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34th Regiment New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

Arrival of the Thirty-Fourth Regim't.
This Regiment which was recruited mainly in Herkimer county, under Colonel M. Ladue, and which was mustered into the United States service in June, 1861, reached here yesterday morning, on its way home, under command of Colonel Lafflin. It then numbered over 800 men. Since then it received about 100 recruits and now comes back with only 427.
The Regiment took breakfast at the Delavan House, as guests of the city authorities, after which they paraded through several streets.—They carried with them a framed portrait of Major General McClellan, and this brought o.. from the people, all along the route., the heaviest cheers, which were responded to by the soldiers with great gusto. As with all the other returned regiments McClellan is their idol, and they avail themselves of every opportunity to testify their unbounded admiration of him. Marching up State street they filed in the Park, and paid their respects to Governor Seymour. His Excellency, after the cheers with which the soldiers greeted him, had subsided, welcomed them home in a happy little speech, in which he gave them full credit for their distinguished services and great sacrifices, and expressed the hope that they would long live to enjoy the honors and laurels they had so bravely won. Lieut. Colonel Beverly responded in a few appropriate remarks, and then the regiment marched to the Barracks, where they will remain until mustered out.
After the evacuation of Yorktown the Thirty-Fourth embarked for West Point, reaching there in time to act as a reserve for Franklin's Corps in that engagement. On the arrival of Gen. McClellan's army from Williamsburg they joined the advance on Richmond, and acted as a reserve in the battle at Hanover Court House. On the morning of the 31st they crossed the Chickahominy on a bridge of detached logs floating in the stream, jumping from one to another, and many wading most of the way, and after a forced march arrived just in time to intercept the famous Hampton Legion and other South Carolina regiments, on their way to reinforce General Johnston in his attack on General Casey at Seven Pines. They immediately attacked the enemy, and after a terrific fight of two hours put them to flight with immense loss, killing Col. Ward Hampton, of the Hampton Legion, and wounding and capturing the Brigadier General. The battle was decided by a bayonet charge, ordered and led in person by General Sumner, which was made alone by the 84th, supported by other regiments. In this charge the Regiment won imperishable laurels for itself.
They were actively engaged in nearly all the battles on the Peninsula, in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam, and in the Burnside and Hooker disasters.
The following are the present officers of the regiment:—
FIELD.
Colonel—Byron Lafflin.
Lieutenant-Colonel—John Beverley.
Major—Wells Sponable.
STAFF.
Adjutant—John Kirk.
Quartermaster—Nathan Easterbrooks.
Surgeon—B. F. Manley.
Assistant-Surgeon—J. Hurley Miller.
Chaplain—S. Franklin Schoonmaker.
LINE.
Company A—(from West Troy)—Captain. B H. Warford; First Lieutenant, R. L. Brown; Second Lieutenant, John Oathout.
Company B—(from Little Falls)—Captain Irving D. Clark; First Lieutenant, Francis N. Usher; Second Lieutenant, William Burns.
Company C—(from Norway, Herkimer co.) —Captain, Thomas Corcoran; First Lieutenant, Simeon P. McIntyre.
Company D—(from Champlain)—Captain, John O. Scott; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, Byron Coats.
Company E—(from Steuben county)—Captain, Henry Baldwin; First Lieutenant, Henry T. Sanford; Second Lieutenant, Melville S. Dunn.
Company F—(from Herkimer)—Captain, Charles Riley; First Lieutenant, William Van Valkenburgh; Second Lieutenant, B. F. Minor.
Company G—(from Herkimer)—Captain, Joy P. Johnson; First Lieutenant, John Morey; Second Lieutenant, A. Rounds.
Company H—(from Crown Point)—Captain, William S. Walton; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, William Kirk.
Company I—(from Weedsport, Cayuga county)—Captain, Eugene B. La Rue; First Lieutenant, A. T. Atwood; Second Lieutenant, Orrin W. Beach.
Company K—(from Saulsbury)—Captain, Emerson S. Northup; First Lieutenant, James McCormick; Second Lieutenant, Lewis. M. Chapin.
A committee, consisting of Senator Hardin, Canal Commissioner Skinner, Hon. H. P. Alexander and Oliver Ladue, are here to escort the Regiment to Little Falls, where a reception awaits them. The reception will take place on Saturday. In the evening the regiment will return to Albany.

COL. LA DUE'S REGIMENT.
The 34th Regiment from Albany was expected here yesterday, but could not get away until afternoon. They will, therefore, be in New-York to-day, and will proceed directly to Washington by the New-Jersey Central Railroad.

Thirty-Fourth Regiment.
SENECA MILLS, MD., HEADQUARTERS 34TH
REGT., N. Y. S. V., August 8, 1861.
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:
As we anticipated when I wrote you last, we left Kalorama, Washington, D. C., Tuesday, July 30, at 9 o'clock, A. M. There were no incidents of interest on the march, and having left three companies under Major Laflin at Big Falls, on the 31st, we reached Seneca Mills on the 1st of August, with seven companies, under Lieut.-Col. Suiter. We had quite a heavy baggage train, with many poor teamsters and a bad road, and hence we made rather a slow march. But as there was no visible foe in our neighborhood, it was all right. Our guide was Mr. C. G. Sage, formerly of Central New York, who is a resident of Virginia, and a thorough Union man. He was the guide of McDowell at Bull's Run, and was in the thickest of that ill starred battle. He rides a very fine, strong and fleet cream stallion, which goes like a deer through the woods, leaps fences and swims canals and rivers. Mr. Sage, upon his noble steed, was pursued for three miles by five cavaliers, who emerged suddenly from the woods between Bull's Run and Fairfax. But the pursuit was vain. Had it been successful it might have cost the pursuers dear, as Mr. Sage is an unerring shot and a man of great coolness and courage. He is to remain with us to act as guide and messenger.
Last evening, Col. LaDew, Capt. Beverley, Capt. Riley, Lieut. Carr and Ensign Wafford came to camp with a number of recruits. They had been absent nearly two weeks, and the boys were very glad to see them, and I guess their cheers for the Colonel could have been heard half a mile. The Colonel is certainly very popular, as he deserves to be, as he is very devoted to the comfort, welfare and efficiency of the Regiment.
Governor Gorman, of Minnesota, arrived with his Regiment at this place yesterday. As the senior Colonel he is to command, as we understand, the troops between Washington and Harper's Ferry. He is to act, we believe, as Brigadier General in this region. He is an active, energetic man, who has seen considerable service. He was in the Mexican war, and participated in the principal battles. He entered that war as Captain, and by his courage and other high qualities, attained the rank of Colonel. He was in the terrible fight at Bull's Run, and occupied the extreme right of Col. Heintzelman's division. His regiment was the nucleus about which the Fire Zouaves rallied after they had been broken and lost most of their officers, and had much to do with the annihilation of the black horse cavalry. This regiment, also, though it lost in killed and wounded as many as any other in the field, came off in good order, and was very soon ready for efficient service. Though there is naturally just now, great distrust of our leaders, yet we are confident that the Governor will be a good Brigadier.
In this letter I will inform you of rather a thrilling incident which occurred eight before last. Just opposite Seneca Mills Lock, across the Potomac, stood an old house and a few other buildings which had been occupied by rebels as a covert from which to fire on our pickets, and annoy the lock tender and family. It occurred to several of us that the nuisance should be removed. Hence James Fanell, John Johnson, Robert McLaughlin and John McLaughlin, of Company K, (Capt. Beverly) volunteered to do the work. About 8 o'clock P. M. they launched an old skiff and started for the old Virginia shore. They stole quietly along when they had reached the shore, until they had reached the desired point, when soon the flames of the old rebels' nest illumined the water and the sky. Just then a heavy signal gun was fired on the enemy's side, to give notice, doubtless, to his troops in the vicinity. But the brave boys did up their work well, and pulled for the Maryland side, which they reached with safety.
I was down to Major Lauflin's camp, day before yesterday, and found the Major and those under his charge well and in good spirits. In the absence of the Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel and Major have had an unusual responsibility, and have sustained it well. The Lieutenant Colonel especially has acquitted himself with great credit, in command of the regiment.
To-morrow I shall go in company with Governor Gorman to Harper's Ferry, who proposes to go with a company of cavalry upon a scouting expedition between that point and this. Hence in my next I shall doubtless have something more to communicate. Yours truly,
J. B. V. P.

The Affair of the Scouts of the 34th Regiment.
Darnestown, Md., Oct. 17.
In a previous communication was narrated the fact of a party of eleven scouts from the N. Y. 34th having crossed the river, and being attacked and cut to pieces by a superior number of rebels, The particulars of the affair are thus detailed by Corporal Robert Gracey, of the party, who until his return on Monday was supposed to have been dead.
On the night of the 16th of September, a detachment of twelve men crossed the river for the purpose of reconnoitering [sic[ and foraging. When reaching about half a mile from the river they were attacked by fifteen rebels, two of whom were instantly killed. Among the wounded was my informant, Corporal Gracey of Company H, a man of gigantic frame and iron endurance. As Gracey lay wounded upon the ground, a rebel named McCarthy Lowe, a farmer residing in the vicinity, rushed up and shot him twice, both barrels taking effect, and was stopped from firing a third time by his Captain.
One of the balls entered Gracey's back in a slanting direction, and came out on his left side, the other entering his back lodged in his left lung, where it still remains.
His two weeks stay at Fairfax was not of an unpleasant character, considering all the circumstances.
In this hospital the inmates were mostly members of the 1st Virginia regiment. Every day or two those seriously ill were sent to Richmond, as it was feared that General McClellan would attack the rebel lines.
During Gracey's confinement his sufferings were intense, as evinced by a comparison of his former with his present weight. His attendants furnished him with opium every night, but he treasured it up as a means of his ultimate escape. One night after he became able to move about, he drugged the beverage of his attendants, and left the hospital in pursuit of cold water for a violent tooth ache. After passing the outer guard he fell in with the sentinels of three distinct lines outside the village. He was repeatedly hailed, and fired at three times, but all the balls failed to hit him. He started towards the Potomac, at the point of his capture, but in consequence of large rebel forces he was compelled to diverge in a westerly direction, crossing Bull's Run, and thence taking a circuitous route to avoid observation. After three days of hunger and suffering he reached the Potomac.
While in the hospital at Fairfax, Gracey had opportunities of becoming familiar with many important facts. He occasionally overheard conversations between officers and the surgeons of the hospital.
On the 5th inst., Jeff. Davis was at Fairfax, and spent several hours with Beauregard. Gen. Johnston was understood to be somewhere in that neighborhood, but Gracey did not see him. On one occasion Gen. Longstreet said to the surgeon, that the rebel forces in front of Washington were so scattered that if attacked at any point on the line, there must be an abrupt retreat by all upon Manassas, our Gibraltar. They think it impossible to be driven from this point. It was generally believed that Beauregard would burn the village of Fairfax Court House if compelled to evacuate it. It was impossible to ascertain the exact number of rebel troops in and around Fairfax. They were variously estimated from 50,000 to 100,000. As far as Gracey's observations went, they were better fed than clothed, but he heard of no complaints in regard to the latter, although their uniforms presented a curious mixture, gray predominating over other shades. Salt ha'd been scarce, but the supply was becoming more plentiful. He learned that hundreds of men were employed on the sea shore in evaporating, each man producing on an average two bushels per day. It was also coming in freely from the western part of the State.
On his homeward route Gracey saw, about one-fourth of a mile northwest of Fairfax, a breastwork about thirty rods long and five feet high, but no troops were then stationed there. He saw no large bodies of troops north of the Great Falls, but lay concealed until forty baggage wagons passed toward Leesburg.

UTICA MORNING HERALD.
AND DAILY GAZETTE. FROM THE HERKIMER COUNTY REGIMENT.
HEADQUARTERS THIRTY-FOURTH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.,
CAMP SENECA, MARYLAND,OCTOBER 16.
CAPTURE OF THE NOTORIOUS JACK CROSS.
Last Thursday Evening, Capt. Oswald of Co. A, of our Regiment, learned that Jackson Cross, whom we were commanded to arrest, was at his home, which is near our camp. Some of our officers advised an immediate search of his house, but the Colonel preferred another plan. He surrounded the house with a strong guard, which carefully kept watch until the dawn of day. The next morning, Adj. Thompson and Capt. Oswald, with a competent suite, looked for the gentleman, and found him—looking very much like a bundle of old clothes—lying upon the lath near the gable end of his house. When he came down through the rat hole near the chimney, he appeared like one who had seen much picket service on both sides the river, which is doubtless the fact. He was brought a prisoner to camp, and the next day sent to Gen. Stone's quarters at Poolsville. Gen. Stone sent him to Washington, where he is now a prisoner in the Senate Chamber. Perhaps, while I write, he occupies the seat of John C. Breckinridge, and graces it as well. It will be remembered that this Jack Cross is reputed to have been instrumental in having his brother-in-law, Dr. Crostein, lieutenant in the U. S. army, arrested and bound by a party from over the river, and taken to Richmond, where he is now a prisoner. The emphatic order which Gen. Mansfield gave Lieut. Col. Suiter; commanding the Thirty-Fourth, when we crime up here, was: "Take him dead or alive, and hang him, or if you do not want to hang him, send him in irons to Washington." He is taken and sent to Washington, and we will see what will be his fate.

A FRIGHTFUL CASUALTY.
Last Saturday evening, a quarrel arose between Lawrence Rooney and Hiram Bush, of Co. G, of our Regiment. High words passed; the quarrel has subsided, and Bush retired a short space from the scene; when he was heard to say, "He has said enough," and suddenly Rooney exclaimed, "He has stuck me!" He had stabbed Rooney fearfully with a large dirk knife, tearing open his stomach, and letting out his bowels. This occurred at about 10 P. M., and about 8 A. M. the next day Rooney died. Bush, by direction of our Brigadier General, was turned over to the civil authority. Yesterday, we escorted him to Rochville, shire town of Montgomery county, Md., where his case was brought before a magistrate, and he was committed to jail to await his trial, which is to come off next November. Bush and Rooney were both good soldiers, and it is needless to add that bad whisky was the cause of the tragedy, which was a fatal to one and put the other on trial for murder. Our commanders have been very decided against the "ardent," but it was smuggled in from a shanty on the canal, and we have seen its accustomed fruits.

AN INTERESTING INCIDENT.
When Mr. Bush was brought to the jail, the jailor demurred to receiving him into that establishment, affirming that it was built for the citizens of Montgomery county, and objecting to its occupancy by a United States soldier. The criminal had been duly committed to the institution by the proper magistrate, but that was not sufficient to satisfy the dignitary who carried the keys that he should receive into custody a soldier of Uncle Sam. Nevertheless, Dr. Walker, who had charge of the escort of the prisoner, cut the parley short by telling the prisoner to step into jail, which, the doors being open, he did. The Doctor walked in, accompanied by the jailor, and looked through the building. Lo! the jail built for the exclusive occupation of the citizens of Montgomery county, Md., was well filled with negroes in heavy irons! These poor fellows—alas! we thought—are incarcerated for trying to secure their freedom, the birthright of human nature and dearest boon of: man; or, perhaps, are here awaiting aucti0n day, or the approach of the Southern trader. Never mind—this is not our business. We are in battle array to perpetuate the Government as it is, and to interdict the march of the vile bondage over the free territories and States.

THE DEAD ALIVE, AND THE LOST FOUND.
Monday Morning, Corporal Gracy of Co. H, who, just four weeks before had crossed the river with Captain Sponable, and was seen to fall from the fire of the rebel ambuscade and supposed to be killed, returned to camp, and made to me the following report, which I carefully wrote as he gave it to me.
He was shot and brought down by a musket ball which entered near the left shoulder blade, and broke one of his ribs—glanced, and came out by the backbone, making a bad wound, but injuring no vital part. When the skirmish was over, and while yet down and in a helpless condition, a citizen by the name of Lowe, shot him with a pistol, the ball entering near where that of the musket did, and lodging in the left lung. This wound which he received from the cowardly wretch when he was completely in the power of the enemy, has been very painful, and dangerous. The other was slightly injurious, but this caused immediately large discharges of blood from the lungs—has produced a number of severe hemorrhages, and now, though much better, is painful, and predisposes the sufferer to pneumonia.
The Corporal was taken to Drainsville, about five miles from the mouth of the Seneca river, where he was kept two week's. Here two resident physicians by the name of Day (let these names be remembered) saw him, but gave him no advice. For two long weeks he lay in their neighborhood, and they made no effort for his relief. Here a citizen by the name of Walker advised and urged the soldiers to take him out and hang him. This Mr. Walker represented himself strongly to officers and privates, as a decided Union man. Some were lured to eat at his table. He enticed over the most of those who went with Sponable, and laid the trap which caught him. And he was the man to urge the hanging like a gross felon, of a wounded prisoner. Such, fellow citizens is the complexion of many of the chivalry of the South. Such, comrades in arms, is the subtlety and refinement of cruelty we may look for in our foes. What men to constitute a State!
Mr. Gracy was taken from Drainsville to Fairfax, where he enjoyed a hospital and the aid of a surgeon. He saved the opium the surgeon gave him that he could sleep, and last Friday night put it into the coffee prepared for the sentinels. He gave them a big dose, and left one of them sleeping at one door, and one at the other. He presumed that they are sleeping yet, and will wake at the resurrection. When he was out of the hospital, he had to pass the line guard of three regiments, all of which fired at him, but missed. He wandered in the woods until Sunday night, when he came to the river nearly opposite Edward's Ferry. He followed the river down until he came opposite our pickets whom he hailed, and when the morning on Monday dawned and they recognized him, they brought him over.
Three still of the unfortunate party are yet on the Virginia shore. Two of these, Oliver P. Darling of Co. G, and Mr. Brumley of Co. I were killed by the party in ambush. The other one, Corporal Kellogg, of Co. H, was injured and taken prisoner a prisoner to Richmond. Mr. Darling was killed, bravely fighting four or five of the enemy. He was an excellent soldier whom we knew well, and a fine Christian man. He died the death of a patriot and hero; but alas, he leaves a wife and family poorly provided for, to mourn his loss. Will not the good people of Salisbury, Herkimer county, look tenderly after this family? Mr. Brumley was reputed a young man of superior intelligence and virtue, and who always did his duty with great alacrity and fidelity. Corporal Kellogg was also a youth of fine endowments and liberal education. With him I had the pleasure of an acquaintance, and had learned to prize him as an accomplished and worthy friend. His loss, as well as that of Brumley and Darling, is severely felt by the regiment.
A week ago last Friday, Corporal Kellogg witnessed from the hospital at Fairfax, a review of three rebel brigades. Jeff. Davis and Beauregard, the Satan and Moloch of the conspiracy, were present. "Oh!" says the Corporal, "how I prayed for my old Enfield rifle! Had I had that I would have shot them both, and then they might have hung me!" Jeff. Davis left the next day for Richmond. Beauregard was at Fairfax the day before he left.
From the officers whose quarters were near the hospital, he heard the rebel force at Fairfax, and Springdale, ten miles northeast of Fairfax, variously estimated from fifty to seventy-five thousand. The rebels have no fortifications at Fairfax of importance. They constantly keep everything ready for a retreat, and purpose to make no stand until they get to Manassas, where they talk of having a very large force and strong intrenchments [sic].
Here they purpose to make a fight and expect to destroy the Yankees.
Mr. Gracey says that many of their regiments have no uniforms and wear citizens' dress, but that there is no suffering from a want of arms, ammunition, clothes, provisions and the like. They are short of coffee, but seem to have plenty of whisky. Pardon me, Mr. Editor, for having detailed a portion of Gracey's story to the correspondent of the New. York Herald, in which print it may appear before this reaches you. I will add that I am informed by Mr. Wright, First Lieutenant of Company H, now commanding the company, that Mr. G. is reported to be a man of candor and integrity.

CAPTAIN SPONABLE.
I will subjoin a word concerning Capt. Sponable as he has been held responsible for the unfortunate affair in which Corporal Gracey was wounded and taken prisoner, and in one or two instances has been pointed at in the public prints as heading an "unauthorized expedition." It is due to the Captain to say that he was authorized to go and make the reconnoissance which he did, and that he did not assume it on his own responsibility. So the Captain affirms and so it is understood among us. Hence, let it not be hinted that in so grave an affair one of our bravest, most high minded and candid captains, undertook any thing which is severely condemned in high military circles. Further, the Captain only took with him two men, who were Corporal Gracey and the lamented Darling, and had determined on a plan by which he would have escaped the ambuscade and succeeded in his enterprise. When over the river, he was met by a squad from company D, who had left their picket duty and come over. The Captain could do no better than to take them along, and unfortunately, yielded to their advice as to the route which brought them into the fatal snare. This is Capt. Sponable's report, which is confirmed by Corporal Gracey. The Captain is a man most highly esteemed in the regiment, and we cannot allow him nor any other brave and worthy officer of the 34th to suffer opprobrium unjustly.

PROMOTION OF NATHAN EASTABROOKS.
Nathan Eastabrooks, of Little Falls, has filled the responsible and burdensome office of regimental Quartermaster with great success. He has recently been made Quartermaster of Gen. Gorman's brigade, to which the 34th is now attached. Thus he has advanced to a Captain's rank and enjoys a higher but less laborious position. We are happy in view of his deserved promotion, but sorry to lose him as a daily associate and member of our regiment.
J. B. Van Petten.

From the Upper Potomac.
DAWSONVILLE, Md., Sept. 18.
There has been no serious demonstration on the part of the rebels within the past forty-eight hours, and as far as can be learned, everything along the upper Potomac remains in a state of quiet to-night.
The Division Quartermaster to-day protested in the name of the War Department, against the payment in coin of any bills for damages sustained by owners of property where encampments are located, but he will certify to such claims based on principles of equity, leaving it to Congress or the Court of Claims to authorize the payment.
The cause of this procedure is supposed to have arisen from the fact that most of the Federal coin heretofore disbursed for this purpose, has found its way to the secession side. It is understood that supplies for forage and subsistence are not included in this protest.
Yesterday an unauthorized scouting party of the 34th New York Regiment went across the Potomac, near the mouth of the Seneca, and were attacked by a superior party of the enemy.
One of our men was killed, and several wounded. One of the latter was shot through the cheek, but fled, pursued by the attacking party. On reaching a creek he threw in his gun and plunged in himself, laying on his back and resting his head upon a stone, with his mouth and nostrils above the water. He evaded his pursuers, and after three hours submersion he crawled to the shore. His companions who were on the Maryland side, discovered and rescued him while making a vain attempt to swim across.
These incursions, which can be productive of no good to our cause, are condemned by experienced officers.
The 2d Rhode Island battery, stationed near the mouth of the Seneca, yesterday shelled an encampment of the rebels nearly opposite, and it is believed that several were killed. The enemy did not respond, probably from want of artillery.
It is reported that a Lieutenant and several men belonging to one of the river guard regiments crossed the river secretly, and is believed to have deserted to the rebels. The name of the officer and the regiment are withheld until the report can be verified, but the authority is conceded to be reliable.
Our own and the enemy's pickets are said to frequently meet on one or the other shore of the Potomac and pass the time in social intercourse, occasionally partaking of each other's hospitality.
This morning at daylight it was discovered by General Stone's pickets, near Conrad's ferry, that the enemy during the previous night had commenced and partially constructed an entrenchment on the Virginia side, about 500 feet from the shore, upon a slope facing the river.—One of our light batteries opened upon it about, nine o'clock, and after twenty or thirty rounds, nothing was to be seen of the enemy, and little results of their labors.
For some days past conversations have been held between our own and rebel pickets, from which it has been discovered that the latter belong to the 2d Richmond cavalry, "who were anxious to exchange late Richmond papers for the leading Union journals, but our pickets declined to reciprocate.
Lieutenant Colonel Seward, nephew of Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State, recently from serious indisposition, withdrew from the command of the 19th regiment and proceeded to Washington, when he tendered his resignation. But before it was accepted, a rumor reached him that a battle between a superior force of the enemy and the division to which he was attached was imminent, and notwithstanding his physical debility, he withdrew the resignation, and immediately re-joined his regiment.
There is great complaint in regard to mail facilities in this division of the army. Numerous letters never arrive, while others are days and weeks behind their time. This is attributed to local officers and carriers, rather than to the
Department at Washington.

