were there to bid these brave boys welcome. Shall it not be a lasting stigma on the name and honor of our goodly city, that we have done so little in behalf of this gallant company of braves, who went forth to protect our home circles, and keep the dark and bloody scenes which were so often re-enacted on Virginia soil from our midst? And nobly have they done it. Faithfully have they toiled, yearning for the loved at home, but turning not aside. Some have fallen, gloriously dying 'neath the star-lit folds of freedom. Not ignominiously have they perished, although we seemingly ignore the fact, but the blood of young Stillson, Hosmer and others, has not been vainly spilled. The memory of the departed shall not perish, although no monument of granduer [sic] marks where they rest, and their epitaphs remain yet unwritten. No, no! we will inscribe them on our hearts' holy of holies, believing that we shall at last behold them marshalled [sic] on the tented fields of glory, their life works appreciated by One who seeth not as man seeth.

From Company H, 27th Regiment.
WHITE OAK CHURCH, VA.,
Camp OF THE 27TH N. Y. S. VOLS.,
May 12th, 1863.
FRIEND HARDING—Our Corps Commander, Gen. Sedgwick, tells us that we shall be ordered to report at Elmira; the order will be dated the 14th inst., and we shall start on that day or as soon after as transportation can be had. We shall be detained at Elmira for a few days, then each Company will return to their homes. Company H will return with some forty men. Aside from all this we are now under marching orders, and in the next twenty-four hours we may be engaged with the enemy. The life-time of our enlistment does not expire until the 21st inst. My men are in good spirits, expecting soon to meet their friends at home, which will be a happy day for us all. Respectfully yours,
S. M. SEELEY,
Capt. Co. H, 27th Regt.

Reception of Company "H."
About all that is left of this gallant Company, (less than forty men.) who left our village some two years since, over eighty strong, are, as we go to press, meeting with a grand reception by our citizens. We shall publish, next week an extended report of this fine demonstration, with a list of the officers and men who have returned. The following programme is bring carried out:

Welcome Reception of the returned soldiers of Company H, 27th Regiment, at Mt. Morris, Wednesday, May 2oth, 1863, at 9 o'clock A. M.

COMMITTEE OF RECEPTION.
N. Seymour, H. Ruggles, H. P. Mills, A. Wigg, C. L. Bingham, H. Skillin, H. Bump, Geo. S. Whitney.
SPEAKERS.— Hon. C. H. Carroll, R. P. Wisher, Esq., and others.
MARSHAL OF THE DAY—Col. William A. Mills.
ASSISTANT.—J. A. Brodhead.
CHAPLAIN. —Rev. A. A. Russell.
Band, Fire Department and Citizens assemble at 9 o'clock A. M.
C. B. ADAMS, President of the Day.
Company H returns under command of Capt. S. M. Seeley; E. C. Camp, Lieutenant. Lt. Col. Jos. H. Bodine, who entered the service two years ago a first lieutenant, returned with this company.

SOLDIERS RETURNING TO ELMIRA.—
Yesterday morning about fifty members of Company K, 27th Regiment, in charge of Lieuts. Gaskill and Hodgeman, came down from Albion on their way to Elmira to be mustered out and paid off. From this city they were accompanied by Capt. Gould's company, of the same regiment, leaving on the 11 o'clock train via the Valley Railroad.

The Return of the 27th Regiment.
Yesterday morning four Companies of the 27th Regiment, left Elmira for their homes in Western New York. These Companies are commanded by Capt. Gould, of this city, Capt. Seeley, of Mt. Morris, Lieut. Rock, of Lima, and Capt. White, of Lyons; Lieut. Gaskill's Company left for Albion on the day previous. Capt. White's Company went to Lyon's via the Elmira and Canandaigua Railroad, while the other three companies came to Avon, via the New York & Erie Railway. At Avon there was a crowd of several hundred people. Here, Capt. Seeley's company, accompanied by Lieut. Col. Bodine, left for Mt. Morris. We understand that a very large concourse of people collected upon their arrival at that place, and they were received with appropriate ceremonies. Capt. Gould's company upon its arrival here at 10 o'clock was greeted by a crowd of nearly 1,000 people, many of whom were friends and relatives of the soldiers.
The different companies of the 27th have to visit Elmira some day next week to be paid off and mustered out. Capt. Gould speaks in the highest terms of his company and of the whole regiment. He says that truer or braver men never faced a foe. He thinks the 27th, which returns 600 strong, is one of the finest regiments in the army. They bravely stood their ground amid a shower of iron hail, and were the rallying point at Bull Bun. They served with credit through the peninsula campaign, and have done their whole duty in whatever position they have been placed. They were under Sedgwick at the taking of Fredericksburg, and by their bravery and coolness added new laurels to their well earned reputation. Capt. Gould states that his company never disobeyed an order but once, and that was during this fight. When he ordered his company to fall back to prevent being outflanked by the rebels, they positively reused to do so until they could fire a few more rounds at the foe, and would not fall back until their ammunition was exhausted. At one time while being used as skirmishers, Capt. Gould's company was exposed to a cross fire of artillery and sharp shooters. He was ordered to hold the position. To do so with safety Capt. Gould ordered his men to lie flat on the ground, and place their knapsacks in front of their heads as a breastwork. Many of these were torn and pierced by bullets from the rebel sharp shooters. It was here that young Hosmer was shot and instantly killed. Capt. G. maintained his position and brought his men off with comparatively little loss.
Capt. Gould deserves more than a passing notice for his connection with the gallant deeds of the 27th. He was formerly a law student in the office of Husbands & Farrar, and is a graduate of the Rochester University. He entered the service in Capt. Wanzer's company as 2d Lieutenant, and has won his way by hard fighting and actual merit to a captaincy. He is modest, brave, unassuming, and of great personal merit, beloved by his men and respected by his superior officers. When other officers deserted their companies at the first battle of Bull Run, he rallied his men, and by his example inspired them with courage. His record is a proud one, and he returns to his home respected and esteemed by his fellow citizens, who are not slow to appreciate valor and heroism. The 27th has furnished one Major and one Brigadier-General since it took the field, and its history is an honorable one in every respect.

MR. WALTON A. GARDNER.—The following mark of respect to the memory of a well-known typo, who was killed at the late Fredericksburg battle, has been handed us for publication:
At a regular meeting of the Rochester Typographical Union No. 15, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, Another of our members has been taken from us while nobly battling for our beloved country and its free institutions, therefore
Resolved, That in the death of Mr. Walton A. Gardner this Union has suffered the loss of one whose fidelity and upright deportment had secured for him the esteem and confidence in which he was held,
Resolved, That while we bow in submission to the decree which has removed our former associate from among us, we are consoled by the thought that his death was made glorious by the sacred cause for which he willingly risked his life.
Resolved, That we recognize in Mr. Gardner many traits of character deserving of notice, and that in several ways his example may be profitably followed.
Resolved, That the knowledge of our own loss enables us to more fully comprehend the affliction which his decease entails upon the widow and orphan left to mourn his untimely death, and that although we cannot assuage their grief we may at least assure them of our heartfelt sympathy.
Resolved, That these resolutions be published in the city papers, and a copy of them forwarded to the family of deceased.

