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37th Regiment, New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

NEW YORK CITY.
The Two Years Regiments.
RECEPTION TO-DAY OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH AND THIRTY-EIGHTH NEW-YORK VOLUNTEERS—GRAND MILITARY PARADE IN HONOR OF THEIR RETURN FROM THE WARS.
The Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Regiments of New-York Volunteers, which were expected to reach the city on Friday, and in whose honor so splendid a reception was prepared, did not arrive until 1 A. M. on Saturday. They have since been quartered in the Park Barracks. This afternoon their official reception will positively take place, and arrangements have been effected between the Military Committee and the Committee of the Common Council on National Affairs to repeat the attractive programme originally devised. The military escort will consist of First and Fourth Regiments N. Y. V.; the Seventh, Twelfth, Seventy-first, Fifty-fifth, and Sixty-ninth N. Y. S. M., the First New-York Militia Cavalry, and nearly all the officers of militia and volunteers now detached or on duty in the city. There will be a review by the Mayor and Common Council in front of the City Hall,  and thence the procession will march up Broadway to Fourteenth street, around Union square, up by Fourth avenue through Seventeenth street to Broadway, up Broadway to Twenty-third street, down Twenty-third street to Madison avenue, up Madison avenue to Twenty-sixth street, through there to Fifth avenue, down Fifth avenue to Fourteenth street, down Fourteenth street to Broadway, and down Broadway to the City Assembly Rooms, where they will be dismissed. In the evening both regiments and invited guests will be entertained by the Common Council at a banquet specially prepared for them.
The Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth deserve all the enthusiastic demonstrations that can be lavished upon them. They have fought splendidly on many a sanguinary field, and bring home no ordinary share of military distinction. Both were raised in the city. The Thirty-seventh was organized by Judge McCunn and left for the seat of war on the 21st of June, 1861. While under his command it saw little if any active service; but under Col. Hayman it took part in the campaign on the Peninsula, gathering laurels at Williamsburg, Glendale, Fair Oaks, and Malvern Hills, and subsequently it added to its fame at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. The Thirty-eighth (known as the Second Scott Life Guard) was organized by Colonel J. H. Hobart Ward, and left here on the 17th June, 1861. It received its baptism of fire in the first battle of Bull Run, and subsequently fought through the Peninsula, at Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, on all occasions covering itself with glory. No regiment from this state can show a prouder record.
Following are the rosters of field and staff as they now appear:
Thirty-Seventh:—Colonel, S. B. Hayman; Lieutenant-Colonel, Gilbert Riordan; Major, Wm. De Lacy; Adjutant, James Henry; Surgeon, Wm. O'Meagher; Assistant-Surgeon, W. Schermerhorn; Quartermaster, John Phalon; Chaplain, Rev. Peter Tissot.
Captains—Co. A, Philip Doherty; Co. B, Richard J. Murphy; Co. C, James R. O'Beirne; Co. D, John Long; Co. E. J. T. Maguire; Co. F, Anthony J. Dignan; Co. G, James D. Clarke; Co. H, William Bird, Jr.; Co. I, Wm. T. Clarke; Co. K, Jonathan W. Barley.
First Lieutenants—James Keelan, Simon Gavacay, Lawrence Murphy, James H. Markey, John Massey, Charles G. Vosburg, Wm. Byrne, C. B. Potter, S. S. Huntley, John Kiernan (wounded and missing in action).
Second Lieutenants—Martin Goss, Martin Conboy, James Boyle, Owen Graham, James Smith, Barth O'Leary, James McDermott, Henry V. Pemberton, Laverne Barris, Walter C. Hull.
Commissary Sergeant—Geo. Taylor. Quartermaster Sergeant—James B. Shepperd.
Thirty-Eighth.—Colonel Strong; Lieutenant-Colonel, R. F. Allison; Major, Augustus Funk; Adjutant, J. McE. Hyde; Surgeon, A. J. Steele; Assistant Surgeons, J. A. Robinson and C. A. Devendorf.
Company A—Captain, Jacob Leonard; First Lieutenant, Benj. C. French; Second Lieutenant, Peter A. Rogan.
Company B—Captain, John Brady, Jr.; First Lieutenant, W. A. Mallory; Second Lieutenant, M. Moran, prisoner, Chancellorsville.
Company C—Captain, H. C. Pratt, aid to General Sedgwick; First Lieutenant, Henry Volkhaussen, commanding company; Second Lieutenant, W. M. Norton, A. R. Q. M.
Company D—Captain, George M. Dennett; First Lieutenant, ____; Second Lieutenant, Thomas C. Garrigan.
Company E—Captain, F. D. Althause; First Lieutenant, W. Warren, A. B. Q. M.; Second Lieutenant, W. H. Martin.
Company F—Captain, F. Walker, wounded at Chancellorsville; First Lieutenant, W. Scott, commanding company; Second Lieutenant, Charles W. Fairfield.
Companies G, H. I. K, (late Fifty-fifth New York Militia,) transferred to Fortieth New York Volunteers.
Unassigned—Captain L. Cuvillier, First Lieutenant W. Banks, First Lieutenant W. E. Crofts, Second Lieutenant V. Bertrand.
Colonel Hayman, on taking his farewell of the Thirty-seventh, has issued the subjoined general order: —
HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, THIRD CORPS, June 6.
General Orders No. 67.
The colonel commanding hereby relinquishes the command of this brigade. In taking leave of the brigade the colonel commanding deems it a proper occasion to express his thanks for the obligations which it has conferred upon him in the cheerful obedience which it has exhibited while under his command, under all circumstances of fatigue and danger; and also for the partiality of the officers of the old brigade, who have twice petitioned for his advancement, that he might remain among them. The honor of having been associated for nearly two eventful years with this command more than repays him for his services; for he confidently believes that when the true history of this war is written no organization in the army will possess a more enviable record. It is with unfeigned regret the colonel commanding bids you all an affectionate farewell. Your high state of discipline and love of country are a sure guarantee that your career in the future will be no less distinguished than in the past.
By order of Col. S. B. HAYMAN.
Edwin R. Houghton, Lieut. and A. A. A. G.

REORGANIZATION OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH N. Y. VOLS.—We are pleased to learn that Major De Lacy of the 37th, has been authorized by Governor Seymour to reorganize the regiment with its old title. Many of the old corps have already enrolled their names, and the new command promises to fill up at an early day.

THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT.
This regiment, Colonel Roome, will leave at an early hour this evening. The members are getting everything in readiness and will number about four hundred men, with no volunteers and but few substitutes.

The Returning Regiments—An Order from Gen. Hooker.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Near Falmouth, May 12, 1863.
GENERAL ORDER, NO. 50.—The Major General commanding desires to express to the troops leaving this army, by reason of the expiration of their term of service, his appreciation of their efforts and devotion. The record of their deeds, while it will prove a proud recollection in future days, will live in history and in the memory of their comrades, who still continue to serve the country and its cause in the honorable and glorious profession of arms.
The Major General commanding directs that copies of this order be furnished to each regiment that has left or is about to leave the army, and he desires that the same be promulgated to the troops, with his best wishes for their welfare. May the same spirit which prompted them to respond to the call of duty and honor remain forever in their hearts and be transmitted a proud legacy to their descendants,
By command of Major General HOOKER.
S. WILLIAMS, A. A. G.

GONE BACK.—Our young friend Lieut. SILAS HUNTLEY, late of Company I, 37th New York, has accepted the position of Quartermaster of that Regiment which is now being reorganized under its former leader, Col. HAYMAN, and returned to New York City on Monday last where he will enter at once upon the duties of his new position. He has served his country bravely and faithfully during the past two years, and we are glad to know that his merits are appreciated and rewarded. We also learn that Sergeant JULIUS C. SHULTS, formerly of the same Regiment, will probably receive the appointment of Quartermaster's Sergeant. Good for JULES!

RETURN OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS—PREPARATIONS FOR THEIR RECEPTION.
The Thirty-seventh regiment New York Volunteers is expected to return from the seat of war during the early part of next week. The fact that this was the first volunteer regiment, composed exclusively of Irishmen, to take the field, bespeaks for them an enthusiastic reception on their return home. A meeting of the friends of the regiment will be held in room No. 14 of the Astor House, at half-past seven o'clock this evening, to make arrangements for the reception. Delegations are expected to be present from the following regiments:—Seventh, Thirty-seventh and Sixty-ninth regiments New York State Militia, First regiment New York cavalry and Fourth regiment New York artillery. Captain James R. O'Beirne, who was wounded during the late battles on the Rappahannock, will be in attendance and give information respecting the movements of the regiment, and when it may be expected to arrive in this city. Judge McCunn, the former Colonel of the regiment, is also expected to be present at the meeting.

MILITARY MATTERS.
THE RETURNING REGIMENTS.—On Monday last, the grand ovation in honor of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Regiments, N. Y. V., took place. The weather was most auspicious; cool, with a light breeze, and at an hour when labor was generally suspended for the day, its influences partook of the most pleasant character, and countless thousands swarmed into Broadway to enjoy the air and the excitement of the hour. It was nearly six o'clock before the column commenced moving from the Park, and long after dark when they reached the corner of Broadway and Grand street upon the return. The programme has been published and elaborated upon so much, that we need not go into other than military details. Suffice it to say, that after Capt. Otto's troop, which headed the column, came the Seventh with its full band and drum I corps, and averaging twenty-nine files front. Next came the Seventy-first, in happy contrast to the graycoats, with their neat and clean blue uniform. It is not often these two commands get so close together; but the comparison was no detriment to either. The Seventy-first paraded ten commands of eighteen files front. They marched with great steadiness and well-preserved distances, and equally divided the honors of the occasion with the: noble but more numerous regiment preceding them. Next came the Sixty-ninth Regiment, under command of Senior Capt. Thos. Clarke, parading some one hundred and fifty muskets. Everybody was glad to see them and wondered they could parade at all, after the many indignities cast upon them at head-quarters, and the various attempts made to wipe them out of existence. Afterward followed the Fifty-fifth, comanded [sic] by Colonel LeGal, which mustered about a hundred members. The Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Regiments, Volunteers, marched by the flank, side by side, with their tattered and war-worn flags—the latter was much smaller than the former, showing, at a glance, the fortunes of war. Some fine guns (not belonging to the First Division) followed the carriages containing the wounded, and, after them, came the opposed-to-walking City Fathers, securely guarded by the First Regiment (Cavalry), N. Y. N. G. The Twelfth Regiment not having received any orders, did not turn out, and the Eighth and Thirty-seventh commandants, very properly, thought there were enough of city troops out to do the honors, without any assistance from them. With one or two honorable exceptions—the reception of Hawkins Zouaves and the National Guards—these escorts to our returned volunteers have been botched from first to last.
At the banquet to the two above-named regiments, on Monday evening, there was almost a row, caused by some impudent and silly remarks on the part of some of the speakers, who insulted the soldiers by prating about peace, and dragging into notice the names of well-known traitors.
At an early hour on Wednesday morning, the Sixth Regiment, N. Y. V. (Wilson's Zouaves), arrived off the Battery, landing from the Cahawba, just before noon. They were immediately marched to the Park Barracks, and, after partaking of a good meal, dismissed to their several homes until Thursday afternoon, when a formal reception was given to them by the city and military authorities. The Eleventh and Twenty-second Regiments, N. Y. N. G., turned out with very full ranks, and in fine style, to give welcome.
There are but three more New York City regiments to arrive, viz.: the Fifteenth (Engineers); the Twenty-fifth (Union Rangers), and the Thirty-sixth (Washington Volunteers).
Judge McCunn, of New York, who has recently declared the Enrollment Act unconstitutional, is the same person who, while Colonel of a volunteer regiment, was arrested by Gen. McClellan and sent to New York, with the injunction not to return to the National Capital on peril of his life.—Boston Journal.
This MCCUNN is a fit instrument in the hands of the depraved men who seek to bring on collision between the State and Federal authorities. We presume he will do whatever he is ordered by his masters. But nobody will pretend to call his absurd decisions "law." The seediest shyster about the Toombs would laugh at that.

CITY INTELLIGENCE.
Our Returning Regiments.
ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE RECEPTION OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH AND THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENTS—THE TWENTY-NINTH REGIMENT RETURNING—THE TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT.
The Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth New York Volunteer regiments—the last of the two years' troops of this state—are expected to return home to-morrow. Both are New York city regiments, and unusual preparations are making for their reception. They will be received by the Common Council Committee on National Affairs, Alderman Farley chairman—and a committee appointed at a recent meeting at the Astor House, comprising city Judge MCCUNN, on behalf of the Thirty-seventh regiment, which was organized [sic] under his auspices; Captain G. O. Beirne, of the Thirty-eighth regiment, who was shot through the lungs, in battle, returned home and is now recovering; and Lieutenant G. M. Dusenbury, of the Thirty-seventh New York State National Guard (city militia) regiment, will also assist in the ceremonies. The third brigade of this city has been ordered to parade, and therefore the Seventh, Eighth, Thirty-seventh, Fifty-fifth and Seventy-first regiments, under command of General Hall, maybe expected to engage in the reception, together with the Twenty-third (Brooklyn) regiment, a new organization, commanded by Colonel Everdell, and not a few of our returned soldiers of different regiments. Three hundred men of the First regiment, National Volunteers, now here and not yet mustered out of the service, will parade with arms; and the Sixty-ninth (Irish) regiment has, we understand, volunteered for the occasion. Thus the military display will be more imposing, in point of numbers, than upon any previous reception.
The Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth started from their camp at Falmouth yesterday morning, and the time of their arrival here is set down for 4 o'clock to-morrow afternoon, so that they will march up Broadway, and the formal review at the City Hall will take place at about half past 4 o'clock. The entire procession will then pass up Broadway to Union Square, and marching through several streets, return to the Park barracks.
The Thirty-seventh regiment is commanded by Colonel S. B. Hayman, of the regular service, and an excellent officer. He is well known in this city. The Thirty-eighth will return in charge of Lieutenant-Colonel Allison, though Colonel Strong, the commandant, will assume his position on its arrival here. The number of men in the ranks of both regiments is said to be between five and six hundred, showing that their losses since they took the field will not fall short of one thousand men. They have been in the army of the Potomac since they entered the service, and have participated in all its battles.
An interesting feature of the reception will be that Generals Sickles, Meagher and Ward share in its honors. They are to assist in the review, and with both committees, the members of the city government, and invited guests, will each with his staff, join in the procession. General J. H. Hobart Ward, it will be remembered, organized the Thirty-eighth regiment, and made it one of the best in the service. He was subsequently promoted to the command of a brigade, and has a high reputation. He will soon return to the field.
In the evening a banquet will be given the returning regiments at the Park barracks, by the city authorities. It is said that a dinner will be tendered General Ward by his friends.

