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39th Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

COLONEL D'UTASSY IN Prison.--The Sing Sing Republican, announcing the arrival of Colonel D'Utassy at the prison in that place, says:
" When he was assigned to a shop he asked his keeper to allow him to go alone from the shop to the mess room, remarking that he deemed it too disgraceful for him, having been a colonel and an acting brigadier-general in the United States service, to march with common convicts. In answer the keeper simply remarked, 'Captains, colonels and brigadiers are all alike here; all reduced to the ranks.' When he incidentally mentioned that he had had a university education, and was master of eleven different languages, the keeper replied, 'One language is all we have here, and we want very little of that.' "

Colonel D'Utassy's Sentence.
The following is published as the text of the sentence of Colonel D'Utassy, the late army officer convicted by a court martial of fraud, &c.:—
To forfeit all pay and allowances now due and that may become due to him; to be cashiered; to be confined for a period of one year at such place as the Secretary of War shall direct; to be disqualified from holding any office of trust, honor or emolument in the service of the United States, and the crime, name and punishment of delinquent to be published in at least three of the public papers of the State of New York.
The Secretary of War endorses the sentence, and orders his imprisonment in the State Prison at Sing Sing, N. Y. The President also approves the sentence.

THE TWENTY-NINTH AND TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENTS.
The Twenty-ninth New York volunteer regiment, organized by Colonel Van Steinwehr, but now commanded by Colonel C. West, passed through Camden at half-past ten o'clock this forenoon, and will arrive here, by way of Jersey City, at about three o'clock this afternoon.
The Twenty-second regiment, Colonel Phelps, numbering three hundred men, arrived here last evening, and took its departure for Albany.

CONVICTED AND SENTENCED.—Col. D'Utassy, convicted by court-martial at Washington of selling officers appointments, selling Government horses, and swearing to and collecting a false and fraudulent recruiting account against the United States for $3265, has been sentenced to degradation from rank, deprivation of back pay, disqualified from holding any office of trust or honor, and one year's imprisonment at hard labor in the Sing Sing prison.

THE SENTENCE OF COL. D'UTASSY.
The President has not yet acted upon the sentence of Col. D'Utassy, whose case he has under consideration. There is reason to believe that the sentence of the Court was imprisonment for a term not far from one year in length.

DEATH OF LIEUT.-COL. LAPPEIN.
Lieut.-Col. George F. Lappein, late of the 5th Maine Battery, died here of a wound received at Chancellorsville.

Trial of Colonel D'Utassy.
The Court-martial on Colonel D'UTASSY, assembled here to-day. Lieut. E. W. WEST was appointed Judge Advocate. Mr. GRAHAM, of New York is counsel for defense. Among the charges against Colonel D'UTASSY, are forging the franks of members of Congress, and selling them to soldiers in his command at three cents each; altering the muster rolls; making false musters; drawing pay for fictitious officers; opening private letters, and other charges affecting as well his virtue as his honesty. The trial promises to be an interesting one.

THE GARIBALDI GUARD
We have received for the Garibaldi Guard the following additional sums:
E. J. Livingston $50 00 Mrs H. De Forrest $10 00
Herbert B. Turner 20 00 Mrs. J. Griswold 10 00
Peter Richards, Jr. 25 00 Edward Kearney 10 00
Wm. Douglas 50 00 Cash 2 00
Mrs. Wm. F. Coles 20 00 Master Goelet 5 00
H. Badeau 6 00 John Paine 50 00
Cash 5 00 Amount previously acknowledged 1191 00
___ DeRham 25 00  
Total $1,478 00
(June 22, 1861)  

ON TO THE SOUTH.
All able-bodied men, especially those who have seen service, can enlist in the Garibaldi Guard, First Regiment of Foreign Riflemen. Americans, Italians, Hungarians, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Germans and Poles, come one, come all. Good rations and perfect drill. Call at once at the Armory, Irving Building, No. 596 Broadway.
D'UTASS, Colonel.
CHARLES B. NORTON,
TAKATS, Adjt. Paymaster.

GARIBALDI VOLUNTEERS.
The drill-room of this regiment will be after to-day at the Austach Theatre, corner of Fourth-street and Avenue A. Col. UTASSY has nearly 600 able-bodied, active men enrolled. The uniform of this regiment will be of the most practical description, being made up from the Hungarian, French and Italian military costume.

CONSOLIDATED.
The Garibaldi Guard Regiment has been consolidated into five companies and placed under the command of one field officer. Some fifteen of the old regimental officers have been mustered —Sixteen officers of the Garibaldi Guard, dissatisfied with their experience, and incompetent to the discharge of their duties, have resigned and returned to New York.
The case for the prosecution in the D'Utassy court-martial will be concluded to-day. About seventy witnesses are summoned for the defense, and their testimony will be commenced on Monday.
— A regiment of riflemen is forming here of Italians, Swiss and Hungarians, to be called the Garibaldi Guard. (April 29, 1861)

