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81st Regiment Infantry New York Volunteers
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

Veterans of the 81st Regiment.
Through the courtesy of L. B. Robe, Esq., who visited the 81st Regiment at the instance of the War Committee, we are this afternoon enabled to publish the names of those members of the Eighty-First Regiment who have re-enlisted for three years or the war. The following named persons are all residents of this county, and besides these there are several belonging to Oneida County. Much credit is due to ROBE for the energy and efficiency he has displayed in this agency. The work has not been accomplished without a great deal of labor on his part, and he is entitled to the thanks of the citizens, especially those who were subject to the draft, for the pains and labor he has endured.

COMPANY A.—ELIAS A. FISH, CAPTAIN.
Amos M Copeland, Oswego Harmon Ernst, Schroeppel
Miles Sullivan, do                   George Reavy, Oswego
Geo G Gregg, do                                Valentine Lapoint, do
Christopher Hoye, do                         Jerry Mahony, do
Geo Charnie, do                                  Joseph Z..., do
John Wilson, do                                  Wm H Gaston, do
Richard Wilson, do                 John Walker, Palermo
Ed J Anthony, do                   Alexander Jack.., Dawego
Jas Simpson, do                                  Michael Kelley, ...
Wm Ormsby, do                                 Nelson Emlow, Oswego
Earl G Prowty, Palermo          Francis Coon, Scriba
James Fitzgerald, Oswego      James Probst, Scriba
James Tobin, do                                  John S Huguning, Volney
Geo Wilkinson, Schroeppel    Adelbert Whitney. Scriba
Walter W Burch, Granby        John Shaen, Oswego
Martin Pangburn, do               Wm F Stafford, do
Geo H Stone, Scriba               Wm D Anthony, do
Michael Purcell, Mexico

COMPANY B.--M. __ DEFOREST, FIRST LIEUT.
Wm Moore, Oswego               John Wilber, New Haven
Wm M Horton, Scriba                        Chas Loungley, Oswego
Joseph V Perkins, Oswego     Frank Leroy, Oswego
Fred'k Beckstedt, Oswego     Chas Davids, Oswego
Joseph Greguire, Oswego       Lewis W Newton, Oswego
Levi Blair, Oswego                 Lorenzo N Borden, Scriba
Joseph Monett, Oswego         Albert Sydman, Mexico
Frank Benford, Oswego         Silas Virginia, Oswego
Chas Beckstedt, Oswego        John Champing, Oswego
Frank London, Oswego          Justin Morrell, Oswego
Marshall E Parker, Mexico      James G Foot, Oswego
Chas Button, Oswego                         John Darling, Phoenix
VanDuzen Babcock, Oswego             John White, Oswego
Geo E Darling, Phoenix          Wm G Angell, Oswego
Neil Horton, Oswego              Albert Place, Oswego
James McGraw, Oswego        John W France, Oswego

COMPANY D.—L. B. PORTER, LIEUT. COMD'G.
L V S Mattison, Oswego        L D Northrup, Oswego
Wm F Stewart, Oswego         Wm P Babcock, Oswego
Wm Strobeck, Oswego                       Higgins Collinger, Oswego
John Hourigan, Oswego         Hezekiah I Hall, Oswego
Sam'l Wiseman, Oswego        Charles E Hill, Oswego
Marshall Mattison, Oswego    Joseph W Hall, Oswego
David Sears, Oswego                         Wm Fetherly, Oswego
A Cunningham, Oswego        Lewis H Felter, Oswego
John Henan, Oswego              James Low, Oswego
H B McComber, Oswego       Hiram J Knight, Oswego
C L Kennill, Oswego              Loren N Barnes, Oswego
J Remmington, Oswego          Wm H Brackett, Oswego
David Gloud, Oswego

COMPANY E.—D. C. RIX, CAPTAIN.
William Bredow, Oswego      A J Johnson, Oneida Co.
James Crothers, do                  Tim Campbell, Oswego
John J Owens, Madison Co    Wm H McKee, Oswego,

COMPANY F. —JOHN T. DE FOREST, CAPTAIN.
Joseph W King, Oswego        Joseph Weeks, Granby
Sam W Dunham, Granby        Wm J Newman, Fulton
H H Patterson, Hannibal         Martin Devox, Hannibal
A H Youmans, Granby                       Norton Carey, Granby
Samuel Wilson, Schroeppel    Peter Meyers, Hannibal
Wm W Patten, Hannibal         John E Smith, Fulton
Henry Hill, Fulton                   Robert McCulley, Oswego
W M Sutton, Schroeppel        Jas W Fuller, Granby
Wm E Dunham, Scriba                       D C Vermilyer, Phoenix
J Tripp, North Volney                         A Barnard, Schroeppel
Wm H Brown, Gilbert Mills   Arthur Youmans, Fulton
Julius B Reinhart, Oswego     Hezekiah Allen, Hannibal
Wm R Flemming, Granby       John Y Bright, Palermo
Geo W Haley, Volney                        A P Harp, Williamstown
Joseph Marshall, Fulton          John D Kay, Fulton
Selah Taylor, Fulton                R E Lawrence, Hannibal

