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43rd New York Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

HOME MATTERS.
THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT N. Y. S. V. —By special order of the War Department Colonel Baker has been authorized to raise two more companies to fill up the gallant old Forty-third regiment. As our citizens may not be fully aware of the faithful service which this regiment has done, we will give a few of the leading facts in its history.
From the 21st day of September, 1861, until the present moment, this regiment has been constantly in the face of the enemy, skirmishing, reconnoitering, or taking part in all the great events of the war. After the first Bull Run battle it made the first reconnoisance to Fairfax, and subsequently was complimented for a forced march of twenty-one miles in midwinter, over the worst roads. Throughout the Peninsular campaign it took a prominent part. At the battle of Golden's farm it held the extreme right of the line on the Chickahominy, when by its steady valor, assailed by treble its own numbers, it repulsed the famous Eighth Georgia regiment in three charged, and contributed partly to the safe escape of Porter across the river. In connection with the Maryland campaign its conduct was conspicuous. After the first battle of Fredericksburg, when it was deemed advisable to organize a Light Division for the most trying and arduous service, the Forty-third regiment was one of five chosen from the army, for its dash and endurance, to constitute a part of the infantry force. At the second battle of Fredericksburg after Schaller's brigade had been repulsed, the task of carrying the Heights was entrusted to toe [sic] Light Division, consisting of the 6th Maine, 8th Wisconsin and 3lst New York on the left and the 61st Pennsylvania and 43d New York in column across a narrow causeway on the right. But one regiment of that gallant band faltered for a moment. This was the 61st Pennsylvania, which retreated in confusion on 43d. Then occurred a scene seldom witnessed in warfare; the 43d receiving the shock of the retreating mass, held it in check under a galling fire, and then actually charged through the affrighted Pennsylvanians, carrying its colors gallantry into the enemy's works, capturing guns and prisoners, and only halting in the pursuit when it had thrown its wearied braves against the works at Salem Heights, where Brooks lost a thousand men the same afternoon. It is a regiment composed of such material as this, reduced by battle and disease, that we desire our citizens to give their earnest support. If any regiment is filled, let it be the 43d Regiment N. Y. S. V.

GONE TO JOIN HIS REGIMENT.—Lieut. Peter K. Kennedy, brother of Ald. Kennedy, who has but recently returned from two years' service in the 3d Regiment left this city last evening to join Co. I, 43d Regiment. Last September when the 43d was recruiting in this city Ald. Kennedy and the 3d and 4th Ward Committee assisted Capt. Newman and Lieut. Annesley in filling up their company, furnishing over forty recruits. A commission as 2d Lieutenant was, therefore, awarded to Peter K. Kennedy, dated Sept. 13th, 1862, and he is now on his way to join the regiment, and assume his position in Co. I, Capt, Newman's company.

Fell at the late battle of Fredericksburgh, May 3, 1863, Lieut. GEORGE H KOONS, 43d Reg't N. Y. S. V.
Among the many noble spirits who have offered up their lives in the support of this patriotic war for the suppression of an infamous rebellion, special remembrance is due to our young fellow citizen, whose untimely fate is noticed above. Leaving a happy home where his many estimable qualities had endeared him to a large circle of relatives and friends, he early entered the field, and though foremost I all the contested engagements of three campaigns, he seemed to bear a charmed life, and escape without a wound. Always attentive to the duties of his position, he soon gained the notice and regard of his superior officers. For meritorious conduct he gained the commission of 1st Lieutenant, and was marked for further advancement. While gallantly leading his command in a charge in the storming of Fredericksburgh [sic] heights, in the last engagement, he received the fatal bullet, which ended his career.—He fell as a hero desires to fall with his face to the foe, and heard as his life passed away the cheering shouts of victory, thrilling the last moments of his existence.
The sad news of his death is a heavy stroke to his parents, though broken hearted at the loss of one they loved so well, there is some consolation, that his blood was shed in a noble cause, and that he now rests secure in a hope of a Christian resurrection.
Buried in a soldier's grave, on the shores of the Rappahonnock, whose waters he had so lately crossed in all the exultation of prospective victory, lies now, all that is earthly of our beloved friend and companion, GEORGE
H. KOONS; his only requieum, the gentle murmur of the stream, as the Southern breezes fan its waters, or the roar of artillery, as future strife may renew the terrific combats, which have brought sadness and tears to so many hearts.
"He sleeps his last sleep, he has fought his last battle,
No sound can awake him again."
E. J. R.

Letter from Lieut. Col. John Wilson.
Extracts from a Letter dated
CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, Va.,
HEADQUARTERS 43D N. Y. S. V.,
LIGHT DIVISION, 6TH CORPS, May 9, 1863.
I imagine it to be unnecessary for me to write you anything with regard to the actions in which we have been lately engaged, as your correspondents have doubtlessly informed you of every detail. The 43d have well sustained the reputation of the Albany soldiers, and of no other Regiment in the service should our own native city feel prouder.
The charge of the "Light Division" (consisting of the 5th Wisconsin, 6th Maine, 31st New York, 43d New York and 61st Pennsylvania Volunteers,) on Mary's Heights, is acceded by all to be the most brilliant action of the war, and although we lost nearly one-half of the effective force of the Division, yet we are ready to rush forward once more, if ordered, and carry those bloody Heights, though the entire command perish in the attempt. The "Light Division" cannot be demoralized as long as the Rebel host remains in arms against our Government; and the greater the odds against us, with more desperate determination does our Column rush to the contest.
I am, faithfully, yours,
JOHN WILSON, Lieut. Col. 43d N. Y. Vols.

FUNERAL OF THE LATE CAPT. DOUGLAS LODGE.—The funeral of the late Capt. Douglas Lodge, of the 43d Regiment, who was killed during the storming of the heights of Fredericksburg, took place yesterday afternoon, from the Unitarian church, Division street, and was very largely attended. The exercises were of the most interesting and solemn character. The escort consisted of a portion of the 25th Regiment, under command of Lieut.-Col. Friedlander, preceded by Schreiber's Band. Co. R, Capt. Kingley, of which the deceased was formerly a member, acted as a guard of honor. The Burgesses Corps followed as mourners, in citizens' dress. The streets through which the funeral cortege passed were crowded with people. The hearse, Springsteed's, was drawn by four gray horses heavily caparisoned, surmounted by very elaborate mourning plumes. The remains of the gallant soldier were deposited in the vault on the hill, to be hereafter removed to the Cemetery.

THE WOUNDED OF THE FORTY-THIRD.—Rev. Mr. OSBORN, Chaplain of the Forty-third, writes us to say that "all the badly and many of the slightly wounded of our Division were sent to Washington, where they can be found by application to the Sanitary Commission there."

CAPT. NEWMAN WOUNDED.—His friends received information Saturday morning, that Capt. John Newman, of the 43d, was wounded in the thigh, in the late battles near Fredericksburgh.—He was in Sedgwick's Corps.

From the Chaplain of the Forty-Third.
Correspondence of the Evening Journal.
FALMOUTH, May 7th, 1863.
You already know that we have fought a series of terrific battles among the Fredericksburg hills; but our part in it perhaps you have not learned. The "Light Division" to which we belong, has covered itself with honor. Though fully one-half are missing, we, who are left, feel that our part was well done.
It was our Division who performed the perilous and delicate work of laying the pontoons, and which was done in darkness and in such silence that our crossing was a perfect surprise.
But the deed of peril and of glory was storming the heights back of the city. One cannot imagine the terrors of that fight. Through storms of bullets, grape and bursting shell, our own Forty-third streamed up the hill, and, with the Sixth Maine, were the first who planted our flag on those long defiant heights.
Colonel BAKER has won for himself a name of which he may well be proud; and every officer in the regiment did nobly. Yet our hearts are sad, and in the eyes which flashed so sternly in that fight, are gathering tears of sorrow, when we think of the noble dead. I think my heart was never so heavy, yet never so proud, as when I looked upon the dead faces of Captain KNICKERBOCKER, Captain LODGE and Lieuenant [sic] KOONS. God comfort their sorrowing friends. We shall never forget them.
If I had time I could fill pages; but there is too much work among these wounded men lying in the chill, damp air.
Of general results I saying nothing, because I know but little; but of this be sure, that our army is not "demoralized."
Yours, truly, C. OSBORN,
Chaplain Forty-third, N. Y.

CAPTAIN JOHN L. NEWMAN, OF THE 43D REGIMENT,
WOUNDED—LIEUT. WM. HASTINGS A PRISONER.—
The New York papers of Saturday contained the following additional: (May 1863)
Wounded—Capt. John L. Newman, thigh.
Missing—Capt. John W. Wilkinson, Capt. William Wallace, Capt, William L. Thompson, Capt. V. V. Van Patten, First Lieutenant William Hastings, First. Lieutenant Hiram Van Buren, Second Lieutenant ____ Smith, Enlisted men killed, 11; wounded, 51; missing, 241.
Saturday noon a letter was received by a brother of Captain Newman, from him, stating that his wound was not of a serious nature. He says he was wounded slightly in the side, but that he will not be inconvenienced by it. He confirms the report that Captains Wallace, Thompson and Van Patten, and Lieuts. Hastings and Van Buren are prisoners.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
Letter from Capt. Burhans, of the 43d.
Copy OF EXTRACTS FROM A PRIVATE LETTER
FROM CAPT. DAVID BURHANS, CO. H, 43D
REGIMENT, NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.
SAFE SIDE OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK,
NEAR BANKS' FORD, May 5, 1863.
DEAR BROTHER—Our "Light Division" has seen at all sorts of work just a week. I will commence by saying that last Tuesday we left our camp and marched all day, and at night our regiment carried seven pontoons down to the Rappahannock, when the 2d Division of our Corps crossed on them and drove the rebs out of their rifle pits. We rested Wednesday, Thursday and Friday—crossed Friday night—were shoved in front on picket and drove their pickets in on Saturday night—marched to the right towards Fredericksburgh [sic] and entered that place about sunrise Sunday morning, taking a dose of canister from a battery as we crossed a hollow, wounding four and killing one in our regiment, and knocking two or three rifles to pieces in my company; but hurting no one. We laid in the city till about 12 o'clock, when we got orders to charge the works in the rear of the city, at the very spot where the Irish Brigade lost their men in December. As we had to cross a bridge, we were compelled to double-quick in four ranks. The 61st Penn., of our Light Division, were sent in just ahead of us. As we got out of the city, the most murderous fire that you can imagine was opened on us, principally spherical case shot and musketry, with some shell. The Colonel of the 61st Penn. was killed before we crossed the bridge, when they broke, holding us in check, under a fire which no soldiers could stand, when our regiment broke and fell back to the city. The 83d N. Y. was in our rear and their Major, I think, got about seventy-five men to follow him. Capt. Knickerbocker and Lieut. Koonz were killed in this charge. We rallied a few men and the 43d planted the first colors in front of us. Col. Wilson led this squad, with some other line officers I carried George Koonz in the shade, and rallied a few men and caught up to our colors, when our regiment took the advance of the whole of Sedgwick's command. I took out a few skirmishers and captured a Second Lieutenant and three privates. We then halted and most of the army passed us, batteries and all, leaving the works we had gained empty.
That night (Sunday) there was a fearful fight, but our division was held in the reserve, as we had done the charging. So early yesterday morning we went to the right and picketed, our right running down to the river. I was here kept in on the support. Capt. Lodge was killed early in the day. We held this point until last night at 10 o'clock, when our pickets were driven in—most of them running in without firing—pressed by a good force of rebels, who gave us a good volley, which was returned by the 6th Maine, that regiment (the best in the service) just coming up to support us. Our regiment here lost 150 men, Captains Wallace, Van Patten and Thompson, Lieut. Hastings and my two Lieutenants (Van Buren and Smith) taken prisoner. I have this morning two Sergeants, three Corporals and thirteen privates, out of five Sergeants and forty-six men in file. I know of but one being killed, six wounded, and the rest are missing. Philip Severance, of Albany, was killed, and Corporal Lasher has a slight wound in the arm. As I gave my boy my money before I went in on the charge, I am afraid I am out $270, as he may be a prisoner; still I have hopes of seeing him again, as he is stout and resolute. I have the sword that I took from the rebel officer, which I consider quite a trophy. I don't know where we are going, whether over the river or back to camp. Sergeants Huyck and Frederick are with me. No Bethlehem boys hurt that I know of, excepting Corporal Lasher.
Your brother, DAVID BURHANS.

SOME OF THE WOUNDED.—The following are the names of some of the wounded in the left wing of Hooker's Army, who are connected with companies or regiments from this city:
David Conley, Co. F, 43d New York, foot.
W. Heilsinger, Co. A, 43d, side.
C. W. Drake, Co. E, 43d, lung.
John Wilson, Co. A, thigh.
C. Philip, Co. A, head.
John L. Tift, Co. I , hip.
Martin Cahill, Co. H, hand.
Asaph Holdridge, 44th New York.
James Banen, Co. C, 44th.
Sergeant W. Johnson, Co. G, 44th.
Andrew G. Taylor, Co. G, 44th.
James Hendrickson, Co. F, 44th.
Lieut. Huested, 44th, by a shell.

DEATH OF TWO BRAVE ALBANIANS.—Among the killed of the 43d Regiment, at the storming of the Rebel entrenchments on Sunday last, Captain Knickerbocker and Lieutenant Koonz, both Albanians, were killed. The 43d was in the thickest of the fight, and fought with desperate bravery. The charge against the enemy was entirely successful, and the two brave officers whose names we give above fell while gallantly fighting for the restoration of the Union and in defense of the Constitution.

Letter from Captain Wallace, of the 43d.
Extracts from a letter from Capt. Wm. Wallace, of the 43d, dated PRISONER'S CAMP,
NEAR FREDERICKSBURG, May 5.
I write to inform you that a number of our regiment were taken prisoners while on picket in rear of Fredericksburg last night. I subjoin a list of my Company now with me. Capt. Thompson, of our Regiment, is also here. Please inform Mrs. T. that John Hoffman was mortally wounded. Father McAtee administered the viatican to him. In addition to the names I subjoin, Capt. Van Patten, Lieut. Van Buren and J. H. Smith are with us.

CASUALTIES IN CO. F, FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.
Killed—Jacob R. Skinkle, Timothy Kelly.
Wounded—John Hoffman (since dead), H. Ewald, David Connelly, Patrick Boyle, John McGown.
Prisoners—Capt. Wm. Wallace, Lieut. Wm. Hastings, Orderly Sergeant Wm. Blasie, Sergeants Wm. Hill, Henry Gunther; Corporals Michael Brown, Dennis Kerr, Martin L. Carroll, Frederick Brooks, Chas. McGuire, Wm. T. Rockfeller; Privates David Griffiths, Jas. George, James McNamara, James Maloy, Jas. T. Slingerland, John Thompson, Joseph Girven, James Padden, John Kelly, Wm. Dalton, Chas. H. Grant, Wm. Clowes, Josiah Stanton, John McCormick, Louis Boyer.
Yours, &c.
The Captain is undoubtedly, ere this, at Annapolis, with the other paroled prisoners of his company.

What the 43d Did in the Late Battles.
The part of the 43d in the late battles commenced on the night of the 28th of April, when the regiment spent a most toilsome night in carrying the pontoons by hand down to the river and launching them.
The two following days, the 29th and 30th, were passed under arms on this side of the river, and at 5 P. M. on the 1st of May, Col. BAKER was ordered, with one hundred men from each of the five regiments of our Light Division, to cross the river and relieve the picket line.
At dark the entire division crossed to support the picket line.
At 5 P. M. on the 2d, the line of pickets under Col. BAKER advanced and skirmished for an hour, driving the enemy before them. At 12 that night we were under arms and skirmished up to the city of Fredericksburg, reaching the city at daylight on the morning of Sunday, the 3d.
The enemy being driven out of Fredericksburg at 10 A. M., the division stormed the heights, under a tremendous fire of canister and musketry.
The ascent was very steep, and about a quarter of a mile in length. Here Captain KNICKERBOCKER was killed.
At the beginning of the ascent, the regiment in front of the 43d broke and fell back upon us. It was in attempting to rally this broken regiment that the gallant Lieut. KOONS, of Albany, met his death.
Finding it in vain to attempt getting through the broken regiment in front of us, the Colonel drew off the colors to one side, rallied the regiment around them, and, as soon as the way was clear, the works were charged at double-quick and carried, the colors of our regiment being the first which were planted on the redoubt on the right, and those of the 6th Maine on the left.
The 43d here captured twenty-five prisoners and one gun. The retreating enemy were pursued for three or four miles, the 43d being half a mile in advance of all the rest. At this point the regiment was halted, by order of Gen. SEDGWICK, within half a mile of a strong position and force of the enemy, which was attacked that night and found to be impregnable.
On Monday, the Rebels returned in our rear, and re-occupied the heights which we had so perilously won.
The 43d having been ordered to leave their knapsacks and haversacks in Fredericksburg, our men were for two days without food, and now held the position on the extreme right, where we had seven companies deployed. On this picket line, Capt. LODGE, while gallantly and coolly leading his company, was shot through the head and died the next morning.
Capt. LODGE was one of the bravest and coolest of our men. He had been struck by a bullet upon the belt-plate during the charge upon the fort, but recovering, said gaily that he would be the first man upon the works, which he actually was.
During the afternoon the entire force on the left which held the position, was withdrawn, except the 43d and two companies of the 81st New York.
It was only at this moment that we discovered that the pickets, as well as the force on the left, was withdrawn, leaving our flank entirely exposed.
We then extended pickets for our own protection; when the enemy advanced in line of battle, came in the rear of our pickets, captured two of our companies and two of the 31st. Of our officers captured, were Capts. WALLACE and VAN PATTEN, and Lieuts. HASTINGS and SMITH. This Rebel line was afterward repulsed by the reserves of the 6th Maine and 43d New York.
After that repulse, knowing that our flank was exposed to a strong Rebel force, we retired, making good our retreat to the main body; during this retreat Capts. WILKINSON and THOMPSON, and Lieut. VAN BUREN were captured.
We recrossed the river at Banks' Ford at about 3 o'clock on Tuesdsy [sic]  morning; having thus crossed the river below Fredericksburg, burst through the enemy's works, marched through them for six miles up the river, and recrossed, with a loss of twelve officers and about two hundred men.

Letter from Capt. Burhans, of the 43d.
Copy of extracts from a private letter from
Capt. David Burhans, Co. H, 43d Regiment,
New York State Volunteers.
SAFE SIDE OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK,
NEAR BANKS' FORD, May 5, 1863.
DEAR BROTHER—Our "Light Division" has been at all sorts of work just a week. I will commence by saying that last Tuesday we left our camp and marched all day, and at night our regiment carried seven pontoons down to the Rappahannock, when the 2d Division of our Corps crossed in them and drove the Rebs. out of their rifle pits. We rested Wednesday, Thursday and Friday—crossed Friday night—were shoved in front on picket and drove their pickets in on Saturday night—marched to the right towards Fredericksburg and entered the place about sunrise Sunday morning, taking a dose of canister from a battery as we crossed a hollow, wounding four and killing one in our regiment, and knocking two or three rifles to pieces in my company; but hurting no one. We laid in the city till about 12 o'clock, when we got orders to charge the works in the rear of the city, at the very spot where the Irish Brigade lost their men in December. As we had to cross a bridge, we were compelled to double-quick in four ranks. The 61st Penn., of our Light Division, were sent in just ahead of us. As we got out of the city, the most murderous fire that you can imagine was opened on us, principally spherical case shot and musketry, with some shell. The Colonel of the 61st Penn. was killed before we crossed the bridge, when they broke, holding us in check, under a fire which no soldiers could stand, when our regiment broke and fell back to the city. The 33d N. Y. was in our rear and their Major, I think, got about seventy-five men to follow him. Capt. Knickerbocker and Lieut. Koonz were killed in this charge. We rallied a few men and the 43d planted the first colors in front of us. Col. Wilson led this squad, with some other line officers. I carried George Koonz in the shade, and rallied a few men and caught up to our colors, when our regiment took the advance of the whole of Sedgwick's command. I took out a few skirmishers and captured a Second Lieutenant and three privates. We then halted and most of the army passed us, batteries and all, leaving the works we had gained empty.
That night (Sunday) there was a fearful fight, but our division was held in the reserve, as we had done the charging. So early yesterday morning we went to the right and picketed, our right running down to the river. I was here kept in on the support. Capt. Lodge was killed early in the day. We held this point until last night at 10 o'clock, when our pickets were driven in—most of them running in without firing—pressed by a good force of Rebels, who gave us a good volley, which was returned by the 6th Maine, that regiment (the best in the service) just coming up to support us. Our regiment here lost 150 men, Captains Wallace, Van Patten and Thompson, Lieut. Hastings and my two Lieutenants (Van Buren and Smith) taken prisoners. I have this morning two Sergeants, three Corporals and thirteen privates, out of five Sergeants and forty-six men in file. I know of but one being killed, six wounded, and the rest are missing. Philip Severance, of Albany, was killed, and Corporal Lasher has a slight wound in the arm. As I gave my boy my money before I went in on the charge, I am afraid I an out $270, as he may be a prisoner; still I have hopes of seeing him again, as he is stout and resolute. I have the sword that I took from the Rebel officer, which I consider quite a trophy. I don't know where we are going, whether over the river or back to camp. Sergeants Huyck and Frederick are with me. No Bethlehem boys hurt that I know of, excepting Corporal Lasher. Your brother, DAVID BURHANS.

The Casualties in the 43d.
THEEE CAPTAINS AND SEVENTEEN OTHERS
KILLED—A HUNDRED WOUNDED—TWO COMPANIES
CAPTURED.
The following letter was received by Gen. JOHN F. RATHBONE last evening:—CAMP OF SIXTH CORPS, HOSPITAL, OPPOSITE FREDERICKSBURG, May 5.
Gen. John F. Rathbone, Albany:
The 43d has suffered severely. About one I hundred wounded, say twenty killed. Capt. Knickerbocker, killed; Capt. Lodge, killed; Lieut. Koonz, killed; Lieut, Russell, injured; Capt. Wallace, prisoner; Capt. Van Patten, prisoner; Lieut. Gilfillan, prisoner; Lieut. Lombard, prisoner. Two companies (on picket) prisoners. Field and staff safe. Col. Baker, "bravest of the brave," led two charges. In haste, MEIGS CARR,
Surgeon 43d Regiment.
The Sixth Corps took, yesterday, 2,000 private Rebels, a Brigadier General, 20 Captains, 30 Lieutenants.

CASUALTIES IN THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.
Among the wounded in the recent battles we notice the names of the following members of the 43d Regiment:—
Charles Drake, Co. E.
David Connelly, Co. F.
J. Thompson, Co. B, forearm, slightly.
Daniel Magee, Co. I, abdomen, seriously.
John Moore, Co. H, hand, not seriously.
H. Eswald, Co. I, knee, seriously.
G. Elden, Co. H, arm, not seriously.
J. E. Stanville, Co. H, thigh, not seriously.
Corp. L. Lasher, Co. H, arm, not seriously.
Michael O'Hara, Co. B, thigh, not seriously.
George Brown, Co. G, hand.
Sergt. Richard Costlo, G, foot, not seriously.
Albert C. Read, Co. G, elbow, not seriously.
Sergt. John Hoffman, Co. F, seriously.
Alex. Thompson, Co. B, wrist, not seriously.
John Hays, Co. K, ankle, seriously.
Lieut. Robert Russell, Co. A, hip, seriously.
Corp. Thomas Bristy, Co. A, leg, seriously.
Fred. Brischt, Co. A, foot, not seriously.
Sergt. J. Henderson, A, stomach, seriously.
Corp. Cyrus C. Smith, Co. I, leg, seriously.
Corp. Michael Doyle, Co. C, thigh, seriously.
Jacob Runstuft, Co. A, ankle, seriously.
Corp. W. Lindsay, Co. A.
John Caldwell, Co. E, dead.
The New York papers contain the following additional:—
WOUNDED.
Capt. John L. Newman, thigh.
MISSING.
Captain John W. Wilkinson.
Captain William Wallace.
Captain William L. Thompson.
Captain V. V. Van Patten.
First Lieutenant William Hastings.
First Lieutenant Hiram Van Beuren.
Second Lieutenant ____ Smith.
Enlisted men killed, 11; wounded 51; missing, 241.
When SEDGWICK found it necessary to cut his way to the river, the Times correspondence says:—
The Forty-third New York and Seventh Maine were left at the extreme right, near a cross-road, to keep up a show, while the remainder of the corps retired across Banks' Ford. The force commenced crossing at 11 o'clock Monday night. The enemy succeeded in getting in the rear of the pickets of these two regiments, took them before they fired a gun, then moved down upon the Sixth Maine, which fired a volley, repulsing them, and then retreated to Banks' Ford, together with the Forty-third New York, reaching it in safety, being obliged to make their way through brush and slushing. Haines' Battery did fine execution, and lost but one man.