The Returning Regiments.
The Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Regiments of New York Volunteers, which were expected to reach the city on Friday, and in whose honor so splendid a reception was prepared, did not arrive until 1 A. M. on Saturday. They have since been quartered in the Park Barracks. This afternoon their official reception will positively take place, and arrangements have been effected between the Military Committee and the Committee of the Common Council on National affairs to repeat the attractive programme originally devised. The military escort will consist of the First and Fourth Regiments N. Y. V.; the Seventh, Twelfth, Seventy-first, Fifty-fifth, and Sixty-ninth N. Y. S. M., the First New York Militia Cavalry, and nearly all the officers of militia and volunteers now detached or on duty in the city. There will be a review by the Mayor and Common Council in front of the City Hall, and thence the procession will march up Broadway to Fourteenth street, around Union square, up by Fourth avenue, through Seventeenth street to Broadway, up Broad way to Twenty-third street, down Twenty-third street to Madison avenue, up Madison avenue to Twenty-sixth street, through there to Fifth avenue, down Fifth avenue by Fourteenth street, down Fourteenth street to Broadway, and down Broadway to the City Assembly Rooms, where they will be dismissed. In the evening both regiments and invited guests will be entertained by the Common Council at a banquet specially prepared for them.
The Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth deserve all the enthusiastic demonstrations that can be lavished upon them. They have fought splendidly on many a sanguinary field, and bring home no ordinary share of military distinction. Both were raised in the city. The Thirty-seventh was organized by Judge McCunn and left for the seat of war on the 21st of June, 1861. While under his command it saw little if any active service; but under Col. Hayman ii took part in the campaign on the Peninsula, gathering laurels at Williamsburg, Glendale, Fair Oaks and Malvern Hills, and subsequently it added to its fame at  Fredericksburg and Choncellorsville. The Thirty-eighth (known as the Second Scott Life Guard) was organized by Colonel J. H. Hobart Ward, and left here on the 17th June, 1861. It received its baptism of fire in the first battle of Bull Run, and subsequently fought through the Peninsula, at Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, on all occasions covering itself with glory. No regiment from this state can show a prouder record.

CAPTAIN JAMES O'BEIRNE.—The above officer, who was attached to the 37th N. Y. Volunteers, and was wounded in the battle at Chancellorville, has been appointed captain in the Invalid corps, and assigned to the department of the Provost Marshal General Fry.

PUBLIC RECEPTION OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH AND THIRTT-EIGHTH REGIMENTS..—The Joint Committee of the Common Council on National Affairs hold a meeting on Saturday and decided to give a public reception to the 37th and 38th Regiments New-York Volunteers to-day; and should the weather prove favorable the display will be the grandest that has yet taken place on a similar occasion. Alderman Boole, Chairman of the Sub-Committee, waited upon Gen. Hall, who assured him that nothing should be wanting on his part to render the affair one of interest as far as a military escort was concerned. Col. Marshall Lefferts has issued an order for the 7th Regiment to parade to-day as an escort to the 37th and 38th, and regimental line will be formed on Lafayette place at 4 o'clock p. m.
Capt. Otto's Troop of the 1st Regiment will also parade, and it is said that the 71st, 69th, 37th and 23d of Brooklyn will unite in the reception of the returned soldiers.
In the evening the 37th and 38th will be banqueted at the City Assembly Rooms, the Park Barracks not affording sufficient accommodation for the purpose.
On Saturday, the 38th marched from the Park Barracks to the lower Arsenal, which place they will use as a temporary quarters until mustered out of the service. The 37th are still quartered at the Barracks.
As will be seen by the programme of the Joint Committee of the Common Council in another column, the reception will take place at 5 o'clock this afternoon, at which time a salute will be fired in the Park. The military will be under the command of Brig.-Gen. Hall. After review by the Mayor and Common Council, the procession will pass up Broadway, around Union Square, up Fourth avenue through Seventeenth street to Broadway, through Twenty-third street, Madison avenue, Twenty-fifth street, Fifth avenue, Fourteenth street and Broadway, to the City Assembly Rooms, where the troops will be dismissed.

THIRTY-SEVENTH AND THIRTY-EIGHTH N. Y. VOLUNTEERS.
We were surprised to see a letter from F. I. A. (Fie?) Boole, Agent and Alderman (vide City Directory) addressed to General Hall, and reflecting severely on "the military gentlemen under whose advice and direction the Committee of the Common Council acted."
The display those military gentlemen made yesterday was truly magnificent, and proved that they did their duty thoroughly; but we have not as yet seen any proof of the energy of the Committee of the Common Council, and we do not think that the Military Committee left anything undone which they promised to have done. They certainly could not force the Railroad Company to carry the soldiers any more than the Common Council, and we learn that they were delayed four hours in Philadelphia, and the Railroad Company could not be induced to carry them direct to Jersey City.
At a meeting held this afternoon of the officers of the 37th, including Major De Lacy, Captains O'Beirne and Murphy, Lieuts. Murphy, Boyle, and Smith; and Captain Horton and Lieuts. Shaw and Brush, of the 1st N. Y. Vols.; and Lieut. Col. Potter, late of the 38th N. Y. Vols., Captain Brittain and Matthew Greene, Esq., members of the Military Committee, we heard the several officers express unlimited satisfaction with the action of the Committee, and great regret and dissatisfaction at Mr. Boole's letter.

The Returning Regiments.--Yesterday was a day of disappointment to the members of our militia regiments. Promptly, in pursuance of orders, they assembled in the afternoon at their several places of rendezvous, and marched to the Battery, where they expected to receive the 37th and 38th N. Y. volunteers, and give them an escort through the city. The regiments which turned out were the 7th, 8th, 23d, 37th, 55th and 69th. As they marched down Broadway they were followed by a crowd of admiring thousands, who were as anxious as the military themselves to join in welcoming home the brave men who have fought for their country. The display of flags was very fine, and was probably never surpassed on any occasion. The tops of the commercial palaces on Broadway almost seemed wrapped in one vast, trembling sheet of bunting.
The military after waiting until near six o'clock marched back to their respective headquarters much disappointed because of the non-arrival of the regiments. A letter was received by General Hall from Alderman Boole, suggesting him to dismiss the regiments, and stating that the error in the time of the arrival of the regiments and the disappointments incident to such error were to be attributed entirely to the military gentlemen who had undertaken to conduct the ceremonies, as the committee acted solely under instructions imparted by them, and for which they (military gentlemen) were entirely responsible.
The 37th and 38th arrived at Jersey City at one o'clock this morning, and immediately crossed the ferry and marched to the Park barracks where they are now quartered.
The reception will take place on Monday at 5 P. M. in front of the City Hall. General McClellan has been invited to be present and review them as they march through the Park.
It is promised that this shall be the grandest reception that has yet taken place.

RECEPTION OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH AND THIRTYEIGHTH REGIMENTS.
Ample preparations have now been made in order to give the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments New York State Volunteers a most enthusiastic welcome on the occasion of their arrival, which is expected to take place this afternoon or early to morrow morning. In addition to the city militia regiments which are ordered to parade upon the occasion is the Twenty-third National Guar of Brooklyn, under command of Colonel Wm. Everdell, Jr. This will be the debut, in a military sense, of the Twenty-third, regiment before a New York public. It is a recent organization, but is said to be one of the best drilled and best officered regiments of the State militia.
Brigadier General Ward, the former commander of the Thirty-eighth, arrived in this city yesterday. General Hayman, late Colonel of the Thirty-seventh, will come to the city with both of the regiments. To those two gallant officers much credit is due for the prestige and honorable name which have heralded both their late commands previous to their return home.

RETURN OF REGIMENTS.—Alderman Farley, Chairman of the Committee on National Affairs, has received a letter from Gen. Hobart Ward, stating that the Thirty-seventh (Irish Rifles) and Thirty-eighth (Second Scott Life Guard) N. Y. S. V., will arrive in New York on or before the 3d of June next. Gen. Ward expects to accompany these regiments, which he has led in many a well-fought battle.

RETURNING REGIMENTS.
The Thirty-Seventh and Thirty-Eighth New York Volunteers.
Notwithstanding the extensive preparations made by the military and civic authorities for the reception of the above regiments yesterday afternoon, they did not arrive in time to receive the honors intended for them. If events had favored the carrying out of the programme, it is reasonable to suppose the ovation would have excelled anything of the kind that has thus far taken place in this City. From 12 P. M. to a late hour in the evening, Broadway was thronged with an expectant multitude, anxiously awaiting the arrival of the returning regiments. Hour alter hour slipped by, and still the troops did not appear. It was at length announced that the troops would not reach the City till late in the evening, which fact, of course, spoiled the entire arrangement for the reception. The following military bodies marched down Broadway to meet the returning regiments, and escort them through the City: Brig.-Gen. HALL and Staff, with troop of cavalry of Eighth regiment New-York National Guard, commanded by Capt. Brown.
Regiment of First New-York cavalry, under command of Lieut.-Col. D. C. HINTON.
Military escort composed of the Seventh, Eighth, Twenty-third, Thirty- seventh, Twelfth, Fifty-fifth and Sixty-ninth regiments New-York State National Guard.
First regiment New-York State Volunteers, under command of Maj. YEAMANS.
Veteran Scott Life Guard.
Invited officers of other regiments, and ex-officers of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth New-York Volunteers.
The following letter received by Brig.-Gen. HALL from the Committee on National Affairs, explains the reason of the non-arrival of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments at the hour designated in the programme published yesterday morning:

OFFICE OF CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL,
No. 8 City Hall,
NEW YORK, June 5, 1863.
BRIG.-GEN. HALL—Dear Sir: I regret exceedingly to be compelled to inform you that from information received by me, as Chairman of the Sub-Committee on National Affairs of the Common Council, it will be necessary to forego all intention of receiving the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments New-York Volunteers, this day. The programme of the arrangements for the reception, as well as all proceedings thus far taken, has been made by a Committee of military gentlemen, under whose advice and direction the Committee of the Common Council has acted. The error in the time of the arrival of the regiments, and the disappointments incident to such error, are to be attributed entirely to the military gentlemen who have undertaken to conduct the ceremonies, as the Committee acted solely under   instructions imparted by them, and for which they are entirely responsible.
I would suggest to yon the propriety of dismissing your command and wait further instructions from this Committee, who will act hereafter-solely upon information received direct from the returning regiments.
The Common Council can recognize no proceedings or be responsible for any expenditure not had or incurred in the actual reception of the returning regiments, in which they, as a matter of course, must be the principal participants.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
F. I. A. BOOLE,
Chairman of Sub-Committee.
The expected regiments arrived in Jersey City at 11 o'clock last evening. Upon their arrival at Jersey City they were transferred to transports, where they will remain until 12 o'clock to-day, at which hour they are expected to land at Pier No. 1 North River. The regiments are under the command of Col. S. B. HAYMAN. Alderman BOOLE and Gen. HALL will make arrangements for their reception to-day. The Thirty-seventh numbers 350 men.

THE RETURNING REGIMENTS.
THE THIRTY-SEVENTH AND THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENTS NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.
Gen. Sickles, in whose division the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments New York State Volunteers are at present, has issued the following special order relative to the return of those soldiers: SPECIAL ORDER NO. 87.
HEADQUARTERS, THIRD ARMY
CORPS, MAY 28, 1863.
III. The Thirty-seventh New York Volunteers and the Thirty-eighth New York Volunteers will move from their respective camps on June 3, 1863, and proceed to the city, of New York, the place of their enrollment, where they will be mustered out of the service of the United States.
The departure of these regiments recalls their distinguished record in the army. Their conduct always elicited the emphatic commendation of the lamented Kearney, under whom they served in the Army of the Potomac and in the Army of Virginia. In more recent campaigns, Major General Birney, commanding the division, has found frequent occasions to signalize their rapid and orderly marches, their ardor and steadiness in action and their admirable discipline in camp. These results illustrate the high professional character of their officers, and especially of Brigadier General J. H. Hobart Ward, (formerly of the Thirty-eighth New York Volunteers) of Col. S. B. Hayman, Col. Thirty-seventh New York Volunteers, commanding brigade, and of Col. R. De Trobriand, commanding Thirty-eighth New York Volunteers.
To enumerate the battles in which these gallant regiments have been conspicuous parts is to recapitulate nearly all the combats in which the armies in Virginia have been engaged. Among these may be mentioned Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Glendale, Malvern, Manassas, Chantilly (where Kearney fell), Fredericksburg, The Wilderness and Chancellorsville.
Wherever valor and fidelity are passports to honor and hospitality these twin regiments, on whose colors the shamrock and the stars are blended, will be heartily welcome. The imperial city which sent them to the army well knows how to embrace and cherish her returning heroes; the nation--never served by braver sons—will not be unmindful of the fame of the few who survive, nor of the memory of the many whose fall attests the devotion of these citizen soldiers to our sacred cause.
By command of Major Gen. SICKLES.
Col. S. B. Hayman, of the 37th New York, now promoted to a Brigadier-Generalship for gallant conduct in the field, was a Major in the Regular army at the outbreak of the war. He asked and obtained permission to enter the volunteer service, where he has made a proud record such as is hastily sketched in the above order of Gen. Sickles. Brigadier-General Hayman is brothther-in-law [sic] to Capt. F. H. Masten, of this city and a modest and gallant officer.

Colonel McCunn's Regiment.
The uniforms for the Thirty-seventh regiment, encamped at the Battery, have been received. The distribution will probably be complete to-day. Some of these volunteers enlisted a month ago, wearing their oldest clothing under the impression that they would immediately be furnished with better, and have since been clad in rags.