COMPANY G.—HUGH ANDERSON, CAPTAIN.
Chas E Laton, Oswego                       Daniel Madden, do
Silas W Litchfield, Oswego    Robert Rodden, do
George W Kirk, Oswego        Samuel E Hardcastle, do
C H Ford, Williamstown        Michael Morris, do
Stephen H Winans, Oswego   ____ ____, do
Geo A Hoag, Mexico              ____ ____ Lyman, do
J Sully, Town of Oswego       ____ ____, do
Daniel Becker, Oswego                      Frank Martin, do
Wm E Miller, do                                 Edward N Blakely, do
Elijah E Curry, do                   Joshua Finley, do
Joseph Watley, do                   John D Gough, do

COMPANY H.--S. ZIMMERMAN, FIRST LIEUT. COMMANDING.
Moses Dalby, Oswego                        H K Sanford, Oswego
Ira Lukentelley, Oswego        James Callahan, Oswego
Edward Mitchell, Oswego      Simon LeRoy, Oswego
George Bell, Oswego              Wm Foreman, Oswego
Harvey Morton, Oswego        Andrew B Bogue, Oswego
John Kinyon, Oswego                        Ezra Brower, Oswego
Wm Appleby, Oswego                       Riley Warner, Oswego
Wm Shay, Oswego                 John Liddle, Oswego
John Shippey, Oswego                       Joseph B Stanton, Oswego
C C Stanton, Oswego

COMPANY K.--JAMES MARTIN, CAPTAIN
Eli B Crane, Albion                L K Aurringer, Constantia
Levi L Gilman, Palermo          W Vandercook, Constantia
Luke J Tryon, Pulaski                         Morris Bookman, Oswego
Henry Thomas, Pulaski           Decator Harmon, Pulaski
John P Wimple, Mexico                      Henry E Bedell, Oswego
David L Martin, Albion                      Charles Wilson, Constantia
S D Mills, Williamstown         J Harrigan, Oswego
Nelson D Bates, Palermo        Robt Todd, Constantia
Benj Crandell, Oswego                       Isaac E West, Constantia
Daniel H Auston, Mexico       Wm F Noyes, Holmsville
Dexter Samson, Pulaski          Chas H S..., Pulaski
Henry M Allen, Pariah                        Chas W Enslow, Albion
Geo O Spencer, Oswego        John H Richardson, Oswego
Wm H Paddock, ____                        Hiram P Ballard, Oswego