Camp Correspondence.
HEADQUARTERS 34TH REG'T,
Camp opposite Fredericksburg, Va.,
May 13, 1862.
MR. EDITOR:—We left our winter quarters one week ago last Saturday night, about twelve o'clock. 1 have in previous letters stated that the 2d corps, with the exception of this division, had already gone to the right with the main body of the army, but as we predicted, we were left to co-operate with Sedgwick in the front. Marching down to the river directly opposite Fredericksburg, we laid upon our arms till morning, when the pontoon bridge was finished, and we were shoved across in exactly the same spot as before, a detachment of Sedgwick's cavalry having previously dashed through from the left, and cleared the town of rebels.—The crossing was made without the slightest resistance from the batteries on the bluff overlooking the city, though it is probable that had not the force of Gen. Sedgwick on the left of the city, been actively engaged distracting the attention of the enemy, we should have had earnest work. In anticipation of such an event, volunteers to cross the river and engage the foe were called for from our ranks, and I take great pride in noticing the fact that this call, though for a perilous enterprise, was quickly reponded [sic] to by the 34th. Did time and space permit, I would willingly furnish a list of the names of those brave men, for the motive and the courage displayed, both voluntary as they were, deserve the highest of mortal encomiums.
Fredericksburg remains the same, and will for years, as the Union forces left it after the terrible destruction of last winter. Very little, if any, attempts have been made by the returning pilgrims to restore their ruined city to its primitive state. Along its gloomy streets treads scarcely a shadow of that enterprise which was once the glory and the pride of this now desolate and deserted city. Fredericksburg, with all the memories that cluster so richly around its history,—Fredericksburg, slumbering beneath the tomb that, forever watches above its destiny, is but a ruined and deserted town. Its streets are crossed, its gardens rooted out,—its beauty ravished, and its buildings torn down to form the thousand defences of the foe, while the fearful ordeal through which it passed before its completion in this last visitation of a powerful army. Many of the citizens remained throughout the battle, but many more left on the approach of our forces,—left to find when they return a ransacked residence. After lying in the streets for about an hour, and shifting position no less than a dozen times, we were finally advanced out of the city into an open field to the right. Nothing stood between us and the rebel batteries on the bluff, which vomited forth their fearful flames of fire, consisting of shell, grape, shrapnel and other destructive missiles. Nothwithstanding [sic] the fire, our batteries were audaciously hauled directly into the open field, and commenced playing upon the earthworks of the enemy, —earthworks as impregnable to their fire as the fortress of Gibraltar to a storm of hail-stones. Several regiments of rebel infantry followed us on to the right, marching in their rifle pits the while, and keeping a strict eye on all our movements. Miraculous indeed, it is that we were not all slaughtered during this march across the plain; three, however, were only wounded.—These were Corporal Bradbury, of Co. G; Alonzo Wright, Co. H; and War­ren Lamphere, Co. K, all badly but not dangerously. Many regiments, however, suffered badly. Our lines entended [sic] the entire length of the field, and every shot from the batteries was sure to strike the lines at some point. How many hearts in future years will linger with a strange remembrance around that memorable morning. Softly beautiful the sun looked down in a thousand beams of gold, upon fields smiling in the green verdure of Spring, while the river rolled along its rugged path, chanting a sublime requiem amid the battle storm.
After we had reached the opposite side of the field, meeting the river as it circles around from below the city, we fell back beneath the shadow of a stone wall that fringed the river. This entire movement was undoubtedly the finest piece of strategy practiced since the opening of the war, and its result was all that the plan designed. Conversing with a prisoner shortly afterward, he stated that he belonged to one of the regiments which followed us up to the right, and that as soon as it was discovered that we had hauled off, and that it was not our intention to give them battle there, they were immediately marched back to the point where Sedgwick had been engaging them, but it was too late,—he had already gained the crest, and the fortifications were ours. But a small force had been left to oppose us in front, the main body of their army having gone to the right towards Chancellorville to meet Hooker, and the feint which was made by our division on the river, drew from the left the forces opposed to Sedgwick, and enabled him to carry the heights.
As soon as it was announced that our forces occupied the earthworks, and that the enemy had retreated, we were marched into the city and back through the heights about two miles, where we remained for an hour, when we again returned to the city, re-crossed the river and took our position on the bluffs, near which we are at present encamped. All were in the best of spirits at the victory we had won; but you all now know the story of how Sedgwick moved on, and the enemy coming into the city the next morning by a flank movement, compelled him to retreat across the river.
We were now set to digging rifle pits commanding the bridges, which the next night were taken up, and in a day or two it was announced that Hooker's entire force had re-crossed the river.
The confidence, however, of this army in Gen. Hooker, remains unshaken. The bold and open manner in which he deals with the forces under his command, has inspired a feeling of reverence, mingled with pride at the confidence which in turn he bestows upon his troops. Not a man but admires the boldness of his movements, and the audacity of his plans, and not a man but would consider it an honor to die in that army which is the "guardian of its own history and its own arms."
The first of May passed off calmer than was expected, a few of the men were inclined to stand out, but the prompt presence of a formidable guard and a few words from the Commanding General, forced them into the sensible conclusion to yield and return to duty. During the late severe trial under fire, every man stood firmly to his post, thus adding new laurels to our proud arms.
Respectively &c., L. N. C., Co. K.

From the 34th.
OPPOSITE FREDERICKSBURG,VA.,
May 8th, 1863.
Dear Journal:
For some days I have been trying to get you a line but have found no opportunity until the present moment.
Doubtless you know the particulars and the result of Gen. Hooker's movement.—I have nothing to say of it and will confine myself to an account of the doings of the 2d Division of the 2d Corps, which includes the history of the 34th. Said division, for a wonder, was not with the grand army this time and therefore it is a very easy matter to give it a separate history.
After the army had moved to the right we kept a strong force on the river front and it was supposed that we were remaining behind to keep up appearances. On the night of the 2d, however, we were ordered to move to a point opposite Fredericksburg. Arriving there, we lay on our arms while the engineers threw the pontoon bridge across. At sunrise all was ready and we passed over without opposition. We remained in the city but a short time when we were ordered to move on the left of the enemy's works, so as to draw their forces away from the center, while Gen. Sedgwick, who had come up from below, made his attack at that point. No sooner had we commenced to march than the enemy discovered us and opened with his batteries. For full half an hour the shells burst among and the solid shot passed over our ranks, and although many were wounded and killed in the division, our Regiment was most fortunate, having but a few wounded, three I believe. There is something surprising in this disproportion of loss in different regiments when, as far as can be seen, the exposure is the same. The Regiment immediately following ours lost full 30 in killed and wounded and in contrast you have our loss of three.
Having succeeded in our object of weakening the enemy's center, we waited while our forces took the Heights. This was most gallantly done between 11 and 12 o'clock. Returning to the city we passed through it and went upon the Heights. The road was strewed with the dead and dying, presenting to us many a sorrowful sight. On our way up we met many prisoners and also several cannon captured by the brave boys of the "Light Brigade." We went out beyond the city some two miles and a half and stopped to dine on the crest of the last ridge or Height. From this the view was most interesting and inspiring. The different Heights crowned by earthworks, the city of Fredericksburg in the valley below, the river and the Falmouth Heights in the distance, all combined to render it a scene never to be forgotten. While here orders came for us to return. We again passed through the city, recrossed the river and went into camp on the opposite side. During the night Gen. Sedgwick's forces passed on to join the main army and the next morning the enemy took possession again in force. Since that time we have lain still, watching the Rebs in the distance and the course of events.
We are all well satisfied with the part we have taken, for we have done, and done well, all that we were asked to do.—When it is remembered that the majority of the Regiment, with much reason, regarded their time as out, its conduct is most praiseworthy, for in the most trying times every man stood up nobly and bravely and faithfully performed his duty.
We know not what awaits us. It may be our fate to again meet the enemy ere we return to our homes, if so—time will tell what we do and how we do it.
But a few weeks now remain to us of service and then we hope to return to enjoy the joys and comforts of home.
Warren Lamphere, Co. K, and Robert Bradbury, Co. G, are the only two wounded from the Herkimer County companies,
For the present,
Yours, etc.

From the 34th.
HEADQUARTERS 34th REG. N. Y. V.
Army of the Potomac, Camp near
Falmouth, Va., May 14, 1863.
Dear Journal:
So peculiar were the circumstances under which my last was written that I did not, rather could not, do justice to the events treated therein. Many little incidents were not noted at all and many things of interest were merely touched upon. It is late to introduce them, but now, as ever, the old adage holds good, "better late than never."
First and foremost, we would notice the exploits of the "forlorn hope," consisting of twenty-five men and one officer, from each Regiment in the Brigade, who volunteered to cross the river and drive the enemy from the town. As soon as the pontoons were laid, they crossed, but met with no opposition until they had passed through the city, when they met the enemy and had a sharp little skirmish. As soon as the "Light Brigade" had possession of the Heights, they were deployed as skirmishers and drove the enemy some two miles and a half, capturing nearly their number in prisoners. The boys say that never before did they know what skedaddling meant. The Reb appeared completely panic-stricken, throwing away guns, equipments and everything that impeded their flight. According to rebel accounts, they were a Division strong, and when we consider such a body of men fleeing before our little handful, it is almost a realization of the "One putting a thousand to flight and two ten thousand." Occasionally they would halt, face about, throw out skirmishers and threaten battle, but one volley from our brave lads always set them flying again. Our boys pursued them until they were warned by a slave that they were nearing the main body of the rebel army, when they returned, bringing in their prisoners and their spoils. Had there been a detachment of Cavalry on hand, the whole command could have been taken. We cannot speak too highly of the brave fellows who thus exposed their lives to danger. We would gladly make their names pubic would room permit. It should also be remembered that many of them had faithfully served out the time of their enlistment and, though, in their opinion, wrongfully held by the government, did not make this an excuse for hanging back.—The officer from our Regiment, was Lieut. MCCORMICK, Co. H, who bore himself most nobly and bravely the day through and has honorable mention in the official report of the Colonel.
In the early part of the day, and before we crossed the river, Col. LAFLIN was placed in command of the Brigade, which left the Regiment in the hands of Col. BEVERLY. The conduct of all the field and staff officers was faultless. Major SPONABLE'S horse was hit slightly, but he escaped unharmed. I cannot but again express my wonder at the small loss.—
Think of walking for half an hour through an open field, at the foot of heights crowned by an enemy's batteries, which he was no ways loth to use or slow in using, and only suffering a loss of four men wounded. We certainly have great cause for thankfulness.
When coming down from the Heights, we met the 121st going up. Great was our delight at this unexpected encounter. Hands were shaken with vigor, congratulations passed, and with a "God bless and keep you," on each side, we parted to meet, some of us—never more. We returned to the city but they pressed on in high spirits elated by our past success and confident of complete victory. About sundown they came unexpectedly upon a strong force of the enemy, and though they fought like heroes, the foe was too strong and they were compelled to fall back, after suffering a loss of 273 men.—This was a sad initiation, but we are happy to state that they were equal to it. Capt. WENDALL, Lieut. DOUBLEDAY, and we regret to say, your correspondent, Lieut. FORD, were among the killed. Capt. ARNOLD, though severely wounded is likely to recover, at least the Doctor holds out encouragement.
The loss of Lieut. FORD will be severely felt by all who knew him. Little did I think, as we parted on the Heights of Fredricksburg, that in less than six hours he would receive his death wound. But so it was. He was brave to the extreme, rushing recklessly forward encouraging his men and offering a tempting mark to the enemy's sharp shooters. I am told that he lived some hours, though have no particulars. Thus died a talented, noble-hearted and patriotic young man. Would that he could have been spared, for he bid fair to make an honorable, a useful and a distinguished member of society. To talent was united an earnestness and enthusiasm which led him to push forward in whatever he undertook and, though his zeal at times led him too far, yet this was easily overlooked by all who knew him. May the grass grow green, the willows bend low, the breezes blow softly and the birds sing sweetly over the grave where this young hero sleeps! Worthy and noble indeed is he who truly feels that
"Tis sweet and glorious for one's country to die."
Just now our lines have fallen to us in pleasant places. Never have we had a finer camp. It is on a large plain, covered with a thick growth of clover, near the river and directly opposite the city of Fredricksburg. The remainder of the Brigade is encamped hard by and gives the scene quite a martial appearance. The enemy occupies the city and one of our principal occupations is watching the manoeuvres of the grey-backed gentry.—
But though they hold the city, they have something else to do besides giving themselves up to mirth and joy. If our loss in the late battles was heavy theirs was terrible. But not alone do they mourn over the thousands of brave unknowns, for great must be the general grief over their PAXTON and JACKSON. These were towers of strength to them and the whole structure trembled when they fell. The Southern heart is clothed in sack cloth and ashes, and they glory but little in their Bunker Hill victory. Daily, and many times a day, do we hear the mournful strains of the death march, as they bear some officer to his long home. Were we at peace and beheld like scenes we would say that Fredericksburg was suffering from the plague.
The health of the army, as far as we can judge, is excellent. The soldiers are in good spirits and their confidence in "Old JOE" unshaken. All is well and we are very willing that the Rebs. should crow a little if they can.
The time draws nigh for our return home. We are gratified to learn that our friends are making preparations for our reception. For the present, as ever,
W.

COMPANY D.—On Wednesday, July 15th the citizens of Champlain gave a public welcome to their returned volunteers of the 34th regiment, consisting of Company D, under command of Capt. SCOTT. A welcoming address was delivered to them by JAMES AVERELL, Esq., and was very neatly responded to by their Captain. An excellent dinner was provided, toasts were offered and responded to, and in the evening a large Festival was given by the ladies. We are glad that their home friends delight to do not less honor to the brave fellows than do the people of the county with whose sons they have been so long intimately associated.
—The citizens of Little Falls have been quite lavish of presents to their volunteers. The members of Geo. Herkimer Fire Co. No. 3, presented a revolver to Lieut. John H. Fralick and also to Samuel Shell, two members of that company. George A. Hardin, Esq., presented Lieut. T. O'Brien with a check of $40 and permission to draw on him for the expenses of his uniform. Major Z. C. Priest retains to Capt. Easterbrook his position in the Freight Office. George Ashley, Esq., presented Ensign Barnes a fine double-barrelled pistol. James Feeter very kindly gave the companies, while there, free use of a room for drill. Lieut. O'Brien received a revolver from H. V. Zimmerman.
—A Union meeting was held in the town of Mannheim on the 27th ult., at which it was decided to raise the sum of $5,000 for the support of the families of volunteers.
This part of the country is not quite cleared of guerrilla bands yet, as an occasional murdered Unionist shows too well. A Southerner from one of these bands was captured to-day within two miles of our camp, having strayed away from his companions, and mistaken his way through the woods. He was mounted, and dressed in a dragoon's uniform, much like our dragoons. Our cavalry started immediately in pursuit of the remainder of the band, with what success has not yet transpired.
THORNBERG.

Co. "I," 34th N. Y. S. V.—This company of "two years men," having faithfully served its time in Virginia, arrived here last Friday morning, en route for Hammondsport, where most of the members belong.—About thirty able-bodied members of the Company return from the hard fortunes of war. Soon after they reached here Capt. Gregg's Steamer arrived, (having made an early trip to meet them) bringing the Prattsburg Brass Band; and at 10 o'clock the Company marched from the Benham House, escorted by the Band and a procession composed of several citizens of Hammondsport and the village, marshaled by Mr. J. B. Green of Prattsburg, a former resident of Penn Yan. The Company embarked on the "Steuben, amid cheers from our citizens, which were lustily returned by the soldier's—who also gave two rousing rounds of cheers for General MCCLELLAN; thus showing that they are no exception to the prevailing sentiment about the Army of the Potomac, of enthusiastic a.... nrent to "Little Mac." On their way ... lake they fastened a fine portrait of McClellan upon their company colors, which they bore in procession when they landed at Hammondsport. An immense crowd of gentlemen and ladies greeted them at the steamboat dock; cheers upon cheers rent the air, and a cannon thundered its notes of "welcome home!" A large procession was then formed, which marched up to the public square. Over the street were suspended flags, flags decorated the buildings, and a fine arch extended across the way. At the square Dr. Van Keuren, of Hammondsport, delivered an address of welcome to the soldiers. It will be remembered that two years ago he addressed the same company as they were about departing from the depot in this village, for the seat of war.—After the address the soldiers were escorted to the "Steuben House," where an elegant dinner was in waiting for them." Altogether, the reception was highly enthusiastic and successful. In one respect it was unlike the ovation here in honor of our Company "I," as nobody made a fool of himself about the McClellan portrait on the flag; and the company carried the same in the procession on the Fourth of July, immediately succeeding; without any loud murmurs from the anti-McClellan Radicals. Perhaps this harmony was due to the absence of any arrogant Abolition Congressman. It is fortunate for Hammondsport that she has no such characters in her midst!

THE RETURNING HEROES—The 34th Regiment is to be mustered out of service at Albany. That part of the Regiment from this County should have a warm welcome, and it is suggested that a preliminary meeting be held for the purpose of making arrangements therefor.—Democrat.
By all means let such a reception be given these veterans—as many of them as shall survive the battles of the next thirty days—as will properly speak the feelings of the citizens of this county in respect to this noble regiment. We suggest that an extra train be procured to convey bands of music and as many citizens as will go, to Albany, and that, upon its return to some point in the county, such an ovation be offered the brave fellows, as will be most creditable to us, and most pleasing to them.

BANKS' DIVISION.—The only interesting news is the following from the Herkimer regiment:
On the evening of the 9th inst., one of the sentinels of the New York 34th discovered a boat containing six men coming into the mouth of the Seneca river. Concealing himself, he allowed the boat to reach the canal aqueduct, when he challenged them. Instead of answering, the leader said to the others, "Boys, by G—d they've got us! Pull back like h—l!" The sentinel gave the alarm and fired, wounding and killing at least one of the party, but before he could receive assistance or load his piece, they were where he could not get a bearing on them, and the boat and crew consequently escaped.—The spot where this occurred is near the farm of the rebel Cross, and the men in the boat were probably his friends coming to communicate with him or ascertain his fate, as well as to get inside our encampments and report their condition, positions and movements to the rebel leaders. It is stated that Cross himself spent several days visiting our camps, disguised as a teamster, and riding a mule, before being arrested.

NORTHERN AND CENTRAL COUNTIES.
HERKIMER COUNTY.
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:—
COL. LA DEW'S REGIMENT—Three companies of Col. La Dew's regiment left Little Falls for headquarters in Albany, last Thursday. A very large concourse of people were present to see them off, and they were escorted to the cars by the firemen and Little Falls Band, with becoming ceremony. Great enthusiasm prevailed, and many a hearty farewell and God speed was bestowed.
Monday, with similar demonstrations of popular sentiment, three more companies left Herkimer for Albany.
Liberal provisions have been made by the people of Herkimer and Little Falls, and of the more rural towns, for the families of volunteers. The volunteers of Fairfield were each presented with fine sixteen inch revolvers, and those of Middleville were presented with twenty-five dollars each in cash, and those of Norway and Salisbury were treated with similar generosity. A very affecting scene took place in Norway upon the departure of the Colonel. The good Norwegians treated with a bountiful repast the Colonel and the Norway company, in the Union church from which, after prayer and other solemnities they departed. The most interesting feature of the scene was the following fact.—Col. La Dew informed the people that some of his Norway soldiers were leaving families unprovided for. Whereupon the Smiths, the Hurds, Austins, Rusts, Roots, and other principal citizens guaranteed the ample support of said families.
I would here say that those who may yet be disposed in Herkimer county, to join Col. La Dew's regiment, may be well assured that their families will be well cared for in their absence. Allow me in this note to bespeak the confidence of the public in Col. La Dew, Lieuts. Laflin and Thomson, the contemplated field officers of this regiment. They are men of much energy and force of character, and well qualified for their respective posts.
Other companies are to join them now at Albany. Recruits will be received this week, by reporting themselves to Col. Suiter, or to Major B. Laflin. Let those disposed to enlist hurry forward, and let good citizens urge on their friends without delay.
The County honored with the name, and hallowed by the ashes of the gallant General Herkimer, bids fair to be represented by a regiment of which the State may be proud.
Fairfield, May 8. J. B. VAN PETTEN.

The 34th Regiment.
The following is a list of the commissioned officers of the regiment and of the noncommissioned officers and privates of the Herkimer County companies:

FIELD.
Colonel—Byron Laflin.
Lieutenant Colonel—John Beverly.
Major—Wells Sponable.

STAFF.
Adjutant—John Kirk.
Quartermaster—Nathan Easterbrooks.
Surgeon—B. F. Manley.
Assistant Surgeon—J. Hurley Miller.
Chaplain—S. Franklin Schoonmaker.

LINE.
Company A—(from West. Troy)—Captain, B. H. Warford; First Lieutenant, B. L. Brown; Second Lieutenant, John Oathout.
Company B—(from Herkimer Co.)—Captain, Irving D. Clark; First Lieutenant, Francis N. Usher; Second Lieutenant, Wm. Burns.
Company C—(from Herkimer Co.)—Captain, Thomas Corcoran; First Lieutenant, Wm. Wallace; Second Lieutenant, Simon P. McIntyre.
Company D—(from Champlain)—Captain, John O. Scott; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, Byren Coats.
Company E—(from Steuben Co.)—Captain, Henry Baldwin; First Lieutenant, Henry W. Sanford; Second Lieutenant, S. Dunn.
Company F—(from Herkimer Co.)—Captain, Charles Riley; First Lieutenant, Wm. Van Valkenburgh; Second Lieutenant, B. F. Minor.
Company G—(from Herkimer Co.)—Captain, Joy P. Johnson; First Lieutenant, John Morey; Second Lieutenant, A. Rounds.
Company H—(from Crown Point)—Captain, William S. Walton; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, Wm. Kirk.
Company I—(from Steuben Co.)—Captain, Eugene B. La Rue; First Lieutenant, A. 'T. Atwood; Second Lieutenant, Orrin W. Beach.
Company K—(from Herkimer Co.)—Captain, Emerson S. Northup; First Lieutenant, James McCormick; Second Lieutenant, Lewis N. Chapin.

NON-COMMISSIONED AND PRIVATES.
Company B—Sergeants, Michael S. O'Brien, (promoted to be 2d Lieutenant of Co. H, vice Kirk promoted), Samuel Shell, Warren Van Allen, Joseph F. Terry, Philip Flansburg; Corporals, Edward Ridner, Samuel Tucker, Adolbert Perry, Patrick Donehue; Musician, James P. Hurley; Privates, William Allen, Russell Allen, William H. Ballard, Valentine Bargo, George Cahoon, Jacob Casler, William Casler, George Fye, Jesse P. Fort, Thomas
Farrall, Jerome Goodbread, Jacob V. Green, William Heutson, Augustus Harthouse, John Mansfield, Charles C. Miller, John Opple, Jacob C. Perry, Orrin Regan, John Stuart, Marvin P. Starring, Horace H. Smith, Earnest Strossman, Thomas Woods, Robert Whitlock.
Company C—Sergeants, James H. Todd, Simon Loyd, Patrick Corcoran, Lewis Lawton, Amos Morse; Corporals, Richard L. Manning, William Mills, Daniel Embody, Lewis Tarble; Privates, Benjamin F . Bennett, Martin Boh, Ashil Bendett, Orin Cornstock, John Coaks, Elisha P. Comstock, Luther Darling, John Dana, Cyrus Eldridge, Oscar E. Hayden, William I. Mc-. Leon, James Murry, Henry Mills, Edward D. Mills, George Minor, William Nelson Charles L. Powers, William Page, John E. Rank, Edwin Snyder, Robert Sanford, Joshua Sherwood, Augustus Thrasher, William
H. Townsend, Andrew Warner, William N. Warner, Thomas Whiteleton.
Company K—Sergeants, James M. Talcott, John Johnson, George Simmons, Chas. Lasure, Samuel S. Clark; Corporals, Wm. H. DeForest, John W Rosa, Henry H. Walton, Frederick Shaver, Jeremiah Casey, Isaac G. Howe, Theodore Smith; Privates Caezer Ambrecht, Leander D. Brown, Jacob Batcher, George E. Corl, George Davis, Mark H. Dry, George L. Durrin, Jas.
Daley, Paul Tay, James Faville, Patrick J. Tynn, James N. Green, Cornelius Guill, George Getman, Michael Governor, Wm. Harper, Alonzo K. Hayes, Martin V. B. Hayes, Charles Habershon, Jacob Kyer, Warren S. Lamphere, Benjamin J. Loucks, John McLaughlin, James McCaffre, John McDougal, William Oathout, Francis M. Piper, Solon Pickert, John Rockwell, John Smith, Henry C. Stowell, Anson Stevens, Rufus Thompson.
We were unable to obtain lists from the other companies from this county.