THIRTY-SEVENTH NEW-YORK.
KILLED—Second Lieut. W. J. Fennon.
WOUNDED—Capt. J. R. McConnell, Capt. A. J. Digne, First Lieut. James Keelan, Second Lieut. James H. Marke, Second Lieut. William Bird, Second Lieut. Wm. G. Green, 7. Enlisted men killed, 12; enlisted men wounded, 66, enlisted men missing, 2. Total, 87

MOTNHED RAEYTU,R JNUINNG EVO 8L,U N1T8E6E3R.S .
The Arrangements for Their Reception To-day, &c.
The Sub Committee of Arrangements of the Committee of National Affairs of the Common Council would respectfully call the attention of the citizens, as well as the officers of the different regiments, to the change of the programme for the reception of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments N. Y. S. V., on Monday, the 8th inst., at five o'clock. The banquet will positively take place at the City Assembly Rooms at half-past seven o’clock P. M.
Should the weather look unfavorable for the military parade, the officers of the different regiments are respectfully invited to meet in room No. 8 City hall at the hour of two o'clock P. M., to consult with the Committee on National Affairs as to the propriety of postponing the same until the next fair day; and if they conclude not to proceed the citizens will be notified of such an event by the City Hall bell and other fire bells throughout the city striking ten three successive times at the hour of half-past two o'clock P.M.
They accordingly submit the following
PROGRAMME OF ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE RECEPTION OF  THE THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS (IRISH RIFLES) AND THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS (SECOND SCOTT LIFE GUARD), ON MONDAY, JUNE 8, 1863.
The military will be under command of Brigadier General Hall.
A salute will be fired by Captain Goodwin, at the Park, at five o'clock P. M.
The procession will move in the following order:—
Brig. Gen. Hall and staff, with troop of cavalry.
Regiment of First New York cavalry.
Military escort, composed of the Seventh, Seventy-first, Twelfth, Fifty-fifth and Sixty-ninth regiment
New York State National Guard.
Officers, Volunteers and National Guard not on duty, in uniform.
First regiment New York State Volunteers.
Fourth regiment New York Volunteers and Scott Life Guard.
Brigadier General Ward and Staff and Brigadier General Meagher and Staff.
Guard of Honor.
Colonel Strong, of the Thirty-eighth regiment New York State Volunteers, wounded, in a carriage.
Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments, side by side.
Wounded officers and soldiers of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments, in carriages.
Sergeant-at-Arms, in carriage.
Mayor and Common Council, in carriages.
Regiments of returned volunteers.
Battery of four guns.
Squadron of cavalry, commanded by Captain Otto.
The line of march will be as follows:
Review by the Mayor and Common Council in front of the City Hall, at five o'clock P.M., and by General McClellan, if in the city, in front of the St. Nicholas or Fifth Avenue Hotel, and by the Major, General D. E. Sickles, in front of the Metropolitan Hotel; thence up Broadway to Fourteenth street, around Union square, up by Fourth avenue, through Seventeenth street to Broadway, up Broadway to Twenty-third street, down Twenty-third street to Madison avenue, up Madison avenue to Twenty-sixth street, thence to Fifth avenue, and down Fifth avenue to Fourteenth street, thence to Broadway, down Broadway to the City Assembly Rooms, where they will be dismissed.
The regiments will be entertained at the City Assembly Rooms, at a banquet, in the evening by the Mayor and Common Council.
The proprietors of hotels, private dwellings and masters of vessels in the harbor are requested to display their flags during the day.
The Police Department will please see that the line of march is not sprinkled during the day.
By order of the Committee on National Affairs.
COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL AFFAIRS OF BOARD OF  ALDERMEN.
Terence Farley,   F. I. A. Boole,
Peter Mitchell,     John D. Ottiwell,
John T. Henry,
COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL AFFAIRS OF BOARD OF COUNCILMEN.
William Joyce,     John G. Haviland,
Alex. Brandon,    Samuel T. Webster.
John McConnell.

THE GARDE LAFAYETTE AND THE RECEPTION TODAY.
Headquarters,
FIFTY-FIFTH REGIMENT NATIONAL GUARD,
New York, June 6, 1863.
By request of the Common Council the regiment will parade on Monday, the 8th inst., for the purpose of joining in the formal reception of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth New York State Volunteers. The regimental line will be formed at Lafayette Hall, at three o'clock P. M.
The band and drum corps will report to the Adjutant at the same hour and place.
EUGENE LE GAL, Colonel Commanding
A. Riedinger Acting Adjutant..
FIRST SCOTT LIFE GUARD (FOURTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS).
The officers and members of this regiment are requested to assemble to-day (Monday), June 8, 1863, at two P. M., at No. 17 Centre street, for parade, to receive the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth New York Volunteers. The field and staff will meet at eleven A.M.
J. D. MACGREGOR, Colonel Fourth New York.
The return of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments New York Volunteers was marked by a very pleasing and interesting affair on their arrival at the depot in Jersey City, on Friday evening last. After the disappointment that occurred on the afternoon of that day, by their non-arrival and the dismissal of the military escort, the "Veteran Scott Life Guard," under command of Colonel J. C. Macgregor, with Major Yeamans, of the First New York Volunteers, and several officers of the Fourth New York Volunteers, with some of the committee on reception, crossed the ferry, determined to give to their old comrades in arms a "welcome home" such as soldiers can appreciate. Mr. Maynard, on the part of the committee, introduced to Colonel Hayman and the officers of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Brigadier General Ward B. Burnett, President of the "Veteran Scott Life Guard," who, in a neat and appropriate speech, welcomed them home. His remarks were happily responded to by Colonel Hayman, on behalf of the whole command. The band of the Scott Life Guard enlivened the affair by stirring and patriotic music. The column then crossed over to the Park Barracks, arriving there about two o'clock on Saturday morning, where the officers and men were well supplied with quarters and rations, by the purveyor, Mr. Yearance, under the direction of the indefatigable superintendent, Captain John Hicks.

Death of Corporal Wm. Wickham.
Correspondence of the Cattaraugus Freeman.
HEADQUARTERS 37TH N. Y. VOLS.,
CAMP SICKLES. May 15, 1863.
Whereas it has pleased Almighty God in His all wise dispensation, to take from us our beloved comrade and fellow-soldier, Corporal WILLIAM WICKHAM, we the members of the Company to which he belonged desire to give expression to the deep sorrow that saddens our hearts and casts a gloom over all.
While we recognize God's hand in the stroke and bow humbly to the decree, we mourn the loss of a noble soldier, a true patriot, a firm and generous friend, whose memory it will be ours, and all who knew him, to cherish thro' life.
While his absence oppresses us, our sympathy turns to his grief-stricken friends at home; and we seek consolation in the reflection that our sorrow is but the shadow of that which will agonize their hearts when they learn that he has fallen; with them we mourn, with them we weep, with them we condole.
That his friends may remember our laments are mingling with theirs, we send this to them—this token—with the prayer that God will comfort them, and be with them in this, their hour of affliction and sorrow.
W. T. CLARK, Capt. 37th Regt. N. Y. V., Comand [sic] Co. I.
LAVERNR BARRIS. Lieut. 37th N. Y.V.
WILLIAM BIRD, JR., Capt. 37th N. Y. V., Command Co. H.
CHARLES B. POTTER. 1st Lieut. 37th N. Y. Vols.
HENRY V. PEMBERTON, 2d Lieut, 37th N. Y. Vols.
WALTER CLARK HULL, Capt. and A. D. C. to Maj-Gen. Stoneman.
SILAS S. HUNTLEY, Lieut. 37th N. Y. V., A. D. C. 3d Brigade.
WILLIAM H. EARL, Sergt.-Major, 37th N. Y. Vols.
1st Sergt. Clark B. Foster,     4th “ Julius C. Shults,
2d   " Jerome A. Andrews,    4th " Frank Baker.
3d   " Charles Latten.
1 Cor. William A Hopkins.    4 " Ebenezer H. Morris,
2 " Henry A. Low,                 5 " Naman Ward,
3 " George M. Gregory                   6 " Charles West,
John Jackson, H. L. Bailey.
PRIVATES.
Garriet Abers,               Lewis Root,
Jmaes A. Bentley,         Charles Shults,
Elisha L. Bentley,         Archibald Schoonover,
Michael Dornley,          George P. Williams,
George Hulburt,           John Welch,
Elbert Hulburt,             Jacob B. Nelson,
Hiram Hull,                  Anson Charlesworth,
George D. Klumpp,      John Walcott,
Stephen T. Oaks,         George Harvey,
Israel D. Prime,           James D. Morris.
P. S.—Cattaraugus Republican and Cattaraugus Union, please copy.

THE RETURNING VOLUNTEERS.
Arrival of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Regiments—Their Reception to Take Place To-Morrow—Programme of the Parade—Complimentary Dinner t o General Ward at Delmonico's—Speech of General Sickles and Letter from General Meagher, &c.
At one o'clock yesterday morning the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments, which had been expected during the afternoon of the previous day, arrived in this city, and their headquarters are now at the Park Barracks. In consequence of the intermeddling of the Military Committee with the Committee on National Affairs of the Common Council, the whole matter of reception was postponed until to-morrow, when an enthusiastic demonstration will take place.
On the arrival of the two regiments at Jersey City they were conducted to the Park Barracks, where they remained for the night. No military escort was on hand to welcome them, as the lateness of the hour prevented any turnout of that description. Both of these regiments have done splendid service since their advent in the present war.
The Thirty-seventh was raised in this city, and went out under command of Col. John H. McCunn. It left for the seat of war on the 21st of June, 1861, and remained in the vicinity of Alexandria for nearly ten months, when it was next ordered to the peninsula. Colonel McCunn resigned the command at this time, and Colonel S. B. Hayman was appointed in his place. At Yorktown the regiment participated in the operations going on there under McClellan. At the battle of Williamsburg the men of the Thirty-seventh fought bravely; and also at the battles of Glendale, Fair Oaks Malvern Hill, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. During the two years campaign of the Thirty-seventh the corps has always received the high commendation of its division and brigade Commanders.
The following are the officers of the Thirty-seventh:—
Colonel, S. B. Hayman; Lieutenant Colonel, Gilbert Riordan; Major, Wm. DeLacy; Adjutant, James Henry; Surgeon, Wm. O'Meagher; Assistant Surgeon, W. Schermerhorn; Quartermaster, John Phalon; Chaplain, Rev. Peter Tissot.
Captains—Co. A, Philip Doherty; Co. B, Richard J. Murphy; Co. C, James R. O'Beirne; Co. D, John Long; Co. E, J. T. Maguire; Co. F, Anthony J. Dignan; Co. G, James D. Clarke; Co. H, William Bird, Jr.; Co. I, Wm. T. Clarke; Co. K, Jonathan W. Barley.
First Lieutenants—James Keelan, Simon Gavacay, Lawrence Murphy, James H. Markey, John Maasey, Charles G. Vosburg, Wm. Byrne, C. B. Potter, S. S. Huntley, John Kieruan (wounded and missing in action).
Second Lieutenants—Martin Goss, Martin Conboy, James Boyle, Owen Graham, James Smith, Barth O'Leary, James McDermott, Henry V. Pemberton, Laverne Barris, Walter C. Hull.
Commissary Sergeant—Geo. Taylor.
Quartermaster Sergeant—James B. Shepperd.
The Thirty-eighth regiment (Second Scott Life Guard) was also organized in this city, and left for Washington on the 17th of June, 1861, under command of Colonel J. H. Ward. The first-battle of Bull run inaugurated the Thirty-eighth into actual service in the field. After this battle the regiment entered the brigades of Generals Sedgwick and Birney respectively. Ina the siege of Yorktown the colors of the gallant Thirty-eighth were the first to wave over Fort Magruder, and they were next heard of in a brilliant charge made on the enemy at Williamsburg.
Then followed the battles of Fair Oaks, Glendale, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, in all of which the regiment lost severely.
The following are the officers returning with the Thirty-eighth:—
Lieutenant Colonel, R. F. Allison; Major, Augustus Funk; Adjutant J. McE. Hyde; Surgeon, A. J. Steele; Assistant Surgeons, J. A. Robinson and C. A. Devendorf.
Company A—Captain, Jacob Leonard; First Lieutenant, Benj. C. French; Second Lieutenant, Peter A. Rogan.
Company B—Captain, John Brady, Jr.; First Lieutenant, W. A. Mallory; Second Lieutenant, M. Moran, prisoner, Chancellorsville.
Company C—Captain, H. C. Pratt, Aid to General Sedgwick; First Lieutenant, Henry Volkhausen, commanding company; Second Lieutenant, W. M. Norton, A. R. Q. M.
Company D—Captain, Geo. M. Dennett; First Lieutenant, ____; Second Lieutenant, Thos. C. Garrigan.
Company E—Captain, F. D. Althause; First Lieutenant, W. Warren, A. B. Q. M.; Second Lieutenant, W. H. Martin.
Company F—Captain, F. Walker, wounded at Chancellorsville; First Lieutenant, W. Scott, commanding company; Second Lieutenant, Chas. W. Fairfield.
Companies G, H, I, K (late Fifty-fifth New York Militia), transferred to Fortieth New York Volunteers.
Unassigned—Captain L. Cuvillier, First Lieutenant W. Banks, First Lieutenant W. E. Crofts, Second Lieutenant V. Bertrand.

FAREWELL ADDRESS OF COLONEL S. B. HAYMAN.
General Orders—No. 67.
HEADQUARTERS, THIRD BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION,
THIRD CORPS, June 6, 1863.
The Colonel commanding hereby relinquishes the command of the brigade. In taking leave of the brigade the Colonel commanding deems it a proper occasion to express his thanks for the obligations which it has conferred upon him in the cheerful obedience which it has exhibited while under his command, under all circumstances of fatigue and danger; and also for the partiality of the officers of the old brigade, who have twice petitioned for his advancement, that he might remain among them. The honor of having been associated for nearly two eventful years with this command more than repays him for his services; for he confidently believes that when the true history of this war is written no organization in the army will possess a more enviable record. It is with unfeigned regret the Colonel commanding bids you all an affectionate farewell. Your high state of discipline and love of country are a sure guarantee that your career in the future will be no less distinguished than in the past.
By order of Col. S. B. HAYMAN.
EDWIN R. HOUGHTON, Lieutenant and A. A. A. G.