CO. K, 81ST REGIMENT.
We are indebted to Mr. Jona. Samson, of this Village, for the following statement of the condition of Co. K, 81st Regt., in Sept. last. Changes have, doubtless, taken place since then:
Captain, James Martin—Vice J D Steele, resigned July 22, 1862. Wounded at Fair Oaks.
1st Lieut., John W Burke—Vice James Martin, promoted.
2d Lieut., Brantley G Read—Vice L J Steele, dismissed, August 16, 1862.
1st Lieut., Henry W Greene—Resigned June 7, 1862.
Sergeants—1st, John King, Henry Squires, Eli B Crane, James M. Crolius, Levi L Gilman, John F Youngs, Promoted Q.M. Serg't, December 20, 1862; John Gilman, Discharged December 4, 1862; John P Winn, Discharged September 16, 1862: Alston C. Whitney, Discharged November 14, 1862; Heman A Hubbard, Discharged January 16, 1863.
Corporals—Isaac E West; Nelson D Bates; Daniel H Austin; Luke J Tryon; Joseph Hager; George King, reduced Feb 7, 1762: Charles H Jones, discharged May 29, 1863; Fay O Robinson, discharged May 28, 1862; William H Smith, transferred to Invalid Corps, August 11, 1863.
Musician—Decator Harmon.
Field and Staff Officers—
Colonel, Jacob J De Forest.
Colonel, Edwin Rose, resigned July 7, '62.
Lieut. Colonel, William C Raulston, resigned Sept 6, 1863.
Major, David B White.
Major, John McAmbly, killed at the Battle of Seven Pines, May 31, 1862.
Adjutant, Edward A Cooke.
Surgeon, William H Rice.
Ass't Surgeon, C Macfarland, promoted Aug 15, 1863, to Surgeon of the 115th N Y Vols.
Ass't Surgeon, George W Earle, resigned March 26, 1863.
Qr. Master, B S De Forest.
Chaplain, Isaac G Duryee.
Non-Commissioned Staff:
Sergeant Major, J Henry Waid.
Qr. Master Serg't, John F Youngs.
Com. Serg't, Henry Smith.
Hospt. Steward, Charles S Hart.
Ord. Serg't, David Sears.
Privates—Anthony, George W; Austin, John W; Auringer, Lewis K; Allen, Henry M; Allen, Joseph W S, died Sept 23d 1862; Burnett, Joseph J, discharged April 7, 1862; Bootle, William W, discharged; Brockway, Jefferson W; Burt, Charles, discharged Dec 4, 1862; Bedell, Henry E; Bookman, Morris; Ballard, H P.
Crandell, Benjamin; Collins, Thomas H, transferred into U S Artillery, Nov 3, 1862 —wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862, Coger, Charles C, discharged Feb 17, 1862; Chappelle, Eugene, Wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862—wounded March 24, 1863; Cullen, James, deserter; Cross, Charles G, discharged; Conroy, Peter; Calkins, Cellette, deserter.
Diamonds, Nathan H, discharged; Demons, Charles, discharged Sept 21, 1862; Dalton, James, discharged Oct 21, 1862; Davis, Henry, discharged Feb 10, 1862; Dunn, Hugh; Dumble, Albert, deserted July 5, 1863.
Elliston, Joshua; Elliston, Joseph; Enslow, Charles W.
Fry, John S, discharged Feb 16, 1862; Fry, William; Ferris, Doranes, deserter; French, Charles, discharged April 7, 1862.
Gordon, Aram, deserted March 30, 1862; Galligher, Patrick, deserted March 28, 1862; Ganns, Lewis, wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. Deserted July 20, 1862.
Hills, Clarke J, died June 12, 1862; Hubbard, Willard, discharged Oct 4, 1862; Hunt, John, wounded and taken prisoner at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862; Harrigan, Jeremiah, wounded at Fair oaks, May 31, 1862; Halliday, Levi F; Harlendorf, Myron E, discharged Sept 7, 1862.
Kenyon, Andrew F, discharged July 12, 1862.
Letson, Rhodes F, died of wounds received at Fair Oaks; Letson, Peleg C; Letson, Isaac W, dead; Longnot, Charles, discharged Dec 23, 1862.
Matteson, Charles E, deserted April 1, 1862; Mills, Samuel D; Martin, David L; Mason, James, died Nov. 12, 1862; Moffitt, Charles O, deserted Feb 10, 1862; Moyes, William T.
Paddock, William H; Preston, Delevan M, discharged June 15, 1862; Phillips, Richard, transferred to Invalid Corps, Aug 7, 1863.
Remore, Andrew J, deserted Dec 28, '62; Rea, Walter H, discharged Feb 10, 1862; Remore, Benjamin F, discharged Oct 24, 1862, from wounds received at Fair Oaks; Richardson, Reuben F, discharged Jan 16, 1863; Richardson, John H; Rylands, William.
Samson, Dexter; Sears, Charles H; Stearns, Daniel P, discharged Nov. 8, 1862, from wounds received at Fair Oaks; Smith, William, killed at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862; Smith, George; Smith, James; Spencer, George O.
Thomas, Henry; Todd, Robert; Turnbull, Hugh, died Nov 8, 1862; Trotman, Joseph, discharged Jan. 8, 1863.
Vandercook, Winslow; Van Duzen, James, died June 1, 1862.
Wimple, John; Wimple, Edward D, discharged June 15, 1862; Wells, Henry C. wounded at Seven Pines, May 31, 1862; Wells, William, died April 18, 1862; Wheeler, Merton E, discharged March 25, 1862; Wood, Elias A, died at Fortress Monroe, May 18, 1862; Wilson, Charles D; Weed, Ira T, deserted Aug. 5, 1862; Wright, John P, deserted March 30, 1862; Walters, John, wounded at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. Discharged Oct 20, 1862.