Home and County Matters.
CLYDE, Wayne Co., May 30, 1863.
The First Volunteers.
Co. B of the 27th Regiment N. Y. S. Volunteers was the first body of men which enlisted for the war. They have nobly done their duty, and have now been mustered out of service, after receiving an ovation at Lyons, at which place they were enlisted.
As anything which contributes to the honor of any one place in the County is honorable to the whole county, we gladly give place to the following Roll of honor of this company; for which we are indebted to the courtesy of the Lyons Republican.
Alexander D. Adams, promoted from Captain to Lt. Colonel Sept. 1, 1861, and to Colonel Oct. 14, 1862.
Henry R. White, promoted from 1st Lieutenant to Captain, Sept. 1st 1862. Severely wounded at Gains Mills June 27th, 1862.
William H. Swan, promoted from 2d Lt. to 1st Lt. Sept. 1st, 1862, and to Capt. Co. H., July 24, 1862. Resigned March 17, 1863.
William C. Balden, promoted from 2d Sergt. to 1st Lt., July 24, 1862. Resigned Jan. 4, 1863. Lost left arm at Cramp ton's Pass, Sept. 14, 1862.
Crosby Hopkins, promoted from 2d Sergt. to 2d Lt. Aug. 20, 1862, and to 1st Lt. Jan. 4th, 1863.
Charles L. Gaul, promoted from Scrgt. Major, to 2d Lt. Sept. 1st, 1861. Died of disease, Aug. 20th, 1862.
Charles Sherman, promoted from 1st Sergt. to 2d Lt. Jan. 4, 1863.
George M. Belden, private to Sept. 1st 1861, Corpl. To Dec. 1st, 1861, a Sergt. to date.
William Shattuck, private to Sept. 1st 1861, Corpl. to Sept. 1st 1861, a Sergt, to date.
John C. Hopper, private to Dec. 1st 1861, Corpl. to Sept. 1st, 1862, a Sergt, to date. Wounded May 3, 1863.
James C. Bourne, private to Sept. 1st, 1861, returned to the ranks, then a Sergt. since Jan. 4, 1863.
William Rooler, Corpl. to Jan. 4, 1863. 5th Sergt. to date.
John D. McVicar, Corporal from enrollment. Wounded in the hand June 27th, 1862.
Almeron Crannell, private from enrollment to Aug. 4, 1862, corporal to date.
John Fosmire, private from enrollment to Aug. 1, 1862, corporal to this date.
James Ellison, private from enrollment, to Sept. 1st 1862, corporal to this date.
Joseph C. Sampson, private from enrollment to Sept. 1st 1862, corporal to this date.
Franklin Hecox, private from enrollment to Sept. 1st, 1862, corporal to this date.
George Rooker, private from enrollment to Sept. 1st, 1862, corporal to this date.
William H. McIntyre, private from enrollment to Jan. 4, 1863, corporal to this date.
Allen, Willard T., Priv.
Althen, Charles, Priv.
Braden, Joseph A., Priv.
Brott, William, Priv.
Brown, Henry V., Priv. Severely wounded at battle of Fredericksburg, May 3d, 1863.
Bulyea, Francis, Priv.
[All the above entered the service May 2d, 1861. The date following the names below indicates the time of enlistment.]
Buell, Dexter, Priv. July 5, 1861.
Cassidy, Andrew, Priv. May 2, 1861. Wounded June 27, 1862.
Czerney, Godfred, Priv. July 3, 1861.
Disbrow, Robert H., Priv. May 2, 1861. Missing since the night of May 4th, 1863.
Durkee, Robert M., Priv. May 2, 1861.
Durkee, James, Priv. Nov. 23, 1861.
Dwinnell, Roderick, Priv. May 2, 1861.
Dwinnell, Myron H., Priv.   "   "      "
Dunn, Gibson, Priv.             "   "      " Wounded and taken prisoner June 27, 1862.
Eames, John C., Priv. May 2, 1861.
Ehert, Michael, Priv. Nov. 28, 1861.
Foster, George, Priv.   "      "       "
Hill, Sylvester C., Priv. May 2, 1861. Wounded at Crampton's Pass, Sept. 14, 1862.
Hillard, Thomas, Priv. May 2, 1861.
Jenree, Charles K., Priv. July 5, 1861.
Knoblock, John, Priv. May 2, 1861, Wounded at Gaines Mills, June 27, 1862.
Klumpp, George, Priv. Nov 27 1861        "       "       “     Mills, June 27,1862.
Lenner, George, Priv. May 2, 1861.
Lawrence, Raymond D., Pri'v. May 2, 1861.
Murphy, Cornelius, Priv.             "   "     "
Murphy, Patrick, Priv. July 5, 1861.
McCumber, Edwin, Priv. Nov. 25, 1861.
Mahanny, James, Priv. July 5, 1861. Severely wounded at Gaines' Mills, June 27, 1862.
Odell, Charles, Priv. May 2, 1861.
Puffen, Charles A., Priv. July 5, 1861,
Pudney, Richard D., Priv. May 2, 1861.
Roehrig, William, Priv.        "   "     "
Rooker, Henry, Priv.            "   "     "
Smith, William, Priv.           "   "     " Severely wounded at Gaines' Mills, June 27, 1862.
Smith, John T., Priv. July 5, 1861.
Snitzel, John H., Priv. Nov. 28, '61.
Snedaker, James W., private, May 2, 1861, wounded at battle of Gaines' Mill, severely, June27, '62.
Tindall, Geo. W., private, May 2, '61.
Tipling, Tho's H.,     "             "
Thomas, William     " Nov. 27, '61 wounded at battle of Gaines' Mills, June 27, 1862.
Walrath, George, priv. May 2, '61, missing since night of May 4, '63.
Westfall, David, priv.          "
Williams, George, Priv. May 2, 1861.
Westfall, Martin V., Priv. Nov. 2, 1861.
Whitney, Myron H., Priv.     "   "     "
Zimmerman, Augustus, Priv."   "    "
TRANSFERRED.
1st Sergt. Robert E. Holmes, May 2, 1861, 2d Sergeant from enlistment to Dec. 4, 1861, 1st Sergt. to Aug. 5, '62
then promoted to 2d Lt. in the 108th N. Y. V., killed at the battle of Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862.
Priv. Clarke C. Ellis, May 2, 1861, promoted to Sergt. Major of the regt., Aug. 30, 1862.
DIED.
Charles Dunn, Priv. May 2, '61, died of disease Dec. 2, 1861.
Joseph Mills, Priv.      "   "     "       "    "      "           "
Alfred Keesler, Priv.   "  "     "        "    "      "           "
George Morey, Priv. Nov. 27, '61  "    "      "
Joseph Seavey, Corp. May 2, '61   "    "      "           "
William McElwain, Priv. July 5, '61. Died of wound received in battle at Ganies' Mills, July 2, 1862.
Louis C. Strickland, Priv. May 2, '61. Died of wound received in battle at Ganies' Mills, July 2, 1862.
Rowland B. Andrews, Priv. May 2, '61. Died of wound received in battle at Gaines' Mills, July 2, 1862.
Chester Brink, Priv. July 5, '61. Died of disease in Richmond, July 21, 1862.
Edward Allee, Priv. May 2, '61. Dies of wounds received in battle at Gaines' Mills, July 27, 1862.
Charles L. Gaul, 2d Lt., May 2d '61. Died of disease, Aug 20, 1862.
Frederick Lapes, Priv. Nov 27, 1861.   "     "      "       Oct 13, 1862.
Edward Hinnigan, Priv. Nov 20, '61     "     "      "       Nov. 20, 1862.
DISCHARGED.
Priv. Edward P Foster, May 2, '61. Discharged for disability August 10, 1861
" Thomas S Betts May 2, '61              do                     do       Aug 11, '61
" Eben L Hill,          "                          do                     do              do
" Hiram C Layton    "                         do                      do      Aug 26, '61
" John H Cosart July 5, '61. A minor. Aug 26, '62
" Jonathan G Wiley May 2, '61. Discharged for disability Oct. 21, 1862.
" William Swelling      "                    do                  do        Dec 17, '61
" Ambrose Leonard     "                    do                   do       Ap'r 5, '62
" David Jones, July 5, '61.                do                   do       Apr 14, '62
" William Vosburgh, May 2 '61       do                   do           " 29, '62
" Theodore Klumpp, July 5 '61        do                   do        June 19, '62
" Seneca Williams,      "   "   "          do                   do        July 12, '62
" Abram M VanAmburg May 2 '61 do                               Aug 3, '62
" James Vaughn, May 2, '61            do                    do       Sept 13, '62
Wounded in battle June 27, 1862
" Jacob Rhodenback, May 2, '61     do                    do        Oct 25, '62
Wounded in battle June 27, 1862
" Edwin Leach, May 2d '61             do                    do        Nov 21, '62
" Otto Miller, May 2, '61                 do                    do        Dec 29, '62
" Royal Bullock Nov 29 '62            do                    do          "      "  '62
" George H Smith July 5 '61           do                    do         Jan 7, '63
" Thomas King Nov 25 '61             do                    do         Dec 31, '63
Wounded in battle June 27 1862
" John E Gary May 2 '61                do                    do          Feb 18, '53
DROPPED FROM ROLLS IN ACCORDANCE WITH GEN'L ORDERS, Oct. 1832
Priv. Louis Adams, May 2, 1861
" Samuel Thorn,         "   "      "
" Abram Lake, Nov 26, 1861
" Jacob Metzker, "    "      "   Wounded and missing since June 27, 1862, supposed to have been killed.
" Spencer C Weaver, May 2, 1861

DESERTERS.
Priv. John Fingleton, May 2, '61. Deserted Aug. 30, '62.
" Geo. C. Graves Nov 28, '61.            "          "         "
" Henry Potter,       "   29,   “              "           "    27   "
" Lafayette Sherman, May 2 '61         "        Dec. 12  "
" Andrew Phillips, July 5, '61             "        July 26 '61
" Chauncy Blynn,     "   "    "              "        Aug. 13 "
" David Richardson, "   "    "              "           "     "  "
" Adolph Martens, May 2,  "              "        July 22, "
" Samuel Fossett July 5. "  "               "            "    "
1st Sergt. M. W. Goodrich, promoted to Adjutant Dec. 1st 1861; dismissed the service for cowardice, Aug. 30, 1862.
RECAPITULATION.
Killed and died of wounds rec'd in battle, …………5
Died of disease, ....................................................... 8
Discharged for disability, …………………………20
Transferred, promoted and resigned,…………….... 6
Dropped from the rolls, as per Gen. Orders. ………5
Deserted.................................................................. 10
Missing (Disbrow and Walrath, since returned). ….2
Total loss.................................................................56
Officers present ……………………………..3
Enlisted men present ………………………58
…………………………………………………….61
Aggregate members of Co. B from organization, 117
General Engagements Co. B, has been in.
Bull Run, July 21, 1861
West Point, May 7, 1862
Gaines' Hill, June 27, 1862
Crampton's Pass, Sept 14, 1862
Fredericksburg, May 3 and 4, 1863
And under fire of the enemy at Goldn's farm, June 28, 1862
Charles City Cross Roads, June 29, 1862
Antietam, Sept 17, 1862
Frederickburg, Dec 11, 1862

To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:
WAR MEETING AT ELPIS.—A large war meeting was held at the church in Elpis, on Friday evening, Nov. 1st. Hon. Giles W. Lane, of Cleveland, was called to the chair, and in some remarks introduced the speakers of the evening. The speakers were Rev. Mr. Sawyer, who has spent some time in the South, Capt. Steele, late Principal of the Mexico Academy, now Captain of Company K, second Oswego Regiment, and Lieut. Hale, brother of the Captain who was a participant in the battle of Stone Bridge, in the 27th Regiment, (Col. Slocum,) at which he received a dangerous bayonet wound in the abdomen, from which he has not fully recovered yet. Rev. Mr. Sawyer gave an interesting account of his sights and what he heard in the South, and closed with an urgent appeal to fill up the second Oswego Regiment, Col.  Rose.
Capt. Steele gave an account of the present state of the Oswego Regiment. It now has about 700 men. Company K, of which he is Captain, has about fifty—enlistments now coming in at the rate of seventy a week. Capt. Steele has been a popular teacher in Mexico for three years. As a speaker he is above the ordinary of his military fellows; as a soldier he has his reputation yet to make. The prayers and good wishes of many of the young people of Oswego county will go with him.

We were favored yesterday with a visit from our old friend Capt. A. M. Tyler. The Captain left Binghamton two years ago a private in the 27th Regiment, whose prospect of enduring the trials and hardships of camp life were very slim, but by perseverence [sic] exertion, and strict adherence to the path of duty, he has won distinction and an enviable position on Maj. Gen. Brook's staff.

LOCAL ITEMS.
To the Ladies of Mount Morris.
Some two years since Company H, of 27th regiment, N. Y. S. V., previous to its departure for the seat of war was presented by the Ladies of Mt.  Morris, with a beautiful banner—our country's flag—with their best wishes and hopes for our prosperity and success in the cause in which we had engaged. That flag was received, and every man at the time made the silent vow that it sho'd never be dishonored. Under its folds we have attempted to do our whole duty to sustain the Government, the Constitution and the Laws. How well we have succeeded, how far we have realized the high hopes and anticipations of the fair donors, we know not; let the history of the many battle fields we have passed through answer. Our Company, diminished in numbers, now return this banner to you, with the hope that the flag which it represents, will shortly wave over a free and a united country.
S. M. SKELEY, Captain.
E. C. CAMP, 1st Lieut.
H. R. CLARK, 2d "

MAJ.-GEN. SLOCUM.—Among the many Generals who hare figured conspicuously in this war, but few have shown the modesty and true soldier- like ability of H. W. Slocum, Major-General of the 12th Army Corps. The records of the army show him on all occasions prompt, efficient—always at his post discharging the duties assigned him to the satisfaction of his superior in command. We see that soon after the army had retreated to Flamouth [sic] he displayed the elements of the true soldier in words of cheer to his men. He assembled his officers around him, and in the kindest terms thanked them from his heart for their valor and determined courage [sic] and regretting that his voice would not enable him to be heard by all the troops, requested them to convey his expressions of pride and satisfaction to the rank and file. He alluded to the hastily written correspondence published from the army, in which it often happens that a corps does not receive its full meed of praise for its actions, and in which one body is sometimes complimented for heroic deeds which were entirely performed by another, telling them that time would develope the whole truth regarding their participation in the recent actions. After his remarks, which were quite lengthy, deafening cheers were given with a hearty will for both him and General Williams.

New YORK VOLUNTEERS.—Brigadier General Slocum, of Syracuse, is fast recovering from his wounds. He has not yet been relieved from command of his regiment, (27th N. Y.,) and although unable to go about without crutches, has taken charge of his men, with whom he is extremely popular.
The term of service of Capt. Martin's old Co., 27th Regiment, will expire in a few days, and they will return home. The people of that village should give them a fitting reception, and we doubt not they will.