THE 34TH AT ALBANY.—The regiment is comfortably located in the Albany barracks. They have nobly and with a self-sacrifice unparallelled offered their services to Gov. SEYMOUR and, if he shall deem it advisable, they will return immediately to the theatre of war. Noble fellows! What can be said in sufficient praise of them?
If they return it will be immediately; if they remain, they will probably not be mus­tered out in several days yet.
Three of the companies were yesterday called out to suppress a riotous "strike" of some of the laboring men, and we are sorry to add, that two or three of Company B, were arrested in the city yesterday for dis­orderly conduct in the street. Keep your record clean, boys!
Lieut. Col. Beverly, Capt. Easterbrooks, Capt. Johnson and Lieut. Chapin, of the 34th, have been stopping in town for several days.

FROM THE HERKIMER COUNTY REGIMENT.
EDWARD'S FERRY, Oct. 21, 1861.
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:
Day before yesterday our regiment was ordered to break camp at Seneca Mills and go to Edward's Ferry. Accordingly we left our encampment this morning at seven, and a half o'clock, and have just arrived here. But there was more in the wind than simply a change of place. Having arrived here we find that two regiments of General Gorman's brigade and Gen. Stone's division have just crossed over upon the old Virginia shore. There are the New York Second and the Minnesota First. Two companies of the Minnesota First crossed the river yesterday, reconnoitered and returned. A smart skirmish has occured [sic] this morning between our advance corps and that of the enemy. Some prisoners and captured guns have been brought in from the enemy. Gen. Baker's brigade, we learn, has crossed above. Orders have come, we understand, from Gen. McClellan, from which it appears that our whole line is once to move.
White I write a company of Berdan's sharp shooters is embarking. All is activity with the 34th, as we are at once to embark. Our Lieutenant Colonel, J. Suiter, and Major Byron Laflin are sick at home. This we much regret, but the regiment is in high spirits, expecting soon to meet the enemy. We are ordered to take three day's rations, which implies quite a march including doubtless a battle. We hope to do our best. God Almighty prosper the right.

Returning Regiment—The 34th New York volunteers, numbering four hundred men, arrived in Philadelphia this morning at eight o'clock, here they partook of a warm breakfast furnished by the citizens of that city, and left for New York in a special train at half-past ten o'clock. The regiment will arrive at the foot of Courtland street, at half-past three o'clock, where a committee will escort them to the Park, and furnish the men with refreshments.

WELCOME TO THE 34TH.—Preliminary arrangements are being made in this village for the proper reception of the 34th regiment. We have also received a call for a meeting to be held at Herkimer as follows:

THE 34TH.—The time of service of this noble regiment will soon expire; and it is fit and proper that the County of Herkimer, should express in a suitable manner the estimate they put upon the conduct of its officers and soldiers.
That there may be a union of feeling and concert of action, let us meet at Herkimer on Thursday the 28th, at 12 M. to prepare for their return. Let every town be represented. Herkimer, May 18th 1863.
Trusting that these two projects may be consolidated into one and that there may be a perfect unity of sentiment in regard to it, we have thought best to merely advise that prominent men in different localities come together as soon as possible and secure this unity of action. Our own idea is that there should and can be but one reception which should be given by the county. We shall of course be pleased if our village shall be designated as the place in which to give the brave fellows the welcome they deserve and trust that it can be so arranged.

HOME MATTERS.
ARRIVAL OF THE THIRTY-FOURTH REGIMENT.—The Thirty-fourth Regiment reached this city early yesterday morning. After breakfast at the Delevan House, they formed and took up a line of march through some of the principal streets for the Capitol, where they where welcomed by the Governor, in an appropriate speech, complimenting them for their distinguished services in the field. Lieut. Col. Beverley responded in a few brief and appropriate remarks. The Regiment then proceeded to the Barracks.
A committee, consisting of Senator Hardin, Canal Commissioner Skinner, Hon. H. P. Alexander and Oliver Ladue, are here to escort the regiment to Little Falls, where a reception awaits the gallant veterans equaling even that with which Utica recently honored her brave sons. The reception takes place on Saturday. In the evening the regiment will return to this city to be mustered out of service.
The Thirty-Fourth regiment was recruited mainly in Herkimer county, and was mustered into the State service in this city May 1, 1861, and the United States service the 15th of June following. It then mustered 800 men, under command of Col. Ladue.
Since leaving the city they have had added to their number about one hundred recruits, and return four hundred and twenty-seven strong.
The following are the present officers of the regiment:
FIELD OFFICERS.
Colonel—Byron Lafflin.
Lieut. Col.—John Beverley.
Major—Wells Sponable.
STAFF.
Adjutant—John Kirk.
Quartermaster—Nathan Easterbrooks.
Surgeon—B. F. Manley.
Assistant Surgeon—J. Hurley Miller.
Chaplain—S. Franklin Schoonmaker.

Sold.—The Barge John T. Lee, of West Troy, has been purchased by Lieut. John Morey, late of Co. A, 34th regiment. Lieut. Morey gets his commission as Captain by virtue of a pile of "green backs" amounting in the aggregate to about $5,000. Capt. M., who distinguished himself in thirteen battles in the present war, has the well wishes of his numerous friends in West Troy for the successful career of his new craft.

ON THEIR WAY HOME.—The Thirty-fourth N. Y. regiment, Col. Laflin, which has served faithfully for some two years, is on its way home. They bring back four hundred men, out of twelve hundred that have been mustered into their regiment. Before leaving they cheered loudly for "Little Mac," and said they were all for the Union, and ready to go back if he would only take the command. This is the Regiment which made the decisive charge at Fair Oaks when the Hampton Legion attempted, under command of General Magruder, to flank Rickett's battery, formerly commanded by General Magruder. They have probably seen as much active service as any Regiment in the field. It was mainly recruited in Herkimer county, and left this city for the war in June, 1861.

Testimonial to Hon. S. N. Sherman.
At a meeting of the Commissioned officers of the 34th Regiment N. Y.  Volunteers, at their camp near Falmouth, Va., April 6th, 1863, Col. Byron Laflin in the chair, and chaplain S. Franklin Schoonmaker, as Secretary, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Resolved, That while we are gratified that Dr. Socrates N. Sherman, the late esteemed surgeon of this Regiment, has received from the Government the appointment of Surgeon in the United States army, we yield with deep regret to the necessity that compels us to part with his professional services as well as the benefits we have derived from the many social and noble qualities with which he is endowed.
Resolved, That we recognise [sic] throughout the whole period of his connection with this Regiment, the principles of patriotism which have inspired him, and the love of country which prompted him, while a representative in Congress from the seventeenth district, to leave the comforts of his home and the profits of a lucrative practice, to endure
"without pay or reward," the hardships of the camp, and the toils of the battlefield.
Resolved, That we can offer no more fitting testimonial of our appreciation of his devotion to the principles of his professional skill which saved, with timely aid, so many lives and limbs, than the assurance of the devoted attachment of every officer and man of the regiment.
Resolved, That our gratitude is due to Providence that it has been our lot under the trying circumstances and dangers of a time of war, to enjoy the society and professional services of such a man, who like Howard "lives not for himself but to bless his fellow men."
Resolved, That in taking his leave of us he will carry with him to his new field of duties our hearts' love and gratitude—a love which has been prompted by no idle fancy—a gratitude which in these resolutions, bears no fictitious import.
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be presented to Dr. Sherman and also furnished to the journals of the counties of Herkimer and St. Lawrence for publication.
Colonel BYRON LA.FLIN, Char.
Chaplain S. F. Schoomaker, Secy.

RECEPTION IN WEST TROY.—There was a complete Fourth of July time in West Troy yesterday afternoon, on the occasion of the reception of Company A, Thirty-fourth regiment. It was a most creditable demonstration on the part of the residents of the village—evincing a patriotic spirit and a warm sympathy with the cause of the Union and its brave defenders. The streets of the place and many buildings, public and private, were profusely decorated with flags, evergreens and banners. The turn-out of people was immense, and evidences of a grand ovation were visible on every side. West Troy did itself proud.
At half-past two o'clock, Company A, with Engine Co. No. 8 of Albany and Doring's Band, reached the Arsenal dock, where they were received with a salute of thirty-four guns and welcomed by firemen and citizens who were in waiting. The procession was then formed in the following order:
Doring's Band.
Chief Engineer and Assistants.
Rip Van Winkle No. 1.
D. D. Tompkins No. 8, of Albany.
Protection No. 2.
Conqueror No. 3.
Volunteer Engine Co., manned by operatives from Roy's Factory.
Volunteer Hose Company.
Sullivan's Band.
Hercules Hook and Ladder Company.
Oswald Hose Company.
Hall Hose Company, of Troy.
Company A, under command of Lieut. Oothout.
Citizens in carriages.
After marching through the principal streets of the village, the procession halted at the park in front of the Exchange Hotel, where the reception exercises took place. President Duffy made an appropriate address of welcome. W. L. Oswald, formerly Captain of Co. A, followed in a really eloquent speech. He referred to the promptness with which the soldiers had rallied to sustain their imperiled country, not waiting for a second call or high bounties. He alluded feelingly to their thinned ranks, their arduous labors, their conspicuous bravery, and thrice welcomed them home. Mr. Oswald spoke of "the arbitrary order of the tyrannical old scoundrel, Gen. Gorman, transferring the company from the first to the ninth place in the line"—an outrage that they resisted, and for which resistance he was punished —not that he considered that he had thereby received any disgrace. He was thankful that this General had been caught in the act of selling cotton and stealing negroes, and was in a fair way to receive his deserts. Mr. O. closed his fifteen minute speech by another cordial welcome.
Samuel Stover, on behalf of Lieut. Oothout, in command of the company, returned thanks for the reception and delivered a panegyric upon Gen. McClellan.
Col. Laflin, commander of the regiment, who was called upon, said that he was a man of action, not of speech. He was glad to witness the reception of Co. A. They richly deserved such a welcome at the hands of their townsmen. He had fought by their side in ten battles, and braver men never trod God's footstool.
Another soldier made a pithy and epigrammatic speech. Said he: "Boys, I'me glad you're home."
The scene, during the speaking, in front of the platform, was worthy the pencil of a painter. The sun-burned faces of the soldiers, the red, white and blue shirts of the firemen, the shining engines and glittering guns—all formed a picture in which the paraphanalia of peace and war were strangely mingled.
After the exercises the procession resumed its line of march, under the marshalship of Smith Waterman, assisted by Messrs. Viele, N. F. Witbeck and others, and paraded the principal streets of the village. The soldiers had a collation at West Troy, while the firemen were also cared for. Late in the afternoon the visitors from abroad wended their way homeward, and "all was quiet" in West Troy.

NOTICE.—All persons subscribing towards the expense of the Reception of the 34th regiment, are requested to call at the Herkimer County Bank and pay the same to A. G. Story, Treasurer, without further invitation. By order of the Committee.
M. W. PRIEST, Chairman.

NOTICE.—All persons having claims against the Committee of Reception of the 34th regiment, (that have been audited by said committee,) will present the same to A. G. Story, Treasurer, for payment, on and after July 20th, 1863.
By order of the Committee.
M. W. PRIEST, Chairman.

COMING HOME.—We learn that the Thirty-Fourth Regt. N. Y. Vols., Col. Laflln—to which is attached our West Troy Co., Capt. B. H. Warlord—expect to leave Virginia on their return home about the 10th of June, and will probably arrive in Albany about the 13th of that month. Our West Troy soldiers have fought as heroes only can in nearly every hotly contested battle in which the Army of the Potomac has been engaged, and a proper reception is therefore due them upon their arrival home. The following appeal, from a correspondent, should be promptly acted upon:

MR. EDITOR:—Are the patriotic inhabitants of our village aware that in a few weeks Company A. 34th Regiment, the first company raised for the war in our midst, and composed almost entirely of residents of the village, will be home? During the two years of their enlistment, it has fallen to their lot to have been in nearly all the serious engagements under McClellan, Burnside and Hooker in the Army of the Potomac, and bravely have they sustained the honor and reputatation  [sic] of our village. With decimated ranks, careworn, and weary, these men who have "fought the good fight" will soon return. Surely, our public spirited citizens will not allow this opportunity to pass away without giving to these noble men a welcome which will gladden their hearts and cause them to feel that they have indeed a home, and friends who can appreciate the arduous duties they have so gloriously performed.
Why cannot our Common Council make a move in this matter? In Lansingburgh and Cohoes large sums of money have been voted to defray the expenses attendant upon the reception of companies belonging in these places. Is there any reason why the same should not be done here? Let our village fathers take this matter in hand, and if necessary, let a meeting of citizens be called to make all suitable and necessary arrangements to give a fitting welcome to our brave boys who have so nobly represented our village on so many bloody battle fields.

The 34th Coming Home.--The 34th Regiment New York State Volunteers, Col. Laflin, has arrived in Washington on its way home. It has seen much service and borne itsself [sic] bravely on many a hard fought field. It left with 1,000, it comes back with 409. It was recruited in Herkimer county, and left this city for the seat of war in June 1861.

THE HERKIMER REGIMENT.—The following is ...ed to Corporal Gracey's accounts of his imprisonment at Fairfax:
While at Drainesville, a large force of the ...s were understood to be shelling our forces ... the Great Falls, and twenty-two of the Tiger ...s and several citizens went thither to see the ...t, but did not remain long. A man named ...ker, who lives in sight of the Thirty-fourth ... at Drainesville, and wanted to have Gracy ... at once. He will be remembered by the Thirty-fourth, for his kind intentions.
Everything published by our journals was ... into the Richmond papers in detail. The ...s and citizens think the Thirty-fourth a ter- ... and unconquerable set of "Yankees," and ... to go near the river in front of the encampment.

Arrival of the Thirty-Fourth Regim't.
This Regiment which was recruited mainly in Herkimer county, under Colonel M. Ladue, and which was mustered into the United States service in June, 1861, reached here yesterday morning, on its way home, under command of Colonel Lafflin. It then numbered over 800 men. Since then it received about 100 recruits, and now comes back with only 427.
The Regiment took breakfast at the Delavan House, as guests of the city authorities, after which they paraded through several streets.—They carried with them a framed portrait of Major General McClellan, and this brought out from the people, all along the route, the heartiest cheers, which were responded to by the soldiers with great gusto. As with all the other returned regiments McClellan is their idol, and they avail themselves of every opportunity to testify their unbounded admiration of him. Marching up State street they filed in the Park, and paid their respects to Governor Seymour. His Excellency, after the cheers with which the soldiers greeted him, had subsided, welcomed them home in a happy little speech, in which he gave them fall credit for their distinguished services and great sacrifices, and expressed the hope that they would long live to enjoy the honors and laurels they had so bravely won. Lieut. Colonel Beverly responded in a few appropriate remarks, and then the regiment marched to the Barracks, where they will remain until mustered out.
After the evacuation of Yorktown the Thirty-Fourth embarked for West Point, reaching there in time to act as a reserve for Franklin's Corps in that engagement. On the arrival of Gen. McClellan's army from Williamsburg they joined the advance on Richmond, and acted as a reserve in the battle at Hanover Court House. On the morning of the 31sl they crossed the Chickahominy on a bridge of detached logs  floating in the stream; jumping from one to another, and many wading most of the way, and after a forced march arrived just in time to intercept the famous Hampton Legion and other South Carolina regiments, on their way to reinforce General Johnston in his attack on General Casey at Seven Pines. They immediately attacked the enemy, and after a terrific fight of two hours put them to flight with immense loss, killing Col. Ward Hampton, of the Hampton Legion, and wounding and capturing the Brigadier General. The battle was decided by a bayonet charge, ordered and led in person by General Sumner, which was made alone by the 34th, supported by other regiments. In this charge the Regiment won imperishable laurel for itself.
They were actively engaged in nearly all the battles on the Peninsula, in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam, and in the Burnside and Hooker disasters.

 

The following are the present officers of the regiment:—
FIELD.
Colonel—Byron Lafflin.
Lieutenant-Colonel—John Beverley.
Major—Wells Sponable.

STAFF.
Adjutant—John Kirk.
Quartermaster—Nathan Easterbrooks.
Surgeon—B. F. Manley.
Assistant-Surgeon—J. Hurley Miller.
Chaplain—S. Frank7l-i2n Schoonaker.

LINE.
Company A—(from West Troy)—Captain, B. H. Warford; First Lieutenant, R. L. Brown; Second Lieutenant, John Oathout.
Company B—(from Little Falls)—Captain, Irving D. Clark; First Lieutenant, Francis N. Usher; Second Lieutenant, William Burns.
Company C—(from Norway, Herkimer co.)—Captain, Thomas Corcoran; First Lieutenant, Simeon P. McIntyre.
Company D—(from Champlain)—Captain, John O. Scott; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, Byron Coats.
Company E—(from Steuben county)—Captain, Henry Baldwin; First Lieutenant, Henry W. Sanford; Second Lieutenant, Melville S.
Dunn.
Company F—(from Herkimer)—Captain, Charles Riley; First Lieutenant, William Van Valkenburgh; Second Lieutenant, B. F. Minor.
Company G—(from Herkimer)—Captain, Joy P. Johnson; First Lieutenant, John Morey; Second Lieutenant, A. Rounds.
Company H—(from Crown Point)—Captain, William S. Walton; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, William Kirk.
Company I—(from Weedsport, Cayuga county)—Captain, Eugene B La Rue; First Lieutenant, A. T. Atwood; Second Lieutenant, Orrin W. Beach.
Company K—(from Saulsbury)—Captain, Emerson S. Northup; First Lieutenant, James McCormick; Second Lieutenant, Lewis M. Chapin.
A committee, consisting of Senator Hardin, Canal Commissioner Skinner, Hon. H. P. Alexander and Oliver Ladue, are here to escort the Regiment to Little Falls, where a reception awaits them. The reception will take place on Saturday. In the evening the regiment ...

Welcome to the 34th.
The time of service of this noble regiment will soon expire, and it is fit and proper that the County of Herkimer should express in a suitable manner the estimate they put upon the conduct of its officers and soldiers.
That there may be a union of feeling and concert of action. Let us meet at Herkimer on Thursday the 28th, at 12 o'clock M., to prepare for their return. Let every town be represented.
Herkimer, May 15, 1863.
Since receiving the above notice we are informed that preliminary arrangements are being made for holding a meeting in this village for a like purpose. We are pleased to see that a public feeling is awakened in the county, and hope those moving in the matter may confer together, and with unity of intention, agree upon a plan that will best subserve the end in view.—The County has reason to feel proud of the Regiment, and every citizen will feel a deep interest in rendering its return home, the occasion of hearty and cordial welcome.

The Mohawk Courier.
LITTLE FALLS, June 4, 1863.
The 34th Regiment.
In another column will be found the proceedings of the convention held at Herkimer last Tuesday, for the purpose of making arrangements for the reception of the 34th regiment. Oneida county has set us a noble example in the welcome given her returned soldiers, and we feel certain that old Herkimer will greet the men of the noble 34th as heroes should be greeted.
At Ball's Bluff they crossed the Potomac in the face of an overwhelming rebel force, and at Yorktown and Williamsburgh [sic] they went into battle as heroes. At Fair Oaks their conduct elicited special praise from the Commanding Division Generals. At Malvern Hill, at White Oak Swamp, at Gaines' Mills, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburgh [sic], they fought as patriots and heroes only can fight, and now, with ranks decimated in battle, and by sickness contracted while on duty, the remnant of those forming the regiment when it left this village, a little over two years ago, are coming back to the homes of their childhood. They have time and again perriled [sic] life to defend the laws that have so benignly governed and protected us, and having won honor themselves, and conferred it upon the county; let us receive them with open hearts. Aside from the ties of blood and old acquaintance which binds most of them to us, the sight of their battle torn ranks would repay every visitor. Let the people of the county generally, make preparation to participate in the exercises of the reception, and contribute liberally of their means to assist in defraying the expenses.

THE HERKIMER CO. REG'T.—The. 34th Reg't arrived this morning in Albany, and were enthusiastically received by the citizens. The regiment paraded through several streets, bearing a framed portrait of McClellan, which was loudly cheered along the route.
After calling on the Governor, and being welcomed in an eloquent address by him, they marched to the Barracks, They will he received in Little Falls, on Saturday or Tuesday next.

Local.
THE RECEPTION OF THE 34TH.—Arrangements are finally completed which promise such a reception to this gallant regiment as their heroism and sacrifices deserve. We give elsewhere the proceedings of the county Convention held at Herkimer last Thursday by which it will be seen that the reception is to be given at this place and that every town in the county is expected to participate. On Tuesday the County Executive Committee met here and concluded upon a plan of arrangements. The citizens here are already at work and a local committee for work, whose names we publish, has been appointed.
With proper co-operation on the part of our sister towns we hope to make this a grand affair that shall creditably reflect the gratitude and love of the entire county. It is not yet ascertained upon what day the regiment will reach here, but it will be so near the anniversary of our National Independence that in all probability there will be no county celebration on the latter day and therefore, for the greater reason, we urge that the people, en masse, may feel like making this a glorious holiday, ever to be remembered by all participants in its festivities.
So far as the refreshments are concerned the plan is to provide one large table for the regiment for which donations should be sent in from all sections of the county. Besides this there will be prepared a table for each town, where all those who desire may partake of such refreshments as they may provide, thus joining in one grand picnic. About two weeks are probably left us in which to complete these preparations and we entreat that every family feel called upon to do something for the occasion. Let thoughts of ornamental decorations and substantial eatables fill our minds, and earnest active exertions occupy our hands!

LOCAL COMMITTEE.—The following persons have been named as a committee to prepare suitable decorations for the street and public grounds of the village for the reception of the 34th Regiment. It is expected that the work will be commenced immediately. Other names will be added to the Committee as circumstances may require.
LADIES.
Miss C. Skinner, C. Feeter, G. Feeter, F. Thompson, A. Zimmerman, M. Zimmerman, J. LaDew, A. House, A. Vanslyke, E. Scott, S. Churchill, F. Rust, H. Rust, C. A. Richmond, M. Richmond, A. Loomis, M. Loomis, L. Loomis, M. Spaulding, Mrs. P. Greene, Miss R. Greene, M. Greene, H. Brooks, M. Brooks, M. Usher, A. Beach, Hill, K. Stebbins, M. Inghham, H. Heath, M. Eaton, A. Green, K. Girvan, S. Howard, M. Whitman, E. Whitman, S. Story, M. Barnard, D. Cole, R. Cole, S. Chase, A. Cressy, M. Shaw, H. A. Wright H. Waite, N. Case.

GENTLEMEN.
Arnold Petrie, Albert Story, J. K. Stebbins, H. L. Greene, R. S. Whitman, R. H. Smith, G. A. Hardin, D. Warcup, B. K. Houghton, G. S.
Houghton, J. L. Simonds, Henry Skinner, C. Smith, W. T. Loomis, H. A. Petrie, H. Uhle, Dor. Chase, P. Turner, Geo. ...nson, W. G. Milligan, I. Snell, P. Reed, Geo. Warcup, W. H. Klock, A. H. Greene, E. S. Briggs, L. P. Knapp, E. D. Manchester, Geo. Waters, W. S. Young, G. G. Stebbins, Fred. Philips, H. H. Gray, T. Sheard, Geo. Ransom, G. B. Beach, Ed. Klock, A. Richmond, Will. Wheeler.

Reception of the Twenty-fourth Regiment.
The old braves of the 24th regiment are about to be mustered out of the United States service, where they have done faithful duty from the 17th of May, 1861. In order to give them an appropriate welcome, the citizens have united upon a general demonstration to take place upon their arrival at Oswego, the time of which is uncertain. They are now in Elmira and arrangements have been made to have intelligence at the earliest moment their homeward movement is determined on. On their arrival at Syracuse the City bells will; be rung for half an hour; and as the train approaches Oswego a National salute will be fired from near the depot.
A procession will be formed at the depot under the Marshal and his assistants, in the following order:
Military Band of the 48th Regiment.
The Forty-eighth Regiment as an escort, under command of Lieut.-Col. A. B. Randall.
The Twenty-fourth Regiment.
Wounded soldiers of the Twenty-fourth and other Regiments, in carriages.
Union Band.
The Firemen under the command of Chief Engineer A. F. SMITH.
Orator and Clergymen.
Common Council and Committee of Arrangements, in carriages.
Invited guests and citizens in carriages.
The Military and Firemen will assemble in the West Public Square at the ringing of the bells.
The wounded soldiers, orator and clergy, Common Council, Committee of Arrangements, and invited guests, will assemble at the City Hall, where carriages will he in waiting to receive them.
The above arrangements will be under the direction of ROBERT OLIVER, Marshal, and Lieut.-Col. A. B. RANDALL, and CHAS. PARKER, Assistant Marshals.