COLONEL JACOB J. DEFORREST does not seem (according to the Oswego Times) to get along very well with the affairs of his Regiment. That paper, in publishing the following order, says he "is still continuing a course which has the appearance of courting unpopularity:"—
HEADQ'RS DEP'T NORTH CAROLINA,
18th ARMY CORPS, June 51st.
General Order No. 91.
1. The general conduct of Col. Jacob J. DeForrest, of the 81st New York Volunteers, while briefly commanding the District of Beaufort, was of highly unmilitary character, and merits the condemnation of the  General commanding the department. Col. DeForrest, in his brief career as commander of the District, manifested but little care for the good of the country or the interest of the service.
2. The exigencies of the service alone prevents Col. DeForrest from being arraigned and tried before a general court martial for violating orders from the War Department, and for manifesting a disregard or ignorance of Army Regulations.
3. This order will be read before the several....  (July 9, 1863)

MY BROTHER:
I venture on your indulgence, in sending you this sheet—and hope, if consistent with your duty, as a Minister of the Gospel of Grace, you will read the following circular, from your pulpit, at least once, on each of the next three Sabbaths, with any remarks you may see fit to make.
By divine guidance and blessing, I intend to have as pure and brave a body of men as ever took the field, for God and the Rights of Man—and with this view, I beg your permission to make my appeal in the Temple of the MOST HIGH. [The Regiment is progressing well] Will you not also, apply, at once, personally, to choice members of your Church and Congregation—(none, too precious, for this cause)—and, if you can, have two, three, or more, unite, and come on, to join our Regiment?—or, better, find some good men, to write for the necessary papers, take hold together, and raise squads of twelve, or twenty, or if practicable, an entire Company. Their Stage and Rail Road fare will be re-paid here.
God, the Almighty, bless our whole Country, and have us all, ever in his holy keeping. Yours, for the Right,
Rome, N. Y., Oct. 18th, 1861. OLIVER B. PEIRCE.