THE 43D MAKE A BIG HAUL.—The correspondent of the New York Times gives an account of a burning of an elegant mansion in Fredericksburg belonging to a man named Bernard __nd adds:—
While a party of the 43d New York, Col. Baker, stationed on picket, last Friday afternoon, near by, were delving among the ruins, they discovered, buried beneath them, in a chest, $100,000 of Confederate money, placed there, doubtless, by the owner, for safe-keeping. There has been no lack of Confederate currency in that regiment since.

LIEUT. HASTINGS, of the 43d, who, with others was taken prisoner at Fredericksburgh [sic], has arrived at Anapolis [sic], paroled. We presume that all the others, captured at the same time, are at the same place, if not already formally exchanged.

Lieut. Wm. Hastings, of the 43d, taken prisoner at Fredericksburg, in a letter to his brother, says:—
When captured, they compelled us to walk from Fredericksburg to Gainea's Station, a distance of upwards of twenty-five miles, in a terrible rain storm, fording streams up to our waist, and camping out without a particle of covering, save what we wore upon our backs. We were released from Libby Prison Wednesday afternoon last, about 4 o'clock, and were again compelled to march from Richmond to City Point, a distance of thirty-five miles—the Rebels refusing to give us any transportation whatever. We marched all that night and all the next day, reaching City Point about six o'clock on Thursday evening, where we took a transport, and arrived at this place to-day.—My feet are so completely blistered that I find it difficult to walk. Our squad consisted of about eighty-six officers, of all grades, including one Brigadier General.
There are about 100 officers still left at Richmond; among them are Captains Wallace, Thompson, Van Patten, and Lieut. Smith. Captain Wilkinson and Lieut. H. Van Buren came on with me.

Letter from Lt. Col. John Wilson.
Extract from a letter dated
Camp near Falmouth, Va., Headquarters of
N. Y. S. V., Light Division, 6TH Corps, May 9, 1863.—I imagine it to be unnecessary to for me write you anything with regard to the action in which we have been lately engaged, as your correspondents have doubtlessly informed you of every detail. The 43d have well sustained the reputation of the Albany soldiers, and of no other Regiment in the service should our own native city feel prouder. The charge of the "Light Division" (consisting of the 5th Wisconsin, 6th Maine, 31st New York, 43d New York and 61st Pennsylvania Volunteers) on Mary's Heights, if acceded by all to be the most brilliant action of the war, and although we lost nearly one-half of the effective force of the Division, yet we are ready to rush forward once more, if ordered, and carry those bloody Heights, though the entire command perish in the attempt. The "Light Division" cannot be demoralized as long as the Rebel host remains in arms against our Government; and the greater the odds against us, with more desperate determination does our column rush to the contest. I am, faithfully, yours,
John Wilson, Lieut. Col. 43d N. Y. V.

INTERESTING LETTER FROM SERG'T.
H. J. WILSON OF THE 43d REG'T.
A March to Richmond as a Prisoner—Indignities to Dead Federal Soldiers—Their Bodies robbed and Stripped—Cowardly Treatment of our Men—Short Rations and Sharp Appetites—Secesh Women Showing Their Teeth—Paroled Prisoners Murdered by a Drunken Rebel, &c. &c. &c.
ON BOARD THE STEAMER STATE OF MAINE, OFF CHESAPEAKE BAY.
FRIEND CUYLER—Having a few liesure [sic] moments, the first I have had since I grot out of the hands of the Philistines, I avail myself of the opportunity of writing you these few lines, informing you, and the many readers of your spicy sheet, that there are 133 of the 43d on board of the fleet on its way to Annapolis, which has the paroled prisoners on, and that they are all in good health and spirits, (notwithstanding the rascally Rebs. tried to kill us off, by marching, rough usage, and starvation,) and will yet make their mark again. I pity the poor secesh that falls into the hands of some of our boys, as they have sworn to have satisfaction, and get even with them. As it will undoubtedly be interesting to the many readers of the EXPRESS, I will endeavor to give them a short description of our treatment while in the hands of the enemy. After the splendid successes of Sunday, and then to be gobbled up was really too bad; but such is the fate of war. We were taken Monday night while out on picket. The Rebels came upon us in overwhelming force, and it would have been madness to attempt to escape or show fight, as we were completely surrounded; in fact it was rather a surprise. How they got up to us so close, without us hearing them, I cannot imagine, as we were all wide awake, and lay stretched on the ground, listening intently, as we expected to be sacrificed, in order to let the main body get over the river safely. This was a military necessity, and the Rebels soon made us change our base from front to rear at a double-quick. After they took us they marched us to the Brick Church, the spot where the bloody battle of the night before took place, called Salem Church.
The next morning I took a short walk around the place and the sight that met my gaze was truly heart-sickening. Our dead were all of them nearly stripped, and the pockets of each turned inside out and robbed of all they contained. The Rebels had lots of greenbacks, and offered us fabulous prices for knives, watches, pocketbooks, &c. For a common knife worth 8s. in the North, they freely offered $10 and $12 in greenbacks; for a good pipe they paid some of our boys as high as $12. They made their brags that they got their money from our dead. That afternoon we fell in line and marched eighteen miles through one of the most terrible rain storms I ever witnessed; it literally poured in torrents, lasting the balance of the afternoon and a portion of the next day. They compelled us to cross a creek up to our waists. For the life of me I could not help laughing to see Lieut. Wm. Hastings plunge in two or three times; when in the middle of the stream he came near being carried away by the rapid current. Officers and all had to follow suit with the privates. By going down a little further we could have crossed over a bridge, but no, they said they wanted to give us Yankees a d—d good soaking. But what made matters worse, before we started, Gen. McLaws, the brute, took our woolen and rubber blankets, also our canteens and pieces of tent from us, consequently that night we had to lie on the cold, damp ground, drenched to the skin. They would not even allow us fires to dry ourselves with. Every man was shaking as if with the ague. Very few of us slept any that night I can assure you. The next morning, at daylight, we were again in motion and went to Guinea's Station, distance twelve miles, where we remained about three days. As yet we had not received anything from the Rebels in the shape of eatables, not until the next day, and then the miserable pittance of five crackers, one cup of flour, a small piece of salt junk, and a something that looked like salt; and even that had to last us two days longer. On the morning of the fourth day we again moved on to Richmond, (telling the folks on the way that we were the advance of Fighting Joe's Grand Army,) in charge of the 38th Georgia Regiment, a devilish good lot of fellows for Rebels, Capt. McCloud acting as colonel, and a splendid fellow he was. He gave us short marches and plenty of rests. After a great deal of grumbling by our men for something to eat, we at length arrived at Hanover Junction, and our eyes were gladdened with the sight of rations once more, which were soon after dealt to us, giving us a small piece of bacon and seven crackers, which had to last us four days; it was intended for two days, but we did not get anything more for four days, with the exception of what we managed to buy on the sly at fabulous prices. Up at daylight the next morning, and after a march of about ten miles, passed through the fine little village of Bowling Green". The ladies (etiquette compels me to call them such) paraded themselves in strong force, and made some very insulting remarks; one of them I can vouch for, as I heard it from her own lips, who had a very pretty face, and looked very much like a lady—it was this, that there would be another chance of getting Yankee bone rings. We stopped for the night just outside of the town; about this time the Colonel came along and asked our boys if there was any of them that could play the violin? if so, he would like him to come back to the village with him, as he said there was a Reb. dance that night, and he would give him all he wanted to eat and drink, and use him well. One of the boys availed himself of the opportunity, as the matter of food was a big consideration.
Sunday, May 10th.—A fine morning, very warm; up at 4 o'clock, and soon after on the march. (As I am spinning this out much longer than I intended when I commenced, I shall have to pass over many points and cut it short.) On the morning of Tuesday we arrived in the hotbed of treason to find the stores closed, and all the flags at half mast, in honor of the late Stonewall Jackson, whose remains were lying in State at the Rebel Capitol. After marching us through the principal streets we passed over the ____ River to Belle Island, where we remained about three days, and were then paroled and marched off to City Point via Petersburg. Here it was where we suffered terribly. They marched us from 2 o'clock that afternoon until 9 o'clock that night, a distance of nineteen miles, giving us only ten or fifteen minutes' rest during the whole march, and to make matters worse, it commenced to rain about 4 o'clock, and continued until we stopped. Up the next morning at daylight, and marched fifteen miles, arriving at City Point that afternoon at 2 o'clock, making, in our exhausted state, the remarkable distance of thirty-four miles in twenty-four hours. Capt. Turner, who had charge of us—the black-hearted, drunken villain—killed two of our men with his sabre, and caused the death of three more by over-exertion. They marched us the whole distance without water or rest. He told me that he had orders to leave none alive behind.
Excuse the writing and composition, as it is done in a hurry.
In haste, yours truly, SERGEANT H. J. WILSON.

From the Chaplain of the Forty-Third.
Correspondence of the Evening Journal.
FALMOUTH, May 7, 1863.
You already know that we have fought a series of terrific battles among the Fredericksburg hills; but our part in it perhaps you have not learned. The
"Light Division," to which we belong, has covered itself with honor. Though fully one-half are missing, we who are left, feel that our part was well done.
It was our Division who performed the perilous and delicate work of laying the pontoons, and which was done in darkness and in such silence that our crossing was a perfect surprise.
But the deed of peril and of glory was storming the heights back of the city. One cannot imagine the terrors of that fight. Through storms of bullets, grape and bursting shell, our own Forty-third streamed up the hill, and with the Sixth Maine, were the first who planted our flag on those long defiant
heights.
Colonel Baker has won for himself a name of which he may well be proud; and every officer in the regiment did nobly. Yet our hearts are sad, and in the eyes which flashed so sternly in that fight, are gathering tears of sorrow, when we think of the noble dead. I think my heart was never so heavy, yet never so proud, as when I looked upon the dead faces of Captain Knickerbocker, Captain Lodge and Lieutenant Koonz. God comfort their sorrowing friends. We shall never forget them.
If I had time I could fill pages; but there is too much work among these wounded men lying in the chill damp air.
Of general results I say nothing, because I know but little; but of this be sure, that our army is not "demoralized."
Yours, truly, C. OSBORN,
Chaplain Forty-third N. Y. V.

MILITARY FUNERAL.—The remains of Capt. Lodge, of the 43d, who was killed at Fredericksburg, have arrived and will be buried on Sunday. A meeting of the officers of the 25th Regiment was held last night, when it was resolved that the regiment would turn out in a body to attend the funeral. We hear that the Burgesses Corps, of which the deceased was a number, will also attend.

Letter from Capt. Newman, of the 43d.
BELOW FREDERICKSBURG, Va.,
May 4th, 1863.
DEAR PARENTS—The Light Brigade crossed over the Rappahannock May 1st, in the evening. We were sent over on picket, and on the afternoon of the 2d drive in the enemy's picket. It was brilliantly drove, and our Brigade received much praise. About twelve at night we were ordered to move, and took position just back of Fredericksburg, where Gen. Hancock's Division suffered so terribly last December. At 12 o'clock on the 3d our Brigade was ordered to charge on the rifle-pits and batteries. Each regiment advanced in a different manner and by different roads, at a double quick march, and while moving up the road we were under the fire of batteries and rifle pits. Oh! it was fearful. We lost Captain Knickerbocker and Lieut. Koonz, and a good many more. Three of my men were killed, and about a dozen wounded, but we planted our flag in one of the batteries and took one cannon. The 6th Maine lost five Captains and their Major, and one hundred and fifty men. Their charge was the most brilliant achievement of the war. They took six cannon, and all our Brigade took many prisoners. The 43d and 61st Pennsylvania went in together. Their Colonel was killed at the first fire. After we had almost reached the entrenchments, which caused a panic, back they came on to us, blocking up the road so we could not advance, and all the time we were enduring the enemy's fire. At last we were obliged to fall back, but rallied again, and with the 82d regiment obtained the hill. We chased the rebels two miles, shooting a good many and capturing many prisoners. Gen. Sedgwick, with two corps, marched up after us, and just before sunset last night another battle was fought. We were in reserve then, and do not know the result. It was four miles back of Fredericksburg where they were entrenched on another range of hills. We did not get possession of them, and to-day our regiment is doing picket duty in front of the enemy. Capt. Lodge was shot through the head this morning—seriously wounded. I am almost worn out with fatigue and excitement. I received a slight flesh wound in my side, which bled some, but feel no inconvenience from it, and I have written this afternoon that you may know I am still all right, and well. Dick is with me on picket, and well. Don't ever believe I am wounded unless from positive information. We have a good deal to go through yet, and may fall, but it will be in a noble cause. Remember that we are in God's hands as of old.  Yours, in haste, Affectionately, your son, John.
NORTH SIDE OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK,
May 5th.
After writing the above, our line was attacked by the rebels, and many of the men killed and taken prisoners--Capts. Wallace, Thompson, Van Patten, Lieuts. Hastings, and Van Buren. The regiment is very much reduced. Gen. Longstreet reinforced them from Suffolk. We hear that Gen. Hooker has had a success. Our success was complete until yesterday when reinforcements drove us in.

CAPTAIN JOHN L. NEWMAN, OF THE 43D REGIMENT, WOUNDED—LIEUT. WM. HASTINGS A PRISONER.—
The New York papers of Saturday contained the following
additional:
Wounded—Capt. John L. Newman, thigh.
Missing—Capt. John W. Wilkinson. Capt. William Wallace, Capt. William L. Thompson, Capt. V. V. Van Patten, First Lieutenant William Hastings, First Lieutenant Hiram Van Buren, Second Lientenant [sic] ____ Smith,
Enlisted men killed, 11: wounded, 51: missing, 241.
Saturday noon a letter was received by a brother of Captain Newman, from him, stating that his wound was not of a serious nature. He says he was wounded slightly in the side, but that he will not be inconvenienced by it. He confirms the report that Captains Wallace, Thompson and Van Patten, and Lieuts. Hastings and Van Buren are prisoners.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
The Forty-third and its Gallant Dead.
But few regiments in the service are composed of braver men, or have suffered more severely since the commencement of this unholy rebellion than the 43d New York State Volunteers, which was recruited in this, vicinity, and which is made up principally of Albanians.—This regiment passed through the battles before Yorktown, Williamsburgh [sic], Manor and Malvern Hill, Fair Oaks, Seven Pines, Antietam, Bull Run number two, and each of the battles at Fredericksburgh [sic]. In the last engagement at Fredericksburgh [sic], the 43d was in the thickest of the fight, and consequently lost several officers and privates. Most prominent among them were the following:
CAPT. DOUGLAS LODGE.
The many friends of the gallant dead will mourn the loss of this departed hero. Capt. L. was born in this city in 1843, and consequently was in his twentieth year. He is a son of Mr. B. Lodge, the tailor. Well do we remember when the echo of Sumter's guns reverberated through the land, with what fervor our young friend rushed to the rescue, he being the first volunteer to sign the roll of a company then forming by Capt. Cottingham. Through some mismanagement this company fell through, but his love of country would not permit him to remain at home. On the departure of the 25th regiment (first time) he accompanied the "Hunkey Boys," under command of Capt. Kingsby. At the expiration of his term of service he enlisted as Third Sergeant in Company A, 43d Regiment. He was shortly afterwards promoted to Quartermaster Sergeant. For meritorious conduct at the battle of Williamsburgh [sic] he was promoted to 2d Lieutenant. Participating in the battles of Fair Oaks, Manor and Malvern Hills, he won by his galltant [sic] conduct the position of First Lieutenant. At Antietam he again displayed his qualities as a brave and gallant soldier, receiving the admiration of all his comrades, and receiving for his gallant conduct, promotion to Canptainoy [sic]. At the last battle of Fredericksburgh [sic], while gallantly leading his command, he received a shot in the forehead which caused instantaneous death. His career was thus brought to a sudden but honorable close. He has offered up his life before he had hardly arrived at the age of manhood as a martyr to his country. His afflicted parents, while mourning his loss will be buoyed up with the proud consciousness that he has left a name which will be ever emblazoned on the martyr's pages of our country's history. A brother of Capt. Lodge, only sixteen years of age, enlisted in Capt. Capt. Lodge's Company, Tenth Regiment, and is at present at the seat of war.
The following letter was received by Mr. Lodge, on Saturday, explanatory of the, death of his son:
MR. LODGE—SIR:—It becomes my painful duty to inform you of the death of your son, Capt. Douglas Lodge, who fell at Fredericksburgh [sic], on the 5th, while skirmishing out in the front, after passing through the most terrific fire of the day before. He was shot in the forehead, penetrating the brain. I had him carried to the rear and his body is safe, and the Colonel has ordered it to be embalmed and sent to you. His body was recovered by private Casey, of his own Company. His personal effects I will have taken care of and sent on. I can say no more, but we are terribly cut up.
LIEUT. S. DAVIDSON,
Com'y. A.

CAPT. KNICKERBOCKER.
In the death of this gallant officer the country has lost one of its bravest men, and brightest scholar. Capt. K. enlisted as Second Sergeant in Company F. By gallant conduct he worked from this position, step by step, until at last he won the Captaincy. He was possessed of splendid literary abilities, being conversant in many of the languages. His company was recruited in Canajoherie. Capt. K. was about thiry-five [sic] years of age, and leaves a family to mourn his loss. We believe they at present reside in Iowa. His death no doubt, is keenly felt by the members of his company, by whom he was greatly beloved while living.

LIEUT. WILLIAM KOONZ.
We regret to announce the death of Lieut. Wm. Koonz while in the prime of life—being only twenty-five years of age. Lieut. K. was for several years a resident of this city. He was a young man of sterling qualities, honest, upright and generous. He has left a large circle of sympathising [sic] friends who deeply deplore his loss. Lieut. K. was formerly a member of Company B, Tenth Regiment. He enlisted and was made Orderly Sergeant in Capt. Griffin's Company C, 43d Regiment. For gallant conduct on the field of battle field at Antietam he was promoted to a Lieutenancy, and while leading a charge in the battle of Fredericksburgh [sic], he met his death.
Orderly Sergeant Russell and privates John Henderson, John Coldwell, John Ballanger, and Daniel McGee, who were killed in the battle of Fredericksburgh [sic], are said to have exhibited remarkable courage in storming the enemy's rifle pits and batters. It is a consosolation [sic] for their friends to know that they died with their face to the enemy like heroes.
       Some of the Wounded.—The following are the names of some of  the  wounded in the left wing of Hooker's Army, who are connected with companies or regiments from this city:—
David Conley, Co. F, 43d New York, foot.
W. Heilsinger, Co. A, 43d, side.
C. W. Drake, Co. E, 43d, lung.
John Wilson, Co. A, thigh.
C. Philip, Co. A, head.
John L. Tift, Co. I, hip.
Martin Cahill, Co. H, hand.
Asaph Holdridge, 44th New York.
James Banen, Co. C, 44th.
Sergeant W. Johnson, Co. G, 44th.
Andrew G. Taylor, Co. G, 44th.
James Hendrickson, Co. F, 44th.
Lieut. Huested, 44th, by a shell.
Capt. Wilkinson, of the 43d Regiment, is on a brief visit to his family in this village. He is looking well notwithstanding the hardships which he underwent while a prisoner in the hands of the rebels. He was taken prisoner at the battle at Frederisksburg [sic] and was paroled, but has not yet been exchanged.

PERSONAL.—Captain William Wallace, of the 43d regiment, who was taken prisoner at the battle of Fredericksburg, and who was subsequently exchanged, arrived home yesterday. He is in the best of health.
—Francis Courtney, a member of Company G, 177th regiment, died at Bonnet Carre, La., on the 16th ult, His disease was intermittent fever. Mr. C. was formerly employed in the Central Railroad office in this city.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
From the Forty-Third Regiment.
ST. PATRICK'S DAY ON THE "SACKED SOIL."
CAMP NEAR BELL PLAINS, Va.,
March 22, 1863.
FRIEND R.—I thought I would write you a few lines, to let you know how we spent St. Patrick's Day on the "sacred soil" of Virginia. On the eve of St. Patrick's Day me and a few more of the boys, among them an old gent whom we call "Lovely" Dalton, got permission to go and see the races and spend the day with the Irish Brigade, which is camped some five miles from us. We arrived in good season for the sport. A few yards from the camp of the brigade was a race course, judge's stand and all complete, with a couple of brass bands, playing all the National airs, and to set everything out Gen. Meagher was mounted on a spendid [sic] horse and dressed in the costume of a real Irish jockey. He was commander-in-chief of the sport, and no one seemed to enjoy it better.
At the appointed time all the jockeys, which numbered some forty or fifty, started off around the race course. All was excitement to find out the winning horse, but where there were thousands of spectators from the different regiments in the army, there was no chance for me to find out his name or what regiment he belonged to.
During the sport, Major Gen. Hooker and staff made their appearance and was accommodated with everything the brigade could afford him. Gen. Meagher reached him a bottle—what it contained I could not say, but could see the boys smack their lips as he drank the health of Gen. Meagher and the Irish Brigade—which was followed by loud cheering for Hooker, Meagher and the Irish brigade.
Among the Generals, I noticed the following General Hooker and staff, Gen. Trench, Gen. Sickles and lady, Gen. Sedgwick, Gen. Newton Gen. Pratt and Col. Baker and lady.
During the sport the "long roll" was beat and the Irish Brigade called to arms. All was excitement. Every one started for their camps but "Lovely Dalton" and I felt so good that we put up in the woods and did not reach the regiment until morning, when everything went on as usual. We will always remember how we spent St. Patrick's day in Virginia.
J. McN.

FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.—A despatch to the New York Evening Post states that Cos. F and C, of the N. Y. 43d Regiment, Col. Baker, while on picket duty, were taken prisoners, and that only about two hundred men of the regiment were left. The despatch adds that nearly the entire Brigade, of which the Forty-Third was part, were mostly captured. The 18th Regiment was also in the same Brigade. Great solicitude is felt in regard to the fate of the two regiments, as they are mainly composed of Albanians.