D'UTASSY'S CAREER.
[ From the New York Tribune.]
On Monday of this week, Col. Frederick George D'Utassy, of the Garibaldi Guard, late Colonel commanding a brigade near Washington, passed through this city, en route for the State Prison at Sing Sing. He was in charge of two United States officers, and his hands were manacled, to prevent his escape.
Two years ago on the 27th of May, this man left the city of New York at the head of as fine a regiment as has been sent to war. In his behalf the sympathies of the people had been enlisted to such an extent that the Union Defense Committee disbursed $60,000 upon his own requisition in equipping his men, and private contributions were collected by gentlemen of the highest social position, to be expended in articles necessary for their comfort. He himself had the countenance and friendly assistance of some of the first families in the city, and was the recepient [sic] of numerous costly gifts as tokens of good-will from those whose good-will was worth having. Those who saw the regiment marching our streets will recall how the soi-disant Hungarian nobleman was georgeously [sic] bedecked, and with what an air of supreme self-satisfaction he headed the imposing procession. It may well be matter of wonder how a man who, upon a fair trial by his peers, has been convicted as a forger and perjurer, and the perpetrator of other base crimes, could have imposed himself upon men of such discrimination, business tact and social standing as those who, in 1861, thronged to do him honor. But it is all of a piece with a personal career, which, for romantic incident and successful knavery has few parallels.
We have been at the trouble of collecting, from the published accounts of the D'Utassy court-martial and among his personal acquaintances in this city, the materials for a personal sketch, which, although necessarily meager, will be found not uninteresting even to the general reader. It seems that in 1848, when the Hungarian revolution broke out, the officers of the huzzar regiments, on arriving at the city of Pesth, found in the Jews' quarter a man of the name of Strasser, who kept a second-hand clothing store, and who seemed to be in confidential relations with the horsekeepers of the Hungarian plains which surround that city, and with whom he had an extensive business connection. Strasser, upon being applied to, furnished a number of horses, obtained from his friends, to the troopers of the patriot army, and ultimately formed a connection with the quartermaster's department in the capacity of a clerk. The person who gives us this information was in one of the regiments, and was personally acquainted with Strasser at that time. He lost sight of him for some years, but finally, in the spring of 1861, when the Garibaldi Guard was being formed in New York, recognized in the elegant and influential D'Utassy, Strasser, the Jewish clothes-dealer of Pesth.
From another person we learn that Strasser, alias D'Utassy, followed his occupation as horse trader for many years, traveling between Pesth, Vienna and other cities, until finally he came to this continent, and commenced operations in another sphere of life. His first field was in Canada, where he seems to have ingratiated himself in the favor of many of the highest officials and private families. He is said at one time to have been private secretary to the Governor of Nova Scotia, and at another a professor of modern languages in Dalhousie College.
He came to this city some three or four years ago, bringing with him strong recommendations from influential people in Canada, which, with his pleasing personal address and perfect self-control, enabled him to gain the confidence of our best citizens. He entered himself as a student in the office of Dr. Watts, and for a time attended medical lectures at the University, ostensibly with the object of pursuing medicine as a profession. All this time he was going under the assumed name of D'Utassy, and living in part by teaching modern languages and in part by his wits. At one time he would call himself Doctor D'Utassy, at another Chevalier D'Utassy, and at another Count. Under the latter pseudonym, he is said to have paid his addresses to a young lady of a most respectable American family, at the same time that, under one of the others, he seduced a German lady of fine education and previously irreproachable character.
Among his associates of foreign birth his pretensions to noble rank were the subject of jest, and, in various saloons and concert halls, persons who had known him as the horse dealer and clothes dealer of '48, under the name of Strasser, openly denounced him as an imposter. But, as too often happens, the truth did not come to the ears of the worthy parties upon whom he was playing the part of Jeremy Diddler on a grand scale, and he was thus enabled to practice his deception until the outbreak of the present war. This was too tempting an opportunity for the exercise of his peculiar talent to allow him to let it slip, and he accordingly rushed into public notice as the organizer of a model regiment, under the very highest local auspices.
Many of our military officers who have entered upon a career of swindling, have waited until they got to the seat of war before commencing operations, but this unpricipled [sic] man appears to have commenced plucking his victims from the very organization of the regiment. From the contractors who boarded and lodged his men he exacted a heavy per centage on the price paid by the Union Defense Committee, and is said to have taken his share of extortionate bills for equipments and clothing which were presented to and cashed by that over confiding body. Pistols that were donated to his officers by the Committee, and placed in his hands for distribution, were sold for his own benefit to such of his own officers as chose to pay 24 a piece, and to officers of other regiments after arriving in the field.
On the very first pay-day after reaching camp, an assessment of about eight dollars was made upon every non-commissioned officer and private in the regiment, ostensibly for reimbursement to the Union Defense Committee for the cost of their uniforms; and money which was subscribed by ladies and gentlemen as a fund for the benefit of the officers and men, the victims of this avaricious and unprincipled Colonel were obliged to repay to him. Rifles that the Committee furnished for the flank companies were taken away with the regiment in boxes, but disappeared soon after reaching camp. Such of the officers as would not tamely endure this tyranny, and wink at his dishonest practices, were forced by one pretext or another to resign, or were dismissed by court-martial on trumped-up charges, their places being filled in every case with creatures of his own selection, to whom the commissions were sold at the best prices he could extort. Two brothers of his, named respectively Anton and Carl Strasser, were called from Hungary to take commissions in the regiment, and their names, transformed into the noble pseudonym of von Utassy, were borne on the regimental pay-rolls for months before the men were even in this country. The members of the regimental band, which was recruited nearly six months after the regiment entered the service, were caused to ignorantly sign a power of attorney giving D'Utassy authority to collect their back pay for the term intervening between their muster and that of the regiment, and the names of two musicians were written upon the muster-roll of each company, and the poor men made to draw extra pay as privates, and pay it over to the Colonel. Everything was the subject of barter or sale with him. The sutlership of the regiment was so over and over again, and at one time there were as many as two or three sutlers recognized and pursuing their vocation. The camp was at once a brothel and a drinking place, beer and liquor being sold openly and women of bad character imported from Washington, and occupying officers' quarters, with his knowledge and consent.
The large amount of money which he realized by his several daring swindles not being sufficient to support his extravagant style of living, and minister to the vices of gambling and debauchery, he resorted to the desperate expedient of defrauding the Government by means of a forged bill of over $3,000, which was presented by him at the War Department and paid by Capt. Elwood, United States Paymaster on the 27th of November, 1861. This bill was made out in the usual form, for subsistence and lodging said to have been furnished by various contractors to the Garibaldians in this city, during the organization of the regiment; and the correctness of the general summary of the whole claim was not only certified by D'Utassy, but the bill was also accompanied by his sworn affidavit before a Notary Public in the City of Washington. This was the first fatal error which the man seems to have committed in his long career of crime, for it ultimately led to an investigation of his life, and his conviction and sentence to a term of imprisonment at Sing Sing, upon which he has just entered.
Emboldened by his success in this nefarious transaction, he carried his audacity to such an extent as to establish a sort of bazaar or market at his headquarters for traffic in horses stolen from the Government and from the farmers of Virginia in the several districts through which his regiment marched. It is in evidence that he had at one time as many as thirty horses in his stable, and that he fed them upon Government’s oats and hay; and there are persons in this city who can prove that he procured by chemical means the removal of the “U. S.” brand, which marks the Government horse, so skillfully that the animals were palmed off upon officers and civilians as private property.
We have been told by one of his officers that some time last summer an ill-dressed slovenly Jewish woman turned up in camp inquiring for Col. U’Tassy, saying that she was his lawful wife, and had come from Hungary to see him, as she had heard that “her man” had become a real Colonel in the United States army, and had brought him his two children (two dirty Jewish boys whom she led by the hand) to receive his blessing and caresses. She was directed to the Colonel’s tent, passed the night with him and the following day disappeared—it is said with a considerable amount of his stolen property, which had been given into her hands for safe-keeping.
All this time this horsethief, perjurer, forger, seducer, this foreign confidence operator, and lining lie, was praised in the newspapers as a brave and competent officer, was regarded by his dupes in new York as a Hungarian nobleman in his own right, a sort of second Kosciusko, and appeared on the avenue and in the hotels at Washington in all the glory of gilt lace and embroidered coats, with an outrider in Mameluke costume following at his heels. He was at Harper's Ferry, and by hook and crook made it appear as if he, "faithful found among the faithless," alone had the courage and disposition to fight, to die like Leonidas, rather than surrender. His time had come, however, and his brilliant career of crime was destined to be brought to a sudden end. The forged claim of $3,000 had undergone some little examination in the War Department, and in course of time was placed in the hands of the Special Commissioner who is making investigations in this city. He not only discovered the fraudulent nature of the bill, but got such an insight into the career of this gay, dashing Hungarian nobleman as induced the Department to order a strict examination into his antecedents. The result was his arrest, his trial by court-martial, conviction, and the sentence to be cashiered, deprived of all pay and allowances, and confined at hard labor in Sing Sing prison for the space of one year.
It is not a little surprising how Strasser —D'Utassy—should have been able to run so great a length in crime without detection, considering that among our German population his character was so well known. We have found no trouble in getting at the above pretty full personal sketch by making inquiries in the right quarters. Months ago discharged soldiers and officers who had been sorely wronged by him recited their grievances in our public saloons and among their friends. That their complaints never reached the ears of the Government, and of honest, independent journalists who would gladly have exposed his misdeeds and procured the punishment he merited, is strange indeed. If Germans permit unprincipled German or Jewish refugees to hold high positions as representatives of German nationality, and the supposed possessors of German confidence, without exposing their true character, how can the American people be blamed for taking the base coin as pure gold?

COL. D'UTASSY UNDER GUARD.
Col. D'Utassy has petitioned the Secretary of War that the guard which has been in his house for several days may be withdrawn, and that be may be put on his parol [sic] of honor in arrest during his trial. Gen. Hitchcock, the President of the Court, has indorsed, this petition, with the remark that he "has no hesitation in expressing his individual opinion that Col. D'Utassy may with propriety be relieved from the surveillance of a military guard." Gen. Hitchcock, however, declines to enter the petition upon the records of the Court. Judge-Advocate Gaines has filed with the petition his remonstrance against granting it, in which he states that Col. D'Utassy has not only been proven to have signed and sworn to the correctness of a false account, by which $3,000 were improperly drawn from the Government, but has confessed in open Court that he did so.

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—The Garibaldi Guard, which went from new York to Washington a day or two since, is entirely composed of adopted citizens who have seen service. Each company has one or more vivandieres. Their uniform is the Garibaldi hat of the regiment, a red flannel basque and blue shirt, and the black, laced gaiters of the regiment. They are all married, their husbands being members of the companies to which they are attached. So strictly has this rule been observed, that a young girl who was determined to accompany the Guard, at once married a soldier whom she had never seen before, and her tall, fine figure was one of the most conspicuous in the line.

THE DAILY JOURNAL.
WEDNESDAY EVENING JUNE 17, 1863.
Col. D'Utassy.
In the Tribure we find an interesting sketch of the audacious career of this adventurer and swindler recently sentenced to hard work in the penitentiary. Considering that among the Germans his real character was known, it is strange that this person, at times a peddler [sic], doctor, professor, count and colonel, should have been allowed to run so long a career of fraud. We are informed that other adventurers, who disgrace the general integrity and intelligence of our foreign-born citizens, remain to be exposed.
It seems that in 1838, when the Hungarian revolution broke out, the officers of the Hussar Regiments, on arriving at the city of Pesth, found in the Jew's quarter a man of the name of Strasser, who kept a secondhand clothing store, and who seemed to be in confidential relations with the horsekeepers of the Hungarian plains which surround that city, and with whom he had an extensive business connection. The person who gave us this information was in one of the regiments, and was personally acquainted with Strasser at the time. When the Garibaldi Guard was being formed in New York, he recognized in the elegant and influential Col. D'Utassy, Strasser, the Jewish clothes dealer of Pesth.
D'Utassy's first field in America, was in Canada. By dint of audacity and cunning, he is said at one time to be private Secretary to the Governor of Nova Scotia and at another a Professor of Modern Languages in Dalhousie College. He came to New York some three or four years ago, bringing with him some strong letters of recommendation from influential people in Canada, which with his pleasing personal address and perfect self control, enabled him to gain the confidence of our best citizens. He entered himself as a student in the office of Dr. Watts, and for a time attended medical lectures at the University, ostensibly with the object of pursuing medicine as a profession. All this while he was going under the assumed name of D'Utassy, and living in part by teaching Modern Languages, and in part by his wits.
At one time he would call himself Dr. D'Utassy, at another Chevalier D'Tassy, and at another Count. Under the latter pseudonym, he is said to have paid his addresses to a young lady of a most respectable American family at the same time that, under one of the others, he seduced a German lady of fine education and previously irreproachable character. Among his associates of foreign birth his pretensions to noble rank were the subject of jest, and, in various saloons and concert halls, persons who had known him as the horse trader and clothes dealer of '48 under the name of Strasser, openly denounced him as an imposter. But, as too often happens, the truth did not come to the ears of the worthy parties upon whom he was playing the part of Jeremiah Diddler, on a grand scale, and he was thus enabled to practice his deceptions until the outbreak of the present war.
On the very first pay-day after reaching camp, an assessment of about eight dollars was made upon every non-commissioned officer and private in the regiment, ostensibly for reimbursement to the Union Defence Committee for the cost of their uniforms; and money which was subscribed by ladies and gentlemen as a fund for the benefit of the officers and men, the victims of this avaricious and unprincipled Colonel, were obliged to repay to him. Rifles that the Committee furnished for the flank companies were taken away with the regiment, in boxes, but disappeared soon after reaching camp. Such of the officers as would not tamely endure his tyranny, and wink at his dishonest practices, were forced by one pretext or another to resign, or were dismissed by court-martial on trumped up charges, their places being filled in every case with creatures of his own selection, to whom the commissions were sold at the best prices he could extort. Two brothers of his, named respectively Anton and Carl Strasser, were called from Hungary to take commissions in the regiment, and their names transformed into the noble pseudonym of von Utassy, were borne on the regimental pay-rolls for months before the men were even in this country. The record of his speculations in camp would fill a long chapter.
We have been told by one of his officers that some time last summer, an ill-dressed, slovenly, Jewish woman, turned up in camp, inquiring for Col. D'Utsassy, saying that she was his lawful wife, and had come from Hungary to see him, as she had heard that "her man" had become a real Colonel in the United States Army, and had brought him his two children (two dirty Jewish boys whom she led by the hand), to receive his blessing and caresses. She was directed to the Colonel's tent, passed the night with him, and the following day disappeared—it is said with a considerable amount of his stolen property which had been given into her hands for safe-keeping.
All this time this horse-thief, perjurer, seducer, this foreign confidence operator, and living lie, was praised in the newspapers as a brave and competent officer, was regarded by his dupes in New York as a Hungarian nobleman in his own right, a sort of second Kosciusko, and appeared in the avenues and in the hotels at Washington in all the glory of gilt lace and embroidered coats, with an outrider in Mameluke costume following at his heels. He was at Harper's Ferry, and by hook and crook made it appear as if he "faithful, found among the faithless," alone had the courage and disposition to fight, to die like Leodinas, rather than surrender.
The large amount of money which he realised [sic] by this several daring swindles not being sufficient to support his extravagant style of living, and minister to his vices of gambling and debauchery, he resorted to the desperate expidient [sic] of defrauding the Government
by means of a forged bill of over $3,000, which was presented by him at the War Department and paid by Captain Elwood, United States Paymaster, on the 27th of November, 1861. This bill was made out in the usual form, for subsistence and lodging said to have been furnished by various contractors to the Garibaldians in New York during the organization of the regiment; and the correctness of the general summary of the whole claim was not only certified by D'Utassy, but the bill was also accompanied by his sworn affidavit before a notary public in the city of Washington.—This was first fatal error which the man seems to have committed in his long career of crime, for it ultimately led to an investigation of his life, and his conviction and sentence to a term of imprisonment at Sing Sing , upon which he has just entered.