From years of acquaintance with Col. Peirce—his kindly, but determined characteristics—we believe he will endeavor to carry out, in good faith, the principles enunciated in his circular, for the welfare of the men of his command; and we shall be glad to learn that our brethren of the Ministry earnestly and practically co-operate.
W. E. KNOX, Pas't Presbyterian Ch., DAVID BELLAMY, Pas't 1 Baptist Ch., O. P. PITCHER, Pas't Embargo M. E. Ch., J. B. FOOTE, Pas't 1st M. E Ch., S. R. WARD, Pas't Universalist Ch., J. ERWIN, P. E. Rome Dist. M. E. C.
The effort of Col. O. B. Peirce to raise a Regiment to be composed of men of religious character, and his design to guard them while under his command from the exposures to which the health and morals of our soldiers are ordinarily liable in Camp, is highly praiseworthy, and it is hoped that he may be able to carry out this effort successfully and thus render a most important service to his country in this time of its peril.
Rome, Oct. 1861. N. BARROWS, Rector of Zion Church.
MOHAWK REGIMENT—GUARDS of LIBERTY AND UNION!
Col. O. B. PEIRCE, Com'd'g.
Head Quarters AND Rendezvous, Rome, Oneida
County, N. Y.
The undersigned, having been commissioned, by the WAR DEPARTMENT of the UNITED STATES, to raise a Regiment of Infantry, (1,048 men,) to which he expects to add a Company of Cavalry, and a Company of Artillery, invites, to the STANDARD of the UNION, the Lovers of the Constitution, Order and Law.
To the citizens of the Slave States, in their rights, real or imaginary, of person or property, we had done no wrong—had threatened no wrong—had projected no wrong—had even conceived no wrong. From the foundation of the Government, we had conceded to them, privileges, unasked by ourselves, and repugnant to our convictions of right. By every form of appropriation and patronage, we have yielded our just claims, to their cupidity and caprice; and have hitherto consented to be controlled by them, in matters of the Nation, and often in affairs of the State.
While, as the fondly infatuated mother, with her child, we were yet caressing and indulging their, as "our brethren of the South," they were plotting our ruin. While, in pursuance of a scheme they had been cherishing and maturing for years, they were begging of us in the honied [sic] words of fraternity and conciliation, to grant them new favors, unknown to the Constitution, they were in the very act of stealing our arms and munitions of war, prepared for the common defence—were appropriating our revenues—plundering our mails—forcing even our hospitals—were corrupting our officers—seizing our ships and forts—and expelling, robbing and murdering our people—and now, unabashed in their career of crime, they have formally declared war against us, and are employing the means filched from us by years of guilty industry, to ravage the country, prey on our commerce, and destroy our lives—and all, with the guilty object, and insane hope, of subverting the most benign government on which the eye of God has rested, from the creation of the world; and erecting an empire of darkness, founded in the enslavement of mankind. While, some of those States, with a perfidy found only in an Arnold, or a Judas, were prating of Union! to lull, yet deeper, our baseless credulity, and save themselves from a deserved and fearful retribution; they were hurrying forward their men and means, to aid the foe, in a more deadly strike at the heart of the Nation. Niggard, always, hitherto, in support of the Government, they were lavish—prodigal—now, for its overthrow.
The day of reckoning approaches. Aroused, at last, from our supineness, like Samson from his fond dalliance and repose, in the lap of Delilah— awakened, though late, from our delicious revery of unreal concord and security, by unfraternal blows which mar our national visage, depress our agriculture—deaden our manufactures, and destroy our commerce—which waste our treasures, augment our taxes, and drain our blood—we are girding on the armor of Justice—impelled by necessity, Nature's supreme law,to go forth, in the name of our Country, Humanity, and God, for the corrective chastisement of those outlaws of Christendom—the enemies of civiliza­tion and our race.   Bayonets teach profoundly [sic]. Leaden embassa­dors [sic]are more efficient negotiators of peace, than gorgeously apparalled [sic] Ministers of State. To the madly ambitions, rifled cannon are more impressive instructors in Ethics, than is the chaste orotund professor, or the faithful, fervent divine. He who strikes for the defence of the Coun­try, strikes to fortify and perpetuate the best of human governments, on Earth, and ensure the largest measure of happiness, for the hundreds of millions who are to inhabit the Continent, in ages yet to come.
Fellow-citizens: will you incur the necessary personal hazard, and make the needful sacrifice of time and effort—trifling, however great—in view of the aggregate blessings, for all time, which would flow from your endeavors. If you are ready, advance, now, to the test of patriot-ism and duty; and join your fellow-citizens, al­ready enrolled, as Lovers and Defenders of Right—Soldiers of the Army of the Union
By the hallowed memories of the past-the enduring heroism and fortitude which achieved our liberties—the unfaltering devotion and bravery which repelled the arrogant invader, in that unequal contest, the Second War of Independence—by the treasure and blood already profusely given to oppose the march of this unnatural, accursed rebellion—by all the cherished hopes of the future, for every country and every age—let us rush to the Standard of our Country and our God; and hurl ourselves, as an avalanche, on these desolators of our homes and hearts, the disturbers of the peace of the world.
For intellectual, moral and social, as well as for physical and fighting qualities, the MOHAWK REGIMENT shall be second to none, raised, or to be raised, since the days of CROMWELL—"Old Ironsides"—who, while trustfully relying on the God of Justice, and of Battles, was careful "to keep his powder dry!"
Young men and middle-aged men of sound health and good morals, whether married or unmarried, are invited to join the MOHAWKS—assured, that the first great and continual aim of the undersigned, will be carefully and tenderly to guard the health and morals, and consequent comfort of his command; and this, as essential to their greatest military efficiency. We shall carry with us, into camp, and on the march, all the facilities for moral and religious enjoyment and progress to which we have been accustomed in civil, social life.
In sickness and health, in hospital or camp, on the march, and the battle-field, he will be ever with his men—anxious, alike, for their efficiency and honor, in combat, their safety and happiness. He will share their dangers, and rejoice, if it may be, in their triumphs. He will prove a father to his Regiment—his ear ever open to the complaints, and his hand, ready to right the wrongs, if any, of the humblest defender of his Country's Rights and Honor, or, as it is, of her VERY EXISTENCE!
Wives, and fathers and mothers, can trust, under God's mercy, their husbands and sons in his care. His officers, he believes, will be, chiefly, men fearing God, and nothing else—his Quarter Master, to be one of the purest and best business men in the State. Black-legs and petty gamblers, those pests of the army, will be treated with unceremonious severity, as viler than rebel enemies, in arms. That curse of the camp, a sutler or regimental grocer, as such, is banished from the Regiment—and the profits of this department will go into a regimental fund, for the benefit of the private soldiers or their families.
Any right man, by enlisting 40 men, (with himself.) can secure the place of captain; any man, 35, 1st Lieut.; any one 26, 2d Lieut.; 10 men, 1st Sergeant; 8 men, a Sergeant; 5 men, Corporal. [There are 5 Sergeants and 8 Corporals in each company.] The man working for Captaincy, may select 3 good men as Sergeants, and 3 as Corporals, to help him raise his 40; for 1st Lieutenancy, 2 as Sergeants, and 2, as Corporals; and for 2d Lieutenancy, 1 Sergeant and 3 Corporals. It is better, generally, for several men of one town, or adjoining towns, to consult together, and send for three Recruiting Warrants; and so raise a company from one locality. What is to be done, must be done quickly. A person sending, with his Post Office address, the indorsement [sic]of his Pastor, and a Supervisor, or Justice of the Peace, will receive by mail, a Recruiting Warrant, with necessary instructions.
Pay of the soldier, liberal, with $100 bounty when discharged. Pensions, for themselves or families, in case of wounds or death. Pay to commence as soon as they are mustered in.—Board as soon as they enlist.
For years, the undersigned has successfully presented claims for bounty, pensions, land warrants, &c, for soldiers of former wars; and all business of this kind, for the members of the Mohawk Regiment, or their families, he will attend to personally, promptly, and without charge.
Head Quarters, (till the Arsenal can be opened,) the Armory in the Armstrong Block, Rome. Lieut. MILTON A. EDMONDS,
Lieut. FRANCIS X. GREENIA,
Recruiting Officers.
Rally, Friends, Rally, and at once, for t he Whole Country, God, and the Rights of Man.
O. B. PEIRCE,
Colonel, Commanding.
Head Quarters, Rome, N Y., Oct 18, 1861.