THE ROUTE OF PROCESSION
Will be as follows:—From the West Public Square down Cayuga to First Street, up First to Oneida, up Oneida to Second, up Second to Utica, down Utica to First street, and down First street to the Post Office, where it will await the arrival of the Twenty-fourth regiment. After that regiment takes its place in the line, the procession will then move forward on the following route:—Down First street to Bridge street, across the Bridge to East first street, down First to Cayuga, up Cayuga to Fourth street, up Fourth to Bridge street, down Bridge to West First street, down West First to Seneca, up Seneca to the West Public Square, where the following exercises will be held:
Music.
Prayer,
Music
Welcoming Address.
Reply on behalf of the Regiment.
Music.
Benediction.
After the exercises, the procession will re-form and march to Doolittle Hall, where refreshments will be served out to the 24th regiment and invited guests.
During the movement of the procession guns will be fired and the bells will ring.
Citizens are requested to display the National flag from private residences, public buildings, and from the vessels in the harbor, during the day.
By order of ROBERT OLIVIER,
Marshal.

The 34th Regiment.
Pursuant to notice a meeting was held in the village of Herkimer, Monday, May 28th, for the purpose of designating the place, and making preliminary arrangements for the public reception of the 34th Regiment. Delegates met at the Court House, and on motion of S. F. Richmond, Judge Graves, was appointed Chairman, and S. F. Bennett Secretary of the meeting.
After confering [sic] together, by unanimous consent, LITTLE FALLS was designated as the place for receiving the 34th Regiment on their return home.
On motion of Wm. I. Skinner, the Chairman was instructed to appoint an executive Committee consisting of one from each town in the County.
On motion of Mr. Owens, it was resolved to add to this Committee five from Little Falls; also that there be two additional names added to the Committee from German Flatts, Frankfort, Ilion, Herkimer, Newport, Fairfield, Manhiem, Salisbery, Russia, and Danube. It was further resolved that the Chairman and Secretary of this meeting be members of the Executive Committee,—whereupon the Chairman named the following gentlemen as such Committee:
Danube—Edward Simms, John Smith, Alonzo Reed.
Columbia—B. D. Beckwith, James Myers, Jefferson Rouland.
Fairfield—J. Mather, Samuel Green, Dr. Sweet, Sam. Franklin, Geo.  Thomas.
Frankfort—R. Etheredge, Col. Bridenbecker, Wm. Gates.
German Flats—A. H. Prescott, L. L. Merry, F. O. Shepherd, E. Spencer.
Little Falls—Seth M. Richmond, Wm. I. Skinner, Z. C. Priest, James Feeter, M. W. Priest, S. F. Bennett, Wm. M. Dorr.
Herkimer—A. H. Lafflin, C. A. Moon, Dean Burgess, E. Graves.
Manhiem—J. H. Wetherwax, Morgan Bidleman, John Feeter, David P. Ransom.
Salisbury—J. J. Cook, L. Carryl.
Stark—Richard Van Horn, Harvey Ellsworth, John R. Hall, Geo. Springer.
Warren—Geo. M. Cleland, John M. Treadway, Jefferson Liman and Wm. Barras.
Winfield—S. S. Morgan.
Litchfield—O. B. Seals.
Schuyler—E. W. Day.
Russia—A. J. Carpenter, S. Graves.
Norway—A. Bust.
Ohio—A. Abeel.
Wilmurt—D. W. Dawson.
Newport—Wm. Getman, H. G. Burlingame, J. H. Wooster.
On motion of Mr. James Feeter, it was resolved that the Executive Committee meet at the Benton House, in the village of Little Falls, Tuesday,
June 2d, 11 o'clock, A. M., for the purpose of confering [sic] upon the details to be pursued.
The Secretary was authorized to notify the different members of said Committee of their appointments, and invite them to attend the meeting above named.
Hon. Ezra Graves, Chairman of the metting [sic], was, by resolution, authorized to confer with the Colonel of the Regiment, fixing the time for their reception.
S. F. BENNETT, Sec'y.

In accordance with a resolution passed by the committee, Hon. Ezra Graves forwarded a letter of invitation to the Colonel, officers and men of the 34th, of which the following is a copy: Col Byron Laflin, and the Officers and Soldiers of the 34th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.
We are advised that the term of service for which you enlisted will soon expire, and that an opportunity will be afforded you by the Government of returning to your homes and friends.
We have watched with deep solicitude your footsteps from the time you entered the service, until now. Although we regreted [sic] the necessity which prompted you to leave your business and employments, and meet the hardships and fatigues of a military life,—yet we loved the patriotism that induced you to enlist. The county of Herkimer is grateful to you for the brave, gallant, and fearless manner you have met the enemy on the field of battle, as well as for your manly bearing as a regiment in the camp and on the tented field.
As an evidence of our sincerity, we tender you a public reception at Little Falls, at such time as may suit your convenience. We cannot permit you to separate without tendering to you this tribute of respect.
I am, with great respect,
Your obedient servant,
EZRA GRAVES.
Herkimer, June, 1863.

The Executive Committee met at the Benton House Tuesday forenoon. They estimated the necessary cost attending the reception at $1000, and have invited each town in the county to contribute as liberally as possible to the sum. The programme of Arrangements will be announced as soon as possible, and all interested may be assured that nothing will be omited [sic] to render the reception such as the regiment deserves, and creditable to the people of the county.

—The 34th (Herkimer county) New York Regiment is now stationed at Seneca Mills, with the exception of three companies left at Great Falls. The Minnesota Regiment is at Edward Perry, and their pickets are said to extend westward until they meet those of Gen. Banks. The line of the canal is now so well guarded that boats are expected at Georgetown to-day. Secession troops are frequently seen on the other side of the Potomac in small bodies. Shots are occasionally exchanged between them and our troops.

—The Thirty-Fourth (Herkimer) regiment Col. La Dew, have been ordered to Washington via Harrisburgh [sic], and will leave Albany Friday. This is considered a first class Regiment, and we have no sort of doubt they will do right yeomanly service in the good cause. Rev. J. B. Van Patten, of the Fairfield Seminary, has accepted the position of Chaplain, and was sworn in on Saturday. Mr. V. is a patriotic Christian gentleman, admirably adapted for the position he has accepted. D. Milton Heath, of Mohawk, has been appointed Drum Major. Hon. S. N. Sherman of Ogdensburgh, goes as Surgeon of the Thirty-Fourth, and Dr. E. S. Walker, of Brockett's Bridge, has been appointed Surgeon's Mate. Both appointments are such as could not well be improved upon.

ALBANY EVENING JOURNAL.
THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 11, 1863.
Arrival of the Thirty-fourth Regiment.
The Thirty-fourth Regiment reached this city early this morning. After breakfast at the Delavan House, it formed and took up a line of march through some of the principal streets for the Capitol, where they were welcomed by the Governor, in an appropriate speech, complimenting them for their distinguished services in the field. Lieut. Col. BEVERLEY responded in a few brief and appropriate remarks. The Regiment then proceeded to the Barracks.
A committee, consisting of Senator HARDIN, Canal Commissioner SKINNER, Hon. H. P. ALEXANDER and OLIVER LADUE, are here to escort the Regiment to Little Falls, where a reception awaits the gallant veterans equaling even that with which Utica recently honored her brave sons. The reception takes place on Saturday. In the evening the Regiment will return to this city to be mustered out of service.
The Thirty-Fourth Regiment was recruited mainly in Herkimer county, and was mustered into the State service in this city May 1, 1861, and the United States service the 15th of June following. It then mustered 800 men, under command of Col. WM. LADUE.
It left for Washington July 1st, and went into Camp on Kellorama Heights, and remained there until the first of September. They were then ordered to the extreme right, and went into camp near Darnestown, Md. Crossed the Potomac at Edwards Ferry in September, and were on that side of the river three days, when they re-crossed and went into camp near Poolesville, where they remained during the winter. On the 30th of March, 1862, they crossed the Potomac at Harper's Ferry and advanced under Gen. BANKS to Winchester, and from there they returned to Washington. The regiment went to the Peninsula under Gen. MCCLELLAN, arriving at Fortress Monroe on the 30th of April. They lay before Yorktown during the siege, and after the evacuation embarked for West Point, reaching there in time to act as a reserve for FRANKLIN'S Corps in that engagement.
On the arrival of Gen. MCCLELLAN'S army from Willamsburg [sic] they joined the advance on Richmond, and acted as a reserve in the battle at Hanover Court House. On the morning of the 31st they crossed the Chickahominy on a bridge of detached logs floating in the stream, jumping from one to another, and many wading most of the way, and after a forced march arrived just in time to intercept the famous Hampton Legion and other South Carolina regiments, on their way to reinforce General JOHNSTON in his attack on General CASEY at Seven Pines. They immediately attacked the enemy, and after a terrific tight of two hours put them to flight with immense loss, killing Col. WADE HAMPTON, of the Hampton Legion, and wounding and capturing the Brigadier General. The battle was decided by a bayonet charge, ordered and led in person by General SUMNER, which was made alone by the 34th, supported by other regiments. In this charge the Regiment won imperishable laurels for itself. Not a man flinched, every one pushing forward nobly, determined to drive back the enemy or perish in the attempt. All honor to the brave heroes who perished in the terrific onslaught, and their more lucky but no less brave companions who survived the shock. Captain (now Major) WELLS SPONABLE here received a ball in his right leg, which has not yet been extracted.
On the morning of the 1st they acted as a reserve to Gens. SICKLES and MEAGHER, who successfully engaged and drove the enemy. After the battle they laid there for three days, and then erected entrenchments and advanced a short distance on the extreme front, having always a heavy picket out considerable in advance of the works. Here they were annoyed considerably by the enemy bringing down their batteries and shelling them, some times for days in succession. When the retreat commenced the corps was ordered to act as a rear guard, and in this capacity held the enemy in check during the entire march to Harrison's Landing, fighting on the 29th of June the battles of Peach Orchard and Savage's Station, falling back during the night and fighting the next day the bloody battle of Nelson's Farm, where it again distinguished itself, losing heavily, especially among the officers. Again falling back during the night, they fought on the 1st of July the battle of Malvern Hill, losing a number of men and Major BROWN of Oneida. They arrived at Harrison's Landing completely exhausted, but were immediately sent to the front to throw up works and hold the enemy in check.
They left the Peninsula with the Army of Potomac, arriving at Washington and encamping at Long Bridge, and were immediately ordered to proceed to Centreville, marching constantly for forty-eight hours without rest. On arriving there they found our forces falling back, and returned with them.
Accompanied General MCCLELLAN in his Maryland campaign, taking part in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam. At the last named battle they were very much cut up, losing some of their best officers and many of their bravest men. The colors were riddled, and the Color Sergeant (CHARLES BARTON, of Norway, Herkimer county) shot in seven places and left for dead. Here they were entirely surrounded at one time by the enemy, through the cowardice of a Pennsylvania Regiment, which broke ranks and run during the fight. The Regiment, however, succeeded in cutting its way out. After the retreat of the enemy, they went with the 2d Corps (of which they formed a part) to Harper's Ferry, and encamped on Bolivar Heights, where they remained until the advance of Gen. MCCLELLAN toward Warrenton, the 2d Corps being in the advance. The Regiment moved to Fredericksburg with General BURNSIDE'S army, General SHELLY'S Brigade being the first to arrive before the place, and went into camp near Falmouth, until the crossing of the river by Gen. BURNSIDE in December. Here the Division under Gen. HOWARD were the first to cross on the right, driving the enemy from the city, and forcing them back into their fortifications on the Heights.
Their brigade (the first) was ordered to the front, where they held the enemy in check, though greatly exposed to the fire of the Rebel batteries. When the army recrossed, they went into their old camp at Falmouth, where they remained during the winter.
After the crossing of Gen. HOOKER on the right, the 2d Division under Gen. HOWARD again crossed the river into the city and came under the command of Gen. SEDGWICK, who was approaching on the left, driving the enemy before him. Their division was ordered to the right of the enemy's works, to occupy their attention while the forces under Gen. SEDGWICK charged and captured the Heights in the centre. This was successfully accomplished. though exposed to a heavy fire. Advanced with Gen. SEDGWICK some miles beyond the city, when they were ordered to return and occupy Fredericksburg and Falmouth Heights. They lay there until the recrossing of the river by Gen. SEDGWICK, when the city was again abandoned to the enemy. They then went into camp near Falmouth, opposite Fredericksburg, where they remained until the morning of the 9th, when they received orders to report in this city.
Where all alike achieved such high and lasting renown, it may seem invidious to make special mention of any; yet it may not be amiss to say of Col. LAFLIN, Lieut. Col. BEVERLEY and Major SPONABLE, (and the Major who preceded him and was killed at Fair Oaks,) that they were officers whose bravery inspired their men, and led them to do acts of courageous daring which they might not otherwise have attempted.
Since leaving the city they have had added to their number about one hundred recruits, and return four hundred and twenty-seven strong.
The following are the present officers of the regiment: —
FIELD.
Colonel—Byron Lafflin.
Lieutenant Colonel—John Beverley.
Major—Wells Sponable.
STAFF.
Adjutant—John Kirk.
Quartermaster—Nathan Easterbrooks.
Surgeon—B. F. Manley.
Assistant Surgeon—J. Hurley Miller.
Chaplain—S. Franklin Schoonmaker.
LINE.
Company A—(from West Troy)—Captain, B. H. Warford; First Lieutenant, R. L. Brown; Second Lieutenant, John Oathout.
Company B—(from Little Falls)—Captain, Irving D. Clark; First Lieutenant, Francis N. Usher; Second Lieutenant, William Burns.
Company C—(from Norway, Herkimer co.)—Captain, Thomas Corcoran; First Lieutenant, William Wallace; Second Lieutenant, Simeon P. McIntyre.
Company D—(from Champlain)—Captain, John O. Scott; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, Byron Coats.
Company E—(from Steuben county)—Captain, Henry Baldwin; First Lieutenant, Henry W. Sanford; Second Lieutenant, Melville S. Valkenburgh; Second Lieutenant, B. F. Minor.
Company G—(from Herkimer)—Captain, Joy P. Johnson; First Lieutenant, John Morey; Second Lieutenant, A. Rounds.
Company H—(from Crown Point)—Captain, William S. Walton; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, William Kirk.
Company I—(from Weedsport, Steuben county)—Captain, Eugene B. La Rue; First Lieytenant, A. T. Atwood; Second Lieutenant, Orrin W. Beach.
Company K—(from Saulsbury)—Captain, Emerson S. Northup; First Lieutenant, James McCormick; Second Lieutenant, Lewis M. Chapin.

Reception of Co. D., 34th N. Y. Volunteers At Champlain.
On Wednesday, July 15th, the citizens of Champlain gave a public welcome to their returned volunteers of the 34th N. Y. Regiment. The reception was a very well arranged affair, and pleasant to all who participated in it. The surviving members of Co. D. formed into line under Capt Scott, at 2 P. M., and headed by the North Lawrence Brass Band, marched to the Presbyterian Church. Here they were welcomed by James Averill, Esq., in the following address:
Capt. John 0. Scott and others, Soldiers—remnant of Co. D., 34th Reg't N. Y. Volunteers —Brave men all.
This assembly of your neighbors and fellow citizens—this crowd of old men and maidens, young men and children, with music and with song, with prayers and benedictions, with words of joyous welcome and tears of bitter regret have met to do you honor—to welcome your return from fields of carnage and slaughter—to express, with meet words, the gratitude we owe, and to speak those words of encouragement and express that heart felt sympathy, which, as a community whose honor and interests you have so bravely and earnestly upheld, is demanded at our hands. Looking upon you, brave men, as the first who from among us, at the sacred call of your country, voluntarily, without conscription or compulsion of any kind, stepped forward and enrolled your names and hazarded your lives—as the first who left your homes, your wives, your parents, your children—as the first to separate those ties which circle round the family fireside, and go forth to battle manfully for the right—looking upon you, brave men, as the first offering of blood laid upon the altar of our country—looking, with just pride upon you, members of Company D., who have returned from scenes of warfare more bloody and more fierce than history has before recorded—returned without a spot or blemish upon your character for courage, and patience, and honorable warfare, we tender you, brave men, a thrice hearty welcome.
Think not, soldiers, that your absence from us for two years, has been unheeded—think not that those you left behind have been unmindful of your course—think not that earnest prayer, from this and every of your altars, has failed to ascend, constantly, to the God of mercy and of battles in your behalf, for personal safely and health, and for your success in every effort—think not that tears of sympathy and bitter regret have failed to moisten every eye, as the lightening's [sic] flash has borne to us the news of impending conflicts, or the sad intelligence of a comrade fallen in death—think not that the wounds of a Scott, a McDonald, a Moore, a Zougg, a Carte, a Hudson, a Carter, a Hill, a Rainer, a Loomis, a Barcelo, a Lepage and a Northedge—when who bear these wounds in our presence to day—think not the imprisonment of a Miner, a Kellogg, and a Cook, think not these have failed to receive honorable mention with us.
Think not, soldiers, that the falling, bravely but willingly in the cold embrace of death, of a Ransom, a Bramley, a Brewer, a Carleton, a Bailey, a Hayes, a Coonan, a Gadbaw, a Hubbell, a McCue, a Jollie, and a Sashegra, all members of your company, remains unrecorded in our hearts.
Think not, brave men, that the weariness of camp life, which marked the earlier period of your service, during the winter of 1861; your deadly skirmishes, and your arduous duties, faithfully and patiently discharged while watching with eagle and sleepless eye the enemy fronting you and threatening incursions in the vicinity of Seneca Mills and Edwards Ferry—the long and tedious marches, the innumerable deadly conflicts, and the glorious Victories you have won—think not that Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Peach Orchard, Savage Station, Glen-Dale, White Oak Swamp, Malvenrn Hill, Antietam, and Fredericksburgh [sic], at each of which points you nobly met the enemy, and bared your breasts to the deadly bullet, and with death stalking around you upheld the banner, of your country amid the piercing storm of "iron hail and leaden rain" think not that these brave acts are forgotten. No, brave men, they live in our hearts and memories, they are faithfully recorded on the page of history, and will forever stand as monuments of your patriotism and valor.
Soldiers, Your period of enlistment has expired. Your duties, so far as you have contracted with your government, have been honorably and courageously fulfilled. You have in the language of your oath, "borne true faith and allegiance” [sic] to your government and performed faithfully, under all circumstances, the solemn and dangerous requirements nescessarily [sic] incident to a soldier's life; and although you now return, as a company, with your ranks thinned by disease and death, you will never have reason to regret your action. May your noble example have its rational and proper effects upon us, who have thus far remained at home—may it encourage the hearts and nerve the arms of all who are now called, by conscription, from the ease and endearments of home to go forth manfully, and in their persons, and prove that the country which is their greatest boast, shall never lack for sons to uphold its integrity with their lives, whenever such service is demanded.
And now, Fellow Citizens, Ladies and Gen­tlemen, and Children—all of us, whose lives and interests and dearest hopes have been de­fended by these noble men, whom we now honor with our words, let us see to it that our sympathy and welcome rest not in words alone; but that in all our future intercourse with them we are regardful of our solemn obligations [sic]—our solemn vows, which we know we should per­form. Let us by our kindly acts and greetings, by our readiness at all times to lend material aid and comfort, by our friendly admonition and advice, by a tender care for the widows and fatherless, whose dear ones have laid down their lives for us and for our cause, and whose bones lie bleaching upon the enemy's soil, without a monument to mark their resting place—prove the fathomeless depths of our sincerity. Let these men now here, and let the near and dear of those who went out with them, but who return not again any more forever, let them feel, and know, that we are their friends in deed, and that we will not suffer any known want to be uncared for but that we will at all times, share with them from our abundance, and fulfill in them, the teachings of our most holy religion. Let us remember that our first duty is to those who are immediately around us, who cross our path daily, and not reach forward to unknown and imaginary [sic] objects upon which to bestow sympathies and our means, while there remains a reasonable want to be administered to a returned soldier of company D., or while a widow, or child of a fallen one, have needs that we can fill.
Brave men, again I say to you, in behalf of all present, welcome to your homes—welcome to the homes and hearts of each of us And now invoking the blessing of Almighty God upon you and yours I leave the pleasant task of further words of welcome to others, whose hearts I know are full and whose lips will further testify.
Capt. Jahn [sic] O. Scott, responded as follows:
Mr. Speaker and Fellow Citizens:
In behalf of the officers and men of this company, I thank you for the kind reception you have given us. We are proud of the compliments you have paid us, and hope we are worthy of them. We know that your sympathies have followed us through the many hardships of the past two years, and hope that our conduct has sustained the honor of our country. To the Ladies of Champlain we are under many obligations for past favors, and we cannot thank them too much.
Reverends Copeland and White, and Marshal Dunn also addressed the remnant of the gallant Co. D. in very happy and eloquent strains.—The speaking was interspersed with admirable music from the choir of the church and from the Band.
The assembly then proceeded to the Champlain House, where an excellent dinner had been provided by its capital host, Mr. B. P. Douglas. Toasts were proposed by the Committee of Arrangements, and eloquently responded to by Messrs. Copeland, White, Dunn and Everest. Our townsman, Mr. Wagoner, of the Committee, managed everything smoothly and gracefully. We believe that everybody left the dinner table in the best of humor.
In the evening, the ladies of the village, assisted by Mr. Wilson Graves, gave a festival, the proceeds of which go to the aid of sick and wounded soldiers.
The fair was largely attended, and together with the previous cordial mingling of our citizens, made a happy and memorable day for all.

Chapter in the History of the 34th.
The following proceedings of a Court of Inquiry are at once an interesting chapter in the history of the 34th regiment and a deserved and complete justification of as brave, efficient and capable an officer as the service has yet seen. Beloved by all the men and officers of his command, Gen. SULLY was an especial favorite with the members of our regiment who are greatly delighted at this report of the Court and who earnestly wish that he may be made to fill that place in the army to which his merits entitle him and from which nothing but his excessive modesty keeps him.

HEADQUARTERS, 2ND ARMY CORPS.
MAY 19th, 1863.
GENERAL:—Herewith please find proceedings of Court of Inquiry convened at your request. I send through General THOMAS, Adjutant General of the Army, not knowing your address.
I am General, very respectfully,
Your most obedient servant.
JOHN S. SCHULTZE,
Capt.A. D. C. & A. A. A. G.