AN APPEAL TO THE PATRIOTIC—A regiment of riflemen is in process of formation, entitled the GARIBALDI GUARD, composed of men who have served in the various European armies, and properly officered by gentlemen of experience. The undersigned having been appointed treasurer of this organization would respectfully ask for money, rifles and pistols.
CHARLES B. NORTON, Treasurer
IRVING BUILDING, 594 and 596 BROADWAY.
CHEV. D’TASSY,
A. REPETTI, Committee
CHARLES B. NORTON.

D'UTASSY'S CAREER.
Two years ago Col. Frederick George D'Utassy, of the Garibaldi Guard, left the City of New York at the head of as fine a regiment as has been sent to the war. In his behalf the sympathies of the people had been enlisted to such an extent that the Union Defense Committee disbursed $60,000 upon his own requisition in equipping his men, and private contributions were collected by gentlemen of the highest social position to be expended in articles necessary for their comfort. He himself had the countenance and friendly assistance of some of the first families in the city, and was the recipient of numerous costly gifts as tokens of good-will from those whose good will was worth having. Those who saw the regiment marching our streets will recall bow this soi-disant Hungarian nobleman was gorgeously bedecked, and with what an air of supreme self-satisfaction he headed the imposing procession. It may well be matter of wonder how a man who, upon a fair trial by his peers, has been convicted as a forger and perjurer, and the perpetrator of other base crimes, could have imposed himself upon men of such discrimination, business tact and social standing as those who, in 1861, thronged to do him honor. But it is all of a piece with a personal career, which, for romantic incident and successful knavery has few parallels.
We have been at the trouble of collecting, from the published accounts of the D'Utassy Court Martial and among his personal acquaintances in this city, the materials for a personal sketch, which, although necessarily meager [sic], will be found not uninteresting even to the general reader. It seems that in 1848, when the Hungarian Revolution broke out, the officers of the Hussar regiments, on arriving at the city of Pesth, found in the Jews' quarter a man of the name of Strasser, who kept a second-hand clothing store, and who seemed to be in confidential relations with the horsekeepers of the Hungarian plains, which surround that city, and with whom he had an extensive business connection. Strasser, upon being applied to, furnished a number of horses, obtained from his friends, to the troopers of the patriot army, and ultimately formed a connection with the quartermaster's department, in the capacity of a clerk. The person who gives us this information was in one of the regiments, and was personally acquainted with Strasser at that time. He lost sight of him for some years, but finally, in the Spring of 1861, when the Garibaldi Guard was being formed in New York, recognized in the elegant and influential Col. D'Utassy, Strasser, the Jewish clothes dealer of Pesth.
From another person we learn that Strasser, alias D'Utassy, followed his occupation as a horse-trader for many years, travelling [sic] between Pesth, Vienna, and other cities, until finally he came to this continent, and commenced operations in another sphere of life. His first field was in Canada, where he seems to have ingratiated himself in the favor of many of the highest officials and private families. He is said at one time to have been Private Secretary to the governor of Nova-Scotia, and at another a Professor of Modern Languages in Dalhousie College.
He came to this city some three or four years ago, bringing with him strong letters of recommendation from influential people in Canada, which, with his pleasing personal address and perfect self-control, enabled him to gain the confidence of our best citizens. He entered himself as a student in the office of Dr. Watts, and for a time attended medical lectures at the University, ostensibly with the object of pursuing medicine as a profession. All this while he was going under the assumed name of D'Utassy, and living in part by teaching modern languages and in part by his wits. At one time he would call himself Dr. D'Utassy, at another Chevalier D'Utassy, and at another Count. Under the latter pseudonym, he is said to have paid his addresses to a young lady of a most respectable American family at the same time that, under one of the others, he seduced a German lady of fine education and previously irreproachable character. Among his associates of foreign birth, his pretensions to noble rank were the subject of jest, and, in various saloons and concert halls, persons who had known him as the horse trader and clothes dealer of '48, under the name of Strasser, openly denounced him as an impostor. But, as too often happens, the truth did not come to the ears of the worthy parties upon whom he was playing the part of Jeremy Diddler on a grand scale, and he was thus enabled to practice his deceptions until the outbreak of the present war. This was too tempting an opportunity for the exercise of his peculiar talent to allow him to let it slip, and he accordingly rushed into popular notice as the organizer of a model regiment, under the very highest local auspices.
Many of our military officers who have entered upon a career of swindling, have waited until they got to the seat of war before commencing operations, but this unprincipled man, appears to have commenced plucking his victims from the very organization of the regiment. From the contractors who boarded and lodged his men he extracted a heavy percentage on the price paid by the Union Defence Committee, and is said to have taken his share of extortionate bills for equipments and clothing which were presented to and cashed by that over confiding body. Pistols which were donated to his officers by the Committee and placed in his hands for distribution, were sold for his own benefit to such of his own officers as chose to pay $24 a piece and to officers of other regiments after arriving in the field.
On the very first pay-day after reaching camp, an assessment of about eight dollars was made upon every non-commissioned officer and private in the regiment, ostensibly for reimbursement to the Union Defence Committee for the cost of their uniforms; and money which was subscribed by ladies and gentlemen as a fund for the benefit of the officers and men, the victims of this avaricious and unprincipled Colonel were obliged to repay to him. Rifles that the Committee furnished for the flank companies were taken away with the regiment in boxes, but disappeared soon after reaching camp. Such of the officers as would not tamely endure his tyranny, and wink at his dishonest practices, were forced, by one pretext or another to resign, or were dismissed by Court-Martial on trumped-up charges, their places being filled in every case with creatures of his own selection to whom the commissions were sold at the best prices that he could extort. Two brothers of his, named respectively Anton and Carl Strasser, were called from Hungary to take commissions in the regiment, and their names, transformed into the noble pseudonym of von Utassy, were borne on the regimental pay-rolls for months before the men were even in this country. The members of the regimental band, which was recruited nearly six months after the regiment entered the service, were caused to ignorantly sign a power of attorney giving D'Utassy authority to collect their back pay for the term intervening between their muster and that of the regiment, and the names of two musicians were written upon the muster roll of each company, and the poor men made to draw extra pay as privates, and pay it over to the Colonel. Everything was the subject of barter or sale with him. The sutlership of the regiment sold over and over again, and at one time there were as many as two or three sutlers recognized and pursuing their avocation. The camp was at once a brothel and a drinking place, beer and liquors being sold openly, and women of bad character imported from Washington, and occupying officers' quarters, with his knowledge and consent.
The large amount of money which he realized by his several daring swindles not being sufficent [sic] to support his extravagant style of living, and minister to his vices of gambling and debauchery, he resorted to the desperate expedient of defrauding the government by means of a forged bill of over $3,000, which was presented by him at the War Department, and paid by Capt. Elwood, United States Paymaster, on the 27th of September, 1861. This bill was made out in the usual form, for subsistence and lodging said to have been furnished by various contractors to the Garibaldians in this city during the organization regiment; and the correctness of the general summary of the whole claim was not only certified by D'Utassy, but the bill was also accompanied by his sworn affidavit before a notary public in the city of Washington. This was the first fatal error which the man seems to have committed in his long career of crime, for it ultimately led to an investigation of his life, and his conviction and sentence to a term of imprisonment at Sing Sing, upon which he has just entered.
Emboldened by his success in this nefarious transaction, he carried his audacity to such an extent as to establish a sort of bazaar or market at his headquarters for traffic in horses stolen from the Government and from the farmers of Virginia in the several districts through which his regiment marched. It is in evidence that he had at one time as many as thirty horses in his stables, and that he fed them upon Government oats and hay; and there are persons in this city who can prove that he procured by chemical means the removal of the "U. S." brand, which marks the Government horse, so skillfully that the animals were palmed off upon officers and civilians as private property.
We have been told by one of his officers that some time last Summer, an ill-dressed, slovenly Jewish woman turned up in camp, inquiring for Colonel D'Utassy, saying that she was his lawful wife, and had come from Hungary to see him, as she had heard that "her man" had become a real Colonel in the United States Army, and had brought him his two children (two dirty Jewish boys, whom she led by the hand) to receive his blessing and caresses. She was directed to the Colonel's tent, passed the night with him, and the following day disappeared—it is said with a considerable amount of stolen property which had been given into her hands for safe keeping.
All this time this horsethief, perjurer, forger, seducer, this foreign confidence operator and living lie, was praised in the newspapers as a brave and competent officer, was regarded by his dupes in New York as a Hungarian nobleman in his own right, a sort of second Kosciusko, and appeared on the avenue and in the hotels at Washington in all the glory of gilt lace and embroidered coats, with an outrider in Mameluke costume following at his heels. He was at Harper's Ferry, and by hook and crook made it appear as if he, "faithful found among the faithless," alone had the courage and disposition to fight, to die like Leonidas, rather than surrender. His time had come, however, and his brilliant career of crime was destined to be brought to a sudden end. The forged claim of $3,000 had undergone some little examination in the War Department, and in course of time was placed in the hands of the Special Commissioner who is making investigations in this city. He not only discovered the fraudulent nature of the bill, but got such an insight into the career of this gay, dashing Hungarian nobleman as induced the Department to order a strict examination into his antecedents. The result was his arrest, his trial by court-martial, conviction, and the sentence to be cashiered, deprived of all pay and allowances, and confined at hard labor in Sing Sing prison for the space of one year.

