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30th Regiment New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT.—This Regiment will be mustered out in this city on the 2d of June. It is, or was, composed largely of Albanians—its first Colonel being the lamented Frisby. It is entitled to a glorious reception by the citizens of Albany. This is its record:—It has been engaged in eleven battles and twenty-six skirmishes. It was in the first battle of Fredericksburg, in the battle of Cedar Mountain, in three battles between there and Bull Run, in the battle of Bull Run, in the battle of South Mountain, in the battle of Antietam, in the battle of Fredericksburg in December last under Burnside, and finally in the eight days' battles at the same place under Hooker. In all these engagements, it gained laurels for its efficiency and courage. Out of the original number that started for the seat of war, but one hundred and eighty-six remain. Company B, that left here ninety six strong, now has but sixteen of the original number left. Other companies can show a similar record of depletion. All of the original field officers are gone, some of them transferred to other regiments, but most of them martyrs to their country. Beside their services in the field, the Thirtieth almost entirely built one of the forts near Washington. What regiment, in the whole course of the war, can show a better record than this? Let us give the returning heroes an ovation that will show that their brilliant services have not been forgotten.

IRON BRIGADE.—In the army of the Potomac was an "Iron Brigade," so called because of its fighting qualities, its endurance and its heroism. It was the admiration of the service, and frequently received special and flattering notice from the President and General Commanding. We see that some of our Western exchanges claim that the "Iron Brigade" was composed of the Second, Sixth and Seventh Wisconsin, the Eighth Indiana and the twenty-fourth Michigan regiments." This is an error. The Fourteenth Brooklyn, Twenty-second, Twenty-fourth and Thirtieth New York were the only regiments forming the "Iron Brigade." The name was bestowed by Gen. Patrick, and is inscribed on the regimental flags of the above named regiments.

THE "VETERAN CORPS."--The "Veteran Corps" to be organized in this State from returned volunteers, will consist of two Cavalry and twelve Infantry regiments only. The "Empire Light Cavalry," now being raised by Col. M. H. Chrysler, (late of the 30th,) is one of these.
It should be borne in mind that the U. S. bounty of $402 will not be paid to "veterans" who enlist in new organizations; but to realize this bounty they must join the "Veterans Corps."

Reception.--The reception of the volunteers of the Thirtieth Regiment, at Cambridge, Wednesday, was an old-fashioned ovation. All Washington county was present. Speeches were made by Rev. C. H. Taylor, Messrs. Palmer and Gray, a fine collation was served, and a large procession paraded--consisting of the Thirtieth militia regiment, with fire companies from Cambridge and Union Village. Doring's Band furnished the music, and gave the highest satisfaction.

DAILY LOG BOOK.
MONDAY. JUNE 1_.
The Reception.
A despatch was received from Albany by the Committee of arrangement for welcoming our brave boys on their return home, that the company would reach here by the noon boat to-day. This short notice gives us but little time for preparation, but it is just as well. We can show our grateful feelings towards them as well by a scanty display on short notice as by a grand, display on long notice. But considering the few hours we have for preparation it is believed we shall have one of the grandest processions that has ever been exhibited in this city.
The following are the officers of the day:
JOHN P. ADRIANCE, Marshal.
Aids—THOMAS PARISH,
WILLIAM S. JOHNSON,
CYRUS SWAN,
EDWARD INNIS,
EDWARD STORM,
JOHN TROWBRIDGE.

The Procession.
The following is the Programme of arrangements for the reception of Co. E, 30th Reg. N. Y. S. V.
Band.
21st Regiment N. G. S. N. Y.
Mayor and Common Council in Carriages.
Honorably Discharged Volunteers.
Co. E. 30th Reg, N. Y. S. V.
Band.
Chief and Assistant Engineers Fire Dep't.
Fire Wardens.
Protection Engine Co. No. 1.
Phoenix Hose Co. No. 1.
Davy Crockett Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1.
Niagara Steam Engine Co. No. 2.
O. H. Booth Hose Co. No. 2.
Lady Washington Hose Comp'y No. 3.
Cataract Steam Engine Co. No. 4.
Young America Engine Co. No. 6.
Band.
C. B. Warring's Military School.
H. G. Eastman's Business College.
Citizens in General.
Line of March.

The procession will form on Market st., the right resting on Main street. Line of march—down Main to the river, counter march up drawing up in line on south side of Main st., left resting at the dock. After marching salute, form line, marching up Main to Mill street, down Mill to Washington, through Washington to Main and Market, through Market to Cannon, up Cannon to Hamilton, down Hamilton to Church, through Church to Academy, through Academy to Noxon, down Noxon to Market and Main streets and dismiss. The Mayor, Common Council and delegates escorting the company to Pine's Hall, where there will be a collation ready for them.

Forming Orders.
SECTION 1—consisting of the 21st Regt. will form on Washington street, right on Mill, at a quarter before 12 precisely.
SECTION 2—consisting of the Fire Department, will form in Mill street, right resting on Garden, at a quarter before 12 precisely.
SECTION 3—consisting of C. B. Warring's Military School and H. G. Eastman's Business College, will form on Mill street, right on Washington.
The Cavalcade will form on Cannon st. As soon as formed will take post on the extreme right, right resting on Main street, in Market.
The sections will be notified by the Marshal the time to move into line.
The Foreman of each Fire Company will report at my head-quarters, in the Common Council room, at 10.30 A. M. the number of men expected to take part; and after taking their respective positions, will report the time of their doing so.
JOHN P. ADRIANCE, Marshal.
THOS. PARISH, A. D. C.

NOTICE.--The collation will be given at Pine's Hall instead of the City Hall.

To the Ladies.
Provisions for the collation can be sent to Pine's Hall at any time before 1 o'clock. S. J. Farnum will be in attendance to receive them.

The Stores will be closed.
We understand that our merchants will close their stores from one to four o'clock this afternoon, in honor of the reception of Co. E., Thirtieth Regiment.

Ringing of Bells.
It is requested that all the church bells be rung for ten minutes after the arrival of the boat containing the returning company. Head Quarters 21st Regt. N. G. S. N. Y.

ORDERS--The parade this day will be considered a public one. All owners of horses and teams are hereby ordered to keep out of the way of the procession.
By order of Col. JOS. WRIGHT.
J. E. SCHRAM, Adjt.
Head Quarters 21st Regt. N. G. S. N. Y.
The commandants of companies taking part in the parade will report to the Adjt. at 10.30 A. M., at these head-quarters, Common Council room, the number of men they expect to muster.
All honorably discharged officers and soldiers and officers and soldiers on furlough will report at these head-quarters, at 10.30 A. M. to the Adjutant, for position in line. It is hoped that all such as may be in Poughkeepsie will take part in the ceremodies [sic].
By order of Col. JOS. WRIGHT.
J. E. Schram, Adjt.
Attention Co. A, 21st Regt. N. Y. N. G.
You are hereby ordered to be at the Armory, armed and equipped, at 10 o'clock this A. M. R. R. HAYMAN, Capt.
June 1, 1863.

Duryea's Zouaves.
The members of Duryea's Zouaves are requested to meet at the House of Engine Co. No. 1, at 11 o'clock, in full uniform. Muskets will be furnished for the parade; also uniforms to those who have none.
Fire Department Notice.
All companies of the Fire Department intending to take part in the reception of Co. E. of the 30th Regt. N. Y. S. V. are requested to appear in Mill street, right resting on Garden street, at a quarter before 12 o'clock this day, in full uniform, without apparatus.
R. W. FROST,
1st Ass't Engineer Fire Dep't.

Attention Phoenix Hose.
The members of Phoenix Hose Co. No. 1 are requested to meet at their Carriage House this morning at 11 o'clock, in full uniform, for the purpose of participating in the reception of Co. E, 30th regt. By order,
E. W. SHURTER, Foreman.
JAS. COTTER, Sec'y.

Pro Bono Publico.
The members of O. H. Booth Co. No. 2 are requested to meet at their house at 11 o'clock this day, in full uniform for the purpose of participating in the reception of Co. E, 30th Regt, N. Y. S. V. By order.
CHAS. H. SHURTER, Foreman.
R. I. SHIELDS, Sec'y.

Honor the Brave.
The officers and members of Niagara Steam Engine No. 2 are requested to meet at their engine house, this day, at 11 o'clock, in full uniform. JOHN LOCKWOOD, Foreman.
EDWARD W. TUCKER, Sec'y.

Attention Engine Co. No. 4.
The members of Cataract Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 4 are hereby notified to meet at their house to-day at 12 o'clock noon, in full uniform, to take part in the reception of Co. E, Thirtieth Reg. N. Y. S. V.
A. J. VALENTINE, Foreman.
M. B. STANTON, Sec'y.

RECEPTION OF THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT.
—Extensive preparations are being made to receive this regiment, which is now on its way home. They are expected to arrive at night, and the entire Fire Department will be out with a torch-light procession to welcome them. There will also be a fine display of fireworks. Arrangements are also being made in Troy and Lansingburgh to receive those portions of the regiment belonging in those places. No regiment that has yet returned from the war has been more conspicuous in its gallantry, or has suffered more losses than the Thirtieth, and it is due to the few who return to receive them with every demonstration of gratitude for their services and their sacrifices.

THE RECEPTION OF CO. E.—Arrangements for a proper reception of this company are progressing finely. We are informed that all the military of the city, together with every company in the Fire Department have been invited to take part in the reception. The committee were around yesterday and will be around again to-day to solicit subscription for carrying out the arrangements. We need not urge our citizens to subscribe freely in that undertaking as the mere mention of the subject will undoubtedly answer the purpose. As soon as we can ascertain the programme of the reception we shall lay it before our readers.
At the reception of a portion of the Thirtieth Regiment at Saratoga, last Monday, Col. Searing, in reply to the welcoming address of the President of the village, referred, among other things, to the pleasing surprise he had felt on hearing the reception address of Gov. Seymour. He said that "he had been told that this State was the very hot bed of what is called 'Copperhead-ism,' but that if Gov. Seymour's remarks made him a 'copperhead,' he (Col. Searing) might also be classed as a 'Copperhead.' Gov. Seymour had said nothing but what was loyal, manly and patriotic. He was in favor of using all the power of the country to aid the government in putting down the rebellion and to restore the Union.

RECEPTION OF THE 30TH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.—A meeting of the Board of Foremen of the Fire Department was held at the Chief Engineer's office, last evening, to consult together with reference to the reception of the 30th Regiment, which is expected to arrive here in the course of a week. A resolution was adopted requesting the Department to parade in full force on that occasion, and also requesting the Foremen of the different companies to use their exertions to carry out the wishes of the Board and the Common Council.
It is understood the arrangements will be so perfected as to have the regiment reach this city at night, and that the reception shall be a grand torchlight display, which it is expected will far excel anything ever witnessed in our city. We have no doubt the different companies in the Department will enter into the matter with spirit, and that the duty assigned to them will be performed in a manner alike creditable to them and satisfactory to the citizens and authorities.

COLONEL FRISBY'S REGIMENT EN ROUTE.
ALBANY, June 27, 1861.
Colonel Frisby's regiment went to New York at six o'clock this evening by the Hudson River Railroad.

THE ROBBERY OF A MEMBER OF THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT.—It will be remembered that on Saturday night last, Jacob Koonz, a member of the 30th Regiment, was taken across the river in a skiff by three men, who robbed him of his money and beat him in an outrageous manner. This occurred after the par__ of the Regiment on Saturday night..—Koonz had been drinking considerably, and at a very late hour he took a notion into his head of going to Greenbush to see his aunt, residing there. At the ferry he met these men, and the fact of his being under the influence of liquor, no dount [sic], induced them to invite him to cross in the skiff. Koonz supposed that they had oars in the boat, but when they reached midway in the river he discovered they were paddling with pieces of boards. On nearing the opposite shore they commenced an attack upon him, knocking him down several times, and attempted to throw him overboard, but he clung to the side of the boat, and thus escaped from their clutches for the time being. After he got ashore he was followed and knocked down by the same party several times, and left almost lifeless in the street. Reaching this city he communicated the facts to his friends, and gave the names of his suspected assailants. This led to the issuing of a warrant for two young men named Thomas Burns and James Shephard, and they were arrested by officers Toomey and Franklin yesterday. A prolonged examination took place before Justice Cole, during which Koonz, on his direct examination, swore positively that Burns and Shephard were the parties who assaulted and robbed him of his money; that he was well acquainted with Burns, he having belonged to the same company with him. On his cross-examination, however, he was not quite so positive, and said that he had not seen Burns before that night in four years; that he was told Burns belonged to his company, and did not know it of his own knowledge. A number of witnesses were called and testified that Burns and Shephard both went to bed, in the house of the former, between 12 and 1 o'clock Sunday morning, and remained there during the night. It is alleged that the robbery was committed between 2 and 3 o'clock Sunday morning.

Reception at Poughkeepsie.
POUGHKEEPSIE, June 1
Co. E of the 30th N. Y. V. , enlisted at the commencement of the war and first from this city, met with a most brilliant reception here to-day by the entire Fire Department, all the military, pupils of Warring's Institute and students of Eastman's College.
The company lost 50 men in the 13 engagements in which they participated.
The 7th Regiment band from New York headed the procession.
Secretary.

AN HONORABLE RECORD.—All the officers recently belonging to the 30th N. Y. V., who were turned over to the N. Y. 76th, when the 30th was mustered out, were killed or wounded at Gettysburg, as follows:—
Killed.—Capt. Everett. Wounded. 1st Lieut. Keeler, ankle; 2d Lieut. Noxon,
leg; 2d Lieut. Long, foot; 2d Lieut., Buchanan, shoulder.

LOCAL AFFAIRS. (June 1, 1863)
ARRIVAL AND RECEPTION OF THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT.--The 30th Regiment, under command of Col. William M. Searing, arrived in this city at an early hour Saturday morning, on board the steamer Vanderbilt. The regiment were met at the boat by the Committee of Arrangements, and escorted to breakfast, which they partook of heartily. After breakfast, the members were dismissed for the day, and called upon their friends in different parts of the town. Towards evening Tivolia Hose Company proceeded to the barracks with the Committee of Arrangements, and escorted the regiment to the Delavan House, where a good supper was prepared for them.
About 8 o'clock the different Fire Companies assembled at the Chief Engineer's Office, and proceeded thence to the corner of Broadway and Maiden Lane, where the Thirtieth was received.
The members of the Common Council of Troy, and also the Trustees of Lansingburgh came down in carriages and took up their position on the right of the line.
The Fire Department was drawn up in line, and as the regiment filed past cheer after cheer rent the air. The enthusiasm of the citizens as manifested upon this occasion was seldom equaled [sic].
The regiment came to a halt in Broadway at Hudson street, and the Fire Department filed by, and opened order.
The Mayor and Common Council of this city and Troy and the members of the Board of Trustees of Lansingburgh, in carriages, took up a position on the right of the line. The steamer "Hugh Rankin," of Troy, followed, and then came the regiment. The Fire Department flanked the regiment and carriages, and thereby prevented the enthusiastic crowd from enterfering [sic] with the marching of the regiment by rushing into the ranks, &c.
The procession marched through Broadway, Church, Lydius, Pearl, Clinton avenue and State street to the Capitol, where the regiment was received by His Excellency, Governor Seymour. The exercises at the Capitol were of a highly enteresting  [sic] character.
The display of bunting in private residences along the route was immense. The pyrotechnic display in State street, and also at other points, particularly at the residences of Alderman Wilson and Colonel Harcourt, was one of unusual magnificence.
At the conclusion of the exercises at the Capitol the regiment was escorted to the barracks.
Although the heavy clouds betokened rain, with the exception of a slight shower, the weather was all that could be desired.

NARROW ESCAPE.—During the display of fireworks in State street, on Saturday night, a ball of fire discharged from a roman candle, set on fire the window curtain in Milwain's hat store. Fortunately it was discovered in time to prevent a conflagration.

Three Cheers Called for Gov. Seymour.
To the Editor of the Saratogian:—I see that the Editor of the Ballston Atlas questions the accuracy of your report of the reception of the officers and men of the 30th regiment, where you stated that during Col. SEARING'S reply to the welcome of President WHITE a man called for three cheers for Gov. Seymour, which were not given. Now I have no doubt that the Editor of the Atlas is sincere in denying that such a call was made, although he might have been more gentlemanly and temperate in his language; but to show how hard it is to remember correctly, except one's mind is specially attracted to an affair on purpose to report it, I will relate the substance of a conversation on this subject between two Republicans and two Democrats. One Republican confidently vouched for the truth of your report, and the other as stoutly denied it. One Democrat, (no less a person than the Editor of the Republican,) could not remember distinctly as to the facts, and the other, (the Editor's son, Samuel,) remembered hearing the call for cheers, and quoted Col. Searing's allusion to it, "Cheer for no political man or party," or words to that effect. This quotation recalled the circumstance to the minds of the others, so that all remembered it. Ferdinand Height, a Democrat whose word the editor of the Atlas should not hesitate to take on this subject, distinctly remembers it, about the same as Samuel Young does.
EX-REPORTER.

We print the above communication, because it was sent to us without solicitation, and not because any reply was needed to the ruffianism of the Ballston Atlas. Hundreds of names could be obtained, if necessary, comprising men of both parties, to sustain the entire accuracy of our report of the reception of the 30th regiment,

THE THIRTIETH ALBANY REGIMENT, COL. FRISBEY. (June 28, 1861)
The Thirtieth Albany regiment, under command of Colonel Frisbey, did not arrive in the city yesterday, much to the disappointment of large numbers of the friends of the regiment in New York. Late in the afternoon a despatch was received at General Arthur's office, stating that the regiment had been detained, but would leave Albany at half-past six o'clock P. M. They may therefore, be expected here at about two o'clock this morning.