CORPORAL W. H. MERRELL ALIVE.—The many friends and acquaintances of Corporal MERRELL, in this city, will be glad to learn, from the following letter to his wife in Rochester, that he is not dead, as was reported, but alive, though severely wounded, and treated well in the hospital at Richmond. The letter is dated:
RICHMOND, July 30, 1861.
I fear you are in trouble on my account, not having heard from me snice [sic] I left Fairfax. * * God has been good to me in sparing my life, * * I received a wound from a musket ball in the left breast, just above the heart, the ball lodging in my left side. It was a very narrow escape from instant death, but our Heavenly Father willed it otherwise. I was taken prisoner with hundreds of others, and brought to Richmond, where my wound was dressed, and where I have received nothing but kindness, the best of care and good treatment. God bless the doctors, and Sisters of Mercy, and all the kind hearted people of Virginia. I could not have been treated better among my own friends than I have been here. I am recovering rapidly and will be about in a week or two. I expect we will be exchanged in due time.
It is very hard to get word to friends at the North, but I will write as often as I can find a way to send a letter to you. I am in the military hospital here. There are some hundreds of others, some very badly wounded, and who can not live.
I must close, as I need rest. My heart is light, because I know that God doeth all things well, and that he will care for us. I commend you and my dear child to Him, knowing that you are safe in His kind hands. Be of good cheer!
W. H. MERREL.

The Syracuse Journal learns that Lieutenant Colonel Joseph J. Chambers, of the 27th Regiment, (Col. Slocum) will not be retained. It is said that he is incompetent, a coward, and has no qualifications for the position. It is alleged that instead of receiving four wounds, as reported, he was not at all injured, as is perhaps apparent from his readiness to take the command so soon.

ANOTHER UTICA COLONEL.--J. J. BARTLETT formerly of Utica, and a brother of Rev. Wm. ALVIN BARTLETT, of Brooklyn, was in the battle of Bull's Run as Major of the New York 27th—Col. SLOCUM'S regiment. Col. SLOCUM was wounded in the engagement, Lieut. Colonel Jos CHAMBERS deserted, resigned, or otherwise absented himself, and Major BARTLETT has been in command of the Regiment ever since the battle. He has now been made Colonel—his competency having been thoroughly tested Colonel SLOCUM has been made Brigadier General, and has his former regiment in his Brigade. The 27th were among the severest sufferers at Bull's. Run, and proved their courage to the satisfaction of their Brigade and Division commanders both of whom gave them the most honorable mention in their reports.

LETTER FROM CAPT. ROGERS.—Capt. ROGERS, of Sauquoit, of Co. D, Col. SLOCUM'S Regiment, writes to his parents a letter, from which we make the following extracts:
CAMP ANDERSON, WASHINGTON,
July 26, 1861.
I am here again, safe and sound, after passing through the most terrific battle ever fought on American soil. You have doubtless seen by the papers that I was slightly wounded; I am now recovered and feeling well. I was struck in the left shoulder by a glancing grape-shot, which brought me to the ground without much ceremony. It only proved a bad bruise, and I led my men on to another charge, though the boys said the Captain is shot, and it is currently reported here that I was killed. Our member of Congress was much surprised [sic] to see me back alive. Our Regiment (Col. Slocum's 27th) was the first to charge the enemy's battery, and suffered terribly. My second lieutenant, Asa Park, was killed instantly by my side, a ball passing through his heart. He only said, looking at the wound, "What a large hole!" and expired. You can form no idea from newspapers or history of a battle—the shot, shell, grape, canister and balls fell thick and fast about us, and the only wonder is that any of us ever escaped.
To give a little idea of the comforts of war, I will tell my experience for three days. The second day after we left here we found ourselves bivouacked near Centerville. We were called up at twelve o'clock Saturday night, and ordered to march with nothing but dry crackers (sea biscuit) and some meat in our haversacks. We did not halt until we arrived at the battle field at Bull's Run, about eleven A. M. Sunday. We were then ordered on at double-quick, and were soon under fire. We repulsed the rebels and drove them behind their batteries, and after an hour's hard fighting were obliged to retire to the woods. Mind you, we had had no breakfast. After waiting a very short time we went in again, and kept it up till 4 1/2 o'clock P. M., when our whole army began the retreat, and marched thence back to Washington, without food or rest, and nothing but muddy water. We arrived here at ten o'clock A. M. Monday, in one of the most drenching storms I was ever exposed to. Was not that some duty for green boys? I got the breakfast which I should have had the day before. Since then I have been resting and caring for the wounded.

DEATH OF A SON OF COL. HOSMER.—Our correspondent "Marker" yesterday gave us intelligence of the death of Charles A. Hosmer, of the 27th New York Volunteers, son of Col. Hosmer, the poet. The young man was killed in the late battle near Fredericksburg. The sad tidings carry sorrow not only to the parents of deceasd [sic] but to many citizens of Avon who knew him.

Co. B., in the Late Battle.
The 27th Regiment was engaged in the recent battle of Fredericksburg. We have no particulars except that the men behaved bravely, and that Sergeant John C. Hooper, of Huron was wounded, and that Henry W. Brown of Lyons had his hip fractured.

A UTICAN AMONG THE KILLED!—W. HOWARD MERRELL, son of the late BILDAD MERRELL, (and nephew of B. S. MERRELL, in whose bookbindery he was for a time employed,) was one of those who fell at Bull's Run. He had of late years resided at Rochester, and was a Corporal in a company from that city (Co. E) in Col. SLOCUM'S regiment. He fell doing battle nobly, and was left dying on the field. He probably died there, though it is barely possible he may have survived and fallen a prisoner into the hands of the Rebels.
Of his character while a resident of Rochester, and of the motive which carried him into the battle field, the Rochester Express says:
We believe there were few fitter to die than he, and that none have been actuated by a purer devotion to the holy cause in which he was engaged.
It is scarcely three weeks since we pressed his hand at parting, and his beaming countenance and confident hope seemed to augur anything but misfortune. We knew that he would fight with bravery, and we looked for his promotion and his ultimate return in safety. In view of this prospect he said but little. "Duty, duty," said he; "I go because I am sent to discharge a duty." The first duty in which he engaged was the organization of a prayer meeting in the company, and these meetings, at first thinly attended, were conducted with regularity, and when the writer visited Elmira he found himself one evening, unexpectedly, introduced to a small room in which were congregated almost the entire company, a majority of whom were upon their knees, listening to the sweet and touching voice of Howard Merrell, invoking the Divine mercy and blessing upon those assembled. This was the first duty which he went to perform, and assisted by several who shared his religious convictions, these meetings were continued, and not only the company, but the regiment, enjoyed their privileges. That they exerted a decided and salutary influence, there are many evidences and that to the fidelity of Mr. Merrell may be attributed in no small degree their success, is equally beyond question.
Mr. Merrell leaves a wife and one child in Rochester.

JULY 31, 1861
A Volunteer Tells His Story.
A volunteer in Colonel SLOCUM'S Regiment, which was in the thickest of the fight at Bull's Run, in a letter to a friend—Mr. N. S. PLATT, of this city—thus relates his experience in the battle and during the retreat. The letter is communicated to us for publication, and contains several passages of much interest:
WASHINGTON, D. C., Friday, July 29.
DEAR FRIEND PLATT: I think the papers have greatly misrepresented the battle, though the facts are coming out. I'll tell you a little of our experience, (the 27th Regiment, of Hunter's Brigade, and McDowell's Division.) We left Washington one week ago last Tuesday at 3 P. M., having had but one hour's notice, with several other regiments, for Virginia, with sealed orders. It was a fine moonlight evening. We marched till 11 P. M.; halted and lay down for the night within eight miles of Fairfax Court House, slept well, and in the morning marched into Fairfax Court House, expecting a battle there, but the rebels—about 5,000 in number—had fled to Manassas about one hour in advance of us. Fairfax was a deserted, rickety, old town, but our 15,000 filled it to overflowing. We enjoyed twenty-four hours there exceedingly well. The property that was left behind was appropriated by the soldiers, excepting that of Union men—which was carefully guarded; as an instance, bullocks, calves, turkies, geese, chickens in great numbers—and in two regiments no less than seventy-five pigs—were killed, brought into camp, and roasted before our camp fires. Seven miles southwest from Fairfax our division halted two days and a half. At two o'clock Sunday morning we marched silently, except the rumble, of heavy artillery, towards Manassas Junction; when within two miles of Bull's Run, we turned to the right, taking a narrow track about six miles through thick woods, coming out on the opposite side of Bull's Run. The sun was now shining hot upon us as we marched rapidly forward over a dusty road towards the enemy's trenches. We here expected to meet Gen. Tyler's and Gen. Patterson's Divisions from east and west, to surround and take the enemy's stronghold. We saw nothing of these two divisions, though Tyler was said to be there. We have since been told that on the great plan of General Scott, battle was not to fought till the next day. General Scott was not there, but the fool-hardy McDowell, no doubt confident of success or eager for glory, after a tiresome march rushed his men on double quick time, nearly one mile, one regiment at a time, before the rebels' batteries—like a target. The men went at it bravely as they entered the field. They threw off their blankets, haversacks (with two days' rations) and all that cumbered them, without stopping, and cheered lustily, but when they made their stand, all were too exhausted to fight long, but the men rallied, some regiments four or five times, silenced two batteries and drove the rebels to the woods. But the masked batteries were too thick, and did terrible work in our ranks. At eleven o'clock in the forenoon, the battle was raging hottest, and continued terribly for over four hours. Our cavalry made few charges—a good opportunity did not present itself. The artillery became short of ammunition, and large number of the men cut off, and in the confusion several pieces were lost. But it became evident the odds were too great, (the rebels having at least 50,000 or twice that number,) and our men too exhausted. At last, after fighting bravely, and having seen too much, panic stricken and confused, men retreated, bringing colors with them. Though sickened at sight, and in great confusion, men gathered around their wounded brought away what they could; there were but eight or ten ambulances to be seen; nearly all the wounded who could not help themselves, and all dead were left behind. Most of the wounded had been brought away to an old church about half a mile from the field; most of their wounds were dressed during the fight, but poor fellows left, the last who came from field, among whom was Surgeon Barnes, of regiment, say that the wretches, as they followed our retreat, came cursing yelling, and killed wounded with their bayonets, giving no heed to their cries spare them. One of the Zouaves told me that when in the field he stopped and gave one of their wounded drink from his canteen. The contrast speaks for itself.
The sights that field presented I can't describe— though too plain before my eyes. I hope I may be spared from ever seeing like again, —dead men, horses, and munitions of war scattered over a great field, under a hot sun, surrounded by smoke dust. We met with another great mistake of Gen. McD.—no troops reserved cover a retreat, doubt many were cut off by rebel cavalry, who had followed behind our exhausted troops. The retreat made in a rapid walk, and it was a wonderful but pitiful sight to see 10,000 men covered with dust and blackened with powder, filling up the road, all pressing forward as fast as possible, weary and hungry, with forty miles before them, to be marched before they could lie down for the night with safety. All seemed to think that nothing was secure but Washington. On we came—the strongest reaching Fort Corcoran by 9 o'clock Monday forenoon, having marched sixty miles and fought five hours, within thirty hours. At noon, our regiment had mostly come up, and sore-footed and weak, we marched to Camp Anderson, Franklin Square, Washington, D. C., in a drenching rain, where we still remain recruiting. On that march I thought of Mr. Seward's kind advice, i.e., "Trust in God, and keep our shoes easy."
Our Colonel, (Henry Slocum,) was wounded at Bull's Run; he is here now and recovering; we may not see service again in several weeks.
Gen. McDowell is superceded. Gen. McClellan commands. McD. is to be court martialed; our boys call him a traitor.
Truly yours, C. C. E.