To Brigadier General SULLY, U. S. V.
HEADQUARTERS, 2ND ARMY CORPS.
NEAR FALMOUTH VA., May 1863.
SPECIAL ORDERS,
No. 114.
PAR. IX.—The following statement and opinion thereon, is rendered by the Court of Inquiry, convened by request of Brigadier General ALFRED SULLY, U. S. V., by par. iv, S. 0.105, Headquarters Second Army Corps, May 7, 1863, and of which Major General W. S. HANCOCK is President, viz:
That on the 30th of April last, after the grand movement of the army had commenced, but before General SULLY'S brigade had left camp, a number of men of the 34th N. Y. Volunteers forwarded to General SULLY, with the request that he would forward them to the proper authority, petitions that they might be discharged on the first of May following. A part of this Regiment claims that it has been in the service of the United States since May 1st, 1861, and it was to serve but two years; the remainder have been in the service since June 15th, 1861, and it has been decided by the War Department that the term of service of the whole Regiment expires with that of the Company last mustered in, on the 15th of June proximo. These petitions had been signed by men of six companies, and individuals of other companies, who did not claim that they had been in the service two years; but, only members of the six companies before mentioned refused to do duty on the first of May. These petitions, respectful in their tone, were forwarded with a favorable endorsement by General SULLY, but subsequently were returned by General GIBBON without his approval. On May 1st, General SULLY sent General GIBBON the note marked "A," in which he stated that the "Colonel commanding the 34th N. Y. Volunteers reports that some companies of his Regiment refused to do duty this morning." To which General GIBBON replied in an endorsement, directing General SULLY to send a good Regiment to their camp to disarm them—to separate them from the rest of their Regiment—to keep a strict guard over them, and to allow no communication with them. Shortly afterwards General GIBBON sent General SULLY the communication marked "B," in which he directs him to use any and every means to quell the mutiny in the 34th N. Y. Volunteers, and bring the men back to their duty; promising that any respectful representation these men might see fit to make after their return to duty, would be forwarded to the proper authority, and stating that in the meantime they must be compelled to do their duty—and that General GIBBON did not desire to interfere in the matter until General SULLY had announced his inability to maintain his authority in his own command.
To this General SULLY replied in the letter marked "C," acknowledging the receipt of General GIBBON'S communication, and stating previously he had received from him a note instructing him to march a Regiment to the Camp of the 34th N. Y. Volunteers—separate the men who refused to do duty from those who were willing—disarm them and place them under a guard, which he had done to some sixty or seventy men, a part of whom were intoxicated. He also stated that the men still refused to do duty. General Gibbon then sent General SULLY a verbal message by an officer of the Staff of the latter, to send the men who were intoxicated to the Provost Marshal of the Division, asking at the same time whether the letter, the last mentioned, was intended as an announcement of his inability to maintain discipline in his own command. After this message had been reiterated by an officer of General GIBBON'S Staff, General SULLY sent the communication marked "D," wherein he stated that it was not in his power to force the men in the 34th N. Y. Volunteers who refused to do duty, to return to their duty, that they were most of them perfectly quiet and respectful in their deportment—that they were still confined as prisoners—that he had not threatened them, and thought that it would be useless to do so. In the same paper he further stated that he knew of only one way to make them return to their senses, and that was by shooting, suggesting that some could be selected by lot and tried on the spot for mutiny. A few examples, he thought, might convince the rest of the necessity of obeying orders. To this General GIBBON replied by an order (read evidence of General GIBBON) in which he failed to state that he was willing to take the responsibility of such extreme measures but directing General SULLY to have the loyal part of the Regiment paraded under arms, and another Regiment with loaded muskets, paraded in front of the mutineers, and then to meet him on the ground. This General SULLY did, and General GIBBON then addressed the mutineers, between sixty and seventy in number, beseeching them to return to their duty, declaring that if they did not he would have their ring-leader shot on the spot, and promise.
That after they had returned to duty, if they would forward any respectful communication, setting forth what they consider their wrongs, he would forward it with a favorable endorsement. On a final appeal made to the men who were willing to return to duty, to step to the front, all, after some little hesitation did so, and the mutiny was essentially quelled. Then General Gibbon, by his Special Order No. 122, relieved General Sully from the command of his brigade "for having reported to the General commanding the Divsion [sic] that it was not in his power to enforce discipline in his own command." The men who refused to do duty were orderly and quiet, and expressed a willingness to fight if necessary, provided they could be discharged immediately after the engagement. Previous to Gen. Gibbon's remarks to them, they fell |in and were marched to the place designated, without the use of armed force.—When their Regiment was called upon for twenty-five (25) men for a forlorn hope, eighteen of those who had refused to do duty volunteered. It appears that during the whole occurrence the Brigade remained in the camp it had occupied all winter, and there was no necessity for such immediate action on the part of General Sully as would prevent the reference of the matter to higher authority. Evidently he desired that the responsibility of ordering extreme measures, should rest with General Gibbon as the Commanding General of all the troops in that vicinity. And in the opinion of the Court, there it should have rested. There is every reason to believe that the petition had been forwarded when first submitted, the greater of the trouble would have been avoided. In view of these facts, the Court is of the opinion that Brigadier General Sully probably doubted his authority, under existing circumstances, to order extreme measures, and that therefore his action and conduct were not such as to warrant the issue of Brigadier General Gibson's Special Order No. 122, of May 1st, 1863.
II. The proceedings, statement and opinion of the Court are approved.
III—The Court of Inquiry of which Major General W. S. Hancock, U. S. Volunteers is President, is dissolved.
By command of MAJOR GENERAL COUCH.
JOHN S. SCHULTZE, Capt., A. D. C. & A. A. G.

Reception of the 34th Regiment.
GRAND SUCCESS.
Herkimer County did herself honor last Saturday—and we may add, without a reflection upon other towns, that Little Falls did herself honor. The welcome which was prepared for our returning veterans was one of which we, as well as they, have reason to be proud. The notice of their coming on Saturday was only made known on Tuesday evening; the weather had indeed been most unpromising; and the rain of the morning, as we have good reason to know, prevented the completion of many decorations, and, we doubt not, kept at home many people who would otherwise have gladly been present.
Yet it is impossible for us to estimate the thousands who were here or to describe all there was to be seen. The clouds gradually cleared away and by the time the procession was formed the weather was by every one pronounced just suited to the occasion. Many who were present at the Utica reception assert that, for good taste in the arrangements made and for beauty of the whole display, we were far ahead of our neighbors, although many of their arches and other objects were much more expensive and elaborate than ours.
From early morning, long lines of wagons and horseback delegations from the different towns came crowding into town and long before the regiment arrived every stable and hitching post in town was appropriated. At the depot the crowd was absolutely impenetrable and when, about _ o'clock, the train with the regiment stopped and the boys began to appear, the cheers and confusion were actually deafening. It was difficult to form them in line, but this was finally effected.
They were then greeted by President
M. W. Priest, as follows:

WELCOME OF PRESIDENT PRIEST.
Gentlemen of the 34th Regiment:
Upon me, as President of this village, devolves the duty and the pleasure of welcoming those of you, the officers and soldiers of the 34 Regiment of New York State Volunteers, who belong to this county on their return home. In behalf of my fellow citizens I thank those of you who belong to other parts of the state for your presence on this occasion, and hope that nothing may occur here that may cause any but kind recollections toward us when you shall be far away. To the relatives and friends of those brave men who, alas! do not return I can only say that you have the sincere and heartfelt sympathy of this entire community.
Hon. AMOS H. PRESCOTT will address you in a more appropriate manner than I am able to do; and again I bid the heroes of the 34th Regiment a warm and cordial welcome to the village of Little Falls.

The officers of the Day were:
President—Hon. Robert Earl.
Orators—Hon. A. H. Prescott, Hon. Ezra Graves.
Marshal—Maj. Z. C. Priest.
Assistant Marshals—Oliver Ladue, Little Falls; Floyd. C. Shepherd, German Flatts; Col. James A. Suiter, Herkimer; Samuel Franklin, Fairfield; J.J. Cook, Salisbury; Morgan Bidlemire, Manheim; Jacob Connor, Danube; Robert Etheridge, Franklin; Albert Story, Little Falls; Geo. M. Cleland, Warren; S. L. Day, Winfield; Harris Lewis, Schuyler; Wm. Coppernoll, Ohio; Solomon Graves, Russia; Richard Van Horne, Stark; Alanson Burlingame, Newport; Alonzo Rust, Norway; E. D. Beckwith, Columbia; O. B. Beals, Litchfield.
The procession was then formed on John St. in the following order:—
ORDER OF PROCESSION.
Squad of Police.

FIRST DIVISION.
Maj. Z. C. Priest, Marshal of the Day.
Mohawk Valley Band.
County Committee Mounted.
Mounted citizens from the various towns.
Marshal. Visiting Committee. Marshal.

SECOND DIVISION.
Marshal. Frankfort Band. Marshal.
President and Trustees of the Village.
Orators of the Day.
President of the Day.
Clergy.
Operatives from the Factories.
Citizens in General.

THIRD DIVISION.
Ilion Band.
Marshal. FIRE DEPARTMENT. Marshal.
Chief Fireman.
Herkimer Fire Company.
Mohawk Fire Company.
Ilion Fire Company.
LITTLE FALLS FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Cascade Engine Co., No. 1.
Protection Engine Co., No. 2.
Gen. Herkimer Engine Co., No. 3.
Citizens Brass Band.
Marshal. Drum Corps. Marshal.

34th REGIMENT N. Y. S. VOLUNTEERS.
Disabled and Discharged Soldiers.
The line being formed, Rev. Mr. GREGORY eloquently addressed the Throne of Grace, offering up thanksgiving that we were permitted to enjoy this festal day under circumstances so beneficent and propitious to our happiness. He expressed sincere gratitude to God for the return of the regiment, which might be deemed a harbinger of the day when all who have gone forth shall return with peace and praise upon their banners. He invoked the blessing of God upon the large assemblage present and upon all the returned soldier's of the 34th regiment, praying that such might be our appreciation of their heroic deeds that the memory of them might ever be as fresh in our hearts and in the hearts of our children, as are the bright evergreens under which we now welcome them home. Most earnestly did he commend to God the families who have been bereaved by the casualties in that regiment, mentioning such names as Middlebrooks, Terry, Barton, and others, and asked for them all the consolations of God's abounding grace. In conclusion he alluded to the day when the Son of God shall lead forth in triumphal procession the redeemed hosts to the reception of the blessed on the evergreen shore, the Paradise of God, and prayed that on that day all might be there.
Hon. A. H. PRESCOTT then forcibly and with much feeling addressed the Regiment.
SPEECH OF GEN. PRESCOTT.
Col. Laflin, Officers and Soldiers of the 34th Regiment of the Volunteer forces of the State of New York:—
I have unexpectedly been selected to perform the honorable duty of greeting you, and in behalf of the people of the county, to extend to you their cordial and heartfelt welcome.
It is now more than two years since you, each and all, abandoned your peaceful pursuits in civil life, left your homes, friends and kindred to engage in a new vocation.
The employment was one of a different character from any you had before that time been engaged in. You did not go to gratify an ambition, to obtain wealth, or for place, or position, whereby you could personally enjoy the favor, comforts and emoluments of the world—but it is in response to the call of our country to perform not a pleasant, though a highly important duty which belongs to the citizens of all classes who live in the land of Washington. You, of your own free will and accord, abandoned all you held dear so far as the social relations were concerned, because you desired to obey the summons which called you to defend the institutions of our fathers.
The time when your organization was effected is fresh in my memory,—well do I remember the difficulties and hardships you encountered, and the sacrifices made to reach the battle-field. Well do I remember the day when you bade adieu to the loved ones, and amid their tears, with firm and manly bearing, departed upon the train which was to convey the regiment to the scenes of deadly conflict and strife, and which also was to many of your brave comrades their departure upon a journey from which no traveler returns.
As you went away, the sympathies and prayers of the people were with you. All had a deep interest in you as citizens—a county that has, since the days of the revolution, been always distinguished for its firm attachment to the principles of a Republican Government. The honor of the fair fame of the county of Gen. Herkimer, was committed to your trust. You were to prove, whether or not you were worthy of your noble ancestry. Did the same unaltering courage, devoted patriotism, and fidelity exist in A. D., 1861, as prevailed and were exhibited in the days of 1776?
The record already made up in the history of this great contest, still existing in behalf of Human Freedom and the "inalienable rights of man," shall speak and answer the question. The battles of Fair Oaks, Nelson's Farm, Glendale, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Antietam, and Fredericksburg were, each and all of them, distinguished as closely contested fields, by the opposing forces, for the unflinching bravery, and valor there displayed and have become classic ground. On those bloody fields tens of thousands of brave soldiers, sacrificed their lives on the altar of Liberty and have gone to receive their reward in the land of light beyond the sun. The soiled, blood-stained and tattered banners which I see before me this day, proud emblem of a nation's hope, were there unfurled and nobly sustained by you. That brave, accomplished and deeply lamented officer, Gen. SUMNER, in his official report of the battle of Fair Oaks, by simply stating facts in regard to what you did there, has made a page in history which is destined to place unfading laurels upon the 34th New York. When the fortunes of the day were against us, and the traitorous legions of the enemy were advancing, and nothing except firm, noble and decided action could prevent defeat, your services were requested, and upon you rested the responsibilities of that important contest. Your line of battle, on that occasion was as perfect and in as good order as though you were only on dress parade, or drawn up for review, Shoulder to shoulder, every man at his post, you made that noble, gallant and glorious charge which will be remembered, "not for a day, but for all time." The enemy fled, and one of the most brilliant victories of the war, was thus achieved, but at a loss of ninety-eight of your brave comrades.
At Antietam, when outflanked and surrounded, you nobly cut your way through the enemy, and saved the regiment, coming out of the contest with numbers much diminished. Nobly did you stand up against the iron hail and missiles of death and destruction at Fredericksburg. But I have not time to continue the history of your gallant deeds further here.
You have gained the imperishable glory of true courage, and bravery at all times and in all places, in which you have been called upon to act. "The fighting 34th," well in the advance at all times when on the march against the enemy, and in the rear at the retreat.
More than the full period of your enlistments having expired, you are now about to lay down your arms and return to your families and firesides. A cordial, earnest, and happy greeting awaits you.
The assembled multitude here affords evidence, of the place which you each and all hold in the affections of the people of the County, who all hail and know you, the survivors of so many well fought battles.
But the rejoicings and congratulations of this hour must be disturbed by the incidents that are always connected with each conflict—in proportion to the character, magnitude and severity of the contest must be our losses and reverses.
How happy we should feel if all those who went out with you in April 1861, could be restored to society, friends and families on this occasion.
While your safe arrival causes the tears of joy to flow down many cheeks, emotions of a different character prevail in many sad hearts. But about one half of your original number have been permitted to return. Where are those who went with you, but who cannot be present here to-day? A large proportion of them have fallen in battle and their remains repose beneath the clods of the valley; their bones are now bleaching in the sun in a distant land—All honor is due to the memory of the illustrious dead! Their names and deeds are recorded in our hearts and in a suitable manner shall the record be preserved, and transmitted from generation to generation. I trust, also, that each and all of us, will remember in a manner to be exhibited by substantial acts of kindness and charity the widows and the orphans.
Another painful consideration is suggested here. Notwithstanding your part has been well performeded [sic] the end has not yet been accomplished; the rebellion against the best Government, that the light of the sun has ever shone upon still rages with undiminished fury. While much has been accomplished, great sacrifices and exertions are yet necessary and demanded—I desire to ask a question here, put to all those who composed this assembly, returned soldiers as well as civilians—shall we abandon this contest, allow our institutions to be overthrown, and the fit and chosen emblem of our nation's glory to trail in the dust? Will we, as far as our action is concerned, continue to make all the further sacrifices that are, and may become necessary to preserve to the world, to bless mankind the richest boon which God in his wisdom, has ever vouchsafed to man? I believe it to be the firm and decided opinion of all present. "That our glorious Union must and shall be preserved."
Then in conclusion, permit me to say, let this consideration be uppermost in the minds of all, and let all else be subservient to that great end:—
To establish our glorious Government required the sincere and earnest efforts and the greatest sacrifices of all those possessed of patriotic hearts. To preserve and continue it requires greater exertion, more united action, than it did to establish it.
From this time henceforth, then, let us each and all feel that we have an individual duty to perform, and waiving less important considerations, let us be united as one sacred band of patriotic men and women, and let the only question be—In what way and manner can we do the most good towards the accomplishment of this much desired object?
Fellow citizens: The example of the 34th is before you. It has been noble, manly and glorious from the beginning to the end. If we do our part, yet to be performed as well as they have done theirs, the rebellion will be speedily put down.
Officers and soldiers: Trusting your presence with us will incite in all emulation and action for that purpose, in this hour of peril, I welcome you, and may the richest of Heaven's blessings reward and bless you and yours.
Loud cheers were given at the conclusion both for the speaker and for the regiment.
At the conclusion of Gen. Prescott's address, Col. LAFLIN responded, briefly as follows;—
REPLY OF COL. LAFLIN.
Mr. President and Fellow Citizens:—
In behalf of the officers and men of this command I thank you for the compliment paid us, and for the very magnificent reception given us. And while it is exceedingly gratifying to us, it is also encouraging to those brave men of our own county whom we left last Sunday crossing the Rappahannock below Fredericksburg.
Our flag to which you have so complimentarily alluded has been with us through many a field of battle, and we love it with a love stronger than words can express; and should we be called upon to defend that flag, I assure you that our future will not belie our past.
In conclusion, I cannot refrain from thanking the ladies for their kind presence here, for I assure them it has been long since the soldiers of the Potomac have been blessed with a sight of such fair faces. (Cheers and applause.)
The line of march was then taken, presenting a most beautiful and imposing spectacle. The several bands struck up lively music and the long procession took its way through crowded streets, under beautiful arches, greeted on every hand by words of cordiality and welcome. As it passed along Main St. the enthusiastic masses could hardly be driven back from the center of the street sufficiently to permit it to pass. It was a sight the like of which many an old inhabitant had never seen. The Regiment itself was the center of all attractions. The returning veterans marched finely and in excellent order, although greeted on both sides by friends and relatives, and in fact their uniform good behavior and gentlemanly appearance was the subject of universal remark through the day.
MOTTOES AND DECORATIONS.
We shall not be expected to give one half of the many decorations with which almost every house along the line of march was ornamented. The hundreds of flags flying from windows, house-tops, arches and flag-poles and from ropes drawn across the various streets it would be impossible even to enumerate. Many of them were very large and very fine and they added greatly to the beauty of the occasion [sic].
At the Freight House the following mottoes were displayed:—"To all  Friends of the Union," "Welcome to our Brave Boys," The Union Forever."
Maj. PRIEST'S residence was decked with flags. In front was the rnotto—

IN MEMORIAM.
The Gallant Dead of the 34th Regiment.
"Whether on the gallows high
Or in the battles van;
The fittest place for man to die,
Is where he dies for man."

W. H. Williams had a number of fine wreaths with a Gothic archway and the words, "Thanks 34th, defenders of our Homes;" also a statue of Washington holding a scroll with the inscription, "Though dead I am with you." Messrs. Richmond and Bennett displayed a photograph of "Old Abe," and the words, "Long live the heroes of Fair Oaks."
The arch at the corner of John and Mary St. was a beautiful structure, covered with evergreens and on one side the sentiment, "Welcome, gallant 34th; on the other "Your record is immortal."
M. M. Abel had a portrait of McClellan and "Welcome 34th" over gateway.
The residence of Mrs. Geo. Morse was draped in mourning and in front was a fine likeness of Sergt. Morse.
At Wm. B. Houghton's was the motto, "Our first volunteers—we are proud of you."
The houses of Messrs. Rust and Dorr were very finely decorated with cedar wreaths and over the street were hung two large flags,
H. Whittimore displayed a shield with "Welcome home, 34th."
M. Baddy had prepared a fine arch with "Welcome 34th," in gilt letters.
Rev. B. F. McLaughlin had flags waving from every window, with photographs of Washington and McClellan.
On the Academy belfry was a fine flag and the word "Union."
At John Feeter's were seen some of the finest bouquets and wreaths of flowers of the day and "Manheim" on an arch over the gateway.
Wreaths of flowers and cedar were festooned about the piazza of Judge Loomis.
At H. Burrill's flags and wreaths were hung out and a "Happy Greeting" upon an arch at the gate.
Geo. Bertram had flags at every point and over the doorway the words, "Welcome, brave boys of '61."
The Nelson House was trimmed in excellent taste with cedar and the stars and stripes.
At Nelson's store was a neat arch of evergreens and the salutation, "How are you vets?"
J. Churchill's gate was surmounted with a neat arch.
The stores of G. F. Girvan, B. R. Jones, and Knapp and Arnold and the hotel of E. Davis were decked with cedar wreaths.
Mrs. Dibble's Millinery shop was carefully adorned and bore the words, "Home, Sweet Home."
Nearly opposite Snell and Scott's store was a very beautiful arch from which were pendant circular wreaths each containing upon a red, white or blue canvass, the name of a principal battle in which the regiment has been engaged. It was designed by Mr. I. Snell and was very prettily done.
J. Lee displayed a likeness of Washington and the motto, "We honor the Living and mourn the dead. Your heroism is recorded.
Geo. Foster has a “Welcome.”
Lipe and Abel's store was trimmed in excellent taste.
From the Courier office hung the motto, "Soldiers of the 34th Regiment, a grateful people welcome you."
The entire block of buildings from Burch & Co.'s to W. T. Wheeler's was decorated with evergreen wreath-work,
At the crossing of the streets was hung a large pencilled [sic] likeness of "Little Mac" with the names of the regimental battlefields. Although the likeness was shabbily done, the design of the. poles supporting it was very pretty. They were wound with cedar wreaths and stripes of red white and blue cambric.
Ed. Lee had a portrait of Washington and large festoons and wreaths in front of his store.
Tiffany's store was trimmed with evergreens.
From Mrs. Pepper's Millinery shop was "Welcome, brave 34th!"
The Benton House displayed several large flags, one of them across the street being forty feet long. Long festoons and wreaths hung tastefully upon every side and at the entrance were the words, "Brave Defenders, Home Again!"
Opposite this office was another of the fine arches, planned and erected by the Committee. Upon one side of this arch was the sentiment "To Valor and Constancy;" upon the other, "Brave as the Bravest."
At Fralick's Store was, "Gallant 34th, Welcome Home."
Kibbe's saloon was neatly decorated.—Portraits of Washington and McClellan were hung out and the words, "How are you, boys?" "Happy to greet you."
At Carver's was an eagle with the mottoes, "Stand by the Old Flag," "The Star-spangled Banner in triumph shall wave."
Wm. Taylor's store was beautifully ornamented. Upon the awning was a bronzed eagle, behind which between two flags was a statue of Washington,
The windows of Miss Wright's schoolroom contained mottoes in bronzed letters: "The patriots of '63," "34th, Welcome," "Home, Sweet Home."
The Post Office was trimmed neatly with festoons of evergreens; over the doorway was, "Welcome 34th."
At Mr. Dygert's were fine wreaths of flowers.
Wm. I. Skinner's residence and gateway looked beautifully. "Welcome 34th" was displayed.
"All honor to the brave defender of our country" appeared at Perrine's shop. W. H. Klock had wreaths and a "Welcome, brave 34th."
At Esq. Uhle's was the salutation "We greet you, 34th."
At Geo. Ransom's, "Thrice Welcome, Gallant 34th."
At Eph. Boyer's, "Welcome home, boys!"
At A. Griffin's, "Welcome."
At J. Griffin's "Welcome, gallant 34th," in a fine wreath over the gateway.
Here was another arch of evergreens with, "34th, Welcome."
Wm. Ingham's residence was trimmed with festoons.
The stores of Wm. Southworth and P. A. Staring were nearly covered with cedar.
R. C. Petrie displayed, "Welcome Home," "Honor to the 34th."
At the large gateway of the Woolen Mills, in letters made of blue shoddy, was "Herkimer is proud of the 34th."
Heath's bakery had the sentiment, "Stand by the Old Flag."
Upon the iron railings of the canal bridge were the words, "Happy Greeting to all," and "Spirit of "76."
The arch just across the bridge was finely located so that the procession passed twice under it. "Welcome, thrice welcome, noble 34th" was on one  side;" "Home Rweet [sic] Home" on the other.
"Honor to the brave 34th" appeared near Mr. Heath's and from that to the house of Messrs. Bellinger and Casler, an arch trimmed with flowers.
Upon No. 3 Engine house was, "Gen. Herkimer greets you," and opposite was a splendid arch of cedars and flowers with red, white and blue letters, "Welcome Home, 34th."
From Mrs. J. N. Barber's were hung wreaths and the Constitution of the United States in a frame.
The festoons around D. H. Hull's were among the finest seen.
Another beautiful arch was located here.
Upon the lower side was, Herkimer greets her heroes;" on the upper, "Ever faith­ful to the Flag."
The residence of M. W. Priest was draped with the Stars and Stripes, with "Welcome Home" and a portrait of Wash­ington.
At Dr. Ingham's was the expressive word "Union."
A. Zimmerman displayed likenesses of Washington and McClellan and wreaths very tastefully arranged.
At Dr. Brown's was a beautiful arch.
Messrs. Wright and Levi had each a Welcome to the gallant 34th.
Col. Griswold's portico was neatly fes­tooned.
A neat arch fronted the residence of E. Reed.
Wreaths and festoons and a likeness of the President appeared at Dr. Stebbins'.
At James Feeters were two pretty gateway arches and a crayoned likeness of
Washington.
Mrs. Beardslee's residence was decorated with much taste. Upon the piazza was the motto, "Honor to the brave 34th Regiment."
One of the most beautiful, imposing and appropriate features was the large monument erected on Ann St., in memory of the fallen heroes, whose absence from the festivities of the day gathered afresh choking sobs and burning tears of mourning relatives. It was a massive structure, twenty feet high, surmounted by a large eagle grasping in each claw an American flag. Upon the column, wreathed in cedar and white flowers were the names of the battles of "Fair Oaks, Glendale, Antietam, Yorktown, Fredericksburg, South Mountain, Malvern Hill, and Edward's Ferry" and upon the base, "Nelson's Farm, Fredericksburg Heights, Savage's Station, and Peach Orchard Station." Upon four sides of the base, festooned in white and cedar wreaths were the following:

They died in defence of the GOOD OLD FLAG.
"Freedom's battle once begun,
Bequeathed from bleeding sire to son,
Though baffled oft is ever won."

The MEMORY of their GALLANT DEEDS, Will live FOREVER.

Virginia's soil is consecrated to FREEDOM by the BLOOD of our HEROES.