PROMOTED.—The numerous friends of Wm. Lombard, of this city, will be happy to learn that he has been promoted to Second Lieutenant in the Forty-third Regiment. Lieut. Lombard enlisted last Fall as & private, and for meritorious and good conduct he has rapidly risen to his present position.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
EXTRACTS FROM A PRIVATE LETTER FROM A DRUMMER Boy in the 43d Regiment.—We make the following extracts from a letter received in this city from John Ahern, a drummer boy in Co. A, 43d Regiment, who was in the recent battles at Fredericksburg, and is I therefore able to give a correct account of the part taken by his regiment. Young Ahern has passed through several battles in each of which he has done himself credit, and proved that he was no coward. In one engagement he was I slightly wounded, and after being taken to the Washington hospital, the loyal ladies of that city, learning of his bravery, contributed a sufficient sum to purchase a handsome drum, which I has been presented to him. With this drum he now marches at the head of his company:
* * * On the 28th of April last we left camp and marched toward Falmouth. We came as far as the pontoon park, and at about 7 o'clock, P. M., lay opposite the pontoons.
At 9 o'clock P. M., the regiments moved down to the river, each regiment carrying four pontoons the distance of a mile. About 4 A. M., the next morning, a part of General Newton's division crossed the river, and drove the rebels out of their rifle pits. Among the wounded in this little affair was Col. Irwin, of the 49th Penn. Regiment. All that day we lay on the north bank of the river, and all the next day and night.
On the 1st of May, at 5 p. m., two companies, A and E of our regiment, crossed, and relieved the skirmish line of the 121st N. Y., and about 7 T. M., [sic] the whole regiment followed. That night the picket line was all quiet, but the next morning early the rebels commenced shelling. That night, at 6 P. M., we drove their skirmishrs [sic] back to the foot of their heights.
At about 1 o'clock A. M., on the morning of the 3d, we started on the road to Fredericksburg, where we arrived at daylight that morning. The 1st Chasseurs were in advance, and just as they reached the town, congratulating themselves on the easy job they had, viz., "to take the town," the rebels opened on them, wounding their Major, and killing and wounding a good many others in the regiment. They then charged, and, at the point of the bayonet, drove the rebels from the town.
The artillery them moved into the town, and commenced shelling. The action then became general. All of our siege guns on the north side of the river opened on the rebels, and they lay still, not firing a shot for a half hour.
We started to get into the town, and as we were crossing a little creek, a shell burst right in the drum corps, a second one burst in Co. C, and a third in Co. D, wounding Sergeant J. Hughes, and breaking another man's gun. Jim Hughes's wound it is hoped is not bad.
We lay on the roads around this city till 10 A. M., that day, and then got ready for the charge. That was a seeming desperate idea—two regiments to charge across an open field and up a height, in the face of a sweeping cross fire, where the celebrated Irish Brigade had been three times repulsed in the first battle of Fredericksburg; but the boys threw off their haversacks, knapsacks and canteens, and started. The 61st Penn. had the advance. The fire from the different batteries was terrific; and it was a grand and sublime sight to see those two regiments move across in the face of shot and shell, to victory or death. * * * *
The lamented Capt. Lodge at this instant fell, knocked down by a piece of shell, which struck him on the sword belt, and at the same time our brave Colonel fell, completely exhausted. This seemed to give the regiment a check, but Lieut. Col. Wilson and Major Fryer rallied the regime again, and Col. Baker and Capt. Lodge, who had only had the breath knocked out of his body, sprang into their places again.
Now commenced an exciting race between the gallant 6th Maine, 5th Wisconsin, and our regiment, to see which should get their colors in first. The brave 6th Maine were the first to plant their colors in the fort on the left of us; scarcely had their standard touched the ground, ere Captain Lodge sprang up the ramparts, and planted our colors on the redoubt which we had stormed and carried. Then cheer after cheer was echoed and re-echoed from our regiments on the rebels forts to the batteries on the hills in front of them. * * * *
The following are extracts from a letter written by the same person two weeks after the battle:
* * * As you are aware ere now, we have had some very hard fighting lately, in and around Fredericksburg, and our Light Division has been most disgracefully used, after doing the hard part of the fighting. We have not been even mentioned in the papers for it. We did all the fighting, and the 6th Corps got all the honor.
Ask any man who was engaged in those seven days' fighting what division charged and carried at the point of the bayonet those heights, from which the celebrated Irish Brigade was three times repulsed? Before which three divisions were uselessly butchered in a vain attempt to carry; and the answer is the Light Division; and that Division numbered 2,200 men.
You will understand the greatness of that charge when I tell you that the Irish Brigade numbered, when the charge was made, as much as 3,000 men, and the three divisions which charged after the Irish Brigade numbered full 6,000 men each.
We had first to take the caps off the guns, so that the men should not fire, for on the bayonet alone were they to depend. Then to move across a large open field, and up a hill some fifty feet high, in the face of a terrible cross fire of solid shot, shell, grape, canister and musketry, after which to drive the rebels, who numbered some 5,000, out of rifle pits and forts, which they considered as impossible to be tsken [sic]. We fairly astounded them, and before they recovered from their astonishment at seeing a handful of men spring in among them, the bayonet and butt of the gun were doing their terrible work.
The first man on the redoubt was the lamented Capt. Lodge, who now rests in peace; "he has gone to that bourne from whence no traveler returns." May his soul rest in heaven. He forms one of that holy band who died for their country. May their blood cement the Union stronger in the bonds of love. He died beloved by all his men, and there was not a dry eye in the company when they heard he was no more. I stayed with him till he died. He was the first on the ramparts, and planted our colors five minutes after the heights were in our possession; and the Stars and Stripes waved triumphantly over another hard-fought field.
COMPANY F, FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.—The subjoined is a correct list of the killed, wounded and missing, in Company F, (Captain Wm. Wallace) 43d, in the recent battle at Fredericksburgh [sic]
Killed.—Jacob R. Shinkle, Timothy Kelly.
Wounded.—John Hoffman, (since dead) Henry Oswald, David Connolly, Patrick Boyle, John McGowan.
Prisoners—Captain Wm Wallace, Lieut. Wm. Hastings, Orderly Sergeant Wm. Blasie, Sergeant's Wm. Hill, Henry Gunther; Corporals Michael Brown, Dennis Kerr, Frederick Brooke, Martin L. Carroll, Charles McGuire, William T. Rockfeller; Privates David Griffiths, James George, James McNamara, James Maloy, James T. Slingerland, John Thompson, Joseph Girnen, James Padden, John Kelley, Wm. Dalton, Chas. H. Grant, Wm. Chewes, Josiah Stanton, John McCormick, Lewis Boyer.

RETURNED HOME.—Lieut. William Hastings, of the 43d Regiment, who was taken prisoner at the storming of the heights of Fredericksburg, and sent to Richmond, where he was confined in Libby Prison for five days, when he was paroled and sent to Annapolis returned to this city yesterday morning. The Lieutenant is enjoying excellent health, and looks exceedingly hale and hearty. He will remain here until he is exchanged, when he will return to his regiment.

The Casualties in the 43d Regiment.
Correspondence of the Evening Journal.
CAMP, NEAR FALMOUTH, MAY 22.
At the request of parties in Albany, I enclose you a list of the killed, wounded and missing of the 43d Regiment. The list is copied from the records of the Regiment, and is as nearly accurate as it is possible to make it.
Yours, very respectfully,
C. OSBORN, Chaplain 43d N. Y. V.
KILLED.
Capt. Douglas Lodge, Co. A, May 4.
Sergt. John Henderson, Co. A, May 8.
Private Willis Helsinger, Co. A, May 3.
Private Patrick Rooney, Co. B, May 3.
Private Henry Doyle, Co. B, May 4.
Capt. H. B. Knickerbocker, Co. D, May 3.
First Lieut. Geo. H. Koons, Co. D, May 3.
Private Geo. Lord, Co. D, May 3.
Private John Caldwell, Co. E, May 3.
Private John Farrell, Co. E, May 3.
Private Timothy Kelly, Co. F, May 3.
Private Jacob R Skenkie, Co. F, May 3.
Private Phillip Severance, Co H, May 3.
Private Daniel McGee, Co. I, May 3.
Private Andrew Liddle, Co. I, May 3.
WOUNDED.
Lieut. Robert Russell, Co. A, side, May 3.
Sergt. John Slavin, Co. A, hand.
Corp. Wm. Lindsay, Co. A, arm.
Corp. Thos. Bertey, Co. A, leg.
Private Frederick Busche, Co, A, foot.
Private Hugh Guyson, Co. A, shoulder.
Private Phillip Miller, Co. A, neck.
Private John Rumph, Co. A, leg.
Private John Wilson, Co. A, leg.
Private Alex. Thompson, Co. B, hand.
Private Michael O'Herron, Co. B, leg.
Private James Larkins, Co. B, arm.
Sergt. Wm. Russell, Co. C, arm.
Corp. Michael Doyle, Co. C, hip.
Private E. Rose, Co. C, head.
Private J. McDonald, Co. C, testicles.
Private Albert Graves, Co. C, hand.
Private J. McCawley, Co. C, head.
Sergt. James L. Hughes, Co. D, shoulder.
Private Chas. Drake, Co. E, side.
Private Frank Miller, Co. E, leg.
Private Wm. Hadley, Co. E, hand.
Private Patrick Boyle, Co. F, hand.
Private David Connelly, Co. F, foot.
Private Henry Ewald, Co. F, leg.
Private John McGowan, Co. F, hand.
Private Henry Ewald, Co. F, leg.
Sergt. John Hoffman, Co. F , back, since died.
Sergt. Richard Castle, Co. G, leg.
Private George Brown, Co. G, hand.
Private W. Flemming, Co. G, foot.
Private J. H. Johnston, Co. G, hand.
Private H. C. Reid, Co. G, arm.
Corp. Lenard Lasher, Co. H, head and arm.
Corp. Fred. Swab, Co. H, leg.
Private Barney Fitzpatrick, Co. H, arm.
Private George England, Co. H, arm.
Private John Van Sternburg, Co. H, leg.
Private Alfred Gebean, Co. H, hand.
Capt. John L. Newman, Co. I, thigh.
Corp. Cyrus C. Smith, Co. I, leg.
Private Thos. Donnelly, Co. I, side.
Private James Kelly, Co. I, hand.
Private Dennis McGinty, Co. I, hand.
Private John Moore, Co. I, hand.
Private John L. Tifft, Co. I, thigh.
Corp. Edward C. Lowth, Co. K, leg.
Private Patrick O'Brien, Co. K, hand.
Private John Hays, Co. K, ankle.
Private John Stanford, Co. K, ear.
Private Alex. Morrison, Co. K, abdomen.
Private James Lyms, Co. K, back.
Private James Donlon, Co. K, head.
MISSING—May 4.
Company A. A. Moyer,
Corp. H. J. Stocking,  David Johnson.
John D. Belts,               Company F.
Thos. Gleason,                        Capt. Wm. Wallace,
Henry H. Halbert,                   Lieut. Wm. Hastings,
Henry I. Weaver,                    1st Sergt. Wm. Blaire,
John Hoy,                                Sergt. Henry Gunther,
Robert D. Heady,                   Sergt. William Hill,
George Heady,                        Corp. Michael Brown,
John Hoy,                                Corp. Fred’k Brooks,
Charles Houghtaling, Corp. Martin Carroll
Henry Long,                Corp. Dennis Kerr,
Richard H. Lawrence,             Chas. McGuire,
Orville Wolcott,                      Corp. Wm. Rockfeller,
Michael Higgins.                     Lewis Boyer,
Company B.                William Clewer,
Capt. J. W. Wilkinson,            Martin Carroll,
Sergt. John Kanary,    William Dalton,
Corp. Alexander Begg,           John McCormick,
George Allen,              James McNamara,
Carmi Buck,                James Maloy,
James Clark,                John I. Slingerland,
William Coffee,                      Chas. Grant,
William Edwards,                   David Griffiths,
Horace A. Gould,                   Joseph Givin,
Israel Secord,              Martin Flynn,
George F. Sibley,                    Edward Owen,
Joseph Snyder,                        James Padden,
Thos. N. Smith,                       John Thompson,
John Van Buren,                     James Geuge,
Richard Ryan,                         John Kelly,
Company C.                Joseph Stanton.
Copt. V.V Van Patten,           Company G.
Sergt. H. I. Wilson,     Sergt. J. H. Holton,
D. K. Doty,                             Sergt. C. H. Davis,
M. Hennifan,               Wm. H. Bulson,
James Hargraves,                    W. H. Gardiner,
Solomon Kimball,                   J. Wilson,
John McCawley,                     M. D. Johnson,
C. McKerbie,              E. Leary.
John McGrau,                         Company H.
J G. Mieers,                             Lieut. H. Van Biren,
J. Montray,                              Lieut. Jas. H. Smith,
R. Pattleton,                Sergt. John Van Buren,
James Redman,                       Sergt. W. H. Stebbins,
C. A. Seider,               Sergt. D. D. T. Hiams,
John Singleton,                       Corp. Samuel Hoag,
F. Wallace,                              Corp. Edward Ferris,
A. Wenzel,                              Leonard Arnold,
P. Kane,                                  Fred. Allmand,
F. L. Birney,                Stephen Gangel,
John Johnston,                        Philip Helker,
Company D.                John J. Kelsey,
Sergt. John McAlister,            Samuel Williams,
Corp. Wm. Dwyer,     Jacob Wheeler,
Corp. Wm. Lannigan,             John Wagner.
Wm. Butler,                Company I.
James Cripps,              Godfrey Buckner,
C. W. Dean,                Patrick Feenan.
Thos. Hosie,                Company K.
W. Keleker,                             Corp. W. H. Thompson,
M. Rogers,                              Sergt. James Lee,
J. Shields,                                Alvin E. Ainsworth,
J. Wright,                                Peter Connell,
Company E.                Aaron Cole,
Sergt. M. Noonan,                  Martin Hart,
Corp. Thos. Lee,                     William Hickey,
Jacob June,                              William H. Haber,
Edward Taylor,                       Patrick Safon,
Peter McNiney,                       John Seyman,
John Spencer,              John Lowrey,
Joseph Thompkins,      John Nolan,
Chas. Shultz,               Martin O'Conner.
Henry Himmerman,

INTERESTING LETTER FROM SERG'T.
H. J. WILSON OF THE 43d REG'T.
A March to Richmond as a Prisoner—Indignities to Dead Federal Soldiers—Their Bodies robbed and Stripped—Cowardly Treatment of our Men—Short Rations and Sharp Appetites—Secesh Women Showing Their Teeth—Paroled Prisoners Murdered by a Drunken Rebel, &c. &c. &c.
ON BOARD THE STEAMER STATE OF MAINE,
OFF CHESAPEAKE BAY.
FRIEND CUYLER—Having a few liesure [sic] moments, the first I have had since I got out of the hands of the Philistines, I avail myself of the opportunity of writing you these few lines, informing you, and the many readers of your spicy sheet, that there are 133 of the 43d on board of the fleet on its way to Annapolis, which has the paroled prisoners on, and that they are all in good health and spirits, (notwithstading [sic] the rascally Rebs. tried to kill us off, by marching, rough usage, and starvation,) and will yet make their mark again. I pity the poor secesh that falls into the hands of some of our boys, as they have sworn to have satisfaction, and get even with them. As it will undoubtedly be interesting to the readers of the EXPRESS, I will endeavor to give them a short description of our treatment while in the hands of the enemy. After the splendid successes of Sunday, and then to be gobbled up was really too bad; but such is the fate of war. We were taken Monday night while out on picket. The Rebels came upon us in overwhelming force, and it would have been madness to attempt to escape or show fight, as we were completely surrounded; in fact it was rather a surprise. How they got up to us so close, without us hearing them, I cannot imagine, as we were all wide awake, and lay stretched on the ground, listening intently, as we expected to be sacrificed, in order to let the main body get over the river safely. This was a military necessity, and the Rebels soon made us change our base from front to rear at a double-quick. After they took us they marched us to the Brick Church, the spot where the bloody battle of the night before took place, called Salem Church.
The next morning I took a short walk around the place and the sight that met my gaze was truly heart-sickening. Our dead were all of them nearly stripped, and the pockets of each turned inside out and robbed of all they contained. The Rebels had lots of greenbacks, and offered us fabulous prices for knives, watches, pocketbooks, &c. For a common knife worth 8s. in the North, they freely offered $10 and $12 in greenbacks; for a good pipe they paid some of our boys as high as $12. They made their brags that they got their money from our dead. That afternoon we fell in line and marched  eighteen miles through one of the most terrible rain storms I ever witnessed; it literally poured in torrents, lasting the balance of the afternoon and a portion of the next day. They compelled us to cross a creek up to our waists. For the life of me I could hot help laughing to see Lieut. Wm. Hastings plunge in two or three times; when in the middle of the stream he came near being carried away by the rapid current. Officers and all had to follow suit with the privates. By going down a little further we could have crossed over a bridge, but no, they said they wanted to give us Yankees a d—d good soaking. But what made matters worse, before we started, Gen. McLaws, the brute, took our woolen and rubber blankets, also our canteens and pieces of tent from us, consequently that night we had to lie on the cold, damp ground, drenched to the skin. They would not even allow us fires to dry ourselves with. Every man was shaking as if with the ague. Very few of us slept any that night I can assure you. The next morning, at daylight, we were again in motion and went to Guinea's Station, distance twelve miles, where we remained about three days. As yet we had not received anything from the Rebels in the shape of eatables, not until the next day, and then the miserable pittance of five crackers, one cup of flour, a small piece of salt junk, and a something that looked like salt; and even that had to last us two days longer. On the morning of the fourth day we again moved on to Richmond, (telling the folks on the way that we were the advance of Fighting Joe's Grand Army,) in charge of the 38th Georgia Regiment, a devilish good lot of fellows for Rebels, Capt. McCloud acting as colonel, and a splendid fellow he was. He gave us short marches and plenty of rests. After a great deal of grumbling by our men for something to eat, we at length arrived at Hanover Junction, and our eyes were gladdened with the sight of rations once more, which were soon after dealt to us, giving us a small piece of bacon and seven crackers, which had to last us four days; it was intended for two days, but we did not get anything more for four days, with the exception of what we managed to buy on the sly at fabulous prices. Up at daylight the next morning, and after a march of about ten miles, passed through the fine little village of Bowling Green. The ladies (etiquette compels me to call them such) paraded themselves in strong force, and made some very insulting remarks; one of them I can vouch for, as I heard it from her own lips, who had a very pretty face, and looked very much like a lady—it was this, that there would be another chance of getting Yankee bone rings. We stopped for the night just outside of the town; about this time the Colonel came along and asked our boys if there was any of them that could play the violin? if so, he would like him to come back to the village with him, as he said there was a Reb. dance that night, and he would give him all he wanted to eat and drink, and use him well. One of the boys availed himself of the opportunity, as the matter of food was a big consideration.
Sunday, May 10th.—A fine morning, very warm; up at 4 o'clock, and soon after on the march. (As I am spinning this out much longer than I intended when I commenced, I shall have to pass over many points and cut it short.) On the morning of Tuesday we arrived in the hotbed of treason to find the stores closed, and all the flags at half mast, in honor of the late Stonewall Jackson, whose remains were lying in State at the Rebel Capitol. After marching us through the principal streets we passed over the James River to Belle Island, where we remained for three days, and were then paroled and marched to City Point via Petersburg. Here it was where we suffered terribly. They marched us from 2 o'clock that afternoon until 9 o'clock that night, a distance of nineteen miles, giving us only ten or fifteen minutes'
rest during the whole march, and to make matters worse, it commenced to rain about __ o'clock, and continued until we stopped. Up the next morning at daylight, and marched fifteen miles, arriving at City Point that afternoon at 2 o'clock, making, in our exhausted state, the remarkable distance of thirty-four miles in twenty-four hours. Capt. Turner, who had charge of us—the black-hearted, drunken villain—killed two of our men with his sabre, and caused the death of three more by over-exertion. They marched us the whole distance without water or rest. He told me that he had orders to leave none alive behind.
Excuse the writing and composition, as it is done in a hurry. In haste, yours truly,
SERGEANT H. J. WILSON,
Co.C, 43d Reg't N. Y.S.V.

MILITARY FUNERAL.—The funeral of the late Capt. Douglas Lodge, of the 43d Regiment, took place yesterday afternoon, from the Unitarian  Church, Division street. It was attended by three German companies of the 25th Regiment, in full uniform, and Company K, Capt. Hale Kingsley, and Burgesses Corps, Capt. Thomas, in citizen's dress, wearing badges. The remains were deposited in the vault at the head of State street.
Lieut. HASTINGS, of the 43d, who, with others, was taken prisoner at Fredericksburg, has arrived at Annapolis, paroled. We presume that all the others, captured at the same time, are at the same place, if not already formally exchanged.

43d REGIMENT.
David Conley, Co. F, foot.
W. Heilsinger, Co. A, side.
C. W. Drake, Co. E, lung.
John Wilson, Co. A, thigh.
C. Philip, Co. A, head.
John L. Tift, Co. I, hip.
Martin Colile, Co. H, hand.

Letter from the 43d Regiment.
SANDY HOOK, Aug. 2, 1864.
Dear Friend—I have but a moment to devote to replying to your letter, for we are on the skedaddle all the time, taking hardly time to eat or sleep. We left Washington on the 13th of July and marched up through Maryland, crossed the Potomac at White's Ford, followed close behind the Rebels till we crossed the Blue Ridge at Snicker's Gap, where the Rebels made a stand on the south side of the Shennandoah [sic]. We looked at them a couple of days, and then we heard that Mrs. Snicker was going to move the gap, so we had to get on the other side and then put for Washington. Arrived there the 23d, got paid off and equipped, and the whole Corps went on a bum. On the 24th we all got ready to ship for City Point, but a farmer came on and said a "Confederacy" had made his appearance at the Potomac and threw his knapsack across, and would probably make a raid. So on the 26th we pulled up, and leaving two-thirds of the Corps spilled along the road, we started for Harper's Ferry, passed the Rebels, and reached Harper's Ferry on the 29th; went up the Shenandoah a little distance and camped. 30th, found that the Rebels were 20 miles in our rear, in Maryland. So up we got and ran back. The train stopped at Sandy Hook and the troops went on. I presume they will fetch up in Philadelphia or near there. The men are marched death for nothing, and the whole thing is played out. By George, Sam, don't you come back now, unless you bring several pair of extra legs. Yours, very truly,
MILLER W. GOODYEAR,
Q. M. S. 43d N. Y. V.