Poughkeepsie, June 1.
The 30th New York State Volunteers, enlisted at the commencement of the war, and the first from this city, met with a most brilliant reception here to-day by the entire Fire Department, all the military pupils of Waring's Institute, and students of Eastman's Business College. The company lost 50 men in the 13 engagements in which they participated. The 7th regiment band, of New York headed the procession.

Stand by No. 6.
Officers and members of Young America Engine Co. No. 6 are notified to meet at their engine house this (Monday) morning, at 11o'clock, in full uniform, to take part in the reception.
J. H. Gildersleeve, Foreman.
JOHN J. PETTILLON, SEC'Y.
To-morrow the collector of the Daily Eagle will call on the subscribers in the First Ward for the usual two weeks subscription and he wants it to be distinctly understood by all who take the paper that they must pay up better than they have done lately. This waiting four or five weeks is played out. So look out for yourselves when he comes around in all the Wards.

THAT ROBBERY AND ATTEMPTED MURDER.
—Our readers will recollect that on Saturday night last, Jacob Koon, a member of the 30th Regiment, was taken across the river in a skiff by a couple of men who robbed him of nine dollars and then attempted to murder him. This outrage was committed after the parade of the 30th regiment on Saturday night. Koon had imbibed freely during the day, and at a very late hour concluded to pay a visit to his aunt, residing in Greenbush. At the ferry he met these men, who invited him to go across in a skiff. He supposed that they had oars in the boat, but when they got out into the stream, he discovered that they were paddling with pieces of boards. On reaching the opposite shore they commenced an attack upon him, knocking him down several times with the boards, and also attempted to throw him overboard. After getting ashore, he was followed and beaten by the same party who left him helpless on the ground. He soon regained strength enough to be able to walk to this city, where he communicated the facts to his friends, and gave the names of the suspected assailants. On Monday he appeared before Justice Parsons and issued a warrant for two persons to be identified. Yesterday officers Franklin and Toomey arrested two young men named Thomas Burns and James Shepherd, on the charge of committing the robbery and assault. Koon identified the prisoners as being his assailants. He said that he was well acquainted with Burns, because they both belonged to the same company.
On the cross-examination, however, he was not quite so positive. He did not know, of his own knowledge, that Burns belonged to the same Company with him. He was only told so by some of the members. He described the clothing, &c., of his assailants.
Several witnesses were examined on the part of the defence, and each testified that the accused party were on this side of the river at the time of the alleged occurrence; that they both slept together at the house of Burns.—
They retired at 12 o'clock.
After a protracted examination, the accused were discharged.

COL. SEARING AND THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT.—Colonel Searing is buisily [sic] engaged in closing up the affairs of the 30th Regiment, which he finds no small job, as there are a great many papers to perfect before the regimental business can be considered as fully disposed of. He will probably have to visit Washington before everything can be fully arranged. In the meantime, Governor Seymour and Adjutant-General Sprauge, as well as other influential persons, are very anxious to have him take the field again, and Governor Seymour has asked him to take a regiment now in the service; but it is understood he will close up his old regimental business, and look a little to his own private affairs, before leaving home again. Two years ago, when he went with the 30th, the emergency was such that he left his private business entirely unsettled, and having been almost continually in the field since, he feels that it is necessary to spend a short time at home; although he would like to go immediately if he could be assured that Hooker was to have a fight on the old Bull Run field. His regiment was left there without such support as had been promised; and after standing their ground until their amunition [sic] was expended, was compelled to fall back before an overwhelm- ...

A NEW REGIMENT OF CAVALRY.
We learn that Lieut. Col. M. H. Chrysler, of the late 30th regiment, received authority, a few days since, to organize a new regiment of cavalry, and with his usual energy entered upon the business of recruiting, so that he is reported to have nearly 300 men on his rolls. The following officers are engaged in recruiting the regiment: Capt. A. L. Gurney, who has been mustered in as Regimental Quartermaster; Capt. Williams, Capt. Lanning, Lieuts. Van Voast and Backer, all of the 30th, are raising companies as is also Capt. Duncan Cameron, late of the 22d regiment. Col. Chrysler is desirous of having his regiment rendezvous at this place, if suitable arrangements can be made for their accommodation.
Several other officers beside those above named are raising companies, but we have not been favored with their names.

Arrival of the Thirtieth at Albany.
ALBANY, May 30.
The Thirtieth regiment, Col. Scanny, arrived yesterday morning. In the evening a grand torch light procession took place, the entire fire department participating. After the parade the regiment marched to the Capitol, and were welcomed home by Gov. Seymour and Gen. Sprague.

A CORRESPONDENT of the Troy Whig informs that paper of a singularly mean and narrow-minded incident that transpired in the village of Lansingburgh at the reception of Company A, of the Thirtieth Regiment. It appears that the Committee of Ladies who arranged the dining hall, and ornamented it so beautifully, had prepared, among other decorations, a wreath of evergreens and flowers, in the centre of which was placed an engraving of Gen. McClellan. This the Republican gentlemen, committee of arrangements, saw fit to remove, forbidding its presence in the room, fearing probably that it might awaken the cheers and enthusiasm of the returned volunteers. The ladies, of course, felt very much chagrined at this most shabby treatment and gross insult.

Local Matters.
Col. SEARING is busily engaged in closing up the affairs of the 30th regiment, which he finds no small job, as there are a great many papers to perfect before the regimental business can be considered as fully disposed of. He will probably have to visit Washington before everything can be fully arranged. In the meantime, Gov. Seymour and Adjutant General Sprague, as well as other influential persons, are very anxious to have him take the field again, and Gov. Seymour has asked him to take a regiment now in service; but it is understood he will close up his old regimental business and look a little to his own private affairs, before leaving home again. Two years ago, when he went with the 30th, the emergency was such that he left his private business entirely unsettled, and having been almost continually in the field since, he feels that it is necessary to spend a short time at home; although he would like to go immediately if he could be assured that Hooker was to have a fight on the old Bull Run field. His regiment was left there without such support as had been promised; and after standing their ground until their ammunition [sic[ was expended, was compelled to fall back before an overwhelming force. He thinks General Hooker would not leave a regiment or brigade in that way—at least he is willing to try it.

COMPANY E.--The members of this company are taking advantage of the chance given them to visit their friends and associates in the city. We are informed that they will proceed to Albany in a day or two and there remain until they are mustered out of service.
We are also informed that the company have three months back pay coming to them, which, together with the United States bounty, payable when they are discharged, will make one hundred and thirty nine dollars that each of them will receive. Quite a "brace" for the boys.

COMPANY E.--It may not be generally known that our excellent townsman, Hon. John H. Otis, was chiefly instrumental in raising this company, immediately after the attack on Sumter and the call of the President for volunteers. They were among the first, if not the very first of the volunteers in this state, who organized a full company. With untiring personal exertion and liberal aid Mr. Otis procured and kept together the recruits. He had been a member of the Union Home Guard in Charleston in the time of nullification, and knew what rebellion meant in South Carolina; and he had been in military service in Florida and knew what was the best material for good soldiers. Full of patriotic zeal, he labored to procure recruits, and had his health permitted he would have accompanied them to the battle field. The fifty two war worn and battle stained veterans who were welcomed home yesterday were among those who enlisted at the beginning.

RETURN OF CO. A, THIRTIETH REGIMENT TO ALBANY.—This morning Co. A, Thirtieth regiment, returned from Lansingburgh to Albany to be mustered out of the service. They left the former place in one of the street cars, in charge of John E. Brown, and reached here at 10 o'clock. They formed in line on Washington Square, and exhibited a splendid proficiency in drill, as Capt. Campbell put them through the manual. After their pictures had been taken by Joe Herron, the soldiers marched to the depot and took the 10.45 train for Albany. On arriving at that place, they will return their arms and equipments, and be mustered out of the service as soon as the necessary papers can be prepared.
A meeting of citizens to adopt measures to give Co. A, 30th Regiment, a public reception on their return to Lansingburgh, was held on last Tuesday evening; James C. Comstock was appointed Chairman, and Eugene Hyatt Secretary.
The Chairman in a few well timed remarks stated the object of the meeting and the following named persons were appointed a committee to make the necessary arrangements.
John Ames,                             Albert E. Powers,
H. W. Knickerbocker,             G. W. Cornell,
P. B. King,                              Charles Clark,
S. P. Welch,                George A. Lally,
Wm. O'Connor,                       A. Gillespie,
J. C. Comstock,                       E. Hyatt.
G. W. Cornell offered to furnish the powder, and the meeting passed a resolution requesting the Board of Trustees to make a handsome donation.
The Trustees subsequently held a meeting and appropriated $100, and they, and also the several fire companies appointed committes [sic] to act in concert with the committee appointed by the citizens.
The Committee had a joint meeting on the same evening and matters are progressing.

30th Regiment, and its Reception.
At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of this village, held on Saturday evening last, a committee of citizens previously constituted and consisting of Daniel Shepherd, J. R. Putnam, L. B. Putnam, Hamilton Perry, John T. Carr, H. H. Hathorn, W. M. Potter, J. A. Corey, and E. J. Huling, made application to the village authorities for their co-operation in the reception of the field officers and members of Co's. D. F. and G., of the 30th Regiment.
A joint meeting was held immediately after the adjournment of the Board, and organized by the appointment of John H. White, Esq., chairman, and F. Height, Secretary.
On motion, it was Resolved, That Henry H. Hathorn, John R. Putnam and L. B. Putnam be appointed a committee to procure subscriptions to give Cos. D. F. and G., of the 30th Regiment, a fitting reception on their arrival here, and with power of substitution in cases of inability to serve.
Invitations were also extended to the several members of the Fire Departments to attend the reception in a body.
The joint meeting then adjourned to Tuesday evening, to hear the report of the committee as to the amount of funds that could probably be raised, and necessary plan to carry on the reception, at which time a committee of five was appointed to form a full programme of the proceedings, and the probable expenses of the reception in detail, and report at a subsequent meeting of the committee.
The following persons were appointed such committee:
John A. Corey, H. H. Hathorn, D. Shepherd, James N. Case, A. A. Patterson, with power to call a meeting of the joint Committee of the Trustees and committee of citizens at a future time.

HOME GUARDS.—No one, we trust, imagines that the services of home guards will ever be needed in our quiet and orderly city. And yet it is well to be at all times prepared for any emergency. To this end there were several meetings held last night at which military companies for home defense, were very properly organized.
Company E, of the Thirtieth New York Volunteers, met at the City Hall and reorganized under Captain Joseph Williams. Those desiring to join this veteran corps will have an opportunity to do so this evening at the City
Hall, where the company will meet for drill at half-past seven o'clock.
A brief notice in our third edition of yesterday, called together a large meeting of citizens at the armory of the Ellsworth Guard, where two full companies—numbering one hundred members each—were organized and entitled Companies A and B. The following officers were chosen:
COMPANY A.
Captain—William Berry.
First Lieutenant—C. W. Leffingwell.
Second Lieutenant—George C. Davidson.
First Sergeant—Robert G. Vassar.
Second Sergeant—Alfred Atkins.
Third Sergeant—Robert High.
Fourth Sergeant—John Schickle.

COMPANY B.
Captain—John P. Adriance.
1st Lieutenant—Charles Wilkinson.
Second Lieutenant—E. P. Bogardus.
First Sergeant—Theodore Van Kleeck.
Second Sergeant—George Lawrence.
By these lists of officers it will be seen that a number of them have been in active service. They are all good soldiers, and will take pride in drilling and disciplining our home guard, so that they will be ready at a moment's call for any service required of them. Let us hope they may never be called out except for ...

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
ARRIVAL AND RECEPTION OF THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT.—The 30th Regiment, under command of Col. William M. Searing, arrived in this city at an early hour Saturday morning, on board the steamer Vanderbilt. The regiment were met at the boat by the Committee of Arrangements, and escorted to breakfast, which they partook of heartily. After breakfast, the members were dismissed for t he day, and called upon their friends in different parts of the town. Towards evening Tivolia Hose Company proceeded to the barracks with the Committee of Arrangements, and escorted the regiment to the Delavan House, where a good supper was prepared for them.
About 8 o'clock the different Fire Companies assembled at the Chief Engineer's Office, and proceeded thence to the corner of Broadway and Maiden Lane, where the Thirtieth was received.
The members of the Common Council of Troy, and also the Trustees of Lansingburgh came down in carriages and took up their position on the right of the line.
The Fire Department was drawn up in line, and as the regiment filed past cheer after cheer rent the air. The enthusiasm of the citizens as manifested upon this occasion was seldom equaled [sic].
The regiment came to a halt in Broadway at Hudson street, and the Fire Department filed by, and opened order.
The Mayor and Common Council of this city and Troy and the members of the Board of Trustees of Lansingburgh, in carriages, took up a position on the right of the line. The steamer "Hugh Rankin," of Troy, followed, and then came the regiment. The Fire Department flanked the regiment and carriages, and thereby prevented the enthusiastic crowd from enterfering [sic] with the marching of the regiment by rushing into the ranks, &c.
The procession marched through Broadway, Church, Lydius, Pearl, Clinton avenue and State street to the Capitol, where the regiment was received by His Excellency Governor Seymour. The exercises at the Capitol were of a highly enteresting [sic] character.
The display of bunting in private residences along the route was immense. The pyrotechnic display in State street, and also at other points, particularly at the residences of Alderman Wilson and Colonel Harcourt, was one of unusual magnificence.
At the conclusion of the exercises at the Capitol the regiment was escorted to the barracks.
Although the heavy clouds betokened rain, with the exception of a slight shower, the weather was all that could be desired.

FIRST ARMY CORPS, May 28, 1863.
THE THIRTIETH NEW YORK VOLUNTEER REGIMENT.
... Searing, leaves the First Army corps this morning, ... mustered out of the service at Troy. It has participated in the following engagements:—Falmouth, Rappahannock Station, Massaponax, Sulphur Springs,  Gainesville, Groveton, Second Bull run, South Mountain, Antietam,
Fredericksburg, Rappahannock river and Chancellorville. The losses have been six officers and ninety four enlisted men killed, and twelve officers and two hundred and nineteen enlisted men wounded. Seven color bearers have been killed and wounded under the colors.
The whole number of men on the rolls of the Thirtieth has been 1,154. Of those 152 are three years men, who (including five officers) a re transferred to the Seventy-... New York Volunteers; 70 are in hospital, sick and wounded, and about 400 return home with the regiment. The following was the
ORIGINAL ROSTER OF THE THIRTIETH:
Colonel—Edward Frisby.
Lieutenant Colonel—Charles E. Brintnall.
Major—William M. Searing.
Adjutant—R. C. Bentley.
Quartermaster—Charles E. Russ.
Surgeon—F. L. R. Chapin.
Assistant Surgeon—Julius A. Skilton.
Company A—Captain, Samuel King; First Lieutenant, _. H. Campbell; Second Lieutenant, Francis Dargen. Company B—Captain, W L. Lanning; First Lieutenant, __ Casey; Second Lieutenant, J. Seymour Scott.
Company C—Captain, B. M. Van Voast: First Lieutenant, M. V. V. Smith; Second Lieutenant, Edward Van Voast.
Company D—Captain, Miles T. Bliven; First Lieutenant, ___ G. Putnam; Second Lieutenant, John H. Marston.
Company E—Captain, Harrison Holliday; First Lieutenant, Edgar S. Jennings; Second Lieutenant, Nathaniel __ner.
Company F—Captain, Albert G. Perry; First Lieutenant, Andrew M. Franklin; Second Lieutenant, James M. Anson, Jr.
Company G—Captain, Morgan H. Chrysler; First Lieutenant, Wm. T. Conkling; Second Lieutenant, Asa L. __ney.
Company H—Captain, Walter P. Tillman; First Lieutenant, Lemuel B. Ball; Second Lieutenant, Sylvester W. __rues.
Company I—Captain, Jno. M. Landon; First Lieutenant, Samuel D. Potts; Second Lieutenant, Alonzo Alden.
Company K.—Captain, Bartholomew Pruyn; First Lieutenant, Gilbert W. Becker; Second Lieutenant, Adam __pman.

TRANSFERRED FROM THE THIRTIETH.
Lieutenant Cutting, formerly of the Thirtieth, is now on General Augur's staff; Captain Tillman has been Assistant Adjutant General, and Lieutenant Becker Aid-de-Camp on the staff of Acting Brigadier General __ps, of the Twenty-second New York; Adjutant Bentley was made Lieutenant Colonel of the Sixty-third New York; Adjutant Aidee, Major of the One Hundred and Sixty-ninth New York; Quartermaster Russ Brigade Quartermaster and Captain A. Q. M. of Seymour's brigade. The following is

THE PRESENT ROSTER OF THE THIRTIETH.
Field and Staff—Colonel, Wm. M. Searing; Lieut. Col., Morgan H. Chrysler; Major, Albert J. Perry; Adjutant, Z. _. Knight; Quartermaster, Stephen V. Trull; Surgeon, F. L. R. Chapin; First Assistant Surgeon, Roger M. Deering; Second Assistant Surgeon, Horace T. Hanks.
Company A—Captain, John H. Campbell; First Lieutenant, William Shelly, Second Lieutenant Alexander Gilespie.
Company B—Captain, J. Seymour Scott; First Lieutenant, Bernard Gallaghan; Second Lieutenant, Andrew Smith.
Company C—Captain, Samuel D. Potts; First Lieutenant, Edward Van Voast; Second Lieutenant, _____.
Company D—Captain, Warren L. Lanning; First Lieutenant, _____; Second Lieutenant. Herbert H. Bryans.
Company E—Captain, Joseph Williams; First Lieutenant, Theodore Buckman; Second Lieutenant, William D. Jones Acting.
Company F—No Captain; First Lieutenant, James M. Andrews; no Second Lieutenant.
Company G—Captain, Asa L. Gurney; First Lieutenant, Thomas Smith; Second Lieutenant, David T. Burnham.
Company H—Captain, Walter P. Sillman; First Lieutenant, Thomas Hall; Second Lieutenant, Wm. S. Haight.
Company I—Captain, Jno. M. Landon; First Lieutenant, Charles Roth; no Second Lieutenant.
Company K—Captain, Adam Lampman; First Lieutenant, Gilbert W. Becker; Acting Second Lieutenant, Wm. _. Betts.

