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33rd Regiment New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

The Late Battles—Letter from Lieut. Mix, Thirty-third Regiment.
Fredericksburg, May 3, 1863.
It is with extreme gratification that I can re-cord the Thirty-third New York as having won lasting honors in assisting, after desperate fighting, in taking the heights of the place from which I indite this epistle. Our division
(Howe's) alter crossing the river on the 2d, was immediately placed in position on picket, where we remained all night, with no sleep. Early this morning our brigade (Gen. Neill) was ad­vanced to the front of the enemy's fortifica­tions, and Capt. Cowan's battery, with others right and left, soon made the air reverberate with the harsh, discordant screech of shot and, shell, which, being replied to from the forts, made a fine display of artillery, firing. The 33d was ordered to protect Cowan's battery, and, unslinging knapsacks, were to be ready for a charge up the hill at the proper time. Soon the opportunity offered, and away we went, followed by the 7th Maine. Both regiments dashed upon the top of the first fort directly in rear of the town, swept over that, thence onward to the second line, which was still stronger, up that, (a hill similar to the "Pinnacle" near Brighton,) where we met with the strongest kind of reception, in the shape of bullets, that this regiment has had accorded to them during the past two years. It was a perfect storm of the "leaden messengers of death." The regiment bravely withstood the rebel fire, and poured in upon them such a return volley that they soon ran down the other side, vacating the premises "right smart quick," and scattered over the country in every direction, leaving several pieces of artillery in our hands, besides a large number of prisoners, and their killed and wounded.
Our batteries were managed splendidly, as the result of their accurate aim showed; but our regiment suffered badly—over seventy-two being killed and wounded. The Lieutenant-Colonel and Major had their horses shot.
The third brigade is deservedly commended for the unswerving courage and perseverance exhibited by them during this successful sortie on a position considered impregnable. It is to be considered, of course, that the main body of rebels and artillery had been drawn away to act against Gen. Hooker, thereby denoting why a comparatively few men could take such a formidable position. The forts were evidently commanded by Gens. Early and Barksdale, a great number of the troops being Mississippians.
Our regiment, after the battle, came off the heights, collected the knapsacks, and immediately, with nearly the whole of the corps, followed the enemy west of the city about 5 miles, when another battle took place, more serious in its results, with a heavy loss on both sides, We are cognizant of great slaughter in the 10th, 18th and 27th New York, 119th and 95th Pennsylvania troops. The enemy had been reinforced, and were desperate in their attempt to draw us back.
In the attack on Fredericksburg heights, Capt. Cole, of Waterloo, Capt. Root, of Penn Yan, Lieut. Byrne, of Seneca Falls, and Capt. Warford, of Geneseo, were the only officers wounded, but every company in the regiment had more or less killed and wounded.
May 4th.—To-day has been a battle day most assuredly. There has been fighting nearly all day, but we know not what has transpired, only as witnessed from the heights opposite Fredericksburg, at Hospital Camp, where I had to fall back on account of the old Antietam wound breaking out again. The events above roughly sketched cover a period of as hard fighting as ever occurred on the Peninsula. The ambulance corps of the army is finely organized, and the benefits accruing therefrom were notable in the extreme. Never before was the thing systematised [sic]. The ambulances of our division are under the charge of Lieut. Wm. E. Roach, whose ability for the post was demonstrated to be of the first order during the past few days. Our hospitals are also everything one could wish—Hospital Steward Degraff, of the 83d, having arduously assisted in attending to the wants of the wounded under his care. Miss Farnham has been laboring with us in her philanthropic way, displaying the sympathy and good womanly judgment of a Dix or Fry in her endeavors to ameliorate the sufferings of our wounded soldiers. The 83d soon return home, with new laurels; achieved at a time, when they fitly adorn a career any regiment could be proud of. But this closing affair on this field of operations cannot be condensed in this short hurried letter. As matters progress I will note accordingly and transmit. L. C. M.

NEIGHBORHOOD ITEMS.—The Livingston Republican states that Fast day was very generally observed in that village, services being held in the Presbyterian and Methodist churches, at which the Rev. Dr. S. H. Cox officiated. The Republican, also, has the following:
We regret to see that Lieut. Col. Chapin, of the 86th Regiment, was killed in one of the recent engagements at Richmond. The deceased was a resident of Dansville—a most thorough and courageous officer, and man. His early death will be lamented by a host of friends.
On Friday last the remains of Duane Powell, son of Curtiss Powell, of York, were received by his friends, and on Sunday they were deposited in their last resting place with appropriate ceremonies. He enlisted last fall in the 8th N. Y. Cavalry.
Some time ago it was feared that the peach crop had been destroyed by the unfavorable weather in the winter. We are gratified to know that this is not the case in this locality. The trees now give promise of a large crop.
Last week we neglected to notice the death of Mrs. Ruth Hubbard, of this town. The deceased was 94 years of age, and was, we believe, the oldest person in the town. She settled in this town in 1805, and she died on the farm on which she first settled. She was an exemplary woman and christian.
During last week we heard from three or four different sources, that a prominent Democratic politician residing in one of the western counties of this State, was in town, and organized a Lodge of Knights of the Golden Circle. Is the report true?
The "sugar season" has closed, and taken together has been a poor one, not more than half as much having been made as last year.—The prices range high, from 16 to 18 cents being offered.
— The Palmyra Courier is informed that the 33d Regiment will return about the middle of the present month, and recommends that the village authorities prepare to give the battle-worn boys a cheering welcome. An additional paragraph embodies patriotic resolutions by the Board of Trustees, who have appointed a committee to carry out the suggestion. Palmyra is represented in the 33d by Co. B.
—The Courier also announces that the name of Dr. H.T. Spencer does not appear in the published list of passengers of the ill-fated Manhattan, and the Doctor's family, therefore, have strong hopes of his safety.
— The Lyons Republican perpetrates a grave joke. After apologizing for inadvertently [sic] announcing a case of matrimony under the head of obituaries, it proposes to rectify the blunder, at the proper time, by publishing the aggrieved parties' deaths among the "marriages."
—A fatal accident occurred at Macedon last week. A son of Wm. Brown while driving a team attached to a heavy land-roller, fell beneath it and was crushed to death—one arm being completely severed from his body.
—The Savannah correspondent of the Republican states that the inhabitants of that village are making an effort to build a church, to be incorporated by the Presbyterian denomination.
—The latest sensation at Newark was caused by the discovery of a large sturgeon in the canal. The Courier states that the citizens turned out with axes, clubs and pitch-forks, and the monster was finally pinned and captured. He measured four feet eight inches in length.

THE BUFFALO COMPANY IN THE 33D—GRAPHIC ACCOUNT OF THE FIGHTING BY SEDGEWICK'S CORPS.
CAMP OF THE 33D N. Y. VOL'S., NEAR WHITE
OAK CHURCH, VA., May 9th, 1863.
MR. EDITOR:—Feeling well assured that anything of interest, relative to the Buffalo boys of the old 33d, would prove acceptable to yourself and patrons, I have ventured to address these few lines to you. I have written them as a history of the part we have performed in the events of the past few days. Before commencing I will state that during the month of October last, Co. D, of this Regiment, (which was composed of Canandaigua boys) was broken up and most of its members were transferred to Co. G, which company I have the honor of commanding. Since then the Canandaigua and Buffalo boys of the 33d have associated together in the same company, and nobly have they stood by each other in the bloody scenes through which they have so lately passed.
The military operations of the past few days, were commenced on the morning of the 28th ult. Our corps (the 6th) after leaving camp, proceeded to the river, a distance of some four or five miles, and that night two bridges were thrown across and one division was sent over to protect them, so as to enable us to cross speedily over, when the time should arrive for us to do so.—The rest of the corps was left on the north bank of the river out of range of the enemy's artillery, where we remained until Saturday, when about 5 P. M. the enemy made an attack upon our skirmishers across the river. Our boys immediately retaliated by charging upon their lines, which, after a feeble resistance, gave way, and they retired to their entrenchments. Just at this critical moment the order came for us to advance, which we immediately did. After crossing the river we formed a line of battle on the right of the troops already there. It was now dark, and operations was consequently suspended until morning. Our regiment was detailed for picket. We immediately deployed as skirmishers, and established our line some distance in advance of the rest of the troops. Of course sleep was not to be thought of, and we had a long weary night of it. During the night the rebels busied themselves in building large fires, the object of which must have been to lead us to suppose that they were evacuating. The pretence was too shallow, however, and did not succeed. Morning dawned at last, when we were drawn in, and ordered to assume a position in the road, directly in the rear of Cowan's battery. We executed the order and ere long the ball was opened. Until 10 A. M., however, nothing occurred beyond some lively skirmishing, but then the real business of the day was commenced. The order was to charge and take the heights. Before attempting a description of the awful scene that ensued, allow me to say that words are inadequate for the purpose. Still, I may be able to convey a slight idea of it, which you will probably consider better than nothing.
It came in whispers along the lines, that preparatory order to unsling our knapsacks. Too well we knew what it meant. Throwing them off, we quickly formed in line and awaited the order to charge. Hark! The General commands; "Forward, guide centre"; an awful silence prevails; the deafening roar of artillery seems to be momentarily hushed, every heart beats high, on every face can be seen the shadow of a stern resolve, every breath is drawn with the full consciousness that it may be our last, every ear is stretched to catch that final word, which is to seal the fate of so many loyal hearts. "March." Now we advance, common time at first, which gradually changes into quick, and that again as we become warmed up to the work before us, is succeeded by a double quick step, which brings us quickly to a point where the fire of two rebel batteries converge. No sooner do we reach the spot, than the air is filled with the roaring, hissing and screaming of the different projectiles known to modern warfare, and the next moment the cries of the wounded and dying are heard, but through this scene of blood and carnage our line sweeps bravely on. The fire of the enemy now grows more rapid and decisive, and we are literally enveloped by a storm of iron hail. Now over a knoll, then through a ravine, up the hill, and the first battery is taken without a struggle, for the enemy has fled. "Rest a moment boys." We throw ourselves upon the ground, and a single glance serves to show us our position. We are on the flank of the only battery which the rebels now have in position, and that of course must be taken. "Fall In." Every man is ready and we are off again. Moving by the right flank, we pass down through a deep ravine, and then form a line at the base of the hill on the crest of which is the battery we are to take. The line commences to move forward. "Steady" is the word, no unnecessary haste, for we are climbing a hill, and every man must husband his strength for the moment when he will need it. As we near the crest, every man brings his piece a ready, and with bayonets fixed we silently proceed. The enemy as yet is unaware of our approach, as his attention is directed towards the Vermonters who are coming in on his right. The hill side up which we are advancing covered with underbrush, and in passing through it our cine has become broken. Now those who have pressed the most eagerly forward have reached the top, and there before them is the coveted prize. And just at this rebels have received orders to retire, as their lines are broken. They have commenced to hitch up, not a moment must be lost, and without waiting for command, a sharp scattering fire is poured in upon them, causing them to retreat in no little haste, and guns are ours. But all of a sudden, two rebel regiments that had not discovered before, rise and pour a destructive volley into us. Many of our brave comrades are forced to bite the dust; still we do not yield our vantage ground, and fight has commenced. For forty minutes it obstinately contested, each party still holding its position. Now our line begins to waver, when we fortunately receive reinforcements. They deliver their fire, and the enemy is at last retreating, leaving us masters of the field. The fruits of our victory are as follows: 13 rifle cannon, 2 brass howitzers, several hundred small arms, one stand of colors, from two to three hundred prisoners, the possession of the heights of Fredericksburg.
The assertion I am now about to make, will seem to you incredible, and yet it is true. Immediately after we had taken the heights, we pursued the retreating enemy, left fortifications without a garrison. The consequence was that the rebels came in by another road, and re-occupied them before the next morning. As for ourselves we started along the road after replenishing our cartouch boxes; soon the sharp rattle of musketry fell upon our ears. It continued to grow heavier, and it was evident that a second engagement was in progress. We had nearly reached the scene conflict, when we were ordered to assume a position, which would cover left flank. After marching and counter-marching through woods and underbrush for nearly an hour, we succeeded in accomplishing our object. Darkness now closed in upon scene and put an end to the conflict, temporarily at least. We retired to rest, well satisfied with our day's work. Little did we dream what the morrow was to bring forth, that even then the enemy was occupying entrenchments that had so bravely won. Morning dawned at last, and while regaling ourselves upon coffee, hard tack and pork, the rebels were discovered marching along crest of a hill, about a half mile distant, in a direction which would bring them in our rear. We were quickly in line and started in same direction. We had not proceeded far when a heavy artillery fire was opened upon us, killing some and wounding others. Soon, however, we reached a spot where we were partially protected from their fire. Here we formed a line and deployed one company as skirmishers. The enemy now formed for a charge, but after a sharp infantry engagement, which lasted perhaps three-quarters of an hour, we succeeded in checking them for the time being. We now changed our position a little farther to the left, still keeping our skirmishers deployed. Soon another charge was made by the enemy; the 49th New York repulsed them, however, and captured one stand of colors, with some two hundred prisoners. My company was now ordered to relieve the skirmishers, which we did. Nothing more was done on either side until late in the afternoon, when the enemy, having received reinforcements, made their final effort to drive us into the river, which was about a mile and a half to our rear. Our brigade formed the first line of battle, and a short distance in the rear were the Vermonters formed in line to support us. The rebels formed as follows: two lines of battle on the left, two on the centre, and the same on the right, with a strong force held as a reserve. Their centre now advanced and the fight was opened. Their first line seemed to melt away as if by magic, before our fire, but their second soon came up to the work, and we found there was work before us. By this time their right and left, had succeeded in gaining a position where they could pour a cross fire into us, which they did. We were now forced to fall back, and, having done so, we formed our line on that of the Vermonters. A short engagement now ensued of a half hour's length, at the close of which we had checked, if not repulsed the enemy. Night now closed the proceedings, but it was apparent to the most casual observer that we could not hold our position any longer. A retreat was therefore ordered, and morning found us all safely encamped upon the northern banks of the river.
Nothing more of interest has occurred, and we are again in camp. Our regiment has sustained a loss of two hundred and seventeen, killed, wounded and missing. This is a heavy loss, considering that we only took four hundred and seventy-five into the fight. Our field officers are all safe. Lieut.-Col. Corning's horse was shot from under him. Of the line officers Lieut. Caywood of Co. I, is missing and it is feared that he was killed. Capt. Root of Co. I, Capt. Cole of Co. C, Lieut. Rossiter of Co. D, and Lieut. Byrnes of Co. H, have all received serious wounds. It is, said that Lieut. Rossiter fell into the hands of the enemy, and I fear that the report is only too true.
In regard to the loss sustained by Co. G, I have to make the following report. Before we crossed the river, we reported for duty, fifty-four men, officers included. We now report twenty-nine, a decrease of twenty-five; nearly half are gone. The following is a list of the wounded and missing, according to the latest information I have received, as to their whereabouts and the nature of their wounds:
FIRST DAY.
Private—Charles Starkey, severely, thigh and arm.
    "          Robert W. Blanny, severely, shoulder, thigh and arm.
Private—Michael Burcher, severely, abdomen.
    "        George Rook, severely, groin.
Corpora1—Chas. Lovett, slight, ankle.
    "             Benj. Patterson, very slight, face—1st day.
    "                "           "       severe, breast and arm, 2d day.
Private—John Bliss, slight, wrist—1st day.
    "            "        "     severe, shoulder—2d day.
    "          Joseph Wologan, slight, head—1st day.
    "            "        "     2d day—missing.

SECOND DAY.
Corporal—Henry Storey, severe, breast—left on the field.
Private—John Decker, slight, shoulder.
    "          F. L. Brome, slight, arm.
    "         Henry Burchin, slight, foot.
    "         Jabez Randall, slight, leg.
1st Sergeant—Wm. H. Thiebald, missing.
Corporal—John McCarthy, missing.
Private—Samuel Chapel,         "
    "         Henry G. Davis,         "
    "         Timothy Howard,      "
    "         John H. Sloan,           "
    "         Patrick Hagan,           "
    "         Robert Lubbock,        "
Before closing allow me to testify to the gallant conduct of my brave command. Where all did so nobly, it is difficult to particularize, and yet I will venture to say that the conduct of Lieuts. Marshall and Crain, was such as to show that fear is a stranger to their breasts.
Need I say that I am proud of my company? Our term of service has nearly expired, and hoping that we shall return soon, to peaceful pursuits, and revel once more in the delights of home and the society of friends.
I remain, your obed't servant,
GEORGE A. GALE,
Capt. Co. G, 33d N. Y.V.
P.S.—I omitted to mention Lieut. Porter, of Co. H, as being seriously wounded, and I also intended to say a few words in regard to the gallant conduct of all our field officers. They performed their duty nobly, and to their efforts can be justly ascribed a large share of the success which we attained.
I have retained this letter three days after the fight, so as to enable me to have a correct list of the casualties of my company. Our first days report in the regiment was 217 killed, wounded and missing, thus far we have only five men returnrd [sic].
Lieut. Col. Hamilton, 62d N. Y., is safe, his wound being very slight, not serious enough to keep him from his duty. His regiment lost very heavy.

VILLAGE AND COUNTY MATTERS.
We will be thankful to persons throughout the County for reliable information in regard to all local occurrences of general interest.

33d Regiment--Public Meeting.
A public meeting of the citizens of Geneseo will be hold at the AMERICAN HOTEL, on FRIDAY EVENING, 15th inst., at 7 1/2 o'clock, to make the necessary arrangements for a proper reception of Co. E., 33d Regiment, N. Y. S. V. It is hoped that every citizen will attend. Geneseo, May 11, 1863.

WHAT WILL WE DO?—The term of service of the 33d Regiment will expire on Friday of next week, and it is probable that the Regiment will leave for Elmira this week, and the Co's arrive home early next week. In this Regiment are Co's. E., Capt. Warford, of this village, and G., Capt. McNair, of Nunda.—For near two years have the members of these Co's. nobly and heroically performed their duty in defence of the Government, and of the rights of the people. Now, what there are left are about to return to us. Shall we not receive them in a befitting manner? We sent them forth with a "God speed.'' Shall we not on their return say to them, "well done good and faithful servants," and give them such a reception as they are justly entitled to? Shall we not hold a public meeting this week and make the necessary arrangements? Who will move in the matter? If the people of the village do not take hold of the matter our village authorities should take early and necessary steps to show to these veteran soldiers that their services and sacrifices are appreciated by all.
—Since the above was in type we have received a call for a meeting of our citizens to be held at the American Hotel on Friday evening. The meeting should be largely attended, and it is hoped that all of our citizens will attend.

PERSONAL.—We had the pleasure yesterday of a call from Capt. Geo. A. Gale of the 33d Regiment, which is now being mustered out at Elmira. Capt. Gale has commanded the company raised here by Lieut. Col. Hamilton, and with it has gone through eighteen bona fide battles. The regiment has brought home only about 230 men. Capt. Gale has made a proud record for himself and has well earned the respite he now enjoys.