Local Affairs.
From the Forty-Third Regiment.
HEADQUARTERS 43D N. Y. VOLS.,
Camp Middletown, Va., Oct. 20
Messrs. Editors of Albany Daily Knickerbocker—Gents: Yesterday, the 19th inst., was another epoch in the history of this war that will add new glory to the bravery of our troops, and carry dismay to the hearts of the Southern Confederacy; and at the same time cannot but carry sorrow to many hearthstones for the brave and fallen ones, which, through the inattention and cowardice of part of our forces in the Valley, I fear was greatly increased to what it otherwise would most probably have been, had they been on the alert and promptly received the charge made on their lines. The disposition of our forces the past few days was as follows: The 8th corps, Gen. Crock's command, occupied the extreme left, and rested on Cedar Run; on the centre, and defended by breastworks, was the 19th corps, Gen. Emory's command; and on the extreme right was the 6th corps, Gen. Wright's command. Early yesterday morning, about 3 o'clock, the 6th corps was aroused by the crack of musketry on the picket line in their front, and about 4 A. M. the same sound from the left, but had no orders to prepare for action, as this fire is somewhat common of late. But here the disaster that caused so many casualties to our army occurred. The rebels had marched all night through the Luray Valley, and at early dawn crossing the Cedar Run, attacked the 8th corps before they were at all prepared to receive them, and on the first onset they fled in disorder and left their artillery, ambulances and camp equippage [sic] in the hands of the enemy, who, quickly following up their advantage, threw the 19th corps into disorder, and were it not for the bravery of the 6th corps in meeting and repulsing their vigorous assaults, farewell to the Shenandoah Valley. The battle raged for some three or four hours with great obstinacy on either side, each falling back and again advancing, when a kind of quietus was put on the matter til about 4 p. m., when our lines formed, and falling on the rebels drove them in hot haste back through Middletown and to Cedar Run, when our cavalry, taking up the charge, gave the rebels such a chastisement that they will hardly have the temerity to attack us again for hardly have the temerity to attack us again for some days. When the attack was made in the morn Gen. Sheridan was absent either in the city of Martinsburg or Winchester, and hastening to the front, he was received with wild cheering by the gallant 6th, when he said, "Now pitch in, boys; give them h--l; we will camp in our old camping ground to-night." And he was as good as his word—the troops slept where they did the night before. Among the fruits of this victory, by which we placed hors du combatat least as many of their troops as they did ours, and though surprising our for­ces on the onset, we can compare favorably with them in prisoners—the numbers I cannot at present state—but besides recapturing our ar­tillery we took from them 19 pieces, beside a large amount of wagons and ambulances; also several stand of colors. Our victory at night was complete. Gen. Sheridan is a hero. Now for the 43d. Only I would be trespassing too much on your columns, I would send you a copy ofGeneral Orders, wherein they received the thanks of the commanding Generals. Our losses you will find annexed, but we have to lament the fall of our brave old Brigadier General, D. D. Bidwell, of Buffalo, who fell while bravely leading his brigade to a charge under a withering fire of the enemy. Casualties in the 43d N. Y. Vols.: Killed—1st Serg. C. Buck, Sergt. Joseph Rafler, Co. B; Private George Johnson, Co. D. Wounded—Major C. A. Miliken, back, slightly; Capt. R. L. Annesley, head, slight; Capt. E. B. Goodyear, ankle, severe; Private Joseph Van Ness, Co. C, leg, amputated; John G. Myers, Co. C, head, slight; Horacs Hart, Co. C, knee, severe; Jacob Winder, Co. A, knee; Andrew McDermott, Co. A, head, slight; Serg. Frank Shubert, Co. E, right arm, severe; Private John E. Karg, Co. E, head, severe; Michael Nash, Co. D, knee, severe; Patrick O'Brian, Co. D, head, slight; Patrick Lyons, Co. D, arm, slight; Charles Terrell, Co. D, back, slight; Thos. N. Smith, Co. B, leg, severe; B. Fitzpatrick, Co. B, thigh; Alexander Duffield, Co. B, thigh, severe; John Moore, Co. E, hand, by himself intentionally, third time—coward. All quiet to-day.
Yours, &c., Eustace.

KILLED AND WOUNDED IN THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.—The Forty-Third regiment which was recruited in this vicinity, suffered severely in the recent battles at Fredericksburgh [sic]. The following is an additional list of the killed and wounded:
KILLED.
John Henderson, Co. A, killed.
Capt. Douglas Lodge, Co. A, killed.
Orderly Sergeant Russell, Co. C, killed.
John Caldwell, Co. E, killed.
John Ballanger, ____ killed.
Daniel McGee, Co. I , killed.
WOUNDED.
J. Thompson, Co. B, forearm, slightly.
Daniel Magee, Co. I, abdomen, seriously, by shell.
John Moore, Co. H, hand, not seriously.
H. Eswald, Co. I, knee, seriously.
G. Elden, Co. H, arm, not seriously.
J. E. Stanville, Co. H, thigh, not seriously.
Corporal L. Lasher, Co. H, arm, not seriously.
Michael O'Hara, Co. B, thigh, not seriously.
George Brown, Co. G, hand.
Seargeant Richard Costlo, Co. G, foot, not seriously.
Albert C. Read, Co. G, elbow, not seriously.
Sergeant John Hoffman, Co. F, seriously.
Alex. Thompson, Co. B, wrist, not seriously.
John Hays, Co. K, ankle, seriously.
Lieut. Robt. Russell, Co. A, hip, seriously.
Corporal Thos. Bristy, Co. A, leg, seriously.
Fred. Brischt, Co. A, foot, not seriously.
Sergeant John Henderson, Co. A, stomach, seriously.
Corporal Cyrus C. Smith, Co. I, leg, seriously.
Corporal Michael Doyle, Co. C, thigh, seriously.
Jacob Bunstuft, Co. A, ankle, seriously.
Corporal W. Lindsay, Co. A.

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—The Albany Regiment, Col. Vinton, left New York for Washington on Saturday.
Hancock's Brigade—which suffered so severely in the fighting near Williamsburgh [sic], is composed of the 5th Wisconsin, Col. Cobb; the 6th Maine, Col. Knowles; the 49th Pennsylvania, Col. Irwin; and the 43d New York, Col. Vinton.
At a meeting of the officers of the 25th Regiment, N. Y. S. N. G., held on the 13th instant, the following resolutions were adopted:
Resolved, That this regiment has heard, with deep sorrow, of the death of one of its late members, Capt. Douglass Lodge, of the 43d N. Y. S. V., who fell gloriously in defence of his country's flag and honor, at Fredericksburg.
Resolved, That we sincerely sympathize with his parents and family in their hour of bereavement. That as a mark of respect to his memory the regiment will attend his funeral and perform for him the last sad rites of a soldier.
Resolved, That these resolutions be published, and copies thereof be transmitted to the family of the deceased.
DAVID FRIEDLANDER,
JACOB FREDENDALL,
HALE KINGSLEY,
JAMES I. JOHNSON,
Committee.

FROM FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.
CAMP OPPOSITE FREDERICKSBURGH [sic],
May 5th, 1863.
DEAR SIR:—The Forty-Third has suffered severely—about 100 wounded—say 20 killed.
Capt. Knickerbocker, killed.
   "        Lodge, killed, (embalmed.)
Lieut. Koons, killed.
   "        Russell, injured.
Capt. Wallace, prisoner.
   "        Van Patten, "
1st Lieut. Gilfillan, "
2d    " Lombard, "
These two companies were on picket.
Field and staff officers safe. Col. Baker, bravest of the brave, led ten charges.
The 6th Corps took yesterday 2,000 privates (rebels,) 1 Brig. General, 20 Captains, 30 Lieutenants.
A tremendous shower has separated the combattants [sic] after a fight of seven days. It was the most desperate fighting of the war.
Yours, &c. C.

 

The Casualties in the 43d.
THREE CAPTAINS AND SEVENTEEN OTHERS KILLED—A HUNDRED WOUNDED—TWO COMPANIES CAPTURED.
The following letter was received by Gen. JOHN F. RATHBONE last evening:—
CAMP OF SIXTH CORPS, HOSPITAL,
OPPOSITE FREDERICKSBURG, May 5.
Gen. John F. Rathbone, Albany:
The 43d has suffered severely. About one hundred wounded, say twenty killed. Capt. Knickerbocker, killed; Capt. Lodge, killed; Lieut. Koonz, killed; Lieut. Russell, injured; Capt. Wallace, prisoner; Capt. Van Patten, prisoner; Lieut. Gilfillan, prisoner; Lieut. Lombard, prisoner. Two companies (on picket) prisoners. Field and staff safe. Col. Baker, "bravest of the brave," led two charges.
In haste, MEIGS CARR,
Surgeon 43d Regiment.
The Sixth Corps took, yesterday, 2,000 private Rebels, a Brigadier General, 20 Captains, 30 Lieutenants.

CASUALTIES IN THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.
Among the wounded in the recent battles we notice the names of the following members of the 43d Regiment:—
Charles Drake, Co. E.
David Connelly, Co. F.
J. Thompson, Co. B, forearm, slightly.
Daniel Magee, Co. I, abdomen, seriously.
John Moore, Co. H, hand, not seriously.
H. Eswald, Co. I, knee, seriously.
G. Elden, Co. H, arm, not seriously.
J. E. Stanville, Co. H, thigh, not seriously.
Corp. L. Lasher, Co. H, arm, not seriously.
Michael O'Hara, Co. B, thigh, not seriously.
George Brown, Co. G, hand.
Sergt. Richard Costlo, G, foot, not seriously.
Albert C. Read, Co. G, elbow, not seriously.
Sergt. John Hoffman, Co. F, seriously.
Alex. Thompson, Co. B, wrist, not seriously.
John Hays, Co. K, ankle, seriously.
Lieut. Robert Russell, Co. A, hip, seriously.
Corp. Thomas Bristy, Co. A, leg, seriously.
Fred. Brischt, Co. A, foot, not seriously.
Sergt. J. Henderson, A, stomach, seriously.
Corp. Cyrus C. Smith, Co. I, leg, seriously.
Corp. Michael Doyle, Co. C, thigh, seriously.
Jacob Runstuft, Co. A, ankle, seriously.
Corp. W. Lindsay, Co. A.
John Caldwell, Co. E, dead.
The New York papers contain the following additional:—
WOUNDED.
Capt. John L. Newman, thigh.
MISSING.
Captain John W. Wilkinson.
Captain William Wallace.
Captain William L. Thompson.
Captain Y. V. Van Patten.
First Lieutenant William Hastings.
First Lieutenant Hiram Van Beuren.
Second Lieutenant ____ Smith.
Enlisted men killed, 11; wounded 51; missing, 241.
When SEDGWICK found it necessary to cut his way to the river, the Times correspondence says:
The Forty-third New York and Seventh Maine were left at the extreme right, near a cross-road, to keep up a show, while the remainder of the corps retired across Banks Ford. The force commenced crossing at 11 o'clock Monday night. The enemy succeeded in getting in the rear of the pickets of these two regiments, took them before they fired a gun, then moved down upon the Sixth Maine, which fired a volley, repulsing them, and then retreated to Banks' Ford, together with the Forty-third New York, reaching it in safety being obliged to make their way through brush and slushing. Haines' Battery did fine execution, and lost but one man.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
Letter from Capt. Burhans, of the 43d.
COPY OF EXTRACTS FROM A PRIVATE LETTER FROM CAPT. DAVID BURHANS, CO. H, 43D REGIMENT, NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS. SAFE SIDE OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK,
NEAR BANKS' FORD, May 5, 1863.
DEAR BROTHER—Our "Light Division" has been at all sorts of work just a week. I will commence by saying that last Tuesday we left our camp and marched all day, and at night our regiment carried seven pontoons down to the Rappahannock, when the 2d Division of our Corps crossed on them and drove the rebs out of their rifle pits. We rested Wednesday, Thursday and Friday—crossed Friday night—were shoved in front on picket and drove their pickets in on Saturday night—marched to the right towards Fredericksburgh [sic] and entered the place about sunrise Sunday morning, taking a dose of canister from a battery as we crossed a hollow, wounding four and killing one in our regiment, and knocking two or three rifles to pieces in my company; but hurting no one. We laid in the city till about 12 o'clock, when we got orders to charge the works in the rear of the city, at the very spot where the Irish Brigade lost their men in December. As we had to cross a bridge, we were compelled to double-quick in four ranks. The 61st Penn., of our Light Division, were sent in just ahead of us. As we got out of the city, the most murderous fire that you can imagine was opened on us, principally spherical case shot and musketry, with some shell. The Colonel of the 61st Penn. was killed before we crossed the bridge, when they broke, holding us in check, under a fire which no soldiers could stand, when our regiment broke and fell back to the city. The 83d N. Y. was in our rear and their Major, I think, got about seventy-five men to follow him. Capt. Knickerbocker and Lieut. Koonz were killed in this charge. We rallied a few men and the 43d planted the first colors in front of us. Col. Wilson led this squad, with some other line officers. I carried George Koonz in the shade, and rallied a few men and caught up to our colors, when our regiment took the advance of the whole of Sedgwick's command. I took out a few skirmishers and captured a Second Lieutenant and three privates. We then halted and most of the army passed us, batteries and all, leaving the works we had gained empty.
That night (Sunday) there was a fearful fight, but our division was held in the reserve, as we had done the charging. So early yesterday morning we went to the right and picketed, our right running down to the river. I was here kept in on the support. Capt. Lodge was killed early in the day. We held this point until last night at 10 o'clock, when our pickets were driven in—most of them running in without firing—pressed by a good force of rebels, who gave us a good volley, which was returned by the 6th Maine, that regiment (the best in the service) just coming up to support us. Our regiment here lost 150 men, Captains Wallace, Van Patten and Thompson, Lieut. Hastings and my two Lieutenants (Van Buren and Smith) taken prisoners. I have this morning two Sergeants, three Corporals and thirteen privates, out of five Sergeants and forty-six men in file. I know of but one being killed, six wounded, and the rest are missing. Philip Severance, of Albany, was killed, and Corporal Lasher has a slight wound in the arm. As I gave my boy my money before I went in on the charge, I am afraid I am out $270, as he may be a prisoner; still I have hopes of seeing him again, as he is stout and resolute. I have the sword that I took from the rebel officer, which I consider quite a trophy. I don't know where we are going, whether over the river or back to camp. Sergeants Huyck and Frederick are with me. No Bethlehem boys hurt that I knew of, excepting Corporal Lasher.
Your brother, DAVID BURHANS.

The arrangements for the care of drafted men at this rendezvous are now perfected. The war department have assigned squads of men and officers to take charge of the men, who have drawn Uncle Sam's prizes. There are six men and three officers selected for this work from the following regiments:
5th N. Y. Artillery, 10th N. Y. Artillery, 53d N. Y. Vol., 49th N. Y. Vol., 109th N. Y. V., 141st, and 43d N. Y. V., and 13 commissioned officers placed over these. Similar detachments a re to come from each other N. Y. regiment in the field.
Lieut. GEO. W. JOHNSON has been appointed to the charge of the barracks, by Capt. LIVINGSTON. The present barracks occupied are those near the old Fair Ground. The various companies of cavalry being raised here are occupying the same quarters.—Elmira Advertiser.

CAPT. JOHN E. NEWMAN.—We are glad to learn that Capt. NEWMAN'S wound is not serious. He has written a letter to his brother, from which we make the following extracts:—
"I am wounded slightly in the side—a flesh wound. It bled some; but I will not be inconvenienced by it.
"Capts. Wallace, Thompson and Van Patten and Lts. Hastings and Van Buren are prisoners.
"The Regiment is very much reduced, and tired out."

Departure of Col. Vinton's Regiment.
The FORTY-THIRD Volunteer Regiment, Col. F. L. VINTON, have received marching orders, and will leave this city, by steamer, at four o'clock this afternoon. The regiment numbers 570 men, and is composed of the following companies:—Co. A, Capt. JOHN WILSON; B, Capt, VAN SLYCK; C, Capt. GRIFFIN; D, Capt. CLARK; E, Capt. ROGERS; F, Capt. JACOB WILSON; G, Capt. MATTHEWS. The regiment will be filled up on its arrival in New York. We believe that with the exception of Col. VINTON, the Field Officers are yet to be appointed. Major JAMES H. BOGART, of this city, is the Adjutant, and Dr. CASE the Assistant Surgeon.
Colonel VINTON is the son of Major VINTON, who found a hero's grave in Mexico. His uncles, the Rev. Dr. VINTON, Rector of Trinity Church in New York, and Major VINTON, Assistant U. S. Quartermaster-General at New York, naturally feel the greatest interest in his success. He is a graduate of West Point, and of the School of Mines, in Paris. He was engaged in engineering in South America at the breaking out of the rebellion. He at once resigned his position there, came to New York and immediately offered his services to Gov. MORGAN, was accepted, has spent his entire time since in organizing his command, and now proceeds today to the field, where we are sure he will give such an account of himself as will justify the high expectations of his friends. (Journal, July 16, 1861)

DEPARTURE OF THE 43D REGIMENT.—Col. Vinton has received orders for the immediate departure of the Regiment under his command for the seat of war. It is now stationed at the Barracks, and numbers about seven hundred rank and file. It is rumored that the Regiment will leave in a boat chartered expressly for them this afternoon, while on the other hand those attached to it say that it is impossible for the men to get ready in so short a notice. Upon arrival in New York their number will be further increased by the addition of four companies recruited in that city. Their departure from this city will revive the recollections of the scenes enacted during the months of May, June and July, and afford the Police an opportunity of accomplishing that which they have frequently attempted but never as yet accomplished—of driving out of the streets all vehicles through which the Regiment may pass.

LEAVE FOR WASHINGTON THIS MORNING—The 43d Regt. N. Y. S. V., Col. Baker, received orders yesterday morning, to return to-day  forthwith, and will leave for Washington this morning at 8 o'clock,
The 93d Regt. N. Y. S. V., Col. Crocker, will leave for Washington at 6 o'clock this morning.

ARRIVAL OF COLONEL VINTON'S REGIMENT.
Colonel Vinton's regiment arrived here yesterday afternoon from Albany, on their way to the seat of war. They came in the steamer McDonald and a barge which she brought in tow, and landed at the foot of Robinson street, North river. From thence they marched to the Park to the music of their drum corps, and partook of a substantial repast provided for them. They seem to be equal to the average of our troops in appearance, and are fairly drilled. They mustered some 700 men. They will probably proceed to Washington to-day or to-morrow.

THE FORTY-THIRD (ALBANY) REGIMENT.
Some few inaccuracies occurred in our list of the officers of this regiment. C. H. Piersons is Lieutenant Colonel and C. Mersereau is First Lieutenant of Company I. (Sep. 25, 1861)

Death of William C. Rodgers.
The following letter was received by Mr. Charles H. Rodgers of this city, brother of the late Wm. C. Rodgers, who was killed in one of the recent sanguinary battles before Richmond, from Capt. Charles H. Clark, of Co. D, 43d Regiment, N. Y. V., of which company deceased was a member.
CAMP NEAR HARRISON'S LANDING,
July 12, 1862.
To Charles H. Rodgers:
Sir. I received yours of the 8th and hasten to reply.
I am grieved to inform you that the report of your brother's death is only too true. We had been drawn up in line of battle all day on the memorable 27th day of June, when about five o'clock in the afternoon the enemy with a heavy force attempted to turn our position, with a view probably, of cutting off the retreat of Gen. Porter across the Chickahominy. Our regiment (43d) hrld [sic] the right resting on the Chickahominy, with two regiments of Vermonters to support us, if necessary.
For one hour and a half we were subjected to a terrific fire of musketry without cessation. In about the middle of the action the enemy appeared to to be preparing for a charge, when we fixed bayonets. At this moment the enemy poured in a murderous volley. It was at this time your brother fell mortally wounded.
The men fought desperately, and the enemy were repulsed, and our men cheered, and your brother raised himself up and faintly cheered with the rest. As brave a soldier as ever stood in action, now lies beneath the sod. He died while being conveyed to the hospital in an ambulance, since which time, owing to rapid movements. I am unable to inform you what disposal was made of his body. All I can say, he was taken to the Trent House Hospital, which the next day fell in the possession of the enemy,
Yours truly,
CHARLES H. CLARK.

KILLED AND WOUNDED IN THE 43D AND 44th REGIMENTS.—The following is a list of the killed and wounded in the above regiments as far as heard from:
Forty-Third Regiment.—Wounded, Col. Johns Wilson of this city; J. Van Buren, scalp; Louis Fisher, side; Joseph Secord, thigh; Peter Firman, shoulder; Cyrus Sailsbury, arm; William Coffee, foot; Frederick Otto, knee; Chas. Lee, groin; W. E. Shoddy, shoulder; H. McCaffrey, side; Chas. Miller, leg; Henry Reed, leg; James Clark, thigh; Philip Reitmeyer, ankle; J. G. Porter, finger; Philip Hibel, shoulder; W. Heppinger, arm; Henry Somers, finger.

KILLED AND WOUNDED.—The following is a correct list of the killed, wounded and missing of Co. K, Forty-third regiment, (which was recruited principally from West Troy,) in the terrific battles of the Wilderness, as the Advocate learns from a private letter from Captain Thompson to a gentleman in that place:
Killed—Corporal Edmond C. Lowth, privates Thomas Conroy, John Keough, John Casey.
Wounded—Capt. W. L. Thompson, foot; Sergeant Jas. A. Gregg, leg; Sergeant W. H. Ainsworth, foot; Corporals Wm. H. Laws, thigh; Jas. H. Kegan, side; P. F. Chevalier, side; privates Lewis Bashaw, neck; Alex. Morrison, side; Timothy Stanford, side; Francis Lyman, neck; John Nolan, shoulder; Jas. Lyons, hand; Milo Killam, hand.
Missing—Corporal Patrick Lynch, privates John Lyman, Peter Connell, Patrick Lafou.

FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT (COLONEL VINTON) NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.
OFFICIAL REPORT OF KILLED AND WOUNDED IN THE ACTION OF JUNE 27TH, 1862.
Killed.
Co. D—Levi Boomhower, Wm. C. Rogers.
Co. G—Athanaums Gitzgibbons.
Wounded.
Co. A—Private Henry S. Long, slight in hand; Private James F. Hogan, severely—died at Savage Station.
Co. B—Sergeant Ferdinand H. Kraft, shoulder, severe; Private Terrence McManus, abdomen, severe—died June 28; Private Dennis Daly, slight, shoulder.
Co. D—Private William Butler, ball through thigh; Private Amenso Bogart, face, severe; Private Thomas H. Dwyer, ball through thigh; Private John O. Grady, arm and chest, severe; Private Charles Stevens, arm, slightly; Private
John Tracy, foot, slightly.
Co. E—Corporal Cornelius Van Alstine, cheek, severe; Private James Gordon, legs, slight.
Co. G—First Sergeant William Russell, arm and hand, slight; Corporal Monckton Somers, leg, severe; Corporal John Niels, wrist, slight; Private Frederick Koch, shoulder, slight; Private Patrick Donnelly, hip, slight; Private Hugh O. Hare, leg, slight; Private Edward Rose, arm, slight; Private Henry Seeley, leg, slight; Private Matthew Shearer, leg, slight.
Co. H—Sergeant Miles Goodyear, hand, slight; Private William Tompkins, arm, slight; Private John Sayres, leg, slight; Private Jeffrey O. Connell, arm, slight; Private Augustus Bassett, scalp, slightly.
Co. I—Corporal Elisha Litchfield, arm, slight; Private Wiley Ward, finger, slight; Private John Miller, finger, slight.
Co. K—Private John A. Herran, ankle, slight; Corporal Charles F. Robinson, face, severe—wounded June 30th.

List of Killed, Wounded and Missing.—We continue to-day our list of killed, wounded and missing in the 43d Regiment:
Killed—Corporal David Landers, Co. C.
Wounded—Capt. J. W. Wilkinson; Lieut. E. D. Goodyear; Lieut. Henry Shutters, a resident of the 10th Ward; Sergt. John Van Buren; Sergt. Mee; Corp. Biscey; Corp. Laws; Privates, Peter Rollam, Co. H; C. L. Frister, Henry Garrison, T. H. Smith, Peter Frink, L. Arnold, John J. Hesley.
Missing—Lieut. Wm. Blaisie.
In the 44th Regiment we notice the names of Lieut. C. H. Zeilman. Privates Wm. W. Allen; S. W. Burroughs, Co. E; Wm. Gammel, Co. I; Henry Lamfier, Co. I ; John T. Johnson, Co. C; D. E. Watkins, Co. C; Stephen C. Dye, Co. C; D.J. Moulard, Co. F.

FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.
The officers of this Regiment all escaped unhurt. Wm. C. Rodgers, of Co. D, (Capt. Clark) was killed, as was also Levi Boomhower, of Westerlo. John Desmond and John O'Grady, mortally wounded. Wm. Butler, John Tracy, Thos. Dwyer and Menses Bogart are also among the wounded.

PERSONAL,—Capt. Charles S. McEntee, of the 43d Regiment, formerly a clerk in the store of Daniel Harris, on Green street, arrived in town yesterday. He is now acting as Quartermaster and Commissary to the Artillery Brigade, and highly esteemed by not only the officers of his own department, but by the Government at Washington. To show how the latter appreciates his worth and integrity,  we would state that he has no less than fire millions of dollars worth of property under his immediate charge. He has become an indispensable institution in his department of the army, and we are proud of it. Long may he remain so.