COMING INTO THE FIELD AGAIN.
It is understood that Lieutenant Colonel Chrysler will immediately recruit the Thirtieth and bring it into the field again. Already nearly two hundred of those who g__ __me with the regiment have signified their intention to re-enlist.

THE THRITIETH AND TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT TO BE MUSTERED OUT TO-DAY.—The Thirtieth regiment, Col. Searing, will positively be mustered out of the service at the Albany barrack at ten A. M., to-day. Lieut. John S. Wharton, of the .... U. S. Infantry, will perform the ceremony the 14th ....
On Thursday, at the same place, the 22d Regiment is to be mustered out by Capt. C. H. Corning, 17th U. S. Infantry. The allotment rolls of the 30th Regiment were received yesterday by Major Richardson, and the necessary preparation of the allotment checks may delay the payment of that regiment one day longer than has been the case with those heretofore paid off.

LANSINGBURGH, June 2 .
MR. EDITOR:—An incident transpired in connection with the reception of Company A, of the Thirtieth Regiment, at this place, which should be chronicled. It appears that the committee of ladies who arranged the dining hall, and ornamented it so beautifully, had prepared among other decorations, a wreath of evergreens and flowers, in the centre of which was placed an engraving of Gen. McClellan. This the Republican gentlemen, committee of arrangements, saw fit to remove, forbidding its presence in the room, fearing probably that it might awaken the cheers and enthusiasm of the returned volunteers. The ladies felt very much chagrined at this most shabby treatment and downright insult, and I think with hundreds of others, most justly so. OSCAR.
The complaint of our correspondent, reaches us from different quarters. Also, the additional one, that no Democrat was placed on the Committee of Arrangements, though Democrats subscribed at least half the money that was raised for the celebration.
Our Lansingburgh friends did things so handsomely, so generously, in all outward respects, at the celebration, that we are sorry to hear of these matters. We commend all who feel aggrieved [sic], to possess themselves in patience. The time is not distant when portraits of Gen. McClellan will give no offence. "Wait for the wagon," friends.

CORNING EXPRESS.
A DESERVED COMPLIMENT.—The members of Co. F of the Thirtieth Regiment, Col. Searing's, have presented their former Captain, now Major of the regiment, A. J . Perry, with a very handsome field sabre, bearing the following inscription on the scabbard:—"Presented to Maj. A. J. Perry, 30th Regt. N. Y. S. Vol's, Iron Brigade, by the old members of Co. F, as a mark of respect when a Captain in command, and for meritorious conduct on the Battle-field." The sword is elaborately etched, and the scabbard, which is of steel, is neatly decorated and mounted. It may be seen at R. P. Lathrop's for a few days.
Capt. Campbell, late of Co. A, 30th Regiment, is recruiting a Company of State National Guards, for the new Militia Regiment. He is getting along finely and it is expected that the Company will receive ....

LOCAL DEPATMENT.
THE "WELCOME HOME" to Co. A, 30TH REGIMENT--Company A, 30th Regiment, under escort of ... Engine Co. No. 11 of this city, arrived at Lansingburgh soon after eleven o'clock Monday morning, and was met at the south end of the village by the President, the Board of Trustees, and the entire fire department of the village. An immense crowd of citizens was also in attendance, and on the company forming in line, they were greeted with loud and long continued cheering.
A procession was formed, consisting of the fire department and citizens, and after marching through the principal streets of the village, a halt was made on the public square, where an address of welcome was delivered to the company by J. C. Comstock.
Lieut.-Col. Brintnall, formerly of the 30th, responded in behalf of the company.
The exercises over, the line of march was again resumed. At 2 1/2 o'clock the procession was dismissed at the Phoenix Hotel, where Company A, with the authorities of Lanslngburgh and took dinner. Prayer was offered by Rev. Mr. Beveredge, and after-dinner speeches were made by Messrs. J. C. Comstock, Mayor Van Alstyne, Col. Brintnall, F. B. Hubbell, Rev. Mr. Beveredge, Provost-Marshal Hughes and others. The demonstration was a great success, and our neighbors honored themselves in thus honoring the soldiers.
The members of Relief Engine Co. No. 11 were hospitably entertained by the members of Engine Co. No. 4, at the Anderson House, and returned home at 6 o'clock. They were heartily welcomed in the 'burgh, where they are always at home.
Company A will return to this city to-day, for the purpose of being mustered out of service.

THE THIRTIETH AT ALBANY,—The demonstration at Albany, on Saturday evening, in honor of the Thirtieth regiment, Col. Searing, is said to have been a fine one. Nothing was left undone by the Albany authorities to render the affair an imposing one. Our city was represented by Mayor Van Alstyne, Ald. Gary, Rankin, McKeon, Stanton, Gurley, Regan, Grace, Starbuck, Prentice, Green and Smart, Gen. Allen and staff, and Engineers Starbuck and Nobles, and Chief Barron. They were hospitably received, and formed an important part of the procession.—The steamer Hugh Rankin, (not the Osgood, as the Argus has it,) also took part in the firemen's pageant, and was "the observed of all observers." The Express says:
"One of the noticeable features of the procession was the Hugh Rankin steamer, of Troy, drawn by four horses; as also the tender and a large wagon, drawn by four horses, containing the members of the company. The steamer was splendidly decorated with flags and varied colored lanterns, presenting a most superb appearance.—The shrill whistle of the steamer was blown all along the route, and the turn-out, which was complete in every particular, was the centre of attraction.
—The Troy official delegation returned about midnight. According to the Albany Knick., a difficulty occurred among parties from our city. That paper says:
"Quite a large number of Trojans came down on Saturday evening, to take part in the reception of the Thirtieth regiment, among whom was a squad of soldiers from the Second regiment.—The Hugh Rankin steamer company engaged an open wagon to convey its members to this city and return. About two o'clock yesterday morning, the wagon was taken possession of by the members of the Troy regiment, who were under command of a Lieutenant, and when the members of the steamer company—who had left the wagon but a few minutes before—returned, and found their seats occupied by outsiders, an effort was made to eject the soldiers. The result was a general fight between the firemen and the soldiers. The Lieutenant was roughly handled by the Captain of the steamer. The row was finally quelled by the interference of the "stars of the night." The firemen, however, got the best of the deal, and several of the soldiers went off with sore heads."

COMPANY A, THIRTIETH REGIMENT, GONE TO LANSINGBURGH.—Yesterday morning; at 8 o'clock Relief Engine Co. No. XI, in. full uniform, turned out in strong numbers to act as escort to Company A, of the 30th Regiment, which was going to Lansingburgh, where ... reception awaited them. Shortly before 9 o’clock both companies came down from the barracks and paraded through some of the principal streets previous to their departure for the 'burgh. They were accompanied by a deputation of the citizens from Lansingburgh, and also Doering's brass band. They made a very creditable display. Company A was recruited in Lansingburgh, and is composed principally of firemen of that village. Although the company went off over one hundred strong, it suffered severely in battle, and returns with less than one half of its original members. The tattered banner borne by the company is an evidence of what it has passed through.

"PUT HIS FOOT IN IT."—Joseph Shannon, the soldier who was confined in jail about four months as a witness in the case of John Stevenson, indicted for grand larceny, is again in durance vile. It appears that Shannon met a boy named James Farrell in the street and enquired if the lad had been empolyed at the Gayety Theatre. The boy answered in the affirmative, and then Shannon accused him of having stolen twenty dollars from him. The boy denined [sic] it, but said that he had found a dollar gold piece, and that possibly it might belong to him. Shannon asked to be shown the gold piece, and when the boy handed it to him, he claimed it as his own. He also, took one dollar and seventy-cents in shinplasters away from the boy, and caused his arrest on a charge of theft. When the examination came off the above facts were elicited, and the boy also proved by several witnesses that he came by the money honestly. So that instead of the boy being held for larceny Shannon was committed to jail on the charge of stealing the money from the boy.

DECEPTION OF COMPANY A, THIRTIETH REGIMENT, IN LANSINGBURGH.—Our neighbors at Lansingburgh are engaged to-day in giving a noble welcome to Company A, Thirtieth regiment, which claims a home in that village. The reception is not only an imposing one, but the residents seem to have entered into the spirit of the occasion with zest and enthusiasm that do them lasting honor.
Co. A, the heroes of the occasion, with nearly all the regimental officers, Relief Engine Co. No. 11 and Sullivan's Band, reached Troy by the steamer G. C. Davidson from Albany at half-past ten o'clock this morning On landing at the foot of Broadway they marched through several of our principal streets, and took the street cars—attracting much attention from our citizens. Seven horse-cars were comprised in the train that took to the 'burgh the soldiers and firemen, with the Common Council of Troy and a host of spectators. It was the largest and best managed line of cars ever run on the road.
Reaching Lansingburgh at half-past eleven o'clock, the visitors were received by President Dickson and the village Trustees, and the pro­cession,  which was in waiting, started in the following order, under the direction of Alfred Seaman, Marshal, and Messrs. King and Welch, Alds:  
Doring's Band. 
Franklin Hook and Ladder Co. No. I.
Lafayette Engine Co. No. 3.
Sullivan's Band.
Washington Engine Co. No. 4.        
Columbia Engine Co. No. 5.
Independent Hose Co. No. 1.              
Ross' Band.                            
Relief Engine Co. No. 11.
Officers of the Thirtieth Regiment.
Co. A, Capt. Campbell.
This procession marched through the streets of the village, which were a sea of flags—the gay hues of the patriotic bunting mingling beautifully with the tints of the foliage. Such a general decoration we have rarely seen. On State street, especially, the display was imposing. We would mention among those who were most successful in their adornments, the Misses Hawkins, who erected a platform of flowers in front of No 3's Engine house, the managers and children of the Troy Orphan Asylum, J. G. McMurray, John M. Mott, Geo. A. Lally, Messrs. Lavender, S. D. Smith and and Mason, Mrs. Burton, (an elegant "Welcome home,") Geo. W. Wilson, of the Central House, the Phoenix Hotel, Wilson House, the News Room of Mr. Porter, Messrs. Ball, Fox, Fitch, Wasson, Peter and Daniel King, (brothers of the lamented Capt. King,) Noble, Mrs. Adams, ex-Sheriff G. W. Cornell, (who furnished the powder,) E. Sprung, Dr. Gushing, Sayles and J. Ames. There were others whose names have escaped us.
The feelings of the brave boys, marching under this patriotic canopy, amid such a "welcome home," must have been pleasant. At noon the procession was marching towards the "Green," where J. C. Comstock is to deliver an address of welcome, to which Col. Brintnall will respond. The soldiers will have a dinner at the Phoenix, while Engine Co. No. 11 will be the guests of No. 4, at the Anderson House.
Lansingburgh was never so crowded as today; and the gay scene is one that its people will long remember with pleasure and commendable pride.

ROBBING A SOLDIER AND ATTEMPTSD MURDER.--Between 12 and 1 o'clock on Saturday night two desperadoes enticed a member of the 30th Regiment to take a sail with them on the river in a row boat at Albany. After they had got the soldier beyond the reach of assistance, probably near the eastern shore, they demanded his money. Upon refusing, they both assailed him in a fiendish manner, kicking and beating him until he became almost senseless. He then, to save his life, gave them all the money he had, $10, and subsequently they compelled him to give up a silver watch he had worn through all the battles. The fiends, having obtained all the available treasure that the soldier had, threw him overboard, doubtless with the intent of drowning him, but with a death like grasp he clung to the sides of the boat, notwithstanding they beat him about the head with the oars and almost severed his hands from his arms. He finally relinquished his hold and succeeded in reaching the shore, horribly mangled, faint and almost lifeless. We trust, says the Journal, that no effort will be spared to ferret out and arrest these inhuman wretches, and that when arrested, speedy justice will be meeted out to them.

Arrival of the Thirtieth Regiment.
The Thirtieth regiment state volunteers (Col. Frisbee,) which left Albany at 7 o'clock last evening, by the Hudson River Railroad, arrived at Canal street this morning at 5 o'clock; and marched directly to the Park barracks, when breakfast was provided.
The regiment, which was enlisted in the northern part of the state, and is made up principally of farmers, numbers 780 men. They are armed with the Springfield musket of 1842, but have been promised better weapons.
This is a well-trained body of men, having been in camp about six weeks. The first march was from Troy to Albany, eleven miles, which was performed in 3 1/2 hours.
The spirit of the men is excellent, and they are not only anxious to enter the field, but are evidently able to sustain themselves when there.

Welcome Home.
Respectfully Inscribed to the 30th Regiment.
Fling out our starry banner—forever way it wave!
Ring bells! your loudest welcome to the loyal true and brave!
Let every joyous symbol—let every sign be shown,
To toll the war-worn patriots that they are welcome home!
When first along the flashing wires came news of Sumter's fall,
Ere hope of gain made patriots—they answered duty's call;
And now with laurels laden, they come both "true and tried."
Then banners wave! ring loudly bells, to tell our joy and pride!
It will recall to mind the day, two weary years ago,
They turned away from friends and home, to meet our Southern foe,—
When 'mid the booming cannon and pealing bells was heard
The muffled beat of aching hearts—the low, sweet farewell word.
Ah! many lips on that sad day faltered their last "good-bye"
To those whose "welcome home" is sung by angel hosts on high!
And while the kiss is given now, and words of welcome said,
We'll not forget the tribute due the brave and honored dead,
Whose bodies sleep in far off graves, beneath the daisied sod,—
Whose spirits, glorified, were led by angels up to God!
And though no stone above their dust is reared with kindly care,
Still flowers—bright flowers—are blooming, by angels planted there.
And on our hearts the hand of love has traced each well-known name.
E'en while a grateful nation placed them on t he scroll of fame,
And now, O bells, one moment stay, and toll for him who died
While leading this devoted band against vile treason's tide,—
Who laid his crown of victory down, the hour in which it was won.
And angels bore it, twined with stars, beyond the setting sun!
And now his blood, with thousands, at the bar of Justice pleads,
While Fame and History gather up his name and noble deeds! .
And should we need a beacon light to lead us on to fame,
We'll look aloft, where glory crowns our FRISBY'S honored name!
Now ring again, O joyful bells! Our Nation's banner, wave!
Unite in giving welcome to t he loyal, true and brave:
And pay this tribute to the dead—the noblest ever given—
They sleep in soldiers' honored graves! Their rich reward is—Heaven!
And say to those returning, a Nation bids them come
And share its hallowed blessing, and earnest welcome home!
NETTIE COLBURN.
Washington, D. C., May 25, 1863.

THE HONORS TO THE THIRTIETH.
The Torch Light Procession.
The Procession Saturday evening, in honor of the brave THIRTIETH Regiment, was admirably arranged and carried out.
The Department was out in full force, and the display, in point of brilliancy, and, indeed, in every other respect, was all that could have been anticipated.
The route of the procession was as follows: Through Broadway to Church, Church to Lydius, Lydius to Pearl, Pearl to Clinton avenue, Clinton avenue to Broadway, Broadway to State, State to Capitol Park.
The line, under the management of Chief Engineer MCQUADE, assisted by the Assistant Engineers, was formed about 9 o'clock, and it was 11 o'clock before the parade was over. The firemen, who were nearly six hundred strong, carried, in addition to their torches, a large number of Roman Candles; as these were being fired, as the procession moved through the principal streets, the effect was beautiful. It was a delightful evening, and the streets were packed with people, who, with cheers and waving of handkerchiefs, and otherwise testified their pleasure at the hearty welcome extended to our brave volunteers.
At many points along the route of the procession, dwellings were brilliantly lighted with lanterns and trimmed with small flags. In Lydius street, particularly, this was the case. Here a great number of the houses were illuminated and tastefully decorated. The dwellings of Alds. HARCOURT and KENNEDY were particularly noticeable for an elegantly arranged arch that had been constructed between them.
In Pearl street, too, there were several houses neatly decorated with colored lights, flowers and flags.
A striking feature of the procession was the fire steamer "Osgood," of Troy, trimmed with red, white and blue lanterns. The powerful, and at the same time, beautiful steamer, attracted general notice.
The company, consisting of twenty members, rode, while their steamer was drawn by four splendid looking horses.
The Mayor and Common Council of Troy, took part in the procession, as guests of the Mayor and Aldermen of this city.
At the Capitol, Gov. SEYMOUR and General SPRAGUE were introduced to the Regiment, and addressed them briefly, congratulating the men on the valuable services they had rendered their country, and in acknowledgment of the brave manner in which they had upheld the reputation of the State on the battle-field.
After the procession, the soldiers were treated to a collation at Peck's Restaurant, on Broadway, and subsequently a large party of gentlemen visited the office of Chief Engineer McQuade.
It was a very happy affair throughout, and reflects much credit upon those to whom the duty of making the arrangements was committed.
Mayor PERRY, in his address of welcome to the Regiment, made the following reference to Col. FRISBY:—
While rejoicing at meeting you again, we cannot fail to remember the sad death of our much lamented and beloved Col. Frisby. That sorrowful event brought deep sadness to our hearts. In the death of Col. Frisby, our city lost a worthy citizen, a devoted patriot, and you a brave and gallant commander, who, in the hour of his country's peril, animated by the purist motives, entered the service and nobly offered up his life upon the field of battle for the cause of his distracted country. The citizens of Albany, who loved the man, could not rest until his remains were safely deposited in our Cemetery, and on the 15th of September last his remains were followed to their last resting place by a large concourse of people, who will revere his name whlist memory lasts.