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—Major Waring of the Garibaldi Guards has been tendered the commission of Major of Cavalry under General Fremont.

NEW-YORK CITY.
MILITARY MOVEMENT.
DEPARTURE OF THE GARIBALDI GUARD.
The Garibaldi Guard, which has been formed and organized during the few weeks past, left for Washington yesterday afternoon. The regiment is composed of foreigners, all stalwart, hardy men, many of whom have already become acquainted with the experiences of battle on the fields of Austria and Hungary, others among the mountains of Switzerland, and not a few upon the classic plains of Italy. Eight hundred and thirty men compose the regiment, which is officered as follows:
Field Officers.—Colonel, Fred. Geo. D'Utassy; Lieutenant Colonel, Alex. Repette; Major, Com. the Depot, L. W. Finelli; Major in Field, Geo. Waring; Captain-Adjutant, John M. Sickel; Adjutant, F. O. Rice, Surgeon, Dr. Adolph Mayer.
Staff Officers—Paymaster, Charles B. Norton; Commissary, W. P. Molo; Quartermaster, E. D. Lazell; Standard bearers, John Lindner, Charles Sebwickardy, and Jacob Hoffmann; Sergeants, A. P. Zyler, and Albert E. D. Hughes.

 
Company Officers No. of
Men
Men
Married
Company A.—Capt. Cesare Osnaghi; Lieut. Antonio dal Molin; Ensign, Allegretti 80 20
Company B.—Capt. Jas. Schmidt; Lieut. Giovanni Colani; Ensign, Alf'd. Meller 76 15
Company C.—Capt. Carl Schwarz; Lieut. Anton Vekey; Ensign, Joseph Aigner 80 30
CompanyD.—Capt. Jose Torrens; Lieut. Jose Romero; Ensign, Carlos A. de la Meser. 80 15
Company C.—Capt. John L. Siegl; Lieut. Wm. Robistseek; Ensign, Fritz Bauer 80 30
Company F.—Captain Charles Wiegand; Lieut. Conrad Schandorf; Ensign, Emil Hollinde 90 25
Company G.—Capt. Franz Takerts; Lieut. John Juenger; Ensign, N. Tenner 80 15
Company H.—Capt. Otto Bernstein; Lieut. Bernhard Baer; Ensign, J. Kaufmann 78 20
Company I.—Capt. Van Unwerth; Lieut.; Ensign, George Brey 84 16
Company K.—Captain Louis Tassillier; Lieut. V. Chandoni; Ensign, Ant. Dumazer 92 19
  830 205

The uniform consists of dark blue pantaloons and coat, and red shirt; shoes with black leather leggings, and a Garibaldi hat, which is of black felt, with a round top, banded with a wide leather belt bearing a medallion of the American eagle, a tricolor badge and a small plume of black feathers. Three ladies accompany the regiment as vivandieres, according to the French custom, each uniformed in a blue skirt, loose red jacket, belted at the waist, and the Garibaldi hat. Of one of these vivandieres a romantic story is told. Being desirous of accompanying the Guard, she applied for permission, but was told that none except the wives of soldiers were allowed to go, whereupon she selected a good looking and stalwart soldier, and it being agreeable to both parties, they were married on the day before the regiment departed, the fair vivandiere accompanying them in triumph. There are ten companies, of which three are Hungarian, three German, one Swiss, one Italian, one French and one Spanish.
A company of forty buglers accompany the regiment, and the band march to their music instead of the tap of the drum. At the departure Manahan's brass band were present. It was expected that a flag would be presented to the Swiss company, but it was not completed, and will, therefore, be sent on subsequently. The regiment formed at 4 o'clock on Lafayette Place, and was reviewed by Dr. A. B. Mott and one or two members of the Union Defense Committee. Half an hour later the regiment commenced its march, escorted by the Germania and Teutonia Maennerchor societies. The escort bore the German and American flags and the ensigns of the societies. The regiment bore the flags recently presented it, one being the famous flag which Garibaldi is said to have planted on the capital of Rome in 1848. The different companies sang lustily their national war songs, and the intermingling of bold Hungarian, Swiss, and German airs, with the more assuasive but not less inspiriting songs of Spain, France and Italy, formed an expressive and pleasing chorus.
The line of march was through Fourth street to the Bowery, thence down the Bowery to Bond street, down Bond to Broadway, up Broadway to Fourteenth street, down Fourteenth to the Fifth avenue, up the avenue to Twenty-first street, then to Broadway and through Twentieth street to Fifth avenue again, down the Fifth avenue to Washington parade ground, thence to Waverley Place, and down Broadway to the City Hall, thence to Jersey City via Cortlandt street.
Nearly the entire route was lined with welcoming citizens, and down Broadway the ovation was superb. The regiment departed before evening by the Jersey City cars.

AN APPEAL TO THE PATRIOTIC.—A Regiment of Riflemen is in process of formation, entitled the Garibaldi Guard, composed of men who have served in the various European armies, and properly officered by gentlemen of experience. The undersigned having been appointed Treasurer of this organization would respectfully ask for money, rifles and pistols.
CHARLES B. NORTON, Treasurer
Irving Building, Nos. 594 and 596 Broadway.
CHEV. D'UTASSY,
A. REPETTI, COMMITTEE
CHARLES B. NORTON.

MUTINOUS SOLDIERS.
Reports of Army Movements Prohibited.
MORTALITY IN NEW YORK REGIMENTS.
[Special Despatch to the Evening Post.]
WASHINGTON, July 9.—A company of the Garibaldi Guard of New York which mutinied yesterday was surrounded early this morning by the President's Mounted Guard, two companies of regular cavalry, two companies of infantry and a company of District militia, and forced to lay down its arms. The refractory men are now imprisoned in the Treasury building. An example will be made of the ringleaders.
[The Paymaster of the Garibaldi Guard, Mr. C. B. Norton, of this city, arrived in town last night. He says that there was nothing of the difficulty, reported by telegraph, in his regiment when he left Washington. The men have complained that they were enrolled as a rifle regiment, with the express understanding that they should be furnished with rifles on their arrival at the capital, and, that, after waiting a long time, they have been advanced into Virginia with comparatively worthless arms. This is undoubtedly the cause of the reported revolt. The regiment has no other cause of complaint. —EDS.]
The despatch [sic] of news of army movements, by the telegraph, has been forbidden by General Scott. He thinks the publication of such reports will have an injurious effect, and prohibits any further transmission of army intelligence.
The undue mortality in one or two of the New York regiments is attributed to the excessive consumption of lager-bier.
Mr. Burnett, in the House, and Mr. Polk, in the Senate, will probably obstruct the progress of legislation on matters relating to the war so far as the rules of Congress will allow.

The Garibaldi Guard of New York, and Its Troubles.
[Correspondence of the Evening Post.]
HEADQUARTERS GARIBALDI GUARD,
ALEXANDRIA, Va., July 10, 1861.
To deny that much dissatisfaction has existed among the soldiers of this regiment would be untrue, however much we may regret to acknowledge it. The causes of this dissatisfaction are not the want of good and sufficient food, or comfortable clothing, or of too severe drilling, as some of the papers have stated. Clothing and food we have had in abundance, and the discipline and exercise in drilling of the regiment have been justly tempered by the long military experience of the Colonel and Lieutenant-Colonel, and the practical wisdom of Major Waring; but since leaving New York the regiment has not received, till to-day, any money from the government. Nor was this the fault of the government entirely, but the delay was occasioned by some defect or error in the form of our pay-rolls.
Again, the officers have not received their commissions from Governor Morgan, from the fact that the regiment was one of those accepted directly by the President, and not by the state of New York. In this, also, there is no reasonable ground for complaint, since sooner or later they will receive their commissions from either the state or United States government. But to explain all of this intelligently and satisfactorily to all of the foreign officers and soldiers of the regiment, composed of different nationalities, is extremely difficult, inasmuch as they rigidly adhere to the customs and habits of European armies, which are entirely different from our own.
In addition to their assumed causes for complaint, the regiment has had truly valid and reasonable ones.
First. The families in New York of many of the soldiers have suffered greatly from the want of the necessary means of support. They have received little or no money from the committees formed for their relief, and none at all from the soldiers here. Hence the soldier, removed far from all those he loves and holds most dear, and made sadly aware by constant letters of their suffering, cannot always feel contented, much less always happy.
Secondly. The soldiers of the regiment have had constant promises that before they were led against the enemy they should be provided with rifles, instead of the inefficient arms which were placed in their hands. The government constantly made these promises to the officers of the regiment, and the officers as often made them to the soldiers, but to the present time the government have been unable to procure these rifles. Hence the soldiers, who have always used no arms but rifles in European engagements, began to distrust all promises made to them, and when the regiment was ordered to advance, without the promised arms, many of the soldiers lost their patience; but to-day the government, faithful to its promises, both paid off and furnished the soldiers with the arms they desired, which were received with long and enthusiastic cheering.
We are now ready to advance, and trust that we may soon find that field where we can entirely wipe out any disgrace that the conduct of a few impatient soldiers, within the last few days, may have justly or unjustly attached to the good name of the Garibaldi Guards. R.