PRESENTATION .—The members of Americus Engine Co. No. 13 are to give, at their engine house, this evening, a grand ball, in honor of Wm. Lombard, formerly Assistant Foreman of the Company, and now a Lieutenant in the 43d Regiment, to which he was connected since the war broke out. The members of the Company, on this occasion, will present him with a complete Lieutenant's uniform, consisting of a dress coat, vest, pants and cap; also an elegant sword, sash and belt.

CAMP NEAR BRANDY STATION, Nov. 10, '63.
Editors of the Albany Evening Journal:
By order of the Colonel Commanding, I forward the inclosed [sic] official list of casualties in this Regiment, in the late action at Rappahannock Station. The 43d New York and 5th Vermont did the skirmishing for the Second Division.
KILLED.
Sergt. Stuart G. Morehead, Company I.
Sergt. John H. Christopher, Company G,
Corp. John Taylor, Company E.
Private Lewis Boyer, Company F.
WOUNDED.
Sergt. Walter Davis, Co. K, shoulder, slightly.
Corp. James Farrell, Co. B, thigh, severely.
Priv. David S. Johnson, Co. E, leg, severely.
Priv. John Spencer, Co E, shoulder, seriously.
Priv. James Dougherty, Co. E, side, slightly.
Priv. Henry Simmons, Co. I, cheek, slightly.
E. B. GOODYEAR,
Lieut. and Act. Adj. 48d N. Y.

Local Intelligence.
ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
From the Forty-Third Regiment.
CAMP IN THE FIELD, NEAR RICHMOND.
FRIEND—Being out on picket duty, and having nothing to do for an hour or two, I avail myself of the opportunity to drop you a few lines.
Since the battle of Williamsburg we have had things pretty easy, marching but four or five miles a day, and some days none at all. We are advancing but slowly on towards Richmond, but I think the move is sure for our success. At Williamsburg we were very near the river York, and for the last two weeks we have been on the banks of the Pomunkey river, a little crooked river that runs into York river at West Point, the first place we landed troops after the battle of Williamsburg. There was any quantity of transports in the river, with supplies for the army of the Potomac, and it was a gratifying sight to witness so many old Albany boats in the stream, and also some of the Albany boys,—as firemen and deck hands.
We are now in a part of Virginia that is magnificent. Farms of 1000 to 2000 acres all under cultivation in wheat, corn and potatoes; but a great deal of it is destroyed by us as we encamp very often in the centre of a beautiful wheat field.
The "sacred soil" is desecrated, as the rebels say, by the d—d Yankees, but they dare not make a stand to keep us back; they keep on to the advance of us to Richmond. I suppose you have heard much of the battle of Williamsburg and of the 43d Regiment. It was indeed a terrible battle, and great was the slaughter on both sides; but the rebels lost the greater number. They left a great number of their dead and wounded on the field, and we found them lying in the woods for a number of days after the battle. On Sunday we started from Lee's Mills, near Yorktown, and made our way towards Williamsburg, where we arrived on Sunday night. We then made a reconnoisance in the woods to the front of their breastworks; it being dark we did not make an attack, but we charged and fired in going through the woods and drove in their pickets, and caused them to spike two heavy guns in one of the forts. We slept on our arms in the woods that night, after marching fifteen miles, and in the morning, May 5, the battle commenced by Hooker's Division opening on the left, while Smith's Division (ours) was held as a reserve. The battle raged hot until the afternoon, when part of the reserve was called, and our brigade was sent through rain and mud, knee deep, through swamps, wood and brush, which was perfectly awful; and to cap the climax, we had nothing to eat for three days but eight hard biscuit, and nothing to drink but dirty war. When we arrived we were pretty well used up. Our Regiment was sent to the left in a thick wood, to cover part of Hooker's men, and the balance of the brigade was drawn up in line of battle to the right. The enemy had the best position, both right and left, and they had a chance which they tried to improve, of flanking our men, when Hancock arrived on the field, and by his movements prevented it.
They then formed in the woods, intending to fight us under cover, but Hancock knew a trick worth two of that, so he gave the word "Advance," which we did for about 100 yards. He then gave "About Face,'' and commenced to retreat slowly, which brought the rebels out of the woods with the cry of another Bull Run. We then had the order, "About Face," the enemy advancing steadily, equally as steady as ourselves.
The grand part of the battle now commenced, and then the great charge of Hancock's Brigade decided the battle and gave us the victory of Williamsburg, with the loss of many a noble soul. The victory would have been still more complete if reinforcements had been sent in time to cut off their retreat from Williamsburg. General ____ was to blame for it, I believe, but bad roads had a good deal to do with it, and McClellan should have been on the ground five hours sooner than he was. Something kept him back, and just as he came on the field the battle was one. You may believe that the air resounded with the cheers that went up from the throats of the soldiers, amidst the roar of artillery and bursting of shell.
The sight the next day was awful to behold, the dead thrown in holes, in piles, while arms, legs and different parts of the body were promiscuously thrown together and covered up, without a friend to turn a sod upon their remains; and then to go through the hospitals and see the wounded, and limbs, amputated, lying in heaps for burial. In some you would see the dead that had just drawn their last breath—there they lay, dead and dying together—rebels and Union men—those that had fought to preserve, and those that had fought to sever the Union lay dead, dying and wounded together, in nergo pens, log houses and barns.
The sight was sickening in the extreme. I never want to witness the like again, but if the enemy make a stand at Richmond, if we live and escape the dangers of war, I suppose that the sight will be still worse, for then there will be two mighty armies in the field. It will be the death struggle of rebellion. Our cavalry is now within a few miles of Richmond, and I think you will soon hear of some heavy work from the Army of the Potomac. While I sit in the woods now, writing, I can hear the booming of heavy guns on the York or James river, which is probably from our gun boats, feeling their way up towards Richmond. The weather is very warm here and getting more so daily.
Yours, W. C. R.

The Late Capt. Wilson.
We have received a detailed account of the meeting held by the officers of the Ninety-third regiment, in camp near Brandy Station, March 24th, 1864, on the announcement of Capt. Wilson's death in New York. Major McConihe called the meeting to order, and after announcing the sad intelligence paid the following tribute to the deceased Captain:
"Noble, kind and generous in his nature, sympathizing and benevolent, he was a true friend and brother to us all. To his company he was a father. So warm-hearted and genial was he, such a friend to us all, that all who knew him loved him and no enemies had he. The lonely and weary wayfarer, roofless and homeless, always found a bed in Capt. Wilson's tent, a seat at Capt. Wilson's table. His heart was open to the private soldier as well as to the officer, for he had no feeling of caste. He was a true and practical philanthropist and humanitarian, a modest, unassuming, self-abnegating man, a true patriot, a brave soldier, an efficient and capable officer. My brother officers, we all lament and deplore his loss. We shall mourn him ever and for aye, and his name we shall ever carry deeply enshrined in our hearts. Never shall we forget him; ever shall we remember him, and our love for him shall never die!"
The following preamble and resolutions were subsequently adopted:
"Whereas, We have this day received the mournful intelligence of the death of Hiram S. Wilson, Captain Ninety-third New York volunteer infantry, which occurred on the night of the 23d inst.; therefore,
"Resolved, That we deeply deplore the loss to our regiment and to the army occasioned by the decease of our brother-in-arms, Capt. Hiram S. Wilson. By his death, this regiment has sustained an irreparable loss, his brother officers lose a warm-hearted, generous and honorable friend and genial companion, and our country, a brave and chivalric officer.
"Resolved, That the commissioned officers of the regiment wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days, and that the regimental colors be draped in mourning for the same length of time.
"Resolved, That we sincerely sympathize with the family of the deceased in their great affliction, and forward a copy of these resolutions to them as an expression of our sympathy; and that a copy be forwarded to the leading newspapers for publication."
Remarks were subsequently made by Capts. Johnson and Barnes, who feelingly testified to the high moral character and kind nature of the deceased soldier. Col. Crocker said:
"I have known Capt. Wilson well for some fifteen or twenty years, longer and perhaps better than any of you. I know the pure and noble sentiments that actuated his life. I know what warm and generous impulses ever stirred his manly heart, that now, alas, lies cold and motionless in death; his high and lofty patriotism, and strong and holy integrity of purpose. He was one of the few we meet in our life-journey, whose heart and right hand of fellowship is extended to each and all, high or low, rich or poor. With you I mourn him most deeply, most sadly, for he loved us all, every one of us. I know it well and truly. Identified as he was with this regiment from its organization, his heart was bound up with it, as well as it could be with any one thing. He cherished its honor and its fame as his own. Never would he admit that it had its equal in the service. His high moral nature rebelled at anything wrong or unjust. While in Washington at one time, he took with him a number of his soldiers to entertain them at one of the leading hotels. Some objections were made to the presence of common soldiers in that aristocratic locality. But Capt. Wilson's generous nature rebelled at such unjust treatment of the nation's defenders, and indignantly declaring that what was too good for his men was too good for him, he compelled these shameless would-be aristocrats to evince an appearance at least of common justice and politeness. God bless such Nature's noblemen who have in their very souls that great knowledge 'that all men are born free and equal.'"
Lieut. William L. Bramhall, Acting Adjutant of the regiment, then said:
"The stranger whom he might meet, however cold and repulsive he might be, was immediately warmed into new life by the cheerful and kindly countenance or the warm and soul-stirring shake of the hand of Captain Wilson. He was one of those few and singularly constituted men who had not an enemy and who was the friend of all. A little incident came to my notice about a year ago, which well illustrates his character. I casually met a friend of mine, a Lieutenant whom I had not seen for several years. In the course of the conversation, he told me that toward the close of the seven days' battles he threw himself down under a tree by the roadside, wasted by fever and nearly dead from his sufferings and fatigue. He was taken up by Captain Wilson, a perfect stranger to him, who took him to his own quarters, placed him upon his own bed, and nursed and nourished his worn-out frame until so far recovered that he returned to his regiment. My friend told me, and I doubt not, that Captain Wilson saved his life."
On motion, it was unanimously
"Resolved, That a committee be appointed to confer with the widow of the deceased for the erection of a suitably-inscribed monument to the memory of the late Capt. Hiram S. Wilson, by the officers of this regiment."
Col. Crocker appointed Captains D. E. Barnes, Edson Fitch, Henry C. Newton, Nathan J . Johnson and John Bailey, to constitute such committee.
The meeting then adjourned.
COMMON COUNCIL, May 17.—PRESENT—Mayor Perry, Recorder Paddock and a quorum.
After roll call, the Mayor said:—
GENTLEMEN OF THE COMMON COUNCIL—The sad events of this war have taken from our midst another brave, devoted and gallant soldier, whom we were wont to meet in fraternal relations.
It has pleased God in His mysterious providence to remove by death our much esteemed fellow-citizen, Col. JOHN WILSON, of the Forty-third Regiment, New York State Volunteers, who died from the effects of wounds received at a recent battle in Virginia, while gallantly charging in the late battle of the "Wilderness, thus adding another name to the already long list of Albany's noble sons who have laid their lives a voluntary sacrifice upon the altar of our country; therefore,
"Resolved, That we recognize in Col. WILSON a young man of the rarest excellence of character, whose gentlemanly deportment, unassuming manners and social virtues endeared him to all who shared his acquaintance, and who, although surrounded by all the endearments of the most pleasant home, hesitated not when his country called to sacrifice every personal interest, sever every endearing tie, and exchange the comforts of a happy home for the hardships of the tented field.
Resolved, That his was no ordinary sacrifice. That those who knew his circumstances and relations in life best, cannot but appreciate the pure, unselfish, devoted patriotism that prompted him to enter a career where, personally, he had everything to lose and nothing to gain.
Resolved, That in his death our country has lost one of her most earnest, faithful defenders, our city one of its brightest ornaments, his widowed mother a most dutiful son, and his weeping sisters a loving brother.
Resolved, That we deeply sympathize with the bereaved family in their severe affliction, and while we share with them the sorrow, we may also share the abiding consolation that the 1oss to us of one so Noble, pure and virtuous, cannot be other than his eternal gain.
Resolved, That to his remains and memory are eminently due the highest respect that a city can pay to one of her most valiant sons.
Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to make all necessary arrangements for the funeral of the lamented Col. WILSON, on the day to be appointed after the arrival of his remains, and that the members of the Common Council will attend his funeral in a body, and wear the usual badge of mourning.
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be signed by the Mayor and Clerk, and sent to the family of the deceased.
The resolutions were adopted, and Ald. Amsdell, Johnson, Tracey, Judson and Bancroft, were appointed the Committee of Arrangements,
Ald. JOHNSON moved the appointment of a committee to draft suitable resolutions on the death of General Rice and Major Wallace, to report at the next meeting; also, that the Board attend the funeral of General Rice in a body.
[Adopted, and Alds. Johnson, Bancroft and Kennedy were appointed such committee.

Col. John Wilson.—The report that the brave commandant of the 43d Regiment was wounded, caused considerable regret among our citizens. He was among the first of our citizens to move when the rebellion first broke out, and as Captain and Major of the gallant 43d, was in every battle on the Peninsula, displaying the greatest courage and bravery. Subsequently he was made Colonel, and the recent fight was the first into which he led his men since he be their head and front. He never received a scratch before, and the earnest prayer of all is, that if wounded, he may soon recover.

The remnants of Colonel Wilson arrived this morning, and the funeral will take place Sunday afternoon. Due notice will be given.
L. G. BANCROFT,
Sec. of Com. of Arrangements.

FUNERAL OF THE LATE COLONEL JOHN WILSON.—Funeral services will be held to-morrow afternoon (Saturday) at the residence of the mother of the late Col. John Wilson, after which the remains will be taken by a detachment of the Burgess Corps to the Capitol, where they will remain until Sunday noon, guarded by the Corps.
The remains will be brought from the Capitol at 2 o'clock on Sunday afternoon by the Corps and taken to the Pearl Street Baptist Church, of which the deceased was a member. The public services at the Church will be conducted by the Pastor. After this the remains will be taken to the Cemetery under escort of the Twenty-fifth Regiment, Col. Church, and interred in the family grounds.

FUNERAL OF COL. WILSON.—A meeting of the committee of the Common Council appointed to make arrangements for the reception and burial of the remains of Col. Wilson, was held in the Mayor's Office, City Hall, Monday evening, Ald. Amsdell in the chair, and Ald. Bancroft acting as secretary. Representatives from the several fire companies, 25th Regiment and Burgesses Corps were present.
The Board of Foremen met last evening to take action with reference to a parade of the Fire Department on the occasion of the funeral.
Col. W. S. Church was selected as Grand Marshal.

At a regular meeting of the Clinton Lodge, No. 7, I. O. of O. F., held at their rooms in Cooper's Building, Thursday evening, May 20th, 1864, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously passed:
Whereas, it has pleased the Almighty Maker of the Universe to take to himself our beloved companion and Brother, Col. John Wilson, who fell with his face to the enemy while nobly fighting for his Country; be it, therefore
Resolved, That while we bow with submission to the will of Him who doeth all things well, we can never forget the many virtues which characterized his noble nature--a true patriot, a brave soldier and a loving son--has shed his blood upon our Country's altar--
"Green be the sod o'er the young hero's grave."
Resolved, That our heartfelt sympathies be offered to the family of our deceased Brother, and may they receive consolation from a Divine Providence.
Resolved, That we attend the funeral of our deeply lamented Brother, and that a copy of the above be published and transmitted to the family of the deceased.
R. H. COZZENS, N. G.
J. E. Weaver, Sec'y.

FUNERAL OF COLONEL JOHN WILSON
—A meeting of the Committee of the Common Council appointed to make arrangements for the reception and burial of the remains of Col, John Wilson, was held in the Mayor's Office, City Hall, last evening, Alderman Amsdell in the Chair, and Alderman Bancroft acting as Secretary. Representatives from the several fire companies, Twenty-fifth Regiment and Burgesses Corps were present.
The Board of Foremen decided to call meetings of their respective companies this (Tuesday) evening, to take action in regard to a parade by the Department.
A committee was appointed to consult with the family of deceased as to the propriety of having the body deposited in the Receiving Vault for the present.
Col. Church was selected as Grand Marshal.
Col. Baker, who visited the battle field of the Wilderness in quest of the body of our gallant and lamented townsman, Col. John Wilson, of the Forty-third Regiment, succeeded in his mission, and it was stated at the meeting that he left Washington on Sunday morning with the body of the deceased. It was expected here this morning, but a delay occurred on the route, and it is probable that the remains will not reach this city until to-morrow morning.
The time has not yet been fixed upon for the funeral, but it will probably take place either on Thursday or Friday afternoon.

The Late Col. John Wilson.
Capt. Terrell, of the 43d Regiment, who went to Washington with expectation of being permitted to go forward in search of the body of the late Col. John Wilson, of this city, returned home Saturday afternoon, having failed to accomplish the object of his visit. He ascertained from the wounded members of the 43d in the hospital, that the Colonel was shot in the leg and suffered greatly from the loss of blood before amputation was performed. He was so much weakened by the excessive bleeding of his wound that death soon ensued. Shortly after an order was received directing the regiment to push forward without delay; but two of the members remained behind to inter his body. They dug a grave and buried him in his overcoat. They placed a board at his head to denote where he was placed, and then hurried forward to join the regiment. This was in the Wilderness, and as many more of our brave heroes were buried there, it was deemed impracticable to proceed there; but Col. Baker, formerly in command of the regiment, obtained a pass to go forward, and it is fervently hoped he will be able to accomplish the purpose in view. He will, undoubtedly, encounter many difficulties in the performance of his duty, and may not succeed in his mission.

ARRIVAL OF THE REMAINS OF COL. JOHN WILSON.—The remains of the gallant and heroic Col. John Wilson arrived yesterday morning in the steamer Hendrik Hudson, and were taken in charge by a detachment of the Burgesses Corps. They were taken in the afternoon to the late residence of the deceased, where they will remain until Sunday noon, when they will be brought down to the Pearl street Baptist Church, where the funeral services will take place in the afternoon.
The funeral escort will consist of the Twenty-fifth Regiment, under the command of Col. Church. The Burgesses Corps, of which the deceased was a member, will act as a guard of honor. The funeral will be under the direction of the Committee of the Common Council. It is expected that the entire Fire Department will unite with the military in paying funeral honors to one of our late and noblest citizens.
Col. Baker, who arrived here in charge of the remains of Col. Wilson, says the delay in getting the body arose from some technical difficulty with regard to the flag of truce. He experienced no difficulty in finding the grave. He learned that the very best of care had been taken of the deceased from the time he was wounded until his death. He suffered greatly from his injuries, but all that could be done to alleviate his sufferings was done.

ENLISTED AS A PRIVATE.—Among those enlisted yesterday by Captain Terrell, of the 43d Regiment, was William N. Middlebrook. Middlebrook was formerly a member of the Police Department. He served under Captain Conway, in the 4th precinct, at a time when there were about twenty burglaries committed in a week in that district. Finally, the perpetrator of these crimes was "copped to rights" through the vigilance of Middlebrook. The burglar was subsequently tried, convicted and sentenced to prison for five years. We allude to this circumstance in order to show that Middlebrook was a shrewd and efficient officer, and that he should have been retained on the force. But his politics or something of the kind went against him, and when the present law went into effect he was decapitated, as were many other worthy officers.
Well, about two years since, the subject of this article went off as a non-commissioned officer in the 43d Regiment. He served faithfully for several months, and was finally rewarded for his bravery by receiving a commission as a Lieutenant. A short time since he obtained a leave of absence for fifteen days, to visit his family in this city. He remained here a few days over his time, never suspecting that he was committing any grave military offence. But it turned out that he was mistaken. A couple of days ago he received a Washington paper containing a list of officers dismissed the service for absence without leave—among which he found his own name recorded. Instead of stopping to inquire into the whys and wherefores for being thus unceremoniously relieved of his shoulder straps, Middlebrook was determined on serving his country in her time of need, and, to prove his loyalty and good faith, enlisted, as the caption of this paragraph denotes, as a private in the 43d Regiment, under his old commander, Col. John Wilson, of this city. Whether as a private in the front rank, or as a commissioned officer, Middlebrook is bound to make his mark on the flank of the enemy. May success attend such a soldier, say we.

THE LATE WILLIAM B. ORR.--At a special meeting of the Directors of the Knickerbocker Base Ball Club, held June 4th, 1864, the following preamble and resolution were presented by Mr. R. V. De Witt, Jr., and unanimously adopted:
Whereas, God in His infinite wisdom, has taken from the world William E Orr, one of the founders of our Club, and has pronounced his work finished, when to us it seemed that his career of usefulness had just commenced; and
Whereas, This Club has lost one of its most prominent members, and each of us as members a valued comrade and friend; therefore be it
Resolved, That while we recognize the truth that each of us must die and return to dust, we rejoice that man is capable of noble sacrifice, and that individual death may minister to a nation a life.
Resolved, That in the death of our comrade, we acknowledge the afflicting hand of God; but we rejoice that one of our number has so faithfully acted the part of a patriot and soldier, while we mourn that his life has been a necessary sacrifice for the defence of our afflicted country.
Resolved, That we tender our sympathies to the relatives of our deceased friend in their deep affliction.
M. V. B. WINNE, President; N. D. WENDELL, GEO. P. WHITNEY, Secretaries.

ALBANY REPUBLICAN ARTILLERY.
To the Memory of Lieut. Col. Fryer, 43d Regiment N. Y. S. V.
At a meeting held on Monday evening, May 16, the following preamble and resolution were adopted:
Again we are called to mourn the loss of a brother member; one who has endeared himself to us by ties of friendship; who, when the first battle cry was raised, joined with us in the true spirit of patriotism in saving our National Capitol. He it was who, in our first advance on Arlington Heights, leading the van, ordered the first rebel met on that dark night to surrender, thereby showing he was truly in earnest. When, on the return of our regiment, after a three months' service, he went out with the 43d Regiment, Col. Vinton, shouldering his musket (although qualified to command), it was not a selfish ambition, but true love of country, that led him on, from the ranks to Lieutenant, from thence to Major, and finally to Lieut. Colonel, in each and every position of which he won the love of the rank and file, the confidence and esteem of the officers. After the lamented Wilson fell, he led them on, and when pierced with the bullets of the enemy and lying on the bloody field, he still encouraged his men to advance. He died a soldier, and while we offer our sympathy to the family for their only boy, we feel that he has gone to a better and brighter world. May God sustain them in their affliction.
Resolved, That the Company will unite with the villagers of Greenbush to pay the last sad tribute of respect to the remains of the deceased, and that a copy of this preamble and resolution be sent to the family of our late comrade.
Capt. J. S. POCHIN,
Lieut. W. V. COLKOSE,
Sergt. M. V. B. MOORE,
Sergt. C. T. HEALEY,
S. B. DIAMOND,
Committee.
P. S.—Such members of the 43d as are in the city are invited to join with us in attending the funeral of the deceased. They will please meet at the armory to-day (Friday), at 1 P. M., at the room of Company A. J. POCHIN, Captain.

MAJOR FEVER HEARD FROM.—It was reported that Major Fryer, of the Forty-third, had been killed in the battle of "the Wilderness;" but it will be seen by the following letter, written by him on the 10th, that he was wounded, but is doing well:
FREDERICKSBURGH, Va., May 10.
Dear Father—I take this, the first opportunity, to inform you that in the action of last Friday I received three wounds—one through the right shoulder, the neck and the right arm. They are not considered dangerous, and I am doing well. We are now in Fredericksburgh [sic], and will probably be sent to Washington as soon as possible. Lieutenant Cavanagh has lost his left leg. John Alendorf is shot through both thighs [sic]. Col. Wilson received a wound from which he has since died.
Maj. JOHN FRYER, 43d Vol.
Per S. H. LINCOLN, Adjutant.