Co. E., 33d REGIMENT.—This Company was in the 6th Corps, Gen. Sedgwick, at the battle of Fredricksburg, and were in the thickest of the fight, the Regiment suffering severely. Capt. Warford was struck in the shoulder by a spent ball, and disabled, though he did not leave the field until the battle was over. His wound is not dangerous, and he will prabably [sic] be in condition to return home with his Co. Privates Kimball, Richmond, Fox, Farrar, and one or two others, of Co. E. were slightly wounded. The Company has been exceedingly fortunate. During its near two years service it has been in almost every battle in Virginia and also at Antietam, yet has had but two men killed—Lieut. Church who was instantly killed, and private Coates, who died in a day or two of his wounds.
LATER.—On Tuesday we received a letter from Capt. Warford in which he gives a list of the casualties in his Company. The record will be read with melancholly [sic] interest. The letter bears date "on the Field." May 5th. The Captain makes no mention of himself, but other letters have been received which state that he was wounded in the shoulder from a spent ball. The time of this Company expires in a few days, and it is not probable they will perform any more active duty. For two years have the brave boys been in the thickest of the battles, yet up to the time of the late Fredericksburg battle, they have escaped miraculously. But now fearful havoc has been made in their thinned ranks. Nobly have the men performed their duty—more than half a dozen battle fields have attested their courage and nerve. We give the list:
WOUNDED.
Corp. Tilton E. Smith, in hand, slight,
   "      John S. Taggart, in arm, severe,
Private Bela P. Richmond, in leg, severe,
   "       Eli P. Smith; in neck, mortar, left in the hands of the enemy,
Private Madison Fox. in ancle [sic], severe,
   "       Joseph Kincade, in breast, slight,
   "       John Russell, in side, mortal, left on the field,
   "      Amos Farrar. in arm, severe,
   "       Robert Baty, in face, slight and still missing.
MISSING.
Sergts. George Sands and Orville P. Dana.
Privates Frederick Bissell, Wm. Boga, Henry Haskins, Wm. Harrison, John Hanby, John Jessey, Melvin Munger, Patrick McGinn, Henry Winney.
While the following was not intended for publication, we take the liberty of giving it for the purpose of showing the part taken by the 33d Regiment and Co. E. in the storming of the Fredericksburg heights:
On the second day of May late in the evening we crossed the Rappahannock at the same points where we crossed last December, half mile below Fredericksburg, and were sent directly to the front, and deployed as skirmishers, which position we held until the follow­ing morning when we were relieved and sent to the right of our Brigade, and were ordered to prepare to make a charge upon the ene­my's works, and if possible carry the heights. It required some nerve. From the point where our lines were formed to the summit was at least one mile, and to reach the point assigned the 3d Brigade, we had to cross the plains in front of the enemy’s Batteries, exposed to a raking fire—had to cross a marsh knee deep in water. At the foot of the hill was a strong line of Rifle pits, and from there to the top of the hill was a mass of brush heaps. It looked like a difficult undertaking, as it was. To charge the point assigned the 3d Brigade was the second line of works, and the most difficult to reach. The 33d were assigned the post of honor, and led the charge, and well did they acquit themselves on this occasion. We drove the enemy from his Gun,. shooting the Gunner dead while he was in the act of running a charge home intended for us.
We captured a beautiful 12 lb. Brass Piece, and drove the enemy from the heights in good style.

LETTER FROM CAPT. TYLER.
Casualties in Co. A, of the 33d.
CAMP 33D REG., N. Y. V., NEAR
FREDERICKSBURG, Va., May 8th, 1863.
Ed. Courier;—It becomes my painful duty to report for publication, for the information of those interested, an account, as near as possible, of the casualties in my Company in the battle of the 4th inst., in rear of the heights of Fredericksburg:
1st Sergeant A. B. Randolph, wounded in leg below the knee; brought off the field, but afterwards taken prisoner.
2d Sergeant William Proudfoot, flesh wound in thigh; prisoner.
6th Sergeant David Lawrence, in left side, not dangerous; in hospital.
Corporal George H. Welles, shot through the body; left on the field; supposed to be dead.
Corporal Daniel A. O'Neil, in face; missing.
Corporal William F. Hecker, in ankle; not dangerous; is in hospital.
Corporal John McDonald, fell on the field; is missing.

PRIVATES.
John Proudfoot, flesh wound in thigh; in hospital.
M. Poquette, in arm below elbow, (broken) and in side slightly.
Washington Waite, through both thighs, (dangerous) and prisoner.
Andrew J. Clarke, fell on the field, and missing.
Irwin P. Humphrey, in leg above the knee; in hospital.
J. Warren Hendricks; left arm amputated.
William Pow, in back, serious.
Patrick Ryan, in breast, not dangerous.
Harrison Lewis and George Metzger, taken prisoners on the field.
Robert Jardine, Charles Whitcomb, and David P. Miller, missing,—killed or prisoners.
This is the most correct statement possible to make at this time. It is with deep sorrow that I have to record such fearful fatality; for out of forty-three men that I took into the fight, until to-day I could only muster eighteen. The Company and Regiment have acted with heroic bravery, and did all that men could do. We were among the first in storming the heights on Sunday, and fought more than twice our number from sunrise until dark on Monday, and had possession of the field, and were engaged in picking up and taking care of the wounded, as well as possible in the dark, when we received the order to retreat to Banks' Ford, being at the time almost entirely surrounded by an immensely superior force.
You will bear in mind that all the fighting at and around Fredericksburg was done by the 6th Army Corps, entirely independent of the main army. The fighting began on the night of the 28th of April, and ended on the night of May 4th, and in the whole war I have not seen displayed more desperate valor, or sturdy bravery and perseverance, than was exhibited by the glorious old 33d, as our decimated ranks but too well testify. Our flag is torn into shreds, by shot and shell, and at one time nothing but the most determined valor saved it from falling into the hands of the enemy.
The Regiment went into the fight 466 strong (rank and file,) and at roll-call, after we had got back on this side of the river, there were 191; but this number will be augmented to about 250, by men slightly wounded, stragglers, &c. There were but two or three men in Company A but were hit somewhere, and there were many instances of individual bravery. Some of my men were taken prisoners, and afterwards the captured became the captors, and brought their prisoners safely in our lines.
The people of Seneca have no occasion to blush for their sons in this Regiment; they have done their whole duty from the first, and will continue to do it until the morning of the 22d of May, and then, if there are any of us left alive, we expect to be allowed to come home to visit our friends.
Respectfully yours,
E. J. TYLER,
CAPT. CO. A. 33d Reg., N. Y. V.

REPORTED DEATH OF W. L. INGRAHAM.—In the list of killed of the 33d New York Volunteers at the late battle upon the Rappahannock, we regret to find the name of our townsman W. L. Ingraham. Mr. I. was a printer by profession, and was employed for some time in the job department of this office. Four or five years since he commenced the study of law in the office of T. C. Montgomery, Esq., and was admitted to practice two years or more ago. He was at one time an unsuccessful candidate for Justice of the Peace on the Republican ticket.
Last summer when Captain Brown recruited a company to go into the 33d, Colonel Taylor's regiment, Mr. Ingraham enrolled himself, as a private, we believe, and remained in the service till he fell as stated.
Deceased was a worthy citizen, and his friends will regret to hear of his death. He leaves a wife and one child in this city.
Since writing the above we have seen a letter from Captain Gifford, of Co. D, the Rochester company in the 33d, which we publish elsewhere. It contains a list of casualties, and the name of Mr. Ingraham is not given. Capt. Gifford's company is D, and in the New York papers Mr. Ingraham's name appears as a member of Co. B. It is possible that he may have been transferred to another company. It is possible--indeed, probable--that his death is erroneously reported. We hope to hear that such is the case.

THE THIRTY-THIRD.—A private letter from an officer of the 33d Regiment, says:
"The 33d hare lost now at least over one-half their number, but have bravely stood up and will be spoken of in "orders" from the General as having done their whole duty—marked A No. 1. Our flag is a curiosity—the staff is there, a portion of the blue, and a few dragging stripes. Once when our color-bearer was stricken down, the Colonel snatched up the staff and waved it in the face of the enemy, on horseback. It is useless to go into details; they would fill pages. * * * Suffice it to say we can go home with honor unscathed, which some regiments we wot of cannot.
"The great trouble seems to have been in not retaining the Heights after taking them; but we went right on following the rebels, apparently to join Hooker. The enemy then flanked us, driving all hands to Banks' Ford. * * * Col. Taylor is in command of the brigade, Gen. Mills being injured. Gen. Sedwick is blamed for not holding the Heights with the 6th corps. Had this been done, all would have been right."

From the "Old 33d."
DETACHMENT 33D N. Y. VOLS.,
CAMP NEAR WARRENTON, Va., Aug. 10.
EDS. UNION AND ADVERTISER:—The mail last evening brought to us Rochester papers containing lists of the drafted men in the city. A great excitement ensued. The names were read aloud—the reader being interrupted almost every moment by cheers, and exclamations of all kinds: "George, your brother is drafted!" "Bully for him!" He can come as well as not!" There was an eagerness manifested to welcome most of the "prize drawers;" yet occasionally might be heard remarks like this: "Too bad for Jim; he can't raise the three hundred—he has four children and his house is not paid for." For all such a spirit of condolence was evinced. If they are compelled to come the city of Rochester should not let their families suffered.
We are now enjoying (!) the warm weather. The brigade moved camp one day last week going about two miles. In some regiments whole companies fell out—officers and all. The 33d ment [sic] into camp with the following force: Capt. Gifford, three sergeants and one private! It is a good thing for the army that we are not actively engaged at present. A long march would occasion more eases of sun-stroke than all the surgeons in the army could attend to.
The 33d Detachment wish to say a word through your columns in favor of the 1st Veteran Cavalry, now being recruited by our brave and efficient commander, Col. R. F. Taylor. The sooner the regiment is filled up the sooner will we be transferred from our present position, which in many respects (being attached to another regiment) is disagreeable to us,—back to the command of our veteran Colonel, and hereafter be known as Cos. "A" and "B," 1st Veteran Volunteers. A contingency for which we devoutly wish and pray. We trust that all of our friends will lend a helping hand in the good work, and that ere many days we may have orders to report at Camp Swift, Geneva. Notwithstanding the long and tedious marches made by the men from the Rappahannock to Pennsylvania and back, some days going thirty-five miles, their health is generally quite good. They are now tickling their palates with green corn, string beans, new potatoes, and the large and luscious blackberries which are found in great numbers here. Truly yours, H.

The Thirty-third at the Storming of Fredericksburg Under Sedgwick—
Letter from Capt. Gifford of the Rochester Company.
The following letter from Capt. Gifford, of the Rochester Company in the 33d, addressed to W. Seward, Esq., will he interesting to the friends of the company and the regiment, as it shows the part taken in the Moody contest, and the list of casualties:
CAMP 33D N. Y. S. V., NEAR BANKS' FORD, VA., May 7, 1863.
WM. E. SEWARD.—DEAR SIR: I take the present opportunity of writing you regarding the action in which the 33d has been recently engaged, at the same time requesting you to have the letter published for the information of the friends of my company.
We crossed the river below Fredericksburg  about dark Saturday night, picketed until daybreak Sunday morning, at which time our whole corps (the 6th,) had crossed the river and had occupied the city. There was considerably artillery firing between us and the enemy until about 10 o'clock A. M., when the whole line was ordered to charge the heights.
The hill back of the town was taken in less than fifteen minutes by the Light Division, commanded by Col. Burnham (6th Maine,) on the right, and the 33d N. Y. S. V. on the left. As soon as our line could be reformed we (the 33d,) were ordered to charge the heights on the left of those already taken. Away we went with a cheer, and in less than 20 minutes we had gained the top of the hill, capturing one brass piece just loaded for our benefit, but which the rebels had not time to discharge or take away. Here we were met by a galling fire from two lines of battle which the enemy had formed within one hundred yards of us, but the gallant 33d faltered not. At them went our boys, loading and firing as fast as they could. A storm of bullets swept the hill, thinning our ranks terribly, but our brave boys stood it like heroes, and many a rebel bit the dust. We held the hill for forty minutes under the most galling fire I have ever seen, unsupported either on the right or the left. At the expiration of that time the 7th Maine arrived, and together we soon drove the rebels beyond the reach of our fire.
The balance of our division having by this time arrived on the heights to our left the fighting closed, and the heights of Fredericksburg were taken.
The loss of our regiment during this engagement was 72 officers and men. The loss in Co. D was two killed and six wounded. The following are their names: Killed—George H. Howard and Benjamin Swift; wounded—Corp. Michael Flood, thigh, severely; Privates Henry S. Boss, shoulder, severely; Geo. C. Crofutt, breast, severely; Wm. Foley, foot, slightly; Barnett Geelan, leg, not serious; Dolphin S. Porter, wrist, slightly.
During the afternoon we were moved to the right some two or three miles, the enemy having been engaged by Gen. Brooks' division. We did not get into the fight; night closed the scene and we held our ground. During the night the enemy having received reinforcements succeeded in turning our left, and before daylight Monday morning they were again in possession of the heights that had cost us so much blood. This can only be accounted for by the incompetence of our corps commanders, who did not leave sufficient force on the heights to defend them.
At 8 o'clock they attacked us on the left, but were repulsed. We established our lines and rested till 6 o'clock P. M., when our whole line was attacked by Jackson's forces. We stood our ground as long as we could, but being flanked by greatly superior numbers were obliged to give way. We were driven back about half a mile when we rallied and drove the enemy and regained the position we occupied in the morning. Darkness came on and a retreat across the river at Banks' Ford having been ordered, we fell back, leaving most of our dead and wounded on the field, as there was not time to get them off.
Co. D. lost one killed, five wounded and ten missing during the fight of Monday. The following are their names: killed—Valentine McNeiss; wounded—Lieut. C. D. Rossiter, leg and ankle, (taken prisoner); Sergt. David Vandecarr, abdomen; Corp. John E. Mylacraine, hip, slight; Corp. Thos. W. Roach, (color guard,) face, slight; Privates Henry C. Kennison, side and hand. Missing—Privates Hiram Budd, George Catline, Joseph Gleason, Nathan S. Horton, Matthew Keers, Michael Lightheart, Albert S. McGowan, Michael Nelligan, Harmon Pike and Wm. O. Witter.
All of the wounded of Co. D are on this side of the river except Lieut. Rossiter. I was not aware of his being wounded until nearly dark, at which time I was on the extreme left to rally the stragglers. He was wounded during the retreat and after we had rallied and driven the enemy back, two of my men brought him down to the hospital, at which place they were obliged to leave him. The ambulances having already crossed the river (which was two miles from the hospital) and he being unable to be carried in a blanket, requested to be left. Had I known the facts I could have gotten him across. His wounds are not serious I think, except the one in the ankle, which appears to have been made by a bullet passing through the joint shattering the bone.
The total loss in my company during the two fights is as follows: Killed, three; wounded, eleven; missing, ten. The boys all fought like veterans, not one of them showing the least sign of cowardice. I could relate incidents of personal bravery among them, but time will not permit. Should anything be heard from any of the missing I will promptly inform their friends through you.
The loss in the 33d is as follows: 18 killed; 126 wounded; 67 missing. Also 6 officers wounded and 1 missing.
Respectfully yours,
H. J. GIFFORD,
Captain Co. D. 33d N. Y. S. V.

Reorganization of the 33d Regiment.
The work of reorganizing the 33d regiment under the auspices of Col. Taylor is going steadily forward, and numbers of the drafted men from the surrounding counties are already seeking its ranks. Col. Taylor has now twelve branch recruiting offices in Western New York to procure men for his regiment, nearly all of which are doing well. He has now over 300 men on his rolls. He pays the handsome sum of $552 bounties for veteran recruits, and $175 to new volunteers. The reputation of the old 33d regiment was second to none in the field. Many members of the old regiment are again rallying "round the flag."
We learn that a History of the Campaign of the 33d N. Y. Volunteers, is in progress of publication, and will shortly be issued. To the Regiment and its many friends throughout Western New York, it will prove invaluable as a souvenir of the trials and privations endured for a period of two years, and doubly interesting from the fact that it will be profusely illustrated with engravings from sketches made by an officer of the regiment, of every Camp, Battle-field, and every point of interest wherever the regiment has sojourned. The book will consist of 250 pages, and some seventy engravings, and the cost will be $1,50 only, thus placing it within the reach of all with whom the regiment is so closely allied, by the ties of father, brother, son and relation, who went forth to battle for the Union. As we have a Company which had taken an active and conspicuous part in all the operations of the 33d, the book will possess peculiar interest to the people of this locality.

Wounded in Howe's Division.
Thirty-third New York--Col. Taylor.
S. Larwood, H, finger, slight J Proudfoot, A, thigh
1st Sgt L McCall, B, face       2d Lt S Porter, H, rt thigh
E P Humphrey, A, slight                     J C Robinson, C, slight
John Bliss, L, severe               Corp B Patterson, L, chest
M Boquett, A, rgt forearm      W H Piper, F, chest
Sgt M O'Brien, K, rt arm                    Corp J S Taggart, E, arm
Corp T H Roach, D, head       Sgt D Vandacurr, D, abd'm
M Smith, C, forearm               Corp _ H Watson, F, arm
C L Truax, B, left hip                         J W Hendricks, A, arm
J E Wanderlin, C, lt leg                       Corp B Mephan, B, back
D W Elsworth, H, hand                      M Smith, C, chest, slight
We learn that a History of the Campaign of the 33d N. Y. Vols., is in progress of publication, and will shortly be issued. To the Regiment and its many friends throughout Western New York, it will prove invaluable as a souvenir of the trials and privations endured for a period of two years, and doubly interesting from the fact that it will be profusely illustrated with engravings from sketches made by an officer of the Regiment, of every Camp, Battle-field, and every point of interest, where-ever the Regiment has sojourned. The book will consist of 250 pages, and some seventy engravings, and the cost will be $1,50 only,  thus placing it within the reach of all with whom the Regiment is so closely allied, by the ties of father, brother, son, and relation, who went forth to battle for the Union. As Co. E, Capt. Warford, has taken an active and conspicuous part in all the operations of the 33d the book will possess peculiar interest to the people of this locality.