PROMOTED.—Lieut. Col. J. J. De Forest, of the 81st Regiment, who was wounded at the battle of Fair Oaks, is fast recovering, and will soon be able to join his regiment on the James River. He has been promoted to the Colonelcy, in place of Col. Rose. His brother, J. T. De Forest, who is recovering from typhoid fever, will join the same regiment in a few days.

The Trouble in the 81st Regiment.
EDITOR ROME SENTINEL.—Dear Sir: The Oswego Commercial Times, of July 7th, contains extracts (as it appears) from two letters purporting to come from individuals or members of the 81st Regt. N. Y. Vol. derogatory to the military character of Col. De Forest, of that Regiment, and eulogising the conduct of Lieut. Col. Raulston, of the   same Regt. The facts are these: in the first place Lieut. Col. Raulston has been so ambitious to be Col. of the 81st Regt. that his folly has run away with his better judgment, so that an attempt has been made to have Col. De Forest mustered out of the service, which in the end proved abortive, and appears to be reacting upon those engaged in that dirty operation. But this I will say no more about until it appears again, from the other side. I will now confine myself to what appears in the Times. The Times tells us that "Lieut. Col. Raulston for some time past has been holding the position of Provost Marshal of Morehead City, N. C. and Collector of the district." Major Curlis, of the 9th New Jersy [sic] Regt. was Provost Marshal, for the District of Beaufort, N. C. which included Morehead City. The Major had held this position for some time giving general satisfation [sic] to both Military and civilians, until Brigadier General Spinola came to Beaufort, and assumed command of that District, in the absence of Gen. Heckman. The first move that Gen. Spinola made, was to assume the business of the Provost Marshal, and thereby take it out of the hands of Major Curlis. The general impression was that he wished to embarrass Major Curlis, so that he would ask to be relieved from acting longer as Marshal of the District. Whether this be so or not I don't profess to know—but I do know that Major Curlis did ask to be relieved, which was promptly accepted, and. Lieut-Col. Raulston hoisted, as was expected, into his place. The result was, Col. DeForest, commanding the Brigade, and I think the District, (but won't be certain), three or four days after this took place, issued an order relieving Lieut Col. Raulston from acting as Provost Marshal, and another order replacing Major Curlis who had been shamefully misused by this Father of Bombast and paper orders, Gen. Spinola. If paper orders would subdue the rebels, Spinola would have ended this war long ago. Well, this is the injustice of Col. DeForest of the 81st Regt, who is one of the best and bravest Col's in the service. I would say here that Gen. Spinola commanded the District of Beaufort, instead of the department of N. C, as stated in the Times. Just at the time of Lieut.-Col. Raulston's being so hastily relieved as Provost Marshal, Gen. Spinola was about starting for Fortress Monroe, with his Brigade, and for some reason unknown to me Lieut Col. Raulston was in a hurry to go with Gen. Spinola, his particular friend that had made him Provost Marshal, and off he went. I can't see the point of his wishing to be relieved, for I think that he was relieved before he dreamed of such a change. So far as being Chief of Brig. Gen. Spinola's staff, or any other Brig. Gen., I think it would hardly reach an officer of the rank of Lieut. Col. The affecting scene described by the writer in the Times at the departure of Lieut. Col. Raulston, from the Regt., for Fortress Monroe, I did not see, nor did I see the men gather around him in groups and beg to be taken with him to the Peninsula. As for the lack of confidence in Col. DeForest, by some of the officers of the 81st Regt., Col. DeForest against all the opposition brought to bear against the promotion of Raulston's from Capt. To the Lieut. Colonelcy, stood by him, and was the means of securing Raulton's promotion to Lieut. Col. Now I honestly believe from the time of his promotion, down to the present time he has been Col. DeForest's worst enemy. There are some other officers in the Regt. who have also secured their promotions on the recommendation of Col. DeForest, who have followed the fortunes of Col. Raulston, and perhaps they may fear that their ingratitude may return to them, consequently they fear their own shadows. I don't think that Col. DeForest has any desire to hurt one of them, I don't believe that he thinks them worth the powder of his wrath.
Now for Gen. Spinola:—
General order No. 91, in relation to the "general conduct of Col. J. J. DeForest, of the 81st New York Volunteers," &c., never had the honor of reaching so high as a "dress parade," for I never saw or heard of it until I saw it in the Oswego Commercial Times, of July 7th. I don't mean to be understood as complaining of the Times, for I believe the Times means to be just to all. I will say here that the course pursued by Col. DeForest I believe met the approbation of Gen. Heckman, upon his return to his command, a day or two after the removal of Lieut. Col. Raulston, and the reinstating of Major Curlis. Gen. Heckman is a brave and able General, and a gentleman that means to do justice to all under his command. The Majorship of the 81st Regiment, once made a good deal of smoke, that arose partly from the same quarter—or at least from a relative of Lieut. Col. Raulston's, and ended in smoke.
At that time the charges which the Major (White,) were tried upon first appeared in the Times.The editor of that paper acted the part of a gentleman, refusing to take any part in the matter until a fair trial had been had. Well the trial was had and the accusing party failed to sustain the charges.—Now, as far as Lieut. Raulston is concerned, I will say that he is one of the best of drill officers, and if he would not let his ambition get the better of his judgment he would be a good officer. The 81st Regiment is one of New York's best, and if it were not for a few in it who wish to make trouble, everything would run smooth, and Col. DeForest would have no trouble. But other Colonels besides Colonel
DeForest, have secured the promotion of men who have proved vipers, ready to sting them at the first opportunity. My humble opinion is that the 81st Regiment is as well thought of by the Commanding General, as any other Regiment in the Department of N. C. Yours, &c,
A Soldier.