REMAINS OF COL. WILSON.—Col. BAKER who arrived here this morning in charge of the remains of Col. WILSON, informs us that the delay in getting the body arose from some technical difficulty with regard to the flag of truce. He experienced no difficulty in finding the grave. He learned that the very best of care had been taken of the deceased from the time he was wounded until his death. He suffered greatly from his injuries, but all that could be done to alleviate his sufferings was done.

FUNERAL OF THE LATE COLONEL JOHN WILSON.—Funeral services will be held to-morrow afternoon (Saturday) at the residence of the mother of the late Col John Wilson, after which the remains will be taken by a detachment of the Burgess Corps to the Capitol, where they will remain until Sunday noon, guarded by the Corps.
The remains will be brought from the Capitol at 2 o'clock on Sunday afternoon by the Corps and taken to the Pearl Street Baptist Church, of which the decased [sic] was a member. The public services at the Church will be conducted by the Pastor. After this the remains will be taken to the Cemetery under escort of the Twenty-fifth Regiment, Col. Church, and interred in the family grounds.

CAPT. WILSON'S FUNERAL.—The imposing military and civic display, added to the immense concourse of friends and spectators present at the funeral of the late Capt. Wilson yesterday afternoon, have not been equaled [sic] on any similar occasion for a long time past. The body, which had lain in state at the Common Council room since Saturday morning, was removed to the Third street Baptist church about 3 o'clock. That spacious edifice was literally packed. In the central pews were the mourners, officers and soldiers from the Albany barracks, the Troy City Artillery, officers of the Twenty-fourth regiment, Col. Levin Crandell and Major Hyde, of the One hundred and twenty-fifth regiment, Colonel John McConihe, Capts. Vaughn, Snyder and Tarbell, and Lieuts. W. H. Merriam and Clark Smith, Adjutant of the One hundred and sixty-ninth regiment, several officers, representatives of the old Second regiment, Mayor Thorn and several other prominent city officers, and the Masonic Fraternity, represented by Apollo, King Solomon's and Mount Zion Lodges, who turned out in large numbers. The side pews and galleries were filled with spectators. Dr. Baldwin's remarks were exceedingly brief, but admirably adapted to the occasion. He dwelt with particular impressiveness upon the suddenness of the decease. Only a week ago he had met the lamented soldier at the wedding of a friend in Troy, and he never had appeared so stalwart, so strong, so healthy, as at that time. In five days afterwards he was a corpse. Dr. B. also adverted to the fact that while we all know that death must come to us sooner or later, none of us are aware of the exact time and place when the blow will fall. This gallant soldier had anticipated death on the battle-field; he had braved the dangers of swamp and bullet, and had fallen far from scenes of danger, at a time when he least expected it. Dr. B. paid a generous tribute to the character of the deceased, as a citizen, a soldier, a husband and a father. After a hymn by the choir—Mr. Huntington presiding at the organ—the friends were afforded an opportunity to inspect the features of the corpse, as it laid in front of the pulpit. About an hour was occupied in this ceremony, and it was past five o'clock before the procession started for Oakwood cemetery, preceded by Doring's Band. A shower of rain came up—driving away the hundreds of men and women who had assembled in front of the church and along the route of the procession. At Oakwood, the usual vollies were fired over the grave, (at the receiving vault,) and the impressive ceremonies of the Masonic Order were fully carried out. Dr. Baldwin also performed religious services.
—The suddenness of Capt. Wilson's attack and death were alluded to by Dr. Baldwin, yesterday. The New York Herald says that the deceased was poisoned by the bite of a rat. On Tuesday, he discovered a slight pimple on one of his fingers, which was thought to be a mere trifle at first, but which soon caused Capt. Wilson the most painful suffering. His whole arm became black, and from the symptoms presented, it is supposed he was poisoned by the bite of a rat, dog, or some other animal of that character. Hart's Island is said to be infested with rats of the most daring and venomous character, and hence it is deemed probable that Capt. Wilson has been the victim of a rat bite. Several doctors were called in; but, notwithstanding all the efforts made to save him, Capt. Wilson expired on Wednesday morning while sitting in a chair and perfectly conscious. The affair caused the most profound sorrow among all the officers on Hart's Island, as Capt. Wilson was much beloved and esteemed for his good qualities as an officer and a man. Gen. Jackson, the commandant of the post, considered the deceased as one of his best and most efficient officers. The commissioned officers on Hart's Island held a meeting on Thursday, and adopted appropriate resolutions.

ORDER OF ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE FUNERAL OF THE LATE COL. JOHN WILSON, SUNDAY, MAY 29TH, 1864, AT ALBANY, N. Y.—The line will be formed at 2 o'clock P. M. The Police Department will form on North Pearl street, right on Maiden lane. On the left of the Police Department, Burgesses Corps. The Twenty-fifth regiment, National Guard, will form on North Pearl, right on State. Tivoli Hose Co. will form on State, right on Pearl. Clinton Lodge No. 7, I. O. O. F., on the left of Tivoli Hose. On the left of Clinton Lodge No. 7, the relatives of deceased, the Governor and Staff, and State and other Civic Associations and Citizens.
The Mayor and Alderman on State, right on Chapel street. The Fire Department will form on State, right on Lodge street.
The procession will move in the followingorder at 2 1/2 P. M.:
Police Department, under command of Chief
Johnson,
Twenty-fifth Regiment N. G. S. N. Y., Col. Church, as escort.
Hearse, flanked by Burgesses Corps as Guard of Honor, Capt. Donovan.
Military Mourners.
Tivoli Hose Company as Mourners.
Clinton Lodge No. 7, I. O. O. F. as Mourners,
Relatives.
Governor and Staff.
State Officers.
Fire Department, under Chief McQuade.
Other Civic Associations.
Citizens.
The line of march will be up North Pearl street to Clinton avenue, down Clinton avenue to Broadway, up Broadway to the north bounds of the city, where cars will be furnished for the military.
W. S. CHURCH,
Grand Marshal.

THE LATE LIEUT. COL. FRYER—AT a meeting of the citizens of the village of Greenbush, held at the Boston House, May 17th, to make the necessary arrangements for the funeral of the late Lieut. Col. FRYER, on motion, Hon. Martin Miller was appointed Chairman, and S. P. Diamond, Secretary of the meeting.
The Chairman, after stating the purpose of the meeting, paid, in a few well-timed and appropriate remarks, a glowing tribute of respect to the memory of the deceased.
Mr. Fairchild offered the following preamble and resolutions, which were adopted:
Whereas, We have heard with feelings of profound regret of the death of our worthy and esteemed young friend and fellow-citizen, John Fryer, who was wounded while gallantly leading his men at the battle of the "Wilderness," on the 6th day of May inst., as Lieutenant Colonel of the Forty-third Regiment New York State Volunteers, with the Army of the Potomac; and
Whereas, Although we recognize in this dispensation of an All-Wise and Omnipotent Creator the sorrowful hand of affliction, still we can point with pleasure and admiration to the career of this noble and self-sacrificing young man. Upon the first call of the President for troops to put down this accursed rebellion, which is now hovering like a vulture over our beloved country, he joined the Twenty-fifth regiment N. Y. S. M., volunteering as a private in the Albany Republican Artillery, in which he was an honored member, serving a period of three months, gaining for himself in that short time an enviable reputation as a man and a soldier.
On the expiration of his term of service he returned home, and immediately proceeded to raise a company to be attached to the Forty-third Regiment, with the expectation that, in the event of his success, he would be Captain, but in consequence of the great emergency in which the War Department was then placed for men, an order was received by the Regiment to proceed at once to the seat of war, thus depriving Col. Fryer of sufficient time to get the requisite number of recruits to entitle him to the captaincy. Nothing daunted, however, but with a zeal and patriotism worthy of emulation, he joined the ranks and went to the front, a second time shouldering a musket, and in the very company which he had helped to recruit, where, by his correct deportment and sterling military qualifications he was speedily promoted to a Lieutenancy.
Through the recommendation of his superior officers, he was again promoted to the majority and lastly to that of Lieutenant Colonel of the Regiment in which he had served with such distinguished ability for nearly three years, having been attached during all that time to the Army of the Potomac, enjoying all its honors, and necessarily engaged in all its battles. He had steadily pursued the course of an earnest and devoted advocate of his country's cause. A {person of undaunted courage he was ever ready and willing to encounter danger when duty called, as is shown by the heroic manner of his death. Therefore be it
Resolved, That in his death his parents are called upon to mourn the loss of a dutiful son, his sisters an affectionate brother, his friends a worthy companion, and his country a tried and true defender.
Resolved, That we earnestly and sincerely sympathize with the family and friends of the deceased in this their hour of adversity, not doubting that He who controlleth the destinies of all created beings will restore peace to their troubled minds.
Resolved, That the citizens of Greenbush are respectfully requested to attend the funeral of our lamented friend, and would recommend the closing of their places of business during the passage of the cortege through the village, as a lasting tribute of respect to his memory.
Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolutions, suitably engrossed and signed by the Chairman and Secretary, be transmitted to the family of deceased.
On motion, a committee of seven were appointed to make arrangements for the funeral, consisting of the following gentlemen:—Jones Whiting, S. P. Diamond, Hiram Drum, George Benedict, James H. Miller, William Van O'Linda and Martin Miller.
On motion, adjourned. S. P. DIAMOND, Secretary.
The funeral of Lieut. Col. Fryer will take place on Friday, 20th instant, at 2 o'clock P. M., from the residence of his father (Rail Road House,) East Albany.

DEATH OF MAJOR WILLIAM WALLACE, OF THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT N. Y. V.—At the first regular meeting of Albany Typographical Union No. 4 held since the sad intelligence was received, the following were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, We have learned, with deep sorrow, of the death of our former President, Major WILLIAM WALLACE, who was killed, whilst in the performance of his duty, during the recent brilliant movements of the Army of the Potomac; therefore,
Resolved, That the lamented deceased was endeared to us by the purity and gentleness of his character, respected for his unobtrusive talents, and admired for his unselfish patriotism.
Resolved, That by his death our country has lost an ardent defender—our city a public-spirited and honorable citizen; and our Society an energetic and useful member.
Resolved, That we sincerely sympathize with the widow and relatives of our deceased friend in their great affliction—trusting that the nobleness of his death, in defence of his country, may, in a measure, alleviate their sorrow.
Resolved, That the charter of this Union be draped in mourning for the usual period; and that these resolutions be transmitted to the family of the deceased, and duly spread upon the minutes.
GEO. W. QUACKENBUSH, President.
JAMES O'SULLIVAN, Recording Secretary.

Death of Col. Visscher.
Another hero has fallen. Col. JAMES D. VISSCHER, of the Forty-third New York State Volunteers, is reported killed in the recent fight before the Northern defences of Washington.
Col. VISSCHER was every inch a soldier. He loved the profession for its own sake and for the sake of the noble cause to which it was dedicated. He was accustomed to the rigors of the drill-room from boyhood, and was master of all the details of military rules and evolutions long before he had attained his majority. At the outbreak of the war he was employed as Bookbinder in the establishment of WEED, PARSONS & Co., and went out as Second Sergeant in Capt. KINGSLEY'S Company (Burgess) which followed the Twenty-fifth regiment. The term of that regiment having expired, he returned home and resumed his situation, which he held until the following Summer, when he re-entered the service as Captain in the Forty-third regiment. Since that time he was continually in the service, and participated in many of the severest engagements of the war. He rose to the rank of Major; subsequently to that of Lieutenant Colonel; and, on the death of Col. WILSON, became Commander of the regiment. But whether as Sergeant or Colonel, he was everywhere and at all times the undaunted Soldier and the unselfish Patriot. He was conspicuous for his gallantry where every man was a hero, and extorted praise from his superiors for his courage and coolness in the moment of supremest danger.
Col. VISSCHER was not only a brave soldier but a chivalrous and high-toned gentleman. He had a noble scorn of everything mean and selfish, and embodied in his daily life and practices the best elements of manhood. His death will carry sorrow to many hearts beyond the circle of his family; for he had the qualities of head and heart which endeared him to all who came in contact with him.
FUNERAL OBSEQUIES OF THE LATE COL. VISSCHER.
To take place on SUNDAY, July 24th, 1864, at 2 o'clock P. M., from the North Pearl street Baptist Church.
The precession will form on North Pearl street at 2 o'clock P. M., left resting on Maiden Lane, and move in the following order, preceded by Schreiber's Band:
The 25th Regiment N. G. S. N. Y., Lieut. Col. Cassidy commanding.
HEARSE,
flanked by the Burgesses Corps as Guard of Honor.
Military Mourners.
His Excellency the Governor and Staff.
The Major, Recorder and Aldermen.
Citizens.
The line of march will be up North Pearl to Clinton avenue, through Clinton avenue to Broadway, up Broadway to Thac_er street. By order of
Lieut. Col. CASSIDY, commanding.

HEADQUARTERS 25TH REGIMENT N. G. S. N. Y.,
ALBANY, July 22d, 1864.
General Orders, No. 12.
The 25th Regiment N. G. S. N. Y. is hereby ordered to assemble on Sunday, July 24th, at 1 o'clock P. M., fully armed and equipped, at the Regimental Armory, to escort the remains of the late Lieut. Col. VISSCHER to the Cemetery. By order of
Lieut. Col. CASSIDY, commanding.
J. M. Kimball, Adjutant.

MILITARY FUNERAL —The funeral of the late Colonel James D. Visscher, of the Forty-third regiment, N. Y. Vols., who was killed while nobly leading his regiment into battle near Washington, took place yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. On Saturday afternoon the remains were escorted to the Capitol by a detachment of the Burgesses Corps, where they remained in state until 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon, when they were escorted to the Pearl street Baptist Church. The funeral services in the church were of a most solemn and imposing character. At the conclusion of the services in the church, the body was brought out, placed upon an open catafalque, drawn by six grey horses plumed, and t he funeral cortege moved in t he manner laid down in the order of arrangements. The bearers were Col. Harcourt, Col. Johnson, Col. Friedlander, Col. Ainsworth, Col.Chamberlain and Col. Woodhall. The Governor and staff, Mayor and Common Council were in carriages. The Twenty-fifth regiment, under command of Lieut. Col. Cassidy, turned out in goodly numbers and presented a fine appearance. The same may be said of the Burgesses Corps. Tivoli Hose, of which deceased was a former member, also attended in a body, wearing their uniforms. A special train was provided on the Northern railroad, which conveyed the military and firemen to the Cemetery.

FUNERAL OF COL. VISSCHER.—The funeral of the late Col. James D. Visscher, 43rd regiment, took place yesterday afternoon. The body remained in state at the Capitol until 2 o'clock, when it was escorted by a detachment of the Burgesses Corps to the Pearl street Baptist Church, where the funeral exercises took place. The services in the church were of a solemn and impressive character. At the conclusion of the ceremonies in the church, the funeral procession was formed and moved through Pearl street, Clinton avenue, Broadway and Spencer street to the Northern Railroad, where a special train was in waiting to convey the participants to the Cemetery. The bearers were Col. Chamberlain, Col. Ainsworth, Lieut. Col. Woodhall, Col. Harcourt, Col. Friedlander and Col. Johnson. The 25th Regiment turned out strong, as also the Burgesses Corps and Tivoli Hose Company, of which companies the deceased was formerly a prominent member.

FUNERAL OF COL. VISSCHER.—The funeral of the late Co. James D. Visscher, of the Forty-third regiment, New York Volunteers, who was killed while nobly leading his regiment into battle near Washington, took place yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. On Saturday afternoon the remains were escorted to the Capitol by a detachment of the Burgesses Corps, where they remained in state until 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon when they were escorted to the Pearl Street Baptist Church. The funeral services in the Church were of a most solemn and imposing character. The address by Rev. Mr. Bridgman was marked with depth of thought, and was such as the times and the occasion demanded.
At the conclusion of the services in the Church, the body was brought out, placed upon an open catafalque, drawn by six grey horses plumed, and the funeral cortege moved in the manner laid down in the order of arrangements. The bearers were Col. Harcourt, Col. Johnson, Col. Friedlander, Col.  Ainsworth, Col. Chamberlain and Col. Woodhall. The Governor and Staff, Mayor and Common Council were in carriages. The Twenty-fifth Regiment, under command of Lieut. Col. Cassidy, turned out in good numbers and presented a fine appearance. The same may be said of the Burgesses Corps. Tivoli Hose, of which deceased was a former member, also attended in a body, wearing their uniforms. A special train was provided on the Northern Rail Road, which conveyed the military and firemen to the Cemetery.
At a meeting of the members of Co. F, 3d Infantry N. Y. Vols., held in the entrenchments near Petersburg, Va., the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, It has pleased the Almighty Ruler of the Universe to remove by the hand of death our esteemed and beloved comrade CHARLES GROUNDS, and
Whereas, We have always found him during his stay a sincere friend and true patriot, as well as a brave and gallant soldier; therefore
Resolved, That in the death of CHARLES GROUNDS we are called upon to sustain the loss of a dear friend and brother soldier, one who has always commanded our admiration for his abilities and integrity as a soldier, and our esteem as a gentleman, for the uniform courtesy which marked his intercourse with all.
Resolved, That while we deeply deplore his early death we sympathize sincerely with his bereaved family, and we shall cherish the fond recollection of his many acts of kindness when living.
Resolved, That the above preamble and resolutions be published in the ALBANY MORNING EXPRESS and that a copy be transmitted to the family of deceased.
JESSIE W. KENTER, WILLIAM HOESTON,
GEORGE SUTTER,    PATRICK COSTIGAN,
FRED’K VAN VESS   Secretary.

Col. Visscher. —In speaking of the death of the gallant and lamented Col. James D. Visscher, 43d regiment, the Journal of last evening says:
Col. Visscher was every inch a soldier. He loved the profession for its own sake and for the sake of the noble cause to which it was dedicated. He was accustomed to the rigors of the drill-room from boyhood, and was master of all the details of military rules and evolutions long before he had attained his majority. At the outbreak of the war he was employed as Bookbinder in the establishment of Weed, Parsons & Co., and went out as Second Sergeant in Capt. Kingsley's Company (Burgesses), which followed the Twenty-fifth regiment. The term of that regiment having expired, he returned home and resumed his situation, which he held until the following Summer, when he re-entered the service as Captain in the Forty-third regiment. Since that time he was continually in the service, and participated in many of the severest engagements of the war. He rose to the rank of Major; subsequently to that of Lieutenant Colonel; and, on the death of Col. Wilson, became Commander of the regiment. But whether as Sergeant or Colonel, he was everywhere and at all times the undaunted Soldier and the unselfish Patriot. He was conspicuous for his gallantry where every man was a hero, and extorted praise from his superiors for his courage and coolness in the moment of supremest danger.
Col. Visscher was not only a brave soldier, but a chivalrous and high-toned gentleman. He had a noble scorn of everything mean and selfish, and embodied in his daily life and practices the best elements of manhood. His death will carry sorrow to many hearts beyond the circle of his family; for he had the qualities of head and heart which endeared him to all who came in contact with him.

In Memoriam.
At a special meeting of Tivoli Hose Co., held at their Carriage House on Saturday evening, July 16th, 1864, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, In the inscrutable providence of God, this Company has again been called upon to mourn the loss of one of its members, Lieut. Col. JAMES D. VISSCHER, who gave his life while nobly battling for our Nation's Capital.
Whereas, In the death of JAMES D. VISSCHER the ties that bound us together have now been severed; a sincere friend, and active fireman and a true patriot, one who has laid his life down on his country's altar has, we trust, ere this been the recipient of an everlasting crown of never fading brightness "in the mansions of the skies."
Resolved, That while contemplating with admiration and pride the example furnished by the deceased, of conscientious devotion to the Union, we deeply lament the too early death of one whose cultivated mind and pure character gave promise of so much usefulness and distinction. Among his fellow citizens his daily life was eminent for uprightness and manly bearing. Knowing the magnitude of the sacrifice at which he entered upon the career of arms, we venerate the heroism and constancy of one who was capable, when his country demanded his service, of exchanging the delights of a home, where he had ever been an object of the tenderest affections, for the hardships, the perils and the sufferings of the camp and the field.
Resolved, That we tender to the parents and friends of the deceased our heartfelt sympathies in the affliction which this melancholy event has brought upon them, and that we invoke ... behalf the consolations which enabled our departed brother to meet it with Christian fortitude and resignation.
Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolutions be sent to the family of deceased, and that they be published in the papers of the city.
ALAN F. HILL, Secretary.

Letter from J. E. McElroy, Esq., at Fredericksburg.
Mr. McElroy, now in Fredericksburg nursing the wounded, sends a note to his brother, giving, in addition to what we published yesterday, the following:
FREDERICKSBURG,
Friday Evening, May 20, 1864.
Sergeant Lemuel Warren, of battery B, 7th, is killed. Royal Schermerhorn, F, wounded in hand. Sergeant James A. Reynolds, of Guilderland, M, right finger shot off. Private Davis, M, ball through head, and dead.
Capt. Davidson, 43d New York, is in town sick, but improving, and only wants rest. About eighty privates and four officers remain. Officers well, viz: Capt. Visscher, Capt. Van Patten, Lieuts. Reed and Russell.
Faverill, of the 146th New York, arm off. In hospital here and is doing well.
Swan, of Greenbush, of the 44th, wounded in knee and doing well.
Albany is represented in attendance upon the wounded as follows: Mr. Hagur, Mr. C. Humphrey, Dr. Henry March, Dr. Wilson, Dr. Griffin, Rev. Mr. Bridgeman, Rev. Mr. Twombly, Mr. G. W. Carpenter, Dr. Comfort, Mr. Butler, Mr. J. E. McElroy, Mr. James McClure, and all are diligently employed, early and late.
Capt. Geo Dawson, of the Second Artillery, is reported uninjured. The regiment fought well.

General Orders No. 8.
HEADQUARTERS 25TH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. N. G.,
ALBANY, May 26, 1864.
With sad emotions the Colonel Commanding announces to you the death of Col. John Wilson, another son of Albany, who has fallen on the bloody fields of Virginia, while fighting bravely at the head of his command, the 43d Regiment, N. Y. S. V, He was greatly distinguished for his valor on the field and his virtues and worth as a citizen. He has died in the discharge of his duty as a soldier, and deserves at our hands the highest mark of respect.
The Regiment, therefore, is hereby ordered to assemble at the Regimental Armory on Sunday, May 29th, at 1 o'clock in the afternoon, fully armed and equipped, for the purpose of attending the funeral and paying to his memory the highest military honors due to the rank, valor and worth of our deceased brother.
WALTER S. CHURCH,
Colonel Comd'g 25th Regt., N. Y. S. N. G.
J. M. KIMBALL, Adjutant.

ORDER OF ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE FUNERAL OF THE LATE COLONEL JOHN WILSON, SUNDAY, MAY 29th, 1864, AT ALBANY, N. Y.—The line will be formed at 2 o' clock P. M. The Police Department will form in North Pearl, right on Maiden Lane. On the left of Police Department, Burgesses Corps. The Twenty-fifth Regiment National Guard will form on North Pearl right on State. Tivoli Hose Co. will form on State, right on Pearl. Clinton Lodge, No. 7, I. O. O. P., on the left of Tivoli Hose. On the left of Clinton Lodge, No. 7, the relatives of deceased, the Governor and Staff, and State and other Civic Associations and citizens. The Mayor and Aldermen on State, right on Chapel. The Fire Department will form on State, right on Lodge. The procession will move in the following order at 2 1/2 o'clock p. m.
Police Department, under command of Chief Johnson,
Schreiber's Band.
Twenty-fifth Regiment N. G. S. N. Y., Col. Church, as escort.
HEARSE,
flanked by the Burgesses Corps, as Guard of Honor,
Capt. Donovan.
Military Mourners.
Tivoli Hose Company as mourners.
Clinton Lodge, No. 7, I. O. O. F., as mourners.
Relatives.
Governor and Staff.
State Officers.
Fire Department, under Chief McQuade.
Other Civic Associations.
Citizens.
The line of march will be up North Pearl street to Clinton avenue, down Clinton avenue to Broadway, up Broadway to the north bounds of the city, where cars will be furnished for the military.
W. S. CHURCH, Grand Marshal.