Orders have been given by the War Department directing the delivery at Sing Sing, in this State, of Colonel d'Utassy. Captain Todd, the Provost Marshal, left Washington on Saturday, in charge of the prisoner, for that locality.

Col. D'Utassy.
ROME, June 15, 1863.
ED. SENTINEL:—Could you inform an anxious enquirer how it is that such men as Col. D'Utassy are retained in the service after their real characters have been found out. For my part, I think that there are scores of just such men in the army to-day, some occupying higher positions, and others perhaps who have not as yet donned the shoulder straps, but whether this be true or not, it is very strange after the character of this man had been exposed, that he was retained in the service. If all the vultures in our army were thus summarily dealt with, we would hear less complaint from the families of soldiers, many of whom are actually suffering from want of the commonest necessaries of life.
Yours &c. Civis.

The Case of Col. D'Utassy.
The order containing the findings and sentence in the case of Col. D'UTASSY is in the hands of the printer, and will be published in a day or two. The sentence, which is understood to be degradation from rank, deprivation of back pay, disqualification from holding any office of trust or honor, and one year's imprisonment at hard labor, has been approved, and Sing Sing Penitentiary has been designated as the place of confinement.
Col. D'UTASSY, who is now in the Old Capitol Prison at Washington, has been found guilty of many of the offences charged, including that of selling appointments to officers, selling Government horses, and swearing to and collecting a false and fraudulent recruiting account against the United States for $3,265.

THE CASE OF COL. D'UTASSY.—The order containing the findings and sentence in the case of Col. D'Utassy is in the hands of the printer, and will be published in a day or two. The sentence, which is understood to be degradation from rank, deprivation of back pay, disqualified from holding any office of trust or honor, and one year's imprisonment at hard labor, has been approved, and Sing Sing Penitentiary has been designated as the place of confinement.
Col. D'Utassy, who is now in the Old Capitol Prison, has been found guilty of many of the offences charged, including that of selling appointments to officers, selling Government horses, and swearing to and collecting a false and fraudulent recruiting account against the United States for $3265.

The Case of Col. D'Utassy.
The order containing the findings and sentence in the case of Col. D'Utassy is in the hands of the printer, and will be published in a day or two. The sentence, which is understood to be degradation from rank, deprivation of back pay, disqualification from holding any office of trust or honor, and one year's imprisonment at hard labor, has been approved, and Sing Sing Penitentiary has been designated as the place of confinement.
Col. D'Utassy, who is now in the Old Capitol Prison at Washington, has been found guilty of many of the offences charged, including that of selling appointments to officers, selling Government horses, and swearing to and collecting a false and fraudulent recruiting account against the United States for $3,265.

MOVEMENTS OF TROOPS IN NEW YORK
DEPARTURE OF THE GARIBALDI GUARD.
The Garibaldi Guard, Colonel d'Utassy, departed yesterday afternoon for the seat of the war. The regiment, which is composed of Germans, Italians, French and Swiss, formed on Lafayette place at two o'clock for the purpose of receiving a flag, which was to have been presented to the Swiss company; but on their arrival there they found that the ceremony was postponed in consequence of the banner not having been finished. The men looked exceedingly well, and as they marched up and down the square one could not help admiring their soldier-like appearance. They were dressed in blue frock coats, blue pants trimmed with red cord, red undershirts, and felt hats ornamented with feathers and green leaves. Their knapsacks contained blankets and comfortable under clothing, while the haversacks were crammed with bread, cheese, Bologna sausages, and all manner of eatables and drinkables. The German element strongly predominated, notwithstanding the name and origin of the regiment, and but few Italians could be perceived in the ranks. The men looked robust and exceedingly active, and unless appearances are very deceptive indeed, they will not fail to distinguish themselves on the field of battle. Commanded as they are by able and experienced officers, a large proportion of whom have seen active service in Hungary, Italy and the Crimea, the Garibaldi Guard will do credit to their name, and bear the Stars and Stripes proudly through every conflict.
After being reviewed in Lafayette place, the regiment was formed in marching order and proceeded to Jersey City by the following route:—Up Fourth street to the Bowery, down the Bowery to Bond street, through Bond street to Broadway, up Broadway to Fourteenth street, through Fourteenth street to Fifth avenue, to Washington Parade ground, up Waverly place to Broadway, and thence down to the Cortlandt street ferry, where they embarked in two boats especially provided for the purpose. The march through the city occupied about an hour and a half, and all along the route of the procession the troops were received with intense enthusiasm. Manahan's Band accompanied the regiment, and discoursed some excellent music. A corps of buglers, attached to the regiment, attracted a good deal of attention. The soldiers were without arms, their rifles being packed up in cases, and conveyed in that way with the ordinary baggage.
All along Broadway the regiment was received in the most enthusiastic manner, and as they passed down towards the ferry the voices of a hundred thousand people bid them God speed. As the troops reached the Park the scene was enlivened by one of the companies (a French one) singing the Marsellaise Hymn with fine effect, which was immediately followed by another company singing the Star Spangled Banner. At Barnum's the band played several patriotic airs, and dipped the flags in honor of the occasion.
No lees than six vivandiers accompanied the regiment. One of them had her husband in the ranks, and attracted much attention by her fine, dashing appearance. In the procession there were the American, Hungarian, French and Italian flags, and it only required to have the Swiss colors to make the thing complete. The turnout was a very creditable one indeed, and does honor to all concerned.
The following is a list of the officers:—
Field and Staff Officers—Colonel, Fred. George d'Utassy; Lieutenant Colonel, Alexander Repetti; Major (Commissary of the depot), L. W. Tinelli; Major (in the field), Geo. Waring; Quartermaster, E D. Lazelie; Paymaster, Charles B. Norton; Commissary, W. P. Molo; Surgeon, Adolph Majer.
Company A—Captain, Cesare Osnaghi; Lieutenant, Antonio Dal. Molin; Ensign, ____ Allegretti.
Company B—Captain, Joseph Schmidt; Lieutenant, Giovanni Colani; Ensign, Alfred Muller.
Company C—Captain, Carl Schwarz; Lieutenant, Anton Velsey; Ensign, Joseph Aigner.
Company D—Captain, Jose Torrens; Lieutenant, Jose Romero; Ensign, Carlos A. de la Mesa.
Company E— Captain, John N. Siegl; Lieutenant, Wm. Robitseck; Ensign, Fritz Bauer.
Company F—Captain, Charles Wiegand; Lieutenant, Conrad Schondorf; Ensign, Emil Hollinde.
Company G—Captain Franz Takats; Lieutenant, John Lunger; Ensign, N. Tenner.
Company H Captain, Otto Bernstein; Lieutenant, B. Baer; Ensign, J. Kauffman.
Company I—Captain, V. Unwerth Chaplin; Lieutenant, J. C. Rice; Ensign, George Brey.
Company K—Captain, Louis Tassillier; Lieutenant, Victor Chandone; Ensign, Ant. Dumazer.
Emil Diverbois, late a member of the Garibaldi Guard, died yesterday in the New York Hospital from the effects of injuries received on Wednesday last. Deceased was in the act of pulling the ramrod from the barrel of his rifle, and in consequence of being rusty it stuck fast. Suddenly the rod was forced from the barrel, and the upper end of it entered the nostril of Diverbois with so much force that it passed up through the nose and penetrated his brain, inflicting fatal injuries. Coroner Schirmer was notified to hold an inquest.