… Albany M...
LOCAL DEPARTMENT.
THE "WELCOME HOME" TO Co. A, 30TH REGIMENT.--Company A, 30th Regiment, under escort of Relief Engine Co. No. 11 of this city, arrived at Lansingburgh soon after eleven o'clock Monday morning, and were met at the south end of the village by the President, the Board of Trustees, and the entire fire department of the village. An immense crowd of citizens were also in attendance, and on the company forming in line, they were greeted with loud and long continued cheering.
A procession was formed, consisting of the fire department and citizens, and after marching through the principal streets of the village, a halt was made on the public square, where an address of welcome was delivered to the company by J. C. Comstock.
Lieut.-Col. Brintnall, formerly of the 30th, responded in behalf of the company.
The exercises over, the line of march was again resumed. At 2 1/2 o'clock the procession was dismissed at the Phoenix Hotel, where Company A, with the authorities of Lansingburgh and took dinner. Prayer was offered by Rev. Mr. Beveredge, and after-dinner speeches were made by Messrs. J. C.  Comstock, Mayor Van Alstyne, Col. Brintnall, F. B. Hubbell, Rev; Mr. Beveredge, Provost-Marshal Hughes and others. The demonstration was a great success, and our neighbors honored themselves in thus honoring the soldiers.
The members of relief Engine Co. No. 11 were hospitably entertained by the members of Engine No. 4, at the Anderson House, and returned home at 6 o'clock. They were heartily welcomed in the 'burgh, where they are always at home.
Company A will return to this city to-day, for the purpose of being mustered out of service.

PAINFUL AND DELIBERATE SUICIDE.—Peter Riley, of this city, on Sunday morning last Committed suicide by jumping into the Genesee river, and was carried over the falls. The Rochester Express gives the following particulars of the sad occurrence:
"On the arrival of the New York Express train there, Sunday morning, a man was discovered to jump from the platform of one of the cars as it reached the east end of the river bridge, and spring over the railing into the water. He fell where the water was shallow, near the raceway wall, but being intent upon destroying himself he struggled into the current, and the next moment was swiftly borne over the precipice before the train had crossed the bridge, and within sight of scores of passengers.
"The unfortunate man was Peter Riley, of Albany. He had become addicted to intemperance, which was without doubt the exciting cause of the suicide. He was for a while proprietor of a saloon in Rochester, and afterwards engaged in the same business at Elmira. He was also employed at intervals on the Central Railroad, in the capacity of baggage master, &c., and being an accomplished book-keeper, had for the last four years been a clerk in the freight department in Albany. Riley got aboard the train there Saturday night, taking a sleeping car berth. The passengers observed that he was beside himself with liquor, and during the night he occasioned considerable annoyance by frenzied and startling ejaculations, such as 'I never murdered a man!' 'I never stole anything!' 'Rum has ruined me!' When the conductor passed through the cars, Riley implored him to shoot him. In reply to inquiries, he stated that he was on his way to Kansas. The unfortunate man was between 35 and 40 years of age.

Republican & Sentinel.
Friday Morning, June 5, 1863.
THOMAS G. YOUNG, EDITOR.
WHAT IS REPUBLICANISM?—HENRY CLAY said twenty years ago, of the now-called Republican party:—
"With them, the rights of property are nothing; the deficiency of the powers of the general Government is nothing; the acknowledged and incontestible [sic] powers of the States, are nothing; the dissolution of the Union, and the overthrow of a government in which are concentrated the hopes of the civilized world, are nothing. A single idea has taken possession of their minds, and onward they pursue it, overlooking all barriers, reckless and regardless of all consequences."
And Henry Clay told the truth.

THE RECEPTION OF THE THIRTIETH N. Y. VOLUNTEERS.
This regiment having arrived in Albany on Saturday, the 30th of May, a delegation from the board of trustees, of Saratoga Springs, and from the citizens of the place, went down to see them, and to invite the field officers, and the men who had been recruited in this place, to come up and be present at a public reception.—Col. Searing, on considering the matter, ascertained that he could not do it unless the reception could be given on Monday the 1st of June. As the train from Albany would arrive at 9 A. M. on Monday, there was but little time in which to make the requisite preparations to meet these gallant men. Notwithstanding this, at the time the southern train came in on Monday, a sufficient platform had been erected on the east side of Franklin Square, facing west, by the junction of two platform cars, side by side, with planks between, decorated with proper flogs, and furnished with benches and chairs.
The fire companies, trustees and citizens turned out, and Major P. H. Cowen kindly consented to act as the marshal of the day. He was assisted by J. N. Case, Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, and by E. Isbell as deputy marshal.
When the war-worn remnant of this sterling regiment arrived, we were somewhat pained to see how few of them were left. Col. Searing was as stalwart, erect and energetic as ever, though browned by exposure and hard service. So also were the other officers of the regiment, as well as what remained of the rank and file. Only three companies were represented, companies D, F and G. They, with their company officers, were received in front of the platform, on the west, while the Colonel, Lieut. Colonel and Major took their places on the Speaker's stand.
The President of the village, J. H. White, then delivered the following address of welcome:—
Colonel Searing, Officers and Soldiers of the Thirtieth:—It becomes my agreeable duty, on behalf of the corporate authorities of this village, and the people of this locality, to extend to you, on your return from the fields of battle and of danger, a cordial welcome.
Two years ago you suddenly left the quiet pursuits of civil life, and the comforts and security of home, to live upon the tented field, and to subject yourselves to the wasting influences of a sickly climate.
For two years you have been soldiers,—not fancy soldiers—not soldiers of parade, but soldiers who had constantly to move in front of a watchful and vengeful enemy, and who, upon many a stricken field, have had to expose yourselves to every missile and means of death or mutilation. For two years you have had to make long and sudden marches, to undergo privations of food, of clothing, and of the shelter of houses; and yet I am proud to say, and we are all proud to know, that you have done your duty like men, without complaint, and fought your battles like heroes, without flinching. Sustained by the pride of manhood, by the love of country, by the sense of being in the right, and by the hope that this enormous rebellion would soon be overwhelmed by the masses we have been hurling against it, you have upheld the honor of the old flag in every engagement and in every campaign. The bloody fields of Bull Run, South Mountain, of Antietam, of Fredericksburg, and others, where the bones of so many of your comrades are laid, attest that the spirit of your fathers still remains with their sons, and that the fighting days of 1776 are revived in full vigor in 1863. The memory of the "Iron Brigade," will long remain with the armies of the Potomac and the Rappahannock.
Soldiers! you have now, after the performance of all these arduous duties, again returned to your friends, and to the quiet habits of industrious civilians. You will never regret the service you have, to the best of your ability, sought to render the country. The dangers you have run, will continue to do you honor for the rest of your lives. Men will remember you, and say, as they point you out, "that man was one of the first volunteers in the war of the great rebellion. He was at South Mountain, at Bull Run, at Antietam, and at Fredericksburg; he belonged to the "Iron-Brigade."
Soldiers! We receive you, and your gallant officers, with gladness. We know that men who behave so well in the field, and arc so patient upon the march, must make good citizens and members of society, when peace shall again be restored, and when all the hardships and dangers you have had to undergo, shall be forgotten.—Your experience of actual warfare will have taught you its actual horrors, and you will also have learned the value of the glorious institutions which rendered those horrors necessary. Peace, repose and freedom, are the sure rewards of soldierly valor in a righteous cause.
Soldiers! I regret to recall that the gallant Col. Frisby, who first led you to the field, has sealed his devotion to the service with his blood. Peace to his ashes and honor to his memory.—His equally gallant successor, Col.  Searing, today, happily, our honored guest, with you, has sought to emulate his old commander, and has successfully led you in the path of victory and honor. While we thus congratulate ourselves upon what has been done, and upon our brighter hopes for the future, we must still remember and regret the brave and the dead,—the soldiers who have, like the lamented Frisby, lost their lives during the struggle, and the remains of most of whom, now slumber in a distant land.—Whether it was the deadly bullet, the bayonet thrust, or that malignant scourage [sic] of armies, the Typhoid fever that carried them off, makes no dif­ference; they should equally be honored.
Colonel! We tender you our congratulations and thanks for the services you, with your brave command, have rendered the nation.—The honor of old Saratoga has remained untar­nished in your keeping. The grandsons can now be as proud as their grand sires, and if there was once a "Stillwater" there has since been a "South Mountain."
Col. Searing then replied, expressing himself grateful for the tokens of kindly feeling and honor which he, his officers and men had received. He next paid a generous tribute to the gallantry of the soldiers who had been under his command; he said that they had never flinched; that he had seen them under all circumstances of peril; that at the battle of Bull Run, after being decimated by shot and shell and out of ammunition, as he rode along the lines, his men cried out, "Colonel, we are out of cartridges, what shall we do next?" and on being told to stand firm, or to advance, they would remain in line, or make a charge as steadily as if they were all still together, and  none had been killed. The Colonel then alluded to the prospects and objects of the war. He was firmly of opinion that the Union must be restored, and as the rebels were unwillingly to yield, and abide by the guaranties of the constitution, it must be by force of arms. He spoke of the desperate fighting character of the Southern soldiers, and paid to them the tribute which brave men always yield to the brave.
Col. Searing then referred to the pleasing surprise he had felt on hearing the reception address of Gov. Seymour. He had been told that this State was the very hot bed of what is called "Copperhead-ism," but that if Gov. Seymour's remarks made him a "copperhead," he (Col. Searing) might also be classed as a "Copperhead." Governor Seymour had said nothing but what was loyal, manly and patriotic. He was in favor of using all the power of the country to aid the government in putting down the rebellion and to restore the Union. After some other pleasant allusions, to the people of Saratoga Springs, (and to the ladies in particular,) Col. Searing turned to his friends and companions of the Fire Department and spoke of those who had followed him to the war, mentioning Sergeant James Lowrey, one of them, who, at the battle of Bull Run after three color bearers had fallen, once more raised the colors and advanced in front of the line, alone, when he was shot down,
The speech was that of an able, manly, brave and patriotic man. We have not, for a long time listened to such another one. We regret that we cannot report it literally, but we speak of it according to the pleasing impression it left upon our mind.
It was followed, after a loud call, by some remarks from Lieut. Col. Chrysler, his second in command,—a bluff, cordial, genial, jovial soldier—a man who would evidently lead a forlorn hope or face a bevy of ladies. Chrysler spoke chiefly of the bravery and steadiness of the men and said there was not one of them who was not entitled to as much credit as the officers, (if not more), because they had harder duties to perform and equal dangers to face. Chrysler is evidently one of the "unflinching," one of the "bravest among the brave." Major Perry was then loudly called for. He responded briefly, exhibiting a flag which had been presented to Company D, by the ladies of Saratoga, when it left under his com­mand. It had not been carried in battle, as it was against regulations to have more than one flag to a regiment, but it had been cherished and   carried with them in their marches, and was re­turned untarnished. Major Perry is a fine sol­dierly looking man; and, we are told, has gained greatly upon the confidence and good will of the   men.
The Reception, on the whole, was gratifying to the people of the village and vicinity—we sincerely hope it was the same with the officers and soldiers of the regiment. It was a sudden and offhand affair, and we are happy to say that every body seemed pleased. Tokens of approval and enthusiasm met the procession every where along the line of its march. Each of the field officers bore in his hand a boquet [sic] of flowers,—an indication that the ladies have not been indifferent to the services of these brave men or their faithful and patriotic followers. After the march through the village, the soldiers, officers and invited guests were treated to a cold collation at White's Hotel.

ATLAS & ARGUS
MONDAY MORNING, JUNE 1, 1863.
Arrival and Reception of the Thirtieth Regiment.
This Regiment arrived here early Saturday morning, on board of the steamer Vanderbilt. A salute of a hundred guns bade them welcome. A large crowd of friends met thorn, and they proceeded, at 7 o'clock, under escort of the
Committee of Arrangements, to breakfast, at the Stanwix, Merchants' and Exchange Hotels.
After breakfast the Regiment proceeded to the Barracks, under escort of Mayor Perry, Alds. Wilson, Harcourt, and Chief Engineer McQuade. Arrived there, and forming a hollow, His Honor the Mayor addressed them as follows.
Officers and Soldiers of the 30th Regiment.
In behalf of the Common Council and the citizens of Albany I welcome you back from the arduous duties of the field of battle. The enthusiasm manifested on your arrival home, speaks the true sense of our people, and their appreciation of your invaluable services in defence of the cause of our common country.—You have been constantly on duty since called into service. You have been engaged in eleven battles and twenty-six skirmishes. You have marched more miles than any other regiment in the same length of time that you have been in the service. You have fought as heroically as any of them during the war, and we have every reason to feel proud of your record.
Fellow Citizens: Let our voices go up from every heart as it were the voice of a trumpet, with thanksgiving and praise to the gallant and noble 30th N. Y. S. Volunteers, who have so bravely borne their part in the great struggle.
The war-worn banner that you have rallied around so often, speaks in language that cannot be mistaken. In your hands it has been righteously defended, and its tattered condition is the best evidence of your bravery.
But while we rejoice at meeting you again, we cannot fail to remember the sad death of our much lamented and beloved Col. Frisby.—That sorrowful event brought deep sadness to our hearts. In the death of Col. Frisby, our city lost a worthy citizen, a devoted patriot; and you, a brave and gallant commander, who, in the hour of his country's peril, animated by the purest motives, entered the service and nobly offered up his life upon the field of battle for the cause of his distracted country. The citizens of Albany, who loved the man could not rest until his remains were safely deposited in our Cemetery, and on the 15th of September last, his remains were followed to their last resting place by a large concourse of people who will revere his name whilst memory lasts.
In his loss, as in the loss of many more of your comrades, we deeply sympathize with you. May the God of Heaven protect the widows and orphans of those who have thus laid down their lives for our common cause. Finally, my friends, we feel grateful to Divine Providence that we are permitted to welcome you back to your friends and your homes, and when history shall proclaim the sad tale of this unhappy war, the noble and patriotic deeds of the Thirtieth Regiment will, I am confident, form one of its brightest pages.
The reply of Colonel Searing, though brief was very happy and interesting, embracing as it did a statement of several important events in the history of the Regiment.
Subsequently the Regiment partook of a substantial dinner as guests of several committees of arrangement from Troy, Lansingburgh and Saratoga.
In the evening they participated in a grand torchlight procession, under escort of the Fire Department. The Department was out in full force, and the display, in point of brilliancy and indeed, in every other respect, was all that could have been anticipated.
The route of procession was as follows:
Through Broadway to Church. Church to Lydius, Lydius to Pearl, Pearl Clinton Avenue, Clinton Avenue to Broadway, Broadway to State, State to Capitol Park.
The line, under the management of Chief Engineer McQuade, assisted by the Assistant Engineers, was formed about 9 o'clock, and it was 11 o'clock before the parade was over. The firemen, who were nearly six hundred strong, carried, in addition to their torches, a large number of Roman Candles; as those were being fired, as the procession moved through the principal streets, the effect was beautiful. It was a delightful evening, and the streets were packed with people, who, with cheers and waving of handkerchiefs, and otherwise testified their pleasure at the hearty welcome extended to our brave volunteers.
At many points along the route of the procession, dwellings were brilliantly lighted with lanterns and trimmed with small flags. In Lydius street, particularly, this was the case. Here a great number of the houses were illuminated and tastefully decorated. The dwellings of Alds. Harcourt and Kennedy were particularly noticeable for an elegantly arranged arch that had been constructed between them.
In Pearl street, too, there were several houses neatly decorated with colored lights, flowers and flags.
A striking feature of the procession was the fire steamer "Osgood," of Troy, trimmed with red, white and blue lanterns. The powerful, and at the same time, beautiful steamer, attracted general notice.
The company, consisting of twenty members, rode, while their steamer was drawn by four splendid looking horses.
The Mayor and Common Council of Troy, took part in the procession, as guests of the Mayor and Aldermen of this city.
At the Capitol Governor Seymour and Gen. Sprague were introduced to the Regiment, and addressed them briefly, congratulating the men on the valuable services they had rendered their country and in acknowledgement of the brave manner in which they had upheld the reputation of the State on the battle-field.
After the procession, the soldiers were treated to a collation at Peck's Restaurant, on Broadway, and subsequently a large party of gentlemen visited the office of Chief Engineer McQuade.
It was a very happy affair throughout, and reflects much credit upon those to whom the duty of making the arrangements, was committed.
The Thirtieth was organized under the supervision of the lamented Col. Frisby, who retained command, as he did the affection of every man in the Regiment, until he was killed while heroically fighting at the last battle of Bull Run, on the 30th of August.
The following is a list of the present officers of the Regiment:
FIELD 0FFICERS.
Colonel—William M. Searing.
LIEUT. Colonel—M. H. Chrysler.
Major—A. J. Perry.
STAFF OFFICERS.
Quartermaster—S. V. Trull.
Adjutant—Z. M. Knight.
Surgeon—F. L. R. Chapin.
First Assistant Surgeon—R. M. Deering.
Second Assistant Surgeon—H. T. Hanks.
LINE OFFICERS.
The Captains are given in the order of their seniority:
Company I—Captain, J. M. Landon; 1st Lieutenant, Charles Roth.
Company D—Captain, W. L. Lanning; 1st Lieutenant none; 2d Lieutenant, H. H. Bryant.
Company B—Captain, W. P. Tillman; 1st Lieutenant, Thomas Hall; 2d Lieutenant, William S. Haight.
Company G—Captain, A. L. Gurney; 1st Lieutenant, Thomas Smith; 2d Lieutenant, D. T. Burnham.
Company B—Captain, S. Scott; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, ____ Smith.
Company E—Captain, Joseph Williams; 1st Lieutenant, Theodore Buckman; 2d Lieutenant, William S. Jones.
Company A—Captain, John Campbell; 1st Lieutenant, William Shelby; 2d Lieutenant, Alexander Gillespie.
Company C—Captain. S. D. Potts; 1st Lieutenant Edward Van Vorst.
Company K—Captain, Adam Lampman; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, Wm. S. Betts.
Company F—1st Lieutenant, James M. Andrews, commanding.