As the procession passed this point heads were reverently uncovered, steps were measured to the solemn music of the bands, silence came over the crowds of people and many a tear was shed in memory of those who would never return. The effect upon the brave fellows of the regiment, as they looked anew upon their thinned ranks, was too deep for utterance. It was indeed a beautiful tribute to departed patriotism—a tribute too often forgotten in the glad times of welcoming those whose lives, though not less freely offered, have not been taken.
Upon this street also the houses and grounds of Geo. Ashley. H. M. Burch and A. G. Story were most fittingly and neatly ornamented, as were those of Jas. Aldrich, Jorame Petrie, on Gansevoort St.
The residence of O. Ladue displayed a large "Welcome" and much beauty in its adornments.
At J. T. Alden's and L. D, Waite's were various ornaments of evergreens.
A pretty thought it was which suggested the idea of the motto of his mother on Major Sponable's home, "My all for my Country."
At L. O. Gay's were the words, "Honor to the brave 34th" in evergreen letters.
W. T. Wheeler's piazza and gateway were suitably decorated.
The house of Mrs. Brooks was beautiful in an abundance of wreaths and bouquets of choice flowers.
At the entrance to the park was a chaste little arch and upon it the words,
"Fair Oaks—Better Fare."
The Mohawk Fire Company bore upon their banners: "Welcome, 34th! Our latch-string is out, boys."; "Honor to the 34th—Welcome home!"
Upon the whole these decorations were most beautiful and are said to have surpassed even those of our neighbors of Utica at their recent reception; and although there would seem to be a sameness which no effort of ours can avoid in a brief description of them, yet the styles of lettering and the variety of tastes displayed in ornamenting were so different that the effect, in almost every instance, was good
Upon its arrival at the public square the procession was formed on both sides of the park, the regiment only being admitted within, where already a crowd, estimated at more than ten thousand had gathered. And here transpired one of the prettiest and most impressive events of the occasion. Upon a large, elevated platform stood thirty-four young Misses, scholars of Miss WRIGHT'S school dressed in white and arranged to represent a "pyramid of beauty." The most perfect stillness reigned as they arose and clearly and in perfect concert repeated the following:

WELCOME OF THE YOUNG LADIES.
SOLDIERS:—We welcome you! Gladly we hail this day that returns to home and friends those who went forth to battle for a nation's honor. You left us amid rejoicings, tears and benedictions; your return is greeted by the same. Rejoicings that, protected by an invisible hand, you have returned, scarred perhaps by many a conflict, but returned to home once more.
Tears we drop for the fallen brave, tears for the unmarked grave. Hallowed be the spot where the bones of our bold repose! and benedictions, aye, let them rest unnumbered upon the heads of those who have fought our battles.
We know the war cry still resounds; the angel of peace sits afar off with folded wings, and who can know when his blessed pinitas shall again hover over this free "Land of the West?" God in his mercy has chastised us deeply, and while we bow in humility to His will, we would not forget those who, thus far, have so nobly done the nation's bidding. We welcome you proudly; no stigma of cowardice has ever been coupled with the name of our gallant 34th.
When the tale of Fair Oaks gleams upon history's page, it will picture a true, warrior band, eagerly responding to the noble SUMNER'S command. Even now we hear that order—Charge 34th"—and your thinned ranks tell, alas, too well, how there you met the traitor.
Of memory's immortal tablets we know there is one for the heroes of Malvern Hill, Antietam and Fredericksburgh [sic]. Kindly we welcome you to the rest so nobly won.
As the address was concluded each lady came forward and threw a bouquet of fresh spring flowers among the deeply effected soldiers. Those who saw this beautiful scene can never forget its impressiveness.
The President, Hon. Robert EARL then announced Hon. EZRA GRAVES who spoke as follows:—
ADDRESS OF JUDGE GRAVES.
Officers and Soldiers:—
Our friends and neighbors, who have come back from the field of blood and carnage with your garments faded by a southern sun and your faces bronzed by a southern wind. You have come home unharmed from the rebels, from whose hearts the sting of national death has emanated and by whose hands the temple of freedom has been desecrated. You are permitted to meet again the kind embraces of those you left behind, with such additional claims upon them as your fidelity and heroism have created. The two years that you have been absent have been long years to those who have missed you at home, and who have gazed upon the vacant chair with tearful eyes and prayerful hearts, whose thoughts and imaginations have followed you from your enrollment in 1861, to the barracks at Albany, and onward to your encampment on Kalorama Heights, from thence to Seneca Mills, to the Great Falls, to Edwards Ferry, Poolsville, Bald­wins Heights, Charlestown, Berrysville, Winchester, and back to Sandy Hook, and Washington, and Alexandria, and then by ship to Fortress Monroe, disembarking at Hampton. We followed you through Big and Little Bethel, the entrenchments at Howard's Bridge, pursuing the rebels on their retreat to their formidable defences; at Yorktown, and from thence to your encampment at the Tyler House. We followed you to Fair Oaks, to witness the full strength of your heroic daring, as you took the   place of Gen. Casey’s vanquished forces and came to the relief of Gen. Couch, who was then about yielding the field to the enemy. We heard your shouts as they welled up from your patriotic hearts on that memorable day at Fair Oaks, when, with glistening bayonets, you charged the rebel foe with such intrepid-ty and determination that stone walls, un­derbrush and swamps were no obstacles in your way to the attainment of that glory that came with a halo clustering around your heads, writing on the trees as it pass­ed over the field of deadly conflict. "The brave, invincible 34th;" we read it on the wings of the wind, as it passed over the homes you left behind, and our bosoms beat with pride and our hearts throbbed with gratitude that you, our associates, had nobly defended our country's flag though the missiles of death thinned your ranks and laid low by your side your val­iant companions in arms. We followed you through that seven days bloody con­flict, at Peach Orchard, Savage Station, White Oak Swamp, Glendale, Nelsons Farm, and Malvern Hill, where you met the enemy and added to former successes by forcing them to flee before you, leaving their dead and dying in your hands. We saw you at Harmons Landing, erecting breastworks, cutting down the forests and making corduroy roads, faithful to duty everywhere. Next at Newport News and then at Alexandria. Thence by peremp­tory order you was summoned to Bull Run, the order was changed while you were on the march as you met the Yankee in disrespectful retreat before the enemy, and you will all remember that dreary and fatiguing all night march to Chain Bridge, arriving there early in the morn­ing and breaking camp the same afternoon, and taking up march for Centreville to cover Pope's retreat. Six days mud and exhaustion brought you back to Chain Bridge. We followed you to Tennellytown, Rockville, to South Mountain and on to the long-to-be-remembered bloody field of Antietam, where you escaped destruction by unequalled coolness and unparalled [sic] bravery; from thence to Harper's Ferry and Baldwin's Heights, thence to London Valley, clearing the gaps of the Mountains by your firm step and deadly fire, until you reached Warrenton; and then to Falmouth, when, by that fatal order which brought you over the Rappahannock on the 13th of December last, you fearlessly mingled in that bloody scene which moistened the earth of Fredericksburg with blood too pure for rebel soil.
Although we have detailed ourselves to do sympathetic duty at home, yet we know we have not followed you through all the trying and embarrassing duties which have blocked your pathway. And although we have stood by your side in thought and hope, amid pelting storms, in dreary marches, in tents of wasting fever and bleeding wounds, and although we listened to the throbbing heart of electricity with breathless suspense as it out-rode time to bring us the soul-inspiriting tidings that victory was not for our enemies while the 34th remained unconquered; yet you know, with all our solicitude and anxiety, we could no comprehend that self-sacrifice and deprivation to which you have been subjected through the complex realities of a soldiers life. It would be unworthy a freeman who loved his country and his country's cause to be unmindful of any who periled their lives to save its laws and institutions. But when the news came of the sacriligious [sic] and cowardly attack upon Fort Sumpter [sic], you left the plough in the field, the work shop, the counting room, the halls of science, the sacred altar, the learned professions, parents, brothers, sisters, friends and home, to mingle your bones and blood, if freedom demanded it, on soil cursed by rebel footsteps. No glittering gold invited you to the contest. No government bank-bill was placarded before you to arouse your patriotism. With that intuitive impulse of passion which every true lover of his country feels, you drew the sword and shouldered arms, and with firm step and manly bearing, went to the battle field to honor the cause you espoured; and if succeeding regiments had imitated your example, provost marshals and sheriffs would have had but small duties to perform in searching in the crevices of the rocks for those ruffian deserters and niggardly cowards who have stolen the form of man to disgrace the creature that God made in his own image. You saw the embers of Liberty were uncovered afresh; you saw the fires of freedom burning with renewed heat over the priaries [sic] of the west, mountains of the north and granite hills of the east; you saw the lovers of your country renewing their allegiance. You saw the mountains and the valleys, the ships and the rail roads teeming with fathers, brothers, sons and lovers, eager for the battle field, demanding an atonement for the insult offered to our flag on the walls of Sumpter [sic]. Officers and soldiers, you went at the call of your country, with hearts beating and throbbing for victory, and you bore with you the prayers of those who, from age and inability were not permitted to share with you a soldier's fate and a soldier's honor. You went to join your brethren in arms, to strew your pathway with laurels of fame to be won by noble daring in deadly conflict.

"With the patriot's prayer your bosoms were beating
With the patriot's arms the flag you unfurled,
Defend it or die, each man was repeating,
It is liberty's cause—it's the hope of the world."

You went exhibiting that cool, calm, determined fortitude and bravery which enabled you to welcome the approach of your enemies with a heroism that has quailed at no glistening steel or booming cannon.
The contract you entered into with the Government, has been performed, its conditions executed and nobly done. And we have met this day with this vast assembly to satisfy you that we are proud of our country, that we are proud of our institutions, that we are proud of our Government, but, above all, that we are proud of you, the citizen soldiers, who have gallantly defended them. And although our hearts are made glad at year presence, yet where are all the brave men who went with you? I see your ranks are thinned, your numbers lessened—where are they? Have they fallen? Yes, the rebel foe cast his arrow but to slay. The sacred soil, cursed by the igratitude [sic] of its owners, is to be enriched by the flesh and bones of brave men who fell fighting with you. They lived for imitation, they died for example. Though the sigh of affliction may heave, the tear of regret may fall at severing the cords of consanguinity, yet we will boast of their deeds with an enthusiasm, in after years, that shall blot out the anguish their dead has created. The sleeping patriotic friend upon the battle field is a heaven-born legacy. It is a legacy which time cannot destroy. It is written in the family bible of fame, a rich inheritance which descends to future generations unimpaired and unstained. The humble graves where rest those who struggled with you for victory have no Parian marble to mark the place where sleeps the man, but at that roll call of national justice, the true and good will point to the spot and the acacia of fame, fresh from the grave of loyalty, will rise a towering evergreen, spreading its branches to shade a world of freemen, as fadeless and undying as the fame of those who gave nourishment to its roots.
You have come back to finish that which you had commenced when the clarion note of war summoned you to the temple of Freedom. You have learned the casualties of war, have felt its burdens and responsibilities, and have come home to enjoy its honors so richly won. Yours indeed is an enviable reputation. It is a reputation worthy of preservation. As a regiment your glory is unfading. That glory is the individual property of you all; each man wears the crown of success; each man holds before him the record of his own achievements, written with the (indelible ink of a nation's gratitude. To preserve that reputation is the work of your coming life and, whether in the tented field or on the battle ground, amid shot and shell from deadly foes, or surrounded with Northern traitors or Southern sympathizers [sic], with hypocritic cant or loud professions, or reposing in the more quiet and unobtrusive employments of life, I pray you, yield to no allurements or enticements that shall betray your want of courage to overcome every enemy which may assail your future comfort. History informs us that war demoralizes a nation. The experiment has never been tried where, like this, the people are the gov­ernment. Remember that each man here is a sovereign and charged with the preservation of our institutions and the moral character of our nation. Remember that though the strong arm of military power may resist aggression and subdue rebellion, that power must be based upon the moral character of the people. Go then, officers and soldiers, to your different employments and associations, crowned with the congratulations of a grateful people, and may that God who guided the dove from the ark to the mountain, direct your footsteps and preserve you through the frost of many winters, to live in the affections of the people and prove a national truth, that in a ''Republican form of Government does not demoralize the citizen soldiery.
Col. LAFLIN called for three cheers from the regiment at the conclusion of the speech, and they were given with a will.

THE COLLATION.
The soldiers were then conducted to the tables which had been prepared for them under the most active and efficient superintendance of M. W. PRIEST Esq. Here everything was provided in the most liberal manner, and nearly one hundred ladies gladly waited upon the youthful heroes of so many battles. Some idea may be obtained of the magnitude of these preparations from the following figures:
Length of table for Soldiers                        1054f
    "       "     "          Firemen and Cit.            850f
No. pounds of meat                                      800
  "   loaves of bread                                       200
  "   large pies                                                150
  "   loaves of cake                                                  200
  "   pounds of sugar                                     100
  "   "               cheese                                    100
  "   "               coffee                                       40
  "   boiled eggs                                              360
  "   pounds of butter                                       50
Besides pork and beans, pickles, radishes, oranges, tarts, &c., &c., in quantities that cannot be estimated.
While at the table, and indeed, throughout the entire day, the men of the 34th behaved with that gentlemanly bearing for which they have received so many compliments at New York, Albany and elsewhere. These gallant fellows, seated around so festal a board, and. the attentions paid them by the ladies were a most beautiful sight to be long remembered.
Besides these tables at which sat the soldiers, were those of the firemen and citizens. Our village firemen entertained the visiting companies in a most hospitable and liberal manner. Among the citizens' tables we noticed particularly that of the ladies of Manheim. It was fairly overloaded with choice eatables and was magnificently decorated with fine bouquets [sic].
After the soldiers had left the tables the hungry crowd rushed forward and scenes were enacted both shameful and ridiculous. People who, we presume to say, have enough to eat when at home, acted as though they expected never again to have such a chance and so a general stampede for the tables began. But, by the efforts of the committee some show of order was finally secured and we believe everybody ate to his heart's content—and there was plenty to spare which, it is a pleasure to announce, has been distributed, among the needy widows and families of deceased soldiers.
After dinner the crowd swayed to and fro after squads of soldiers who roamed where they pleased. Joyous greetings and happy, hearty shakings of the hand, and fears and kisses of affection were the order of the day. Everybody was happy and we trust everybody was satisfied with the reception. The soldiers appreciated fully the efforts made to honor them and their friends were proud that the brave fellows were so deserving it and all other honors that could he given them. It was a proud day both for them and for us.
At live o'clock that portion of the regiment who did not have furloughs for home visits returned to Albany. Loud cheers were given on their departure, after which the multitude quietly dispersed. Not an unhappy or disgraceful scene occurred during all the day. Everything was in good taste and in good order, and every body was happy and proud of his participation in the festivities.

The Mohawk Courier.
Little Falls, June 18, 1863.
Return of the 34th Regiment.
THEIR RECEPTION.
Last Saturday was a gala day in our village. The gallant soldiers of the 34th regiment were coming home after two years hard and honorable service, to receive the thanks and congratulations of relatives, friends and old acquaintances, previous to their being mustered out of the service. During their absence, they have participated in battles that will be recorded in history, and won a name for bravery that will be honored so long as the record of our country shall be kept. They had rallied from the hills and along the valley, when the first alarm of danger was sounded, and 800 in number had entered the service of the Government two years before. Three hundred and twenty only of that number were in the ranks,—the ballance [sic] were mouldering upon fourteen battle fields, or scattered, sick and disabled among the scenes of their childhood. (An article copied from the Evening Journal on our first page, will give the reader a concise history of their movements.)—Little time remained after the day of their return was fixed in which to complete arrangements for their reception, but with general enthusiasm and cooperation, our citizens accomplished a great amount of work. Saturday morning all things were in readiness. Before sunrise, rain began to fall, and about 9 o'clock it poured upon us heavily. Notwithstanding, loads of people began to move along the roads leading to our village, and our streets were soon thronged by thousands.—The rain ceased about, 10 o'clock, loads of people continued to arrive, and at 11 the assemblage was all that could have been expected. At that time the train bringing the 34th arrived. Cannon thundered a welcome, our band played "Home, Sweet Home," and amid waving of 'kerchiefs the regiment debarked. For a few moments the scene baffles description. Parents sought among the ranks for sons,—sisters looked for brothers.—and every one seemed to have a friend among the gallant soldiers. After receiving the congratulations of the assemblage, the regiment formed in line. They were then welcomed home in behalf of the Board of Trustees by M. W. Priest, President of the village, in the following brief and appropriate speech:—
GENTLEMEN, Officers, and Soldiers of the 34th Regiment, of New York State Volunteers:—
The duty and the pleasure devolves upon me as President of this village, to welcome those that belong to this County on their return home. Thanking those members of your regiment belonging to other parts of the State for their presence on this occasion, I hope that nothing may occur that will cause any but kind, recollections and good feelings towards us when far away from us. I assure the relations and friends of those that do not return that they have the sincere sympathy of this community. Hon. AMOS H. PRESCOTT will welcome you in behalf of the County. Again I bid the heroes of the 34th Regiment a warm and cordial welcome to the Village of Little Falls.
The procession was then formed in the following order, by the Marshal of the day, Maj. Z. C. Priest, and marched to the corner of second and John streets.
Squad of Police.
FIRST DIVISION.
Maj. Z. C. Priest, Marshal of the Day.
Mohawk Valley Band.
County Committee, Mounted.
Mounted Citizens from the various Towns.
Marshal. Visiting Military. Marshal.
SECOND DIVISION.
Marshal. Frankfort Band. Marshal.
President and Trustees of the Village.
Orators of the Day.
President of the Day.
Clergy.
Operatives from the Factories.
Citizens in General.
THIRD DIVISION.
Ilion Band.
Marshall. FIRE DEPARTMENT. Marshal.
Chief Fireman.
Herkimer Fire Company.
Frankfort Fire Company.
Mohawk Fire Company.
Ilion Fire Company.
LITTLE FALLS FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Cascade Engine Co. No. 1.
Protection Engine Co. No. 2.
Gen. Herkimer Engine Co. No. 8.
Citizens' Brass Band.
Marshal. Drum Corps. Marshal.
34th REGIMENT N. Y. S. VOLUNTEERS.
Disabled and Discharged Soldiers.