A NEW REGIMENTAL FLAG FOR THE 81ST.—The old Eighty-First has been the pet regiment of Oswego County since the day it first left for the front, and very justly so. No regiment in the service has endured longer marches or fought more terrible battles. It has sent home three tattered battle-flags—two of which we believe have been deposited in the Military Bureau at Albany, and one remains in this city, under charge of the Common Council. This morning we were shown a beautiful silk flag, which the Government is to present to the 81st, in pursuance of an order from the General commanding the Army of the James, who awards it to the regiment for gallant services at Fort Harrison, Va., where it is now quartered. The lettering upon the flag is very superb. It was done at Tiffany's in New York.—The ensign truly is of the most beautiful silk texture, red and blue stripes, and blue field, emblazoned with gilded stars. It bears the following inscriptions in gilt letters:
Yorktown, Seven Pines, Malvern Hill, Winton, Kingsland Creek, Drury's Bluff, Cold Harbor, June 1st, 2d and 2d, Petersburg June 16th and 24th and July 9th and 30th, Fort Harrison Sept. 29th and 30th,
Fair Oaks.

COMMERCIAL TIMES.
Oswego, Tuesday Evening, July 7.
CITY AND COUNTY.
COL. RAULSTON OF THE EIGHTY-FIRST REGIMENT.—By a letter from a member of the 81st Regiment to a gentleman in this city, we learn with pleasure the high estimation in which Col. RAULSTON is held, both by the members of the 81st and the General commanding the Department.—Although the letter was not designed for publication, the gentleman receiving it has favored us with a perusal of it, and we feel certain the many friends of Col. RAULSTON in this city and vicinity will be gratified in learning the patriotic and unselfish conduct of that officer. For some time past Col. R. had been holding the position of Provost Marshal of Morehead City, N. C., and Collector of the District.
A short time since, Gen. SPINOLA was relieved from his position as Brigadier-General Commanding the Department of North Carolina, and was ordered to Fortress Monroe with all the troops that could be spared from the Department. Notwithstanding the lucrative and pleasant position in which Col. RAULSTON was placed, he also desired to be relieved from his duties as Provost Marshal that he might accompany General SPINOLA to the Peninsula. The General was naturally surprised at such a request, it being out of the usual course of events for an officer to voluntarily throw up a comparatively pleasant post to hazard the chances of a doubtful campaign on the Peninsula. Being convinced, however, that it was the earnest desire of Col. R. to again serve on the Peninsula, Gen. SPINOLA immediately tendered him the command of a regiment. The troops in that department are principally composed of Pennsylvania nine months volunteers, and Col. RAULSTON declined, and Gen. SPINOLA then appointed him chief of staff. The writer describes the scene as most affecting when he bade farewell to the regiment. He had endeared himself to both officers and men by his uniform kindness and soldierly conduct.—The men gathered around him in groups and begged to be taken with him, as they all wished to go back to the Peninsula.
By another letter from the 81st, we have a corroboration of the above, and learn that many of the officers of the regiment are distressed at the departure of Lieut. Col. RAULSTON. This may probably be explained by their lack of confidence in Col. DeForrest, they evidently feeling that Lieut Col. R. stood between them and injustice from the Colonel commanding. The estimation in which Col. DEFORREST is held, may be gleaned from the following General Order:
HEADQRS. DEPT. NORTH CAROLINA,
18TH ARMY CORPS, June 2lst.
GENERAL ORDER NO. 91: 1. The general conduct of Col. Jacob J. De Forrest, of the 81st New York Volunteers, while briefly commanding the District of Beaufort was of highly unmilitary character, and merits the condemation [sic] of the General commanding the Department. Col. De Forrest, in his brief career as Commander of the District, manifested but little care for the good of the country or the interest of the service.
2. The exigencies of the service alone prevents Col. De Forrest from being arraigned and tried before a general court martial for violating orders from the War Department, and for manifesting a disregard or ignorance of Army Regulations.
3. This order will be read before the several Regiments and Detachments of this Department at dress parade. F. B. SPINOLA, Brig.-Gen. Comd'g Dep't North Carolina.
We regret to learn that Col. DEFORREST is still continuing a course which has the appearance of courting unpopularity. While the regiment was organizing here, he rendered himself obnoxious to the majority of the officers and men, by his high-handed injustice and tyrannical [sic] conduct, but more favorable accounts were heard from him after he came in command of the regiment by the resignation of Col. ROSE, and we were in hops he would continue to merit the esteem he gained with our citizens by his gallant conduct at Fair Oaks.