Letter from W. L. Ingraham, Esq., 33d Regiment—An Account of his Mishaps in Dixie.
Correspondence of the Democrat and American.
U. S. GENERAL HOSPITAL
ANNAPPOLIS, Md., May 24, 1863.
I am in this hospital, disabled from the effects of a wound received at the battle of Fredericksburg, on the 3d inst. Our brigade, the 3d, 2d division, 6th Corps, stormed and carried those fatal heights in the rear of Fredericksburg on the day previous Sunday. Don't you think it would be better to lose an advantage, than to commence an attack on that holy day? I do. Instead of fortifying and holding those heights, gained with so much loss, we pressed on in an insane attempt to form a junction with Hooker. Sunday night we encamped on a barren hill side, and at daybreak Monday, we stood under arms, prepared for an emergency. No cause of alarm appearing, we cooked our coffee and ate breakfast. Nearly every one had finished the meal, when we perceived a long line of rebel infantry filing over the hills and through the woods on our left, and getting in our rear. We were instantly after them, double quick, our speed, no doubt, acclerated [sic] by the storm of ball and shell which their artillery was pouring into our ranks. We gained the hights as quickly as possible, and there found ourselves face to face with the same foe we had driven from the same spot the day previous.
It was here and in this battle that I was wounded. A ball struck me on my right side directly over my bowels. You may ask if it went through me. The wonder is that it did not. It was sent with force enough to go through three human bodies if nothing intervened to prevent. But through a kind Providence, my life was saved in this way. The ball, in the first place, passed through two thicknesses of my leather belt, then through my knit woolen blouse, and through my military jacket, and struck directly at the left end of my right hand vest pocket. I happened to have in that pocket,—rnd [sic] the wonder is that they were all in the spot where the ball struck,—a couple of brass buttons, a bone button, a couple of steel pens, and a leather string. These stopped the ball, and saved my life. The brass buttons were bent out of all shape, the bone button was broken into minute fragments, the pens were broken and bent into small pieces, and the leather string jammed and cut into two parts.—I picked these relics out of my pocket two days afterward, and not till then did I know how my life was saved, I have preserved them, and will show them to you if I live to see you.
The blow knocked me senseless, and the next thing I knew, two fellows in grey clothes were rolling me over, and exploring my wounds and my pockets at the same time. They asked me if I was able to walk. I told them I should hardly think so. They picked me up, saying that a half dead man was better than no prisoner. I while protested, but they hung to me, and after a had me within their lines. One of their physicians examined me, and gave me treatment in the kindest manner. The ball had caused an internal injury, producing a rupture of the bowels. My journeys to Richmond, and thence to City Point, were severe and trying ones. I arrived here last Sunday morning in the hospital steamer "State of Maine," in company with one hundred and fifty other wounded and sick. We were all in a woful [sic] and destitute condition. I have good treatment, and the hospital is situated in a most salubrious and beautiful spot being formerly the United States Naval grounds, but since the war, dedicated to its present use. The physician has, however, pronounced me unfit for further service, and has ordered me to be discharged. I have endeavored to do my duty to my government and country since I have been in the army, and have never lost a day since I came to my regiment, by sickness or otherwise, till now. I moan in spirit when I think of those fatal Fredericksburg heights.—To think of the labor, treasure, time and precious lives lost in taking them, and then to lose them so easily. My heart misgave me when we left them. I felt it to be wrong. I almost knew it to be folly. I felt that we should root ourselves there, and fortify.
But praise be to God who ordereth all things. I did not see much of Richmond, but I have nothing to complain of in the way of treatment during my stay there. The people seemed very kind and considerate, and very fond of discussing the subject of the war with us Yankees, as they called us, which they always did in good spirit. The soldiers are most inveterate beggars. What they could not beg from our men they would try to buy with their worthless paper. They were most bare-faced in their begging. One cavalry officer even asked me to let him have the buttons off my military jacket. I asked him if he had not better have jacket and all. The soldiers who took me begged away my drinking and coffee cups. The physican [sic] who examined me, expressed himself so frequently as being desirous of possessing a canteen just like mine, that I finally relinquished it to him, not sorry to do anything to please a gentlemen who had treated me so kindly, and cared for me so skillfully. In fact, I should have been begged or bought away, clothes, body and all, I believe, but for the "eternal vigilance" I was obliged to display.—They seemed infatuated to carry off some relic belonging to a Yankee. When they could not prevail by begging, they were exceedingly sharp at driving a bargain, and our boys very "flat" at the same. They got almost everything our soldiers possessed, on their own terms, and I could not help smiling scornfully at the manner in which they have been wont to twit us North­erners with being sharp-trading "peddling Yankees."
Prices for provisions were very high in Richmond and Petersburg. Being very hungry I was obliged to pay in the latter place one dollar for a small piece of fried shad and a piece of bread. Milk was a dollar a quart; eggs two dollars per dozen; small loaves of bread, that Howe, of your city, would sell for three cents, were sold in Richmond three for a dollar. Those small molasses cakes that he sells at ten cents per dozen, were sold five for a dollar.
Our prisoners were allowed but two meals per day, and small meals at that—being a piece of bread, and a very small piece of boiled bacon, with nothing to drink but cold water. They contend that they have plenty of provisions, but that transportation is difficult. I asked them if their transportation facilities were not as good as they ever were. They said, "Yes, but—" The fact is, provisions are very scarce, but their soldiers live and thrive on much less food than our men could or would. I make no hesitation in saying that our army wastesfood enough every month to feed theirs the same length of time.— They waste none, and are patient and satisfied with what they get. Our soldiers could not get along without coffee and sugar. They get neither, and say they are better off without them. They pretended to have great faith in the cause for which they fight, but express themselves as satisfied with what they have seen, and wish most heartily that the war was over—wish the matter could be settled in some way, and the war stopped, &c. But I must close.
Yours Truly,
W. L. Ingraham.

The Late Michael Flood.
CAMP OF THE 83D N. Y V
NEAR WARRENTON, Va., Aug. 15, l863.
At a meeting of the members of Co. "D," held this day, the death of Corporal Michael Flood being announced, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, Intelligence has reached us of the death of Corporal Michael Flood, who was wounded May 3d, 1863, at the moment he reached the crest of Mary's Height, in the charge which planted our colors on that stronghold; therefore, be it
Resolved, That we sincerely mourn the loss of one who has endeared himself to us all by his bravery, attention to duties, and the kindness and good nature displayed toward his associates at all times.
Resolved, That we tender our sympathy to the relatives of our late comrade, and with them look to Him alone who can grant consolation in the hour of affliction.
Resolved, That a copy of these proceedings be sent to the parents of deceased, and also to the Rochester papers for publication.
GEORGE B. HERRICK, Chairman.
Sergt. Wm. E. Boullis, Secretary.
Committee--Capt. H. J. Gifford, Orderly Sergeant John Beedle, Sergt. James Walls, Corporal N. C. M. Gifford, Timothy O'Reagan, John Brooker, Frank Miles.

From the "Old 33d."
DETACHMENT 33D N. Y. VOLS.
CAMP NEAR WARRENTON, Va. Aug. 10.
EDS. UNION AND ADVERTISER:—The mail last evening brought to us Rochester papers containing lists of the drafted men in the city. A great excitement ensued. The names were read aloud—the reader being interrupted almost every moment by cheers, and exclamations of all kinds: "George, your brother is drafted!" "Bully for him!" "He can come as well as not!" There was an eagerness manifested to welcome most of the "prize drawers;" yet occasionally might be heard remarks like this: "Too bad for Jim; he can't raise the three hundred—he has four children and his house is not paid for." For all such a spirit of condolence was evinced. If they are compelled to come the city of Rochester should not let their families suffered.
We are now enjoying (!) the warm weather. The brigade moved camp one day last week going about two miles. In some regiments whole companies fell out—officers and all. The 33d ment [sic] camp with the following force:
Capt. Gifford, three sergeants and one private! It is a good thing for the army that we are not actively engaged at present. A long march would occasion more cases of sun-stroke than all the surgeons in the army could attend to.
The 33d Detachment wish to say a word through your columns in favor of the 1st Veteran Cavalry, now being recruited by our brave and efficient commander, Col. R. F. Taylor. The sooner the regiment is filled up the sooner will we be transferred from our present position, which in many respects (being attached to another regiment) is disagreeable to us,—back to  the command of our veteran Colonel, and hereafter be known as Cos. "A and "B," 1st Veteran Volunteers. A contingency for which we devoutly wish and pray. We trust that all of our friends will lend a helping hand in the good work, and that ere many days we may have orders to report at Camp Swift, Geneva.
Notwithstanding the long and tedious marches made by the men from the Rappahannock to 7 Pennsylvania and back, some days going thirty-five miles, their health is generally quite good. They are now tickling their palates with green corn, string beans, new potatoes, and the large and luscious blackberries which are found in great numbers here. Truly yours,

From the "Remnant" of the Old 33d Regiment—The March from the Rappahannock to Gettysburg.
The following letter from Capt. Gifford to Lieut. Mix, contains information which will interest the friends of the 33d Regiment, and is the first account we have seen of the march from the Rappahannock to Gettysburg:
CAMP DETACHMENT, 33B N. Y. S. V.,
Near Berlin, Md., July 17, 1863.
The 33d is still in the field. We have had some hard marching since we left the Rappahannock. We came up by way of Dumfrees and Fairfax Court House. The 2d Division went out as far as Briston Station; staid there four days; then marched back to Centerville; thence to Edward's Ferry via Drainsville; met Col. Taylor on the way; boys were all pleased to see him; crossed the river at Edwards Ferry; marched thence through Poolesville, Barnesville, New Market and West Minster to Manchester, (all in Md.;) then ordered to Gettysburg, double quick. We left Manchester at daylight, and by 4 o'clock P. M. arrived on the field of battle, a distance of thirty-three miles—rather tall traveling. Gen. Sedgewick led in the 3d Division the same night, thereby saving the fight; this was on the night of the 2d of July. The 3d Brigate [sic] (ours) was detached from the corps, and supported a battery of heavy artillery during the afternoon and evening of the 2d. On the following morning we were moved to the extreme right, and held that position during that bloody day. We were not engaged except in picket firing. Our brigade lost only ten or twelve killed and wounded—none were injured in the detachment of the 33d.
Such a day as was that 3d of July, 1863, I can never forget. The booming of 300 pieces of artillery resounded on all sides, and the horrid screaching [sic] of shells filled the air. After the battle was over I visited the field, and saw the result of the terrible struggle. The ground was literally piled with the rebel dead; nothing that we saw at Antietam began to compare with it. In front of the rifle pits of the 12th Corps, in a space of less than one-half an acre, I counted 350 dead bodies, and this was but a fraction of what could be seen farther to the left.
The rebels had thrown their whole force upon us in two lines of battles, extending more than three miles in length, and with desperate energy had striven to break our line; but firm as a rock stood the invincible Army of the Potomac, and although the rebel army numbered 103,000, while ours was but little more than half that number, yet we hurled them back broken and defeated. I have not space to write particulars, you have read them ere this.
The next morning, the 4th, the whole rebel army fell back from Gettysburg, and on the morning of the 5th the 6th corps followed them down the valley. Before night we came in sight of their rear guard. Our orders were not to press them, therefore we did not. The next morning we followed slowly after them, the 49th N. Y., (to which the 33d is attached,) being the advanced skirmishers. By 8 o'clock we overtook them, or at least overtook their skirm­ishers. They attacked my company first, but after a brisk engagement of a few minutes, we drove them from the field, with a loss of two killed, two wounded and some fifteen prisoners. I had three men wounded slightly, as follows: William E. Jenkins, musket ball through fleshy part of thigh; William Greenwood, finger shot off; Samuel Larwood, slightly in the hand.—This fight took place rt Fairfield, Pa. Before night we advanced to Fountaindale, some six miles further. The next day we marched to Waynesboro, Franklin county, Pa., at which place we remained four days. Here we were joined by Gen. Smith (Old Baldy) with about 6,000 militia. Leaving the militia at this place, we pushed on toward Hagerstown, going to the left and rejoining our corps, (from which our brigade had seperated [sic] at Fairfield,) at or near Funkstown. After lying in line of battle for  two days, we found that LEE had succeeded in crossing the Potomac, our cavalry capturing his rear guard of 2,000 men. You probably remember the celebrated "white horse" that was so often seen in the enemy's line on the peninsula: well, we have killed the rider (Gen. Pettigrew) and captured the horse. This was done by our cavalry under Kilpatrick, I believe. Gen. Pettigrew was with the rear guard. He was surprised and ordered to surrender, he refused, and his head was split open with a sabre. After this he had no more to say. We are now near Berlin preparing to cross the Potomac again, once more to set foot upon the "sacred soil."
Thus I have given you a roaming account of our doings for the past three weeks. What may come to pass during the next three I leave for fate to develop, assuring you that come what may, you will find the remnant of the old 33d on hand. Yours ever,
H. J. GIFFORD.

THE 33D REGIMENT.--We find in the Rochester Democrat of Monday the following extract from a letter from Col. Taylor of this Regiment:
My loss in two days was 155 killed, wounded and missing. They are as follows: Three Captains, three Lieutenants wounded and one missing. The officers are as follows: Capts. Cole, Root and Warfield--the latter very slight. Lieuts. Byrme, Rossiter and Porter wounded, and Caywood missing. I lost 74 men in one charge. Frank Miles is missing--think he is wounded. Lieut. Col. Corning had his horse killed. Mine was slightly wounded. Did not receive a scratch, nor either of my field officers."

Reception of the 33d.
At a meeting of the Board of Trustees and citizens of the Village of Waterloo, held Tuesday evening, May 12th, 1863, for the purpose of making arrangements to give company C., 33d Regt., N. Y. S. V. a public reception at the time of their return home, James Stevenson, President of the Village, was called to the Chair, and E. W. Sentell, Village Clerk, was appointed Secretary.
On motion a committee of eleven be appointed to make such arrangements, and that said Committee meet at the Corporation Room, on Wednesday Evening the 13th inst., at 8 o'clock.
The Chair appointed the following gentlemen as such Committee:
Elias Johnson, Wm. Knox, Henry C. Welles, Samuel Birdsall, Levi Fatzinger, S. R. Welles, Charles Sentell, S. G. Hadley, R. P. Kendig, and A. B. Slauson.
On motion, James Stevenson was added to the Committee.
The meeting then adjourned. JAMES STEVENSON, Chairman,

The Geneva Gazette.
S. H. PARKER, Editor.
TERMS.
Office & Mail Subscribers, $2,00
When paid in Advance, 1,50
Village Subscribers, b y Carrier, when paid in Advance, 2,00
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 29, 1863.
Arrival Home of the 33d.
A GALA DAY IN GENEVA.
Grand Ovation to the Returning Braves.
Saturday last was made a grand holiday in Geneva, in commemoration of the return of the 33d N. Y. Volunteers—or rather the remnant of brave fellows who survive the dozen bloody battles through which the regiment has passed. The day was excessively hot and sultry, yet the heat and dust in no wise checked the enthusiastic ardor of our village and country people, who turned out by thousands to participate in the welcoming pageant.
The regiment arrived by steamboat at half past 10 o'clock in the morning, and were received at the landing by the village authorities and deputation of citizens numbering about 50. The thundering of cannon and the chimes of every church bell, joined in the welcome.
A procession was formed, the regiment being "armed and equipped as the law directs," and under the command of those worthy and intrepid officers, Col. TAYLOR and Major PLATNER, who had led it in numberless marches and shared its hardships and dangers for the last two years.
The procession marched up Castle to Genesee, up Genesee to Lewis, down Lewis to Geneva, down Geneva to Castle, down Castle to Water st., up Water to Seneca, and up Seneca and Main st. to the ravine, where it countermarched and returned down Main st. to the Park. Stores and private dwellings along the route were gaily and tastefully decorated with the national colors, "red, white and blue," while ever and anon the populace who crowded the streets burst out into cheers for the heroes who were "the observed of all observers."
At the Park the regiment formed in line in front of the stage that had been erected, and Hon. CHAS. J. FOLGER stepped forward and addressed the officers and men in the following heartfelt and appropriate welcome:
Col. Taylor, and Officers and Men of the 33d Regiment.
There has fallen to me the pleasant duty of tendering to you a welcome home again. In behalf of the community from which you went forth, I offer you a hearty and an overflowing welcome back from your service as soldiers.
But it does not seem to us that you are the same men from whom we parted. It is now two years since we saw you, some of you, leave this shore, young volunteers, familiar only with the ways of happy homes and a peaceful community, and now you return to us bronzed and scarred veterans, conversant with all the rude alarms of war, having looked Death steadily in the face in many a well-contested field of strife, and having won for yourselves an ample soldierly reputation.
Two years ago I said! It seems, as we look back, but a little space, yet how full that time has been crowded with stirring incidents and exciting events. And to none more than to you have come those events and those incidents. Of what we have only read or heard with but a dull ear, of that you have been a great part, and have looked upon with courageous eyes. We can scarcely name a battle in the long catalogue which tells of the acts and achievements of the Army of the Potomac, in which the 33d Regiment has not borne a part, and borne it valiantly and well.
Raised, as you for the most part were, in that district of country which once fell within the limits of Old Ontario County, you went forth with the name of the Ontario Regiment, and that fact has always endeared you to us in this immediate region. You were christened after our County. It is a proud old name, for Ontario is the mother of Counties not only, but the Mother of MEN as well. And we felt proud of you, for we were, and are, proud of the name; and we were jealous of it, too, jealous that it should take no tarnish in your hands. But as report after report came back to us of your good behavior, of your courage and steadiness, of your fiery valor, our jealousy was gone, lost, merged, in a sense of swelling pride, that the noble old name of Ontario had been so well bestowed, and that, not only it took no stain, but that it received an additional and higher lustre and greater glory from the soldiers of the 33d.
And you may be sure that when the news came of battles fought, and the papers told us of our troops in action, there was a speedy search here for the name and exploits of the 33d, and an eager community was interested in its sufferings and in its achievements, and never, never pained by its defaults, or by its individual disasters.
And so as time went on, though you may not have noticed it, the Regiment which went out as the Ontario Regiment, came to be called the 33d or Ontario Regiment. And then, and not long after, nought else but the 33d, and that was a sufficient and an individual designation, for you had made the "two threes" famous throughout the army and the country; and you needed no appellation of distinction, save your own name, the gallant 33d-"Taylor's fighting Devils." And all this has been due to, and resultant from, the good qualities and spirit of the men, encouraged and trained and brought out by the labors and example of the officers.
We owe you many thanks—we offer them to you now, that you have so well, so eminently glorified this community whose geographical name you have borne.
I just said that we traced the papers after a battle, and looked for mention of the 33d and its deeds; and then, the days after when came the long and sorrowful list of casualties, with what tremor and apprehension we looked again for the beloved number, 33. For well we knew, that where all were so brave in battle, some must have met Death and yielded to his power. And we cannot now look upon your thinned ranks and diminished numbers without missing from them some well-remembered faces, very dear to many among us. Nor without feeling that a great and awful sacrifice had been made for a great and righteous cause. And more especially was this the case, when the report came of the last conflict upon the Rappahannock, so glorious and yet so fatal to your regiment. When here at home all was buoyant expectation of your soon return, even then announced, it was sad and sorrowful indeed, to read and know that there was no return, for alas, too many.
Yet it is a consolation that the sacrifice, so costly. has been made for a cause, precious above price, for the defence of Constitutional and legitimate government against the assaults of a hateful and hated rebellion in arms. And there is the further consolation that no one who has been taken from your ranks has died the death of a traitor or of a deserter or as a coward running from the fate which overtook him; but that loyally, manfully, gallantly, all have stood with their comrades, and have met their destiny as a true soldier loves to meet it, with his face toward the foe.
And you have brought back with you your Colors the last thing which a brave Regiment surrenders. These Colors have never been surrendered, have never been repulsed, have never been driven back have never retreated save at the order of the General commanding, and when a whole army or the whole force fell back with them. The 33d has never, as a Regiment, fallen back upon compulsion, but has often stopped the current of the enemy's advance, and has turned the tide of many an unpromising conflict and saved from the chronicle the record of a loyal defeat. Torn by shot and shell, dim with the stain of the elements, spotted with the blood of its brave defenders and faded from the bright hues which were first unfurled to the sun light, these colors yet bear upon them one word, which is a sunbeam of itself--
"WILLIAMSBURGH,"
inscribed there for gallant conduct and persistent obdurate bravery in that field, by an order delivered to you from the mouth of your Commander-in-Chief, George B. McClellan.
That one word written there is a lustre and a glory which no warp and woof of the artificer, though shot with silk of richest dye, and with thread of purest gold, can equal or imitate.
It is worn and tattered. But the perils it has shared with you, the hardships you have borne under it, make it beautiful and sacred to us, men of inaction, who now look upon it, the mute yet eloquent witnesses of all your noble deeds. It will soon take its place in the treasured archives of this noble State, among its kindred flags, second to none, equal to any in interest.
But I weary your patience with a theme which grows upon my mind, and I must come to a close.
I hope, we all, whose spokesman I now am, hope and pray, that escaped from the hardships of your service, you may live long to enjoy the blessings of a Government and a Union as we trust, saved and restored, in no small part, by your devotion. And it will add no canker to your enjoyment to reflect, that you turned your back upon home and its comforts and endearments, and periled all for the preservation of this Nationality, and all there is so priceless, bound up in its perpetuity.
And let me say in conclusion, that I know in this generation of American men, none who has a right to bear himself with prouder, loftier, self respect than he who two years ago, when the Country of his birth, or of his adoption, was in the dark hour of its extremest danger, and seemed ready for extinction, stepped forth from the mass of community, as a volunteer soldier for its defence; and who through two years of varying fortune, has kept right on in the path of duty; and ready at every call, has braved danger, has endured hardships, has met deadly peril face to face, and never flinched, and who, now his term of service over, returns to the society he has protected, to pursue the ordinary avocations of life, the pursuit of which would have been ended and lost in political chaos but for his sacrifices and his daring. I am not able to express the emotions which swell my soul when I look upon the men who have done all this. Let him who can survey them unmoved, go ally himself to the iceberg, or confess himself the spawn of that Devil, who, all self and selfish emotion, is the only legitimate progenitor of such a cold and heartless wretch.
Again and again, Colonel and Officers and Men of our own gallant 33d, I return you the public thanks, and give you the public hearty welcome home.
As the speaker, alluding to the inscription on their battle-flag, pronounced the name of MCCLELLAN, the soldiers gave vent to their feelings of regard for their favorite and beloved commander in spontaneous and rapturous cheers. It was the first indication the public had had of their feelings as a body towards the proscribed General, and it was such an one as to silence all cavil on that heretofore controverted point. The soldiers who have fought under him are for "LITTLE MAC" to a man!
Col. TAYLOR responded in behalf of the regiment to the welcome of Judge FOLGER, in substance as follows:
Friends and Fellow Citizens:—It gives me unbounded pleasure to meet with you again in Geneva, and I feel grateful to you for the warm hospitality and kind reception you have given to my Regiment. Words can but poorly express the gratitude of our soldier hearts for this unexpected welcome from your hands, and rest assured we shall long cherish the remembrance of this hour as among the happiest of our lives.
Friends, I did not come here to address you at length, and you doubtless are all aware that I am not a man of many words, but rather a man of actions, and quite unaccustomed to public speaking. Therefore you will pardon my brevity, while I assure you that we feel more than we speak. When we left you two years ago, we resolved to do our duty in the field, and can freely say that there's not a man in the 33d Regiment, but has done his whole duty on all occasions. What our career has been during this eventful period you need not be told. You are familiar with every engagement, and if our conduct on these occasions but merits your approval we are content.
Again I thank you all kindly in behalf of my Regiment, for the welcome you have extended to us, and should unlooked-for events transpire that would demand their services, the Regiment would be among the first to respond to the call and I believe every man would be found again in the ranks.
On concluding, he called on the "boys" to give three cheers for the citizens of Geneva, and they responded with a will; and three more for the Union in imitation of their greeting to the rebels in the charge at Williamsburgh [sic] and the shouts were fairly deafining. [sic] But this was not enough: some private in the ranks called out "three more for GEO. B. MCCLELLAN," and a great part of the populace catching the inspiration, there went up from soldiers and civilians three cheers and a "tiger" that made the welkin ring.
The ceremonies concluded, the soldiers took up the line of march for Camp SWIFT. On arriving there they found and participated in a most superb banquet, prepared by the Ladies of Geneva. Every substantial, and delicacies in profusion were spread out before them in quantities that would have supplied a full brigade. And they were served with hands as fair and hearts as warm and willing as can be found in this land of lovely women.
The afternoon and evening were spent in greetings with relatives and friends, and reciting incidents of the camp, the march and the battle-field.
A most joyous incident of the return was the presence of sixty-eight men of the regiment, who, reported missing at the last Fredericksburg fight, had that morning just returned from their brief imprisonment among the rebels. In the retreat from the heights, ordered after being virtually surrounded by the enemy, these men were captured—their comrades, however, not knowing their fate. Their return "all right" was a subject of joyous congratulation.
The regiment is still in camp here, waiting to be mustered out and paid off. This will be delayed for several days, owing to the unfortunate loss of rolls and accounts by some of the officers.
The following embraces the names of the present commissioned officers of this Regiment.
FIELD AND STAFF.
Colonel—ROBERT F. TAYLOR.
Lt.-Col.—JOSEPH W. CORNING.
Major—JOHN S. PLATNER.
Adjutant—JOHN W. CORNING.
Qur.-Master—H. N. ALEXANDER.
Surgeon—D. E. DICKINSON.
Asst.-Surgeons—RICHARD CURRAN, MCLAUGHLIN.
Chaplain—REV. A. H. LUNG.