ATLAS & ARGUS.
MONDAY MORNING, JUNE 1, 1863.
ARRIVAL AND RECEPTION OF THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT.
This Regiment arrived here early Saturday morning, on board of the steamer Vanderbilt. A salute of a hundred guns bade them welcome. A large crowd of friends met them, and they proceeded, at 7 o'clock, under escort of the
Committee of Arrangements, to breakfast, at the Stanwix, Merchants' and Exchange Hotels.
After breakfast the Regiment proceeded to the Barracks, under escort of Mayor Perry, Alds. Wilson, Harcourt, and Chief Engineer McQuade. Arrived there, and forming a hollow, His Honor the Mayor addressed them as follows.
Officers and Soldiers of the 30th Regiment:
In behalf of the Common Council and the citizens of Albany I welcome you back from the arduous duties of the field of battle. The enthusiasm manifested on your arrival home, speaks the true sense of our people, and their appreciation of your invaluable services in defence of the cause of our common country;—You have been constantly on duty since called into service. You have been engaged in eleven battles and twenty-six skirmishes. You have marched more miles than any other regiment in the same length of time that you have been in the service. You have fought as heroically as any of them during the war, and we have every reason to feel proud of your record.
Fellow Citizens: Let our voices go up from every heart as it were the voice of a trumpet, with thanksgiving and praise to the gallant and noble 30th N. Y. S. Volunteers, who have so bravely borne their part in the great struggle.
The war-worn banner that you have rallied around so often, speaks in language that cannot be mistaken. In your hands, it has been righteously defended, and its tattered condition is the best evidence of your bravery.
But while we rejoice at meeting you again, we cannot fail to remember the sad death of our much lamented and beloved Col. Frisby.—That sorrowful event brought deep sadness to our hearts. In the death of Col. Frisby, our city  lost a worthy citizen, a devoted patriot; and you, a brave and gallant commander, who in the hour of his country's peril, animated by the purest motives, entered the service and nobly offered up his life upon the field of battle for the cause of his distracted country. The citizens of Albany, who loved the man could not rest until his remains were safely deposited in our Cemetery, and on the 15th of September last, his remains were followed to their last resting place by a large concourse of people, who will revere his name whilst memory lasts.
In his loss, as in the loss of many more of your comrades, we deeply sympathize with you. May the God of Heaven protect the widows and orphans of those who have thus laid down their lives for our common cause. Finally, my friends, we feel grateful to Divine Providence that we are permitted to welcome you back to your friends and your homes, and when history shall proclaim the sad tale of this unhappy war, the noble and patriotic deeds of the Thirtieth Regiment will, I am confident, form one of its brightest pages.
The reply of Colonel Searing, though brief, was very happy and interesting, embracing as it did a statement of several important events in the history of the Regiment.
Subsequently the Regiment partook of a substantial dinner as guests of several committees of arrangement from Troy, Lansingburgh and Saratoga.
In the evening they participated in a grand torchlight procession, under escort of the Fire Department. The Department was out in full force, and the display, in point of brilliancy, and indeed, in every other respect, was all that could have been anticipated.
The route of procession was as follows:—Through Broadway to Church. Church to Lydius, Lydius to Pearl, Pearl to Clinton Avenue, Clinton Avenue to Broadway, Broadway to State, State to Capitol Park.
The line, under the management of Chief Engineer McQuade, assisted by the Assistant Engineers, was formed about 9 o'clock, and it was 11 o'clock before the parade was over. The firemen, who were nearly six hundred strong, carried, in addition to their torches, a large number of Roman Candles; as these were being fired, as the procession moved through the principal streets, the effect was beautiful. It was a delightful evening, and the streets were packed with people, who, with cheers and waving of handkerchiefs, and otherwise testified their pleasure at the hearty welcome extended to our brave volunteers.
At many points along the route of the procession, dwellings were brilliantly lighted with lanterns and trimmed with small flags. In Lydius street, particularly, this was the case. Here a great number of the houses were illuminated and tastefully decorated. The dwellings of Alds. Harcourt and Kennedy were particularly noticeable for an elegantly arranged arch that had been constructed between them.
In Pearl street, too, there were several houses neatly decorated with colored lights, flowers and flags.
A striking feature of the procession was the fire steamer "Osgood," of Troy, trimmed with red, white and blue lanterns. The powerful, and at the same time, beautiful steamer, attracted general notice.
The company, consisting of twenty members rode, while their steamer was drawn by four splendid looking horses.
The Mayor and Common Council of Troy took part in the procession, as guests of the Mayor and Aldermen of this city.
At the Capitol Governor Seymour and Gen. Sprague were introduced to the Regiment, and addressed them briefly, congratulating them on the valuable services they had rendered their country and in acknowledgement of the brave manner in which they had upheld the reputation of the State on the battle-field.
After the procession, the soldiers were treated to a collation at Peck's Restaurant, on Broadway, and subsequently a large party of gentlemen visited the office of Chief Engineer McQuade.
It was a very happy affair throughout, and reflects much credit upon those to whom the duty of making the arrangements, was committed.
The Thirtieth was organized under the supervision of the lamented Col. Frisby, who retained command, as he did the affection of every man in the Regiment, until he was killed while heroically fighting at the last battle of
Bull Run, on the 30th of August.
The following is a list of the present officers of the Regiment:
FIELD OFFICERS.
Colonel—William M. Searing.
Lieut. Colonel—M. H. Chrysler.
Major—A. J. Perry.
STAFF OFFICERS.
Quartermaster—S. V. Trull.
Adjutant—Z. M. Knight.
Surgeon—F. L. R. Chapin.
First Assistant Surgeon—R. M. Deering.
Second Assistant Surgeon—H. T. Hanks. 

LINE OFFICERS.
The Captains are given in the order of the seniority:
Company I—Captain, J. M. Landon; 1st Lieutenant, Charles Roth.
Company D—Captain, W. L. Lanning; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, H. H. Bryan.
Company H—Captain, W. P. Tillman; 1st Lieutenant, Thomas Hall; 2d Lieutenant, William S. Haight.
Company G—Captain, A. L. Gurney; 1st Lieutenant, Thomas Smith; 2d Lieutenant D. T. Burnham.
Company B—Captain, S. Scott; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, ____ Smith.
Company K—Captain, Joseph Williams; 1st Lieutenant, Theodore Buckman; 2d Lieutenant, William S. Jones.
Company A—Captain, John Campbell; 1st Lieutenant, William Shelby; 2d Lieutenant, Alexander Gillespie.
Company C—Captain, S. D. Potts; 1st Lieutenant, Edward Van Vorst.
Company K—Captain, Adam Lampman; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, Wm. S. Betts.
Company F—1st Lieutenant, James M. Andrews, commanding.

ARRIVAL AND RECEPTION OF THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT IN ALBANY.—The brave Thirtieth arrived at Albany early Saturday morning, and was welcomed with a salute of 100 guns, and the cheers of an immense concourse of citizens. The regiment, escorted by the Albany Committee of Arrangements, proceeded to breakfast at the Stanwix, Merchant's and Exchange Hotels. After breakfast, the regiment marched to the Albany barracks, where they remained until evening.—During the day, the regiment dined with the committee of Arrangements of the Albany Common Council, and invited guests from Lansingburgh, Saratoga, and other places.
Many of the men belonging to this city and Lansingburgh, procured leave of absence, and visited their friends and acquaintances in the course of the day, returning in the evening to be present at the formal reception.

THE DISPLAY IN THE EVENING—RECEPTION OF THE MAYOR AND COMMON COUNCIL OF TROY.
In compliance with an invitation from the authorities of Albany, Mayor Van Alstyne and several members of the Common Council were present and participated in the reception exercises in that city on Saturday evening. The delegation was composed of the Mayor, Ald. Gary, Rankin, McKeon, Stanton, Gurley, Regan, Grace, Starbuck, Prentice, Green and Smart. Gen. Allen and Staff, and Engineers Starbuck and Nobles and Chief Barron, also went down. The party started from the Mayor's office at seven o'clock, in carriages, and reached Albany about eight o'clock. They were received by Mayor Perry and members of the Common Council, at the Mayor's office, in the City Hall. A bountiful spread had been prepared, and the Trojans were cordially welcomed and handsomely entertained.

ARRIVAL OF GOV. SEYMOUR.
After an absence of a few minutes, Mayor Perry arrived, accompanied by Gov. Seymour, whom he introduced to the assemblage. The Governor  remarked that he was proud to meet the Mayor and Common Council of the city of Troy, as well as the Mayor and Common Council of the city of Albany ... ... any, and he was gratified to witness such evidences of fraternal regard between the representatives of both cities.
Addressing Mayor Van Alstyne, the Governor incidentally remarked: "I have not yet had the pleasure of visiting your city, but I hope to do so at some future time." The Mayor replied by saying that the authorities and citizens of Troy would be highly gratified to meet him at such time as it might suit his convenience to visit their city.
The interview with the Governor, which lasted about ten minutes, was of a pleasant and agreeable character—gratifying in the highest degree to all present—more especially so to the Trojans.—Cheers were proposed and heartily given, for Gov. S., and by the Trojans for Mayor Perry and the Common Council of Albany. The demonstration was well calculated to strengthen the bonds of fraternal regard which should always exist between "Sturgeondom" and "Illium."
The exercises ended, the entire party proceeded in carriages down State street to Broadway, where the procession was forming.

THE PROCESSION.
The line was formed on Broadway, and was composed wholly of the firemen, the regiment, and the city authorities of Albany and Troy, in carriages. The regiment was flanked by files of firemen, and as the procession marched down Broadway, the scene was striking and beautiful. Almost every man in line was furnished with a supply of rockets, Roman candles, &c., which were set off in great profusion along the route. Many private residences were illuminated, and the soldiers were everywhere cordially greeted and welcomed. After parading through the principal streets, the procession again emerged on Broadway and turned up State street to the Capitol Park. The view in State street, as the procession wended its way in a serpentine line, up that magnificent avenue, was beautiful in the extreme. The steady blaze of the torches, the lurid glare of the rockets, and the shouts of the multitude—were at once soul-stirring and inspiring, and must have convinced the soldiers of the gratitude entertained for them by their fellow-citizens.
Arriving at the Capital Park, the regiment was drawn up in line, preparatory to being addressed by Gov. Seymour.

SPEECH OF GOV. SEYMOUR.
The Governor, accompanied by Adjutant General Sprague and Mayors Perry and Van Alstyne, advanced to the steps of the Capitol, when the former, addressing Col. Searing, delivered a brief, but eloquent speech of welcome. He remarked that the history of the Thirtieth regiment was the history of the Army of the Potomac. Your decimated ranks and blood stained banners, as well as the absence of the noble man who first led you to the field, attests more eloquently than language can express, the manner in which you have performed your duty. In every conflict in which you have been engaged, you left behind numbers of your comrades, whose blood will forever enrich the soil of the enemy's country. Your record is a noble one, and will for all time stand as a monument to the bravery and devotion of the sons of the Empire State.
Soldiers of the Thirtieth regiment: In the name of the people of the great State of New York, I thank you for your service. I thank you for the imperishable honor which you have conferred upon your State. I thank you for the sacrifices which you have made, and the sufferings which you have endured, in behalf of the glorious flag of your country. In the name of your fellow citizens, I welcome you to your homes and fireside—I welcome you to the enjoyment of your former privileges as citizens of the State of New York—now ... to you by privation and suffering. Soldiers—again I bid you welcome, thrice welcome; and whatever may be your future career, whether you return to the tented field or follow the peaceful avocations of life, my heartfelt prayer is, that the Almighty will bless you in all your undertakings, and protect you through life.
The Governor's remarks were received with great applause by the soldiers.

COL. SEARING'S REPLY.
When the cheering had subsided, Col. Searing replied to His Excellency in a pert and soldier-like address. Sir, said he, the highest reward coveted by a soldier is to merit the thanks and good wishes of his superior. Since we joined the army, our constant endeavor has been to preserve the honor of our State, and uphold the flag of our beloved country. The cheering, eloquent words which your Excellency has seen fit to bestow upon us, as well as the demonstration of our fellow citizens to-night, more than compensates us for our efforts in the field. I can only thank your Excellency, on behalf of the officers and men of my command, for encouraging words spoken this evening, and for the complimentary manner in which you have referred to our humble efforts in behalf of our common country.

PRESENTATION OF THE REGIMENTAL FLAG.
Before concluding his remarks, Col. S., turning towards the Governor, said: It only remains for me, to present to your Excellency the Flag of the Thirtieth regiment.
Colonel—I accept, in the name of the people, the flag which you have borne through the conflict—the flag that never has been dishonored—that never trailed before the foe. It will be deposited among the treasured war trophies of the State—there to remain as a monument to the patriotism, endurance, and heroism of the Thirtieth regiment.
The Governor retired amid the cheers of the multitude.

ADJUTANT GENERAL SPRAGUE
Was then introduced, and spoke eloquently of the Thirtieth regiment. At the conclusion of his speech, cheers were proposed and given by the soldiers for Gov. Seymour, Gen. McClellan, Gen. Sprague, the Mayor, Common Council, Fire Department and citizens of Albany, and the authorities and citizens of Troy.
The regiment was again escorted by the firemen to the Albany barracks.
The Trojans adjourned to the Mayor's office, at the City Hall, where they were again entertained. Mayor Van Alstyne briefly returned thanks for the cordial manner in which his associates and himself had been entertained, after which the delegation left for home, where they arrived about 12 o'clock.

THE RANKIN STEAMER.
A very prominent and much admired feature in the procession was the Rankin steamer. The engine was very tastefully decorated with colored lanterns, &c., and with steam up and the whistle blowing, attracted a great deal of attention. The hose-cart and wagon of the Rankin were also handsomely decorated.
The members of the company chartered Gladding's carryall, and accompanied the steamer.—The company are entitled to much credit for the excellent display made on the occasion. The steamer accompanied the soldiers to the barracks, and arrived home early yesterday morning.
Before leaving for home, the officers and members of the steamer were handsomely entertained members of the ... at the McCardiel House, by Engineer McQuade.—A card of thanks in another column attests the gratitude of the "boys."

RECEPTION OF THE LANSINGBURG CO. TO-DAY.
The Lansingburg company, Capt. Campbell, will leave Albany at 8 o'clock this morning, accompanied by Sullivan's Band and Relief No. 11, for Troy, on board the steamer G. C. Davidson. The boat will land at the foot of Division street, and the procession march up River as far as Hoosick, where the firemen and the military will take the Horse cars for the 'Burgh. It will form on the public square, and will embrace the fire department of the village, and one or two visiting companies. A salute of 34 guns will be fired on the arrival of the company, by Lieut. Curran, of the City Artillery. The soldiers will be entertained at the Phoenix Hotel, by the village authorities, and No. 11, of Albany, will be entertained by No. 4, at Nolan's Anderson House, No. 291 State street.—The procession will move about 11 A. M. Doring's and Sullivan's Bands, of this city, have been engaged for the occasion. Mr. A. Comstock will welcome the soldiers, and Mr. Chas. E. Brintnall, of this city, will respond in behalf of the company.
The "Garden" will no doubt be agitated, and will wear its gayest garb.

Reception of the Field Officers and Companies D, F and G, of the 30th Regiment, at Saratoga.
SARATOGA SPRINGS, June 1, 1863.
Editor Albany Express:
This has been a day that will long dwell in the memories of the citizens of Saratoga, and the soldiers of the 30th Regiment, who have been honored by them.
When it was announced that the 30th Regiment was about returning from their two years' service it was determined to honor the field officers and remains of Companies D, F and G, recruited in this place and vicinity, by a public reception, and accordingly a public meeting was held and a committee of arrangements appointed, to whom was joined the trustees of the village, who signified a desire to join in it and make it a joint affair. Funds were raised and a committee appointed to proceed to Albany to meet the Regiment on its arrival there; but it was expected that several days' notice would be given of the arrival of the men, in order that time might be had for preparation. Contrary to expectation, however, it was not until Friday evening that news was received that the Regiment would arrive in Albany the next morning, and accordingly on Saturday morning the committee delegated for that purpose proceeded to Albany, and to their surprise learned that the men were so impatient to return that they would be here on Monday morning. A message was telegraphed here to that effect, but it failed to reach the person intended, so that no notice was given until the committee returned, and it was not until Sunday afternoon that any hand-bills or public announcement was made of the affair or intended programme, with line of march. It was not therefore expected that there would be much display along the line of the procession, but a few very handsome displays were made.
Monday morning was spent by the committee and firemen in busy preparation, and on the arrival of the train at 9 o'clock the firemen were arranged in a square in front of an impromptu platform prepared of two railroad cars on side track, near the depot, and the officers and men were soon arranged thereon for the reception. Over the platform was a banner inscribed, "Iron Brigade; we welcome our Returning Heroes."
Major P. H. Cowen, of the 115th Regiment, who was home on a temporary leave of absence, having kindly assented to act as chief marshal, I desire in this place to make a public acknowledgment of the obligations of all concerned for his efficient services in arranging and carrying through the whole affair.
After the field officers had been arranged on the platform, John H. White, Esq., as President of the village, made a welcoming speech, which was appropriately replied to by Col. Searing; and then Lieut. Col. Chrysler, in response to a call, made a few remarks, and Major Perry returned to the President a flag presented to Company F when it left here, under his command, a little over two years ago. It had not been carried in any engagements, the regulations not permitting it; but it had been preserved, and carried with the regiment on its marches, and the men had not, in any of their battles, done anything to forfeit the confidence reposed when it entrusted to them by the ladies of Saratoga.
After the exercises at the stand, a procession was formed, headed by the Committee of Arrangements, and several of the principal citizens of the village, (among whom were Judges Bockes and Hulbert, and the clergy), in carriages, followed by the firemen, led by the Fort Edward Band as escort for the returning heroes. This procession marched through the principal streets for about an hour, being finally dismissed at "White's Hotel, where a dinner was provided by the Committee for the soldiers and other guests, and the affair was thus brought to a very happy conclusion.
The brief time between the issuing of the notice and the arrival of the soldiers prevented many from attempting any decorations; but there were a few very happy things to notice as the procession passed. Excelsior Fire Company, No. 8, of which Col. Searing had been a leading member, and which also numbered among its members Sergeant James Lowry, killed whilst advancing the regimental colors at Bull Run, and Corporal Plumketty, killed at Antietam, had prepared a banner which they got permission to hang across Broadway, from the Centre House, on which was inscribed—

THIRTIETH REGIMENT.
"Welcome those who've bravely fought;
Honor to those who've nobly died."