PROGRAMME OF ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE RECEPTION OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS (IRISH RIFLES), AND THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS (SECOND SCOTT LIFE GUARD), ON MONDAY, JUNE 8, 1863.
The military will be under command of Brigadier General Hall.
A salute will be fired by Captain Goodwin, at the Park, at five o'clock P. M.
The procession will move in the following order:—
Brig. Gen. Hall and staff, with troop of cavalry.
Regiment of first New York cavalry.
Military escort, composed of the Seventh, Seventy-first, Twelfth, Fifty-fifth and Sixty-ninth regiments
New York State National Guard.
Officers, Volunteers and National Guard, not on duty, in uniform.
First regiment New York State Volunteers.
Fourth regiment New York Volunteers and Scott Life Guard.
Brigadier General Ward and Staff and Brigadier General Meagher and Staff.
Guard of Honor.
Colonel Strong, of the Thirty-eighth regiment New York State Volunteers.
Wounded officers of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments New York State Volunteers, in carriages.
Thirty-seventh regiment New York State Volunteers.
Colonel S. B. Hayman commanding.
Sergeant at-Arms.
Mayor and Common Council in carriages.
Thirty-eighth regiment New York State Volunteers, Lieutenant Colonel Alason commanding.
Wounded soldiers of both regiments, in carriages.
Regiments of returned volunteers.
Battery of four guns.
Squadron of cavalry.
The line of march will be as follows:—
Review by the Mayor and Common Council in front of the City Hall, at five o'clock P. M., thence up Broadway to Fourteenth street around Union square, up by Fourth avenue, through Seventeenth street to Broadway, up Broadway to Twenty-third street, down Twenty-third street to Madison avenue, up Madison avenue to Twenty-sixth street, thence to Fifth avenue, and down Fifth avenue to Fourteenth street, thence to Broadway; down Broadway to the City Assembly Rooms, where they will be dismissed.
The regiments will be entertained at the City Assembly Rooms, at a banquet in the evening, by the Mayor and Common Council.
The proprietors or hotels, private dwellings and masters or vessels in the harbor are requested to display their flags during the day.
The Police Department will please see that the line of march is not sprinkled during the day.
By order of the Committee on National Affairs.
COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL AFFAIRS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN.
Terence Farley,   F.I. A. Boole,
Peter Mitchell,     John D. Ottiwell,
John T. Henry.
COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL AFFAIRS OF BOARD OF COUNCILMEN.
William Joyce,     John G. Haviland,
Alex. Brandon,    Samuel T. Webster,
John McConnell,
Colonel Lefferts, of the Seventh, has issued the following:—
GENERAL ORDERS—NO. 8.
HEADQUARTERS, SEVENTH REGIMENT,
New York, June 6, 1863.
By request of the Committee of the Common Council this regiment will parade in full fatigue uniform (white gloves) on Monday, the 8th instant, to give a formal reception to the Thirty-Seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments New York State Volunteers.
Company roll call at half-past three o'clock.
Regimental line in Lafayette place, at four o'clock P. M.
Band and drum corps will report to the Adjutant.
Field and staff mounted. By order or
Colonel Marshal LEFFERTS.
W. H. HUME, Adjutant.
The Seventy-first has been also ordered out, as the following will show:—
GENERAL ORDERS---NO. 11.
HEADQUARTERS, SEVENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, N. G.,
NEW YORK, June 6, 1863.
The officers and members of this regiment will parade in full fatigue on Monday, June 8, to participate in the reception of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments New York Volunteers.
Officers will appear with sashes.
The line will be formed in Broome street, right on Broadway, at half-past three o'clock P. M.
The field and staff will report to the commandant, on the ground, fifteen minutes before the hour of formation.
The non-commissioned staff, band and companies will report to the Adjutant fifteen minutes after three o'clock P. M.
Commandants will make a return of delinquents within ten days after the parade.
By Order of Colonel BENJ. L. TRAFFORD,
Commanding Seventy first regiment, N. G., S. N. Y.
JOHN R LIVERMORE, Adjutant.
PARADE OF THE SIXTY-NINTH REGIMENT.
HEADQUARTERS, SIXTY-NINTH REGIMENT,
NEW YORK, June 6, 1863.
By the request of the Committee of the Common Council, this regiment will parade in fatigue uniform on Monday, June 8, to receive the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth New York State Volunteers. Regimental line will be formed at Essex Market at two o'clock P. M, The troop, band and drum corps will report to the Adjutant. Staff will report mounted. By order,
JAMES BAGLEY, Major Commanding.

THE RECEPTION OF THE 37TH AND 38TH N. Y. V. TO-DAY.
The finest parade of the military which has taken place in this city for the past year will probably be witnessed this afternoon, the occasion being the formal reception by the municipal authorities, of the 37th and 38th regiments. The display was to have taken place on Friday, but owing to the non-arrival of the soldiers on that day, it was necessarily postponed until to-day. The appreciation which our city militia cherish for the soldiers who have returned from the battle-field crowned with the highest honors which bravery can bestow upon them, was not destroyed or even lessened by this disappointment, however, and an ovation will be given them this afternoon which will not fail to cause their hearts to beat high with pride and gratitude.
The military escort will comprise the 1st and 4th N. Y. volunteers, the 7th, 12th, 71st, 55th, 69th and 1st (cavalry) militia regiments. The procession will start from the Park, and will be reviewed in front of the City Hall by the Mayor and Common Council. The line of march will be thence up Broadway to Fourteenth street and around the Washington monument, through Fourth avenue, through Seventeenth street to Broadway, thence to Madison avenue to Twenty-sixth street, thence to and down Fifth avenue to and through Fourteenth street to Broadway and down Broadway to the City Assembly Rooms, where it will be dismissed. General McClellan, it is expected, will review the soldiers from the balcony of the St. Nicholas or Fifth avenue hotel, and by Gen. Sickles from the Metropolitan.
The 37th and 38th regiments have both done excellent service in the army of the Union. They were engaged in all of the principal battles in which the Army of the Potomac has participated, and never, by either cowardice or inefficiency, have merited even the mildest censure. The following are the rosters:—
THIRTY-SEVENTH.
Colonel, S. B. Hayman; Lieutenant Colonel, Gilbert Riordan; Major, Wm. De Lacy; Adjutant, James Henry; Surgeon, Wm. O'Meagher; Assistant-Surgeon, W. Schermerhorn; Quartermaster, John Phalon; Chaplain, Rev. Peter Tissot.
Captains—Co. A, Philip Doherty; Co. B, Richard J. Murphy; Co. C, James R. O'Beirne; Co. D, John Long; Co. E, J. T. Maguire; Co F, Anthony J. Dignan; Co. G, James D. Clarke; Co. H, William Bird, Jr.; Co. I, Wm. T. Clarke; Co. K, Jonathan W. Barley.
First Lieutenants—James Keelan, Simon Gavacay, Lawrence Murphy, James H, Markey, John Massey, Charles G. Vosburg, Wm. Byrne, C. B. Potter, S. S. Huntley, John Kiernan (wounded and missing in action).
Second Lieutenants—Martin Goss, Martin Conboy, James Boyle, Owen Graham, James Smith, Barth. O'Leary,, James McDermott, Henry V. Pemberton, Laverne Barris, Walter C. Hull.
Commissary Sergeant—Geo. Taylor. Quartermaster Sergeant—James B. Shepperd.

THIRTY-EIGHTH.
Col. Strong; Lieut. Col. B. F. Allison; Major Augustus Funk; Adjutant J. McB. Hyde; Surgeon A. J. Steele; Asst. Surgeons, J. A. Robinson, and C. A. Devendorf.
Co. A—Capt. Jacob Leonard; 1st Lieut. Benj. C. French; 2d Lieut. Peter A. Rogan.
Co. B—Capt. John Brady, Jr.; 1st Lieut. W. A. Mallory; 2d Lieut. M. Moran, prisoner, Chancellorsville.
Co. C—Capt. H. C. Pratt, aid to Gen. Sedgwick; 1st Lieut. Henry Volkhausen, commanding company; 2d Lieut. W. M. Norton, A. R. Q. M.
Co. D—Capt. George M. Dennett; 2d Lieut. Thomas C. Garrigan.
Co. E—Capt. F. D. Althause; 1st Lieut. W. Warren, A. B. Q. M.; 2d Lieut. W. H. Martin.
Co. F—Capt. F. Walker, wounded at Chancellorsville; 1st Lieut. W. Scott, commanding company; 2dt Lieut. Chas. W. Fairfield.
After the parade a banquet will be given to the regiments at the City Assembly Rooms, where speeches will be made, toasts given and a good time had generally.
Colonel Hay man, of the 37th, having retired from the command of the regiment, has issued the subjoined order:—
HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE, FIRST
DIVISION, THIRD CORPS, June 6.
General Orders No. 67.
The colonel commanding hereby relinquishes the command of this brigade. In taking leave of the brigade the colonel commanding deems it a proper occasion to express his thanks for the obligations which it has conferred upon him in the cheerful obedience which it has exhibited while under his command, under all circumstances of fatigue and danger; and also for the partiality of the officers of the old brigade, who have twice petitioned for his advancement, that he might remain among them. The honor of having been associated for nearly two eventful years with this command more than repays him for his services; for he confidently believes that when the true history of this war is written no organization in the army will possess a more enviable record. It is with unfeigned regret the colonel commanding bids you an affectionate farewell. Your high state of discipline and love of country are a sure guaranty that your career in the future will be no less distinguished than in the past.
By order of Col. S. B. HAYMAN.
Edwin R. Houghton, Lieut. and A. A. A. G.

A WELCOME TO OUR VOLUNTEERS.
Our patriotic citizens, we are glad to say, are making great preparations to extend a cordial welcome to the two Cattaraugus Companies in the famous 37th New York, whose term of service has nearly expired, and who are expected to arrive in this village the last of this, or the first of next week. A liberal sum of money has been raised to defray the expenses of the reception; the soldiers will be escorted from Great Valley to this place by a numerous delegation of our people; a speech of welcome will be made to them by DAVID H. BOLLES, Esq.; a bountiful collation will be served up for them and all who may choose to come at Concert Hall, and a gay and festive time generally may be expected. Handbills, announcing the time of the arrival of the soldiers, will be issued as soon as the fact can be ascertained, and we hope to see a large crowd assemble to honor our brave volunteers.

ORGANIZATION OP A NEW REGIMENT—THE KINGS COUNTY VOLUNTEERS.—Col. Michal Murphy has received authorization from the State government to raise a new regiment, under the title of the "Kings County Volunteers." He has now entered upon his duties, and there is no doubt but that the well known energy of the Colonel in this connection will materially aid him in rapidly raising a first class organization. Col. Murphy has seen considerable service in the present war. He went out as captain in the Thirty-seventh regiment, and next is heard of in the One Hundred and Sixty-third New York Volunteers, raised for Spinola's brigade, and of which he was in command shortly after the battle of Fredericksburgh. His militia experiance [sic] dates back to 1847, when he was connected with the Ninth New York. The headquarters of the Kings County Volunteers will be in Brooklyn, with branch office in this city and elsewhere. Every aid should be given Col. Murphy in raising his command.

NEW YORK, June 24.
The 37th Regiment, left to-night for Washington.

THE RETURN OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH AND THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENTS.—The Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth New York regiments left Philadelphia at one o'clock on Friday last. The Thirty-seventh returns with three hundred and ninety-eight men, and the Thirty-eighth with three hundred and thirty-six.

CAPTAIN O'BRIEN, OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH NEW YORK.
This gallant officer, who was wounded severely by a rebel bullet, which entered his chest and passed through his body during the deadly battle of Chancellorsville, is now lying under the effects of his wound at the Astor House, carefully watched over by his estimable lady, who went to the scene of action to bring him back. The wounded veteran in the service of his country desires to express his heartfelt thanks to the officers and men of the New York Volunteers for the kindness they displayed in removing him, while exhausted from wounds and loss of blood, from the field of Chancellorsville.

FORMAL RECEPTION OF THE 37TH AND 38TH NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—Monday last, pursuant to adjournment, the reception of the above regiments took place. The arrangements which were previously made to receive them, failed in its execution from the fact that those who initiated the movement did not clearly understand their duty. Through their ignorance a large number of local troops paraded on Saturday, which prevented their appearance on Monday. Nevertheless, the parade of Monday was an excellent one. The Committee on National Affairs, through their sub-committee, of which Alderman Boole was chairman, conducted the general arrangements, and General William Hall, commanding the Third Brigade, National Guard, the military portion thereof. This portion consisted of the 7th, 71st, 69th and 55th regiments, National Guard, and the 1st Cavalry, in connection with the Brigade Lancers.
The order of the reception was as follows:
A detachment of the 1st Cavalry as escort to the Brigadier; 7th Regiment New York National Guard, headed by Grafuelas' 7th Regiment Band; 71st Regt., N. Y. N. G., headed by Dodworth's Band; 69th Regt., N. Y. N. G. and a battalion of the 55th, commanded by acting Colonel Eugene LeGal. Following these were the 1st Cavalry, and the returned regiments.
The reception took place at 6 P. M., the 37th and 38th being formed in Park Place, at open ranks—the escort marching past in column, in the following order: the 7th by platoons of 14 files front, 20 commands; the 71st by company, double rank formation, 10 files front, 10 commands; the 69th by company, 8 files front, 8 commands; the 55th by company, 10 files front, 6 commands. The Cavalry were formed by sections of 8 front. The returned regiments paraded by platoons.
The line of march was through the Park, passing in review, thence up Broadway, giving a marching salute at the Metropolitan, to Gen. Sickles. This finished, the line of march was continued through Broadway, passing around Madison Square, giving a marching salute to Gen. George B. McClellan, at the Fifth Avenue Hotel. The attendance at this place was immense, occasioning great difficulty to the troops in getting through. At the close of this review, the troops were marched to the monument, when a portion escorted the volunteers to the hall, where the supper was prepared. The banquet, which succeeded the parade, was held at the City Assembly Rooms. There were present several prominent officials, among whom were Mayor Opdyke, and City Judge McCunn. The occasion seemed to afford an opportunity to these officials to exercise their peculiar faculties and feelings, resulting in a scene anything but pleasant to the audience. With this exception, the whole affair may be looked upon as a success. It was an ananimous [sic] response of the people to render honors to those who had hazarded their lives for the good of the country.

—At the request of Gov. Morgan, Col. McCunn remains in temporary command of the New York Thirty-seventh, though his resignation was accepted by the authorities. Five of the ten Captains of the Thirty-seventh are now on trial before a court martial, presided over by Col. Green, of the Fifteenth Massachusetts Volunteers. They are Capts. Reardon, Company A; Doran, Company C; Cavanuagh, Company E; McHugh, and Michael Murphy. They are charged with making out false pay-rolls, by which pay has been received for from ten to twenty-two more men than they had in their respective commands. In three cases the evidence has been closed with but a meagre defense to the charges.
Witnesses from the ranks have testified that at the command of their officers they had answered to false names. Col. McCunn is charged with purging the regiment of such offenders.

COL. M'CUNN'S REGIMENT OFF.
This regiment, which has been encamped for some time past on the Battery, will leave today for the seat of war. The following are the field officers:—Colonel, John H. McCunn; Lieutenant-Colonel, John Burke; Major, D. C. Vinton. Two guide-colors were presented yesterday to the regiment by Dr. Wilson; speeches were made, and the affair was one of great interest.