LINE OFFICERS—COMPANY A.
Captain—E. J. TYLER.
1st Lieut.—PRICE W. BAILEY.
2d    "     —THOS. SIBBALDS.
COMPANY B.
Captain—H. J. DRAIME.
1st Lieut.—L. C. Mix.
2d     "    —JOHN J. CARTER.
COMPANY C.
Captain—CHESTER H. COLE. *
1st Lieut.— ____ BRETT.
2nd    "   — ____ STEBBINS.
COMPANY D.
Captain— GIFFORD.
1st Lieut. Rossiter. **
2nd   "     ROACH.
COMPANY E.
Captain—W. B. WARFORD.
1st Lieut.—JOHN GUMMER.
2nd   "        (vacant.)

COMPANY F.
Captain—JAMES M. MCNAIR.
1st Lieut.—HENRY A. HILLS.
2nd Lieut.—JOHN P. WINSHIP.
COMPANY G.
Captain—GEORGE A. GALE.
1st Lieut. — ____ MARSHALL.
2nd   “     —BYRON CRANE.
COMPANY H.
Captain—A. H. DRAKE.
1st Lieut.—OTIS COLE.
2nd   "    —SYLVESTER PORTER.*
COMPANY I.
Captain—E. E. ROOT.*
1st Lieut.—GEORGE BRANNAN.
2nd   "     —DAVID CAYWOOD.
COMPANY K.
Captain—PATRICK MCGKAW.
1st Lieut.— BURNS.
2nd   "    — CAREY.
* Wounded at Fredericksburg.
** Killed in the last battle at Fredericksburg.

REORGANIZATION OF THE 33D REGIMENT.—
The work of reorganizing the 33d regiment under the auspices of Col. TAYLOR is going steadily forward and numbers from the drafted men of the surrounding counties are already seeking its ranks. Col. TAYLOR has now twelve branch recruiting offices in Western New York to procure men for his regiment, nearly all of which are doing well. He has now over three hundred men on his rolls. He pays the handsome sum of $552 bounties for veteran recruits, and $175 to new volunteers.—The reputation of the old 33d regiment was second to none in the field. Many members of the old regiment are again rallying "round the flag."
When Co. E, 33d Regiment, was being raised in 1861, about $3,500 was subscribed and pledged for the support of the families of soldiers who enlisted from Genesco. The question is agitated, how much of this money was collected. What became of it? Was any of it used for partisan purposes? Was any of it diverted for personal uses? Was there any humbug or false pretences about it?

FUNERAL OF LIEUT. ROSSITER.—The funeral of Lieut. Chas. D. Rossiter, of the 33d Regiment, took place from the Brick Church yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Company C, of the 54th Regiment, with arms reversed, and headed by Newman's band, escorted the remains to the church, and thence to Mt. Hope, where they fired a salute of three volleys over the grave. Company G, also of the 54th, of which the deceased was formerly a member, turned out as numerous, and accompanied the remains of their lamented comrade to their last resting place.
The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Dr. Shaw, who delivered a very pathetic and impressive discourse, alluding in fitting terms to the patriotism which urged the deceased to take up arms in his country's defence. He also paid a high tribute to his bravery on the battle-field, and the appreciation and favor in which he was held by both the officers and men of his regiment. The services were very impressive, and were another sad reminder of the grief and sorrow which is brought to many a home and fireside throughtout [sic] the country, by the effects of war.

J. SPRAGUE of Company I, 33d Regt., has returned home. He had a severe wound in the leg at the last Fredericksburg fight, which confined him at the hospital for some time. His wound is doing well.

The Times.
N. J . MILLIKEN, Editor.
WEDNESDAY JUNE 3, 1863.
Reception Speeches.
The following is the speech delivered by E. G. LAPHAM, Esq., on the occasion of the reception of the 33d Regiment by the citizens of Canandaigua and vicinity:
OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS:
You have come back, after two years of arduous service in the cause of your country, to receive, as is your due, the gratitude of the State and the homage of the People. The high honor has been assigned me, humble and unfitted as I am for the duty, in the name and behalf of the people of this county and locality, to bid you a hearty and generous welcome. You have come among us at a period when our hearts are inspired to make your reception the more cordial by the news of the brilliant achievements of our arms in the south-west. You return with thinned ranks, and diminished numbers, the glorious remnant of a noble band, whose bravery and skill have been displayed on almost every battle field, from the scene when the great contest for our independence was closed to the last deadly conflict around Fredericksburg and at Chancellorsville. Each one of you has brought home his tale of thrilling incident or noble daring, which will be repeated from hearthstone to hearthstone, and from generation to generation, as long as the name of America shall be known among men.
You have brought back in triumph that banner (pointing to the regimental banner presented by the ladies of Canandaigua) soiled and tattered by the casualties of war, and it too, is a witness of your devotion and fidelity to the honored flag of your country. That banner was an object of interest to us when it was confidingly placed in your keeping by the donors. It was an object of interest to you when you received it on your parade ground at Elmira. It was an object of still deeper interest to you when its tattered fragments were borne aloft by brave hands and dimly seen through the cloud and smoke of battle. It is to become an object of still deeper interest to us when you shall soon return it to the fair hands from whom you received it in fulfillment of your honored pledge to return it unstained by cowardice or shame "though stained with blood in a righteous cause." Soldiers, that flag, like all things earthly will perish, "Its silken folds may feed the moth," but the precious lives which have been gloriously laid down in its defence are treasures laid up where "neither moth nor rust corrupt" and their names will go into the history of this Republic as among its most priceless treasures. We trust, that after a brief respite from the toils and privations of the battle field, and the enjoyment of the rest and renewed vigor you will derive from the abundant delights and comforts of home and fireside, most, if not all of you, will again be found, if need be, rallying to the support of the flag you have so long and so nobly defended.
To you, sir, (addressing Col. Taylor.) and your Aids, the cherished leaders of this glorious band of men, no words are adequate to express the deep gratitude we feel for your fidelity to your trust.
Officers and Soldiers, it only remains for me in conclusion, without detaining you longer, again to say that in the name and by the authority of the people I represent, we bid you welcome—thrice welcome among us.
Col. TAYLOR made a very handsome reply, after which the Regiment proceeded to the Fair Grounds, where it was addressed by J. P. FAUROT, Esq., as follows:
Soldiers and Officers of the 33d Regt. of Volunteers, and of the Army of the Potomac:
The thousands within the sound of my voice, have this day assembled to extend to you, for your courage, you patriotism, your noble sacrifices the plaudits and homage of a grateful people, and of a warm and hearty welcome to your homes, and the joys of domestic life. A little more than two years ago, this nation was basking in the meridian splendor of national glory, happiness and prosperity, with a territory extending from ocean to ocean; a flag that floated in triumph over every part of our vast domain; a constitution and government dispensing, its blessings and its benefits over all; a great, a glorious and happy nation of thirty three millions of people. Suddenly the tocsin of war was sounded by several of the States, which, for three-quarters of a century, had enjoyed the blessings, the privileges and prosperity incident to the government handed down to us by our patriot fathers; the freemen of the north saw the threatened danger to our institutions, to our country and our homes.—You, soldiers and patriots, at this crisis in our country's history, worthy sons of patriot sires, left your farms, your work-shops, your counters and your homes, and organized the Regiment comprising the immortal 33d Volunteers of the Empire State, and went forth to meet the foe that would strike down the liberties of millions of happy freemen; and who would destroy the wisest and best government ever devised by the wisdom of man. Unacquainted then with the arts of war, with patriot hearts you rushed to the rescue of your country from impending peril and desolation; and first in deadly conflict at Lewinsville, you proved that your valor, your patriotism and your skill, were equal to the trying emergencies through which you were called to pass. At Yorktown, the place of final victory to our arms under the immortal Washington, you seemed to be inspired by his spirit and nobly, bravely proved yourselves soldiers worthy the high and holy cause you were defending.
At Williamsburg—that desperate conflict—you exhibited a daring, a high and ennobling courage, unsurpassed in ancient or modern times; a daring that knew no fear; a resolution as immovable, as determined as that of the most daring patriots and veterans of Revolutionary fame. To your noble conduct for your deeds of valor there, the name of WILLIAMSBURG was inscribed upon your banner, by order of your great chieftain, GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.—[Cheers, loud and long.] You, officers and soldiers of the gallant 33d, in every battle have covered yourselves all over with glory:—After the inscription upon your banner, you no less distinguished yourselves for bravery and deeds of noble daring, at the battles of Mechanicsville, White Oak Swamp, Melvern Hill, Peach Orchard, the 2d battle of Bull's Run, Antietam and South Mountain, and the battles at Fredericksburg, under the gallant Burnside and Hooker, the last of which was only three weeks ago this day. It was then but a few days before your two years of enlistment expired, that many of your brave companions offered up their lives as sacrifices upon their country's altar. It was then that one of the officers of this Regiment, in advancing ahead of his men, in the midst of a deadly fire, silenced one of the largest and most deadly guns of the enemy—a deed that has seldom if ever been exceeded for noble daring and self-sacrificing patriotism in the annals of any age or of any country. You left your homes from the rendezvous at Elmira two years ago, with about 900 men: you return to us with 350, all told; your colors and your flags rent and torn by shell and shot of the enemy in bloody strife, tell a truer tale of your sacrifices, your achievements and your patriotism, than any language can portray. Yes, you have by that flag and your deeds of valor, erected a prouder monument, a more enduring fame, than would be perpetuated by the loftiest mauosleum that the genius of man could erect. While we sympathize and do honor to you who appear with us to-day, we must not forget your companions—the patriot dead—who fell fighting for civil and religious liberty; for the great principles of constitutional government;—they have offered up their lives upon the altar of their country, and their and your names will fill the brightest page in history for all coming time; yes, as long as the lights of civilization shall endure; yes, this day, we must also remember the sacrifices of the fathers and mothers—of the desolate homes—of the tears and the sighs of the widowed, and the sufferings and sorrows of the bereaved. You have nobly met the necessities of your bleeding country, and obeyed her every call until the last hour of your enlistment expired, and may we, your countrymen, catch the spirit of your patriotism and fill up the ranks in our country's defence. We shall triumph; our country again shall hold her high position among the nations of the Earth. The principle, that man is capable of self-government, shall here be maintained.—Your example has shown us that no sacrifice is too great; that the stars and stripes of our native land again shall float in triumph over every foot of American soil, and the bird of liberty shall again expand her pinions, and with one wing touch the sun-rise, and the other, the sunset—and cast its shadow over the whole world. It may be truly said:

"Your country's glory, 'tis your chief concern:
For this you struggle, and for this you burn;
For this you smile, for this ALONE you sigh;
For this you live, for this would FREELY die."

After the Address, the Choir song [sic] "Red, White and Blue," Miss H. ETTA SMITH taking the lead, in a clear, rich, musical voice of song.
Lieut. Col. CORNING replied to J. P. FAUROT, Esq., thanking him for the eloquent manner in which he had alluded to the noble deeds and daring, privations, sufferings and imperishable honors of the 33d Regiment. They were worthy of it all. If you could have seen them, said he, on the battle field, a spontaneous feeling of gratitude would have burst out of your hearts. Yes, they were worthy of all the honor you can bestow upon them. We thought at one time, that your loyalty was growing cold, and that the "God bless you" tendered to us at parting, had been forgotten. But, thank God, he was pleased to find it different, by the splendid manner in which you have welcomed us home this day. These men are entitled to all the honor you can bestow on them; and the sick, those who had to come home on account of impaired health, were equally entitled to your honor and regard as those who had passed safely through the perils of the battle field. He urged all to be united in support of the government, and he believed if this were the case, the war would soon be brought to a close.
The Banner presented to the Regiment on entering the service, being returned by Col. TAYLOR, was received in the following address, read in their behalf by A. H. HOWILL, Esq.:
COL. TAYLOR:—When two years ago you honored the Ladies of Canandaigua in accepting for the 33d Regiment this Banner, the work of their hands and the gift of their affection, the Regiment through you pledged themselves with their lives, to protect it from dishonor and cherish it as the emblem of Love and Loyalty. The Recording Angel registered that vow in figures of Life, and nobly has the pledge been redeemed in the Blood of Malvern Hill, Fair Oaks, Williamsburg, Lee's Mills, Antietam and Fredericksburg.
This Bullet-riven, Blood stained Banner, dearer to us now that we know it has inspired acts of courage and patriotic ardor, and that it has been as the presence of Mother, Sister, Wife, Home to the dying Soldier, than it was when we parted with it in its freshness and new life impatient for the pomp and circumstance of War.
We were proud of it as a beautiful offering. We receive it now with its honorable scars—as a weary soldier seeking rest and shelter. We will guard it carefully and protect it tenderly.
Many a home in our midst is desolate—many waiting, watching Hearts are bereaved, but every true woman will thank God it was not made so by the death of a Coward or Renegade, and that her dead are "Freedom's now and Fame's."
Soldiers, on the Field of Battle you proved yourselves all that was noble, brave and manly—worthy sons of old Ontario.
The women of Ontario still expect you to do Battle in their service by respecting as citizens those Laws and Domestic Institutions for which you have periled your lives; and to your latest posterity your children and your children's children can have no prouder heritage-- can make no prouder boast, than that you were members of the gallant 33d.

COMPANY I.—The 33d Regiment was finally mustered out of service and paid off last week, at Geneva. The boys of Company I, were expected in Penn Yan on Saturday evening and preparations were made to give them a greeting. But they did not come except a small company that came over by private conveyance at a late hour. They have scattered so that no regular reception, such as was anticipated has yet been possible. If not altogether impracticable the should yet have a public supper, and we hope the citizens will not let the opportunity pass to do honor to a company that has done honor to the town and county. Let the brave soldiers who fight our battles be made to feel that their services and sacrifices are appreciated.