Give them a Reception.
The term of enlistment of the 27th and 28th Reg'ts of volunteers from this State, will expire within a few days. Many of the brave and gallant men belonging to these regiments are our neighbors and friends.—They went forth two years ago, at their country's call, and at war's first alarm, to vindicate their country's honor and to uphold her flag. They have borne themselves nobly on many a hard fought field, and have sealed their devotion to country with the best blood of their race. Not a few of those who went forth fresh with health and strong in the vigor of manhood, now sleep in honored graves beneath ground hallowed by heroic deeds and glorious memories. Their achievements are a part of the history of their country—a record that will go down to immortality. All honor to the dead—and thrice welcome to the living!
It has been suggested that a public reception should be prepared and a spontaneous welcome offered the returned soldiers.—This we think both fitting and deserved, and would suggest that a public meeting of our citizens be called at an early day, for the purpose of appointing a committee to make the necessary arrangements for the reception and welcome of the scarred heroes who have so nobly performed their duty. Let some of our prominent citizens move in the matter without delay.
P. S. Since the above was put in type we have been authorized to say that a meeting for the purpose suggested, will be held at the Court House on Saturday evening next. Let there be a full attendance of citizens of the village and country.

From the 27th.
A private letter from Lieut. Gaskill written on Tuesday after the re-crossing of Sedgwick's corps says that "Co. K is all safe and sound" although they were the last to cross the river and came near all being captured on the night previous, the rebels pursuing them closely and yelling like demons. The 27th lost about thirty men in the storming of the heights of Fredericksburg.

Local and Miscellaneous. Meeting of the Reception Committee.
At a meeting of the Committee appointed by the Village Board to arrange for the reception of the returning members of Co. B, 27th Regiment N. Y. V., held on Saturday evening, May 9, Gen. Wm. H. Adams Chairman of said Committee, presiding, Wm. T. Tinsley was chosen Secretary of said meeting.
On motion, a committee of two persons was appointed to proceed to Elmira at the time of the arrival of the Regiment at that place, to inform Co. B., of the reception awaiting them at Lyons. The Chairman appointed as such committee Wm. T. Tinsley and Wm. Van Camp.
A Business Committee was appointed to provide for the entertainment of the Company on their arrival: Messrs. Beldon, Hunt and Layton.
A Committee on Transportation, to arrange with teamsters for the conveyance of the Company from Geneva to Lyons: Messrs. Sherman and McElwain.
A Committee on Invitations was selected: Messrs. Adams, Gavitt and Richmond.
On motion Resolved, That Rev. C. H. Platt, late Chaplain of the 28th Regiment be invited to deliver the Reception Address.
On motion Resolved, That H. G. Dickerson be invited to act as Marshal—and that D. L. Norton and Wm. B. Rudd be invited to act as Assistants.
On motion adjourned to Monday evening, May 11, at 7 o'clock.
WM. H. ADAMS, Chairman.
W. T. TINSLEY, Secretary.

Adjourned Meeting.
An adjourned meeting of the Committee, held on Monday evening, May 11, Gen. W. H. Adams in the Chair, the following proceedings were had:
Gen. Adams, from the Committee on Invitations, reported that owing to other engagements, Rev. Mr. Platt was unable to accept the invitation of the Committee to deliver the address of welcome on the occasion of company B.'s return.
On motion, Resolved, That Rev. Mr. Montgomery be requested to deliver said address.
A communication was received from the Young American Zouave Company, of Lyons, requesting that their company form a part of the procession on the occasion of the return of Co. B.; whereupon it was Resolved, That the Committee avail themselves of the offer of the Zouave Company, and invite said company to join the procession.
The Committee were informed that the Marshal and Assistant Marshals appointed by the Committee had consented to serve as such.
The Business Committee reported that they had engaged the Fair Building, in which to have the tables set; and they recommended that an agreement be made with Messrs. G. W. Williams and L. Breithecker to furnish and serve the collation; whereupon it was Resolved, That the Business Committee be empowered to adopt such action in the matter as they may think proper.
On motion, Resolved, That the Committee on Invitations be requested to invite as participants in the reception of Co. B., all former members of said Co. who have been honorably discharged; also all other officers and soldiers residing within the town, on furlough or honorably discharged, also the wives and mothers of officers and men in said Co. B.
On motion, Resolved, That Mr. McElwain have charge of the cannon-firing.
On motion, Resolved, That a committee of three, consisting of Messrs. Adams, Van Camp and Tinsley, be appointed to make up and have printed a programme, or order of of exercises.
On motion, adjourned to Saturday evening, May 16th.
W. H. ADAMS, Ch'-n.
W. T. TINSLEY, Sec'y.

A DESERVED PROMOTION.—In our telegraphic report yesterday afternoon was an announcement that the President had given to Col. JOSEPH J. BARTLETT a Brigadier General's Commission "for meritorious ser vices in the field." The promotion is deserved. Gen. BARTLETT was a resident of Utica several years ago, while engaged in the study of law. He was previously connected with a daily newspaper in St. Louis, and, after he came to Utica, was an occasional contributor to the columns of the DAILY OBSERVER. He went to the war as Lieut. Colonel of Col. SLOCUM'S Twenty-Seventh Regiment. A year ago, SLOCUM was made a Brigadier, and BARTLETT Colonel of the Regiment. During the Maryland campaign, BARTLETT has been acting General of a Brigade in Gen. SLOCUM'S Division. Gen. BABTLETT'S many friends in Oneida county have watched his course with satisfaction, and are pleased with the news of his advancement.

DEATH OF CHARLES A. HOSMER.—The fall of young Hosmer at the recent battle in Virginia, has already been announced. Capt. Gould addressed a letter to the mother of deceased, announcing to her in befitting terms the sad event, of which the following is a copy. Col. Hosmer has sent us some lines giving expression to a father's feelings on hearing of the death of a darling boy, given as a sacrifice to his country's cause, which will be found elsewhere. In these touching events that we are daily called upon to record, the horrors of war are brought home with a painful reality:
CAMP OF 27TH N. Y., NEAR
FALMOUTH, Va., May 5, 1863.
Mrs. W. H. C. Hosmer:
Dear Madam: It becomes my painful duty to inform you of the death of your son, Charles A. Hosmer, of my company. He was shot by a rebel sharpshooter on the 3d inst., and died instantly. This sad casualty has thrown the deepest gloom over the company. Charles was a favorite with the whole company, and was dearly beloved throughout the regiment. We all feel that we have lost a dear brother. As a soldier Charles was ever most prompt, and in times of danger he seemed to know no fear. Well and nobly has he battled for his country, and it is a noble offering to the country when such as he are sacrificed upon her altar.
No words of mine can lessen the sorrow which this sad bereavement will cause you. I can but direct you to God, who is the only true consoler, etc.
E. P. GOULD,
Captain Co. E 27th Regiment N. Y. V.

The Twenty-Seventh.
Our former correspondents in the Twenty-Seventh Regiment are chary of their favors. Not one of them has written us concerning the part the Regiment took in the recent battle. We learn, however, from other sources, that the Twenty-Seventh was not found lacking in courage or determination; that it was in the thickest of the fight (under Sedgwick;) and that although it received no special mention at the hands of the puffers for the New York papers, no Regiment can show a cleaner record than the Twenty-Seventh.
The casualties in this Regiment were comparatively few. In Company B, there were four men wounded: Sergeant John C. Hooper, (slight,) Henry W. Brown, B. Disbrow, (slight,) and G. Walrath, (slight.) Brown's injuries are said by a correspondent of the Rochester Union to be slight; but other reports say that his injury is a fracture of the hip, caused by a musket-ball, and that his leg has been amputated. One or two others are reported missing, but as they may yet be heard from we refrain from giving their names at present.

THE LYONS REPUBLICAN.
Reception of Company B.
We publish to-day the proceedings at two meetings of the Reception Committee appointed by the Village Board. We can assure our readers that the Committee will spare no pains to render the occasion an interesting one. Its success will, however, depend in a very great measure upon a general participation therein by our citizens, who we trust, will join in a united and hearty observance of one of the days which will be most memorable in the history of Lyons. Let our welcome of those war-worn veterans, the pride of our village and of our county, be commensurate with their bravery their endurance, and their services.  It is probable that Company B will be sent from Elmira to Lyons by railroad, via Rochester, but possible that they will come from Elmira to Watkins by railroad, thence down the Lake to Geneva, and from Geneva to Lyons in wagons.

List of Wounded.
Surgeon Sheldon forwards us a list if wounded men from this county, who are at hospitals in Washington, viz:
COMPANY B, 27TH REG'T.--Sergt. John C. Hoooper; severe flesh wound in neck. Henry W. Brown; comminuted fracture of the thigh; recovery doubtful.
COMPANY I, 17TH REG'T.--Alfred Bailey; slight flesh wound in leg. Geo. Bullock; ball through great toe.
COMPANY B, 33D REG'T.--Sergt. S. Mc Call; ball entered mouth and  came out of side of neck. Corp. E. E. Lewis; slight shell wound in leg. Corp. J. Clemons; slight wound in leg. Corp. Wash. Everett; flesh wound in leg. Corp. Benj. Mepham; struck by cannon ball--sprain of back, being hit on knapsack. John Jarvis; ditto of arm; Chas. Truax; ditto of thigh. Thos.  Hibbard; ditto of leg.
Surgeon Sheldon says that most of these men will be able to go home at the expiration of their term of service.

Reception of Company B, Twenty-Seventh Regiment.
Meeting of the Reception Committee.
At a meeting of the Committee appointed by the Village Board to arrange for the reception of the returning members of Co. B. 27th Regiment N. Y. V., held on Saturday evening, May 9, Gen. Wm. H. Adams, Chairman of said Committee, presiding, Wm. T. Tinsley was chosen Secretary of said meeting.
On motion, a committee of two persons was appointed to proceed to Elmira at the time of the arrival of the Regiment at that place, to inform Co. B., of the reception awaiting them at Lyons. The Chairman appointed as such committee Wm. T. Tinsley and Wm. Van Camp.
A Business Committee was appointed to provide for the entertainment of the Company on their arrival: Messrs. Beldon, Hunt and Layton.
A Committee on Transportation, to arrange with teamsters for the conveyance of the Company from Geneva to Lyons: Messrs. Sherman and McElwain.
A Committee on Invitations was selected: Messrs. Adams, Gavitt and Richmond.
On motion Resolved, That Rev. C. H. Platt, late Chaplain of the the 28th Regiment be invited to deliver the Reception Address.
On motion Resolved, That H. G. Dickerson be invited to act as Marshal—and that D. L. Norton and Wm. B. Rudd be invited to act as Assistants.
On motion adjourned to Monday evening,
May 11, at 7 o'clock.
WM. H. ADAMS, Chairman.
W. T. TINSLEY, Secretary.