Why the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Regiments were Delayed.
To the Editors of the Evening Post:
In the World of Thursday you are arraigned as guilty of "a scandal and a shame," for you assertion that General McClellan's popularity with the army formerly under his command had fallen off; and you are sneered at by the same professional scoffer for choosing the return of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments as the occasion of your remark. As to which I beg to be allowed to make two statements. First—that such is happily the esprit de corps of an army, that soldiers will have a feeling of comradeship for any man with whom they have served and who has not proved an arrant coward or a manifest traitor. This I have observed myself; and more, I have been told by regimental officers of the Army of the Potomac (being personally known to me, and not "radicals"), that their men would cheer any of the generals under whom they had fought—Pope, McClellan or McDowell. As to the occasion referred to, there is a bit of history which should be known, as it shows how this popularity and "spontaneous ovation" business is managed, and to what purpose, by the men who engineer the spontaneousness. The disappointment at the failure of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth regiments to make their appearance on the day when their return was announced, and the inconvenience and expense which it caused, are fresh in our memories. Now, the reason of this disappointment was the following: The regiments were on the point of departure from Philadelphia, all was ready, and they would have arrived in good time, according to the programme, when a telegraphic dispatch was received to this effect: Do not let the regiments come on. General McClellan cannot be present tomorrow." Thus the reception was postponed one day; the citizens of New York kept in the streets, waiting in vain half a day, and four regiments of troops kept under arms for many hours, a great expense fruitlessly incurred, and no little offence and trouble given, in order that the "spontaneous ovation" managers might use the two regiments and General McClellan for the benefit of the faction which serves Jefferson Davis two-fold better than it could if it were in arms south of the Rappahanock.
You know that through good report and through evil report I have stood by General McClellan: and that my estimate of his military ability has not changed within the last six months. But his course since he was relieved from duty has effected that with me which nothing that he or his detractor could do while he was in command. A soldier of this Republic who throws himself into the hands of the men who now are using General McClellan, and who goes about in company with a general who was cashiered, and who should have been shot, for cowardice, or worse, for treachery, is plainly not the man to be trusted with the task of compelling the unconditional submission of the rebels. The statement which I have made, I need hardly assure you is not made upon report.
A FREESOIL DEMOCRAT.

THE RETURNING REGIMENTS.
The Ovation to the Thirty-Seventh and Thirty-Eighth Regiments.
Those who believe that "republics are ungrateful," must hereafter tell it to the marines; certainly they cannot tell it to our soldiers with hopes of being believed. She reception which the metropolis yesterday gave to her returned braves, the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth New-York Volunteers together with previous receptions on similar occasions, demonstrated that the people, both appreciate and honor the noble efforts of the soldiers in the field. Nor was the reception less enthusiastic than might have been naturally anticipated from the multplicity [sic] of military displays which have environed the metropolis, during the last two years. Indeed, the very fact that curiosity could not draw forth such crowds, lent a heartiness to the welcome, that could not attend a mere military parade. It was the consciousness that the brawny heroes who carried the National colors had defended them with their own lives on many a hard-fought field, that made the occasion of such thrilling interest. The metropolis pride which has so often swelled at the display of our citizen miliatia [sic], was donbly [sic] heightened at the appearance of real veterans, fresh from the smoke of battle, many of them marked with honorable scars, and proudly bearing their untarnished flag. Though deprived of its spontaniety by the balk in the arrangements of Saturday, the welcome was in fact more complete in its details.
There was perhaps less confusion from the multiplicity of those glad greetings of relatives and friends which have characterized other receptions; but the widely extended notices of the arrangements, and the convenience of the hour named, enabled more of the bone and sinew of the City—the immediate kindred of the honored guests—to be present with the throng, and mingle their lusty cheers with the shouts of rejoicing that every where rent the air, and gladden the hearts of the soldiers by their presence. The streets along the line of march were alive with humanity and gaily decorated with the red white and blue, forming almost a continuous triumphal arch of the national colors. The clerk of the weather must have been insulted by the bare supposition in the officially published programme, that aught but cloudless skies could greet such a memorable scene. Though warm, not hot; refreshing, yet not cold. The weather was all that could be desired, and was alike agreeable to citizens and soldiers.
One of the most interesting features of the reception, was the review by Gen. Sickles at the Metropolitan Hotel, and by Gen. McClellan at the Fifth avenue Hotel, and all along the route the enthusiasm was immense. It was a long march, however, and it may well be imagined that at the end of it the soldiers were ready for the banquet.

The Battery Encampment.
The Battery encampment, vacated yesterday by Colonel McCunn's Thirty-seventh Regiment, is not yet deserted. Men who were left behind are constantly coming in. To-day a squad of forty or fifty was sent on to join the regiment. To-morrow another will be sent, and afterwards as often as conveyance can be obtained, until all the stragglers are at the seat of war. The Thirty-seventh New York Volunteers at the battle of Fredericksburg
The Thirty-seventh regiment New York Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Hayman, took a most prominent part in the late battle of Fredericksburg, so much so that their conduct has been mentioned by General Berry in the most flattering terms. Their coolness under fire, and while they were being mowed down by the terrific fire of the enemy, won for them the highest admiration. In the report of General Berry allusion is made to the Thirty-seventh in the following language:—
The Thirty-seventh New York Volunteers was no less conspicuous. Colonel Hayman was ever on the alert. His regiment was in support of a battery, and was always ready. It contributed largely in repulsing the enemy. It has won new laurels in this fight, which, added to its very many old ones, make this organization one of the most noted in the volunteer service.
H. G. BERRY,
Brigadier General Volunteers, commanding.
Capt. F. Birney, A. A. G. First division, Third corps.

(Newark, N. J., June 1, 1863)
LOCAL MILITARY.
PREPARATIONS FOR THE RECEPTION OF THE  THIRTY-SEVENTH AND THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENTS.
... of the city, or Saturday afternoon, when they were assured that every facility would be afforded for a proper reception, to the returning volunteers. The following order of procession will be adopted upon the occasion, the regiments being expected to arrive on Tuesday and Wednesday:
Military Escort, consisting of six regiments and the First New York Cavalry under command of Brigadier General Hall.
Invited Officers and Delegations from various regiments.
"Veteran Scott Life Guard," Fourth New York.
Brigadier General Ward and Staff, with files of Infantry on right and left, as Guard.
Colonel Strong and Wounded Officers of Thirty-eighth in open carriages, on the right.
Field, Staff and Music, followed by Thirty-eighth regiment.
Common Council in open carriages, in two lines.
Committees of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth, in open carriages, with red, white and blue ribbon in left buttonhole of coat.
Brigadier General Hayman and Staff, mounted with files of infantry on right and left, as Guard.
Captains O'Bierne and McGuire, in open carriages, on the right.
Field, Staff and Music, followed by the Thirty-seventh regiment.
Wounded and disabled of Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth in open carriages.
Section of Battery.
Fire Department.
Civic Societies.
The following has been issued relative to the reception:
The wounded and disabled members of the above commands will report to Captain Watson, No. 176 Thirteenth street, or to captain James R. O'Beirne, at the Astor House , on or before Monday, June 1, 1863, at three P. M., in order to participate in the reception of their regiments.
L. F. MINARD,                   Committee
Capt.  R. S. WATSON,        Thirty-eighth
Hon. JOHN H. McCUNN,         New York.
Capt. JAS. T. MAGUIRE,         Committee
Capt.  JAS. R. O'BEIRNE,        Thirty-seventh
New York.
     General Sherman, on the part of the committee to give a banquet to General Ward and officers of the Thirty-eighth New York, and inviting General S. B. Hayman and officers of the Thirty-seventh New York, was present at a meeting held on Saturday evening, and expressed a warm desire to co-operate with the committee of the Thirty-seventh for a similar purpose, who would reciprocate the honor bestowed in favor of General Ward and officers of the Thirty-eighth with friends.
Judge McCunn, Major Yeamans and Capt. O'Beirne conferred with Gen. Sherman, and satisfactory arrangements were made.
Gen. Hall has issued the following:
Headquarters Third Brigade, N. Y. S. N. G.,
New York, May 29, 1863.
Brigade Order--The several regiments of this brigade are hereby directed to hold themselves in readiness to parade on the arrival of the Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Regiments, New York Volunteers, under command of Gen. J. H. Hobart Ward, which will arrive on or about the 3d of June. The brigade line will form in Bond street, right on Broadway, at 3 1/2 o'clock P. M. By order of
WM. HALL, Brigadier General.
J. Groshon Herriot, Brigade Major.

MASS MEETING IN REGARD TO THE ELEVENTH CORPS
--LETTER TO THE NEW YORK DAILY NEWS.
A large and influential meeting of German and English citizens will be held to-morrow evening at the Cooper Institute to express their appreciation of the patriotism and gallantry of the German volunteers, and their indignation at the malicious slander which have been published about their behavior at the battle of Chancellorsville. A field officer, who was wounded and taken prisoner by the Confederates at Chancellorsville, writes from Annapolis to a gentleman connected with the News:
"There is a tremendous howl of defamation going up against the Eleventh Corps for its alleged cowardice in the late battles. I assure you that it is a gross misrepresentation. No troops could or would behave better under the circumstances. There was no talk of 'poltroons' and sheep after the first battle of Bull Run, when troops of all kinds threw away their arms nor at the battle of Manassas, where the Eleventh Corps went forward and attacked the enemy at a time when our whole army was in full retreat. But down with the Dutchmen. I blush for my own countrymen when I read some of the lying articles in the papers. My sympathies are not particularly enlisted in favor of the Trentons, but I like to see fair play."

BATTALION DRILL OF THE 37TH N. Y. N. GUARD, COL. ROOME.--Thursday evening last, pursuant to orders, the above command assembled at the State Arsenal, for military exercises. The night was rather unpleasant, yet there was a very fair attendance of visitors. The regiment paraded ten companies of ten files front, accompanied by a band. The time appointed for the formation was eight, but it was not established till quarter to nine. The formation was creditably executed, and the command was presented to Colonel Roone, when he practised [sic] the companies in the following movements:
1st. Facing by the flank by the right and left; 2d. March by the flank and the right about; 3d. In right by file into line; 4th. By the flank, and change of direction; 5th. Advance in line of battle; 6th. Close column by division on first division right in front, into column; 7th. On first division deploy column; 8th. By the right of companies to the rear into column; 9th. By the right flank in column—advance, and face to the front; 10th. On first company to half distance close column; 11th. On first company take wheeling distance; 12th. On first company close en mass; 13th. On first company take wheeling distance; 14th. About face, the march, and the right about march; 15th. The advance, the change of direction to the left in column, the oblique march—the direct march; 16th. Change of direction to the right—and on right into line—guide right; 17th. By the flank, the march, halt, and rest.

PART SECOND.
18th. Advance in line of battle; 19th. Double column at half distance; 20th. Close column by division on first division—right in front, double quick; 23d. By the left flank, advance; 24th. On fifth division deploy column; 25th. By the right of companies to the rear into column; 26th. Close en mass by the head of column; 27th. Form division; 28th. About face, the march, the right about march; 29th. Repeated; 30th. On first division take wheeling distance; 31st. To form square to half distance close column, and the change; 32d. Reduce square; 33d. About face, the march to the rear, and the right about halt; 34th. By the head of column take wheeling distance; 35th. To half distance, close column; 36th. About face, the march to the rear, the right about halt; 37th. By the head of column take wheeling distance; 38. By the right flank by file left—the halt, and order arms, and dismissal for a street parade.
The general appearance and spirit of the men comprising this regiment is good. They strive to show a good front, and with a little care promise to be on an equality with other regiments. The errors observable were more numerous at this drill than ought to have occurred, from the fact that they were principally in the school of the company. The Adjutant omitted the command "Battalion" after "Post." The next difficulty was by the Colonel in habitually retaining the piece at a support, and executing the movements without a change. The advance in column, the right about, the ployments and deployments were made at support arms. Again, in the Advance in Line of Battle the captains in the left wing did not change to the left of their companies. In the taking distance by the head, guides did not face about at the halt. In the obligue march but two companies—the 9th and 10th—appeared to do it correctly. In the formation of the square the Lieutenant-Colonel and Major were not in their proper place, nor did they seem to know where their place was. The forming of square, the charge of flank march, as well as that by company, were very good; the right about and the double quick to form column was excellent. One great impediment to the regiment is the drum corps. There appears to be a constant buzz and beating by these performers during the drill, which mars the comfort of the guests. We are apprehensive that this regiment will find drum corps composed of boys to be what other regiments have found them—an intolerable nuisance. A parade followed the drill which the boys enjoyed heartily.

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—The report that Col. McCunn, of the 37th regiment, has been found guilty of insubordination and dismissed from his command is premature. The evidence in the case is not yet all in—an alleged important witness for the defense being absent from
Washington.

THE 37TH REGIMENT N. Y. S. V. is now organizing under its late Major William De Lacy. A large number of the late regiment has joined the new organization, and men are still coming up. The regiment will be attached to the brigade of General Ward B. Burnett.

LEFT BEHIND.
More than one hundred men of Colonel McCunn's Thirty-seventh regiment were left behind yesterday. This morning they were collected together and marched to the park barracks. They will be forwarded by the first opportunity to join the regiment.

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—Gen. McDowell has ordered a court-martial in the case of Col. McCunn, (City Judge of New York, and commandant of the 37th Volunteer Regiment,) against whom charges have been preferred by Provost Marshal Porter. Col. McCunn, being in the city one night, was questioned by the Provost Guard, and defied them, but was subsequently arrested. This disrespect to the Guard forms the gist of the charges against him.
City Judge McCunn has resumed command of the 85th regiment, which is rapidly preparing for service.

KILLED AT CHANCELLORSVILLE.—A letter from a member of the old 101st regiment, which was last fall consolidated with the 37th, to Capt. Peter Ohneth, says that Joseph Hoffman of the same regiment was killed at Chancellorsville. Mr. Hoffman was a resident of the Fourth Ward. He leaves a wife and two young children.

THE PARK BARRACKS.
A company of recruits arrived in this city yesterday from Albany, to join Colonel McCunn's regiment. They were .... with breakfast and dinner at the Park Barracks, and afterwards marched up town to the depot of the regiment. They are all of them strong, thick set and well built men, and will no doubt prove a welcome addition to the strength of this regiment, which is now we believe almost filled up.
The following order was issued yesterday to the members of Company D, of Col. Pratt's regiment:

(June 24, 1861) FIRST REGIMENT WASHINGTON VOLUNTEERS.
Company D, Capt. Atwood, has removed to quarters foot of Forty-ninth street, North river. Members of said company will report accordingly.
This reduces the number of men stationed here to about one thousand, and of these Colonel Lansing's Westchester Chasseurs will be removed during the early part of next week to their quarters on Staten Island, at present occupied by the Wilson Zouaves. The men are progressing steadily and satisfactorily in their drill, and the plentiful supply of good substantial food which is served out to them every day, together with the privilege of a bath, of which all avail themselves, has a surprising effect on their physical appearance. Occasionally the men get a little too rough in their manners towards each other, but the activity and energy of Captain Green--Colonel Van Buren's aid--has always prevented any serious trouble resulting from these encounters.