BURIAL OF LIEUT. ROSSITER.—Yesterday at three p. m. the funeral of the late Lieut. Chas. D. Rossiter, of the 33d Regiment, took place from the Brick Church. The attendance at the funeral was considerable. The services were conducted by Rev. Dr. Shaw, whose sermon for the occasion was very appropriate, and highly eulogistic of deceased, whose record in the field and camp has been excellent throughout.
Companies C and G of the 54th regiment turned out as an escort. The American Flag was used as a pall, and the band led the procession, playing a dirge as it moved slowly to Mt. Hope. The soldiers marched with arms reversed, and the mourners and friends followed, making a solemn pageant. At the grave the customary salute was fired, and the young soldier was left to his last slumber in earth.

Reception of the 33d.
We publish elsewhere the proceedings of a meeting held at the Trustees' room last evening, at which a Committee was appointed to make proper arrangements for the reception of Co. C. of the 33d. The Committee will meet at the Trustees' Room, this evening, at 8 o'clock.

Casualties in the 33d.
We have received a letter from Lt. Brett, giving a statement of the casualties in Co. C. of the 33d, which regiment suffered severely in the late fights. Lt. B. reports the killed wounded and missing in the regiment at 259 although it is possible that some of the missing may be heard from.

TUESDAY, May 5th, 1863.
Mr. SENTELL:—
We have just had two or three very hard battles, in which the 33d took a very active part. I have not time to give you the particulars as the Chaplain is waiting for this letter, but will enclose you a copy of the casualty Report.
The 33d has made two more brilliant and successful charges—one in company with the 7th Maine, the same regiment that charged with us at Williamsburg just a year ago. I will send you the details soon. Our wounded have all been taken care of except those mentioned in the missing.
Respectfully, yours,
R. H. BRETT.

Report of Co. C,. 33d N. Y. Vols.
KILLED.
Peter Riley, Andrew J. Harmance, George Rager.
WOUNDED.
Capt. Chester H. Cole, ball through the thigh; Orderly Sgt. W. H. Alexander, hand and arm; Sgt. James Martin, arm, slight; Corp. Geo. Covert, ball in leg just above the ancle [sic]; Corp. Robert Dobson, wounded in three places dangerously; Corp. Wm. G. Cook, ball through the abdomen, mortally; John Baily, slightly in the arm; Michael Cusick, nature of wound not known; W. Moran, slight wound in the hand; Hiram A. Morse, slight wound; Wm. O. Peasley, rifle ball through the lungs; Elijah J. Rice, slight wound in the hand; Marion W. Smith, slight wound on the breast; John Wounderlin, leg broke below the knee by a ball.
MISSING.
Corp. Richard Ridley, Frederick Bowman, John Battell, John O'Neil, John Robinson, Alexander Shirley, B. F. Taylor, Joseph Wieder.
Since Lt. Brett's letter was received, we learn that John Robinson has been heard from. He has a slight wound. Wm. H. Cook has died. John Wounderlin's leg has been amputated. This embraces all the information we have been able to obtain in relation to Co. C.
Since the above was in type, we learn that B. F. Taylor, whose name appears among the missing, we learn is safe and not injured.
One of the most painful scenes we have witnessed in a long time, was the grief displayed by Mrs. Rager on learning the death of her son, who was a most excellent soldier, and only 17 years of age.
Our old friend, Peter Riley, we took leave of near the Bank, in company with his children, and wished him a safe return—a wish that has not been realized. A. L. Hermance was also a married man. He left a good many friends who would have been glad to have seen him again.

THE RECEPTION OF THE 33D.—We mentioned yesterday the fact that the citizens of Canandaigua had determined to do honor to the 33d.—The Ontario Times says:
"The 33d has been invited by our War Committee to visit this place, and the invitation has been accepted. The day fixed upon for the proposed visit, is Monday next—25th inst. Handbills will probably be issued to-morrow, announcing the programme for the day, and it is hoped that our patriotic citizens will be prepared to give the gallant Col. Taylor and his brave boys such a reception as they deserve.—The 33d, it will be remembered, is the famous "Ontario Regiment" to which the ladies of Canandaigua presented a banner, and which has shown by its gallantry in presence of the enemy, that the gift was most worthily bestowed. It is understood that the Regiment will arrive here at 8 A. M., coming from Elmira."
Seven members of Company E, 33d Regiment, arrived at Geneseo on Tuesday evening, Samuel and George Luce, William Black, Samuel Thompson, Shelby Barnes and J. Copeland are among the number. They return to Elmira on Saturday for payment. The 33d visits Canandaigua on Monday and Company E is expected at Geneseo on Wednesday next. Capt. B. F. Spencer of the 104th returned on Tuesday evening.
We learn that a History of the Campaign of the 33d N. Y. Vols., is in progress of Publication, and will shortly be issued. To the Regiment and its many friends throughout Western New York, it will prove invaluable as a souvenir of the trials and privations endured for a period of two years, and doubly interesting from the fact that it will be profusely illustrated with engravings from sketches made by an officer of the Regiment, of every Camp, Battle-field, and every point of interest, wherever the Regiment has sojourned. The book will consist of 250 pages, and some seventy engravings, and the cost will be $1,50 only, thus placing it within the reach of all with whom the Regiment is so closely allied, by the ties of father, brother, son, and relation, who went forth to battle for the Union.
It is with no ordinary pleasure we transfer to our columns, from the Lyons Republican, the following poem, so appropriate to the present time. We have before availed ourselves of the gems which the young and talented writer, Miss Sarah E. Hall, has given to the public. Thousands of pure and loving hearts will respond to the aspiration for the return to our beloved country, of the peace and unity that once made it the most prosperous land on earth.

A Welcome to Company C.

Why should the joy-bells ring to-day?
Why should the banners glare?
Why should the cannon's heavy boom
Surcharge the balmy air?
Why should the people one and all
From vale and hill side come?
For this, to say, "O, soldier boys,
We bid you welcome home!"

"We bid you welcome!" and the cheers
From crowding hundreds swell;
"We welcome you for bravest deeds
That you have done so well!
We welcome you to loyal hearts
And loyal homes again.
Since, on the battle-field, you bore
The arms of loyal men!"

A welcome home! How sweet must fall
Such words upon the ear!
How sweet to clasp t h e hand you clasped,
The voice you heard to hear!
To know that, bathed in. gladsome tears,
A mother waiteth now,—
A maiden, or a wife, perhaps,
To kiss her soldier's brow.

Yes, this is joy. But, O, 'twere meet
To think of mourning ones —
Of children who are fatherless,
Of mothers without sons!
They stand all hopelessly beside
Full many a lonely door,
Nor lift their eyes; 'twere vain to watch.
He cometh nevermore.

And O, our Father! This good day
We crave a boon of thee;
That all the strife that clouds our land
From hence may cease to be,—
That peace and hope, and trust and love
May shine from heaven, like stars,
And Ceres' leafy crown displace
The blood-stained crown of Mars.

SODUS, May 20. S. E. H.

Benefit Ball.
The members of Company C. 33d Reg. N. Y. V., will hold a Ball at Columbian Hall, on Wednesday evening next.
The proceeds to go to the widows and orphans of their deceased comrades. Turn out and give the boys a good Benefit. Where are They?
The feeling of gladness which the return of the remnant of the gallant band of soldiers, who left our village two years since, impressed upon every one, was tempered in more thoughtful minds at least, by the reflection that few had come back. It was a sentiment due to the unreturning brave, and though, in the excitement of the hour, it was overlooked by the mass, there were many who could not but feel that some whom they cherished, would be seen no more.
Company C., of the 33d, which was recr... this village and its vicinity, numbered __6 men, we are told. It probably was not so strong as this when it left, but it received many additions. Of this number thirty three have returned! Nor is this a solitary instance. Company K., Capt. McGraw's, recruited at Seneca Falls, numbered 78 men, and but eighteen have returned, and we presume the other companies have suffered in the same way. How mutely eloquent --how solemnly impressive, is this record of the ravages and desolation of war. Nor need we wonder that the true Christian and patriot—not the mock one—earnestly prays that unity and, peace may again bless the land. 
But we return again to the question at the beginning in reference to the unreturning brave—"Where are they?" We have endeavored to keep track of the members of Company C., and we cannot account for even one-half —Rev. Geo. N. Cheney late Chaplain of the 33d Reg. died at Branchport, Yates Co. last week. He was the rector of the Episcopal Church at Branchport.

Another Regiment to be Recruited Here--Order for Recruiting Veteran Volunteers.
Col. R. F. Taylor, late of the 33d Regiment, has been authorized to enlist a regiment, making his headquarters in this city, and having branch offices in other parts of the State. His arrangements are not yet quite perfected. No doubt hundreds of his old command will readily respond to the call to go with him to the field again. It is not yet precisely known what branch of the service this regiment will enter. It may be mounted infantry or cavalry.
The following is the order of the War Department under which the Col. Taylor will act.
WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S
OFFICE, June 25, 1863.
General Order No. 191:   LIV

Village & Country Matters.
We will be thankful to persons throughout the County for reliable information in regard to all local occurrences of general interest.
Co. E.—Up to the hour of going to press we have no intelligence as to the time when Co. E, Capt. Warford will return. It was expected that information would have been received ere this of the time of their coming.—
The Co. will probably return this week.

THIRTY-THIRD REGIMENT.—We learn that Col. Taylor has received an order to proceed with his gallant regiment from Elmira to Geneva, where they will be paid off and mustered out. They are expected to reach Geneva on Friday of this week. All the members of the regiment are requested to report at Geneva on that day. One company, of about sixty men, came up on the cars from Canandaigua yesterday morning, and left for Palmyra on the Eastern train. The people of Palmyra gave them a grand reception. On Monday next the citizens of Canandaigua are to give the Thirty-third a reception, which will no doubt be a fine affair, and highly gratifying to the veterans of this regiment.

Reception of Company C.
The reception of Company C. of the 33d Regiment on Saturday last, was a very pleasant affair. The Company reached here on the 5.10 train from the west, and were received by the Fire Department, and a large assemblage of citizens. A Procession was formed, led by a band of music, which, after passing through several streets, halted in front of the Union School House, where refreshments were served. Here the soldiers were addressed in a feeling and appropriate manner by the Rev. R. N. PARKE, and the Colors of the Company were presented to the Ladies of Waterloo, and were received by Mrs. E. HULBERT. Heavy cheers were given for Capt. COLE, who, though wounded, was able to be present in a carriage, for Lt. BRETT, and for the gallant band themselves, when the Procession was again formed, and marched to the Eagle Hotel, where the soldiers partook of a most excellent supper, prepared by direction of the Committee of Reception.
The reception, as before stated, was a very pleasant affair, and called out a large assemblage, and showed a proper appreciation of the services of the gallant band, who have returned to us, fearfully thinned, after enduring two years trial of the perils and hardships of war.

Lively Recruiting.
It is a fact worthy of notice that since the draft has been made, Lieut. Brett, of the 33d, who is recruiting for the new Cavalry regiment about to be formed by Col. R. F. Taylor, has recruited 30 men in this village, of which — are from this town. Nearly all the members of the 33d, who served in the Waterloo Company, and returned home in May last, have gone into the service again. At the rate at which recruiting is now going on, the Regiment will soon be raised.
Under the spirit if not the letter of the Conscription law, this town would not have to send a drafted man. But we cannot learn that the credit to which it is entitled will be given, or that there is the slightest intention the part of the Government to carry out this part of the law.

Letter from Capt. McNair.
Justice to the 33d.
FRIEND SANDERS:
In a letter from a brother in Gen. Curtis's army, speaking of his desire to hear fro us, he says, he never saw the 33d mentioned in the papers. To those of us who have been accustomed to regard the papers as oracles of truth and impartiality, this same thing has caused not a little indignation. For some reasons the lighting qualities of the 33rd. have always been made to render to the glory of the "Superb" Hancock, or to the praise of "Smith's gallant Maine and Vermont boys." As the 33rd is not the only regiment which has suffered by this studied [sic] misrepresentation, I shall be pardoned for what I say. Our successful fight at Williamsburg, resulted in securing Hancock's Protrait [sic] for the illustrated papers and the announcement that "the 43rd. N. Y. of his Brigade made a most gallant charge by which the fortunes of the day were finally turned." This mistake was corrected about three weeks after by the Colonel of the 43rd. who says, "My regiment was not in the field, and the praise is due some other gallant N. Y. regiment. Gen. McClellan discovered that other regiment, and made due acknowledgement, but the papers did not.
At the battle of Garnet's Farm, it was announced that the rebels were driven back with great slaughter by the Vermont boys and the 33rd. N. Y. The Vermont Brigade were a mile away. About one hundred of the 33d did all the slaughtering that occurred that day.
At the battle of South Mountain, while McClellan was engaged in a general battle at Turner's Gap, Gen. Slocum achieved one of the most brilliant victories of the war at Crampion's Gap. Genl's. Brook's and Davidson's Brigade supported SLOCUM, and suffered a severe shelling, but the victory was Gen. Slocums and the credit belonged to him. The enemy under McLaws were strongly posted on the Mountain 1000 feet in height. We could not use our artillery. In the face of a fearful fire from their guns planted on the sumit [sic] of the mountain, Slocum marched his Division across the plain encountered a ...ng force at the foot of the mountain, drove them from their position, chased them into the woods and entirely over the mountain, into the valley beyond, capturing their guns, and defeating them with terrible loss. The papers announced that "the Division of Gen. Hancock, whom all will remember for his gallant charge at Williamsburg, after a splendid fight, drove the enemy from the mountain with terrible slaughter." Gen. Hancok [sic] was the reserve of Brook's and Davidson's Brigades, and did not leave the woods a mile behind us. This mistake is extremely annoying to us as we are all friends of Gen. Slocum, and our friends of the 27th were the fore front of the battle.
But to the field of Antietam. In a glowing account by the Tribune correspondent, which was extensively copied, he says. "At this crisis Franklin came up with fresh troops. Slocum was sent forward along the slopes lying under the first ranges of rebel hills, while Smith was ordered to retake the cornfields and woods, which all day had been so hotly contested. It was done in the handsomest style. His Maine and Vermont regiments and the rest went forward on the run, and cheering as they went swept like an avalanche through the cornfields, fell upon the woods cleared them in ten minutes and held them. They were not again retaken. The field and its ghastly harvest which the reaper had gathered in those fatal hours, remained finally with us.—Four times it had been lost and won. The dead are strewn so thickly, that as you ride over it you cannot guide your horses steps too carefully."
Smith's Division is composed of Hancock's, Brook's and Davidson's Brigades. Hancock was in reserve behind Slocum, and did not lose a man. Brook's Vermont Brigade did not come up until an hour after the fearful "Ten Minutes" were over, and did not participate in the battle. This left Davidson's Brigade to do what the above writer so vividly describes. But this Brigade is composed of 4 N. Y. Regiments, (the 20th, 33rd, 49, 77th, and the 7th. Maine. Of 15,000 composing this Brigade 358 answered not to the roll call next morning. They fell fighting most gallantly against fearful odds. As the sad intelligence is borne from home to home in their loved Empire State, there will be weeping there, but ...erwise than among the indefinite "rest" of the above paragraph.
Deserved acknowledgment is no incentive to deeds of dareing [sic] and bravery, while neglect or purposed misrepresentation chills the ardor of the generous heart. But althought [sic] the papers let us alone severely we shall keep on fighting even though we figure under the title of "Smith's gallant Maine and Vermont boys and the rest." The truth of the matter is, that the 3rd Brigade has been most cruelly treated in regard to its Generals. We have had some of the best Generals in the service at different times, (Stevens, Brannan, and Davidson,) but neither has remained long enough to more than become interested in the Brigade before being transferred elsewhere, and then we have no one to take care that we have our rights.
We are now for the first time since March, enjoying a few days respite from incessant work and watchfulness. Its beneficial effects can be seen in the increased healthfulness of the men.—We are situated in a most healthful section, and I trust the last traces of disease contracted in the swamps before
Richmond will soon disappear. I am much disappointed in the country here. The scenery surpasses in beauty and loveliness any thing I have seen in Western New York. The soil also is most fertile. Many of the farms resemble the beautiful place of John Barber of Portage, and sell at prices ranging from $80 to $150 per acre.
The people generally are loyal. The very air seems laden with the spirit of Freedom and devotion to our government and laws, and we can but contrast the whole with the woe begone and pitiable condition of Old Virginia. Our boys will not soon forget the reception they met with while charging throught [sic] the village of Birkitsville near Crampions Gap. While Slocum was attacking the enemy in the Mountains, we were led accross [sic] the plain at a double quick in the face of a terrific [sic] cannonade from the summit. Nearer and nearer, faster and faster, they came as we approached the little village in our way until when we were in the center of the principal street, for some reason a halt was ordered. And now the shells poured into the town in terific [sic] volleys. They came whizzing through the air, tearing the boards from the fences, bursting in the streets, and not a few went plunging, crashing through the churches, stores, and dwellings of the inhabitants. Think you any cellar was too deep, or secure for the terrified [sic] women and children rushing thither terror stricken, and do you doubt that every one availed themselves of the most safe retreat.
But look! when the cannon roars the loudest, and when the shells strike the thickest, see those brave women.—While the stoutest heart nerves itself to meet imminent danger, those women, even girls without the appearance of fear, passed from rank to rank helping the wearied men to water and with smiles and words of cheer encourage them in their fearful work. All honor to the women of Birkitsville. No wonder the rebels hastened to leave "My Maryland."
To the heroic women of this State as much as to the steel of McClellan's host, are we indebted for our signal victories here.
We are now near neighbors to the Wadsworth Guards. They fought with great gallantry almost on the same ground with us at Antietam.—They suffered considerably and I am pained to find that their excellent Captain of Company A. was seriously wounded. I have visited the regiment and am pleased to find the officers and men, so finally attached to Major Skinner. He has truly done a triple duty in this arduous campaign as the other Field Officers have been almost constantly absent. Thus after more than a year the Nunda companies met again as Brothers. Yet not all. Eight noble young men of My Company rest in the soldier's grave, while Captain Tuthill has lost several. May they rest in peace.
My wounded will all recover. Stebbins who was shot through the right breast, is gaining remarkably.
Yours &c., JAS. M. MCNAIR.