From the Saratogian office was hung a National flag, to which was attached a banner, inscribed—"Iron Brigade. Welcome to the heroes of Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg."
Several buildings displayed flags, and at one place on Front street, corner of Van Dam, three ladies stood in the door—one dressed in red, another in white, and the third in blue, holding wreaths of flowers—a device which drew cheer upon cheer from the soldiers as they passed.
At Dr. Beecher's Temple Grove Institute the procession halted. As the soldiers got opposite, the young lady teachers and pupils sung a patriotic song for them.
The dinner was then served by Messrs. Aikin & Dunn, at 12 o'clock, as all the soldiers were impatient to avail themselves of the leaves of absence granted them to return to their homes. The dinner was a substantial and good one, and as soon as it was over the soldiers left, with their friends in waiting, in all directions. SPECTATOR.

HOME MATTERS.
Reception of the Thirtieth Regiment.
The reception of the gallant Thirtieth Regiment on Saturday evening was a very brilliant one. The firemen turned out in full force, with torches, producing a fine effect. One of the most noticeable features of the procession was the steamer Hugh Rankin, from Troy, which was brilliantly illuminated with colored lights. The Mayor and Common Council of Troy, together with the city authorities of this city, formed part of the procession. A large number of houses along the route were illuminated, and the display of fireworks was effective. After passing through the principal streets, the procession passed up State street to the Capitol, where the regiment was received and welcomed by Gov. Seymour.
The Thirtieth was organized under the supervision of the lamented Col. Frisby, who retained command, as he did the affection of every man in the Regiment, until he was killed while heroically fighting at the last battle of Bull Run, on the 30th of August. The Lansingburgh Gazette gives the following brief history of the Regiment:
The Regiment was mustered in in May, and left Albany (Col. Frisby commanding) in June, 1861, with 741 enlisted men and a full complement of officers. In the fall of the same year, 132 were raised for the unexpired term of the Regiment. In the fall of 1862, 268 recruits were enlisted for three years, making in all 1,123 enlisted men. For several months after the Regiment left home, it was stationed near Washington; but when the Peninsular campaign was opened, it was as a part of McDowell's corps moved to the Rappahannock.
On the 18th of April, 1862, the Thirtieth, with the rest of Gen. Anger's Brigade, took possession of Fredericksburg, driving the enemy across the river, and was only prevented from pursuing him by the burning of the bridges over the Rappahannock. The regiment remained there until August. During that time the brigade to which it belonged, made several brilliant reconnoissances, one of which was towards Spottsylvania Court House, when Stuart's cavalry attacked them in their rear, taking several of their number prisoners. After which our men attacked the rebels and drove and pursued them about seven miles, On the 10th of August the regiment left Falmouth and marched to Culpepper to reinforce Gen. Pope after the battle of Cedar Mountain and reached there on the 11th. Next morning preparations were made to attack the enemy, but on the skirmishers being thrown out, it was found that the enemy had retreated. They lay at Cedar Mountain until about the 17th, when Gen. Pope was ordered to fall back across the Rappahannock. From Culpepper the Thirtieth brought up the rear of the army, and was the last to cross the river. For three days and nights at the Rappahannock, the regiment was constantly under fire, and was successful in holding the enemy in check, at this point; and was also engaged with the enemy at Sulphur Springs. On the 28th it took part in the short but desperate battle of Gainesville, holding the field after the battle. On the 20th they were engaged in the ill-managed fight of Bull Run, and suffered severely. On the 30th, the battle being renewed, the Thirtieth was among the first to enter the fight, distinguishing themselves for their bravery.
Owing to one of the divisions giving way, on their left, the enemy succeeded in planting a battery which plowed through their ranks, making great slaughter among them. Here the heroic Capt. King was killed in front of his company, and the brave Colonel Frisby fell while leading on his men. This devolved the command upon Lieut. Col. Searing, who has proved himself a worthy successor of the gallant dead. After the battle they returned to their old camp at Upton's Hill. Remaining there a few days, they were ordered off into Maryland, and took an honorable part in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam, where Lieut. Campbell distinguished himself in leading his men of the Lansingburgh company. They were at the battle of Fredericksburg, and under Franklin on the left. They were more fortunate here than in other battles, previously, losing only two men wounded. They also took part in the second battle with Hooker, but lost no men.
From killed, wounded and discharged from disability, the regiment has lost 193 men, leaving its muster out strength about 480. One hundred and fifty-three of the three years' recruits will be left in the service. There are now seventy-two sick and wounded in hospital. Ninety men and six officers have been killed in action. Two hundred and nineteen men and twelve officers have been wounded in action. Only eight man and two officers have died of disease, and two men from accidental causes. Out of the original number that started for the seat of war, but one hundred and eighty-six remain. Co. B, that left Albany ninety-six strong, now has but sixteen of the original number left. Other companies can show a similar depletion. All of the original officers are gone, some of them transferred to other regiments, but most of them martyrs to their country. Beside their services in the field the Thirtieth almost entirely built one of the forts near Washington. We assume that few regiments in the service have done more work, or in a more thorough manner; and none, we venture to say, have suffered less from disease, a proof that both officers and men have been discreet, careful and prudent. They come home, at the expiration of their term of service, with the proud consciousness of having served their country faithfully, and of having earned the heartfelt thanks of every true patriot for the sufferings they have endured, and the kindling smile of every eye, and the cordial grasp of every hand, for the glories they have won.

RECEPTION OF THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT AT SARATOGA.
The citizens of Saratoga have held a public meeting, for the purpose of making arrangements for the reception of the officers and members of Cos. D, F, and G, of the Thirtieth Regiment. The fire department will parade, and the reception will be co-operated in by the citizens generally.

RECEPTION OF CO. A, THIRTIETH REGIMENT IN LANSINGBURGH.
The Gazette says the arrangements for the reception of Company A, Thirtieth Regiment, in that village, appear to be of quite a liberal and complete character, although the day has not has not been fixed upon. About $400 has been raised and appropriated to this end by the committee, and citizens are vicing with each other in a private way in efforts to make the village appear gay as well as festive on the occasion. A. Seaman will act as Marshal, and J. C. Comstock will deliver the reception address.
The following is a list of the present officers of the Regiment:
FIELD OFFICERS.
Colonel—Wm. M. Searing.
Lieut. Colonel—M. H. Chrysler.
Major—A. J. Perry.
STAFF OFFICERS.
Quartermaster—S. V. Trull.
Adjutant—Z. M. Knight.
Surgeon—F. L. R. Chapin.
First Ass't Surgeon—R. M. Deering.
Second Ass't Surgeon—H. T. Hanks.
LINE OFFICERS.
The Captains are given in the order of their seniority:
Company I—Captain, J. M. Landon; 1st Lieutenant, Charles Roth.
Company D—Captain, W. L. Lanning; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, H. H. Bryant.
Company H—Captain, W. P. Tillman; 1st Lieutenant, Thomas Hall; 2d Lieutenant, Wm. S. Haight.
Company G—Captain, A. L. Grurney; 1st Lieutenant, Thomas Smith; 2d Lieutenant, D. T. Burnham.
Company B—Captain, S. Scott; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, ____ Smith.
Company E—Captain, Joseph Williams; Theodore Buckman; 2d Lieutenant,
William S. Jones.
Company A—Captain, John Campbell; 1st Lieutenant, William Shelly; 2d Lieutenant, Alexander Gillespie.
Company C—Captain, S. D. Potts; 1st Lieutenant, Edward Van Vorst.
Company K—Captain, Adam Lampman; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, Wm. S. Betts.
Company F—1st Lieutenant James M. Andrews, commanding.

The Reception.
Of Co. E., 30th N. Y. S. V.
Soon after the commencement of hostilities a company of volunteers was recruited in this city, and left for the seat of war under Capt. Holliday, being attached to the 30th Regiment, Col. Frisbee, and known as Company E. Quite a number of recruits had previously enlisted from Poughkeepsie, but they were scattered through various regiments and companies, so that this was the first organized body upon which we could look and call it a Poughkeepsie company. They left for the seat of war in June, 1861, but were not actively employed till the following year, when they formed part of McDowell's Corps, on the Rappahannock. On the 10th of August the Regiment was sent to reinforce Pope, and afterwards took part in the short but momentous campaign under that General, which ended in the retreat to Washington. In the battle at Gainsville and Bull Run (2d) the Poughkeepsie company lost its Captain, and the regiment its Colonel. Soon afterwards they were again engaged, at the battles of South Mountain and Antietam, bearing in each a distinguished part. They were also present at the battle at Fredericksburgh, under Burnside, and at Chancellorville, under Hooker, but took no prominent part in either. The company left here with 130 men; it returns with 55. Throughout the two years of its service we have never heard a word spoken against it, but it has always been favorably mentioned for accuracy of drill, soldierly bearing, correct discipline, and gallantry in action. The people of Poughkeepsie did well to have a holiday of rejoicing on their return home.
Early in the morning the streets began to wear the aspect of a celebration, flags were hung out from almost every building on the line of march, while many stores were decorated with considerable taste. Among the most conspicuous was the Exchange House at the foot of Main street, splendidly decorated in honor of the event. Passing on further we noticed a large strip of muslin in front of Fowler & Gillen's, on the corner of Main and Clover, on which was inscribed the words, "Honor the Brave." In front of No. Four's Engine House and T. Clegg's shoe store, was another banner, on which was lettered "Welcome Home." Atkin's Dry Goods Store was festooned with the
National colors. A little further along, on the opposite side of the street was a little child in a window, dressed in red, white and blue colors, waving a minature [sic] flag. Among those of our Dry Goods men who decorated their buildings on the occasion were Rescher, Broas, Wilkes, Slee & Co. and a number of others that we cannot spare space to speak of. At the Eastern House flags were suspended across the street. Seward and Hayt in the marble building displayed a fine decoration with national colors. Nelson & Post's building looked fine.
In front of Rice's Female Institute in Mill street was a large banner on which was inscribed "We Welcome the Brave." Mr. Schram's house in Mill street was decorated with American flags.
In Cannon street there was a wreath of flowers reaching from Wright's Seminary to a house opposite. In front of this seminary was also a large banner lettered as follows: "Honor to the Defenders of the Old Flag." The decorations around the city were numerous and reflected much credit on all concerned.
The Procession formed shortly after noon and marched to the river to await the arrival of the City of Albany, having on board the returned volunteers. At ten minutes before two she reached the dock and Co. E marched ashore, while cannon belched forth a salute and all the bells rang out a merry peal of welcome. As soon as preliminaries could be arranged the line moved forward, being composed of the following:
Cavalcade of citizens on horseback.
Seventh Regiment Band.
Companies of the 21st Regiment belonging in this city, preceded by Colonel
Wright and Staff.
A number of returned volunteers from Duyrea's Zouaves and other regiments.
CO. E 30TH N. Y. VOLUNTEERS.
Poughkeepsie Band.
Poughkeepsie Fire Department, in uniform, preceded by the Chief and Assistant Engineers.
Drum Corps.
Students from Warring's Military Institute.
Students from Eastman's Business College.
The procession marched through the principal streets, according to the programme previously announced, being everywhere received with expressions of delight and welcome, the ladies waving their handkerchiefs and dispensing their smiles with the defenders of our national union.
A number of incidents occurred along the route which we cannot avoid mentioning: When the procession passed down Mill st. Co. E, 30th Regiment, was halted directly in front of Rice's Female Institute, where each man was presented with a splendid boquet [sic] by the ladies of that institution. On passing Wright's Seminary our returned heroes were almost suffocated by a shower of boquets [sic]. It was intended to halt the company at this spot, but by some oversight it was not done. During the passage of the
Procession through Noxon street three little girls came out from house No. 32 and presented flowers to our boys. All along the route the returned soldiers were saluted with the greatest enthusiasm.
On arriving at Pine's Hall, the Mayor and Common Council, followed by Company E., proceeded up stairs to the main room where a splendid collation, got up by the ladies, ("God bless 'em") met the view of the beholder.
When all was still a fervent prayer was offered up by the Rev. Mr. Chandler, after which the boys turned their attention to the edibles. During this part of the exercises the friends of the returned soldiers took the opportunity to extend welcomes in person. Many affecting scenes transpired at this junction, among which was that of a mother and child looking for the father and husband, whom they succeeded in finding, and reaching out the child, who shouted "Papa!" the mother bursted into tears as did also the father. Mothers and sisters, wives and sweethearts all met the brave and bronzed veterans with tears of joy. When order was restored, the band played a beautiful opening tune, after which the following persons addressed the audience:
Mr. Allard Anthony, Rev. Mr. Corning, Benson J. Lossing and Ex Mayor Bowne.—After the remarks of the speakers were concluded nine cheers were given for the returned soldiers as a body, nine for Capt. Williams and nine for Seargeat [sic] Kipp. Who led the boys into the fight at Bull Run No. 2, after which the exercises were concluded and the audience adjourned. Co. E then marched to quarters provided for them and dismissed Everything connected with the arrangements for the reception was well carried out and reflects credit on all concerned. God bless Co. E.

Reception of the Field Officers and Companies D, F and G, of the 30th Regiment, at Saratoga.
SARATOGA SPRINGS, June 1, 1863.
Editor Albany Express:
This has been a day that will long dwell in the memories of the citizens of Saratoga, and the soldiers of the 30th Regiment, who have been honored by them.
When it was announced that the 30th Regiment was about returning from their two years' service, it was determined to honor the field officers and remains of Companies D, F and G, recruited in this place and vicinity, by a public reception, and accordingly a public meeting was held and a committee of arrangements appointed, to whom was joined the trustees of the village; who signified a desire to join in it and make it a joint affair. Funds were raised and a committee appointed to proceed to Albany to meet the Regiment on its arrival there; but it was expected that several days' notice would be given of the arrival of the men, in order that time might be had for preparation. Contrary to expectation however, it was not until Friday evening that news was received that the Regiment would arrive in Albany the next morning, and accordingly on Saturday morning the committee delegated for that purpose proceeded to Albany, and to their surprise learned that the men were so impatient to return that they would be here on Monday morning. A message was telegraphed here to that effect, but failed to reach the person intended, so that no notice was given until the committee returned, and it was not until Sunday afternoon that any hand-bills or public announcement was made of the affair or intended programme, with line of march. It was not therefore expected that there would be much display along the line of the procession, but a few very handsome displays were made.
Monday morning was spent by the committee and firemen in busy preparation, and on the arrival of the train at 9 o'clock the firemen were arranged in a square in front of an impromptu platform prepared of two railroad cars on side track, near the depot and the officers, and men were soon arranged thereon for the reception. Over the platform was a banner inscribed, "Iron Brigade; we welcome our Returning Heroes."
Major P. H. Cowen, of the 115th Regiment, who was home on a temporary leave of absence, having kindly assented to act as chief marshal, I desire in this place to make a public acknowledgment of the obligations of all concerned for his efficient service in arranging and carrying through the whole affair.
After the field officers had been arranged on the platform, John H. White, Esq., as President of the village, made a welcoming speech, which was appropriately replied to by Col. Searing; and then Lieut. Col. Chrysler, in response to a call, made a few remarks, and Major Perry returned to the President a flag presented to Company F when it left here, under his command, a little over two years ago. It had not been carried in any engagements, the regulations not permitting it; but it had been preserved, and carried with the regiment on its marches, and the men had not, in any of their battles, done anything to forfeit the confidence reposed when it entrusted to them by the ladies of Saratoga.
After the exercises at the stand, a procession was formed, headed by the Committee of Arrangements, and several of the principal citizens of the village, (among whom were Judges Bockes and Hulbert, and the clergy), in carriages, followed by the firemen, led by the Fort Edward Band as escort for the returning heroes. This procession marched through the principal streets for about an hour, being finally dismissed at White's Hotel, where a dinner was provided by the Committee for the soldiers and other guests, and the affair was thus brought to a very happy conclusion.
The brief time between the issuing of the notice and the arrival of the soldiers prevented many from attempting any decorations; but there were a few very happy things to notice as the procession passed. Excelsior Fire Company, No. 3, of which Col. Searing had been a leading member, and which also numbered among its members Sergeant James Lowry, killed whilst advancing the regimental colors at Bull Run, and Corporal Plumketty, killed at Antietam, had prepared a banner which they got permission to hang across Broadway, from the Centre House, on which was inscribed—

THIRTIETH REGIMENT.
" Welcome those who've bravely fought;
Honor to those who've nobly died.

From the Saratogian office was hung a National flag, to which was attached a banner inscribed—"Iron Brigade. Welcome to the heroes of Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg."
Several buildings displayed flags, and at one place  on Front street, corner Van Dam, three ladies stood in the door—one dressed in red, another in white, and the third in blue, holding wreaths of flowers--a device which drew cheer upon cheer from the soldiers as they passed.
At Dr. Beecher's Temple Grove Institute the procession halted. As the soldiers got opposite, the young lady teachers and pupils sung a patriotic song for them.
The dinner was then served by Messrs. Aikin & Dunn, at 12 o'clock, as all the soldiers were impatient to avail themselves of the leaves of absence granted them to return to their homes. The dinner was a substantial and good one, and as soon as, it was over the soldiers left, with their friends in waiting, in all directions. SPECTATOR.