After prayer by Rev. S. B. Gregory, the following Address of Welcome was delivered by Hon. A. H. Prescott:
Col. LAFLIN, officers and soldiers of the 34th Regiment, of the Volunteer force of the State of New York:
I have unexpectedly been selected to perform the honorable duty of greeting you, and in behalf of the people of the County, to extend to you their warm, cordial, and hearty welcome. It is now more than two years since you, each and all, abandoned your peaceful pursuits in civil life to engage in a new vocation. The employment was one of a different character from any that you had before that time engaged in; you did not go to gratify an ambition, to obtain wealth, or for place, or for position, whereby you could formally enjoy the favor, comfort, and emoluments of the world, but it was in response to the call of our country, to perform, not a pleasant though a highly important duty, which belongs to the citizens of all classes that live in the land of Washington.
You, of your own free will and accord, abandoned all you held dear, so far as the social relations of life were concerned, because you desired to obey the summons which called you to defend the institutions of our Fathers. The time when your organization was affected is fresh in our memory, as well as the many difficulties and hardships you encountered, and the sacrifices made to reach the Battle Field. Well do we remember the day when you bade adieu to the loved ones, and amid their tears, with firmness and manly bearing, departed upon the train which was, to convey the Regiment to the scenes of deadly conflict and strife, and which, alas, was to many of our brave comrades, their departure upon a journey from which no traveler returns.
As you went away, the sympathies and prayers of the people were with you; all had a deep interest in you as citizens of a County that had since the days of the Revolution been always distinguished for their fond attachment to the principles of a Republican Government. The honor of the fair fame of the County of Gen. Herkimer was committed to your trust; you were to prove whether or not you were worthy of your noble ancestry—did the same unflinching courage, devoted patriotism and fidelity exist in A. D. 1861, as prevailed and was exhibited in the days of 1776? The record already made up in the history of this great contest, still existing in behalf of human freedom and the "inalienable rights of man," shall speak and answer the question.
The battles of Fair Oaks, Nelson's Farm or Glendale, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hills, Antietam and Fredericksburg were each and all of them distinguished as closely contested fields, by the opposing forces, for the unflinching valor there displayed, and places that have become classic grounds. On those bloody fields tens of thousands brave soldiers sacrificed their lived on the Altar of Liberty, and have gone to receive their reward in the land of light beyond the Sun. The soiled, bloodstained and tattered banners which I see before me this day—proud emblems of a nation's hope, were there unfurled and sustained by you. That brave, accomplished, deeply lamented officer, Gen. Sumner, in his official report of the battle of Fair Oaks, by merely stating facts in regard to what you did there, has made a page in history which is destined to place undying laurels on the 34th New York. When the fortunes of the day were against us, and the traitorous legions of the enemy were advancing, and nothing except firm, bold, and decided action could prevent defeat, your services were required, and upon you rested the responsibility of that important contest—Your line of battle on that occasion was as perfect and in as good order as though you were only on Dress Parade, or drawn up for review. Shoulder to shoulder you made that gallant, noble, and glorious charge, which will be remembered "not for a day but for all time." The enemy fled, and one of the most brilliant victories of the war was thus accomplished, but at a loss of ninety-eight of your brave comrades.
At Antietam, when outflanked and surrounded, you nobly cut your way through the enemy and saved the Regiment, coming out of the contest with numbers much diminished.
Nobly did you stand up against the iron hail and missiles of death and destruction at Fredericksburg. But I have not time to continue the history of your gallant deeds further here.—Your have gained the unperishable glory of true courage and bravery, at all times and in all places in which you have been called upon to act. "The Fighting 34th," well in the advance at all times when on the march against the enemy, and in the rear at the retreat.
More than the full period of your enlistment having expired you are now about to lay down your arms and return to your families and friends. A cordial, earnest, and happy greeting awaits you. The assembled multitude here affords but slight evidence of the place which you each and all hold in the affections of the people of the County, who all hail and honor you, the survivors of so many well fought battles. But the rejoicings and congratulations of this hour must be disturbed by the incidents that are always connected with such conflicts.—In proportion to the character, magnitude, and severity of the contest, must be our losses and reverses. How happy we should feel if all those who wept with you in April 1861, could be restored to society, friends, and families on this occasion. While your safe arrival causes the tears of joy to flow down many cheeks, emotions of a different character prevail in many sad hearts; but about half of your original number have been permitted to return. Where are those that went with you that cannot be present here to-day?—A large proportion of them have fallen in battle, and their remains repose beneath the clods of the valley, or are now bleaching in the sun in a distant land. All honor is due to the memery [sic] of the illustrious dead.
Their names and deeds are recorded in our hearts, and in a suitable manner, shall the record be preserved, and transmitted from, generation to generation.
I trust also, that each and all of us, will rememeber [sic] in a manner to be exhibited by "substantial acts, of kindness, and charity, the Widow and the Orphan. Another painful consideration. is suggested here: Notwithstanding your task has been well accomplished, the end has not yet been reached; the Rebellion against the best Government that the light of the Sun has ever shown upon, still rages with undiminished fury. While much has been accomplished, great sacrifices and exertions, are yet necessary, and demanded. I desire to ask a question here, put to all those who compose this assembly, returned Soldiers as well as Citizens; Shall we abandon the conflict, allow our institutions to be over thrown, and the fit and chosen emblem of our Nation's Glory to trail in the dust?—Will we, so far as our action is concerned, continue to make all the further sacrifices that are, and may become necessary to preserve to the world, to bless mankind, the richest boon, which GOD, in his wisdom has ever vouchsafed to Man? I believe it to be the firm and decided opinion of all present, "that our Glorious Union, must and shall be preserved."
Then in conclusion, permit me to say, let this consideration be uppermost in the minds of all and let all else, be subserviant [sic] to the great end. To establish our Glorious Government, required the sincere and the greatest sacrifices of all those possessed of patriotic hearts.—To preserve and continue it requires greater exertion, more united action, than it did to establish it.
From this time henceforth then, let us each and all, feel that we have an individual duty to perform, and waiving all less important considerations, let us be united as one sacred band of Patriotic men and women, and let the only question be, in what way and manner can we do the most good, towards the accomplishment of this much desired object.
Fellow Citizens, the example of the 34th is before you, it has been noble, manly, and glorious, from the beginning to the end. If we do our part, yet remaining to be performed, as well as they have done theirs, the rebellion will speedily be put down, Officers and Soldiers, trusting that your presence with us will incite in all, emulation and action, for that purpose, in this hour of peril, I welcome you, and may the richest of Heaven's Blessings, reward and bless you and yours.
The Address was responded to by Col. Byron Laflin, in behalf of the regiment, in a brief, appropriate and eloquent manner. At the conclusion of his remarks, Maj. Priest proposed three cheers for the 34th, which was heartily responded to. Col. Laflin then called upon the soldiers for three cheers for Herkimer County, which were given with a will.
The procession then marched up John street to Eastern Avenue, around Eastern Square to Main street; up Main street to Western Avenue; down Canal street to Ann street; down Bridge street to Jefferson street; up Jefferson street to Ballinger street; up Ballinger street to German street; thence up Ann street to Western Square. During the march bells rang and cannon thundered.
Arriving at the Square, a beautiful scene was presented. A long platform had been erected on the north side, for the speakers and clergy. Upon that stood about fifty young ladies belonging to Miss H. A. Wright's School, dressed in white,—wreaths encircling their heads, each holding bouquets, tied with red, white, and blue ribbons. In front of the platform in long letters was the motto "First to Volunteer." Entering the Square through a beautiful Gothic arch, the procession was marched in front of the platform described. The young ladies then recited in perfect concert a composition addressed to the soldiers, which we have failed to procure. At the close of their recitation, they tossed their bouquets among the soldiers who eagerly appropriated them. Maj. Priest proposed three cheers for Miss Wright's school, which was heartily responded to—the young ladies left the platform,—the clergy and speakers took seats, and Hon. Ezra Graves delivered the following address to the soldiers.
OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS, OUR FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS,—who have now come back from the field of blood and carnage with your garments faded by a southern sun, and your faces bronzed by a southern wind. You have come home unharmed from the rebels, from whose hearts the sting of nations death has emanated, and by whose hands the temple of freedom has been desecrated. You are permitted to meet again the kind embraces of those you left behind, with such additional claims upon them as your fidelity and heroism have created. The two years that you have been absent, have been long years to those who have missed you at home, and who have gazed up on the vacant chair with tearful eyes and prayerful hearts; whose thoughts and imaginations have followed you from your enrollment in 1861, to the barracks at Albany, and onward to your encampment on Kalorama Heights; from thence to Seneca Mills, to the Great Falls, to Edwards Ferry, to Poolsville, Baldwins Heights, Charles town, Berrysville, Winchester, and back to Sandy Hook, and Washington, and Alexandria, and then by ship to Fortress Monroe, disembarking at Hampton. We followed you through Big and Little Bethel, to the entrenchment at Howard's Bridge, pursuing the rebels on their retreat to their formidable defences at Yorktown, and from thence to your encampment at the Tyler House. We followed you to Fair Oaks, to witness the full strength of your heroic daring as you took the place of Gen. Casey's vanquished forces and came to the relief of General Couch, who was then about yielding the field to the enemy. We heard your shouts as they welled up from your patriotic hearts on that memorable day at Fair Oaks, when, with glistening Bayonets, you charged the rebel foe with such intrepidity and determination that stone walls, underbrush and swamps were no obstacles in your way to the attainment of that glory that came with a halo clustering around your heads wilting on the breeze as it passed over the field of deadly conflict. "The brave invincible 34th," we read it on the wings of the wind, as it passed over the homes you left behind, and our bosoms beat with pride and our hearts throbbed with gratitude that you, our associates, had nobly defended our country's flag though the missiles of death, thinned your ranks and laid low by your sides your valiant companions in arms. We followed you through that seven days bloody conflict at Peach Orchard, Savage Station, White Oak Swamps, Glendale, Nelsons Farm, and Malvern Hill, where you met the enemy and added to former successes by forcing them to flee before you, leaving their dead and dying in your hands. We saw you at Harrison's Landing erecting breastworks, cutting down the forrest [sic] and making corduroy roads, faithful to duty everywhere. Next at Newport News and then at Alexandria. Thence by peremptory order you were summoned to Bull Run. The order was changed while you were on the march, as you met the Yankee in disgraceful retreat before the enemy, and you will all remember that dreary and fatiguing all night march to Chain Bridge, arriving there early in the morning and breaking camp the same afternoon, and taking up march for Centerville to cover Pope's retreat. Six days' mud and exhaustion brought you back to Chain Bridge. We followed you to Tamellytown, Rockville, to South Mountain and on to the long to be remembered bloody field of Anteitam, where you escaped destruction by unequalled coolness and unparalled bravery. From thence to Harper's Ferry and Baldwin's Heights, thence to Loudon Valley, clearing the gaps of the mountain by your firm step and deadly fire, until you reached Warrenton, and then to Falmouth, when by that fatal order which brought you over the Rappahannock on the 13th of December last, you fearlessly mingled in that bloody scene, which moistened the earth of Fredericksburgh [sic] with blood too pure for rebel soil.
Although we have detailed ourselves to do sympathetic duty at home, yet we know we have not followed you through all the trying and embarrassing duties which have blocked your pathway. And although we have stood by your side in thought and hope, amid pelting storms in dreary marches, in tents of wasting fever and bleeding wounds, and although we listened to the throbbing heart of electricity with breathless suspension as it out-rode time to bring us the soul-inspiriting tidings that victory was not for our enemies, while the 34th remained unconquered; yet you know, with all our solicitude and anxiety, we could not comprehend that self-sacrifice and deprivation to which you have been subjected through the complex realities of a soldiers life. It would be unworthy a freeman who loved his country and his country's cause to be unmindful of any who periled their lives to save its laws and institutions. But when the news came of the sacriligious [sic] and cowardly attack upon Fort Sumpter [sic], you left the plow in the field, the work shop, the counting room, the halls of science, the sacred altar, the learned professions, parents, brothers, sisters, friends and homes, to mingle your bones and blood, if freedom demanded it, on soil cursed by rebel foot steps. No glittering gold invited you to the contest; no government bank bill was placed before you to arouse your patriotism. With that intuitive impulse of passion which every true lover of his country feels you drew the sword and shouldered arms, and with firm step and manly bearing, went to the battle field to honor, the cause you espoused, and if succeeding regiments had imitated your example, Provost Marshals and Sheriffs would have had but small duties to perform in  searching in the crevices of the rock for those ruffian deserters and niggardly cowards who hive stolen the form of man to disgrace the creature that God made in his own image. You saw the embers of Liberty were uncovered afresh; you saw the fires of freedom burning with renewed heat over the prairies of the west, mountains of the north and granite hills of the east; you saw the lovers of your country renewing their allegiance. You saw the mountains and the vallies [sic], the ships and the railroads teeming with fathers, brothers, sons and lovers, eager for the battlefield, demanding an attonement [sic] for the insult offered to our flag on the walls of Sumpter [sic]. Officers and soldiers, you went at the call of your country, with hearts beating and throbbing for victory, and you bore with you the prayers of those who, from age and inability, were not permitted to share with you a soldier's fate and a soldier's honor. You went to join your brethren in arms, to strew their pathway with laurels of fame to be won by noble daring in deadly conflict.

"With the patriot's prayer your bosoms were beating,
With the patriot's arms the flag you unfurled,
Defend it or die each man was repeating,
It is libertie's [sic] cause—its the hope of the world."

You went exhibiting that cool, calm, determined fortitude and bravery which enabled you to welcome the approach of your enemies with a heroism that has quailed at no glistening steel or booming cannon.
The contract you entered into with the Government has been performed its conditions executed, and nobly done, and we have met this day with this vast assembly to satisfy you that we are proud of our country, that we are proud of our institutions, that we are proud of our Government; but above all that we are proud of you the citizen soldiers, who have gallantly defended them. And althought [sic] our hearts are made glad at your presence yet where are all the brave men who went with you? I see your ranks are thinned, your numbers lessened.—Where are they? Have they fallen? Yes, the rebel foe cast his arrow but to slay. The sacred soil, cursed by the ingratitude of its owners, is to be enriched by the flesh and bones of brave men who fell fighting with you. They lived for imitation, they died for example. Though the sigh of affliction may heave, the tear of regret may fall at severing the chords of consanquinity, yet we will boast of their deeds with an enthusiasm in after years, that shall blot out the anguish their death has created. The sleeping patriotic friend upon the battle field is a heaven-born legacy. It is a legacy which time cannot destroy. It is written in the family bible of fame, a rich inheritance which descends to future generation, unimpaired or unstained.
The humble graves where rest those who struggled with you for victory, have no Parian marble to mark the place where sleeps the man; but at that roll call of national justice, the true and good will point to the spot, and the acacia of fame, fresh from the grave of loyalty, will rise a towering evergreen, spreading its branches to shade a world of freemen, as fadeless and undying as the fame of those who gave nourishment to its roots.
You have come back to finish that which you had commenced when the clarion note of war summoned you to guard the temple of Freedom. You have learned the casualties of war, have felt its burdens and responsibilities, and have come home to enjoy its honors so richly won. Yours indeed, is an enviable reputation. It is a reputation worthy of preservation,—as a regiment your glory is unfading. That glory is the individual property of you all; each man wears the crown of success. Each man holds before him the record of his own achievements, written with the indelible ink of a nations gratitude. To preserve that reputation is the work of your coming life. And, whether in the tented field or on the battle ground, amid shot and shell from deadly foes; or surrounded with northern traitors or southern sympathizers, with hypocritical cant or loud professions, or reposing in the more quiet and unobtrusive employments of life, I pray you, yield to no allurements or enticements that shall betray your want of courage to overcome every enemy which may assail your future comfort. History informs us that war demoralizes a nation. The experiment has never been tried where, like this, the people are the Government. Remember that each man here is a sovereign, and charged with the preservation of our institutions and the moral character of our nation. Remember that though the strong arm of military power may resist oppression and subdue rebellion, that power must be based upon the moral character of the people. Go then, officers and soldiers, to your different employments and associations, crowned with the congratulation of a grateful people, and may that God who guided the dove from the ark to the mountain, direct your footsteps and preserve you though the frost of many winters, to live in the affection of the people and prove a national truth, that in a Republican form of government war does not demoralize the citizen soldiery.
At the close of the oration, Col. Laflin announced that the Regiment would return at 5 o'clock, excepting those soldiers in this vicinity to whom their Captain saw fit to grant furloughs until Tuesday. The reception ceremonies closed with a bountiful repast furnished by the ladies of the County. The tables presented a most inviting appearance, fairly groaning under the weight of good things spread upon them. Enough was provided for soldiers, firemen, and citizens, and none were allowed to go away unsatisfied.
We have thus attempted to give a general outline of the proceedings connected with the reception of the 34th. We had taken pains also, to collect the various mottoes to be seen along the streets through which the procession moved, with descriptions of the decorations, so tastefully and universally made use of by our citizens. Instead of giving them, however, in full, we appropriate the summary made by the Utica Herald, giving our space to various correspondents, among them L. N. C., of the 34th, who has given a graphic description of the journey of the regiment from the Rappahannock to Albany.
1. A semi-gothic arch, with flags and festoons of evergreens, and the mottoes, "Welcome gallant 34th," and "Your record is immortal." 2. A monster circular arch of peculiar construction, with the motto, "How are you Vets." 3. Unique and very beautiful; circular pieces of red, white and blue cloth, surrounded with wreaths, formed into an arch, each one containing the name of one of the battles in which the regiment had participated; above a statue of Washington. Near this arch was suspended across the street a coarsely painted portrait of McClellan, with the names of battlefields, and a little further on, suspended between two flag-staffs, painted red white and blue, festooned with evergreens, and surmounted by evergreen bushes and flags, were the sentiments; "Brave 34th; we welcome the living and mourn the dead; your heroism is recorded." 4. A handsome arch, with the mottos, "To valor and constancy," and "Brave as the bravest." 5. Circular arch, with circles of red, white and blue depending, and from the centre, "34th." 6. A simple arch, with the motto, "34th welcome home." 7. Circular; on one side, in large green letters, on red background, "Welcome, thrice welcome, noble 34th;" on the other, in white letters on evergreen background, "Home, sweet home."—8. Gothic arch, with wreath hung from centre, a star above, and a fine effect produced by the motto, in letters of red, white and blue,  "Welcome home, 34th." 9. Beautiful circular arch, festooned and flagged with the mottoes, "Herkimer greets her heroes," and "'Ever faithful to the flag."
There were also along the route hundreds of designs and mottoes that we cannot stop to specify, although many of them merit mention for their beauty and appropriateness. There was many portraits along with the decorations of the private residences, the most frequent was that of Washington. The most impressive, and perhaps the most beautiful object which the Committee had prepared, was a pyramidial monument, some 20 feet high, in imitation of gray granite, on Ann street, in memory of the gallant dead. It was surmounted by a bronze eagle and national flag, and was twined and hung with evergreen wreath-work. On the shaft and base were the names of the battles of the regiment, and on the four sides of the pedestal these sentiments: "The memory of their gallant deeds will live forever;" "Virginia's soil is consecrated to freedom;" "They died in the defense of the good old flag;"

"Freedom's battle once begun,
Bequeathed from bleeding sire to son
Though baffled oft is ever won."

At this point the Little Falls Band filed to each side of the monument, stopped, and played a mournful dirge while the procession was passing by.  The following are the present officers of the regiment:
Colonel—Byron Laflin.
Lieutenant Colonel—John Beverly.
Major—Wells Sponable.
Adjutant—John Kirk.
Quartermaster—Nathan Easterbrooks.
Surgeon—S. P. Manley.
Assistant Surgeon—J. Hurley Miller.
Chaplain— S. Franklin Schoonmaker.
Company A—(from West Troy)—Captain, B. H. Warford; First Lieutenant, R. L. Brown; Second Lieutenant, John Oathout.
Company B—(from Little Falls)—Captain, Irving D. Clark; First Lieutenant, Francis N. Usher; Second Lieutenant, William Burns.
Company C—(from Norway, Herkimer county,)—Captain, Thomas Corcoran; First Lieutenant, William Wal­lace; Second Lieutenant, Simeon P. McIntyre.
Company D—(from Champlain)—Captain, John O. Scott; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, Byron Coats.           
Company E—(from Steuben county)—Captain, Henry Baldwin; First Lieutenant, Henry W. Sanford; Second Lieutenant, Melville S. Dunn.
Company F—(from Herkimer)—Captain, Charles Riley; First Lieutenant, William Van Valkenburg; Second Lieutenant, B. F. Minor.
Company G—(from Herkimer)—Captain, Joy P. Johnson; First Lieutenant, John Morey; Second Lieutenant, A Rounds.
Company H—(from Crown Point)—Captain, William S Walton; First Lieutenant, vacant; Second Lieutenant, William Kirk.
Company I—(from Weedsport; Steuben county)—Captain, Eugene B. LaRue; First Lieutenant, A. T. Atwood; Second Lieutenant, Orrin W. Beach.
Company K—(from Salisbury)—Captain, Emerson S. Northrup; First Lieutenant, James McCormick; Second Lieutenant, Lewis N. Chapin.

Return of the 34th Regiment.
Detail of their Journey from the Rappahannock to Albany.
LITTLE FALLS, June 15, 1863.
MR. EDITOR:—Thinking perhaps, a brief account of our trip up from the Rappahannock to this place, might not be wholly uninteresting to the many readers of the Courier, I will, your highness permitting, venture to intrude once more.
For several days previous to our departure, we had been expecting orders, but owing to the then unsettled state of the army, and the probability of a battle at any moment, we did not start until the morning of Tuesday, the 9th inst. The day before had been occupied in making preparations for the departure, by packing up and turning in tents and camp equipage, making out various papers and statements in reference to the regiment, etc., etc. However, by six o'clock we were in order of march and ready to depart. The brigade had intended to take a formal farewell of the regiment, but permission for such a privilege could not be obtained, though to say that the brigade did not turn out would be untrue. As we marched along, the way was crowded and the leave takings were as familiar as though it was a separation of brothers; crowding around the cars they grasped our hands, and with tears in their eyes, bid us a God-speed to our happy homes. Strange indeed, and sorrowful, was that parting. On one hand frowned the stern countenance of war; while on the other smiled the vales of peace. Strange paradox and contrast, that! But whatever fortune may hover about its footsteps, whatever clouds may lower, and whatever suns may shine around its pathway, in storm and strife, in trials and in battle, Oh! God protect and shield that old brigade! Fostered beneath its strong arm, brave in the conscious power of its noble and well earned reputation, we have grown proud of our connection, but in our absence we are separated as it were from many dear friends and brothers,—aye, more than brothers,—men with whom we have stood shoulder to shoulder amid the battle smoke, and hand in hand stood round to defend the country of our fathers. May victory everywhere perch upon its banners, and the eulogy of its noble dead be written with the pen of inspiration upon the nations' memory.
As we moved along the road, regiment after regiment turned out to bid us a farewell, and especially among the ...ps of our corps did the greatest excitement and enthusiasm prevail. From every hill-top as we passed along, from every valley and every camp rolled out in thunder tones the mighty tide of popular applause. There are many things to which this fact refers in a manner never to be mistaken. After the battle of Antietam, certain correspondents writing from the army, charged that the 34th disgracefully broke and ran during the engagement, but without quoting any other argument, the facts relating to our departure from the seat of war, ably refute all such charges, and are an evidence of the popularity and high esteem which the regiment had acquired during its connection with the army of the  Potomac. No company or regiment once betraying the confidence of the army, can be admitted to the fellowship of its order again, no matter by what noble deeds it may strive to regain its laurels. No regiment left the service with a better name or reputation than the 34th, and no regiment ever so nobly sustained the confidence it held.
Arriving at Acquia Creek, we were soon aboard the boat and en route for Washington, where we arrived about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, having had a very pleasant and agreeable trip up the Potomac. Here the men had sufficient time to subdue the "irrepressible conflict" going on within, and quell the desire for that which no other element in the physical world can equal in a soldier's idea of the matter. Ornamented with plug noses and black eyes, under a heavy sail of canvass, and with a fresh breeze ever now and then springing up  from the odoriferous regions where grow gin-cocktails and brandy-smashes, half seas over and hard a-ground under the, to many never before equaled occasion, passed off in hilarity and joyous excitement. After awhile, however, everything was in readiness, and we got aboard the cars, —cattle cars,—and started for Baltimore. On the way up, several persons, who had doubtless been drinking too many glasses of "strawberry lemonade," fell asleep and accidentally rolled off upon the ground, injuring them quite severely, but none I believe mortally. The next day about ten o'clock we were in Philadelphia; here we were served to a most excellent dinner by the fair ladies of the city, in the cooper shop soldiers' home. By this time the men had entirely recovered from their exhuberance of spirits, and conducted themselves in a manner highly creditable to the regiment, and which won from the citizens many remarks of commendation. After dinner three cheers were given for the cooper shop retreat, and three more for the ladies of the city of brotherly love,—after which the regiment formed in line and marched to the ferry of the Camden and Amboy Railroad, whither a large crowd accompanied us, and where we crossed the river to take the ears for New York. About three o'clock we arrived in Jersey City, and were soon marching up to the Park Barracks. Here, as at Philadelphia, refreshments were served out, but we confess we were disappointed in the manner New York treats her returned soldiers. The victuals were far inferior to the fare in ordinary camp life, and not such as were very likely to gratify the voracious appetite of a hungry soldier. Many friends here crowded around to extend their congratulations, but we saw very few from Herkimer county. Nine o'clock saw us on the road again,—the old Hudson River Road, flying along behind the steam horse toward our great and nearly last destination. Night was spent upon the road, and morning found us nearly home. Soon the shriek of the whistle announced our approach; and we are whirled along into ferry at Greenbush. Breakfast was served at the Delovan House, and soon after we formed in line, and after perambulating the streets of Albany until our feet were sufficiently blisted [sic] to make them feel exceedingly agreeable, we were treated to a copperhead speech by the Governor, and then took our wandering way up to the old Industrial School Barracks. During the day the men were allowed the freedom of the city, a privilege well improved,—many of the men, as in the day of Fredericksburgh [sic] the first, assumed the prerogative of citizens, and throwing aside the hated blue, could be seen stalking about in all the pride and glory of their ancient greatness.
But a word in reference to the reception of Saturday. The men had of course expected that a cordial welcome would be extended to them on their return, but they had not anticipated a reception equal to that which greeted them upon their arrival here. The citizens, and especially the ladies, of Herkimer county, must accept the hearty thanks of the regiment for their earnest endeavors in our behalf. The memory of their kindness will ever be kept green in the hearts of the soldiers, blossoming afresh as each anniversary of the joyous day rolls around.
The papers will be made out and the regiment probably discharged during the present week or the first of next.—Each man who has served two full years, receiving his wages, bounty and commutation money at the moment of final settlement.
Very respectfully,
L. N. C.

Thirty-Fourth Regiment at Washington.
WASHINGTON, July 12.
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:
The Thirty-Fourth, Col. La Due's Regiment, is encamped at Colloranna Woods, up 17th street, about two miles from Washington City. It will remain here probably but a few days, when it will go into active service. Officers and men are healthy and in tine spirits.
Yours truly, J. B. V. P.

The ladies of Herkimer and vicinity sent a large box of provisions to their volunteers at Albany, Tuesday. They didn't want the boys to forget Herkimer sweethearts, nor Herkimer ...

RECEPTION OF SOLDIERS AT WEST TROY.—The citizens of West Troy have held a meeting and appointed a Committee to make arrangements for the reception of a Company of their townsmen in the 34th Regiment.
Major Sponable, of the 34th, now in the Invalid Corps, is at present recruiting in Illinois.
Col. LAFLIN, of the 34th, is temporarily at Herkimer, assisting his brother, Hon. A. H. LAFLIN in the business of manufacturing straw paper.

NORTHERN AND CENTRAL COUNTIES.
HERKIMER COUNTY.
Good progress has been made in the formation of an independent military corps in Herkimer.

ESCORT ACCEPTED.—Engine Company No. 8, has accepted an invitation to act as escort to Company A, 34th Regiment, which pays a visit to West Troy this afternoon. Company A. was recruited in that village, and they will undoubtedly meet with a hearty welcome.

The 34th Coming Home.—The 34th Regiment New York State Volunteers, Col. LAFLIN, has arrived in Washington on its way home. It has seen much service and borne itself bravely in many a hard fought field. It left with 1,000, it comes back with 400. It was recruited in Herkimer county, and left this city for the seat of war in June, 1861.

C. Craven.
At Fredericksburg, Va., of wounds received at the battle of that city, on the 13th of December last, about eight hours after being wounded, Andrew A. SMITH, son of Wm. M. Smith, of Emmonsburg, Herkimer Co., a member of Co. K, 34th Regt. N. Y.S. V., aged 21 years. Kind-hearted, generous, brave, and patriotic, a favorite in his company and regiment, his death in the early morning of his manhood will be mourned, not alone by parents, brothers, and sisters, but by all who knew him. While being borne from the field of battle, he turned to a friend,, and calmly and exultingly said, "Tell my mother that I died like a man, in doing my duty." His life was a willing and noble sacrifice on the altar of his country. A funeral sermon was preached on his account at Salisbury Centre on the 10th inst., by Rev. D. Skinner, from Ps. cxix: 75, to a numerous: and sympathizing audience. All honor to the brave.

LOCAL DEPARTMENT.
Arrival of the Thirty-Fourth Regiment.
The Thirty-fourth Regiment reached this city early yesterday morning.   After breakfast at the Delavan House, it formed and took up a line of march through some of the principal streets for the Capitol, where they were welcomed by the Governor, in an appropriate speech, complimenting them for their distinguished services in the field. Lieut. Col. Beverley responded in a few brief and appropriate remarks. The Regiment then proceeded to the Barracks.
A committee, consisting of Senator Hardin, Canal Commissioner Skinner, Hon. H. P. Alexander and Oliver Ladue, are here to escort the Regiment to Little Falls, where a reception awaits the gallant veterans equaling even that with which Utica recently honored her brave sons. The reception takes place on Saturday. In the evening the Regiment will return to this city to be mustered out of service.
The Thirty-fourth Regiment was recruited mainly in Herkimer county, and was mustered into the State service in this city May 1, 1861, and the United States service the 15th of June following. It then mustered 800 men, under command of Col. Wm. Ladue.
Since leaving the city they have had added to their number about one hundred recruits, and return four hundred and twenty-seven strong.
The following are the present officers of the Regiment:
FIELD.
Colonel—Byron Lafflin.
Lieutenant Colonel—John Beverley.
Major—Wells Sponable.
STAFF.
Adjutant—John Kirk.
Quartermaster—Nathan Easterbrooks.
Surgeon—B. F. Manley.
Assistant Surgeon—J. Hurley Miller.
Chaplain—S. Franklin Schoonmaker.