Adjourned Meeting.
An adjourned meeting of the Committee, held on Monday evening, May 11, Gen. W. H. Adams in the Chair, the following proceedings were had:
Gen. Adams, from the Committee on Invitations, reported that owing to other engagements, Rev. Mr. Platt was unable to accept the invitation of the Committee to deliver the address of welcome on the occasion of company B.'s return.
On motion, Resolved, That Rev. Mr. Montgomery be requested to deliver said address.
A communication was received from the Young American Zouave Company, of Lyons, requesting that their company form a part of the procession on the occasion of the return of Co. B.; whereupon it was Resolved, to accept the offer of the Zouave Company, and invite said company to join the procession.
The Committee were informed that the Marshal and Assistant Marshals appointed by the Committee had consented to serve as such.
The Business Committee reported that they had engaged the Fair Building, in which to have the tables set; and they recommended that an agreement be made with Messrs. G. W. Williams and L. Breithecker to furnish and serve the collation; whereupon it was Resolved, That the Business Committee be empowered to adopt such action in the matter as they may think proper.
On motion, Resolved, That the Committee on Invitations be requested to invite as participants in the reception of Co. B., all former members of said Co. who have been honorably discharged; also all other officers and soldiers residing within the town, on furlough or honorably discharged, also the wives and mothers of officers and men in said Co. B.
On motion, Resolved, That Mr. McElwain have charge of the cannon-firing.
On motion, Resolved, That a committee of three, consisting of Messrs. Adams, Van Camp and Tinsley, be appointed to make up and have printed a programme, or order of exercises.
On motion, adjourned to Saturday evening, May 16th.
W. H. ADAMS, Ch'n.
W. T. TINSLEY, SEC'Y.

Special Meeting.
A special meeting of the Committee was held on Monday evening, May 13th; Gen. W. H. Adams in the Chair. The following Resolutions were passed:
Resolved, That the Committee invite as participants in the Reception of Company B, in addition to the persons and organizations previously designated, Eagle Fire Company of Lyons, Rescue Fire Company of Lyons, Hook and Ladder Company of Lyons, the several Hose Companies of Lyons, the Clergy of Lyons, the members of the Village Board of Lyons, the fathers of members of Company B, the Lyons Union Cornet Band and a Band of Martial Music.
Resolved, That the Business Committee be requested to furnish with Refreshment Tickets the persons invited to participate in the Reception of Company B, by this Committee, and also the Marshal and his Assistants, the persons serving as Gunners on the occasion, and persons volunteering to furnish transportation for said Company from Geneva to Lyons.
Resolved, That the Secretary of this Committee be directed to request the Clerk of the Village to call a special meeting of the Village Board, at nine o'clock to-morrow morning, at the Engine House, and that this Committee and the Marshal meet said Board at that time. On motion, adjourned.
W. H. ADAMS, Chairman.
W. T. TINSLEY, Sec'y.
[The Committee met with the Village Board yesterday morning. A resolution was passed by the Board, to make the Village chargeable with the expense of the Reception, said Resolution in effect endorsing the action of the Reception Committee at its several meetings. The Programme of the
Reception is in the hands of the Printer, and will probably be issued to-day or to-morrow. Formal invitations to the persons and organizations who are requested to take part in the Reception will be issued in a few days.

Organization and History of Co. H, 27th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.
This company of volunteers was organized May 21, 1861, at Mount Morris, consisting of seventy-five members. During its term of service its roll increased to one hundred and two men. The following have been its officers from its organization to its discharge, which occurred at Elmira, N. Y., May 31st, 1863:—
Cha's E. Martin, Captain, resigned and honorably discharged Feb. 10, 1862.
Joseph H. Bodine, 1st Lieutenant, promoted to Captain. Feb. 10, 1862; to Major July 24, 1862; to Lt. Colonel Oct. 4, 1862.
Oscar H. Phillips, 2d Lieutenant, resigned and honorably discharged Aug. 14, 1861.
Edward Williams, 2d Lieutenant, promoted from 1st Sergeant, Aug. 14, 1862; wounded June 27, 1862; resigned on account of wound Nov'r 28, 1862.
S. M. Seeley, 1st Lieut., transferred from "Sturgis Rifles," May 26, 1862; promoted to Captain March 9, 1863.
Wm. H. Swan, 1st Lt., Co. B., promoted to Captain July 24, 1862; resigned March 9th, 1863.
Edward C. Camp, 2d Lieutenant, promoted from 1st Sergeant Nov. 28, 1862, to 1st Lt. March 9, 1863.
Harvey R. Clarke, 2d Lt, promoted from 1st Sergeant, March 9, 1863.
William M. Nimbs, 1st Lt. Co. D., promoted from 1st Sergeant, Oct. 11, 1862.
July 5th, 1861, at Elmira, this company was equipped and sworn into the U. States service for two years, leaving on the 10th for Washington, encamping on 'Franklin Square.' Only a few days elapsed and they crossed the Long Bridge, and were engaged in the first Bull Run battle, July 21, 1861. Here they distinguished themselves, and with their Reg. gained high honors for their bravery, winning laurels for their gallant commander, Colonel Slocum, and receiving high commendations for their courage from Gen. Wadsworth.—The casualties of this battle were:—
Florence Sullivan, killed; Corporal Wm. Biggs, Privates James Donahoe, Charles H. Hunt, Joseph R. Johnson, Wm. Welch, W. Aplin, Harlan P. Boyd, and Wm. Garrett, wounded and taken prisoners.
They landed at West Point, Va., on the evening of May 6, 1862; that night they drove the enemy's skirmishers back into the woods, capturing a number of prisoners; on the 7th, supported batteries—no casualties.
The battle of Gaines' Mills, June 27, 1862, was the most terrific and disastrous this Co. experienced during their service. Their indomitable courage and heroic daring was nobly displayed in this engagement, going into the fight with forty men and coming out with only thirteen—twenty-seven killed, wounded and missing. They were under fire all day - crossed the Chickahominy at three o'clock P. M., went into action about five o'clock P. M. on the extreme right of Porter's command; drove the enemy from his position by a bayonet charge and captured a large number of prisoners. They held their position until after dark, when, after expending all their ammunition, the regiment was ordered to retire. The casualties in this regiment were about 200 and in this company the following:—
Killed—Wm. H. Chilson and Henry Lockwood. Wounded—Lieut. Edward Williams, Sergeants Edward C. Camp and E. R. Parker; privates George E. Cady, James Driskcome, Willis Griffith, James H. Jones, Rob't McNeilly, Theadore Magee, Wm. B. Robertson, Lafayette C. Willis, W. H. Fasier, C. B. Wheelock, James I. Scribner, R. Hammond, Alex. Howden, Squire Staples, Albert S. Tanner. Prisoners—Charles A. Martin, W. M. Ashton, Francis Flynn, Adam Miller, S. Roy, Thomas McNeilly, John Skelly.
June 30, '62, at Charles City Cross Roads, they skirmished and supported batteries.—Was in action at Malvern Hill July 1, 1862; was sent early in the action to the right of the army to prevent a flank movement of the enemy. During the entire seven days' fight before Richmond they were under fire every day.
At the second Bull Run battle, Aug. 30, 1862, they were thrown to the front to stop the advance of the enemy and to cover the retreat of Gen. Pope's army—only one man wounded.
Sept'r 14, '62, opened the fight of South Mountain, (Crampton's Gap,) as skirmishers. This movement was exceedingly dangerous, and so well executed as to elicit from Gen'l. Franklin the warmest commendations for their bravery. It was exceedingly effective, but proved a serious loss to the company, killing Orderly Sergeant John Beggs, one of the bravest of the brave; wounding Lt. S. M. Seely, H. R. Clarke, John Kruhten, J. M. Magee, B. H. Tallman, Anthony Dunlava.
Engaged at Antietam Sept'r 17, 1862, supporting batteries under a heavy fire of artillery all day, but no casualties.
In Dec'r, 1862, first Fredericksburg battle, were in the first regiment that crossed the Rappahannock, in the left grand division, driving the enemy's skirmishers back from the river—under heavy fire for several days while
across.
Second Fredericksburg battle, May 3d and 4th, 1863, engaged in the capturing of Marie's Heights, they were thrown to the front as skirmishers, covering the retreat of the 6th (Sedgwick's) Corps, and skirmishing until they reached the fortifications at Banks' Ford.—Although under a galling fire all day, only one man, A. S. Tanner, wounded.
The following members of the Co. have died of wounds—Joseph R. Johnson, C. H. Hunt, James Driskscome.
Disease—Wm. Garrett, Wm. Aplin, W. Griffith, Rob't Shannon, Jeremiah Coughlan, Ira Hayes.
Discharged—John J. Kellogg, E. R. Parker, G. W. Bingham, G. W. Barney, Jr., A. V. Cothrell, John Dunn, D. A. Edsall, Geo. Heliker, John M. Nichols, W. H. Fasier, Ja's I. Scribner, R. Hammond, Alex. Howden, Squire Staples, Jesse D. White, Simon Roy, Samuel Wightman.
Absented and never reported themselves—Joseph W. Hanna, W. H. Abrams, Zimri Bush, Jerome Drew, Wm. Fitch, J. R. Havens, Philander Magee, O. Odell, C. Palmer, John Pendergrast, M. J . Reynolds, Lyman G. Reynolds, E. D. Rodgers, J. W. Jones, M. Lockwood, Richard Burk.
No regiment has a more glorious record than the 27th. Their courage and bravery was fully established at Bull Run and continued through fifteen of the most perilous engagements of the war. All honor to the war worn veterans, their gallant deeds will go down to posterity as imperishable as they were daring and brilliant, and to the latest hour will it be the pride of Co. H. to say, "We were members of the gallant and never faltering 27th of New York."

DEPARTURE OF THE TWENTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT.
Elmira, July 10, 1861.
The Twenty-seventh regiment, Colonel H. W. Slocum, one thousand strong, left here this afternoon for Washington.
Capt. S. M. Seeley of Co. H., has been spending a few days in our village. His exposure at Fredericksburg, has left him much debilitated. After being mustered out of service at Elmira, he returns again to Chicago. His many friends here hope soon to learn of his restored health.
The officers of Co. H, have returned to the Ladies the flag presented to them previous to their leaving for the seat of war. The flag was accompanied by a note handsomely acknowledging the kindness of the Ladies to the Company.