MILITARY MOVEMENTS IN NEW YORK.
DEPARTURE OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT FOR WASHINGTON.
SCENES DURING THE DAY AROUND THE BATTERY CAMP—THE ENTHUSIASM OF THE SOLDIERS AND THEIR APPEARANCE—SPLENDID PRESENT TO MAJOR MINTON—AFFECTING PARTING SCENES, ETC., ETC.
The Thirty-seventh regiment of New York, under command of Colonel McCunn, took their departure yesterday afternoon, at half-past three o'clock, on board the steamer Atlas, for Perth Amboy, from whence they started per railway for Washington last night. For several hours prior to the time of departure the vicinity of the Battery was surrounded by a dense crowd of people, many of whom were the wives, sweethearts, sisters, brothers or bosom friends of the soldiers, and all evincing the liveliest concern in the welfare of the regiment. About two o'clock the order was given for the men to make ready, and at once the usual scene of military bustle began. Sentries were placed inside the railings all round the Battery, with a strict order to allow no one inside who was not fully authorized—an order which the men obeyed in due soldier-like style. The Cecilian Band (Father Mooney is chaplain to the Sixty-ninth) was on the ground, and discoursed beautiful music, full of Irish eloquence, throughout the day. About three o'clock the regiment was marched from their camping grounds to pier No. 1 North river, where lay the Atlas ready to transport them to Perth Amboy. As soon as the regiment was placed in motion, the scene of enthusiasm, mingled with sorrow and wild emotion, enacted by the assembled thousands, was one utterly indescribable. The male portion of the spectators shouted, the women sobbed, soldiers rolled back a shout or encouragement and appreciation, add thus they and their numerous escort proceeded to the pier from whence they were to embark. And now a word of the Thirty-seventh themselves. They are nearly all stout, well knit, hardy fellows, with no loose, fleshy encumbrances, full of the muscle, vigor and spirit of manhood, and willing to take the chances of war while fighting for freedom, which means the government of mankind by mankind. Although not quite au fait in the tactics, they will compare favorably with other regiments who have left this city, and they certainly are not behind any in pluck and appearance. As a general thing the officers of the regiment are staunch, determined men, and equal to the responsible positions in which they have been placed. Major D. C. Minton is quite an acquisition to the men, as he is an officer about whose military capacity and strict regard for discipline there cannot be a question. He graduated at the Woolwich Military School in England, where he earned some distinction, and subsequently held the rank of First Lieutenant in the Third Light dragoons. Father J. Tissot, one of the professors at St. John's College, Fordham, goes with the regiment to share the toils and hardships of a campaign, and to give them such religious consolation as is necessary under such circumstances. A great affection seems to exist among the soldiers for their chaplain. Dr. Wilson, of West Eleventh street, presented Major Minton with a magnificent war horse, fully caparisoned which he will ride on the field of battle. Colonel McCunn rides a fine, gray horse, full of mettle. There are two companies in the regiment from Cattaraugus county, consisting of about one hundred and eighty men, which Captain Bingham, who commands one of them, was mainly instrumental in organizing. The regiment has also a very efficient and well-equipped engineer corps, and numbers about eight hundred men, all told. Mr. William De Lacy is to be placed on the staff on arriving at Washington, as engineer, with the rank or lieutenant.
About half past three o'clock, the regiment having nearly all got aboard, the Atlas glided from the dock amidst the cheers of those assembled to witness the departure, which were returned with stentorian effect by the rapidly disappearing soldiers.
Lieutenant Boyle, of Co. A, and Sergeants Kerrigan and McMahon, remain to bring on the rear guard, or those who were left behind. They will leave to join the regiment to-morrow.
Our reporter was shown a document by the Quartermaster of the regiment, signed by the surgeon and all the officers, wherein it is stated that the rations supplied to the regiment by the Messrs. Tracey and Enery were of the first quality, and they therefore tendered their thanks to the men mentioned.
The following is a revised list of the officers:
Field Officers—Colonel, John H. McCunn; Lieutenant Colonel, John Burke; Major, D. C. Minton; Adjutant, C. Murphy.
Staff Officers—Doctors, John McNulty and William O. Meagher; Lieutenant, George W. Clarke; Colonel's Aide-de-Camp and Quartermaster, Hoyt; Chaplain, Rev. J. Tissot.
Company A—Captain, Gilbert Riordan; First Lieutenant, Philip Doherty; Ensign, Andrew J. Dregnan.
Company B—Captain, James T. Maguire; First Lieutenant, David Ren; Ensign, Robt. Johnstone Bassett.
Company C—Captain, Michael Doran; First Lieutenant, Martin E. Lawlor; Ensign, Josiah W. Willwtt.
Company D—Captain, F. McHugh; First Lieutenant, Jas. D. Clark; Ensign, P. H. Hayes.
Company E—Captain, John Kavanagh; First Lieutenant, J. McGorman; Ensign, James P. Boyle.
Company F—Captain, Dominick O'Connor; First Lieutenant, ____ Long; Ensign, ____ Vosburg.
Company G—Captain, Michael Murphy; First Lieutenant, Richard S. Barry; Ensign, James Keeler.
Company H—Captain, Luke G. Harmon; First Lieutenant, John R. McConnell; Ensign, Patrick H. Jones.
Company I—Captain, Wm. T. Clarke; First Lieutenant, George W. Baillett; Ensign, C. S. Treavitt.
Company K—Captain, W. Johnston; First Lieutenant, Charles Dunleavy; Ensign, W. C. McCarty.
Non-Commissioned Staff—The non-commissioned staff are as follows:—Sergeant major, Jeremiah O'Leary; Drum Major, ____ Rollins; Fife Major, Frank W. Murphy; Quartermaster's Sergeant, John Phalan.

THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT N. Y. S. VOLUNTEERS,
New York, June 23, 1861.
By order of Colonel John H. McCunn, of the Thirty-seventh regiment of New York Volunteers, Lieutenant James P. Boyle and Sergeants Owen, Kerrigan and Thomas McMahon, will remain at their encampment for the purpose of collecting and sending off all members of the regiment who were not there the time of starting.

THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT.
A squad of recruits for this regiment, still occupying the advance-guard of the army of the Potomac, were forwarded, yesterday, to Washington. Another detachment will be sent on in a day or two.

ENCAMPMENT OF THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT ON THE BATTERY.
This body of volunteers, over eight hundred strong, left their quarters in Ninety-ninth street on Tuesday morning, and are at present encamped in the Battery. Yesterday about one-half of the regiment mustered into the United States service for two years unless sooner discharged. The appearance of the camp yesterday was anything but inviting, the rain having placed the ground around the tents in a miserable condition for pedestrianism. The tents which are used at this encampment have become quite dilapidated, and the rain in many instances enters through the apertures of the canvass, causing a dampness in the interior which must be highly injurious to the health of the soldiers. This should be remedied, if possible.
The members of the Thirty-seventh are all, with one or two exceptions, men of Irish birth, and possess an appearance of hardihood and natural strength. If, when they are called into active service, they do as well as their countrymen or the Sixty-ninth, the government will have no reason to complain. The Thirty-seventh, there is no doubt, when properly equipped and clothed, will present an excellent front, and, with the little drilling which they have received, they now manoeuvre quite creditably. Their uniform or arms of any description have not yet been provided, but they expect to receive them shortly. The regiment on Tuesday was medically inspected by a physician, and not a single member discarded. It would be well that the Thirty-seventh should at once be provided with their necessary accoutrements, that they may become proficient in their drill. About three o'clock yesterday afternoon two companies—those of Captains Kavanagh and Riordon—were mustered into the United States service and took the oath. Owing to the heavy rain storm which set in the mustering of the remaining companies was postponed until ten o'clock this morning.
The following is a list of the officers of the regiment:—
Colonel—John H. McCunn.
Lieutenant Colonel—John Burke.
Major—D. C. Minton.
Adjutant—Cornelius Murphy.
Quartermaster—Charles W. Hoyt.
Paymaster—Charles O. Storrs.
Company A—Captain Rierdon; First Lieutenant, Philip Doherty; Ensign, Anthony J. Digman.
Company B—Captain, James T. Maguire; First Lieutenant, Wm. Delacy; Second Lieutenant, James L. Dungan.
Company C—Captain, Michael Doran; First Lieutenant, ____ Lawlor; Ensign, ____ Willett.
Company D—Captain, Dom'k O'Connor; First Lieutenant, John Long; Ensign, Chas. G. Vosberg.
Company E—Captain, John Kavanagh; First Lieutenant, ___ McConnell; Ensign, ____ Boyle.
Company F—Captain, Francis McHugh; First Lieutenant, James D. Clark; Ensign, ____ Hayes.
Company G—Captain, Michael Murphy; First Lieutenant, Richard S. Barry; Ensign, James Keenan.
Company H—Captain, Luke G. Harnan; First Lieutenant, John R. McConnell; Ensign, Patrick H. Jones.
Company I—Captain W. T. Clark; First Lieutenant, G. W. Bartlett; Ensign, C. S. Trevett.
Company K—Captain, James W. Johnson; First Lieutenant, S. A. McCarthy; Ensign, Chas. Dunleavy.

OUR ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
HEADQUARTERS THJRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT,
ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, August 23, 1861.
Grand Pageant on Arlington heights—A Date at the Seat of War—March of the Thirty-seventh Regiment from Alexandria to Arlington—Hospitable Reception by the Michigan Second, &c., &c.
McCunn's brigade has been distributed among other brigades recently, and the Thirty-seventh regiment, which Colonel McCunn commands, is for the present attached to General Richardson's command. Yesterday, a little before noon, the Thirty-seventh regiment received orders to move from their encampment outside of Alexandria and march to Fort Albany, on Arlington Heights. The march commenced within four hours afterwards. The distance was some ten miles, over hilly roads, crossed by rivulets in several places, and muddy everywhere, owing to the recent rains. The evening was sultry; but, notwithstanding, not only was every man in the corps ready to turn out, but not a single man fell out of the ranks from fatigue till we reached our present camping ground. One of the streams, which we were obliged to cross was some two feet in depth, and the scenes at crossing it were very ludicrous in some instances. An attempt was made to pass over dry shod by taking down part of the neighboring fences and fastening planks to form a bridge; but, though some time was spent in this way, the bridge was a failure, and the majority had to dash through the water. This was done amid roars of laughter, as the men splashed each other, or knocked one another down in the water. The bridge gave way, precipitating five or six men broadside into the stream at one time. At last we reached our destination, and there the scene was grand. All the regiments in the vicinity were drawn up to cheer us as we passed along them, and the Michigan Second was drawn up to receive us. General Richardson invited Colonel McCunn and his officers to have supper with him—an invitation which was accepted without hesitation. As the night gave signs of rain Colonel McCunn labored without delay, and successfully, to have the men of his regiment under cover. After arriving at Arlington the scene presented to my view was the grandest I ever beheld, and for that reason I will give some idea of what it was. The Thirty-seventh was drawn up in line near the headquarters of General. Richardson. The headquarters are in a fine octagonal house, with a cupola commanding a splendid prospect, surmounting it. On this waved the regimental flag of the Thirty-seventh; underneath were the guns of many fortifications, the tents of many brigades, and the soldiers of many gallant regiments; while further away shone the soft bright waters of the Potomac, and beyond them the capital, which it is our pride and privilege to defend. As soon as the flag was raised over the headquarters and unfolded to the breeze, the regimental band struck up the "Star Spangled Banner" and many other patriotic airs. It was grand to see the regiment as it wound its way through the woods, with its music playing and banners flying, as it was cheered and bidden farewell by the huzzas of other  regiments and the roar of artillery during its march; but all was culminated, all was exceeded in the magnificence and brilliancy of the pageant on the summit of the Heights of Arlington, when the scene I have described occurred, in view of the ....—the city bearing the .... of the great military chieftain who founded the .... which the troops .... in view are assembled to pre... .... as well. The tents of the regiment ....
in .... the rain is over, the .... men are refreshed and merry .... .... the regiments at Alexandria, as well as ours, .... been recently removed to the vicinity of Arlington Heights, which you may be assured are now impregnable.

Personal.—Major A. JH. Steele, Surgeon of the 37th N. Y. V., is in town for a few days visiting friends.
Capt. McPherson, of the Sprague Light Cavalry, (16th), is in town. This regiment is picketing the road been Fairfax and Lewinsville, and are encamped at Vienna, about thirty miles from Washington. The company recruited here by Capt. McPherson is said to be one of the finest companies in the regiment.
Capt. H. N. Throop has been appointed General Superintendent of the "Ontario Steamboat Company" again this season. He will proceed to Charlotte about the 1st of February to put the steamers in thorough repair for another season's business. So says the Commercial Times,
Pultneyville.
(July 21, 1861)

RECRUITING FOR THE ARMY.
The exciting news from .... has had no effect upon recruiting for the regular army .... groups of earnest-looking men might be seen around some of the volunteer offices, particularly that for the Thirty-seventh (Colonel McCunn's regiment,) in Chatham street, where a green flag belonging to the Sixty-ninth regiment was displayed. Quite a number of boys have lately been sent to Governor's Island to learn music. Cedar street and Chatham street have sent twenty this week. The branch office of the Hudson street rendezvous for the mounted service has been removed from Greenwich street to No. 5 Broadway. Recruiting for general service in Boston has almost died out, after twelve months of unprecedented activity. Not more than a dozen men have been enlisted this month. The recruiting sergeant there—Sergeant H. Fox—has received a captain's commission in the Seventh Massachusetts Volunteers. Captain Fox has been upwards of twenty years in the army, and nearly all that time a non-commissioned officer. As First Sergeant in Light Company C, Third Artillery, he did good service in the Mexican war. There are many old soldiers like Captain Fox whom it would be the benefit of volunteer regiments to secure as captains or adjutants. Their previous service entitle them to some reward, while their experience, practical knowledge of military affairs and proved courage in action, could not fail to have a most beneficial influence upon both officers and men under their command, and would go far to counteract, if not entirely prevent, such needless and disastrous panics as that which has just turned a probable victory into a positive defeat. The country needs at this juncture all the tried soldiers it can secure.