Local Affairs.
AUTHENTIC LIST OF THE KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING IN THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.
—The following authentic list of killed, wounded and missing in the 43d Regiment New York State Volunteers, we have received from Capt. James D. Visscher, who is now in command of the gallant old 43d Regiment. The casualties below reported are up to the 15th inst. This act of Capt. Visscher should be held in kind remembrance by all persons who have friends in the 43d:
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.
Killed, May 5th—2d Lieut Theodore S Bailey,
Co A. May 6th—Lieut Col John Wilson;
Capt Wm Wallace, Co F.
Wounded, May 5th—1st Lieut John Cavanaugh, Co B, leg amputated. May 6th—Major John Fryer, arm, shoulder and lung, since dead; Capt John W Wilkinson, Co B, leg, missing; Capt Wm G Rogers, Co D, leg slightly; Capt Wm L Thomson, Co K, foot severely; 1st Lieut Edward B Goodyear, Co D, foot severely; 1st Lieut James H Smith, Co H, leg slightly; 1st Lieut John Barnett, Co E, leg slightly. May 10—2d Lieut Thomas Lynch, Co E, leg slightly. May 10—1st Lieut and Adjt Chas Milliken, leg slightly.
Missing—1st Lieut Henry Shutter, Co A, 1st Lieut William Blasie, Co F, May 6; Capt David Burhans, Co H, May 10.

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF.
Wounded—Sergt Major John B Carter, May 10, slightly.

ENLISTED MEN KILLED.
May 5th—1st Sergt David Meal, Co A; Corporals David Landers, Co C, Daniel K Doty, Co C, Edward C South, Co K, Wm H Hand, Co K; Sergt Wm Marshall, Jr, Co I; Privates Leonard Porter, Co A; Alexander H Smith, Co B, Daniel Sands, Co B, Chas I Dorr, Co C, Chas L Frister, Co H.
May 6th—Privates John Conway, Co A, John Campbell, Co A, John H Edwards, Co A, Joseph Snyder, Co B, Taylor Durkee, Co B, Benj G Kearaey, Co E, James Patten, Co F , Thomas Justice, Co G, Peter F Chevateer, Co K, Thos Conroy, Co K, John Casey, Co K, John Kough, Co K, Geo W Mallery, Co E, May 12.

ENLISTED MEN WOUNDED, MAY 5TH, 1864.
Company A—Privates Peter Flansburgh, wrist; Augustus Hagen, left hand slightly; John Porter, left hand; Philip Brightmeyer, foot and cheek severely; Fred Otto, knee; Sam June, leg slightly; Rody Dougheny, hand slightly; Hiram Alger, hip severely; Thomas Beatty, head severely; Philip Hibel, hand and breast severely. Co B—Corp Carmi Buck, head; Privates Wallace Gutchins, side severely; Chas F B Lieb, hip severely; David McGallon, left side severely; Henry Reed, foot slightly; Rich Ryan, hand; Wm Heppinger, shoulder; Joseph Secord, leg. Co C—Thos Birney, right hand; Frances Wallace, hand. Co D—Jos Kinstel, right hip severely; Henry McAllister. Co E—Wm H Shoudy, breast severely; Chas Miller, left leg; Cornelius Van Alstyne, shoulder. Co F—Michael Dempsey, side; Wm Dalton, nose; John Kahn, hand severely. Co G—John Grace, hand. Co H—1st Sergt John Van Buren, head slightly; John Hisley; Henry Garrison. hip; Philip H Smith; Peter Tallmann, arm. Co I —Henry Simmons, hand; John Moore, finger.
Co K—Corp James H Keegan, back severely; Lewis Bashau, cheek slightly; James Leahey, wounded May 6, 1864. Co A—Cyrus Salsbury; Joseph B Smith, shoulder severely; Henry McCaffrey; David Hainer, breast; Richard Lawrence. Co B—Sergt John Allendorf, hip slightly; Corp Alex Beggs; Thos H Smith; James Clark; Wm Coffee, hand; Wm Edmonds, knee; James O'Brian, foot; John Van Buren, hand; Co C—Cornelius McKellie, left arm; Nicholas Sturma; Corp David Morehead, John Smith; Albert Graves. Co D—Corp John G Geegan; John Wright. Co E—Sergt Sam Kelso, mouth severely; Sergt Jas Leary, Corp Jerome Hill, Corp Jonas Race, Corp James H. Dedrick, Harry Brondo, Frank Jolly, James McGee, Wm B Rice, Stephen Socks. Co F—John I Flood, head; John Kelly, left leg severely; Josias Stanton, Patrick Boyle, John B Rogers, James F Slingerland, Jas McNamara, Jas O'Loughlin. Co G—Ed Leavey, both legs slightly; Wm H Guardinier, arm severely; Thos Mulcahy, head slightly; Charles Berry. Co H—Peter Fish, Max Schindler, Leonard Arnold. Co I—Corp Augustus Eickle, arm severely; Thos Donohoe, hand slightly; Michael Mulcahey, hand slightly; George Smith, hand slightly. Co K—1st Sergt Jas A Gregg, wounded and missing; Sergt Wm H Ainsworth, right foot; Alex Morrison, side; Jas Lyons, left hand; Francis Lyman; Timothy Stanford, left side severely; Milo B
Kilburn, left shoulder severely; John Nolan; Wm H Laws.

WOUNDED MAY 10TH.
Co A—Corp John Herin, hand; Ed Casey, hand; Isaac Blake. Co B—Wm B Louire. Co C—Michael Henifan, leg; Carl A Snyder, face; Andrew Wenzel; Horace Hart, leg; Thos Johns, hand; Patrick Kane; Sergt Maurice Ferriss, slightly. Co D—John Smith, hand; Corp Wm Connors, hand and neck. Co E—John F Hand, hip; Ed Taylor, arm. Co F—John Davidson, hip; Jas Maloy, hand. Co G—Chas Lafferty, leg; Henry G Reed, breast. Co H—Corp Sam Hoag, hip; Patrick Dunn, leg; Wm Dalton, leg; Sergt Leonard Lasher, groin severely. Co I—Corp Ed Dunnigan, hand. Co K—William Seullen, hand; Thomas Scarp, arm.
WOUNDED MAY 12TH.
Co A—John Slain, arm slightly; Wm Hanan, shoulder. Co E—Jas Dedrick, hand; Charles Shultz; Michael Noonan, slightly. Co I—Wm G Spencer, foot slightly. Co K—Thayer.

ENLISTED  MEN  MISSING  MAY  6TH, 1864.
John Stapleton, Henry H Halbut, G Heady, John Behan, Wm J Brenan, Oliver Herbert, J S Davis, Geo H Baker, James H. Carroll, Alex R Coon, Daniel S Dickinson, Wm Kelley, M McNally, Geo W Winne, Chris Hackett, Albt Schermerhorn, Chas Couse, Gustavus Haxt, Solomon Kimball, Jas Redmond, Wm Butler, Ed Connors, Cyrus Dean, Michael Horn, Chas F Jones, Patrick McCormick, David McCleary, John Miller, Eldridge G. Rockwell, Michael Rogers, Wm R Walker, John Windorp, Henry W Whalen, James L Hughs, John McAllister, Michael Kearns, Reuben M Ostrander, Alex Corrie, Fred Willick, Wm Cluse, John McCormick, James Quinlan, Elias Swan, J M Dempsey, Wm Wilcox, This Dalton, Nicholas Dodrick, Elliott Hines, Mcdonald Johnson, John J Johnson, John Kearsing, Wendell Long, Danl Wright, John S De Witt, Albert C Rosekrans, Peter Berageux, David Gerrard, John Jackson, Henry Frederick, Peter Wagoner, Michael Wagoner, John McElroy, James Watson, Patrick Lynch, Peter Murray, John Lyman, Aaron Cole, Patrick Lafen, Peter Connell.

MISSING MAY 10th.
Horace A Gould, John Kearney, Wm B Lowery, John Wilson, Jacob Jence, Wm Bailey, Henry Gunther, Thos Kelly, Wm Murray, R Schudler, J E Van Steenburgh, John Purinton, Conrad Long, Geo Trimble.

Letter from J. E, McElroy, Esq., at Fredericksburg.
Mr. MCELROY, now in Fredericksburg nursing the wounded, sends a note to his brother, giving, in addition to what we published yesterday, the following:—
FREDERICKSBURG.
Friday Evening, May 20, 1864
Sergeant LEMUEL WARREN, of battery B, 7th, is killed. ROYAL SCHERMERHORN, F, wounded in hand. Sergeant JAMES A.  REYNOLDS, of Guilderland, M, right finger shot off. Private DAVIS, M, ball through head, and dead.
Capt. DAVIDSON, Forty-third Mew York, is in town sick, but improving, and only wants rest. About eighty privates and four officers remain. Officers well, viz: Capt. VISSCHER, Capt. VAN PATTEN, Lieuts. REED and RUSSELL.
FAVERILL, of the One Hundred and Forty-sixth New York, arm off. In hospital here and is doing well.
SWAN, of Greenbush, of the Forty-fourth, wounded in knee and doing well.
Albany is represented in attendance upon the wounded as follows: Mr. HAGUR, Mr. C. HUMPHREY, DR. HENRY MARCH, Dr. WILSON,
Dr. GRIFFIN, Rev. Mr. BRIDGEMAN, Rev. Mr. TWOMBLY, Mr. G. W. CARPENTER, Dr. COMFORT, Mr. BUTLER, Mr. S. E. MCELROY, Mr. JAMES MCCLURE, and all are diligently employed, early and late.
Capt. GEO. DAWSON, of the Second Artillery, is reported uninjured. The regiment fought well.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
List of Killed and Wounded in the 43d Regiment.
The following letter from Capt. Wm. H. Terrell of the 43d Regiment, which contains a list of the killed and wounded of the 43d Regiment, will prove interesting to many of our readers. The old regiment sustained its previous reputation, but, in its gallant charge, lost their valiant leader, Col. Visscher. Capt. Van Patten, being the senior captain of the regiment, is now no doubt in command:
CAMP NEAR WASHINGTON, July 13, 1864.
Dear Knick—Here we are again, a few miles from Washington, fighting the "rebs" at the very doorstep of the city. A few days ago we were tugging at them before Petersburg. What a change! Last evening our Brigade, the 3d, was sent out to take the place of the citizens; and it was soon noised around that we were to make a charge—and charge we did. We went outside the breastworks, at 4 in the afternoon, and soon the conflict began for as soon as the "rebs" saw us coming, they did all that was possible to stop us, but it was of no use. Nobly did our boys rush forward on the charge, driving them before us. Cheer after cheer arose from the hundreds of anxious men and women that thronged the line of fortifications as we drove them before us. The President and his wife stood on the fort as the charge was made, and no doubt were anxious spectators, to see the old Flag succeed. We fought until midnight, and many a poor fellow has fought his last fight. Our brave Colonel Visscher fell, nobly doing his duty. I stood by him as his eyes closed in death; he did not suffer, for the bullet had done its work sure.—He gave me one look, and saying, "My poor mother, God help her," his spirit fled to his maker. Beneath you will find a list of the killed and wounded:

KILLED.
Lieut. Colonel James D. Visscher.
Co. G—Sergt. Richard Castle; George W. Farrar.
Co. F—John Davidson.
Co. A—Matthew C. De Graff, Adam Ludorf.
Co. E—Corp. E. C. Barrett.

WOUNDED.
Co. A—Sergt. T. Pillon, John Hannon, Ed. Creamer.
Co. B—Hugh Osborn.
Co. E—Sergt. John M. Blackstock, Corp. J. Hill, Wm. Buckbee, J. H. Fralie, Jas. Doneghan, Matthew Dun, Thos. Lee, George Jones, Wm. Fitzgerald, Daniel Kearns, T. Martonie.
Co. F—Martin Flynn.
Co. G—Sergt. C. H. Davis, Wm. Stone, John D. Clapper, William Lagrange, Alonzo Wright, Charles Berry.
Co. H—D. C. Frasier.
Co. I—Sergt. E. Seaman, George Penman, Wm. Birmingham.
Co. K—Sergt. Wm. Middlebrook, Wm. T. Middlebrook.
Respectfully, yours,
Capt. WM. H. TERRELL.

Local Affairs.
Letter from Col. John Hastings.
HEADQUARTERS 4TH BRIGADE,
1ST DIVISION, 2D ARMY CORPS,
Opposite Petersburg, July 18, 1864.
DEAR BROTHER—In my last letter I stated that we were about four miles above this place. On Wednesday last we fell back. The 2d corps is now in reserve, on the right of the 6th and left of the 9th corps. On Saturday evening, when the 6th corps was ordered to Washington, the 2d corps had to extend its lines and fill up the vacancies which the departure of the 6th had made. This weakened our lines, and laid us open to attack at any moment. Deserters from the enemy reported Hill's corps moving for an attack. Orders were accordingly issued to repel the same. All breastworks in our front, over which much hard labor had been spent by the 6th corps in building, were destroyed. A cavalry force in our front, however, had destroyed a principal bridge, which prevented the advance of the enemy, and no fight took place.
Capt. Tremain, of Gen. Davis' staff, paid me a flying visit to-day. He looked well and seemed to be enjoying good health.
Our position, and the army here now, are stronger than it was four weeks ago. We have got the heaviest kind of earthworks on our flank and front, which makes us almost impregnable here now. The soldiers are gaining in strength bodily and also in numbers every day. Till within the last few days the heat has been almost insufferable. Now we are enjoying a good cooling breeze every day. Since the army has laid here much improvement has been effected. The hundreds and thousands of men that had been separated from their commands by straggling or otherwise have been gathered up and returned to them. Regiments and brigades have been consolidated and re-assigned, and there is also much better feeling than when we first arrived here, both in men and officers. When this army set down in front of this place it was about used up in numbers and exhaustion; but all this has been remedied and everything now looks bright and cheerful. The Army of the Potomac has never fought more gallantly, nor labored more faithfully and energetically than in the battles and movements since the 4th of May. It is true a large, lamentably large, part of this brave and devoted body has been wasted away under the dire destruction of life and limb in half a dozen general actions and innumerable affairs and skirmishes. But its losses have all been made up by additions of old and new troops, and those in the North who are watching its fortunes with truly patriotic anxiety may rest assured that the host now stretching in long, deep intrenched [sic] lines in front of Petersburg, will, when occasion comes, battle again as valiantly as ever. According to the reports of deserters Longstreet's corps was to make an attack, last night or this morning, on the right of the 5th corps or the left of the 9th. The consequence was the troops were under arms all night, waiting for the music to commence, and at half-past 4 the troops were dismissed and ordered to their different quarters. Probably the rebels thought better. Still it is best to be vigilant. To show you how the army is fed, I enclose you a copy of an order I received yesterday. No army in the world is fed like it:
While the army occupies its present position, Corps and other independent Commanders will cause their Commissaries to issue at least four (4) days fresh potatoes and three (3) days fresh onions per week to the troops of their commands. Green cabbages will be issued from two (2) to three (3) times per week, in lieu of the money value of some component part of the rations, and at the ratio of 1/4 lb. per man. Fresh beets, or fresh turnips, or fresh carrots, or whichever one of these articles that can be most readily furnished, will be issued from (2) two to three (3) times per week, in lieu of beans, peas, rice or hominy, and at the ratio prescribed be Regulations, viz: "thirty pounds per (100) hundred rations." If the articles above mentioned cannot be obtained from the Depots of Supplies, the Commanders aforesaid will require their Commissaries to present to them a statement signed by the officer in charge of the Depot, to the effect that the articles required by the Commissary could not be furnished him for issue at that depot.
Truly yours, John.

FUNERAL OBSEQUIES OF COL. JAMES D. VISSCHER.—The funeral obsequies over the remains of the late Col. James D. Visscher, of this city, took place yesterday, and were very imposing. A detachment of the Burgesses Corps on Saturday escorted the body to the Capitol, where it lay in state until 1 P. M. yesterday. The body being embalmed and exposed to view, was visited by a large number of our citizens. Yesterday afternoon it was again taken in charge by a detachment of the Corps and escorted to the North Pearl street Baptist church, where appropriate religious services were performed. This being gone through with, the 25th Regiment, under Lieut. Col. Cassidy, received the body with appropriate military honors, when it was placed upon a catafalque drawn by six grey horses, and the line of march was taken up in the following order: 25th Regiment as escort, hearse flanked by Burgesses Corps and followed by Tivoli Hose Company as mourners, relatives and friends of deceased, Gov. Seymour's staff and Mayor and Common Council in carriages. The body was taken to the Cemetery, where it was deposited.

MORNING EXPRESS.
ALBANY, MONDAY, JULY 18, 1864.
FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.—The following is a list of casualties in the gallant 43d Regiment, which occurred during a charge upon the enemy outside the Forts near Washington a few days since:
KILLED.
Lieut. Colonel James D. Visscher.
Co. G—Sergt. Richard Castle, Geo. W. Farrar.
Co. F—John Davidson.
Co. C—Matthew C. De Graff, Adam Ludorf.
Co. E—Corp. E. CW. OBUaNrDreEtDt..
Co. A—Sergt. T. Pillon, John Hannon, Edward Creamer.
Co. B—Hugh Osborn.
Co. E—Sergt. John M. Blackstock, Corp. J. Hill, Wm. Buckbee, J. H. Fralie, Jos. Doneghan, Matthew Dunn, Thos. Lee. George Jones, Wm. Fitzgerald,
Daniel Kearns, T. Martonie.
Co. F—Martin Flynn.
Co. G—Sergt. C. H. Davis, Wm. Stone, John D. Clapper, William Lagrange, Alonzo Wright, Chas. Berry.
Co. H—D. C. Frazier.
Co. I—Sergt. E. Seaman, George Penman, Wm. Birmingham.
Co. K—Sergt Wm. Middlebrook, Wm. Middlebrook.

Local Affairs.
Letter from the 43d Regiment.
SANDY HOOK, Aug. 2, 1864.
Dear Friend—I have but a moment to devote to replying to your letter, for we are on the skedaddle all the time, taking hardly time to eat or sleep. We left Washington on the 13th of July and marched up through Maryland, crossed the Potomac at White's Ford, followed close behind the Rebels till we crossed the Blue Ridge at Snicker's Gap, where the Rebels made a stand on the south side of the Shennandoah [sic]. We looked at them a couple of days, and then we heard that Mrs. Snicker was going to move the gap, sp we had to get on the other side and then put for Washington. Arrived there the 23d, got paid off and equipped, and the whole Corps went on a bum. On the 24th we all got ready to ship for City Point, but a farmer came in and said a "Confederacy" had made his appearance at the Potomac and threw his knapsack across, and would probably make a raid. So on the 26th we pulled up, and leaving two-thirds of the Corps spilled along the road, we started for Harper's Ferry, passed the Rebels, and reached Harper's Ferry on the 29th; went up the Shenandoah a little distance and camped.
30th, found the rebels were 20 miles in our rear, in Maryland. So up we got and ran back. The train stopped at Sandy Hook and the troops went on. I presume they will fetch up in Philadelphia or near there. The men are marched to death for nothing, and the whole thing is played out. By George, Sam, don't you come back now, unless you bring several pair of extra legs. Yours, very truly,
MILLER W. GOODYEAR,
Q. M. S. 43d N. Y. V.

During the terrible battle of the Wilderness, when our bleeding and suffering wounded soldiers were thronging Fredericksburgh [sic] in untold cumbers, the Ladies' Soldiers' Relief Association "Drew a bow at a venture," and sent a small box, directed to Assistant Surgeon Elting, who was reported to be at Fredericksbugh [sic], or to some other Federal surgeon. After patient waiting, there came the subjoined acknowledgement:

CAMP 4 3D REG'T, N. Y. S. VOLS.,
MONOCACY, Aug. 5, 1864.
LADIES:—I have the honor to acknowledge the reception, by, my regiment, of the box sent by you to my care, some three months ago. We only received it however after two months delay.
The contents were distributed by Doctor Vaghan to the most needy, and were received with many expressions of gratitude by the dusty and ragged soldiers. The handkerchiefs, towels and shirts were especially appreciated.
The men of the 5th Corps have suffered much, while performing the arduous duties to which they have been assigned in this State. The exceeding dryness of the season, and the excessive heat of these long summer days, have broken down many a strong constitution during the long and weary marches which the Corps has made. The bloody battles of the last three months have decimated our ranks, but, still our soldiers are ready to meet our country's foe. Again expressing our thanks to the Ladies of the Society, I have the honor to remain
Your most ob't servant,
V. V. ELTING,
Assistant Surgeon, 43d Reg't.

Local Affairs.
Forty-Third Regiment.—We learn through a letter from Capt. Samuel Davidson, of the 43d, that the regiment is now stationed in the Valley, about 18 miles from Harper's Ferry, where it is engaged in throwing up breastworks. The Captain allows that every man in the 43d is an engineer at that business, from the fact that they have done so much of it. He further says: "Our corps is rather small at present, as we only number about 7,000 fighting men, and when we left Brandy Station in May it numbered 26,000 men for duty. Our regiment has about 150 men for duty. The number present and absent is about 450 men, and out of that number about 100 will be going home about the 10th of this month, so they will be in Albany on the 22d to be mustered out, their three years having expired. It is expected that the remains of the gay and gallant 43d will be consolidated into a battalion of five companies, to be commanded by the Major; so in that case the junior officers will be kept. That will muster out Lieut. Col. V. V. Van Patten, Capts. Wilkinson, White Rogers, Thompson, and Davidson; Lieuts. Barnett, Lynch, Ferris, and B. Russell; Quartermaster Seaberg and Doctor Elting. Capt. Burhans will have to be kept on the roll, as he is reported missing, and cannot be dropped from the rolls at present. So you see one of the best regiments that ever left the State of New York will be nearly extinct unless the citizens of Albany take a little interest in the matter and raise about 400 or 500 men. That would give us a full organization once more."

Local Affairs.
Letter from the Forty-Third Regiment.
Lieut. Carter Killed.—Capt. Terrill wounded.—We have received a letter from Capt. Samuel Davidson, of the 43d Regiment, which refers to the fight of Gen. Sheridan in the Valley, on the 19th, and in which the above gallant old regiment took part. The Captain furnishes us with the following list of killed and wounded, all of whom are Albanians save two:—
"Killed—Lieut. John B. Carter, Co. K, of Albany; Private Wm. Moon, Co. A. Wounded—Capt. Wm. H. Terrill, in arm, Albany; Lieut. Maurice Ferris, in leg, Albany; Sergt. Wm. Hill, Co. F, in leg, Albany. Private Wm. Johnson, Co. E, in neck.
"I tell you, it was the most lively fight that I have seen in some time. It was a complete success. Gen. Sheridan is a 'brick.' He came down along the 3d brigade as we were going to charge, and, taking off his cap, said: 'Boys, go in; I have sent the 19th corps in on the right flank, and they are driving them; I have the cavalry in their rear, and now, boys, give them h—l!' Away we went, as if the lower regions were actually let loose, and I tell you we drove them mighty lively. We expect to be mustered out and in Albany on Monday. P. S.—I rode over the field yesterday, and saw some three thousand small arms stacked, awaiting transportation to the front.
Yours truly, SAM."

Lieut. John B. Carter, who was killed, was well known in this city. He left Albany as Orderly of Capt. James Visscher's company, and was subsequently promoted to be Sergeant Major. His gallant conduct in the battle of the Wilderness, where he was wounded, won for him a promotion to Lieutenant, holding which position he was killed. He was home here on furlough last summer after he was wounded, and exhibited great impatience to get back to his old command.

THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT IN THE BATTLES OF THE VALLEY.—A letter received from Capt Samuel Davidson, of the Forty-third regiment, which relates some incidents that occurred on the 19th inst., when this gallant regiment took part in the battle in the valley under Gen. Sheridan. The Captain furnishes the following list of killed and wounded, all of whom are Albanians but two:—
"Killed—Lieut. John B. Carter, Co. K, of Albany; Private Wm. Moon, Co. A . Wounded—Capt. Wm. H. Terrill, in arm, Albany; Lieut. Maurice Ferris, in leg, Albany; Sergt. Wm. Hill, Co. F, in leg. Albany; Private Wm. Johnson,
Co. E, in neck.
"I tell you, it was the most lively fight that I have seen in sometime. It was a complete success. Gen. Sheridan is a 'brick.' He came down along the Third Brigade as we were going to charge, and, taking off his cap, said:—'Boys, go in; I have sent the Nineteenth Corps in on the right flank and they are driving them; I have the cavalry in their rear and now, boys, give them Jesse!" Away we went, as if the lower regions were actually let loose, and I tell you we drove them mighty lively. We expect to be mustered out and in Albany on Monday.
P. S. I rode over the field yesterday, and saw some three thousand small arms stacked, awaiting transportation to the front. Yours, truly, SAM.

Lieut. John B. Carter, who was killed, was well known in this city. He left Albany as Orderly of Capt. James Visscher's Company, and was subsequently promoted to be Sergeant Major. His gallant conduct in the battle of the Wilderness, where he was wounded, won for him a promotion to Lieutenant, holding that position when he was killed. He was home here on furlough last Summer after he was wounded, and exhibited great impatience to get back to his old command."

Standard & Statesman.
Office, 373 Broadway.
THURSDAY EVENING, SEPT. 29, 1864.
FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT—ITS ARRIVAL IN ALBANY.—We clip the following from a morning paper, for the purpose of endorsing the sentiment: Let members of our Common Council, and citizens generally remember that the gallant 43d regiment, whose term of service has expired, will reach this city on Monday next. What if any, arrangements have been made to receive them?—Here is a regiment that Albany can point to with pride. More of her sons have fallen in the ranks of the 43d than probably any other one regiment. Let it be remembered that Col. Wilson, Fryer, Wallace and Visscher fell while gallantly leading these old veterans forward in battle. Also Capt. Lodge, Gilfillan and Knickerbocker, and Lient Koonz and Carter, poured out their life's blood in defence of the flag while leading their men.—
The casualties of the 43d cast a gloom over many a fireside in Albany, and for this reason we think that the brave comrades of the slain, now alive and about to return, are entitled to warm welcome at our hands. What say the Mayor and Common Council.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
ARRIVAL OF THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT.—We yesterday stated that the officers and men of the 43d Regiment would arrive here on Monday next. They unexpectedly reached here yesterday. There were eleven officers and thirty-eight enlisted men. The following are the officers who have returned: Lieut. Col. V. V. Van Patten, Surgeon V. V. Elton, Quartermaster F. C. Seabrance, Capts. W. Thompson, Samuel Davidson, W. G. Rodgers, Wm. E. White, J. W. Wilkinson, 1st Lieuts. Richard Read, John Barnett, 2d Lieut. Robert Russell. The thirty-eight enlisted men who have returned will be mustered out of the service to-morrow. The officers do not expect to be mustered out inside of a month, for it will take them that time to settle up their affairs with the government. The officers who have re-enlisted and remained behind are as follows: Major C. A. Milliken, Surgeon Camelione H. Vaughan, Capts. David Burhans, W. H. Terrill, Richard L. Armsby, Wm. Russell, E. E. Goodyear, 1st Lieuts. John Kavanaugh, Henry Sheutter, W. Blaise, James H. Smith, Thomas Lynch, 2d Lieuts. Maurice Ferris, James McGraw, Hiram Van Buron.—There are also about 400 men. Capt. Terrill and Lieut. Ferris, who were wounded in the battle of the 19th, came home with the regiment yesterday, on sick leave, and as soon as able will return to the field again. The sudden and unexpected arrival of the veterans, yesterday, prevented them from receiving a public reception, which they most certainly would have had under other circumstances. No set of men were more deserving of it. They are all heroes and veterans, and saw some of the severest ser­vice of the Peninsula campaigns. The history of the regiment may be briefly summed thus: Original strength of command, 35 commissioned officers and 780 enlisted men; added in the field by appointments and promotions about 54 officers, and by recruits enlisted for the regiment about 750 men; of these, nine officers were either killed in action or died of wounds received there; one died of disease; three were dismissed; 47 resigned or were promoted to other regiments or commands; 11 goes out by expira­tion of service, and 15 remain on the rolls, three of whom are supposed to be prisoners of war in the hands of the enemy; three are sick in hos­pitals from wounds received in action; the re­maining nine are commanding the battalion in the front. Of the rank and file, there were 523 remaining on the rolls of the regiment; 83 of whom are supposed to be prisoners of war in the hands of the enemy; 195 remain in the field; 55 are absent without authority, probably desert-ed; and the remaining 187 are absent sick, mostly from wounds received during the campaign of the past summer. Total number dis­charged by expiration of service is 85—leaving about 920 enlisted men to be accounted for as follows: Died of disease, 70; died in action or of wounds received there, 65; transferred to other regiments or battalions, 55; discharged for disability by surgeons, 258; discharged by order to accept promotion, 35; the remaining 437 deserted—the cowardly rascals. Such is the near estimate or rough calculation of the 43d N. Y. Vols. It should be mentioned that of the original number who came out with the regiment in September, 1860, 217 reinlisted [sic] the past winter, and are now going on from victory to victory in the Valley of the Shenandoah.

Daily Knickerbocker.
Price 12 1-2 Cents Per Week.
Albany,
THURSDAY MORNING, OCT. 27, 1864.
Local Affairs.
From the Forty-Third Regiment.
HEADQUARTERS 43D N. Y. Vols.,
Camp near Middletown, Va., Oct. 20
Messrs. Editors of Albany Daily Knickerbocker—Gents: Yesterday the 19th inst., was another epoch in the history of this war that will add new glory to the bravery of our troops, and carry dismay to the hearts of the Southern Confederacy; and at the same time cannot but carry sorrow to many hearthstones for the brave and fallen ones, which, through the inattention and cowardice of part of our forces in the Valley, I fear was greatly increased to what it otherwise would most probably have been, had they been on the alert and promptly received the charge made on their lines. The disposition of our forces the past few days was as follows: The 8th corps, Gen. Crook's command, occupied the extreme left, and rested on Cedar Run; on the centre, and defended by breastworks, was the 19th corps, Gen. Emory's command; and on the extreme right was the 6th corps, Gen. Wright's command. Early yesterday morning, about 3 o'clock, the 6th corps was aroused by the crack of musketry on the picket line in their front, and about 4 A. M. the same sound from the left, but had no orders to prepare for action, as this fire is somewhat common of late. But here the disaster that caused so many casualties to our army occurred. The rebels had marched all night through the Luray Valley, and at early dawn, crossing the Cedar Run, attacked the 8th corps before they were at all prepared to receive them, and on the first onset they fled in disorder and left their artillery, ambulances and camp equipage in the hands of the enemy, who, quickly following up their advantage, threw the 19th corps into disorder, and were it not for the bravery of the 6th corps in meeting and repulsing their vigorous assaults, farewell to the Shenandoah Valley. The battle raged for some three or four hours with great obstinacy on either side, each falling back and again advancing, when a kind of quietness was put on the matter til about 4 p. m., when our lines formed, and falling on the rebels drove them in hot haste back through Middletown and to Cedar Run, when our cavalry, taking up the charge, gave the rebels such a chastisement that they will hardly have the temerity to attack us again for some days. When the attack was made in the morn Gen. Sheridan was absent either in the city of Martinsburg or Winchester, and hastening to the front, he was received with wild cheering by the gallant 6th, when he said, "Now pitch in, boys; give them h—l; we will camp in our old camping ground to-night." And he was as good as his word—the troops slept where they did the night before. Among the fruits of this victory, by which we placed hors du combat at least as many of their troops as they did ours, and though surprising our forces on the onset, we can compare favorably with them in prisoners—the numbers I cannot at present state—but besides recapturing our artillery we took from them 19 pieces beside a large amount of wagons and ambulances; also several stand of colors. Our victory at night was complete. Gen. Sheridan is a hero. Now for the 43d. Only I would be trespassing too much on your columns, I would send you a copy of General Orders, wherein they received the thanks of the commanding Generals. Our losses you will find annexed, but we have to lament the fall of our brave old Brigadier General, D. D. Bidwell, of Buffalo, who fell while bravely leading his brigade to a charge under a withering fire of the enemy. Casualties in the 43d N. Y. Vols.: Killed—1st Serg. C. Buck, Serg. Joseph Rafler, Co. B; Private George Johnson, Co. D. Wounded—Major C. A. Milliken, back,  slightly; Capt. R. L. Annesley, head, slight; Capt. E. B. Goodyear, ankle, severe; Private Josiah Van Ness, Co. C, leg, amputated; John G. Myers, Co. C, head, slight; Horacs Hart, Co. C, knee, severe; Jacob Winder, Co. A, knee; Andrew McDermott, Co. A, head, slight; Serg. Frank Shubert, Co. E, right arm, severe; Private John E. Karg, Co. E, head, severe; Michael Nash, Co. D, knee, severe; Patrick O'Brian, Co. D, head, slight; Patrick Lyons, Co. D, arm, slight; Charles Terrell, Co. D, back, slight; Thos. N. Smith, Co. B, leg, severe; B. Fitzpatrick, Co. B, thigh; Alexander Duffield, Co. B, thigh, severe; John Moore, Co. E, hand, by himself intentionally, third time—coward. All quiet to-day. Yours, etc., Eustace.

From the Forty-third.
CAMP NEAR WASHINGTON, June 25, 1865.
"At last, after four years of such hardships as only those who have served in the Army of the Potomac can know, the remnant of our gallant old regiment is going home.
"Going home! Oh, how that short sentence thrills every nerve and fibre of the frames of those who four long years ago left home and friends to share the perils and fatigues of a soldier's life in defence of their country. Our hearts swell with pride at the thought that after years of arduous service we have finally accomplished our glorious purpose, and are now in triumph to return to our forsaken homes and to the friends and relatives we left behind us.
"Back again we bring our dear old flag, to lay it by forever. It's work is done—it's mission is accomplished.
"Nobly has it fulfilled its part, and with many a sigh, not only for the brave ones who have fallen beneath its folds, but for the many near and dear associations which cluster around it, do we lay it aside. Proudly we bear it back to those who gave it, (the Albany Burgesses Corps) not so beautiful as when they entrusted it to our care, yet with a noble, holier lustre crowning its  stars and investing its stripes with purer light—the light of a re-established free Government. We thank them for the gift and can hand it back to them without a stain. That we have served our country well, the battle fields of Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania bear testimony, and now we turn our faces homeward, our hearts beating rapidly with the thought of the welcome home which will greet us."    * * * S. A. H.
The above extract is from a letter written by a member of the Forty-third regiment, to a friend in this city. It brings the intelligence that this regiment, than which no better ever entered the service, is about returning home. And that suggests the propriety of the following brief and imperfect sketch of its organization and career.
The Forty-third regiment, N. Y. V. was organized in this city during the summer of 1861. Its original field officers were Colonel Francis L. Vinton, Lieutenant-Colonel Chas. H. Pierson, and Major Benj. F. Baker. Of the ten original companies, five were raised in this city, one each in Washington, Montgomery and Otsego counties, and two in the city of New York.
The regiment left Albany, September 16, 1861, was mustered into the United States service September 22d, and was, by order of the War Department, attached to the brigade commanded by Brigadier-General W. S. Hancock, in Smith's division. The regiment took part in all the movements of the Army of the Potomac, via Centreville to Fortress Monroe and the Peninsula, where they arrived in front of the enemy's works at Lee's Mills, April 5th, 1862. On the 16th of the same month they participated in the first Peninsula engagement by supporting the batteries of the division during a spirited attack on the enemy's works.
On suspicion being aroused that the Rebels were evacuating Yorktown, ten men of this regiment volunteered to cross to the lines and ascertain the condition of the enemy's works. They did so and found them evacuated. In the subsequent movements of the army up the Peninsula, the regiment took a leading part, participating in all the different battles.
On the withdrawal of the army from in front of Richmond, the Forty-third held the extreme right of the line of the Chickahominy, thrice repulsing the attacks of the famous Eighth Georgia Regiment, and holding the line until after dark. Throughout the famous seven days' battle, and in the subsequent campaigns of Pope before Washington, and of McClellan in Maryland, the regiment was present at every important engagement, from Golden Farm to Antietam. While at Harrison's Landing, the regiment had become so reduced that the ten companies were consolidated into five, and five full companies were recruited and officered in this city, to fill the regiment to the required standard. These companies were mustered into the United States service September 14, 1862, and joined the regiment in Maryland. After the battle of Fredericksburg, when it was deemed advisable to organize a Light Division, for the most arduous duties, the Forty-third was one of the five regiments selected from the army to constitute the infantry forces. At the second battle of Fredericksburg, the Light Division carried the pontoons a mile and a quarter by hand, completely surprising the enemy.
When the first assaulting column on the morning of May 3d had been repulsed in its attack upon Mary's Heights, the task of carrying this redoubtable position was assigned to the Light Division. The assault, which was probably one of the most magnificent affairs of the kind during the war, was completely successful, and the colors of the Forty-third were the first planted upon the works. The greatness of this achievement will be better understood when it is known that three divisions of six thousand men each were repulsed three successive times from the same works during the first battle of Fredericksburg.
The Forty-third captured in this assault four guns and seventy-five prisoners, pursuing the retreating enemy to Salem Heights, and on the following night, together with the Sixth Maine Regiment, repulsed a brigade of the enemy, who attempted to cut off the retreat to Banks' Ford, and successfully covered the retreat of the Sixth Corps across the river, losing in both actions two hundred men and eleven officers.
In the second Maryland campaign, the brigade to which the Forty-third was attached marched thirty-six miles in twenty-four hours, reaching Gettysburgh [sic] in time to take part in that battle, driving the enemy's skirmish line on the extreme right and establishing a line which was held until the close of the engagement. In the subsequent movements to the Rapidan, the regiment bore its share of the hardships and dangers. On the occasion of the brilliant affair at Rappahannock Station, the Forty-third drove the enemy's right, establishing a position for artillery and effectually cutting off the retreat of the enemy up the river, capturing four guns.
In the final campaign under Grant, the Forty-third has borne a conspicuous part. They have participated in every engagement of the army from the first crossing of the Rapidan until the final assault and capture of the enemy's works in front of Petersburg.
In the battles of the Wilderness this regiment suffered most severely, losing all three of their field officers and one-half their men. Shortly after the battle of Cold Harbor, the Forty-third, together with other troops, were sent to repel the threatened invasion of Washington, by the Rebels under Breckinridge. They arrived in time to repulse an assault of the enemy upon Fort Stevens, and subsequently to drive them from in front of the city. In this engagement the Forty-third lost heavily, including their commanding officer.
Pursuing the enemy into the Shenandoah Valley, they bore a prominent part in the brilliant battles of Cedar Creek and Fisher's Hill, under Sheridan, which resulted in the total annihilation of the Rebel forces under General Early. After which they were sent back to Petersburg, where they occupied a position near Fort Steadman, sustaining the brunt of the first assault of the Rebels upon that fort. In the subsequent assault and capture of the enemy's works in front of Petersburg, the Forty-third bore a leading part, by their gallantry contributing to the success of those movements which resulted in the final destruction of the rebellion. The Forty-third, with the rest of the corps, were then ordered to Washington, to be reviewed and then back to camp, by subsequent orders to be mustered out of the service. Over eighteen hundred men have been recruited into this regiment, of whom about one hundred and fifty have been mustered out of the service by reason of the expiration of their term of enlistment, and about two hundred are with the regiment now—the rest only the casualties of war can account for. Many help to fill the various hospitals throughout the land; and many more, alas! are resting, free from all earthly troubles, on the many battle fields of Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania.
Four commanding officers, as gallant men as ever entered the service, have fallen while in its command. Wilson, Fryer, Wallace and Visscher, names covered with imperishable fame, won by unflinching bravery, displayed on many a hard-fought field. Sad may be the thought of the many brave ones gone, but let us find consolation in the thought that the cause for which they sacrificed their lives, was a just one; and let it serve to remind us of our duty to the living, to those bronzed and war-worn heroes who constitute the remnant of the gallant old Forty-third Regiment. Let their welcome home be one which will show them that their services have been appreciated by those who have remained here at home.
Well may salvos of artillery salute them; well may cheers from assembled hundreds greet them. For they come to us as the saviors of our country and her institutions. All praise be theirs. With laurels crown the victors.
(Alb. Journal, June 29, 1865)

ALBANY EVENING JOURNAL.
SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 1, 1865.
Arrival of the Veteran Forty-third.
THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT arrived on the Huguenot about ten o'clock this morning, and was welcomed at the Steamboat Landing by former officers in the city and a large throng of citizens, notwithstanding the rain. Capt. Bowden fired a salute. Preceded by Schreiber's Band, it marched up Broadway to the Burgesses Corps Armory, where it stacked arms, and then proceeded to the Stanwix to partake of a sumptuous dinner prepared for it by the Citizens' Committee. After dinner, Rev. Mr. Bridgman addressed them in eloquent words of welcome, as follows:
Your friends greet you this morning with their heartiest greeting, and bid me speak to you their welcome. Along the line of your travel hither, repeated exhibitions have undoubtedly been given you of the profound affection with which the people of the North regard their returning soldiery, but here in the midst of the homes whence you went out to the battle, with our recollections of you as friends and neighbors, with the proud record we have of your brave deeds since you became soldiers of the Republic, we cherish for you a special admiration, and with all our hearts say welcome, Forty-third.
We know that the minds of some of you will revert to the Summer of '61, when you marched through these streets with full ranks and elated looks, but conscious that your proud feeling was not reflected in the faces of the crowds which lined your way.
Some of us remember that no flag was given to be a pledge of our remembrance. It could not have been said of you that you were in any sense a "pet regiment" of our city. But we have grown penitent for that neglect. To-day you come back as conquerors to us. You have commanded our gratitude and high respect; and those remembrances of how you went from us, serve only to heighten your triumph and to give our welcome a grander meaning. We knew not how brave you were, nor with what fierce determination when the signal for the battle sounded you would rush upon the foe; but we have come to know you better. Every important battlefield on which the Army of the Potomac has been marshalled [sic] has borne the crimson marks of your presence, and witnesses to the exactness of your discipline, to your endurance and courage.
It was my good fortune to be a guest at your Colonel's quarters when you were encamped at Belle Plain, and whilst you were a part of the famous Light Division that afterwards took so distinguished a part in the second battle of Fredericksburg. I have borne my testimony since then to the good conduct of the regiment and to the high esteem in which you were held by your companion regiments. The old Sixth Maine were encamped just over the hill to your left—but you shared equally with them the honor of being a well-disciplined, a brave, a fighting regiment. And now, that you have won the day, we welcome you back to your home and the rest, which is honorably yours. You have advanced the cause of Liberty and native land. You have faithfully and well clone your part to restore to its former supremacy the old immortal banner which treason had insulted and snatched down. You have endured hardship, hunger, exposure to cold and damp, the fearful peril in the teeth of charging bayonets, before the fierce opening of artillery, or amid the musket-shots singing so musically in the air, but to a swifter music than the voice of any siren. The companions that have dropped at your side are our martyrs—you yourselves are our heroes. Your torn and smoky banner, begrimed with dust and singed with powder, and torn by battle and by breeze, shows more beautiful, worn and rent and stained, than when it flaunted in its prestine [sic] clearness and beauty before the breeze. With the other that so long served you it shall hang hereafter in our Capitol or Hall of Record as the signal of your fidelity and honor, and the ever fresh inspiration to our children and our children's children.
Byron celebrates with matchless paths the "unreturning braves" who went down to the fatal field of Waterloo. There are those who will look in vain, whom no mortal eye will discover, in your veteran column. As I look at you I think of the manly beauty of Wilson, of Fryer, of Visscher, who fell within sight of our National Capitol, with the bright vision in his eye of the statue of Liberty rising to crown that towering dome; of Knickerbocker, Lodge, Wallace, Koonz, and the many others who laid themselves down with brave, manly hearts, on the altar of our country, and who, if to-day they are witnesses of this bright return, are hovering with grateful hearts around this banner, which is henceforth your symbol of struggle and of victory. Enshrine their names deep within your hearts, good friends, and be thankful that God gave you such brave, accomplished leaders.
And now let me again assure you of the joy your presence with us has inspired, and in the name of the friends who are gathered here, and of the larger number outside these walls, bid you welcome, Forty-third, and may God bless you.
The reverend speaker is well known to the heroes, having on several occasions visited their camp, and they are warmly attached to him. His remarks were received with rounds of applause. The regiment then returned to the Armory [sic], and from thence to the Barracks.
The Forty third was mustered in September 16, 1861, with seven hundred and six men, and with the recruits it has received, has numbered within its ranks two thousand three hundred and twenty-seven. It returns with two hundred and ninety-one men and thirteen officers. We published a day or two since a full sketch of its history. By general order, it is permitted to wear on its banner the names of the following battles, in which it has particularly distinguished itself:—Yorktown, Williamsburg, Seven Days Battles, Fredericksburg, Maryes Heights, Salem Church, Gettysburg, Antietam, Rappahannock Station, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Ream's Station, Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Run, Siege of Richmond, Sailor's Creek. Also, Surrender of Lee.
None of the original officers remain with the regiment. The following is a list of the present officers:—
Brevet Colonel—Charles A. Milliken; went out as private.
Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel—W. H. Terrell; went out as First Lieutenant.
Surgeon—H. H. Carpenter.
Adjutant—Thomas Lynch; went out as private.
Quartermaster—Miles W. Goodyear; went out as private.
Company A—Captain, E. B. Goodyear; went out as Sergeant. First Lieutenant, Hiram Van Buren; went out as private.
Company B—First Lieutenant, John Ahern; went out as private.
Company C—Captain, Wm. Russell; went out as private.
Company D—Second Lieutenant, Nicholas A. Swartz; went out as Sergeant.
Company E—Captain, Richard L. Annesley; went out as First Lieutenant. First Lieutenant, James McGraw; went out as private. Second Lieutenant, Frank Shubert; went out as private.
The following have been the Field Officers of the Regiment:—
Colonel F. H. Vinton, promoted to Brigadier-General; Colonel B. F. Baker, went out as Major; Colonel John Wilson, went out as Captain, killed May 6th, 1864.
Lieutenant Colonel Pierson; Lieutenant-Colonel James D. Visscher, went out as Captain, killed at Fort Stevens; Lieutenant-Colonel John Fryer, went out as Sergeant, killed May 6th, 1864. Major William Wallace, went out as Captain, killed May 6th, 1864; Major John L. Newman, went out as Captain; Major Samuel A. Davidson, went out as Lieutenant.
The following Line Officers have been killed in action:—
Captain Knickerbocker, Co. D; Captain Lodge, Co. A; Captain Gillfillan, Co. A; Captain Burhans, Co. H; Lieutenant Koonz, Co. D; Lieutenant Bailey; Co. A; Lieutenant Mead, Co. A; Lieutenant Carter, Co. F; Lieutenant Dempsey, Co. B.
The reception of the regiment was got up entirely impromptu, by the former officers of the Regiment present in the city, and passed off very pleasantly and creditably.

 

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