THE FIRST VETERAN CAVALRY—A CHANCE FOR THE OLD 33D.—Col. R. F. Taylor, formerly of the 33d Regiment, returned from Albany last night with full authority to raise a volunteer cavalry regiment, to be known as the 1st Veteran Cavalry Regiment, and to commence the  enrollment of men immediately. The Regiment are entitled a veteran regiment, and the men receive the full bounty.
Albert H. Nash has been appointed Adjutant of the new regiment. He was formerly a member of the 3d Cavalry, and is well posted on the duties of the position. The members of the old 33d will flock to the call of Col. Taylor, and no doubt the regiment will be speedily raised. Sergeant Erasmus E. Bassett.
This young man was a native of Barrington, in this county. He was a son of Mr. ALLEN and Mrs. JEMIMA BASSETT, and brother of Sergeant-Major G. W. BASSETT, of the 33rd Reg. N. Y. V., who fell at the memorable battle of Antietam while nobly facing the rebel enemies of liberty, who are endeavoring to overthrow the best government the world has ever seen.
GEORGE enlisted at an early period in the war which was inaugurated by the worshippers of that system which Mr. J. WESLEY said almost a century ago, was "the vilest thing that ever saw the sun." But ERASMUS, though equally patriotic, concluded to stay at home and follow the peaceful avocations of agriculture, and become a stay to his parents in the decline of life.
When President LINCOLN called for 300 000 men in 1862, ERASMUS having fully counted the cost, and looked with a cool and intelligent eye upon the condition of his country, finally made up his mind that if the Rebellion triumphed and our country was dismembered he might as well not  live to see it, and remembering that unless his country's sons turned out to her rescue all would be lost, resolved to leave all the associations of home and offer himself upon the altar of Liberty if need be to avenge the vile wrongs which the leading and ruling villians [sic] of the so called Confederacy, (who had for many years ruled these United States, and who when the sceptre had been finally wrested from them at the ballot box, had set on foot the war and brought to the field an ignorant horde of "Poor white trash who went in their ignorance, to fight, to discard, and destroy a Constitution which not more than seven-tenths of them were capable of reading,) were inflicting upon the country.
He therefore enlisted in August, 1862, in Co. B., of 126th Reg., and participated with them in the affair at Harper's Ferry, where he was basely sold by one set of traitors to others not more vile. He was paroled and went out with his fellows to Chicago. Here he contracted disease, and finally obtained a furlough and came home. Soon as his health would permit, he, after having been exchanged, returned to Va., where he spent the winter, and was not allowed to meet the foes of Constitutional Government, but was kept in the background, smarting under the charge of cowardice and imbecility, charged upon him by a false hearted and falsifying reporter, and backed up by a sneaking coward from his own county, he had resolved that when an opportunity offered to meet the dupes of Jeff. the 1st, he would wipe out the foul stain.
This was presented at Gettysburg, and on the second day of that memorable battle, the 126th, with others, were ordered to charge a body of rebels who had captured one of the Union batteries, and retake the same. This was executed in gallant style, but while they were advancing to the charge with the battle cry of "Harper's Ferry; we will show them who are cowards," Sergeant BASSETT, who bore the colors of his Reg., received two balls one through his thigh, the other through his heart, and fell dead upon the field, with the flag of his country in his hands.
His brother, Lieut. R A. BASSETT, had command of the company and was near him when he fell, but could not stop to give him any attention. After the fight for the day was over, the Lieut. Found his body and placed it in a soldier's grave.
ERASMUS was a well educated noble youth. For several years he has devoted his winters to the education of others, and was respected and beloved by all. He was a member of Dundee Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, and probably had not an enemy among all his acquaintances.
He fell in his country's cause at the age of 27, and we had rather occupy his position to-day, than that of his vile traducers, to whom we have before referred. His remains have been cared for, and will be returned to his native town in the coming winter. His name and the sacrifice he made will be remembered and honored by generations yet unborn. We knew him well and offer this volunteer tribute to his memory.

VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. —Col. R. F. Taylor late of the 33d, has just returned from Albany with authority to recruit a regiment, to be known as the 1st Regiment of Veteran Volunteers. He has authority to recruit in any part of the State and will pay the highest bounties. He will receive not only those who have been in the service but all others who are adapted to the duty. Col. Taylor has been a very successful commander in the field, having led the 33d through many of the battles in which the Army of the Potomac were engaged, and he is thoroughly conversant with all the duties that will enable him to secure to his regiment the best that the government affords the soldier. Those who would enlist under his banner are referred to advertisements.

Reception of the 33d Regiment.
The reception of the 33d Regiment, in this village on Saturday last, was a fine affair. The Regiment arrived at the Steamboat Landing at about 10 oclock [sic], A. M., where it was met by a large concourse of people, full of excitement and anxiety, to place their eyes once more upon those who had, from the commencement of this war, witnessed and participated in all its most bloody contests, until its bold front of 900 men in 1861, had been reduced to about 250 at the present time. The Regiment formed at the Steamboat Landing and marched with two or three line bands of music and a large procession of citizens, up Castle and Genesee Streets, down Geneva and Castle to Water Street, up Water and Seneca to Main Street, then up Main Street, (some thought to the Glass Factory, but we believe it halted at Dr. Reeds,) and then counter-marched to the Park, when the Soldiers' thirst was quenched with a glass of cool lemonade.
The following Reception Speech was then made by our Townsman, Judge C. J. FOLGER.
COL. TAYLOR AND OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE 33D REGIMENT:
There has fallen to me the pleasant duty of tendering to you a welcome home again. In behalf of the Community from which you went forth, I offer you a hearty and an overflowing welcome back from your service as soldiers.
But it does not seem to us that you are the same from whom we parted. It is now two years since we saw some of you leave this shore, young volunteers, familiar only with the ways of happy homes, and a peaceful community, and now you return to us bronzed and scarred veterans, conversant with the rude alarms of war, having looked Death steadily in the face in many a well-contested field of strife, and having won for yourselves an ample soldierly reputation.
Two years ago I said! It seems as we look back but a little space, yet how full that time has been crowded with stirring incidents and exciting events. And to none more than to you have come those events and those incidents. Of what we have only read, or heard but with a dull ear, of that you have been a great part and have looked upon it with courageous eyes. We can scarcely name a battle in the long catalogue which tells of the acts and achievements of the Army of the Potomac, in which the 33d Regiment has not borne a part, and borne it valiantly and well.
Raised, as you for the most part were, in that district of Country, which once fell within the territorial limits of Old Ontario County, you went forth with the name of the Ontario Regiment, and that fact has always endeared you to us in this immediate region. You were christened after our County. It was a proud old name, for Ontario is the Mother of Counties not only, but the Mother of MEN as well. And we felt proud of you, for we were, and are proud of the name, and we were jealous of it too, jealous that it should take no tarnish in your hands. But as report after report came back to us of your good behaviour, of your courage, and steadiness of your fiery valor, our jealousy was gone, lost, merged in a sense of swelling pride, that the noble old name of Ontario had been so well bestowed, and that, not only it took no stain, but that it received an additional and higher lustre and greater glory from the soldiers of the 33d.
And you may be sure that when the news came of battles fought, and the papers told us of our troops in action, there was speedy search here for the name and exploits of the 33d, and an eager community was interested in its doings, in its achievements, and never, never pained by its defaults, or by its individual disasters.      
And so as time went on, though you may not have noticed it, the Regiment which went out as the Ontario Regiment, came to be called the 33d, or Ontario Regi­ment. And then and not long after, nought else but the 33d, and that was a sufficient and an individual designation, for you had made the "two threes" famous throughout the army and the country; and you needed no appellation of distinction, save your own name, the gallant 33d—"Taylor's fighting Devils." And all this has been due to, and resultant from, the good qualities and spirit of the men, encouraged and trained and brought out, by the labors and example of the Officers.
We owe you many thanks—we offer them to you now, that you have so well, so eminently glorified this community whose geographical name you have borne.
I just said that we traced the papers after a battle, and looked for mention of the 33d and its deeds; and then, the days after when came the long and sorrowful list of casualties, with what tremor and apprehension we looked again for the beloved number 33. For well we knew, that where all were so brave in battle, some must have met Death, and yielded to his power. And we cannot now, look upon your thinned ranks and diminished numbers, without missing from them some well-remembered faces, very dear to many among us. Nor without feeling that a great and awful sacrifice has been made for a great and righteous cause. And more especially was this the case when the report came of that last conflict upon the Rappahannock, so glorious and yet so fatal to your Regiment. When here at home all was buoyant expectation of your soon return, even then announced, it was sad, and sorrowful indeed, to read and know that there was no return, for alas, too many.
Yet it is a consolation that the sacrifice, so costly, has been made for a cause, precious above price, for the defence of Constitutional and legitimate Government against the assault of a hateful and hated rebellion in arms. And there is the further consolation, that no one who has been taken from your ranks has died the death of a traitor or of a deserter, nor as a coward running from the fate which overtook him; but that loyally, manfully, gallantly, they have stood with their comrades, and have met their destiny as a true soldier loves to meet it, with his face toward the foe.
And you have brought back with you your Colors, the last thing which a brave Regiment surrenders. These colors have never been surrendered, have never been repulsed, have never been driven back, have never retreated save at the order of the General commanding, and when a whole army or the whole force fell back with them. The 33d has never, as a Regiment, fallen back upon compulsion, but has often stopped the current of the enemy's advance, and has turned the tide of many an unpromising conflict, and saved from the chronicle the record of a loyal defeat. Torn by shot and shell, dim with the stain of the elements, spotted with the blood of its brave defenders, and faded from the bright hues which were first unfurled to the sunlight, these colors yet bear upon them one word, which is a sunbeam of itself—
"WILLIAMSBURGH,"
inscribed there, for gallant conduct and persistent, obdurate bravery in that field, by order delivered to you from the mouth of your Commander-in-Chief, George B. McClellan.
That one word written there, is a luster and glory which no warp and woof of the artificer, though shot with silk of richest dye, and with thread of purest gold, can equal or imitate.
It is worn and tattered. But the perils it has shared with you, the hardships you have borne under it, make it beautiful and sacred to us, men of inaction, who now look upon it, the mute yet eloquent, witness of all your noble deeds. It will soon take its place in the treasured archives of this noble State, among its kindred flags, second to none, equal to any in interest.
But I weary your patience with a theme which grows upon my mind, and must come to a close.
I hope, we all whose spokesman I now am, hope and pray, that escaped from the hardships of your service, you may live long to enjoy the blessings of a Government and a Union as we trust, saved and restored, in no small part, by your devotion. And it will add no canker to your enjoyment to reflect, that you turned your back upon home and its comforts and endearments, and perilled [sic] all for the preservation of this Nationality, and all there is so priceless, bound up in its perpetuity.
And let me say in conclusion, that I know in this generation of American men, none who has a right to bear himself, with a prouder, loftier self respect, than he who two years ago, when the Country of his birth, or of his adoption, was in the dark hour of its extremest danger, and seemed ready for extinction, stepped forth from the mass of community, as a volunteer soldier for its defence, and who through two years of varying fortune, has kept right on in the path of duty, and ready at every call, has braved danger, has endured hardships, has met deadly peril face to face, and never flinched, and who, now his term of service over, returns to the society he has protected, to pursue the ordinary avocations of life, the pursuit of which would have been ended and lost in political chaos but for his sacrifices and his daring. I am not able to express the emotions which swell my soul when I look upon the men who have done all this. Let him who can survey them unmoved, go ally himself to an iceberg, or confess himself the spawn of that Devil, who, all self and selfish emotion, is the only legitimate progenitor of such a cold and heartless wretch.
Again and again, Colonel and Officers and Men of our own gallant 33d, I return you the public thanks, and give you the public hearty welcome home.
Col. TAYLOR, who had commanded the Regiment through all its bloody contests, spoke as follows:
Friends and Fellow Citizens:—It gives me unbounded pleasure to meet with you again in Geneva, and I feel grateful to you for the warm hospitality and kind reception you have given to my Regiment. Words can but poorly express the gratitude of our soldier hearts for this unexpected welcome from your hands, and rest assured we shall long cherish the remembrance of this hour as among the happiest of our lives.
Friends, I did not come here to address you at length, and you doubtless are all aware that I am not a man of many words, but rather a man of actions, and quite unaccustomed to public speaking. Therefore you will pardon my brevity, while I assure you that we feel more than we speak. When we left you two years ago we resolved to do our duty in the field, and can freely say that there's not a man in the 33d Regiment, but has done his whole duty on all occasions. What our career has been during this eventful period you need not be told. You are familiar with every engagement, and if our conduct on these occasions, but merits your approval we are content,
Again I thank you all kindly in behalf of my Regiment, for the welcome you have extended to us, and should unlooked-for events transpire that would demand their services, my Regiment would be among the first to respond to the call and I believe every man would be found again in the ranks.
The Regiment was then marched to Camp Swift, where they partook of a sumptuous dinner, prepared by the patriotic ladies of our village. The day was beautiful, and everything passed off in the best of order, leaving an excellect [sic] impression upon the minds of the Soldiers, that they had not been forgotten by those, for whose protection they had periled their lives.

The Republican.
THURSDAY MORNING, JUNE 11.
Co. E., 33d Regiment.
This Company returned on Saturday evening last, after having; faithfully served their full term of service. Few Regiments in the army have seen more active service or acquitted themselves more creditably than did the 33d. The Regiment returned about 350 strong. During the two years' service few changes occurred in the staff or line officers.
—Some time ago our citizens resolved to give Co. E. a public reception on its return, and nobly did they perform that duty on Saturday evening. About 6 o'clock "Major Van Campen" opened his brazen mouth, and the hills and valley re-echoed his thunder notes. Soon after 6 o'clock a procession was formed under command of Col. Rorbach at the Court House, in the following order:
1st. Geneseo Cornet Band.
2d. Military Escort of Co. A., under Capt. Simpson.
3d. Committee of Arrangements.
4th. Fire Co's Nos. 1 and 2.
5th. Juvenile Zouave Co., under command of Capt. Backus.
6th. Citizens generally.
In this order the procession moved to the depot. On the arrival of the train a gun squad under command of Capt. Ward fired a salute, and the bells rang their merriest peals, and each were continued during the moving of the procession to Concert Hall. The procession at the depot was formed in a hollow-square, and Co. E. was marched into the square, where they were warmly welcomed home in a brief but very appropriate speech by Hon. A. A. Hendee. We regret we have not a copy of the Major's remarks, for all concede that he done himself credit.
After this welcome, the procession re-formed and marched to Concert Hall, where the formal reception speech was delivered by Rev. George P. Folsom. We give the address, and all will concede that it was appropriate:
The pleasant task has been assigned me, friends and honored soldiers, of saying to you, on your return home after two yeas absence, a few words of welcome—not formal words, for there is nothing formal in this reception we give you. Another has spoken words that found a response in all our hearts—the church bells have rung out their happy greeting—the cannon has belched forth its welcome—these fire and military companies have turned out to do you honor—what more need I say to assure you that you are welcome? I speak in behalf of your many friends, a few of whom are here in this crowded assembly, the greater portion of whom are not here—not all your personal acquaintances and friends, but friends to you because you have proved yourselves friends to the country we love, to the flag you have so nobly defended and to the cause for which you have suffered and bled, and some of your noble band have been willing even to die. You have labored for us, you have suffered for us, you banished yourselves from your homes for us, and it would be a poor return for all this, did we not at least extend to you the greeting hand and tell you that while you have been gone, we have not forgotten you, and that we appreciate the efforts and sacrifices you have made.
I well remember the scene of your departure twenty-four months ago. It was new to us then to look on military scenes. We had not become accustomed to the dire necessities of war. Our patriotism had been aroused by the sudden blows of rebellious hands on a government our fathers had given us and on a constitution we had learned to revere—by the insult given to our flag always honored by its enemies, now dishonored by its professed friends, and by the wide door opened to secession and to ruin. But we did not then appreciate fully our danger, nor the extent and severity of the conflict that was before us. We were too hopeful of the better feeling that might yet regain ascendancy among our misguided and prejudiced fellow-citizens of the South. We were perhaps a little too boastful of our military power and ascendancy. We knew not then the deep designs an all-wise and kind Providence had in store for us, and hoe He was to lead us along through storms conflict, and under the disheartening clouds defeat even into a sunshine that when once gained has the promise of perpetuity because it is the shining of the sun of righteousness.— was all dark before us then, and yet in that darkness while we were feeling to see where our duty and our hope lay, searching our bibles and constitution of our country to see how far we might lawfully and christianly go in defending with the sword government; against attacks of traitors murderers, you were among the first to catch the inspiration of the hour, to appreciate the danger and the of the loyal citizen to the State, to buckle on your armor for its defense.
I remember that in one of the scenes attending your departure I was permitted to be an humble actor; and, as I placed in the hands of your honored and faithful Captain, who with the other officers of your company have by constant attention to their duties, and bravery on the battle-field, done honor to their town, their State, and their country, as I placed in his hands a copy of the teachings of him who was the prince of peace, the gift of my Sabbath School children, and other hands distributed to the members his company the gifts of the County Bible Society, we told you that with those sacred books went our sympathies and prayers for your safety and success. While you have been faithful to your trust, as many a battle-field and honorable scar, and soldier's grave, will testify, we have not been unmindful of ours. Your patriotic cause we have made our christian cause, and your personal good has been the burden of sympathies prayers. And let us not deem it strange that you have come back to us with your ranks thinned, leaving many a comrade behind you. This is law of nature. This is the price we pay for success any enterprise that calls for labor like yours. This is the sacrifice duty hour calls upon us for. This is the ordering that divine Providence before whose law it is ours to bow humbly submissively. Let us thus bow feeling there are causes for which it is honorable to die, hallowed and honored in our memories be the names of companions who fill a grave. Peacefully they sleep, even though over graves some of them foe is now insultingly treading. The time coming when upon them friendly hands shall plant the green laurel over them shall rise the enduring monuments of a nation's gratitude, speak kindly and gratefully to-night names of Lt. Church, Smith, and Coates, and others whom we greet not in this gathering. Peace to ashes! Divine consolation to their friends.

"No! never shall the land forget,
How gushed life blood of her brave—
Gushed warm with hope courage yet
Upon soil they fought to save."