GARIBALDI GUARD.
The Garibaldi Guard, Col. FREDERICK GEORGE D'UTASSY, took their position at 2 1/2 P. M., between Fifth and Sixth-avenues, marching by the head-quarters of the Union Defence Committee. They numbered about eleven hundred, and are still recruiting. This corps is composed largely of Germans, but there are in the regiment, many Italians, Hungarians, Swiss Spaniards and Portugese. Their uniform is a suit of blue-black, the pants having a narrow red stripe, and the facing of the frockcoat being of red. Their hats are black, round topped, wide, stiff brims, with a black feather and eagle. They have shoes with gaiters protecting the ankles and calf.
On the back of each knapsack are the letters G. G. Their cartouch box is such as is used in the French and Italian army. The corps is intended to serve as an extended line of skirmishers before the attacking line of the main troops. They will form a brigade under Gen. ASBOTH, and will probably have their arms (Minie rifles and sabre bayonet) this week. They made a very fine appearance, carrying the Hungarian colors, and the Italian flag which in 1848 was planted upon the capitol of Rome by GARIBALDI himself, and which was afterwards made a present to the regiment through the daughter of Gen. AVEEZANA. The United States flag was carried between the two. It was presented by Miss Stevens, and the Hungarian flag by Miss GRINELL. Many of these officers have fought in Europe, Asia, South and North America; and some of them are decorated for meritorious services in the Italian and Crimean wars.
The following are the names of the officers of the brigade.
Colonel, Fred. Geo. d'Utassy; Lieutenant-Colonel, Alex. Repetti; First Major, Louis Finelli, Second Major, Waring; First Company—Italian—Captain Osnaghi; First Lieut. Crasto; Second Lieut. Molini. Second Company —Swiss—Capt. Schmidt; First-Lieut. Collani; Second-Lieut. Mullen Third Company —German —Capt. Schwarz ; First-Lieut. Vekey; Second-Lieut. Eigner. Fourth Company —Spanish —Capt. Torrens; First-Lieut. Romero; Second-Lieut. De Mesa. Fifth Company —Hungarian —Capt. Siegel; First Lieut. Robitsek; Second-Lieut. Bauer. Sixth Company —German —Capt. Wiegand; First-Lieut. Schondorf; Second-Lieut. Holinde. Seventh Company—Hungarian—Capt. Tackats; First-Lieut. Junger;
Second-Lieut. Fenner. Eighth Company—German—Capt. Bernstein; First-Lieut. Baer; Second-Lieut Kaufman. Ninth Company—German—Capt. Unwerth; First-Lieut. Rice; Second-Lieut. Brey. Tenth Company—French—Capt. Tassilier; First-Lieut. Chandone; Second-Lieut. Dumazer.
This regiment, by orders received from the Union Defence Committee, will leave for Washington on Wednesday evening.

GARIBALDI GUARD.
Any contribution that may be given to the Garabaldi Guard will, if sent to the headquarters, 596 Broadway, within a week, be forwarded to the regiment at Washington.

THE INSUBORDINATION IN THE GARIBALDI REGIMENT AND IN THE NEW YORK FIRST GERMAN RIFLES. (July 1861)
The Washington Star of the 9th inst., gives the following account of these affairs:
For some time past there has been a disagreement about rations, pay, duty, &c., between Captain Takatsh and Colonel d'Utassy, the commander of the regiment, the Garibaldians. Yesterday he and two other captains and eight lieutenants signed a paper asking Colonel d'Utassy and the Lieutenant Colonel to resign and leave the major in command of the regiment. The Lieutenant Colonel refused to permit it to be presented to Colonel U. The Seventh company refused, with the Italian company (first), to drill yesterday afternoon in consequence. Colonel d'Utassy then ordered Captain Takatsh to give up his sword and go under arrest. He refused, and ordered his men to load and resist his arrest. This they did. Subsequently he marched his company to Washington, crossing the bridge at ten P. M., and bivouacking in the public grounds near the end of the bridge.
General Mansfield, hearing of the affair through a message from Captain Takatsh, sent a squadron—Companies G and H of Second United States cavalry and a company of United States infantry—to arrest the whole party, which was accomplished at midnight. On the appearance of the United States cavalry and infantry, Captain Takatsh waked his men, formed them in line, and ordering them to lay down their arms, stepped forward and delivered up his sword, a prisoner. They were immediately marched to the Treasury Building, the quarters of the Second cavalry, where they are now held prisoners, awaiting Gen. Scott's orders.
The lieutenants of Captain Takatsh's company, and thirty of the non-commissioned officers and men remained in camp, refused to join in the revolt.
On Monday the First German Rifles, of New York, under command of Colonel Bleaker, was marched to the Arsenal to exchange their arms, and receive in place of their old rifles an outfit of improved muskets and equipments. Seventy-one members of the regiment refused to take the muskets. It was understood they expected to be equipped with the rifle with the saber bayonet, but being disappointed they refused the muskets altogether. This insubordination could not be overlooked, and the party was arrested by order of the Colonel. They were escorted to the county jail by a detachment of the Ringgold Artillery, and were fully committed by Justice Dohn to await the orders of the proper military authority.

THE GARIBALDI GUARD—A CORRECTION.
To the Editor of The N. Y. Tribune.
Sir: We, the undersigned, Company Commanders of the Garibaldi Guard, have read with pain an article which appeared in the Courrier des Etats Unis, some ten days ago, stating that the members of the French company were ill provided with clothing and shelter and were overrun with vermin, and we feel keenly the unjust reproach which the publication of such an article casts, not only upon our Regiment, but in an equal degree upon the Union Defense Committee, and upon the many friends of the Regiment who have generously provided our soldiers with all that conduce to their comfort, to such an extent, indeed, that the chief complaint of the men is that they have more to carry than they can stow in their knapsacks.
The letter of the Commander of the French Company, which constituted the principal part of the article, was written during the first days of the encampment, before we had received all of our tents, and while the constant rain made our new camp very uncomfortable. It was a private letter written to friends, without the least idea of its being published, Capt. Tassilier, immediately, upon its appearance in your journal, wrote a refutation of the charges which it implied, but his friends have neglected to secure the insertion of the same. He now joins us in the most complete disclaimer of all charges against those who have so amply provided for our wants, and in the statement that our regiment is in as good a condition as could be desired.
First Company, O. Snaghi, Captain; Second Company, T. M. Colary, Lieutenant; Third Company, C. Schwarz, Captain; Fourth Company, Jose Lorens, Captain; Fifth Company, John N. Leigh, Captain; Sixth Company, Charles Wiegant, Captain; Seventh Company, Francis Takats, Captain; Eighth Company, A. Otto Bernstein, Captain; Ninth Company, H. V. Unwerth, Captain; Tenth Company, Lassilier, Captain.

PIONEERS OF THE GARIBALDI GUARD.
A company of fourteen privates, a corporal, and Sergeant Dwyer (commanding) left on Monday for Washington.

THE PIONEERS OF THE GARIBALDI GUARD
The pioneers of the Garibaldi Guard, mentioned in The Tribune yesterday as having arrived in Washington, are again in New York. They present a very sorry story of their treatment at the camping ground after traveling some seven miles into Virginia, and have returned for that reason. They will wait another and better opportunity to serve the country.

Special Dispatch to the N. Y. Tribune.
WASHINGTON, Tuesday, July 2, 1861.
THE GARIBALDI GUARD.
Two New-York journals have grossly slandered the Garibaldi Guard and its Colonel, asserting that the former was suffering from insubordination, desertion, ill treatment, and theft of the part of those through whose hands contributions passed, and that Col. D'Utassy was not a Hungarian officer, but an American impostor. We are happy to say from personal knowledge, and upon the testimony of Geo. Mansfield and Gen. Sandford, that these assertions are, each and all, untrue. To show the confidence felt in the Guard, it may be stated that the Colonel is officially ordered to hold himself in readiness for active service in Virginia.

RECEPTION OF THE THIRTY-NINTH (GARIBALDI
GUARDS) REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.
Another body of sun-burnt and war-torn men, the Thirty-ninth Regiment, N. Y. S. V., better known as the "Garibaldi Guards," of this city, were also received on Saturday. The Thirty-ninth Regiment is composed of foreigners.
They went to the war with overflowing ranks, and now barely a handful, with tattered banners, emaciated forms in carriages, and many limbless, too, come back to their homes—a sad difference in three short years. But they were kindly met, and seemed highly pleased at the sight of the old metropolis. The reception took place at two o'clock. Forming at the Bowery
Garden, the present headquarters of the Garibaldians, the procession moved in the following order:
Section of Police.
Twelfth Regiment, N. Y. S. N. G., Col. Ward commanding.
Veteran Association of the twenty-ninth Regiment, N. Y. V.
Schiller Band Glee Club.
Wounded of Garibaldi Guard.
Committee of Arrangements.
Marshals of the day.
Veterans of Garibaldi Guard with banner.
The Thirty-ninth Regiment (Garibaldi Guard), Capt. Rasmussen.
Veterans of Garibaldi Guard.
Company F, Sixth N. Y. V., Lieutenant Ad. Weill commanding.

Arriving in front of the City Hall, the procession halted on the esplanade, and in the abscence [sic] of Mayor Gunther, they were received by Alderman John Hardy. Alderman John Fox, Alderman John T. Ottiwell, Alderman Shannon, and Councilmen Joyce, Brandon, Repper and Haviland. Capt. Rasmussen, who commands what is left of the regiment, thanked the civic authorities for their kindness, and Alderman Hardy briefly replied as follows:
Soldiers of the Thirty-ninth Regiment: On behalf of the municipal authorities of this city, I extend to you a cordial and hearty welcome on your return from your gallant and heroic campaign of three years. During that time you have won for yourselves a glorious record, and have done credit and honor to the city from which you went forth. And allow me to say, that it is a source of regret to the officers of the city government, that it is not in their power to extend to you a warmer and more fitting reception on the part of the municipal authorities. It is a source of mortification to them, that while your friends have made preparations for your reception, nothing has been done by this great city, from which you had every reason to expect so much. Bit it is not through any want of gratitude on the part of the city authorities, not from any lack of appreciation of your gallant and heroic services, not from any unwillingness to testify our admiration of your bravery, fortitude and endurance through three long years of mighty strife--it is not from any of these causes that it has happened that you have been made dependent upon the private efforts of your friends for a reception, but simply because the Legislature of the State has taken away from the Common Council all means of paying tribute and rendering honor to our brave volunteers on their return from their glorious services.
But although we have been deprived of the power of extending to returning regiments a formal reception, we can we can still extend to them our heartiest gratitude, and assure them that they have earned a reputation and glory which their fellow-citizens will never forget. Soldiers of the Thirty-ninth, heroes of many desperate encounters, in which you have borne an important and honorable part, I tender you the grateful thanks of the City of New York, and wish you that prosperity through life to which your services have eminently entitled you.
The regiment then proceeded up Broadway to their headquarters. It is understood that the friends of this regiment intend to honor it with a suitable festival at an early day, probably at Jones's Wood. (N Y Times, June 13, 1864)