THE HOLMES MONUMENT.—The Lyons Republican says the monument recently erected in the Lyons Cemetery by the members of (late) Company B, 27th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., is an appropriate testimonial of respect for their lamented comrade, Robert E. Holmes, who fell on the bloody field of Antietam on the 17th day of September, 1862. The monument was gotten up at the Marble Works of E. B. Wells, of Clyde, and its style, finish, and workmanship, reflects great credit upon his establishment. The monument is nine feet in height. It has an American flag neatly chiseled above the inscription.
The inscription is as follows:
ROBERT E. HOLMES,
Volunteered in defence of his country with Co. B, 27th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., April 27, 1861. Promoted to Second Lieutenant in the 108th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., August 5th, 1862. Fell at Antietam, Md., September 17th, 1862, aged 22 years.
A Patriot, Hero, and Friend.
This monument is erected by the members of Company B, his first companions in arms, as a slight testimonial of their love for him as a soldier and a friend.

ARMY SKETCHES.
THE 27TH NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.
BY AN OFFICER OF THE REGIMENT.
NO. 5.
The 6th of July, 1861, noted the departure of the 27th N. Y., for the seat of war. A large assemblage of friends and relatives congregated at the Depot to receive the dreaded adieu,—with some the final farewell. Fond hopes were expressed that the cherished son might pass through the fiery ordeal unscathed; fond mothers shed bitter tears at the sacrifice; parental hands firmly grasped the offering now laid upon the altar of Liberty. The gentle words of advice, welling up from a heart full of affection, the anxious features of the gray-haired and middled-aged, the melancholy look of the young maiden who bids her loved one a tearful good-bye,—all this, with many other outward-signs of sympathy, made up a picture the most beautifully touching of Life's panorama.
Pass along the rank and file of this heroic Regiment. Decision marks every countenance, and although the tender chords of the heart vibrate at the friendly touch, yet feelings are suppressed, and sorrow forced to hide itself in the deep recesses of the soul. They were going forth upon a high and noble mission; to rescue the Ship of State from the surging waves of political corruption. Long had that glorious insignia of a highly gifted people floated without a dissenting star, its stripes made sacred by the hallowed deeds of a noble ancestry. With unflinching nerve they went forth to battle for its honor, and for the preservation of those sacred, inviolable rights, guaranteed by the Constitution,—the grandest document that ever emanated from the brain of man. This was the motive that impelled them to action. The prompter was not the rights or wrongs of Slavery. The object was not to burst the manacles that held an ignorant race in bondage. Their services were tendered the Government, not to please the fancy of radicals, but to defend and preserve the interests of a Republic in peril; a Republic gasping for existence, convulsed by the throes of a huge and horrid rebellion. Cast into oblivion the enmity that works so terribly upon the heart-strings of the Nation; stand by the Constitution and the Union; recognize no party that would administer to a single section; let not a star be blotted out of the National firmament, but preserve, inviolate, the beauty attached to that glorious galaxy.—Sectionalism will destroy the best-formed Government. Let the South be made to understand that no division is necessary; that subjugation, for the sake of power, is not the object desired; then will the tide of reconciliation set in, in spite of the despotic rule of Jefferson Davis:

"Plant blessings and blessings will bloom;
Plant hate, and hate will grow;
You can sow to-day, to-morrow shall bring,
The blossoms that prove what sort of thing,
Is the seed—the seed that you grow."

Amidst loud hurrahs, waving of handkerchiefs by fair hands, and stirring roll of drums, the train moved off. All along the route hearty "God-speeds" cheered the men. The generous ladies of Williamsport, (thanks for their kindness,) prepared a banquet for the benefit of the Regiment, which was heartily partook of upon the arrival of the train at that place. This act of hospitality has never been forgotten; bestowed, as it was, at a time, when the inner man called for nourishment.
Arrived at Baltimore all were busy reaching conclusions. Whether an attack similar to that made on the 6th Massachusetts would occur? In what order the march through the city would be conducted? and an hundred other questions of a like nature. Nothing occurred, however, of a serious character. Rampant secessionists sneered, wondering "of what use these mud-sills would be to Abolition Lincoln?" The fair beauties of "Dixie" smiled their contempt, and with a shrug of their finely-chiselled forms, would exclaim, "What samples of Northern aristocracy! born in a brothel, to be let loose upon undefiled society!" Old inebriated women, whose noses were tinged with the blossom of "Santa Cruz," were not backward in exhibiting their hatred to the "offscourings," as they called us. Small urchins, with tattered garments and besmeared faces assisted in the attack. These were the first discovered enemies, more dangerous than the open foe. The men were astonished at such a state of society, the majority of them having been brought up far away from the evil influences of a city life. They had read the "Mysteries and Miseries of New York," by their own quiet firesides; now they were witnessing the reality in the streets of Baltimore.

ARMY SKETCHES.
THE 27TH NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.
BY AN OFFICER OF THE REGIMENT,
NO. 6.
Upon arrival at Washington, the Regiment was conducted to Franklin Square, (a short distance from the White House,) where quarters were taken in Barracks formerly occupied by the 12th U. S. Regulars. Encamped in the heart of the city, all thoughts of Rebels vanished. The novelties of the metropolis created a complete diversion of mind for the time being, and none were willing to let slip the opportunity of becoming perfectly familiar with all the peculiarities that surrounded them. The products of ingenuity, deposited in the Patent Office, were rigidly inspected; the natural wonders of the Smithsonian Institute were special objects of admiration; the artistic and sculptural work adorning the interior of the Capitol feasted the eye unac­customed to the beautiful and sublime; the agreeable shade of the ornamental vines, clustering shrubs and green bushes of the Capi­tol Yard were far preferable to the stale, un- healthy barracks; here, shielded from a scorching sun, they would refresh themselves and note the varieties of character that make up the population of this great political cen­tre. Before them, upon the slated walks, joined arm in arm, passes the statesman and the speculator; with slow, measured tread, they pace the public alleys of this favorite resort, maturing plans best calculated to sub-serve the public interest, provided they are not called upon to deviate from the alluring path that leads to a fat wallet and an honor-able name; they would sacrifice everything, (except personal interest,) for this poor, war-stricken land. Next follows the elegantly dressed and refined lady of some representa­tive of power and influence, ladened with Parisian airs; the profuse and extravagant amount of jewelry that adorns her person is but a slight draft upon the prodigious salary—all procured by a simple thrust of the fingers into Uncle Samuel's crib; only a small item in the great national column of figures, the sum total of which is to be met and bal­anced by the industrious, hard working tax­payers of the land. In the trail of this arti­ficial combination, follows the Octoroon, whose uncommon beauty almost induces one to step over the charmed circle of her life; fine, waving hair, the tender turning of soft, lustrous eyes, the expressive mouth, etc., etc., cannot be passed unnoticed and unadmired. Richly attired, bearing all the marks of refinement, she would easily compete with the most fascinating of Northern coquettes,— that class of feminines properly denominated heart-breakers, because of the magical influ­ence they are capable of exerting upon weak and vascillating nature. Now comes the rag­ged boot black, singing "Union shine, for half a dime;" always happy and saucy, work or no work. And thus they pass on, hour after hour, black and white, rich and poor,—all admitted to this little Paradise on earth. To the soldiers, this was so new and strange, that they were almost tempted to doubt its propriety. But we will leave them to drink in a world of wonders. This liber­ty will not always be allowed them, for they are in a net, the meshes of which will con­tinue to tighten around them in proportion as they become inured to the service, and are called upon to perform important military duties. We would not convey the idea that bare-faced tyranny predominates in the army, but there is a strict adherence to the rules and regulations framed for its government. This is necessary, for without discipline the best collected material would be a burden upon the Government,—a mutinous, plundering band of desperadoes, removed from the restraints and influences of social life.
As soon as practicable, Col. SLOCUM and Major BARTLETT sought an interview with the War Department, for the purpose of being immediately assigned to active service in the field; urgently requesting a position in the column that was soon to advance upon the Rebels at Bull Run, for the reason that one or two general engagements would probably suppress the rebellion, and they were anxious that the Regiment should not return home without some distinguished mark of honor. Their request was granted, and preparations were made to be in readiness to take the advance.
On the 17th day of July, 1861, the 27th took up the line of march. As they passed beyond the limits of the District of Columbia, and placed their feet upon the soil of Virginia, cheers followed cheers that made the welkin ring. They were given as an indication of purpose, for they had no fallen foe to exult over. They were now in the enemy's chosen land of battle, where, for the first time, they beheld the frowning dogs of war mounted upon the parapets of fortifications--fortifications that could not withstand the attack of a skilful, single line of skirmishers, accompanied by an effective, disciplined battery and an ordinary infantry reserve, unless garrisoned by a superior force. At the Virginia end of the Long Bridge was a barricade of earth, supported by timbers, so constructed as to admit of the working of a few pieces of artillery. To the left was a small-proportioned fort capable, perhaps, of 25 pieces. These, with a few inferior outer works, constituted the main defences of Washington, not of sufficient strength to withstand a formidable siege of 12 hours.
At this point the place in line assigned the Regiment was taken. The march continued throughout the day uninterrupted, and at night encamped near the village of Anandale, situate half-way between Alexandria and Fairfax Court House. This was the first night of sleep in the open air, without shelter from the heavy dew, which falls like rain in this region.
In such haste had this force been collected, that the Government was unable to supply the demand for tents, and blankets were the only protection from chill and storm. Temporary houses of brush was an unsuccessful experiment, proving of little avail against chilling winds and incessant rains.
Pickets were thrown out in front, and upon each flank, to avoid surprise, and the main body retired, firmly believing that ere daybreak they would be aroused by the musketry of the sentinels. The inexperienced soldier hears everything, sees everything—knows nothing. Such was the case in this march. By some it was conjectured that if they ventured beyond the camp line their capture by the enemy would be a certainty. Each bush was a rebel spy, batteries moving in position was the heavy tramp of advancing cavalry, and the bugle-notes of halt! were the signals for united attack. This timidity soon vanishes, however, and leaves the man a better, and by far a happier soldier.
Day-break of the 18th found the column in motion. The march was kept up, with the exception of occasional rests, until near noon, when a halt was ordered for the purpose of closely reconnoitreing [sic] the enemy's entrenched position at Fairfax Court House, and affording the men an opportunity to prepare a portion of the course rations issued prior to leaving Washington. Just at this time occurred one of the uncertainties incident to the service. The men were seated in groups, partaking of their "hard tack" and desserts, when the sudden boom of cannon announced an attack in front. With palpitating hearts they forsook the dinner and seized the musket, prepared to receive the enemy. "Move up the column!" was the peremptory order, and it was executed in lively style. The weak-nerved paled with excitement, the strong and unthinking chuckled in anticipation of a battle, all believed the decisive hour nigh at hand. A forced march of one hour brought us to Fairfax Court House, to find it evacuated by the enemy, and the Stars and Stripes floating upon the entrenched heights. The rebels were taken by surprise, and believing that every road and by-path between Washington and Fairfax swarmed with live Yankees, eager for blood and plunder, had retreated in double quick time, leaving behind their loose articles of camp equipage.—At this early stage of the rebellion, before they were flushed by victories, the appearance of Federal troops caused a strange bewilderment throughout their rank and file. The troops passed to the interior of the fortifications amidst deafening roll of drums, and national airs discoursed by patriotic bands, who drank in the spirit of their music.