And while we speak of your sacrifices and your losses, it is proper to congratulate you on what you have accomplished. You have been in many a well fought battle. You have formed an integral part of our nation's army, an army in which every department, however widely separated, has a common interest in the good or ill success that may attend it—that knows no North, no South, no East, no West save as it is engaged in this wicked rebellion. And you have formed part of this national army, you share a part in all the success with which the past two years have been crowned, and it has not been little. Remember where we were when you left us and where we are to-day. We had none of Central or Southern Virginia but Arlington. Heights. We had not a footing on the Atlantic Coast save at Fortress Monroe, and our Western line of defense stretched from St. Louis to Cairo and up the Ohio along the very borders of the Free State. The whole of the Atlantic Coast now is in our possession or blockaded by our fleets, and the base of operations in our Western army is Central Mississippi. While you have been protecting the heart—the Capitol of the Nation—it has stretched one of its arms around the coral reefs of Florida and laid its hand on the commercial city of the South, and with the other it's threading the windings of the Mississippi, and when those hands shall be clasped who doubts the speedy crushing of the rebellion and the return of peace? And it will not be at all strange if in that crushing process a few bones and perhaps a few fetters are broken or at least some alleviation be given to man's inhumanity to man." We believe in the justice of our cause. We believe in the righteousness of God—that he loves righteousness, and with reference to this he is guiding the great wheel of his Providence. It may move slowly. It may seem sometimes to move in the wrong direction. But it moves onward, never backward, slowly but surely onward, and when it settles finally to its place who doubts that treason and secession will be under and the Union and the Constitution will be supreme. And now you are about to change from the military to the civil life. You showed us how easy and how natural it was under our free government for the citizen to become the volunteer soldier. Now you are to show us how easy to turn to the citizen again.—And as you have been faithful soldiers we shall expect you to be faithful Citizens—no longer under military discipline but under the control of that virtuous respect for civil law which is the glory and the peace of our repub­lic. I remember when we had with us a few of those old revolutionary sires. To them was given the honored places in our national anniversaries. They were the guests of the nation. They had been the companions and soldiers of him who was "first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen." But they have passed away, they have passed to give place to you. Henceforth you are to have the position of honor, and be the nation's guests when it gathers to celebrate the Union, thus cemented by blood. Long may you live to enjoy these honors and our grand-children and great-grand-children rise up to bless you as the soldiers in the war for the Union and the Constitution. Once more I repeat it— welcome home. 
A. J. Abbott, Esq., responded  in behalf of Co. E., in a neat and appropriate manner.— After a benediction by Rev. T. B. Hudson, and music by the band, the procession again re-formed and marched to the American Hotel, where supper awaited the company and the other organizations. The tables were finely decorated with boquets [sic], and were loaded with all that the appetite could desire. And the boys did ample justice to it. Two years of army fare had not satiated their appetite for the good things spread before them. After supper an hour or more was very pleasantly passed, when the crowd dispersed and many of the soldiers started for their homes.
—The streets were crowded with people—the Stars and Stripes floated from several points—and the booming of the cannon and ringing of the bells, with the hearty shake of the hand, must have convinced the returning soldiers that our citizens welcomed their return, and that they justly appreciated the toil, privation, suffering and danger to which they had been exposed.
—As this company went from this village, a brief review of its history at this time, while the material for it is to be obtained, may not prove uninteresting, while in the future it will prove doubly so, and will form a part of the record of the aid the County extended in behalf of the Government for the suppression of the most wicked and causeless rebellion in the history of the world.
—Soon after the fall of Fort Sumter, Capt. W. B. Warford, then Captain of Co. A., N. Y. S. M., 1st Lieut. Moses Church, holding a like position in the same company, and John Gummer, set themselves to work to raise a company. They labored unceasingly, and were seconded in their efforts by several of our citizens. On the 4th day of May, 1861, the company was organized and mustered into the State service by Col. O. B. Maxwell, of Dansville. The company then numbered 78 men. On the 13th of May the company left this village for Elmira. On the 22d the Regiment was organized—it consisted of Captain Warfard's, of this place, Capt. McNair's, of Nunda, one company each from Canandaigua, Geneva, Waterloo, two from Seneca Falls and one from Buffalo. On the 4th of July a large portion of the company returned to this village and took part in the celebration of the day. On the 8th of July the Regiment left for Washington. On its arrival it was encamped for about three weeks at Camp Granger, on 7th street—then removed to Camp Lyon, near Chain bridge, north side of the river. On the 3d of September the Regiment crossed the river, and for several weeks was employed in building Forts Marcy and Ethan Allen. In October the Regiment was moved to Camp Griffin, distant about three miles in advance of the forts, and here the Regiment wintered and remained until the 10th of March, when it started for Yorktown, forming a part of the force under Gen. McClellan for the Peninsula campaign. After considerable marching and countermarching, on the 23d of March, the Regiment embarked at Alexandria and steamed down the river, arriving before Yorktown on the 25th. In all the fighting before Yorktown the 33d took an active part. On the evacuation of the place, the Regiment was in the skirmish at Lee's Mills, and in the big battle of Williamsburg, the Regiment bore a conspicuous and honorable part. It was in this engagement that Robert Coates was killed, and William Stoddard severely wounded, so that he was afterwards honorably discharged from service.—Co. E, in this battle, lost seven men taken prisoners, only one of whom ever returned to the company. The Regiment then moved to the White House, and thence to Mechanicsville, and was hotly engaged in the severe battle that was fought at the latter place. Co. E. in this engagement had no men killed or wounded. After remaining there three days the Regiment was ordered to Gaines' Mills, and was stationed as the outside picket guard. From the Mills the Regiment marched seventeen miles to go two and a half, and crossed the railroad bridge en route to Camp Lincoln—there built a fort, rifle pits, &c. Remained there until the 27th of June, when the Regiment moved, and was engaged in the seven days fight in the Chickahominy. On the 28th Lieut. Moses Church was killed by a minie ball striking him in the forehead. He died instantly. He was shot at about 2 o'clock in the afternoon, and was carried by his comrades until evening, when the Regiment was halted and he was buried. In his death a true man, a bold and courageous officer fell. The 33d formed a portion of Smith's division that covered the retreat of our forces towards Harrison's Landing, and was engaged in all the severe engagements of those fearful struggles of the seven days fighting. Our forces fought by day and retreated during the night. The Regiment reached Harrison's Landing on the 2d of July, and there remained until the 17th of August, when the line of march was taken up for Fortress Monroe, distant 90 miles. The weather was intensely hot, the roads dusty, and the men suffered from heat and thirst. The 90 miles was made in five days. At Fortress Monroe the Regiment took boat for Alexandria—thence to Centerville, thence to Cub Run, too late for the battle at that place; then back to Alexandria. From here the Regiment was ordered to Maryland to op­pose Lee's raid. Was in the fight at Jefferson between cavalry—then to Berketsville, and was in the battle at Crampton's Gap on the   13th of September. From there the Regiment moved to Antietam, and was in the severe fight of the 17th. Here Mather and Collins were wounded. From Antietam the Regiment moved to Sharpsburg, and from that time to the 3d of November was constantly on the move in scouring that portion of Maryland.—On the 3d of November the Regiment re-crossed the Potomac at Berlin, six miles below Harper's Ferry, then to White Plains, across the Bull Run mountains, and rested two or three weeks in camp at New Baltimore. From the latter place the Regiment moved to Acquia Creek, about twelve miles from its mouth—from there to White Oak Church. On the 11th of December the Regiment started to take part in the attack on Fredericksburg, and was in the battle on the 13th. Lost no men in this engagement, though the Regiment formed the outer support to a battery, while two interior lines in the same service lost very heavily. Re-crossed the river the 13th, and moved back to old camp ground. There the Regiment remained until the 27th of April, when it joined in the general move against Fredericksburg. Crossed the river on the 2d of May, and was at once moved forward and that night formed the front of the skirmish line, the right of the line resting in the city. Early in the morning the Regiment was relieved of this duty, and moved to near the city, where it supported a battery until about 11 o'clock A. M., when the Brigade was ordered to make a charge on the heights, the 33d leading the charge. Stormed and carried Cemetery and Mary's Heights, and at the latter place captured a splendid gun—held the heights until ordered to fall back to where knapsacks had been left before making the charge. In these charges Co. E. had six men wounded. The Regiment then moved towards Chancellorsville, forming the rear of the division. After moving about two miles the head of the column met the enemy, but the rear was not engaged on Sunday. Monday morning early discovered the rebels coming over the heights taken the previous day—double-quicked back about half a mile and formed line of battle—shelled fearfully while falling back, and it was in this engagement that Eli P. Smith was killed, and Bela Richmond wounded in hip, and Taggart lost an arm. Then established skirmish line and held it until 4 P. M., when they were attacked and ordered to fall back, and in doing so John Russell of Co. E was killed; and there were nine prisoners taken from Co. E. They were all taken to Richmond, but have since been paroled, and returned to the Co. before it left Washington. After the battle the Regi­ment was ordered to fall back to the river, reaching it near Banks' Ford, and re-crossed the river on a pontoon bridge about 2 o'clock Tuesday morning. After re-crossing the river fell back about two miles, and there remained for four or five days, and then moved back to old camp near White Oak Church.—On the 15th of April the Regiment left camp for Washington—remained there one day, and then started for Elmira. Arrived at Elmira on the 17th, and remained there until the 23d, when the Regiment was ordered to Geneva. On the 2nd inst. the Regiment was mustered out of service, and on the 6th the men were paid off, and left for Geneseo, arriving here the same evening. This, in brief, is an out­line of the wanderings and service of the 33d Regiment, and of Co. E. The record is a noble one—one that the men may with pride point to in the future.
—Co. E left here with 78, men and officers, and returned with 30. During the two years 17 deserted, 17 died from disease, in hospitals, 3 killed in action, 1 died from wounds received in battle, 3 were transferred to other Co's.—Since leaving here the Co. had 39 now recruits; 14 of these were left with the army to be transferred to some other Regiment. On Saturday the men had a full settlement with the Gov­ernment, and received all of their back pay and the $100 bounty. The men are in usually good health, and look as though camp life agreed with them.            

COLONEL FRISBY'S REGIMENT EN ROUTE.
ALBANY, June 27, 1861.
Colonel Frisby's regiment went to New York at six o'clock this evening by the Hudson River Railroad.

WOUNDED AND MISSING OF THE THIRTY-THIRD NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS IN THIRD BRIGADE.
Wounded.
George W. Brown, First Lieut., Co. D, Thirty-third N. Y.
William Stodart, Sergeant, Co. E, Thirty-third New York.
Robert Coates, private, Co. E, Thirty-third New York.
Myron Scott, private, Co. H, Thirty-third New York.
Frank Partridge, private, Co. H, Thirty-third New York.
Charles Mensh, private, Co. H, Thirty-third New York.
Michael Campbell, private, Co. H, Thirty-third New York.
John Mosier, private, Co. H, Thirty-third New York.
Missing.
Alexr. H. Drake, Captain, Co. H, Thirty-third New York.
Thomas Baxter, Corporal, Co. H, Thirty-third New York.
Benjamin Wheater, Corporal, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Alexander Dennis, Corporal, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
William M. Manning, Corporal, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Jones Austin, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Thomas J. Bowen, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Alvin Brotherton, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Charles B. Brown, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Jacob Dennis, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Henry C. Ford, private, Co. H, Thirty third N. Y.
Charles Freshour, private, Co. H, Thirty third N. Y.
William H. Hicks, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Elijah Jones, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Peter Petrie, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Hiram Pratt, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
William P. Rhoades, private, Co. H, Thirty-third N. Y.
Jacob Green, private, Co. H, Thirty-third New York.
Ezra Willson, private, Co. H, Thirty-third New York.
Peter McGill, private, Co. E, Thirty-third New York.
Lamon Pelton, private, Co. E, Thirty-third New York.
Godfrey Lenhart, private, Co. E, Thirty-third New York.
Abram Maston, private, Co. E, Thirty-third New York.
William Russell, private, Co. E, Thirty-third New York
John Williams, private, Co. E, Thirty-third New York
John Buckley, private, Co. E, Thirty-third New York.

SUMMARY.
Wounded          8
Missing            27
Total                35

Killed.
Alexander Adams, private, Battery E, First N. Y. Art'ly.
Edmund K. Perry, private, First Ind. Battery N. Y.
Wounded.
Lucius A. Goodyear, private, First Ind. Battery N. Y.
Harrison B. Smith, private, First Ind. Battery N. Y.
Levi Cleveland, private, First Ind. Battery N. Y.
James Neville, private, First Ind. Battery, N. Y.

Democrat and American.
FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 20.
LOCAL AFFAIRS.
From the Thirty-Third.
CAMP NEAR FAIR OAKS,
OVER THE CHICKAHOMINY, June 8, 1862.
Editors of Democrat and American:
While the fierce battle, in which we were so nearly defeated, was transpiring near this spot, the Thirty-third was at Mechanicsville, up on the right, on the other side of the river, under arms, ready to fly to the succor of our troops if necessary, but after the prompt assistance of Heintzelman, through Sedgwick's and Richardson's, rendered such aid useless—and drove them into Richmond. We prepared to cross, but owing to the high state of the river, three-fourths of a mile wide, overflowing the flats where we were—the whole of Smith's Division was marched down to the railroad, to Dispatch Station, and following the road, we crossed by the immense bridge, re-built by our Engineer lately, and are now encamped between the creek and Fair Oaks, in strong force, on Mr. Golden's farm. Our march to reach this point was a most difficult one, in many respects. We marched over 15 miles to reach a spot barely 3 miles opposite our old camp, in a line. The regiment is now 6 miles from Richmond, behind entrenchments, awaiting for something to turn up. The pickets are very close together, and many prisoners are coming in every day. A Sergeant and five men just came through the lines, all reporting to Col. Taylor, Field officer of the day. The Sergeant is from Ulster county, N. Y. Doubtless a great number would do so, if it were possible to leave without exciting suspicion. Yesterday some amusement was created by the operation of a new and original line of telegraph between our force and the enemy. It seems a number of dogs have been wandering around in front for some days, one of them, yesterday, came in with a letter tied around his neck. It was read by our men, the Thirty-third, being on picket duty at the time, and an answer sent back the same way—another note was written, and answered. The import of our letter was, they were much "obliged for the tender of cannon they took from us the other day, and anything more of the same sort sent them, they would cheerfully receive." No doubt of it. Another was rough in its language, and full of empty boastings. The battle field of last Saturday week is close by us, and bears evidence of the murderous conflict when tens of thousands bore down upon barely a division, and unsuccessfully tried to cut them off, or thrust or crush (as it should be called,) them into the river.
The difficulties attendant upon transporting troops and various munitions of war, has retarded us some, but now we are ready.
This morning (the Sabbath) there was some sharp firing in front, but it was quickly subdued by a battery of our 20-pounders.
A new regiment has been added to our brigade —Col. Max Weber's regiment—a very fine one. We have a fine brigade now, and our General thinks an effective one. Our picket line has been advanced twice, the enemy retiring each time.
The regular receipt of the mails has been inter­rupted again, and of course is a source of regret to us. Sitting on the ramparts of our rifle pits this morning, indicting this letter, the view looking up the river reminds one of Big Flats, at Geneseo, flooded by heavy rains. The stream here is unusually high. An old negro, 106 years old, who has always lived in this section, says that he never knew such an immense quantity of rain to fall before in the same space of time, at this season of the year, as has visited us at this period.
Gen. Prim and staff, with our division staff, just passed through our camp on a reconnoisance to the front. Ordered into line in five minutes.
More anon.
L. C. M.

THE CAMPAIGNE OF THE THIRTY-THIRD NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.—"The Story of the Thirty- Third New York Volunteers, or Two Years' Campaigning in Maryland and Virginia," is the title of a very interesting volume, of 400 pages, written by DAVID W. JUDD, war correspondent of the New York Times, and just issued in very attractive form from the Caloric Printing establishment of Messrs. BENTON & ANDREWS.
The 33d Regiment was organized at Elmira on the 21st of May, 1861, Co. A, Capt. GUION, was from Seneca Falls; Co. B. Capt. CORNING, from Palmyra; Co. C, Capt. Atkins, from Waterloo; Co. D, Capt. CUTLER, from Canandaigua; Co. E, Capt. WARFORD, from Geneseo; Co. F, Capt; MCNAIR, from Nunda; Co. G, Capt. T. B. HAMILTON, from Buffalo; Co. H, Capt. WALKER, from Geneva; Co. I, Capt. Letts, from Penn Yan; Co. K, Capt, McGRAW, from Senaca [sic] Falls. Captain R. F. TAYLOR, of Co. A, 13th Regiment (Rochester) was elected Colonel of the 33d, and on the8th of July it departed from the Elmira rendezvous for Washington.—from that day until its return home, in May, 1863, it enacted a distinguished and memorable part in the grand military drama of Maryland and Virginia, participating successfully in the battles of Lewinsville, Yorktown, Williamsburg, Mechanicsville, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Bull Run No. 2, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg No. 1.
The regiment left Elmira with 900 men and returned with 350. They had well earned the title of veteran soldiers. Four times they crossed the Potomac, twice the Chickahominy, four times the Rappahannock. They had marched by land and water, by day and by night. They had fought in trenches and in fields, had supported batteries and charged bayonets, and the tattered and murky remnants of their silken banners testified that they were ever borne where the storm of battle raged the hottest, and the carnage was most fearful.
This interesting narative [sic] presents a full and accurate record of the regiment's exploits, and an interesting and reliable description of the several campaigns in which it participated. The work had its origin in the general desire expressed by the members and friends of the command to have the scenes and incidents connected with its two years' history collected and preserved in readable shape, valuable for future reference, and interesting as a souvenir of the times. The book embodies brief biographies o the various officers and complete muster rolls of the men.
The subscription price is but $1 50, and we have no doubt the book will be eagerly sought by all who have a personal interest in the 33d Regiment, or who desire to place on their shelves so interesting and reliable a record of our local military history.—Roch. Union.
—The above work will be canvassed for among our citizens, the Agent being now in town. It will be remembered that the former commander of the heroic 33d, Col. R. F. TAYLOR, is at present Colonel of the First Veteran Cavalry, two companies of which were recruited in our vicinity. Col. TAYLOR, accompanied by UPDEGRAFF'S Band, left here for his regiment Wednesday evening.
AN ADDRESS BY COL. TAYLOR.—At the request of many citizens, Mayor Powell has extended an invitation to Col. N. G. Taylor, the able and eloquent advocate of the cause of East Tennessee, to visit this city and address our citizens. Col. Taylor has accepted the invitation, and will speak at Shakespeare Hall to-morrow (Saturday) evening at eight o'clock.
Mr. J. W. Corey, formerly a mem­ber of Captain Root's Company, 33d Regiment, writes us from Alexandria, Va., strongly in favor of the Sanitary Commission, of which he is an agent, and urging people to contribute liberally to its resources. We would gladly publish his   letter, but for lack of space.

THE 33D BATTALION.-A letter received from the Army of the Potomac this morning states that the Company from this city raised for the 33d Reg't N. Y. Vols. (Col. Taylor) a year ago last Spring by Capt. L. Brown, and since the discharge of the regiment has been detached and known as the 33d Battalion, under the command of Capt. Gifford, was on the 29th ult.  Transferred to the 49th Reg't N. Y. Vols. All letters intended for members of this Company should be addressed to the 49th Reg't, 3d Brigade, 2d Division and 6th Corps.