A Valuable Relic.
To the Editor of the Syracuse Journal:
It was announced not long since by some one of our city journals, that the sword of Capt. Charles L. Brown, who fell at the battle of Malvern Hill, was recovered at the battle of Gettysburg, and was on its way to his friends in Oneida. This sword, whose history will be better understood by the following letter, was this morning deposited with the Onondaga Historical Association, by Wm. B. Ferry, Esq., of this city, in behalf of Mrs. Brown. The sword, independent of its history, is a curiosity. Capt. Brown, who, it will be remembered, raised a company of volunteers and entered the service at an early stage of the war, being a large and vigorous man, had the sword made to order, which is considerably larger and stronger than those in general use, and though it seems to have had hard usage while in rebel keeping, it is still capable of doing good service in proper hands. The following letter addressed to the widow of the fallen officer, explains the means by which it has been restored, and will be read with interest by all who feel to sympathize in our country's welfare.
H. WIGHTMAN, Janitor.
Rooms of Onondaga Historical Association,
January 20, 1864.
HEADQUARTERS EXCELSIOR (2D) BRIGADE,
2D DIVISION, 3D Army Corps, October 7th, 1863.

MADAME: Among the prisoners taken by the 34th regiment of this brigade at the battle of Gettysburg was a rebel officer, from whom Lieut. James McDermott, of that regiment, took a sword, upon which was engraved the name of Capt. Charles L. Brown, 34th regiment N. Y. V. I learned from Lieut. J. S. Lockwood, one of my ...ds, that this was t he name of your late husband, the gallant Major of the 34th N. Y. V., who fell mortally wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill, in July, 1862.
Presuming that the sword carried by your husband through many a hard fought battle, worn by a rebel officer for over a year, and then recaptured by our forces, thus giving it an eventful history, would be considered by you a most valuable memento, I respectfully beg leave in the name of Lieut. McDermott, to present it to you. I have this day sent it to Alexandria with instructions to have it forwarded to your address by Adams' Express Company, hoping that it will arrive safely.
I remain, Madame, very respectfully,
Your obedient servant, WM. R. BREWSTER.
Colonel, Commanding Brigade,
To Mrs. Charles L. Brown, Oneida Depot, Oneida Co., New York.

ARREST OF A SUPPOSED DESERTER.—Officer Van Buren on Sunday night arrested Jno Muckle on a charge of being a deserter. He was locked up in the Station House over night and yesterday morning brought before the Provost Marshal. The officer testified that he had been informed that Muckle left this city with the Thirty-fourth Regiment, N. Y. S. V., and that he afterwards enlisted in the Eighteenth, then the Thirty-fourth, and subsequently the Forty-third, and then the Third Infantry, and then a cavalry regiment. Muckle's name is not on the roll of deserters, and the tale he told Capt. Parsons was so plausible, and so like the character of Muckle, that those who know him believe it to be true.
John says that he joined the Thirty-fourth New York on the 7th of July, nearly three years ago, and was mustered into Capt. Oswald's company. After being in it four months he was put out of the camp for being drunk and raising the deuce among the boys in the tents. He was not drummed out, nor did he receive any discharge, for they were glad to get rid of him. He enlisted at the time when volunteers were plenty and no bounties were paid. From that time and during a period of two and a half years, he was employed in Washington as a teamster. Muckle was, however, held at headquarters until further information can be obtained.

Interesting Correspondence.
Ogdensburgh, July 24, 1863.
Hon. S. N. Sherman, Surgeon of the 34th Regiment
New York Volunteers.
Dear Sir: Your fellow citizens, friends, and neighbors, were gratified with your promotion in volunteer service. Camp of the 34th Regiment of N. Y. S. V., on the Potomac, 25 miles above Wash., Aug. 12.
To the Hon. A. B. James, J. C. Spencer, Charles Waterman, Committee.
Gentlemen: Your kind and too flattering letter, in behalf of yourselves and forty others of my neighbors, covering a draft of two hundred and six dollars, reached me at Washington, on the 29th ult. I have delayed a formal acknowlegment [sic] until I could announce the application of the money to the purpose for which it is intended by those who gave it.
Words are scarcely adequate to express the gratitude I feel to those friends who, irrespective of party affiliation, have contributed to this munificent bequest, united in expressions of approval of my course, and tendered their kind wished for my health and safe return when the country no longer needs the services of volunteers. I shall carefully preserve their names and your letter as among the most valued testimonials I possess, and shall henceforward be stimulated to renewed efforts to merit and retain their approval and esteem.
Say to the subscribers of the fund to purchase for me a horse, that it has been so applied, and that I am now in the possession of one that for speed, power, endurance, safety and comfort to the rider, I have rarely seen equaled [sic], and never excelled; and that so long as I retain him I cannot but be constantly be reminded of their generosity and friendship.
In the consciousness that he is serving his country in this the hour of her peril, is the soldier's richest reward, but when to that is superadded such testimonials of the approbation of those whose good opinions he values, couched in such languages of kindness as your letter abounds in, then is the servitor of his country, no matter in how high or humble a spherche acts doubly rewarded.
Will you gentlemen accept my grateful thanks, and allow me through you to tender them to each and every of those you represent, and hoping that I may so discharge the new duties which I have assumed, as to continue to receive your and their approval, and that when war gives place to peace, the integrity of the Union maintained, and the Republic restored to its wonted state of happiness and prosperity, if I am permitted to return again to these scenes around which center all of my affections, that I may find you all in the enjoyment of health and prosperity, and make to you and them personal expressions of the esteem in which I hold you all, is the wish, gentlemen, of
Your obliged and grateful friend,
S. N. SHERMAN.

WELCOME HOME TO COMPANY H, 34TH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.
ADDRESS OF HON. P. E. HAVENS.
The term of service of the 34th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., having expired, the citizens of the towns of Crown Point and Ticonderoga, from which Company H of said Regiment was mostly raised, made preparations to give the surviving heroes of said Company, a public reception on their return home.
The Company being expected to arrive at Crown Point, per steamer, on the 17th of June, the inhabitants of the Southern towns in Essex county, to the number of over two thousand, assembled at the landing, with open hearts, speaking cannon, and sweet music from the band, to greet the veteran heroes as they again set foot on the historic ground of old Crown Point.
Owing to some delay among the mustering officers at Albany, the Company did not all arrive, and a feeling of disappointment at first prevailed to some extent, but adopting the officers and soldiers who arrived as the representatives of the Company, the reception was extended to them in behalf of all, and the proceedings of the day as previously arranged were carried out.
Under the direction of Col. Wm. E. Calkins, marshal of the day, a procession was formed, and passing under the beautiful arch erected by the patriotic ladies of Crown Point, and on which, with exquisite taste, their fingers had wrought, in evergreen, the words
"WELCOME TO OUR BRAVE DEFENDERS."
The Officers and soldiers present were escorted to the hotel of J. W. Bowman, where a bountiful supply of rations, such as none but freedom's land can furnish, was meted out to all. On repairing to the grove, where a stand had been erected for the occasion, Harvey Spencer, Esq., was called to preside, and after a few pertinent remarks made by him, he introduced to the meeting the Hon. P. E. HAVENS, who delivered an address of welcome, as follows:
MR. CHAIRMAN, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN:
If there is a scene on earth calculated to stir the blood and fill the heart with emotions too full for utterance, it is the return to their homes of a band of scarred and war-worn soldiers, who have faithfully served their country.
No events recorded in history have been attended with more pleasurable excitement and intense satisfaction than the welcome home of victorious armies to their native land.
When the first Napoleon's veteran heroes of the army of Italy returned from their conquests, and marched with their victorious banners through the streets of Paris, even the refined and delicate ladies of that city could not be restrained from showering upon them in rich profusion tokens of fond affection and delight, and the great metropolis of France was lighted up in one blaze of exultation and joy.
If in a war of ambition and conquest, the heart of a great nation could be thus moved on the return of the faithful soldier, most certainly it is proper for us on this occasion, as liberty loving American citizens, to give to the gallant heroes, whose return from war we this day celebrate, a welcome to our hearts and homes, worthy, if possible, of the deeds of valor which they have performed on the field of strife and blood, in defense of our government and our dearest rights.
Officers and Soldiers of Company H, 34th Regiment of New York Volunteers, we bid you a most hearty welcome back to your home of freedom, among the hills and dales of Northern New York. We welcome you to our hearts filled with gratitude and thanks, and desire thus publicly to express our high esteem and appreciation of the heroic and valuable services which you have rendered for your country. We desire on this occasion to do you honor, feeling that you have contributed largely to protect and save the honor and integrity of the nation in whose service you have been engaged.
You have been engaged in no war of conquest incited by ambition and lust of power, but in the holy work of maintaining the only government on the face of the earth based upon the principles of equal rights and equal justice to all who seek its shelter and protection—the only government where freedom and constitutional liberty can have an untrammeled and luxuriant growth—a government which none but the corrupted and debased devotees of slavery would ever have incurred the awful guilt of attempting to destroy.
But many of the patriotic men who filled your ranks are not here to-day to share this festive greeting. Their brave hearts are still in death, and will never more be disturbed by the turmoils and conflicts of earth. But while we lament their loss, we can but envy them the glory of such a death. If there is anything on earth, aside from the Christian religion, which can lighten up with a halo of glory the dark valley through which we must all pass from time to eternity, it is to die for our country, in the discharge of the highest, noblest duty which can be imposed upon us. The names of those who have risked their lives and who have poured out their blood upon the battle-field to save this Republic, will be cherished in the memory and enshrined in the affections of future generations, while the names of the Southern traitors and their sympathisers [sic] at the North, will rot in everlasting infamy and disgrace, increasing in intensity as this free Government, redeemed from the assaults of all its enemies and purified from the curse which has so long preyed upon its vitals, shall continue more widely to diffuse its blessings upon mankind.
I will not on this occasion attempt the discussion of those political issues which some are now endeavoring to thrust upon the country. I confess that I have lost all appetite for politics and political discussion.
In the great struggle now culminating to its final result, for the weal or woe of the nation, I have no heart to enter upon the discussion of side issues, or anything else short of the one great theme—the defense of our country.
You will allow me, therefore, at this time, to submit a few such general reflections upon the war and our duty to ourselves, our country and our God, touching the same, as the occasion may suggest.
It no longer needs argument to prove that the war which we wage against rebellion is warranted by every consideration of loyalty, justice and humanity; that our cause is holy and just and that our efforts to maintain it will receive the sanction of high Heaven.
The slur and stigma which the infamous Vallandigham and others of his stripe, who breathe the poisonous breath of treason, have attempted to cast upon the war, will have no influence upon the verdict of Christendom, when truthful history shall have done its work, and will only re-act with crushing power upon the heads of its authors and sink them still lower in the depths of infamy to which they are doomed.
The cry that this is a needless war of abolition, has lost all its power and political signifi­cance—is dying away with the gust of passion and political excitement that gave it birth, and is now heard only from lips accustomed to the dialect of treason and disloyalty.
Nor can it be charged that this is a war of conquest and subjugation or a war to spread carnage and bloodshed over the states in revolt—but on the contrary, it is a war to stay the hand of violence which those states have raised against us,—it is bringing them back to their allegiance and to maintain the government of the country which they have wickedly conspired to overthrow, and thus to preserve the Constitution and the laws which we and they have sworn to support.
I deny that this war has any other avowed or real object than this, but I hail with inexpressible delight the great truth that as an inevitable result of the conflict, the dark blot of human slavery is to be forever wiped out on this continent, and if there is a man who hears me to-day whose eyes are so blind to the endless train of evils which slavery has inflicted upon our nation and whose heart is so insensible to the cries of suffering oppressed humanity, that he will not also rejoice with me, that the triumph of our arms, while it restores the nation to its integrity, removes forever the great cause of all our troubles, I will not say whether I have the more of pity or contempt for that poor benighted man.
No man has ever heard me utter a thought in favor of waging this war for the purpose of abolishing slavery.
I have ever maintained and now declare, that its legitimate primary object is, and should be, to maintain the government,—to defend our republican institutions,—to put down rebellion and restore the country,—the whole country—to the state of peace, prosperity and strength which it has so long enjoyed to the wonder and admiration of the nations. This is the sole object for which we send forth our armies, poured out our treasures and sacrificed our sons and brothers on the bloody field.
But while I say this, I will not be deprived of the right to rejoice that the great struggle is to be attended with some compensatory blessings to the nation—that the curse of southern treason is to be mitigated by the extinction of the mother which hatched it into life, and produced a military necessity which sealed its own doom and secured its final overthrow.
Indeed, fellow citizens, I have sometimes indulged the thought that this war would be worth to the nation all that it will or can cost us.
We should not forget that this war is not for ourselves alone or our posterity, but for the world and for all time.
The question of the possibility of maintaining free institutions is now on trial before the nations,—the problem of free government is now to be settled, and if we fail—if the grand experiment inaugurated by our fathers, and so long and so successfully carried on in our hands shall now fail and our country sink into a state of anarchy or be divided into separate sovereign states—contiguous, jealous and ever exposed to make war upon each other, for one I should feel that the sun of freedom had gone back on the dial plate of time for generations and for centuries, and might never rise again.
It was not long since said by the French statesman, M. Fould, to an American citizen:
"Your Republic is dead. And it is probably the last the world will ever see. You will have a reign of terrorism, and after that two or three monarchies."
If this revolution succeeds, the prophecy of the sagacious Frenchman is likely to be verified and fulfilled.
I have never felt alarm as to the final result, except upon one ground.
If the forces of the North become divided, and their efforts are paralyzed by quarrels and contentions, the rebellion will succeed and our country will surely be lost; but if they become firmly united and work in union and harmony in the great contest, the final result cannot be a matter of doubt.
Then, for the sake of our beloved country and all the momentous interests involved in the issue, let us strive for a union of all parties in this war. Let us in mutual sacrifice discard and rise above our personal preferences and party attachments. The great exigency in which we are placed calls for the union of all true men in the one great issue now pending before the country, and on which the fate of the nation hangs.
Let none contend for old party lines—nor attempt to form new parties—and least of all to cry peace, compromise, adjustment, while the roar of cannon is in our ears or the sword at our breast.
We may differ as to many things in the past—we may differ as to many things in the future—but we now act for the present.
And for the present there is but one course for us to pursue in order to save our government and vindicate its authority. There should be no hanging back—no drawing off into little squads or parties—no secret counsels and plots devised in conclave to embarrass our government or lead any to withhold from it their hearty cooperation and support.
Our duty in this crisis was eloquently expressed by the lamented Douglas in his last great speech at Chicago, a short time previous to his death, in the following memorable words:
"Whoever is not prepared to sacrifice party "organizations and platforms on the altar of his country, does not deserve the support of honest people. We must cease discussing party issues—make no allusion to old party tests—have no criminations or recriminations, and indulge in no taunts one against another, as to what has been the cause of these "troubles."
I can forget and forgive all that I have considered amiss in this great statesman, when I read the burning words of eloquence and patriotism contained in this last and noblest effort of his life. As strong as were his party ties and feelings, his love of country raised him above them all, and in his last great speech he left a legacy to the American people, of more value than the gold of California, and which will render his name illustrious while time shall last.
This speech of Mr. Douglas contrasts strangely with the speeches of a certain few politicians of the present time, who hesitate in their support of the government, and impose conditions to their loyalty.
They are willing to give the government a cordial support, if their own views as to the conduct of the war are carried out, and the Constitution, in all its provisions, construed and enforced as they understand it; otherwise, they threaten to falter and withdraw their support.
Soldiers and fellow citizens, this is not the doctrine and rule of action to save this nation from destruction. The government needs the unconditional loyalty of every citizen, in this hour of its peril.
Grant that the government is at fault in some of its measures, and has given an erroneous construction to some of the provisions of the Constitution. I demand to know whether that is any reason why we should falter in its support. Shall we, for such a reason, abandon our country and allow the rebellion to succeed and all to be lost. Because perfection and infallibility does not bear rule at Washington, shall we therefore aid the rebellion by opposing the war.
No man of common reading and information would expect that this war, more than all other great wars, should be exempt from its train of evils—evils, excesses and mistakes which no human wisdom has heretofore been able to avoid; but since the struggle commenced, I have scarcely found a man worthy to be called such—who did not believe that the President, whatever may be his errors is conducting this war in the integrity of his heart, and with none but an honest purpose to put down the rebellion and restore the supremacy of the Constitution.
I grant that we have a right to differ in opinion and that political parties are ordinarily useful and necessary, and tend to preserve the purity of the government by their mutual check and watchful vigilance over each other, but in this awful moment of peril I ask, in the name of all that is dear to us as American citizens, shall we involve ourselves in controversies and quarrels over comparatively unimportant matters and thus divide and weaken our strength and prevent that union of effort without which the rebellion cannot be crushed and our country saved?  
If I rightly interpret the signs of the times and the present indications of popular senti­ment, we are to have no such unhappy, disas­trous divisions as our enemies have counted upon.
A few restless, disloyal spirits, whose lips are blistering with the hot breath of treason and opposition to the war, may assemble in our metropolis, under the leadership of Fernando Wood, and denounce the government and the war, and raise their voices in vociferous cheer­ing at the utterance of sentiments exciting to revolution and civil war in our own Empire State. But I will not slander the Democratic party, by an intimation even, that they approve or sympathize with such demonstrations.
It was not enough, in this recent Peace Convention, to declare open opposition to the war and defiance to the government , but because the American pulpit at the North, with hardly an exception, has raised its voice in defense of our free institutions and the maintenance of our government against the encroachment of the slave power, their leader, Fernando Wood, had the audacity publicly to utter, amid the cheers of the minions who surrounded him, the following most extraordinary sentiment:
"Among the thousand spires which rear their "lofty turrets to a benignant God, not one covers "a pulpit devoted to the true principles of"Christ."
Desperate indeed must be that cause which requires its devotees to take such an issue with the high-toned principles of piety and religion which adorn the American pulpit.
Instead of regarding this peace movement as an indication of schism and division among the loyal ranks, I believe it will tend more firmly to unite all who love their country in a more vigorous prosecution of the war waged in its defense.
The great body of the American people will not fail to see through their hollow pretenses, and to discover that these peace makers are taking the surest course to light the torch of civil war in every state in this Union, and to produce that reign of terrorism and anarchy which have been so often predicted by European monarchists as being in store for this nation.
I here publicly venture the opinion, that there will soon be but two parties at the north: one will be the great Union, loyal party who, laying aside all former political differences, and all questions of minor importance, unite their strength in support of the government against the rebellion; the other will be composed of these peace croakers—the legitimiate [sic] descendants of a similar party of Revolutionary times—who would abandon the war, yield to the claims of the rebels, admit the doctrine of secession, sacrifice all that is valuable in our government, and inaugurate a reign of anarchy and terror. Soldiers and citizens, I still trust with firm reliance upon the loyalty of the great mass of the American people, and take hope that all will yet be well.
We have much to hope from the great moral forces which are on our side. The wheels of Providence always move forward, and never backward. We live in the nineteenth century of the Christian era, and the forces to which I refer have, during that long period, been gradually but surely developing themselves—gaining strength and extending their influence in the world.
Science, literature, religion and civilization will lend no aid in establishing a confederacy, and building up an aristocratical government, based on slavery as its corner stone, and for the purpose of extending and perpetuating the domain of slavery; but, on the contrary, they are all opposed to it, branding slavery as a relic of barbarism, and utterly inconsistent with free institutions and all true progress of society.
I regard this as certain as any problem in mathematics, and a government based on slavery, or in any way dependent upon it, has an element of rottenness in its very heart, and must sooner Or later fall to decay and ruin.
Equally certain is it that the great moral forces to which I have alluded, exert their whole power in favor of freedom—freedom of speech—freedom of the press—freedom of the elective franchise—the diffusion of general education—the support of free institutions and of true republican government.
These reflections should inspire us with confident hope of ultimate success, and give us patience to hold on in the struggle until the consummation of the great plan of Providence in advancing human society, shall crown our efforts with a victory which will be worth a thousand times more to the world than all it will have cost the present generation.
That victory may not be to-day nor to-morrow. It may even be long delayed, it may cost many millions more of treasure and many thousands more of the lives of our sons in contending with our maddened foe, but come it will, as sure as truth and righteousness and knowledge and civilization and freedom shall prevail over ignorance, barbarism, tyranny and crime. We can wait for the issue if need be; wait in patience, good courage and hope, seeing we are moving on in the line of causes, fixed as the throne of God, and sure of triumph as his own eternal kingdom of truth and righteousness.
We may be sure the Almighty did not preserve this land of ours till so late a period in he world's history, and then plant here the tree of liberty, of knowledge and religion, finally to be overrun with despotism, with slavery, with ignorance and barbarism. No: the tree He planted here He will defend; the institutions established here by our forefathers, under His guiding hand and fostering care, will be preserved and the Constitution and government which were secured for us by the great and good men who fought the battles of the Revolution and which have blessed this land as no other land was ever blessed, for more than three-fourths of a century, will continue to bless those who are to live after us, for generations to come.
Officers and Soldiers of Co. H.: No Regiment engaged in the war has covered itself with greater glory than the noble 34th in whose ranks you have served.
The history of your deeds of valor has been written and preceded your return. The country has watched your movements with proud satisfaction, and confident hope has been inspired in all our hearts that our country can never be lost and our government broken up so long as we have such brave and patriotic defenders.
From the time when on the 31st of April, 1861, your Regiment crossed the Chickahominy on the bridge of floating logs and led by the heroic Sumner, made that brilliant bayonet charge, which decided the fate of the day, scattered the forces of the boastful Hampton Legion and caused their leader to bite the dust in death, through the hard fought battles of Peach Orchard, Savage Station, Nelson's Farm, Malvern Hill, South Mountain, Antietam, Falmouth and  Fredericksburgh; in nearly all of which your regiment had the post of honor and danger, and won for itself the laurels of immortal fame, the eyes of the North were upon you, and a grateful country exulted over the glory shed upon its arms, proving to the world that the blood of our revolutionary fathers has not degenerated in the veins of their sons.
It is a source of peculiar pride to the inhabitants of Essex county, and especially those towns from which you enlisted, to know that in the 34th Regiment no Company bore itself with more gallantry and honor than Co. H.
We welcome you back as good and faithful servants, entitled to the honor and thanks of your country, and the fostering care and protection of the government for which you have so bravely fought. And when this great contest of the nineteenth century between the powers of slavery and freedom shall have terminated and its sad history been written—when through the guiding hand of an overruling Providence, the great events now so rapidly transpiring shall have worked out their final results, whatever may be the fate of our unhappy country, you will have what will be sweeter than life itself, the pleasing satisfaction that you did your whole duty in the great struggle to save this chosen land of freedom from the empire of darkness, tyranny and crime.
At the conclusion of the address the Rev. Mr. Bradshaw, of Crown Point, from the committee on resolutions reported the following:
Resolved, That the present occasion, when the brave defenders of our nation's cause, those who first left us at her call, are permitted to return to us, is a day of thankfulness and joy; which, calls for heartfelt gratitude to that benficent [sic] Being who has kept and defended those dear to us, amid the many perils and dangers to which they have been exposed, to gladden our hearts and homes by their safe return.
Resolved, That the cheering accounts which have from time to time come to us of their patient endurance, of their brave and soldierly conduct on the field of battle, has awakened a just pride of heart in their behalf, assuring us that the spirit of self-sacrifice and heroic valor which animated our fathers in days past, is not extinct. That while we shed a tear of regret over those who have so nobly fallen in their country's cause and embalm them in our memories, we will cherish a just esteem for those who still survive, and honor them as the patriots who defended their country in the hour of peril.
Resolved, That the day of our country's distress, the crises which led these our brethren, so nobly to bare their breasts to danger in her behalf, is still upon us, and still calls upon every good citizen for a like devotion to her interests,—to preserve our glorious Constitution and our noble country undivided,—to transmit to generations yet to come, the birthright of freedom, that precious inheritance which our fathers have left us.
After able remarks from Rev. Mr. Porter of Crown Point, and from Messrs. Flavies J. Cook and Clayton H. Delano, of Ticonderoga, all of which breathed the soul of union and patriotism, the resolutions were adopted by acclamation.
A vote of thanks was given to Hon. P. E. Havens in approval of his course in the last legislature, and for his address, and requesting a copy of the same for publication.
Three cheers were given to the cornet band of Ticonderoga, for the soul-stirring music with which they had enlivened the occasion, and with hearts mutually warmed and nerved with determination and hope for the future, the assembly dispersed.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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