THE 27TH NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.
BY AN OFFICER OF THE REGIMENT.
NO. 9.
The smoke and dust of battle hung in dense clouds over the lost field of Bull Run, thereby partially concealing from the enemy our confused retreat. Regiments had lost their numbers, Generals were without Brigades or Divisions, Line Officers were looking for some familiar face to offer consolation, and privates were pressing to the rear regardless of orders, all of them independent Federal heroes, A, No. 1. This was the constituted rabble that had lost its feeble organization in a spasmodic effort to grasp the horns of the altar of Rebeldom, to seize the "fated" Capitol, and from the gubernatorial chair of Secession, prolong the hurried strain of "On to Richmond," substituting some extreme southern point to lend a bewitching charm to the melody of the ditty so ingeniously wrought out by men professing great skill and masterly political strategy,--strategy that could encompass the Confederacy at a single stroke; deep, far-seeing and  impenetrable strategy, that could quickly crush the life oat of the feeble body, and leave it a friendless corpse, with no kind, sympathizing hand to deposit it in a respectful grave. This disgraceful defeat of our arms was the direct result of impatience and over-eagerness to meet a well-disciplined foe, whose formation dated far back of the Federal organization; the syren song emanating from restless politicians, enchanted the controlling heads, and a shameful attack and retreat was the effect that followed the inconsistent policy of these pompous croakers, who were positive that an immediate attack would prove the overthrow of a determined and persevering enemy.
Upon reaching the hill, near the woods through which the right wing had passed in the advance, the disorganized were halted by guards stationed by order of some general officer. Here an incident occurred of a novel character. Capt. Lewis, Co. C, 27th N. Y., by great effort collected some 30 of his men, and prepared for a march to Centreville, notifying his men that such was his intention. Ordering a "right face," the "forward march" commenced, but was of short duration. He was halted at the entrance-way to the woods, but with characteristic determination informed the guard that he should pass through. The guard remonstrated, stated that the orders were imperative, and must be obeyed, but all of no avail. As he was about to pass his company over the sentinel's line, an inferior looking man, mounted upon a splendid charger, took a position directly in the way of the persevering Captain, who was never   known to falter. The officious person was attired in a loose, blue frock, resembling the article often worn by our northern farmers. Two diminutive eyes insinuatingly glanced through the glasses that decked a favored   nose. His whole appearance betokened that of an adventurer,—following the army for the   purpose of learning the modus operandi of war. He emphatically ordered the Company to halt. The Captain was in a quandary, rather questioning the right of this assuming individual to control his little command. The following is, in substance, the conversation that ensued:
Unknown.—"Captain, you will counter-march your men, and pass outside the line."  
Captain.—"By what authority do you know that I shall do it, sir? My men have been engaged all day, and are going to the rear."
Insulted dignity fevered at the reply, and Unknown, with manifest rage, drew from his holster a revolver, cocked it, and aiming at the undaunted Captain's head, demanded an immediate execution of the order. "I am," he remarked, "Col. Sprague, of Rhode Island, at present commanding at this point; you pass through here only over my corpse, and if you insist upon advancing, you shall receive the contents of this revolver." In such esteem was the Captain regarded, that a dozen guns were ready to retaliate. But the gallant young Colonel was unmoved; decision was written upon every feature. The Captain, regarding discretion the better part of valor, obeyed. Had the rank of this chieftain of "Little Rhody" been known, words would have been unnecessary.
A brief consultation of Generals was held, which resulted in falling back upon Centreville. Whilst passing through the woods, the panic-cry passed down the column, "The Black Horse Cavalry are coming!" The affrighted sought shelter, supposing the "Legion of Terror" were close upon them, bearing aloft the black banner of Death. Some took refuge in dense clusters of bushes; others rushed pell-mell in the direction of the enemy, throwing away guns, knapsacks, and every necessary article of war that impeded rapid locomotion. It was a wild, indescribable tumult, all created by the gallop of a small squad of Federal Cavalry. Quiet was soon restored, and the column moved on.
Reaching the main road, a disastrous spectacle presented itself. Artillerymen were mounting horses disconnected from batteries, and fleeing for dear life; disabled caissons were strewed along the roadside; civilians, who had came out from Washington to witness the annihilation of Secessia, were urging their way through the frantic mass; Federal cavalry were pressing their exhausted steeds, regardless of footmen; the rebel batteries were delivering a deadly fire upon the Bull Run Bridge, and an hundred poor soldiers found a watery grave in the stream beneath. Fortunate for this un-fortunate army, Gen. Blenker, with his reserve, had formed a line south of Centreville, which was the means of preserving this terror-stricken force from destruction.
Exhausted men, necessarily left behind, were taken prisoners, and compelled to re-main for months in the filthy, loathsome rooms of the noted tobacco warehouse, re­ceiving inhuman treatment,—inhuman, be­cause at this early stage of the rebellion, ig­norance of warfare led men to believe that persecution was an honored act of benevo­lence to the Government they were fighting to sustain.
Although our men were followed by an ex­ultant foe, yet no opportunity was lost to car­ry out a confiscation policy. Articles of val­ue were taken wherever found, despite the rapid advance of the enemy. Sergt. Chrissman, Co. A., 27th N. Y., in passing the residence of a prominent Union-hater, espied a well-proportioned animal, which he considered a superior article of beef,—a prize worth possessing, and which he levied upon without form or process of law. Obtaining a rope, he instituted a method that guaranteed him an easy passage to Washington, where he disposed of the "beast" for the sum of $65. He declared it to be the best Bull run he had ever had. This is but a single instance deducted from hundreds, where the humble rank and file replenished their emaciated wallets.
The main army reached the defenses of Washington, Monday, July 22d, foot-sore, starved, devoid of energy sufficient to seek shelter from the rain; being deprived of .... nerves prostrated by unusual excitement, it is not surprising that men unaccustomed to severe hardship should become indifferent to their fate; they were in no condition to offer battle or receive an organized enemy, flushed with victory.
Thus ended the first great raid upon the minions of Jefferson Davis. How this battle was conducted has been rehearsed by the public until it is a worn-out tale. Suffice it to say, that the melancholy night of July 21st, found reserve troops just on the eve of departure from Washington and Alexandria, to participate in the engagement, and turn the boisterous tide. Forty-two miles distant to render support to an army making one of the most disgraceful retreats that could possibly darken the pages of a Nation's history; disgraceful because of political persistency. To the disheartened men, the old flag had lost none of its original beauty; its sacred folds were still admired, and the majority were not willing to forsake the majestic emblem of our country's greatness, because of mismanagement.

RECEPTION OF SOLDIERS AT MEDINA.—On Saturday last, the people of Medina gave their returning soldiers a public reception which was attended by a large concourse of citizens. An eloquent and highly patriotic address was delivered by Judge Davis, of Albion, after which a sumptuous repast was prepared which was partaken of by over one thousand persons. The affair was a creditable one to the people of Medina in every respect.

WANTED IMMEDIATELY.—Energetic and reliable persons in Broome and Chenango Counties to raise two companies for the 13th N. Y. Cavelry [sic] now nearly full. Great inducements offered. Apply at once to Capt. C. A. Wells, American Hotel Binghamton.
C. A. WELLS,
late Capt. 27th, N. Y. S. V.

Funeral of Manly T. Stacey.
On Sunday afternoon last, the funeral of Manly T. Stacey took place at the Methodist Church in this village. The veterans of the 27th, and other soldiers attended the services under command of Capt. B. R. Rogers, of the 160th. There was a large concourse of people present to pay the last tribute of respect to a worthy citizen and a brave soldier.
Young Stacey came to his death, as our citizens are aware, by the discharge of a revolver in the hands of a fellow soldier.

The Flag of Company H, 27th N. Y. Volunteers.
The following correspondence will be read with interest:
MOUNT MORRIS, N. Y.
To Col. L. L. Doty, Chief of Military Bureau, Albany;
DEAR SIR—It is with feelings of pleasure, commingled with sad emotions, that we transfer to your keeping the accompanying Flag, around which cluster associations deeply affecting our entire community. On the going forth from our village of the first company of brave volunteers, May 16th, 1861, this emblem of our Nationality—the work of heroic sisters and sacrificing mothers, amid prayers, tears and blessings—was presented to that indomitable Company. The subsequent fearful and glorious record of that noble band on thirteen battle-fields has fully vindicated their patriotism and love for the "dear old Flag." After two years' of deadly peril, in May last they returned, diminished in numbers, but clinging with unceasing devotion to the glorious "Stars and Stripes." In thus giving up this memorial, which so often has cheered our sons on the battle-field; or, wrapped around brave hearts, has ofttimes been carried to the "soldier's grave," we are deeply assured that you will feelingly appreciate our regard for its safety and preservation. We again assure you, we cherish it as one of our "household gods;" and our prayers will continue to ascend to our common father, that this faithful emblem of our Nation's glory may soon wave over a united and happy country.
Yours, very respectfully,
Mrs. R. P. WISHES,              Mrs. GEO. A. GREEN,
Mrs. A. E. ADAMS,              Mrs. GEO. S. WHITNEY,
Mrs. A. M. FRANKLIN,       Mrs. L. Coy,
Mrs. H. R. MILLER,             Mrs. M. Ames,
Mrs. I. Garlinghouse,             Miss DELIA HUNT,
MISS C. A. VERNAM,         Mrs. A. CONKEY,
Mrs. MCNEIL SEYMOUR,  Mrs. A. G. MILLER.

BUREAU OF MILITARY STASTISTICS,
Albany, Jan. 16, 1864.
LADIES—I have received the beautiful silk flag of Company H, Twenty-seventh Regiment N. Y. V., referred to in your eloquent letter, and which you generously add to the collections of this Bureau.
The Company, among the earliest to leap to arms, was in the first and second battles of Bull Run, West Point, Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mills, Goldborough Farm, Charles City Cross Roads, Malvern Hill, South Mountain, Crampton's Gap, Antietam, first and second Fredericksburg, Marie's Heights, Solan Church, and numerous skirmishes. This bright emblem of your faith in the brave hearts who have so honored your confidence, will stir the patriotism of other generations, and, reviving the deeds of this company, it will likewise recall the labors in behalf of the soldiers and their families and other patriotic acts of the ladies of Mount Morris whose services since the war began in common with those of their loyal sisters everywhere, have ennobled even the women of America.
I appreciate your love for this flag. It is a precious memorial, and shall be preserved with faithful care.
I am, with great respect,
Your obedient servant,
L. L. DOTY, Chief of Bureau.
To Mrs. R. P. Wiener, Mrs. A. E. Adams, Mrs.
A. M. Franklin, and others.

In Memory of Lieut. R. E. Holmes,
Who fell at the Battle of Antietam, and for whom a Monument has recently been erected at Lyons by the Members of Co. B, 27th Regiment. To them the following lines are respectfully dedicated
By Nellie.
Tread lightly near that lonely mound
That marks a patriot's grave;
Let nature's stillness e'er be found,
Where sleeps the noble brave.

There may the flowers of early spring,
Their richest fragrance shed:
And evening zephyrs sweetly sing
Their requiems o'er the dead.

A hero and a patriot true,
His name shall eyer lie
Among the bright, immortal few
That were not "born to die."