From the 33d Regiment.
HEADQUARTERS 33D REGT. N. J. V.
BRIDGEPORT, Ala., Oct. 6, 1863.
DEAR DAILY: This regiment as you will have already been informed has arrived here safely, and with but few incidents having occurred worthy of being related. The weather in this part of "Dixie" is really lovely; and having had a tolerable experience of campaigning in the Army of the Potomac, I can assure you this is just the country to campaign in.
We are lying on the banks of the Tennessee river in a beautiful grove, one of the finest, indeed, I have ever seen; and are attached to the Eleventh Army Corps. Whether we shall remain in this Corps, I am not able to say at present.
The regiment is in the best of health, all well, nearly to a man. Indeed one can hardly get sick in this charming climate. We are perfecting the regiment in drill, and preparing it for the coming struggle, which must soon come off between "Old Rosy" and Gen. Bragg. There is no doubt but that we shall take an active part in it, when it does come off. Let it come, we all say, for we all have a wish to take part in this Western and Southern fighting. Nothing new, however, is transpiring at present.
And here let me ask those portions of our state who have not made up their quota, especially Middlesex and Somerset counties, why their young men do not make an effort to become attached to our regiment. Such an effort, if made, and the proper number of men offered in an additional company, would be successful. There certainly is no regiment offering more numerous inducements. In the first place it is a large regiment; then it is splendidly and comfortably uniformed, and we have assurances that it will retain its present dress until the expiration of its term of service; and finally, it is admirably officered, the majority having been a long time in the service. A more kindly, gentlemanly and effective body of officers, I have never met, and, as you are aware, my experience in the service is second—for length of service at least—to few in either army. Besides these considerations, the climate here is a hundredfold preferable to that of Virginia.
If a company, such as I suggest, should be formed and have its officers commsisioned [sic], I have no doubt it could be arranged satisfactorily to have it attached to our regiment and the officers retain their commissions. It is doubted if another could be found to which it would be so entirely agreeable to be attached. This is the universal testimony of all the "veterans" among us, who have seen service in Virginia and elsewhere. Campainging [sic] here is robbed of all its harsher features; the air is salubrious, and we know nothing of those terrible pest diseases which troubled us in Virginia and destroyed more men than the bullets of the enemy. As for the risks of war, of course they are no less here than elsewhere; but on the other hand they are no greater. My experience, however, is that much less is to be apprehended from them than from camp diseases; and of this last we know nothing here, while in Virginia, often­times, half of our whole regiment would be prostrated by them.
Friends addressing relatives in this regiment should direct to the "Thirty-third Regiment N. J. V. 1st Brigade, Second Division, Eleventh Army Corps, Bridgeport, Alabama."
Yours, F.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
The Campaign of The Thirty-Third New York State Volunteers.
"The Story of the Thirty-Third New York State Volunteers, or Two Years' Campaigning in Maryland and Virginia," is the title of a very interesting Volume, of 400 pages, written by David W. Judd, a war correspondent of the New York Times, and just issued in very attractive form from the Caloric Printing establishment of Messrs. Benton & Andrews.
The 33d Regiment was organized at Elmira on the 21st of May, 1861. Co. A, Capt. Guion, was from Seneca Falls; Co. B, Capt. Corning, from Palmyra; Co. C, Capt. Aikens, from Waterloo; Co. D, Capt. Cutler, from Canandaigua; Co. E, Capt. Warford, from Genesco; Co. F, Capt. McNair, from Nunda; Co. G, Capt. T. B. Hamilton, from Buffalo; Co. H, Capt. Walker, from Geneva; Co I, Capt. Lett's, from Penn Yan; Co. K, Capt. McGraw, from Seneca Falls. Captain E. F. Taylor, of Company A, 13th Regiment (Rochester) was elected Colonel of the 33d, and on the 8th of July it departed from the Elmira Rendezvous for Washington. From that day until its return home, in May, 1863, it enated a distinguished and memorable part in the grand military drama of Maryland and Virginia, participating successively in the battles of Lewinsville, Yorktown, Williamsburg, Mechanicsville, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Bull Run No. 2, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg No. 1.
The regiment left Elmira with 900 men, and returned with 350. They had well earned the title of veteran soldiers. Four times they crossed the Potomac, twice the Chickahominy, four times the Rappahannock. They had marched by land and water, by day and by night. They had fought in trenches and in fields, had supported batteries and charged bayonets, and the tattered and murky remnants of their silken banners testified that they were ever borne where the storm of battle raged the hottest and the carnage was most fearful.
This interesting narrative presents a full and accurate record of the regiment's exploits, and an interesting and reliable description of the several campaigns in which it participated.—The work had its origin in the general desire expressed by the members and friends of the command to have the scenes and incidents connected with its two years' history collected and preserved in readable shape, valuable for future reference, and interesting as a souvenir of the times. The book embodies brief biographies of the various officers and complete muster rolls of the men. A double interest attaches to the numerous engravings which embellish the volume, from the fact that instead of being gotten up to order, they were "drawn on the spot" by our townsman, Lieut. L. C. Mix, the engraver, who was an officer of the 33d, and participated in all the scenes through which it passed. They constitute in themselves a pictorial history of the first two years of the eastern campaigns.
The mechanical appearance of the volume is exceedingly creditable to the publishers. It is printed upon subscription; and is now being delivered by the General Agent, Mr. Porter Taylor. The subscription price is but $1.50, and we have no doubt the book will be eagerly sought by all who have felt a personal interest in the 33d Regiment, or who desire to place on their shelves so interesting and reliable record of our local military history.

STORY OF THN [sic] THIRTY-THIRD NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—We are indebted to Col. R. F. Taylor, late Colonel of the 33d New York Volunteers, for a copy of a handsome volume bearing the above title. It is a narrative of the exploits of the 33d Regiment, in the campaigns of Virginia and Maryland, in which this gallant corps participated for three years of the war. It is a book of over four hundred pages, prepared by David W. Judd, of the New York Times, and printed by Benton & Andrews of this city. It is profusely illustrated from drawings made by Lieutenant L. C. Mix of this city, who was attached to the regiment. The frontispiece is a fine thing and the portrait of Col. Taylor with his autograph, occupies the first page of the book. The friends of the Thirty-third, as well as the surviving members will purchase and treasure this volume among the household gods, where it certainly deserves a place. The regiment has a history, and it is but just to the brave men that it should be written. The author has done the subject justice. It is by far the most complete work of the kind that has yet appeared.
Colonel Taylor is now in command of the 1st Veteran Cavalry, and in the ranks of that regiment are many of the troops who followed him over many a well contested field in the 33d. May they live to see as good a record when their career in that branch of the service is concluded.
This volume is to be sold by Porter Taylor in this city. It will be interesting to all loyal citizens, as well as to the especial friends of the 33d.

STORY OF THE 33d N. Y. VOLUNTEERS.—We see by a notice in the Rochester Union, that a handsome volume, bearing the above title is just published. It is a narrative of the exploits of the 33d Rejt. during their  campaign of two years in Virginia and Maryland. It is a book of over four hundred pages, prepared by DAVID W. JUDD, of the N. Y. Times, and printed by Benton & Andrews of Rochester. The friends of the 33d, as well as the surviving members will purchase and treasure this work among their household gods, where it certainly deserves a place.
The volume is beig [sic] sold in Rochester by Porter Taylor. We have not been able to learn who is to sell the work here, as yet, but we presume it will be put in the hands of an agent, and we promise it a ready sale.

Campaign of the Thirty-Third N. Y. S. V. —The story of the Thirty-Third, prepared by David W. Judd, correspondent of the New York Times, was published a few months ago by Benton & Andrews, of Rochester. The Thirty-Third bore a very honorable part in the early history of the war and maintained its credit as a fighting regiment on numerous bloody fields. The last fight was on the sanguinary field of Fredericks­burg, where it was severely deciminated [sic], and where Capt. Root received his dangerous wound. The work gives a history of the organization of the regiment and each individual company, and a correct record of its two years of war in Virginia.
To be had of Cornwell.

A funeral sermon upon the death of Private Eli P. Smith, 33d regiment, will be delivered at the Central Church, Genesco, on Sunday afternoon next, May 31st, at 1 1/2 P. M., by Rev. Henry Neill.

Seven members of Company E 33d regiment, arrived at Genesco on Tuesday evening, Samuel and George Luce, William Black, Samuel Thompson, Shelby Barnes and J. Copeland are among the number. They return to Elmira on Saturday for payment. The 33d visits Canandaigua on Monday and Company E is expected at Geneseo on Wednesday next. Capt. B. F. Spencer of the 104th returned on Tuesday evening.
Jos. WARREN HENDRICKS, one of the young heroes named in the subjoined extract from the N. Y. Spectator, was a member of Capt, Guion's Company, and is well known to us. He lost his left arm by a Rebel bullet, at Fredericksburg, and is now employed in carrying the mail south from this Village. He is a fine fellow, and as noble-hearted and patriotic as he is brave.
On the day that Stonewall Jackson attacked Porter's troops on the left bank of the Chickahominy, a rebel force moved down from Richmond and opened upon General Baldy Smith's division, which was stationed at Golden Farm, on the right bank of the river. "Baldy" immediately placed the Forty-ninth Pennsylvania, Seventy-seventh New York, and the Ontario Regiment [33d] behind some hastily constructed earthworks, to resist the attack of the enemy. The Seventh and Eighth Georgia, led by Colonel Lamar, and other regiments, soon bore down upon then in a furious charge. Shot and shell flew in every direction, crashing through the trees, plowing up the ground, and scattering the contrabands in every direction. Several of the enemy's missiles struck the breastwork, behind which the troops were standing, and rolled over, occasioning not a little confusion. One shell dropped down into the ditch beneath the parapet among the men, but was quickly tossed out by a New York boy, J. W. Hendricks, and again taken up by another New York boy, Peter Roach, and thrown down the hill, where it exploded, doing no injury. This heroic deed of these brave fellows undoubtedly saved the lives of several of their comrades at the immediate peril of their own.

Casualties in the Companies of the Old 33d Now in the 49th N. Y. V.
HEADQUARTERS 49TH NEW YORK VOLS.,
NEAR SPOTTSYLVANIA C. H., Va.,
May 20, 1864.
EDITORS UNION AND ADVERTISER:—I transmit herewith a list of the killed, wounded and missing among the 33d New York men transferred to the 49th New York, As the regiment is properly a Buffalo organization, I omit the remainder:

Killed—Corporal Edward Penan, Privates Hugh A. Calderwood, Charles L. Truax, James McGorey, James S. Lyon, Timothy O'Regan, William O. Witter, Weezner Voorhees.

Wounded—Sergeants Hugh Hogan, leg; James Walls, breast; William E. Boulls, arm; Corporals Samuel Pearce, groin; Patrick Cooney, arm; Albert V. Sherman, arm; John E. Mylacraine, arm; John G. Nicholas, hand; privates Hamor Dawson, leg, amputates; Wm. Greenwood, arm; Thomas Roach, hand; John B. Teller, leg; Thomas Vettley, leg; George Voltze, breast; Michael Clark, leg; Barney Corby, leg; Marcellus E. Hazen, shoulder; Luther ____, arm; Mortimer Herrick, arm; John T. Johnson, bowels; Eugene Duryee, arm; Amos Farrar, foot; Barnett Gellan, arm; Charles W. Sherman, arm; James H. Smalldredge, leg; Franklin Wonderlin, arm; James H. Truax, foot; John Bego, leg; Jacob Leib, hand; Pliny P. Laird, arm.

Missing—Privates Nathan S. Horton, Mathew Keers, Henry Vanderhorst, Charles Gott, Wm. J. Nolan, Patrick McGinn.

The losses thus far in the 49th have been: The Adjutant, 5 Captains, 4 Lieutenants and 50 men killed; the Major, 3 Captains, 3 Lieutenants and 143 men wounded; one Lieutenant and 33 men missing. Commenced this fight, May 5th, with 372 guns; now stack 133. G. B. H.
Boulls joins with me in the opinion that the Union printers—to which we belong—aimed their guns too high. Had we been present in the body we should have opposed the movement, at least on the plan as carried out. Don't belive [sic] ... "strikes!"   G. B. H.

Letter from the 33d Regiment.
BROWNVILLE, ARK , Sept. 12, 1864.
Editors Gazette:—'Tis so long since I have held any communication with you, that now "me thinks we meet as friends that had forgot to speak." I chose to let those more distinguished for literary talent keep you "up" in our movements and gyrations, but found a stray GAZETTE that fortuitously came within my reach, I discovered that the 33d was either unknown to its readers, or in danger of being forgotten. We still live, and a brief retrospect of our career during the six months past may not be totally void of interest.
On the 2d day of February last, our regiment, then a part of the 1st Brig. 4th Div. 19th A. C., left the Big Black for Meridian, Miss., which was reached in the incredible time of eleven days, distance, one hundred and fifty miles, and with a heavy force of the enemy's cavalry in our front and upon either flank. But this was but the foreshadowing of other brilliant achievements to be planned and executed by the fertile oracular genius of Sherman. In his own language "the experiment was a success," and after the destruction of many miles of railroad and rolling stock, and consuming a large share of the subsistence of the country, we leisurly [sic] retired upon Vicksburg, and here but a short rest awaited us after one of the longest and most fatiguing marches of the war.
On the 9th of March, we embarked for Red River, forming a part of a division made up of detachments from the 17th corps, not on the Meridian expedition, and commanded by Brig. Gen. T. K. Smith. We were present at the capture of Ft. DeRussy, and accompanied the fleet to Loggy Bayou, which point was reached Sunday, April 10th. Soon a message arrived with the consolatory information that Banks had been defeated, and was falling back upon Grand Ecore, and that we were then fifteen miles in rear of the Rebel army! Our feelings wrought upon by so many anxieties and perplexities I leave you to imagine. Slowly and arduously we retraced our tortuous way down the river, without incident, until the afternoon of the 12th, when, opposite Pleasant Hill Landing, a portion of the fleet grounded. While in this embarrassing predicament, we were attacked by the enemy. One brigade of infantry and a battery comprised his strength, and he was either intoxicated or the bravest commander I ever saw. He charged again and again up the river's bank in fine style, only to be swept away by the iron storm hurled upon him by our gun-boats and musketry. He soon fled in confusion, leaving a large number of killed and wounded; the commanding general among them. We reached Grand Ecore the 15th, where we found Bank's army entrenching themselves. This was soon abandoned, and the whole army on the night of the 20th set out for Alexandria; our division covering the retreat. On the 24th we repulsed the enemy with great slaughter at Cloutierville, and again at Yellow Bayou, May 18th. We at length reached
the Mississippi, and Banks being beyond jeopardy, we were permitted to return to Vicksburg thence to Memphis, where we arrived May 31st. June the 22d, we were again upon the war path toward Tupelo Mississippi, to retrive [sic] if possible the losses attending upon the disasterous defeat of Sturgis in that locality on the 10th. We first encountered Forest, eighteen thousand strong, on the 13th of July, while moving Pontotoc to Tupelo and repulsed him. The following day he attached us in our position at Tupelo, and again upon the 15th but was totally routed with a loss of three thousand men, while ours could not have exceeded three hundred and fifty. The 33d was always in the front line and suffered severely, losing forty-two during the expedition. We returned to Memphis July 22d, and ten days after we were ordered to St. Charles on White River, which place we garrisoned until the 2d inst., when we were ordered here, though for what purpose is a question yet to be solved. It is very sickly here, and malignant fevers abound, so that the mortality among soldiers is great. The 33d cannot now muster four hundred men for duty, and will soon be sorely depleted if it remains here.
We have abandoned all hope of ever being returned to our corps in Sherman's command, and the prospect is a gloomy one, for the conduct of affairs in this department, under the auspices of Steel, seems to give satisfaction to no one but the rebels, and murmurings loud and deep are to be heard on every hand from those who favor the pursuit of a vigorous policy.
Our regiment is occasionally favored by an honorable promotion, and none have given more general satisfaction, nor been more richly merited than those of Sergeants Farr and Hoyt, of Company "F."—the first to a 2d Lieutenancy in Company "H," 5th Wis. Vol. Inf't., and the second to a 2d Lieutenancy in Company "H," 1st Wis. Heavy Artillery. Both are capable, deserving men, have seen much active service, and are held in high estimation by their company and regiment. In parting from them, we feel that our regiment has sustained a "falling off," and the organizations to which they are respectively assigned have made valuable acquisitions.
P. Holden Swift, the gallant and accomplished Captain of Company "E," having served a three years' term of enlistment, with great distinction to himself and his country's service, entering the army a private and working his way by application and the culture of soldierly qualities, to the high position of honor and trust imposed on a captain of the line, and after personally witnessing the immolation of two brothers upon the altar of his country, and been thoroughly tested himself in the fiery crucible of battle, has tendered his resignation and it has met with the acceptance of Gen. Steel. He leaves for the North tomorrow, and will soon be in your midst, to grace once more, a large circle of society of which he is a shining light. Wherever he may go, or in whatever enterprise he may embark, the prayers and best wishes of the officers and men of this command will ever attend him. But the lateness of the hour admonishes me that my letter is already "too long drawn out,'' and I will close, promising to be less negligent in the future.
J. H. S.

33d Wis. Vol. Inf't.
Monday next is Washington's Birthday, and we are gratified to see that the day this year is not to go unobserved in this village. The surviving members of Co. E, 33d Regiment, propose to have a parade and drill in the afternoon, and will be joined by other veteran soldiers in this locality. It is expected that the whole force will number from fifty to sixty, and such as have preserved their uniforms are requested to wear them on that day. Co. E. left this village In May, 1861, seventy-eight strong. For two full years they were through the thickest and most deadly of the struggles in behalf of the Government. They were, and are, no holiday soldiers. The glorious achievements of the Regiment—and there was no Company in it that did better service than Co. E,—are already matters of history, and coming years will only add  additional luster to the noble part these valiant [sic] men acted in behalf of an imperilled [sic] Government.
Capt. Warford left this village with seventy-eight men. The company can now muster from twelve to fifteen men. The first Lieutenant rests in the swamps of the Chickahominy, and there is hardly a battle field connected with the Virginia army, in which does not repose the remains of some of those noble men. Officers and privates of Co. E., and the regiment, have left a record that time can never efface. Let our people aid these veterans in the observance of the day that gave to America a George Washington. Let the starry banner of Heaven be thrown to the breeze from every flag-staff, and let our people manifest to these men that their services are remembered and appreciated. At noon a National salute will be fired. In the evening there will be a re-union of these veterans at Concert Hall, where those who desire will have an opportunity of "tripping the light fantastic toe." The supper will be furnished by Charley Sherwood, at the Eagle, and we can assure our readers that nothing will be wanting in this department. The "boys" desire the Hall to be trimmed, and they invite the Ladies of the Soldiers Aid Society to meet a committee at the Hall on Saturday afternoon to aid in this work. The proceeds of this ball will be donated to the widow's of soldiers. The object is certainly a very worthy and commendable one, and we hope many will purchase tickets, even though they should not attend.

THE TWO YEARS' CAMPAIGN OF THE 33D.
33d NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.
1861, 1862 & 1863.

BATTLE ROLL.
Lewinsville, Va.
Lee's Mills, Va.
Williamsburg, Va.
Mechanicsville, Va.
Garnett's Farm, Va.
Gaines' Mills, Va.
Savage's Station, Va.

BATTLE ROLL.
White Oak Swamp, Va.
Malvern Hill, Va.
South Mountain, Md.
Antietam, Md.
Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.
Fredericksburg, Va., May 3, 1863.
Chancellorville, Va.

OTHER REGIMENTS HAVE DONE NOBLY, BUT YOU DID MORE—YOU WON THE DAY!"—Gen. McClellan's address to the Regiment after the Battle of Williamsburg, May 5, 1862.
The 33d Regiment New York State Volunteers, better known in Western New York as the "Ontario County Regiment," are now publishing a History of their Campaign of two years in Virginia. The strongest assurances are given that it will be got up in a style to make it a worthy Souvenir of the hardships and privations endured by the Regiment during their sojourn amid the swamps and pestilential miasmas of the Peninsula, the ARDUOUS MARCHES THROUGH MARYLAND, and the Perilous and Disastrous Campaigns before Fredericksburg, At the latter place, and last battle, they having lost one-half their effective strength. The work will be amply ILLUSTRATED from Sketches of the various CAMPS, FORTIFICATIONS, BATTLEFIELDS, And other places of interest connected with the Regiment, taken on the spot, by Lieut. L. C. Mix, Co. B. Mr. D. A. JUDD, of the New York Times, has been engaged for the past three months compiling the Book from data furnished by the Regiment; and from the many incidents and details collected together, it will doubtless be a work of great interest to the people of this section.
It will comprise about 225 pages; and the surplus accruing from the sale, if any, will be devoted to relieving the wounded and disabled, and the bereaved families.
AGENTS WILL CANVAS THIS PLACE AND TOWNS ADJACENT.
PRICE OF SUBSCRIPTION, $1 50
A. Strong & Co., Printers, Democrat and American Office, Rochester, N. Y.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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