The Case of Colonel D'Utassy Versus the Case of Surgeon General Hammond.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
In last Sunday's HERALD there is a notice of the court martial held upon Surgeon General Hammond, stating the charges of which he has been found guilty and the punishment to which he has been sentenced; and in these respects his case seems so unlike another still fresh in my memory, that I cannot forbear the comparison.
The Surgeon General has been convicted upon all the seven charges against him, involving frauds against the government to a very large amount; and the measure of his criminality, in the opinion of the court, is fearfully augmented by the fact that the frauds were "in part accomplished by the purchase of inferior medical supplies and stores, compromising the health and comfort and jeopardizing the lives of the sick and wounded soldiers--soldiers solemnly committed to the shelter and sympathies of the office held by the accused by the very law and purpose of its creation." And yet, even in such a case, a "sentence in accordance with the nature and degree of the offence committed" was only that the accused be dismissed the service, and forever disqualified from holding any office of honor, profit or trust under the government of the United States.
In view of such a sentence in such a case what shall be said of the judgment of the Court and of the sentence in the case of Colonel D'Utasey?
Of twenty five specifications against him, two were voluntarily withdrawn. He was acquitted of thirteen. Five related to mere matters of a military nature in which there was no question of fraud. And as to four, the finding of the court expressly negatived the allegations that he had ever received or applied to his own use any money or other thing improperly obtained. The number of specifications which proved entire failures sufficiently evinced the bitter malice of the prosecution.
As to one of the specifications, and one only, was it found possible to throw a cloud over his fair fame. And even here the evidence against him was neither direct nor satisfactory. His judges at first acquitted him of the charge, and it was not until their decision was returned by the War Department for reconsideration that, he was finally convicted, the prompting of the War Department controlling the event of the case.
The facts on which this specification was founded were these:-—For pretended expenses in organizing the Garibaldi Guard, in the fall of 1861, an account was presented to the government made up of erroneous items, to the amount of $3,265.40, and the account was paid. The money was not received by D'Utassy, nor was there satisfactory evidence that any portion of it had ever come into his hands; but the account had been verified by him, and he had certified to its correctness, though whether this was done corruptly, as alleged by the prosecution, or inadvertently, in the mere routine of official business, as he himself maintained, did not clearly appear.
In any view of the case, this was the only matter of any importance against him—"the very head and front of his offending had this extent; no more." And yet, upon conviction, he was sentenced to be cashiered, to forfeit all pay and allowance due or to become due, to be forever disqualified from holding any office of trust, honor or emolument under the government of the United States, and to be imprisoned at hard labor for one year in such place as the Secretary of War may direct. And he directed Sing Sing Prison, the most ignominious designation that could have been made.
If the sentence of the Surgeon General was in accordance with the nature and degree of the offences committed, what shall be said of this sentence? Where the charges against the one involved millions, those against the other related only to thousands. While the one had jepardized [sic] the health, the comfort and lives of sick and wounded soldiers, especially entrusted to his care, nothing of the kind was alleged against the other. And yet compare their sentences—the one is dismissed the service; for the other is reserved the most damning disgrace.
D'Utassy had organized his own regiment and had served in the army of the United States two years. By the uniform testimony, even of the witnesses for the prosecution, he was a brave and an able officer, entirely temperate in his habits, and a strict disciplinarian. In efficiency his regiment was second to none in the service, and as a brigade commander he often received demoralized and undisciplined troops, and soon afterwards turned them over as models for the imitation of others. At Harper's Ferry he particularly distinguished himself on the occasion of its surrender, and his whole military career has been entirely creditable and satisfactory. Even Mr. Lincoln himself, when applied to for a pardon, said:—"It is unquestionable that Colonel D'Utassy was one of our best officers, but circumstances are against him."
The law under which he has been punished was not passed until after the alleged offence is said to have been committed, and this fact fatally vitiates the judgment and all the proceedings against him. But the questions now are, Why the unusual severity of his sentence? Why were his past services forgotten? Why has he been the only officer of the army sentenced to a felon's cell? Is there to be no equality in the administration of justice? Or may those in high places wreak their private vengeance as they will?
I cannot account for the severity of D'Utassy's punishment by any special delinquency on his part, but am forced to ascribe it rather to personal enmity on the part of Mr. Stanton, the Secretary of War. That such enmity existed is well known. JUSTITIA.

RETURN OF THE GARIBALDI GUARD—THEIR RECEPTION TO-DAY.
The Thirty-ninth regiment of New-York volunteers known as the "Garibaldi Guard," arrived in this city yesterday, their term of service having expired. This regiment, which was composed principally of foreigners of various nationalities, was the first of the three years' men raised in this state. It went away with a fall complement of men, and returns with one hundred and fifty. It was originally commanded by Colonel D'Utassy, who was subsequently convicted of various fraudulent acts and sentenced to imprisonment at Sing Sing. The regiment will be accorded a public reception to day under escort of the Twelfth and other regiments. Colonel Ward has issued the following order:
HEADQUARTERS TWELFTH REGIMENT,
NATIONAL GUARD STATE N. Y.,
NEW-YORK, June 10, 1864.
General Order No. 5.
1. Pursuant to a resolution of the Board of Officers this command will parade, fully armed and equipped, on the 11th instant, to participate in the reception of the Thirty-ninth regiment New-York volunteers, "Garibaldi Guard."
2. Line will be formed on Washington parade ground, right on University place, at 1 o'clock precisely. Field and staff (mounted) will report to the colonel at headquarters at 12 1/2 o'clock. The noncommissioned staff and drum corps will report to the adjutant, on the ground, ten minutes before the hour of formation.
3. Commandants of companies are directed to carefully revise and correct their company rosters, and return the same to the colonel at regimental headquarters, on or before 24th instant.
By order, Colonel WILLIAM G. WARD.
Wm. L. Burns, First Lieut. and Acting-Adjutant.
FUNERAL OF COLONEL MORRIS, OF THE SIXTY-SIXTH NEW- YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.
Colonel Orlando H. Morris, of the Sixty-sixth New-York state volunteers, Second corps, of the Army of the Potomac, was killed on the battle-field on Friday, June 3. He was twenty-nine years of age. Funeral ceremonies for relatives and friends will take place at the Reformed Dutch Church at Bergen Point, New Jersey, to-day at 2 P. M. The remains will subsequently be conveyed to Courtlandt street ferry, New-York, where, at 8 o'clock P. M., they will be received by a guard of honor of the United States troops, and taken to the Governor's Room, City Hall, where friends will have an opportunity to view the remains until Sunday, 12th instant, at 2 P. M., when the Twelfth New-York National Guard, under command of Colonel Ward, will escort the remains to Greenwood Cemetery. Boats to convey relatives and friends to Bergen Point will leave pier No. 9 North river at 12 3/4 P. M. to-day, and arrangements have been made for their return.
The following is the official order:
HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION N. Y. S. N. G.,
NEW-YORK, June 9, 1864.
Special Order No. 17.
Brigadier-General Yates, of the Second brigade, will detail a regiment from his command as a funeral escort to the remains of the gallant Colonel Orlando H. Morris, of the Sixty-sixth New-York volunteers, who nobly fell while leading his regiment at the battle of Coal Harbor.
The funeral services will take place on Sunday afternoon, at such hour as may be designated by the committee of arrangements.
By order of Major-General CHAS. W. SANDFORD.
Alex. Hamilton, A. D. C.
General Yates has designated the Twelfth regiment as a funeral escort, and it will assemble on Washington parade ground at 1 o'clock.

THE SECOND RHODE ISLAND HOMEWARD BOUND.
The Second regiment Rhode Island volunteers left this city for Providence yesterday. They had arrived here on Thursday evening from the Army of the Potomac, with which they were connected since the commencement of the war, and in all of the principal battles of which they have participated. This regiment, which is now commanded by Colonel J. C. Jenckes, was organized [sic] by Colonel Slocum, who fell while bravely leading his men at the first battle of Bull Run. There remain but two hundred and seventy-six men and eighteen officers.