THE THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT.
OUR ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
OUTPOSTS OF THE AMERICAN ARMY,
NEAR THE POTOMAC, JUNE 27, 1861.
Alarms—Strong Forces of Sentinels—Reconnoissances—Friendly Intercourse Between Our Regiments, &c., &c.
In this letter I purpose to give you an account of camp life in full view of an enemy's encampment. After reaching Washington the Thirty-seventh regiment was ordered to quarters in the city, having been previously reviewed by President Lincoln. In these quarters, which were various unfurnished houses in Pennsylvania avenue, not far from the White House, we remained till the following day at eleven A. M., when we received orders to occupy the encampment near the Potomac, three miles from the city, formerly occupied by the Second regiment. In half an hour afterwards col. McCunn had the regiment in marching order and en route for the encamping ground. The day was warm, and every one felt well satisfied that the march was so short. Having arrived at the ground I took a survey of it, while the men were set to work pitching the camp, lighting the camp fires, &c. We are encamped on the brow of a hill or plateau which slopes down to the Potomac. We are the most advanced regiment of this division of the Union army, and from our camp we can distinguish a large one of the rebels, with the rebel flag floating over it, on the opposite bank of the river at a distance of six or seven miles. This camp has made its appearance since ours was pitched. On our right the Garibaldi Guard is the nearest regiment, and in our rear the New York Twelfth, all within half a mile of each other, and the three being in the form of an L. Many interchanges of civility occur between these three regiments, but the manner in which our corps was received by the Garibaldians on our arrival at the camp exceeded in genuine hospitality anything of which I was ever a participant. A deputation of their officers waited for ours and brought us over to their camp in which twenty-seven different nationalities are represented and eighteen different dialects spoken. Italy and Germany, however, rule the roast, and so do the Italian and Teutonic tongues in this camp. We first visited an Italian officer's tent where hospitalities peculiar to Italian tastes but well suited to our own, were spread before us. Next we were marched off to the tent of a German officer, and actually held prisoners there till we were saturated internally and externally with lager bier and other good beverages, and made to regale ourselves heartily with everything that could be pressed into the service of tyrannical appetites. It is inended [sic] to return this hospitality with the best show our Irish-American hearts can get up as soon as we have all things au fait. Beavers cannot beat the Dutchmen in thriftiness. They have made their camp a beaver's nest, having brought boughs of trees incredible distances to make shady places, dug holes to keep their lager and provisions cool, of yawning aspect sunk wells of incredible depth to procure cold water, and, in fact, those wonderful fellows have changed the whole face of nature out here. Our lads have not been slow to learn a useful lesson from their industrious neighbors. We had an alarm in the camp last night, and all the regiments in this vicinity were aroused and under arms in a few minutes, ready for any emergency. They moved magically, it seemed. The alarm was occasioned by one of our sentries falling into a fit, and causing the accidental discharge of his musket. Col. McCunn, Major Minton and one or two of the staff officers of the Thirty-seventh rode over to reconnoiter the camp on the opposite bank yesterday; but their efforts did not add much to the information previously possessed, though they incurred some personal risk. The health of our regiment is good, and the Colonel has reported favorably of the efficiency and activity of Drs. McNulty and O'Meagher. Our tents are all erected on lovely picturesque ground, and our mess is now well organized. Everything in this and the adjoining camps goes on satisfactorily. I have conversed with a gentleman who attended the Council of War. The subject under discussion was the expediency of seizing Manassas Gap. I know the result, but would not consider it patriotic to make it known. I will post you on all the important movements at the proper time. The Herald is in great demand in the camp, and is not only the only New York paper received in it, but the most enjoyable luxury and source of pleasure to the men. The regiment is up at four o'clock A. M., drills ten hours a day and retires at nine P. M. The weather to-day is 100 degrees in the shade. The only accident that has occurred to our regiment since its departure from New York was the drowning of private Carl McCormac, on Monday afternoon, while bathing in the Potomac. The behavior of the men, so far, has been admirable.

THE THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
Washington, Sept. 14, 1861.
Please contradict statements made in one of your city papers of the 14th inst. No captain was dismissed from the Thirty-seventh New York Volunteers. Colonel John H. McCunn is the only one who felt constrained to retire.
T. J. McHUGH, Captain Co. D.
M. DORAN, Captain Co. C.
M. MURPHY, Captain Co. G.
G. RIORDAN, Captain Co. A.
J. KAVANAGH, Captain Co. E.

COLONEL OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH.
Gov. Morgan, of New-York, has appointed Capt. HAYMAN, United States Army, to be Colonel of the Thirty-seventh Regiment of that State. Lieut.-Col. BURKE was elected to succeed Col. McCUNN, who was ordered from Washington. A committee, consisting of the senior Captains of the regiment, have, in the name of the regiment, waited upon Gen. McCLENNAN, asking him to confirm their choice of a Colonency, a request with which he will probably comply. The objection is not to Capt. HAYMAN, but to the interference of Gov. Morgan, and besides the regiment claim the right to make their own selection.
(N. Y. Times, Oct. 7, 1861)

CAMP MARY, June 28, 1861.
Mrs. Lincoln in the Camp of the Thirty-seventh Regiment--Baptism of the Camp--Interesting Ceremony, &c., &c.
One of the most interesting ceremonies and incidents connected with the present war took place yesterday evening in the camp of the Thirty-seventh regiment. Mrs. Lincoln, for the third time since the arrival of the regiment, signified her intention of reviewing the troops. The Colonel, in consequence of this distinguished honor conferred upon his regiment by the Presidential lady, determined on the occasion of her visit to the camp to christen it Camp Mary, in honor of the name of Mrs. Lincoln. About six o'clock P. M., an open barouche was observed approaching in the distance, accompanied by two buggies. The carriage contained Mrs. Lincoln and a young and handsome lady friend, Schuyler Colfax, member of Congress from Indiana, and General Walbridge, of New York. Mrs. Lincoln never looked better. She was attired in a plain, unostentatious brocatine dress, a black lace bask, and a silk bonnet of red, white and blue ribbons, in parallel stripes, which was sent from Boston. The ruche was of red, white and blue artificial roses. The regiment was already drawn up in battalion order, to receive the distinguished party. After witnessing the regiment deploy breaking into skirmishers, and performing other movements very creditable to their military proficiency, Col. McCunn invited Mrs. Lincoln and the party of which she was the chief feature of interest to visit his tent and see his quarters. The invitation was accepted, and the Colonel aided Mrs. Lincoln in alighting from her carriage. She entered the tent smiling and gracefully, accepted a seat on a camp stool, was introduced to some of the principal officers of the regiment, sipped a glass of champagne with the company in the most social style, and passed many encomiums on the regiment and its condition. The regiment meanwhile was drawn up in battalion in front of the Colonel's tent, and Mrs. Lincoln now passed out to her carriage. I now noticed that there were thirty-four stars in the crown of Mrs. Lincoln's bonnet. Someone remarked the circumstance, and another replied that the thirty-five bright stars of the Union were before us, and that Mrs. Lincoln was the newest and brightest of the constellation, a sally which that amiable lady received in the most modest and becoming manner.
Col. McCunn now took a bottle of champagne, and, breaking it against Mrs. Lincoln's carriage, said: "In honor of the lady of our chief, the President of our country's choice, I now name our camp Camp Mary. This is, perhaps, the proudest incident in the history of the Thirty-seventh regiment. We did not leave New York for the purpose of making war on our brethren of the South, but for the purpose of struggling for the settlement of a great question; and while we are doing this and restoring peace to the country, I trust that the Thirty-seventh regiment will always be first in its readiness, its duty and its ability to discharge that duty. Distinguished lady, you are thrice welcome to this camp, and in the name of the regiment I welcome you, and in doing so I baptize our camp Camp Mary." (Cheers from the regiment, and an inclination of the most charming acknowledgement from Mrs. Lincoln)
Schuyler Colfax, of Indiana, made a speech well suited to the occasion and circumstances. His speech was received with six cheers—three for himself and three for the President of the United States.
General Walbridge was then loudly called upon by the regiment, and delivered the ablest address, by far, I ever heard from him. While he was delivering it Mrs. Lincoln handed him a rosette, and requested him to pin it on Col. McCunn's breast and request him to wear it in remembrance of her. The latter gentleman received it with a handsome bow. The allusions of Gen. Walbridge to this circumstance were very happy, and he was constantly interrupted by cheers and clapping from the regiment, among whom he has many friends. He was very eulogistic of the regiment and its Colonel. Cheers for the President, Mrs. Lincoln, the Union and Gen. Walbridge followed, amid which the cortege of the Presidential party drove off at a brisk pace. The scene was of an extraordinary nature from beginning to end, and hence I have devoted an entire letter to its description.

FROM THE WAR.--Col. Hayman, of the 37th N. Y., wounded in the wrist, is now stopping here. Corp. W. H. Lewis, Co. A, 49th N. Y., wounded in left leg, and Wm. R. Holt, of Co. D, 72d N. Y., wounded in finger, reached here Thursday, 19th. Milo Bailey, Co. D, 72d N. Y., wounded slightly in foot, passed through here on his way to his home in Stockton, on Tuesday last.--[Fredonia Advertiser.

OBITUARY.
LIEUTENANT PATRICK HENRY HAYES, THIRTY-SEVENTH
REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.
Among the slain at the late battle of Williamsburg was Lieutenant P. H. Hayes, of the Thirty-seventh regiment. A little pine cross placed at the head of the grave, near a dense forest of pine close by Williamsburg, bears the following brief record of his death: "Lieutenant P. H. Hayes, Company G, Thirty-seventh regiment New York Volunteers, shot May 5, 1862, at Williamsburg." The deceased was a most efficient and faithful officer, greatly esteemed by his superiors and comrades as a man of extraordinary determination, and possessed of a talent for the military vocation which promised a brilliant future. Captain James O'Bierne in a letter announcing Lieutenant Hayes' death, writes as follows:
Lieutenant Hayes, commanding Company G, Thirty-seventh, when ordered, with the left wing of his regiment, in a dense woods through a pelting rain storm and over fallen timbers, to charge the enemy with bayonets, went dashing and bravely leading on his men until when within fifty yards of the foe concealed in a rifle pit, their terrific and deadly fire was delivered, and poor Hayes fell, never to rise again, mortally wounded by a rifle ball through the heart. The writer was the last of his fellow officers to whom he spoke just as he exchanged places with him in line of battle, and among his mourners none will more sincerely regret the loss of so brave a soul and so gallant a comrade.
Thirty-seventh Regiment.
This regiment, commanded by Colonel Charles Roome, President of the Manhattan Gas Company, will probably leave this morning about ten o'clock. Business at the armory, 596 Broadway, was exceedingly brisk all day yesterday, and recruits were offering themselves to an unlimited number. The officers are:—
Field and Staff—Colonel, Charles Roome; Lieutenant Colonel, Claudius L. Monell; Major, Ossian L. Ashley; Adjutant, Charles M. Catlin; Engineer, Henry J. Scudder; Surgeon, Henry Slack; Quartermaster, James A. Timpson; Paymaster, Walter Roome; Surgeon's Mate, ____; Chaplain, George Jarvis Geer; Military Secretary, Stephen E. Burrall; Commissary, James Meeks; Assistant Quartermaster, W. A. G. Montgomery, Jr.; Assistant Paymaster, J. L. Uhlhorn; Ordnance Officer, J. E. Winne; Sergeant Major, O. F. A. Brockway; Quartermaster Sergeant, Theodore W. Morris; Commissary Sergeant, ____; Ordnance Sergeant, ____.
Captains—Theodore W. Parmele, Company A; Albert M. Smith, Company B; Wm. E. Vermilye, Company C; Wm. H. Farrar, Company D; John H. Quackenbush, Company E; George W. Lyon, Company F; Albert N. Davidson, Company G; George Dudley Waring, Company H.
First Lieutenants— ____, Company A; Thomas Stevenson, Company B; ____, Company C; George M. Dusenberry, Company D; ____, Company E; James M. Vanderbergh, Company F; N. W. Stuyvesant Catlin, Company G; Frederick F. Thompson, Company H.
Second Lieutenants—Charles E. Chapman, Company A; George W. Boister, Company B; ____, Company C; Pierre A. Parsells, Company D; Joshua Isaacs, Company E; Charles L. Terry, Comapny F; Albert A. Drake, Company G; Charles E. Homer, Company H.

(Battle of Williamsburg.)
General Berry's Brigade.
THIRTY-SEVENTH NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.
Officers.—Killed—First lieutenant P. H. Hayes, J. O'Leary. Wounded—Captains Maguire, Company B; W. Delacy, Company K; Second Lieutenant J. Massey; E. W. Brown, James Smith.
Non-Commissioned Officers.—Killed—Sergeant John Gallagher; Corporal James M. Garry, D. McDevitt. Wounded—Corporals H. White, J. A. Drew, Sergeant F. Greely; Corporals J. Collins, J. Ryan, P. Keegan, J. Boyle, M. Kelly, D. Conroy, F. Campbell, F. J. Waters, H. T. Bryant; Sergeant O. Hanberry; Corporal J. Sweeney.
PRIVATES.—Killed—P. Mangan, B. Egan, W. Stevenson, W. Ryan, M. Grogan, T. Burke, W. Russell, J. Hickey, T. Martin, J. Gaffney, P. McArdle, J. Green, W. Martinfield, P. Turner, G. P. Rich, L. Morrill, J. O'Neill, J. Maguire, Wounded—J. Donnelly, J. Wall, M. Farrell, M. McManus, D. G. Lang, B. A. Ford, E. P. Bryant, A. Durlee, W. Balt, J. Morris, B. H. Conklin, G. Hurlburt, H. S. Huntley, O. Finnegan, A. Preston, J. Dowther, B. McGinnis, P. Fitzgerald, J. Cummings, T. Murray, M. Flynn, P. Farrell, M. Jennings, J. Lunnd, J. Rodgers, W. Lewis, C. Daison, J. Collins, E. Beck, D. Grannon, R. Holmes, C. O'Brien, W. Stuart, J. Yurgar, P. Manning, M. Leonard, M. Grady, P. Coffee, J. Gratton, T. Casey, B. Connor, H. Brady, T. Alworth, L. McDermott, Thomas Hart, M. Saltan, B. White, H. Small, C. Regan, P. Lynch, L. Curtis. Missing—Bishop, Company H, J. Smith, Company F.

SEIZING A REBEL SMUGGLER.
Exploit of a New York Soldier—A Storm on the Chesapeake.
There has been some complaints on the part of the New York regiments which left this city in May last on the call of Secretary Stanton, because they have not been sent into active service; yet it appears that they are not always idle in camp, as the following instance proves:
General Wool, desiring to have some important service done, selected for the duty Lieutenant Theodore W. Morris, Acting Adjutant of the Thirty-seventh regiment, now at Camp Belger, Baltimore, and formerly of this city. The young officer was called by an orderly on three o'clock Tuesday evening, and at once accepted the service. Selecting fifteen picked men from his regiment, he had them furnished with three days' rations and ammunition, and at seven in the morning reported himself to General Wool, from whom he received orders to seize a steamboat engaged in smuggling goods to the rebels, and convey her Washington.
Lieutenant Morris marched his men down to the river, and at once took possession of the steamer Mary Washington, and placing a guard over her, started down the Chesapeake Bay for Washington city. At one o'clock the vessel—a large side-wheel steamer—was caught in the fearful squall of Tuesday, thrown upon her beam ends, while the chain boxes stove through her side and fell overboard. Thus the boat had no ballast, and her guards were under water.
Lieutenant Morris ordered his men to get life preservers ready, as it was every minute expected that the steamer would prove a complete wreck.
The captain was also ready with his life preserver. The thunder was fearful, and the rain fell in such torrents that it was impossible to see even the ship's length. The boat was kept head to the wind and drove out towards the Atlantic. Two men were washed overboard, but were saved by clinging to the guards.
Finally the storm subsided, and the damaged steamer was conveyed safely to Washington; where Lieutenant Morris on Wednesday delivered her to Quartermaster-General Meigs. It was a hazardous expedition, but one which reflects credit on a gallant young member of the Thirty-seventh.