Lansingburgh and Vicinity.
JOB PRINTING.
BUSINESS CARDS, BILL HEADS, LABELS,
LAW BLANKS, RECEIPTS, HANDBILLS,
WEDDING CARDS,
CIRCULARS, CHECKS, PAMPHLETS,
SHOW-BILLS,
executed at the "Gazette Office" in a neat and workmanlike style, and at the very lowest prices.

The Welcome Home.
The Thirtieth Regiment reached Albany on Saturday morning, and in the evening the regiment was honored by a grand reception by the authorities, a torchlight procession by the Albany Fire Department, &c. &c. The city and village authorities of Troy and Lansingburgh participated. Mayor Perry welcomed the Regiment, and at the Capitol Governor Seymour and Adjutant Gen. Sprague were introduced to them, and in brief speeches congratulated them on the valuable services they had rendered their country, and acknowledged the brave manner in which they had upheld the reputation of the State upon the battle-field. It was a very happy affair throughout.
On Monday the Lansingburgh Company (A) of the Regiment received from the village authorities and citizens, an appropriate public reception. The Company came by the steamer G. C. Davidson from Albany to Troy, and from Troy to the lower end of the village by the Horse Cars, escorted by Relief Engine Co. No. 11 of Albany, and accompanied by several officers of the Regiment, the Mayor and other citizens of Troy. The day was fine, and the residences and business places and almost every thing else were decorated for the occasion. State street especially was literally shaded with flags and other patriotic emblems, from one end to the other. Lansingburgh was never in a gayer attire.—Everybody appeared to be anxious to contribute by personal effort and presence to add to the unanimity and joyousness of the welcome. The Horse Railway people also deserve credit for their ample and admirable arrangements; and for the handsome manner in which they decorated the rolling and trotting stock of the road.
The Company and other guests reached the lower end of the vilage [sic] at about eleven o'clock where they were received by the village President and Trustees and Fire Department and a large concourse of citizens amid hearty and vociferous cheering. At the Engine House of No. 3, there was an arch tastefully decorated and mounted through the labors of the ladies; when under the direction of the efficient Marshal, Mr. A. Seaman, and his Assistants, Messrs. King and Welch, the procession was formed, and, amid the pealing of bells, the roaring of cannon and the cheers of the crowd, moved off in the following order:
Squad of Police.
Doring's Band.
Chief Engineer Doyle and Assistants.
Franklin H. & L. Co. No. 1.
Lafayette Hose Co. No. 3.
Sullivan's Band.
Washington Engine Co. No. 4.
Independent Hose Co. No. 1.
Relief Engine Co. N 11, Albany.
Ross's Band.
Columbia Engine Co. No. 5.
Lansingburgh Juvenile Military Company.
Capt. Squires.
Committee of Arrangements, President and
Trustees of village.
Mayor and Common Council of Troy.
Wounded Soldiers, in carriages.
Drum Corps.
Officers of the Thirtieth Regiment.
Company A, Captain Campbell.
The procession moved as indicated by the order of arrangements through several streets to the Public Square, where conveniences had been provided for the formalities of the Reception. A platform had been erected for the speakers, guests, &c., and canopied with the national colors, and decorated with a scroll bearing the names of the battles and engagements in which the Company and Regiment have been engaged. The soldiers were drawn up in line by Captain Campbell, when President Dickson introduced J. C. Comstock, who in behalf of the village authorities and citizens thanked them for their prompt response to the call of the country, and their faithful and heroic services, made appropriate allusion to the gallant dead, and in the name of the village bade them welcome. President Dickson here displayed before the assembly, "the old flag of Company A, that never was surrendered and never will be."
Col. Brintnall, the first Lieutenant Colonel of the Regiment, responded in behalf of the Company. He tendered the heartfelt thanks of the officers and members of Company A to the authorities and citizens of Lansingburgh for their noble reception—their hearty Welcome Home. The soldiers have long looked forward to this day—they have long anticipated its pleasure—but they have now experienced its joy. Would to God that those two noble men—King and Dargen, were present here to-day. Their familiar countenances are missed, and their virtues are not forgotten. It was his pleasure to be their messmate in the field for months, and he knew how joyously they anticipated the welcome home. Two years ago this company on bended knees swore allegiance to their country's flag. How well and how faithfully they have remembered their obligation their ranks and their battle flag eloquently testify. He said this—although the representative of the company on this occasion. He said it not less in justice to the dead than to the credit of the living. 'Citizens of Lansingburgh—You have reason to be forever proud of Company A. No town in the State has sent a nobler or truer body of soldiers to the field. You have cordially welcomed them, and I can assure you they keenly appreciate it. To citizens, to firemen, to the representatives of the village—to the ladies—to all—they return heartfelt thanks. I am sure they consider themselves richly repaid for all their labors by this demonstration.' The remarks of both speakers were enthusiastically applauded.
A collection was taken up for the benefit of disabled soldiers, when Provost Marshal Hughes made some remarks embodying some sound advice to the soldiers, and a member of the company sang an amusing song.
The procession was then reformed, and it proceeded through several streets according to the order of arrangements, to the Phoenix Hotel, where Dinner had been provided under excellent arrangements and in good style. The after-dinner entertainment was also in most respects good. Short and pithy speeches were made by Mayor VanAlstyne, of Troy, Provost Marshal Hughes, Mr. Hubbell and others. This over, the guests were escorted to the cars, and Company A's men afforded an opportunity to visit the wives and bair.. and lasses at home.
Thus closed one of the most general and satisfactory demonstrations we have ever seen in Lansingburgh.

A Malicious Falsehood.--Some mischievous individual has imposed upon the Troy Whig a communication in reference to the recent Reception of Company A, which is in every respect destitute of truth. He charges that a portrait of McClellan was excluded from the dining hall on partial and partisan  grounds, when the fact is that the committee had previously ordered the exclusion of all portraits in consequence of urg­ent applications for permission to put up pictures of Fremont and Hooker. It is also charged that no Democrat was permitted to go on the Committee of Arrangements after Democrats had subscribed full half of the funds for the reception. The truth is, that there were not less than five Democrats on the committee, and that other Democrats were proposed as committeemen but could not be induced to serve. In regard to the Democratic subscription we may state that there were four subscription papers out, three of which have been handed in to the treasurer. We have examined these three papers, and find that the subscriptions upon them were made as follows:
By Republicans                     $231
Democrats                                 27
Ladies                                         6
We presume the fourth list will show about the same proportion; if not, the full list of subscribers and their contributions, which we purpose to give next week, will render the fact apparent. We do know, however, that a very large proportion of the subscription is from Republicans—very much larger than the proportionate Republican representation on the committee; and that the committee throughout was not influenced in the slightest by any partisan consideration whatever. We trust that the Whig will see from this statement that it has been misinformed, and done injustice to our citizens and village, and have the candor to brand as false and malicious the imputations of its anonymous fault finder.

ARRIVAL OF THE THIRTIETH REGIMENT.
The brave Thirtieth reached the city this morning at 5 o'clock, in the Vanderbilt. A salute of a hundred guns bade them welcome. A large crowd of friends met them, and they proceeded, at 7 o'clock, under escort of the Committee of Arrangements, to Breakfast, at the Stanwix, Merchants' and Exchange Hotels.
After breakfast, the Regiment went to the Barracks, or visited their friends, as the formal reception does not take place until this evening, at 8 o'clock, previous to which the Regiment will dine with the Committee of Arrangements and guests from Lansingburg, Troy and Saratoga.
The procession is to form at half-past eight, o'clock. It will be composed of the Fire Department, with torches. The route will be: Through Broadway to Church, Church to Lydius, Lydius to Pearl, Pearl to Clinton avenue, Clinton avenue to Broadway, Broadway to State, State to Capitol Park, where the Regiment will be received by Gov. SEYMOUR.
It is expected that the authorities and Firemen and Military of Troy, Lansingburg and Saratoga will join in the proceedings—each of these localities having contributed largely to the Regiment.
The display will be one of unusual magnificence.
The 30th was organized under the supervision of the lamented Col. FRISBY, who retained command, as he did the affection of every man in the Regiment, until he was killed while heroically fighting at the last battle of Bull Run, on the 30th of August. The Lansingburgh Gazette gives the following brief history of the Regiment:—
The Regiment was mustered in in May, and left Albany, (Col. FRISBY commanding) in June, 1861, with 741 enlisted men and a full complement of officers. In the fall of the same year, 132 were raised for the unexpired term of the Regiment. In the fall of 1862, 268 recruits were enlisted for three years, making in all 1,123 enlisted men. For several months after the Regiment left home it was stationed near Washington, but when the Peninsular campaign was opened, it was as a part of McDowell's Corps moved to the Rappahannock.
On the 18th of April, 1862, the Thirtieth, with the rest of Gen. AUGER'S Brigade, took possession of Fredericksburg, driving the enemy across the river, and was only prevented from pursuing him by the burning of the bridges over the Rappahannock. The regiment remained there until August. During that time the brigade to which it belonged, made several brilliant reconnoissances, one of which was towards Spottsylvania Court House, when Stuart's cavalry attacked them in their rear, taking several of their number prisoners. After which our men attacked the Rebels and drove and pursued them about seven miles. On the 10th of August the regiment left Falmouth and marched to Culpepper to reinforce Gen. Pope after the battle of Cedar Mountain and reached there on the 11th. Next morning preparations were made to attack the enemy, but on the skirmishers being thrown out it was found that the enemy had retreated. They lay at Cedar Mountain until about the 17th, when Gen. Pope was ordered to fall back across the Rappahannock. From Culpepper the Thirtieth brought up the rear of the army, and was the last to cross the river. For three days and nights at the Rappahannock, the regiment was constantly under fire, and was successful in holding the enemy in check at this point; and was also engaged with the enemy at Sulphur Springs. On the 28th it took part in the short but desperate battle of Gainesville, holding the field after the battle. On the 29th they were engaged in the ill-managed fight of Bull Run, and suffered severely. On the 30th, the battle being renewed, the Thirtieth was among the first to enter the fight, distinguishing themselves for their bravery. Owing to one of the divisions giving way, on their left, the enemy succeeded in planting a battery which plowed through their ranks, making great slaughter among them. Here the heroic Captain King was killed in front of his company, and the brave Colonel Frisby fell while leading on his men. This devolved the command upon Lieut. Col. Sear­ing, who has proved himself a worthy succes­sor of the gallant dead. After the battle they returned to their old camp at Upton's Hill. Remaining there a few days, they were order­ed off into Maryland, and took an honorable part in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam, where Lieut. Campbell distinguished himself in leading his men of the Lansingburgh company. They were at the battle of Fredericksburg, and under Franklin on the left. They were more fortunate here than in other battles, previously, losing only two men wound­ed. They also took part in the second battle with Hooker, but lost no men.
From killed, wounded and discharged from disability, the regiment has lost 493 men, leav­ing its muster out strength about 480. One hundred and fifty-three of the three years' re­cruits will be left in the service. There are now seventy-two sick and wounded in hospital. Ninety men and six officers have been killed in action. Two hundred and nineteen men and twelve officers have been wounded in ac­tion. Only eight men and two officers have died of disease, and two men from accidental causes. Out of the original number that start­ed for the seat of war, but one hundred and eighty-six remain. Co. B, that left Albany ninety-six strong, now has but sixteen of the original number left. Other companies can show a similar record of depletion. All of the original field officers are gone, some of them transferred to other regiments, but most of them martyrs to their country. Beside their services in the field, the Thirtieth almost en­tirely built of one of the forts near Washing­ton. We assume that few regiments in the service have done more work, or in a more thorough manner; and none, we venture to say, have suffered less from disease, a proof that both officers and men have been discreet, careful and prudent. They come home, at the expiration of their term of service, with the proud consciousness of having served their country faithfully, and of having earned the heartfelt thanks of every true patriot for the sufferings they have endured, and the kindling smile of every eye, and the cordial grasp of every hand, for the glories they have won.

RECEPTION OF THE 30TH REGIMENT AT SARATOGA.—The citizens of Saratoga have held a public meeting, for the purpose of making arrangements for the reception of the officers and members of Cos. D, F, and G, of the Thirtieth Regiment. The fire department will parade, and the reception will be co-operated in by the citizens generally.

RECEPTION OF CO. A, 30th REGIMENT IN LANSINBURG.—The Gazette says the arrangements for the reception of Co. A, 30th Regiment,
in that village, appear to be of quite a liberal and complete character, although the day has not been fixed upon. About $400 has been raised and appropriated to this end by the committee, and citizens are vieing with each other in a private way in efforts to make the village appear gay as well as festive on the occasion. A. Seaman will act as Marshal, and J. C. Comstock will deliver the reception address.
The following is a list of the present officers of the Regiment:—
FIELD OFFICERS.
Colonel—William M. Searing.
Lieut. Colonel—M. H. Chrysler.
Major—A. J. Perry.
STAFF OFFICERS.
Quartermaster—S. V. Trull.
Adjutant—Z. M. Knight.
Surgeon—F. L. R. Chapin.
First Assistant Surgeon—R. M. Deering.
Second Assistant Surgeon—H. T. Hanks,

LINE OFFICERS.
The Captains are given in the order of their seniority:—
Company I—Captain, J. M. Landon; 1st Lieutenant, Charles Roth.
Company D—Captain, W. L. Lanning; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, H. H. Bryant.
Company H—Captain, W. P. Tillman; 1st Lieutenant, Thomas Hall; 2d Lieutenant, William S. Haight.
Company G—Captain, A. L. Gurney; 1st Lieutenant, Thomas Smith; 2d Lieutenant, D. T. Burnham.
Company B—Captain, S. Scott; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, ____ Smith.
Company E—Captain, Joseph Williams; 1st Lieutenant, Theodore Buckman; 2d Lieutenant, William S. Jones.
Company A—Captain, John Campbell; 1st Lieutenant, William Shelby; 2d Lieutenant Alexander Gillespie.
Company C—Captain, S. D. Potts; 1st Lieutenant, Edward Van Vorst.
Company K—Captain, Adam Lampman; 1st Lieutenant, none; 2d Lieutenant, Wm. S. Betts.
Company F—1st Lieutenant James M. Andrews, commanding.