When first the war-trump's thrilling sound
Was heard through land and sea,
He joined the host that rallied round
The banner of the free.

He fell upon the battle-plain,
'Mid sword and bayonet's gleam;
He was among the early slain,
At dark Antietam's stream.

A year of battles since has passed,
And still no glimmering light;
The star of hope is overcast,
And veiled in darkest night.

The ship of state still plows her way,
The troubled waves among;
And care-worn hearts in anguish pray,
"How long, O! Lord, how long?"

O! when shall this wild struggle end--
This cruel war be o'er,
The North and South in Union blend,
And sorrow be no more?

But when our faith is fully tried,
And we bow to Sovereign will;
Our risen Savior, glorified,
Shall whisper, "Peace, be still!"

The Gallant 27th.
This ever memorable regiment of two years men are to be mustered out of the service at Elmira next Friday. In July, 1861, they left with 1,100 men, receiving from time to time a large number of recruits—to-day their mustering roll will barely count 600 men, all told. No regiment has a more honorable and glorious record. Their undaunted courage and bravery was fully established at the first Bull Run battle—continued through fifteen of the most perilous engagements of the war, to the recent daring assault upon the heights of Fredericksburg. During the seven days before Richmond they fought like tigers; at Gains Hill their loss was very severe, our Co. H coming out of that terrific engagement with about thirty loss in killed, wounded and missing. All honor to the war worn veterans. Their gallant deeds are written in the history of this war, and will go down to posterity as imperishable as they have been brilliant and daring, and to the latest hour will it be their pride to say, we were members of the gallant and never faltering 27th Regiment of New York.

RETURN OF COMPANY H.
Great Demonstration.
This gallant Company (about forty strong) arrived in our village last Wednesday morning, in command of Capt. Seeley and Lieut. Camp, attended by its former Captain, Martin, and Lieut.-Col. Bodine. Our citizens had made ample arrangements to receive them, and turned out in large numbers. Messrs. C. L. Bingham and Geo. S. Whitney, of the reception committee, met them at Avon, and escorted them home. At 9 1/2 o'clock A. M. our fire department, headed by McArthur Band, under the direction of Marshals Col. W. A. Mills and J. A. Brodhead, led the procession to the depot. At 10 o'clock, amid the booming of cannon and enthusiastic cheering, this noble band of soldiers arrived. After being drawn up in line in front of the platform and presented by the Captain to the Committee of Reception, the Chairman, N. Seymour, Esq., addressed them as follows:

SOLDIERS OF THE "GALLANT 27TH REGIMENT," AND OUR OWN COMPANY H:—In behalf of the committee appointed to receive you, it is with pleasure, commingled with sad and grateful emotions, that we extend to you a hearty and earnest welcome to your homes.—Just two years since, with hundreds of our citizens, we pressed about you as you were leaving for the seat of war, bidding you "God speed." During your absence you have not been forgotten—by night and by day have we followed you—at early morn, at nightfall, in the social gathering, and in the great congregation has the Almighty been beseeched that he would have you in his protection. Many of your number have fallen—some rest in our own loved cemetery; others, stricken down suddenly upon the battle field, or by lingering disease, have found beneath Virginia's soil a grave, which no kind hands could beautify or plant thereon the Amaranthine flower, that moistened with the tears of affection will forever bloom. But to each and all who have fallen,

"Let it be written on their funeral stone,
They died for God, their country, and right alone."

Your thinned ranks fully demonstrate that your heroic daring, your indomitable patriotism, and your bold and fearless courage was nobly displayed upon the battlefields of Bull Run, Williamsburg, Hanover Court House, in the seven days before Richmond, at Antietam and Fredericksburg.
Soldiers, who have periled all for our common country, who have endured hunger and thirst, cold and heat, who belonged to the gallant 27th—which  regiment has participated in more battles than any other from the Empire State—you return to us to-day covered with glory. Then thrice welcome to your quiet homes. May your future years be as prosperous and happy as your past have been glorious and honorable.
As you go about our streets, you will find that death has not been quiet here. The venerable citizen*, the soldier of 1812, who, with so much feeling, presided over the vast assemblage that gathered around you on leaving; he, too, has "fought his last battle," and his spirit has passed the stars.
You are now about to be marched to the place where you were addressed before you left for the field of bat­tle; you will not long be detained, as we assure you that we are eager to press you by the hand, and thus but feebly express how, from our hearts, we bid you all a cordial and joyous welcome to your homes.

* Col. John Vernam. 

The following are the names of the members who have returned:--
SHERMAN M. SEELEY, Capt.,
EDWARD C. CAMP, 1ST LIEUT.,
HARVEY R. CLARK, 2ND LIEUT.,
John Keuhten, 1st Sergt.,
David I Summy, 2d "
Dwight Graham, 3d "
Benj. H.Tallman, 4th "
Henry Phillips, 5th "
James Roberts, 1st Corp.
Wm. Biggs,      2d     "
Daniel D. Strain, 3d  “
Adam Miller,    4th   "
Albert Young,   5th   "
Chas. E. Sieffert, 6th "
Geo.F Stout,       7th  "
James D. Horten, 8th "

PRIVATES.
Seiner E. Armstrong,
Willis M. Ashton,
George E. Cady,
Michael Clancy,
Anthony Dunlavy,
Francis Flynn,
James H. Jones,
Walter Kemp,
Samuel Leddeck,
Charles A. Martin,
Franklin W. Morgan,
Marvin J. Magee,
Michael McCormick,
John Miller,
Thomas McNeilly,
Henry Williams,
Robert McNeilly,
Denis McCarty,
T. E. McGalpin,
Henry McArthur,
Timothy Oregan,
Artemus M. Rathburn,
Thomas Ryan,
John H. Rulepaugb,
John Skelly,
Joseph A. Sheppard,
Albert S. Tanner,
Richard Talburt,
Charles B. Wheelock,
Wm. Welch,
Lafayette C. Wills.

After the address friends rushed forward to greet the returned soldiers. This scene was extremely affecting. While the Band most appropriately discoursed "Home, sweet Home" and "Welcome Home,'' a few minutes were allowed for heartfelt greetings.
Co. H. led by the Band and followed by the Fire Department and the immense crowd, started for the rostrum on Main St., over which was suspended the American Flag, bearing the appropriate inscription in large letters, "Welcome Home." On reaching the stand the soldiers were drawn up in front, the Fire department on either side. C. B. Adams, President of the day," then addressed them as follows:—
FELLOW CITIZENS:—A few months since, (and it seems to me but as yesterday, so rapidly has time passed,) you assembled here to witness the departure from our village of a Company of Volunteers, recruited in obedience to a call from the Executive of our nation, to do battle in defence of the government under which we live, and the Constitutional rights which we enjoy, and which are our boast and birth-right; then, and still assailed by armed rebellion. That was a day of thrilling interest to the citizens of Mt. Morris.
Fathers and Mothers then surrendered their sons.—Wives, with bursting hearts, bid adieu to fond and devoted husbands, and that heroic band went forth with benedictions, to take their places in the Army of the Union, and meet the stern and dreadful realities of war.
Two years have rolled away, years of anxious solicitude on your part, and of patriotic endurance on theirs, and you assemble again to welcome the return of so many of that Company as now stand before you—would to God we could welcome them all! But we cannot. They come to us diminished in numbers. War and disease have done their work in their ranks—but the survivors stand before you to-day, honored representatives of our pioneer Company, to receive from you, their friends and neighbors, that approbation and welcome to which they are so justly entitled, and I know you will heartily unite with me in awarding HONOR to the gallant 27th, and a cordial welcome to Co. H.
They bear upon their persons evidence of the terrific conflicts in which they have participated. Conflicts which, while they tested the bravery of the Volunteers, demonstrated also the tearful watchfulness with which you followed them over fields of carnage, and the avidity with which you sought for reported casualties in the 27th, at the close of each engagement But those conflicts with them are for the present ended. Their term of enlistment has expired.
O, that the conflict with all was terminated, and that to-day, with the return of these Volunteers, we could congratulate each other upon a suppression of the rebellion, and restoration of the Union, and an honorable peace to our distracted and bleeding country. But this we cannot do. Our brethren are still in the field, and our rejoicings are mingled with anxiety for those who are yet in the strife of arms.
Fellow Citizens—This hour is replete with interest and eminently suggestive. But it is not my province to enlarge upon the thoughts which the occasion inspires. That duty is committed to one much more competent than myself. Our distinguished and eloquent fellow-citizen, who addressed the volunteers on their departure, is here to welcome their return. I arose simply to call the assemblage to order, a duty assigned me.
And now, before proceeding further with the exercises, let us unitedly, reverently and devoutly, return thanks to that Merciful Providence, who has watched over our Volunteers in their absence, and permitted so many of them to return as now stand in our midst.
We will now unite with the Chaplain, Rev. Mr. Russell, in addressing the Throne of Grace.
An appropriate prayer was now offered by Rev. Mr. Russell. Judge Carroll then addressed them in an affecting manner, relating the engagements they had been in, and pay­ing a handsome tribute to their bravery and heroism. Capts. Martin and Seeley and Col. Bodine were each called out, responded and were enthusiastically cheered. The following letter from Hon. R. P. Wisner was read:
Mr. Morris, May 20th, 1863.
Mr. President:—I regret that I cannot be one with my fellow-citizens to-day, to welcome home a remnant of gallant men who have periled life for our common country. My engagements require my presence at another place, yet I am with you in heart and sympathy. It is due to men who for two past  years, voluntarily gave up the pleasures of social life, suffered and sacrificed all that makes life tolerable, for the good of others, to make a demonstration expressive of our heartfelt sincerity, in welcoming them back to home and kindred, and the pleasures of social intercourse.
The brave soldiers of the 27th are entitled to all respect for the undaunted courage and heroic fortitude displayed on many a battle field. The blood of their comrades test their devotion to a country periled and torn by a hated foe. May the reception they are to meet, be as cordial and sincere as their own devotion in the hour of carnage and death; and in after life, as they look back to the pleasures of this day, may they remember that courage and loyalty bring their own reward. Let me, through you, enjoin upon them, as they take their places among the honored citizens of our country, after well fought battles, with civic crowns fairly earned, to cherish a love, for their country that will increase as life bears them along to meet their fallen comrades, in a land where rebellions and insurrections have long since ceased.
Permit me to offer the following sentiment:—Our Whole Country—May the day speed when its enemies may be compelled to lay down their arms, and North and South, once more be united under the Constitution as it is, and remain one Nation forever.
R. P. Wisner.

A patriotic song from D. D. Snyder, closed the exercises at the stand. At intervals, the Band discoursed martial airs, which added greatly to the interest of the occasion. The weary soldiers were then escorted to the "Phelps House," where a banquet provided by the ladies, awaited them. After the collation the Company highly entertained its citizens about an hour in going through the drill on Main St. The crowd then dispersed, all proud of the opportunity of receiving this gallant band of "war worn" soldiers who have endured such hardships and perils for their beloved country.
The Company will return to Elmira on Friday to be mustered out of service.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: December 16, 2008
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/27thInf/27thInfCWN.htm

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