THE 37TH REGT. N. Y. V, "IRISH ..."
ITS HISTORY--SANITARY, MEDICAL , MILITARY, AND MISCELLANEOUS.
BY WILLIAM O'MEAGHER, SURGEON.
THE 37th Regt. was originally recruited in New York city, in the months of April and May, 1861, immediately after the breaking out of  the Rebellion, and amid the moist intense popular excitement and patriotic ardor, occasioned by the fall of Sumter, and the determined and daring attitude assumed by the leaders of the Southern States. The rush to enlist was so great, that, in numberless instances, a proper examination was impossible, in consequence of the urgent need of troops to protect Washington and other places, menaced by the enemy, This was especially the case with the 69th Militia, the colonel of which regiment might, if he were allowed, have recruited not only a regiment but a brigade or division. The 37th Regt. was similarly circumstanced, for to my certain knowledge, more than two thousand members were enrolled, but could not be retained, in consequence as well of the prescribed limits affixed to the military organizations, as of the  difficulties experienced by the recruiting officers in obtaining the requisite authority from the State Department, the latter seeking, as alleged, to control the election of the officers, or appoint favorites of its own. This fact was frequently alluded to by the friends of the regiment, as a just ground of complaint, and the only reason why the command was not sooner in the field, as it might have been, if the organization had not been obstructed by this alleged interference.
At length, about the middle of May, the organization was complete; a camp was formed at Bloomingdale; the men sleeping in a large frame building, commonly used as a German assembly and dance room, being provided with some straw and blankets, the proprietor furnishing them very fair rations, under contract. The officers lived at home.
Nine-tenths of the men and officers, were either Irish or Irish-American, and might be otherwise classed as clerks, mechanics, laborers, farmers' sons, and very few city rowdies. The remainder—two companies—were mostly American born, from Cattaraugus county, with a slight sprinkling of Irish and German citizens. They were all American citizens and harmonized very well.
The social standing of the officers was equally good, and their education not below the ordinary standard. They might be classed as lawyers, doctors, farmers, clerks, teachers, and very few mere politicians.
Immediately on the formation of our first camp, Dr. McNulty, then surgeon, inaugurated a system of sanitary measures, suitable to the condition of the place, being mainly intended to obviate miasma, which prevailed to some extent in the vicinity, owing to the existence of some marshes near the river. With this view, quinine was freely administered as a prophylactic of intermittent and other miasmatic fevers, and with a favorable result which subsequent experience seems to have verified. Frequent ablution, general cleanliness, sinks, and other sanitary precautions were ordered, and very generally the police regulations were observed.
The regiment remained here about two weeks, during which time the two Cattaraugus companies joined the command.
Immediately afterwards, an epidemic of measles broke out among the latter, which was said to have originated at the depot at Elmira. Not having as yet organized a proper hospital, we had those sent to the hospital for contagious diseases, where they soon recovered. This was the only epidemic that occurred in the regiment from first to last.
About the beginning of June, the regiment encamped in the Battery Park under tents. Here, too, the men enjoyed good health, the only exceptions being some cases of miasmatic fever, which, in all probability, originated at the former camp, and a few cases of venereal disease. One or two of the latter were sent to the New York Hospital.
In obedience to orders from the Surgeon General's Department, Albany, we vaccinated the whole command, both officers and men, to the number of 625, a report of which was sent at the time to the Surgeon General, Albany, and also to the Surgeon General, United States Army.
By this operation we discovered 125 persons who had never been vaccinated, chiefly in the Cattaraugus companies. At this time small pox prevailed to a considerable extent in the city, especially among the raw soldiers. Subsequently, the disease broke out in the vicinity of the regiment, while in the field; but one only contracted it, and that only while attending a case belonging to another command; the fact of his having previously had the disease being deemed by the brigade surgeon who incidentally employed him, a sufficient safeguard against a second attack. Not so, however.
Our observations, included in the report, verified the assertion that contagious diseases may be contracted by the same individual more than once. Indeed, I have seen the marks of three distinct attacks of small pox on the person of the commanding officer of Co. B. The vaccine eruption followed in the usual manner in the cases of several who had had small pox; but in the cases of those who had been inoculated by small pox matter, the vaccine matter was entirely inoperative. Such were the prominent facts attempted to be elucidated in my report.
At the Battery Park, excellent rations were served to the men by contract. The officers' mess was equally good, much better in fact than they ever subsequently were able to get.
On the 22d of June, the regiment, then 800 strong, were ordered to Washington, where we arrived on the 23d, going into camp next day, at the foot of East Capitol street, on the bank of the Anacostia, which is in this place bordered by an extensive swamp. Here, again, we administered quinine and whiskey freely, with a view to obviate the miasmatic poison, with equally favorable results, the only other sickness prevailing being diarrhoea, caused by imprudent eating, and drinking water of all kinds. The rations were generally good, and fresh bread was plenty. In addition to the above causes of camp diarrhoea, bad cooking might also be mentioned as a very common and prominent one. The ration itself, is also another, unless there is a free allowance of vegetables. In my opinion, pork and beans might be omitted altogether, and potatoes and onions substituted, with advantage to the men and profit to the Government.
The sanitory [sic] condition of the regiment was always good. Hardships, exposure, hard and prolonged duty, marching or fighting, seemed to have no permanent effect on the great majority, especially the Irish element, which, together with many grave defects, acquired, as well as natural, has still an inextinguishable vitality and elasticity, physical and intellectual, inherent in no other civilized race, to the same extent. The American physique is finer and more symmetrical—the American mind more stable and even; but I have seen both fail beside the common Celtic type of mind and muscle.
The nature of the services performed by the regiment, was naturally of the severest kind, because their extraction was well known and appreciated. Wherever there was an exposed part of the Union line, far to the front and bristling up to the enemy's teeth, were posted the 37th Irish Rifles. Here they were never surprised, never driven back, and never captured, except in one or two instances, when wounded, or too far in advance as at Glendale and Chancellorsville. Not one ever deserted to the enemy; very few deserted at all, and even these were otherwise good men, but reckless when drunk. Some few there were who succumbed to the unusual hardships and exposure, imprudence and other avoidable causes. These, however, were very few, indeed, and not at all worthy of mention, except in a truthful narrative.
I would venture to say that these hardships and exposures rather confirmed and improved the naturally good constitutions of the men. They had in abundance the most essential requsites for good health—pure air and light, plenty of exercise, and generally plenty of food—so that the consequent exuberance of animal spirits was only kept within proper bounds by constant drill, when other sources of action were wanting.
The supplies from Government were almost always abundant and good. Whenever there was anything wrong in this respect, the fault lay generally with the Government agents, or the contractor. Medicines and hospital stores were abundant and good, in most cases, but could not always be obtained, especially when most needed, that is, during, or after an engagement. This was owing in a great measure to the failure of every department of the Army to put into practice the rules proper and peculiar to each. Thus, before, and during an engagement the ordnance depot is entitled to precedence, as a matter of course. Next in proper order should come the medical department, aided by the Commissary and Quartermasters. This, however, is very seldom the case, the four departments being almost always hopelessly commingled, confused, and clashing to their hearts' content; very frequently private interests are preferred to the public weal and to the direst sufferings of humanity. Thus, at Chancellorsville especially, every general officer could have two or three ambulances to carry his private effects, but by express orders from General Hooker, not one could be had to convey the wounded from the field. In fact, the military medical commissary and quartermaster's departments are constantly clashing, at a time when all should be harmonious and all equally efficient, as they might be, by only following the regulations laid down for each. This, however, is utopian, until we see officers appointed solely on the ground of merit and fitness. Such is the only remedy that I know of for abuses in all these departments.
The supplies received from societies, commissioners, &c., were not very large nor very useful.
From the Union Defence Committee we received a hospital wagon or ambulance, which was never used for that purpose, having been appropriated by the Quartermaster's Department and for other purposes. A supply of under-clothes, socks, havelocks, &c., was received from the Sanitary Commission, and the Ladies Association of Trinity Church.—The wagon was worth about $25 and the supplies about $75. These were received before we left the city. During the subsequent service, I should say that about $500 worth of miscellaneous supplies were received from the Sanitary Commission, in the shape of under- clothes, socks, delicacies, wines and other liquors. These supplies were always more easily obtained.
The services of the regiment were as follows: It was in reserve at the first battle of Manassas, retiring in excellent order from Fairfax Station to Alexandria, and guarding the trains of commissary, ordnance and Quartermaster's stores. Not a man recrossed the bridge into Washington after that disastrous battle, the regiment encamping near Bailey's Cross Roads, on the old Leesburg Turnpike.
During the Summer, Fall and Winter following, the regiment performed picket and fatigue duty in the front and on the fortifications around Washington.
In the early part of 1862 a small detachment of the regiment attacked a strongly posted picket of the enemy near Occoquan, killing and wounding about twenty-five of them.—Throughout the entire siege of Yorktown the regiment was constantly under fire in the trenches and in camp. Here they performed the most arduous and harassing labor up to the moment of its evacuation.
At Williamsburg they fought their first general engagement, helping to turn the tide of battle, as admitted by the gallant Kearny,—Here the hospital arrangements were very bad, indeed, for several days, until, by individual effort, the wounded were carried from the field and made tolerably comfortable in adjacent houses and rebel barracks. That many of them perished for want of proper attendance and shelter, is well known.
Their next battle was at Fair Oaks, and here, too, by General Kearny's report, the regiment stopped the advancing and victorious columns of the enemy. The hospital arrangements were very good here, and the means of transportation abundant and accessible.
On the 25th of June the regiment was under fire frequently, Hooker's and Kearny's divisions driving in the enemy's pickets, while the fight and centre of the army were otherwise engaged.
During the Seven Days' Battles the regiment was constantly marching and fighting, losing heavily at Glendale and Malvern Hill. The hospital department, as might be expected, was utterly inefficient.
At the second battle of Manassas, the regiment, though constantly under fire, did not lose many of its members. Here, again, the hospital arrangements were exceedingly defective.
During the Maryland campaign, Kearney's division was detached, under General Stoneman, for the purpose of intercepting Stuart's cavalry returning from the raid into Pennsylvania.
At the battle of Fredericksburg the regiment lost heavily. The hospital arrangements here were fair, but on the first day no transportation could be had, owing to some misunderstanding on the part of the ambulance officer of the brigade. This, however, was soon rectified, and the wounded received every requisite attention.
At the battle of Chancellorsville the regient [sic] also lost heavily in officers and men.—The hospital arrangements were very bad, in consequence of the want of transportation for either the wounded or supplies.
This was the last battle in which the regiment was engaged, having been ordered home immediately after to be mustered out of service.
The Surgeon, William O'Meagher, was with the regiment at the battles of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, during the Seven Days' battles, at the second battle of Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and during the siege of Yorktown—he was detached to the hospital depots as operating surgeon.
The Assistant Surgeon, John P. Phillips, was present with the regiment at Williamsburg and Fredericksburg— detached to a hospital before and after the battle of Fair Oaks, when he was taken prisoner—absent sick at the second battle of Manassas—resigned after the battle of Fredericksburg.
The second assistant, W. B. Schermerhorn, was detached to the hospital after the battle of Fredericksburg, and followed the regiment at the battle of Chancellorsville. The duties of both with the regiment were to render temporary assistance on the field previously to the wounded being conveyed to the principal depots.
The kind and amount of accommodations provided for hospital and men, Winter and Summer, were as follow:—Two hospital tents, capable of holding from sixteen to thirty or more patients, according to the arrangement by separate or continuous beds, were the full allowance, Winter and Summer. On one occasion, during the Winter of '62, I was allowed lumber for floors, and also doors with glass sashes. This was the best hospital I ever had and was admirably heated by a furnace in front, and a chimney of strong stovepipe behind, a flue running under the floor from furnace to chimney. The whole, when completed and properly made is the very best Winter hospital for field service, better than ordinary houses, or even board huts. These two tents, together with smaller ones for the attendants, were fully sufficient for all our wants in this way. In Winter quarters the men had either the common wedge-tent, one to every five or six men, or the Sibley tent, one for fourteen or sixteen. Stoves were used in the latter, making them exceedingly hot, and, at night-time, very unhealthy. During the last Winter of our service, the men had only canvas shelter tents; but, by making a foundation of wood, or stockade, two or three feet high, with the canvas for a roof, very fair huts were produced. A bed raised from the floor, a mud chimney, two or three inmates, combined to render them very comfortable, and very healthy, compared with the other tents. Thus, these shelter tents served for both Summer and Winter. The best material for these would be blue or white India rubber cloth. I am not prepared to say that the temporary loss of tents caused much, if any, illness among the command; comfort, I know, was very often materially affected thereby; but for sick or wounded, the loss is a grave calamity.
In order to improve the condition of the army, strict discipline, good example, and, in fact, constant fatherly attention to the physical and mental wants of the men, are essentially requisite on the part of their officers. Soldiers become mere children, or rather automata, after a short time in service. They expect to be ordered to do everything. They rise from sleep by order, eat, drill, work, pray, &c., all by order, and if not constantly watched by the Surgeon and their company officers, they will become careless, and indifferent about themselves personally, and equally inattentive to their military duties. Company and regimental officers are too commonly indifferent and inattentive to the comfort and cleanliness of the men, and too frequently they furnish the worst possible examples of drunkenness and profanity. The Surgeon, if he be of the right sort, can remedy this in a great measure by proper suggestions to the Colonel and the Company officers; but my experience justifies me in saying that in very many cases their plainest duties are systematically ignored by all these officers. The consequence is that a command with such examples before and above them, is easily demoralized and easily defeated.
Such, however, was not the case of the 37th Regt., which had the good fortune to be commanded by Col. S. B. Hayman, now Major of the 10th Inf., and chief of General French's Staff, 3d corps, and who ought to be a Major General by right, as a reward for twenty-two years' service, as brave and honorable a man as the army can boast of, an officer equally prompt in the performance of all, even the most arduous and perilous, duties. Lieut. Col. Riordan, major De Lacy, Adjutant Henry and Quartermaster Phalon were also able and efficient officers--while our Rev. Chaplain, Father Tissot, S. J., was one of the best in the whole army. The company officers, too, were usually brave and efficient, and the rank and file were moral, brave and thorough soldiers.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: June 9, 2008
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