Letter from Surgeon Hoyt.
IN THE FIELD, NEAR PETERSBURG, Va.,
Sept. 17th, 1864.
J. D. BORDWELL, Esq.—
MY DEAR SIR :—A moment's leisure reminds me of your friendly letter received some time since, to which I have not replied. Campaigning offers but few opportunities for writing, and one feels but little inclined to give up the needed rest an occasional hour yields, to wield the pen. Accept this as an apology for not writing you before.
The present campaign, in its duration, in the vigor with which it has been prosecuted, and in the hardships attending it, is unlike all others, and without a parallel in the history of ancient or modern warfare. It is now nearly five months since we broke up our winter quarters, exchanging the permanent camp for the field. From the Rapidan to the James, and from the James to the Appomattox, it has been one continued battle. The bloody fields of the "Wilderness," "Todd's Tavern," the "Po," the "Ny," "Spottsylvania," "North Anna River," "Tolopotomy Creek," "Cold Harbor," and the "siege of Petersburg," all attest the earnestness and sanguinary character of the conflict. The roar of cannon, and the bang of musketry have become so familiar, that the occasional silence of an hour, is really painful, portending the conflict will soon rage with increased fury.
The same activity characterizing the movements of the army of the Potomac, has been visible in all the military and naval Departments of the Nation. We now begin to see the results of such Herculean efforts.—The fall of Atlanta, the almost helpless condition of Mobile, prostrate at the feet of Farragut, and the strong hold Grant has on Richmond, is indeed cheering to the friends of the Union cause, and ought to send a thrill of joy through every loyal heart, and stimulate to greater exertions should our necessities require.
In the army, thank Heaven, we have but one sentiment,—a stern determination to prosecute the war until the rebellion is crushed. The army desires Peace, nay more, longs for it with an earnestness unknown to those enjoying the comforts and luxuries of home ; yet it has no confidence in, nor will it accept any Peace, unless preceded by entire submission, and complete destruction of the military power of the South. Others are seeking Peace through a different channel and by a different method, urging us as victory perches on our banners, to yield the contest, and compromise with armed traitors. The proposition is too absurd to merit attention. Jeff Davis and his so-called Confederate government have never signified any desire for Peace on any terms, short of a recognition of their independence and the establishment of a Southern Confederacy. With them it is war to the knife, and the knife to the hilt. To them the contest has become one of life or death, and we must accept the issue. If they succeed, they rule; if they fail, their power is at an end. Many of the people of the South would accept Peace on such terms as the government in justice to its outraged authority might dictate, but these are powerless. The military power of Jeff Davis rules them as with a rod of iron. Break this power and the rebellion falls to the ground, as a rope of sand. The surest, safest, and quickest road to Peace, is over the battle-field. All efforts at compromise on our part will be met with scorn and contempt, and he is a fool or traitor, who stoops to offer them. The Peace must be a conquered one. Armed rebellion can be met only by arms. Towards a conquered and repentant South, when the authors of the rebellion shall have been swept away, the Government, vindicated by an acknowledgement of its authority in the submission of all its subjects, might well afford to be, indeed, I think would be, generous. If this be true, and none have reason to doubt it, then the only hope for the South, is the destruction of its military power. Against this Jeff Davis contends; for it, we fight. Upon this issue Parties are formed. There are but two questions involved in the contest—honorable Peace, conquered by the force of arms, with a restoration of the Union, or a disgraceful, compromising effort at settlement, with a divided, distracted country. The responsibility of deciding these questions is thrown upon us, and we cannot shirk this responsibility.
As the Presidential election approaches, we begin to canvas these questions, and are prepared to act.—A large proportion of the army, in the exercise of the only civil right they have the power to exercise, are to vote at the coming election. The Candidates and their Platforms are before us, and already are their merits being discussed.
The Chicago Platform declares the war a failure, and bases the hope for Peace, on a cessation of hostslities [sic], and negotiation. Gen. McClellan, though claimed by his friends, as a War Democrat, in his letter of acceptance, fails to take issue with this declaration. We must, therefore, consider him fair and squarely on this Platform, and if elected, pledged to carry out its provisions.
The Baltimore Platform speaks put boldly in favor of the war, justifies the position assumed by the entire loyal portion of the nation since its commencement, and declares in favor of its vigorous prosecution, until the rebellion ceases. Abraham Lincoln in accepting the nomination, heartily endorses this Platform, and gives assurances that its principles shall be carried out.
Could an issue be made plainer than has been done by the two National Conventions? Elect McClellan, and if true to the convention that nominated him, we present to the world the disgraceful spectacle, of calling a military chieftain to the Presidential Chair, to withdraw our already victorious armies from the field, thus infusing new life into the rebellion and paving the way to eternal national disgrace. In Lincoln, we have a sufficient guarantee for the future, in the history of the past. His administration has been an able and honest one, true to the People, true to the government, and true to the national honor.
Can any one query for a moment how the soldiers will vote? I shall support the nominees of the Baltimore Convention, and the entire Union ticket, state and county. At the commencement of the war, when armed traitors assailed the government, swore eternal hatred to their cause, and pledged myself to the support of the administration of Abraham Lincoln, as the constitutionally elected President of the country. In common with a large portion of the Democrats of our county who had opposed the election of Mr. Lincoln, I joined with you and others in the organizations of the Union Party, and I have never seen cause to recede from the position they assumed. I conceived the cause of the government just then, and over two years service in the army, has served to strengthen and confirm the convictions at that time formed.
I shall vote for Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson, as the only candidates in the field representing the loyal Union sentiment of the country. The ability of both, is undoubted, and their honesty, equaled only by their loyalty and devotion to country, commands my support. Towards the former, the enemies of the government hurl their spite and venom with a vindictiveness that makes his cause the nation's cause, his success the nation's success, and his failure the nation's disgrace.—Will the loyal portion of the country consent to his defeat, and thus insure the triumph of the enemies of the government? Heaven forbid.
The friends of McClellan base their hopes of success upon his support by the army. In this they are to be sadly disappointed. It matters but little as to his former popularity. The army has toiled too long, and sacrificed too much to yield the contest now, and place the government in doubtful hands. I do not charge McClellan or the Democratic party with being traitors, but the fact is significant; every traitor north of Masons and Dixon's line, supports his nomination, and is moving Heaven and Earth to secure his election. In the Presidential race he is coupled with the vilest opposer of the government unhung; yet he lacks the moral courage to throw off such associations. Can such a man be trusted with the affairs of government in times like these?
The spirit that yields to the dalliance of traitors now, will nit be strengthened in the right, by a seat in the presidential Chair. The clamor of his friends as to military power will be of little avail. His party is pledged, soul and body, to a cessation of hostilities, yet with all his military prestige and in spite of for declarations, he yielded assent. It requires no prophet to foretell the fate of the Chicago nominee. The People will stamp him with their disapprobation, in the triumphant reelection of Abraham Lincoln.
The military situation is good, and the signs are chering [sic]. The General-in-Chief is full of confidence. He declares our ability to put down the rebellion by the force of arms, and predicts the utter failure of any other method of closing the war.
Our armies are being rapidly filled, while our enemies are being exhausted without the means of recuperation.—Let there be no faltering now. Give us an administration that will sustain us, and the contest will soon be over. Rally around the man whom the enemies of the government revile and the country is safe. Re-elect Abraham Lincoln, and Grant, Shearman, Farragut, Sheridan, and their co-workers will conquer an honorable Peace, and give the lie to the convention declaring the war a failure. Follow the example of Vermont and Maine, and the army will do the rest, fight and vote consistent with its pretentions.
Confident of our final triumph, and rejoicing with you in our recent successes [sic], I am,
Truly your Friend,
CHAS. S. HOYT,
Surgeon 39th N. Y. Vols.

RETURN OF THE GARIBALDI GUARD —THE RECEPTION TO-DAY.
The Thirty-ninth regiment of New-York volunteers, known as the "Garibaldi Guard." arrived in this city yesterday, their term of service having expired. This regiment, which was composed principally of foreigners of various nationalities, was the first of the three years' men raised in this state. It went away with a full complement of men, and returns with one hundred and fifty. It was originally commanded by Colonel D'Utassy, who was subsequently convicted of various fraudulent acts and sentenced to imprisonment at Sing Sing. The regiment will be accorded a public reception to-day under escort of the Twelfth and other regiments. Colonel Ward has issued the following order:

HEADQUARTERS TWELFTH REGIMENT,
NATIONAL GUARD STATE N. Y.,
NEW-YORK, June 10, 1864.
General Order No. 5.
1. Pursuant to a resolution of the Board of Officers this command will parade, fully armed and equipped, on the 11th instant, to participate in the reception of the Thirty-ninth regiment New-York volunteers, "Garibaldi Guard."
2. Line will be formed on Washington parade ground, right on University place, at 1 o'clock precisely. Field and staff (mounted) will report to the colonel at headquarters at 12 1/2 o'clock. The noncommissioned staff and drum corps will report to the adjutant, on the ground, ten minutes before the hour of formation.
3. Commandants of companies are directed to carefully revise and correct their company rosters, and return the same to the colonel at regimental headquarters, on or before 24th instant.
By order, Colonel William G. Ward.
Wm. L. Burns, First Lieut. and Acting-Adjutant.

....is hereby relieved from staff duty at these headquarters, and will report to Major General Howard for ....ment to duty according to his rank.
By order of Major General W. T. SHERMAN.
L. M. DAYTON, Assistant Adjutant General.
Official—C. Caudle, Jr. Assistant Adjutant General.
Official—J. C. DOUGLASS, Assistant Adjutant General.
Official—D. W. Poick, Acting Assistant Adjutant General.
Official—LLOYD JONES, Adjutant Sixteenth Missouri infantry.

News from Wilmington.
FORTRESS MONROE, April 8, 1865.
The steamer Nevada arrived here to-day from Wilmington.

NEW YORK HERALD.
New York, Tuesday, April 11, 1865.
The Battle Flag of the Thirty-ninth New York Veteran Volunteers.
Captain C. H. Ballou, Company D, Thirty-ninth New York Veteran Volunteers, called at this office yesterday, on his way to Washington to return to the War Department the remnants of the battle flag of his regiment. The flag is an interesting relic of the numerous battles in which the Thirty-ninth has participated. Its folds were stained with the service of many campaigns, and bore numerous bullet holes and rents made by shot and shell. The staff was broken in two, having been severed by a bullet. The flag was first used in the battle of Cross Keys, Virginia, June 8, 1862. In the campaign against Richmond it was borne in the battles of the Wilderness, the Po, Spottsylvania Court House, Laurel Hill, the Anna, Petersburg, Deep Cotton, Coal Harbor and during all the skirmishes and expeditions of the Second corps during the siege. Of the color bearers, Corporal Gaynor was killed while bearing the flag in the battle of Laurel Hill, and Sergeant John Parker, Company K, was killed in the rebel attack on the Second corps works at Ream's station, on August 25.
The Thirty-ninth took part in the late operations on Hatcher's run. In the fighting of April 3 Colonel Augustus Funk, the commanding officer of the regiment, was wounded in the right thigh.

 

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