The "WELCOME HOME" TO THE LANSINGBURGH VOLUNTEER COMPANY.—The formal "welcome home" to Company A, of the Thirtieth regiment, by the citizens and public authorities of Lansingburgh, took place yesterday, and was a grand affair. The reception was most hearty and enthusiastic; the turn-out large and creditable, and the demonstration, on the whole, must have been truly gratifying to the soldiers. Business was pretty generally suspended, and the citizens, without an exception, evidently put forth their best efforts to make the occasion as pleasant and as hearty as possible.
The Company, escorted by Relief Engine Co. No. 11, of Albany, and Sullivan's Band, of this city left the Albany Barracks early yesterday morning, embarked on the steamer G. C. Davidson, and reached this city at half-past ten o'clock. After landing at the steamboat wharf, the company marched to Washington Square, where they were drawn up in line, for the purpose of having a large sized photograph taken, which was successfully executed by Mr. J. M. Herron. The group consisted of the company, Capt. Campbell, Lieuts. Gillespie and Shelley, and Captains _andon, Scott and Potts.
After marching down Second to State, and over State to River, both companies, military and firemen, took the cars which were in waiting on the Square. Mayor Van Alstyne and several members of the Common Council, also joined the party, as guests of the village authorities. The train, which was composed of eight cars, arrived at Lansingburgh soon after eleven o'clock. The cars were decorated with flags, and on the route the soldiers were frequently greeted with cheers and other demonstrations of welcome. The visitors were met at the South end of the village by President Dickson, the Board of Trustees, and the entire fire department of the village. An immense crowd of citizens were also in attendance, and on the company forming in line, they were greeted with loud and long continued cheering. A line was formed, and the procession started up State street in the following order:
Squad of Police.
Doring's Band.
Chief Engineer Doyle and Assistants.
Franklin H. & L. Company No. 1.
Lafayette Hose Company No. 3.
Sullivan's Band.
Washington Engine Co. No. 4.
Columbia Engine Co. No. 5.
Independent Hose Co. No. 1.
Ross' Band.
Relief Engine Co. No. 11. of Albany,
Committee of Arrangements, Village Authorities, and Mayor and Common Council of Troy in Carriages.
Troy Drum Corps.
Officers of the Thirtieth Regiment.
Company A, Capt. Campbell.
The procession marched through all the principal streets of the village, which presented a magnificent appearance, nearly every residence being decorated with flags, wreaths of flowers, &c. In front of No. 3's engine house was a handsomely arranged platform of flowers, in the centre of which were life-size pictures of Capt. King and Lieut. Frank Dargen. The decorations were all in good taste, and contributed greatly to the success of the demonstration. Alfred Seaman, Esq., acted as Marshal of the day, assisted by Messrs. Welch and King, as aids.
The procession finally emerged on the public square, in the lower part of the village, where an address of welcome to the company was delivered by J. C. Comstock. A platform, shaded by a beautiful canopy formed of national colors, had been erected in the centre of the square, for the speakers, guests, and officers of the regiment. The soldiers were drawn up in line by Capt. Campbell, and were addressed substantially as follows by Mr. C., who was introduced by President Dickson, as the orator of the occasion:
Officers and Soldiers of Company A. A patriotic and free State always honors its soldiers. It considers them its ornament and power. We honor you for the noble services which you have     rendered, and for the honor which you have conferred upon your State. In response to the first call of the President, you went forward to battle with your country's foes. You rallied in behalf of an imperilled Government, whose authority was denied by men who never received aught but blessings and protection. We have noticed, with eager eye, your career, since joining the army, and we greet you to-day, as soldiers deserving the highest homage of a free people. We followed you to Bull Run, and Upton's Hill, under King and Dargen, and to the Rappahannock and Chaneellorsville under your present commander, Capt. Campbell. From your ranks to-day, we miss many familiar and loved countenances, and your flag tells most eloquently of your sacrifices and sufferings. It has been asserted, and may be reiterated, without fear of contradiction, that the Old Thirtieth regiment has made longer marches, been engaged in more battles, and performed more reconnoisance duty, than any N. Y. regiment in the service.—(Cheers for the Iron Brigade.) We have to-day but one emotion, and that is that God will bless you for your services in the past, and spare you to enjoy the honors which are in store for you in the future.
President Dickson here presented to the assemblage "the old flag of company A, that never was surrendered, nor never will be." (Loud applause.)
Mr. Comstock resuming, referred at length to the inception and organization of the company.—He spoke feelingly and eloquently of the deceased officers, Capt. King and Lieut. Dargen; and also paid a tribute of respect to the memory of the deceased members of the company. As a company, every officer under whom you have served, bears willing testimony to your efficiency in discipline and your bearing in action. In the name of the village of Lansingburgh, I bid you welcome.—And from Oakwood and St. John's Cemeteries, where repose the mortal remains of KING and DARGEN, comes greeting, in angelic tones, "Welcome brave companions in arms."
Lieut. Col. Brintnall replied in behalf of the company. He tendered the heartfelt thanks of the officers and members of Company A to the authorities and citizens of Lansingburgh for their noble reception—their hearty "welcome home." The soldiers have long looked forward to this day—they have long anticipated its pleasure—but they have now experienced its joy. Would to God that those two noble and manly spirits, KING and DARGEN, were present here today. Their familiar countenances are missed, but their virtues are not forgotten. It was my pleasure to be their messmate in the field for months, and I know how joyously they anticipated the "welcome home."
Two years ago this company, on bended knees, swore allegiance to their country's flag. How well and how faithfully they have remembered their obligation, their ranks and their battle flag eloquently testify. I say this, although I am their representative on this occasion, by way of credit to the living and justice to the dead.
Citizens of Lsnsingburgh: You have reason to be forever proud of Company A. No town in the State has sent a nobler or truer body of soldiers to the field. You have cordially welcomed them, and I can assure you they keenly appreciate it. To citizens, to firemen, to the represen­tatives of the village—to the ladies—to all—they return heartfelt thanks. I am sure they con­sider themselves richly repaid for all their labors by this demonstration.  (Applause.)
Rev. Mr. Bidwell commended the soldiers aid societies, and a collection as taken up in aid of them.
Provost Marshal Chas. Hughes was then intro­duced, and referred pleasantly to a visit made to the camp of the Thirtieth at Upton's Hill. He   gave some sound advice to the soldiers as to their future conduct, and retired amid hearty applause.     
"Jimmy Dennison," a member of the company, entertained the assemblage by singing a comic camp song, which was very amusing.
The exercises over, the line of march was again resumed. At 2 1/2 o'clock the procession was dismissed at the Phoenix Hotel, where Company A, with the authorities of Lansingburgh and Troy took dinner. Prayer was offered by Rev. Mr. Beveredge, and after-dinner speeches were made by Messrs. J. C. Comstock, Mayor Van Alstyne, Col. Brintnall, F. B. Hubbell, Rev. Mr. Beveredge, Provost Marshal Hughes, and others.
The demonstration was a great success, and our neighbors honored themselves in thus honoring the soldiers.
—Relief No. 11, of Albany, was hospitably and handsomely entertained by No. 4 at the Anderson House. The company returned to Albany in the 5 o'clock Greenbush train yesterday afternoon. They made a fine appearance, and are always "at home" in the 'Burgh.

COMPANY A,
will return to Albany on Wednesday, for the purpose of being mustered out of service. Cos. D, F, and G, were received at Saratoga yesterday.
Cos. I, (Landon's), B, (Scott's) H, (Tillman's) will be received in this city in a day or two.
The Thirtieth regiment, Col. Searing, arrived at Albany May 30th, in the morning. In the evening there was a grand torchlight parade, the entire Fire Department participating After the parade, the regiment marched to the Capitol, and were welcomed home by Gov. Seymour and Gen. Sprague.

RECEPTION AT SARATOGA.—Companies D, F, and G, of the Thirtieth Regiment, had a fine reception at Saratoga on Monday week. Col. Searing made a speech in response to one of welcome He is quite fully reported in the Saratogian, a Republican paper, from which we quote a paragraph of his speech:
But I owe an acknowledgement. I wish to say that we have heard something about "Copperheads," and that the Capital of our State contained a good many of them; but if the reception we received there, and the address made to us by Governor Seymour, were manifestations of Copperheadism, then we want to see more of it. Governor Seymour made us as good a Union speech as I want to hear; and if what he said to us is the doctrine of the Copperheads, then I am one of them. [Applause by the Democrats.]

RETURN OF THE 30TH REGIMENT.—The term of this gallant regiment will expire in a short time. It will probably be disbanded at Albany, and that city will undoubtedly give them a noble welcome; but as all the field officers, and three of the companies, are from this village and vicinity, it is but proper that we should participate in the reception. It strikes us that a meeting should be held and Committees appointed for that purpose.

NEW YORK, June 28.
The 30th (Albany) Regiment N. Y. V., Col. Frisby, arrived here this forenoon, and are quartered at the Park barracks. They leave this evening.
Col. Baker's regiment left this evening for Washington.

THE THIRTIETH ALBANY REGIMENT, COL. FRISBEY.
The Thirtieth Albany regiment, under command of Colonel Frisbey, did not arrive in the city yesterday, much to the disappointment of large numbers of the friends of the regiment in New York. Late in the afternoon a despatch was received at General Arthur's office, stating that the regiment had been detained, but would leave Albany at half-past six o'clock P. M. They may, therefore, be expected here at about two o'clock this morning.

ALBANY, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1861.
From Col. Frisby's Regiment.
HEAD QUARTERS 30TH REGIMENT,
CAMP UNION, BRIGHTWOOD, D. C., July 9th, 1861.
FRIEND CUTLER—In my last you will remember I told you that we expected to go to Fortress Monroe, but instead we are camped some 5 miles from Washington, at a place called Brightwood. Our camp is beautifully situated in a pine and chesnut [sic] grove, with level ground, and no underbrush to interrupt free movements in all our drills. A large, nice frame house for officers quarters and hospital use are on the grounds, and two good wells, which furnish us with an abundance of pure, cool water. A short distance from camp is a fine brook, affording us splendid accommodations for bathing and washing purposes. In this beautiful selection for camp grounds our Colonel displayed great foresight and taste, and is deserving of much praises which I know is awarded him by the entire Regiment. Every day he becomes more appreciated and respected by his officers and men. All look upon him as a highly honorable and brave commander, and Albany may well be proud that she was able to furnish one so well and truly qualified to take the command of the 30th Regiment. Then there is our most worthy and highly esteemed Adjutant, R. C. Bentley, another Albanian, well known for his military qualifications. With such officers belonging to the Albany 30th Regiment, Albanians have every reason to expect good tidings from them; and in the event of our Colonel leading us on to battle, he will find his men true as steel, determined to support and uphold their Colonel, maintain the honor of the Empire State, support the Constitution of the Union, and the perpetuity of the glorious Stars and Stripes. Take our officers one and all, and I am persuaded that no Regiment has, or could have, a better or more brave and noble class. The health of our Regiment is very good, considering our change of climate, water and general living, together with the long and severe drills we take daily in the manual of arms, marching in line of battle, double quick time, &c., &c. Could you see us in drill at the present time you would notice a vast improvement since we left Albany.
Some of the Regiments about here that have visited us in squads, complain of their rations, that they are poor, and many times scantily dealt out. Thanks to our good luck we cannot or have we any such complaints to make, for no trouble or pains are spared by our gentlemanly Quartermaster, Charles E. Ruse, to furnish us with an abundance of the very best of food of every description. The fresh beef, and in fact all the meats furnished us, are equal if not superior to any I ever saw in the Albany or any other market. Our Quartermaster's prompt and liberal supply of everything necessary for camp life has won for him a most enviable position in the hearts of the entire Regiment. There too is our Quartermaster's Sergeant, Bernard Galliger, who has won the esteem of the whole Regiment by his impartial distribution of the rations drawn by each company daily. All these things in the Quartermaster's department moving on so smoothly, has a tendency to make peace and concord pervade every other department of our Regiment, for men well fed and clothed, with comfortable tents and other camp necessaries, will invariably be contented and happy.
Yesterday we were furnished with six additional tents to each company, making sixteen large and comfortable tents to each company. On the Anniversary of our National Independence, our Colonel marched us to Washington, where we passed in review before the President, returning to camp about 11 A. M., without coming to a halt, making, as we marched, a distance of about 12 miles. By this you will see we can make quick marches when 'tis necessary, which was the case in this instance, as we left but a hundred men at camp as guard. We are all in good spirits and are anxiously looking for an opportunity to present itself, so that the 30th may make its mark in the history of this war, and fulfill the expectations of its friends at home.
We have been the recipients of a very liberal and valuable present from Mr. C. H. Lilenthal, of New York, consisting of $250 worth of chewing and smoking tobacco. Could the worthy donor have seen the happy faces this caused, and heard the kind remarks made of him, I believe he would have felt abundantly repaid for his liberality.
We are now enabled to get all kinds of vegetables of the season, such as green peas, string beans, new potatoes, tomatoes, &c, and as for blackberries, all they cost us is to pick them, for there is a great abundance of them all about our camp. One can go and pick a quart and not be absent from camp more than twenty minutes, and in a week we shall have an abundance of whortleberries. By this you see soldiers have some of the luxuries of life, which sweetens and smoothes over the rough spots incident to camp life. The drum is now beating the Adjutant's call for dress parade, and I must close with the promise to remember you again soon.

Death of Col. Frisby.
The intelligence of the death of Col. FRISBY, once contradicted, is now confirmed. Private dispatches have been received stating that the gallant officer fell, mortally wounded, on the field of battle, during Saturday's fight. The body, it seems, is in the hands of the enemy, but it is believed it can be obtained, and a request has been made that Col. HARCOURT, a warm personal friend and a brother officer of the deceased, should proceed to Washington to convey home the remains.
The Eve. Journal says of the deceased: "No one of our citizens was better or more favorably known than Col. FRISBY. He has for more than twenty years, been identified with the military organizations of the city—having passed through every grade from Lieutenant to Brigadier General. He held this latter position when the war broke out, and surrendered it to take the Colonelcy of the 30th. He was a thorough disciplinarian, a kindhearted man and a brave soldier. His regiment is one of the very best in the service; and his death will be lamented by the men for whose welfare he labored, by his country, for which he gave his life, and by his family and friends who knew his patriotism and worth."
We can endorse all that is here said, and add our testimony to Col. FRISBY'S worth as a private citizen, and his virtues as a man. His conduct on the field has been warmly eulogized by his superior officers, and by those who served under him. It appears that he had at least one narrow escape before his death. The N, Y. Times says: "During the cannon duel on the
Rappahannock on Saturday—the last day—Col. FRISBY, of the Thirty-seventh New York, had a very narrow escape from instant death. He had just dismounted from his horse, when a shell struck the pommel of the saddle, passed along and took off the head of a negro." It was after this that he received his death wound.
The citizens of Albany will deeply regret the loss of so gallant a soldier and so worthy a citizen, and will offer their warmest sympathy to his family in their bereavement.

RETURN OF THE 30TH REGIMENT.—The term of this gallant regiment will expire in a short time. It will probably be disbanded at Albany, and that city will undoubtedly give them a noble welcome; but as all the field officers, and three of the companies, are from this village and vicinity, it is but proper that we should participate in the reception. It strikes us that a meeting should be held and Committees appointed for that purpose.

Reception of the 30th Regiment N. Y. Volunteers.
The term of service of the 30th regiment N. Y. Volunteers will expire on the 1st day of June, when they will be entitled to a discharge in the City of Albany. It is fitting that Saratoga should extend a cordial welcome to our fellow citizens who have during the past two years, upheld their country's flag in that regiment. All persons in favor of doing so are requested to meet at the Marvin House, on Friday evening, 22d inst., at 7 1-2 o'clock to make arrangements.
Saratoga Springs, May 19, 1863.
H. H. Hathorn,            Jas. M. Marvin,
T. McDonnell,             A. Watrous,
J. T. Blanchard,           J. C. Hulbert,
J. W. Pitney,    J. A. Shoudy,
P. R. Waterbury,         E. Cowen,
H. P. Trim,                  L. P. Close,
C. Sheehan,                 J. W. Eddy,
W. Bennett,                 W. B. Gage.
B. F. Judson,

30th Regiment, and its Reception.
At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of this village, held on Saturday evening last, a committee of citizens previously constituted and consisting of Daniel Shepherd, J. R. Putnam, L. B. Putnam, Hamilton Perry, John T. Carr, H. H. Hathorn, W. M. Potter, J. A. Corey, and E. J. Huling, made application to the village authorities for their co-operation in the reception of the field officers and members of Co's. D. F. and G., of the 30th Regiment.
A joint meeting was held immediately after the adjournment of the Board, and organized by the appointment of John H. White, Esq., chairman, and P. Height, Secretary.
On motion, it was
Resolved, That Henry H. Hathorn, John R. Putnam and L. B. Putnam be appointed a committee to procure subscriptions to give Cos. D., F. and G., of the 30th Regiment, a fitting reception on their arrival here, and with power of substitution in cases of inability to serve.
Invitations were also extended to the several members of the Fire Departments to attend the reception in a body.
The joint meeting then adjourned to Tuesday evening, to hear the report of the committee as to the amount of funds that could probably be raised, and necessary plan to carry on the reception, at which time a committee of five was appointed to form a full programme of the proceedings, and the probable expenses of the reception in detail; and report at a subsequent meeting of the committee.
The following persons were appointed such committee:
John A. Corey, H. H. Hathorn, D. Shepherd, James N. Case, A. A. Patterson, with power to call a meeting of the joint Committee of the Trustees and committee of citizens at a future time.

ALBANY M...
LOCAL DEPARTMENT.
Welcome Home.
Respectfully Inscribed to the 30th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.:

Fling out our starry banner—forever may it wave!
Ring bells! your loudest welcome to the loyal, true and brave!
Let every joyous symbol—let every sign be shown,
To tell these war-worn patriots that they are welcome home!
When first along the flashing wires came news of Sumter's fall—
Ere hope of gain made patriots—they answered duty's call;
And now with laurels laden, they come both "true and tried."
Then banners wave! ring loudly bells, to tel our joy and pride!
I well recall to mind the day, two weary years ago,
They turned away from friends, and home, to meet our Southern foe,—
When 'mid the booming cannon and pealing bells was heard
The muffled beat of aching hearts—the low, sweet farewell word.
Ah many lips on that sad day faltered their last "goodbye"
To those whose "welcome home" is sung by angel hosts on high!
And while the kiss is given now, and words of welcome said,
We'll not forget the tribute due the brave and honored dead,
Whose bodies sleep in far off graves, beneath the daisied sod,—
Whose spirits, glorified, were led by angels up to God!
And though no stone above their dust is reared with kindly care,
Still flowers—bright flowers—are blooming, by angels planted there.
And on our hearts the hand of love has traced each wellknown name.
E'en while a grateful nation placed them on the scroll of fame
And now, O bells, one moment stay, and toll for him who died
While leading this devoted band against vile treason's tide,—
Who laid his crown of victory down, the hour in which it was won,
And angels bore it, twined with stars, beyond the setting sun!
And now his blood, with thousands, at the bar of Justice pleads,
While Fame and History gather up his name and noble deeds!
And should we need a beacon light to lead us on to fame.
We'll look aloft, where glory crowns our FRISBY'S honored name!
Now ring again, O joyful bells! Our Nation's banner, wave!
Unite in giving welcome to the loyal, true and brave;
And pay this tribute to the dead—the noblest ever given—
They sleep in soldier's honored graves! Their rich reward is—Heaven!
And say to those returning, a Nation bids them come
And share its hallowed blessing, and earnest welcome home!
NETTIE COLBURN.                        Washington. D. C., May 25, 1863.

The Thirtieth Regiment.
The Thirtieth regiment, the arrival of which was reported in our First Edition, will remain at the Park barracks until five o'clock this afternoon. The line of march will then be taken to pier No. 1, North river, where they will embark for South Amboy and take the cars for Washington. There will be no demonstration by the regiment in this city, except the march through Broadway to the pier.
The following is a list of the principal officers:
Edward Frisbee, Colonel.
Chas. E. Brintnall, Lieutenant-Colonel.
Wm. H. Searing, Major.
Richard C. Bently, Adjutant.
Charles E. Russ, Quartermaster.
Bernard Galligan, Quartermaster-Sergeant.
Dr. Chapin, Surgeon.
Dr. Skilton, Surgeon's Mate.
Rev. Mr. Axtell, Chaplain.
Company A (Lansingburg)—Captain Samuel King.
Company B (Troy)—Captain W. L. Laning.
Company C (Schenectady)—Captain B. M. Van Voast.
Company D (Saratoga)—Captain M. T. Bliven.
Company E (Poughkeepsie)—Captain H. Holliday.
Company F (Saratoga)—Captain A. G. Perry.
Company G (Saratoga)—Captain M. H. Chrysler.
Company H (Hoosick)—Captain W. P. Tillman.
Company I (West Troy)—Captain John M. Landon.
Company K (Valatia)—Captain B. Pruyn.

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: October 2, 2009
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/30thInf/30thInfCWN.htm

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