THE 81st Regiment, three or four companies of which were from this vicinity, and the balance from Oswego County, seems to have been in bad hands, if reliance can be placed on the following general order:
HEADQ'RS DEP'T NORTH CAROLINA,
18th Army Corps, June 21st.
General Order No. 91.
1. The general conduct of Col. Jacob J. DeForrest, of the 81st New York Volunteers, white briefly commanding the District of Beaufort, was of highly unmilitary character, and merits the condemnation of the General commanding the Department. Col. DeForrest, in his brief career as commander of the District, manifested but little care for the good of the country or the interest of the service.
2. The exigencies of the service alone prevents Col. DeForrest from being arraigned and tried before a general court martial for violating orders from the War Department, and for manifesting a disregard or ignorance of Army Regulations.
3. This order will be read before the several Regiments and Detachments of this Department at Dress Parade.
F.B. SPINOLA,
Brig. Gen. Com'g Dep't N. Carolina.
Whatever may be the demerits of DeForest, our friend Frank Spinola evinces bad policy as well as bad grammer [sic] in his order. To dismiss DeForrest would be well enough, but to disgrace him in the eyes of his men and still let him hold his command, is to continue him in command after his men have been notified not to respect him.

LIFE IN CAMP—THE 81ST REGIMENT—A correspondent of the Mexico Independent, writing from Port Macon, under date of July 26th, gives the following description of the bill of fare and the sanitary arrangements at the Port where part of the 81st regiment is now stationed:
* * * Truly we are having nice times here; we could not ask for any better. All the troops around here have gone up towards Goldsborough. Five out of eight companies have gone. Company I has gone to Beaufort, Company H to Morehead City, and three others (B, D and G) are here at the fort. We now live the best we have ever lived. We draw seven days rations of soft bread out of ten. The bread is baked here in the garrison, and is fresh and nice. We draw one and a half pounds of sugar every ten days. We have potatoes once in four days, baked beans once in three days, fresh beef once in four days, salt beef whenever we wish it, salt pork every day and coffee for breakfast and tea for supper. There was not room for us to cook inside the garrison, and so our company built a cook room outside the fort, and got some brick and built an oven and fire-place. There is hardly any sickness in the garrison this summer. It is kept clean and neat. Every Saturday we scrub and mop our quarters, and the rest of the day we have to wash our clothes. We are now kept as strict as ... We are obliged to touch our hats ... we are reading and an officer ... get up, lay down our ...
Good bye,

From the 81st Regiment.
[Extract form a private letter from N.
GILBERT, Lieutenant commanding Co. E,
81st Regiment.
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C.
July, 16th, 1863.
You see by the above that we have changed the base of our operations, and are now in this department. We left Newberne [sic]on the glorious 4th of July, at 3 p. m., and marched, and kept marching until we all thought we could stand it no longer, but when we learned that we were to go to a certain bridge where the Rebs were expected in force to cut off our Cavalry,—who had left the day before,—we started up with a new  life, and alhough [sic] the weather was terribly hot, we stood it like Majors, a few of my men, however, dropping by the way. (The Captain being absent I have command of the company.) We arrived at the Bridge in the morning and had a short rest which we all very much needed. We had not been there long, when a company from the 9th N. Y. was sent out as skirmishers, who soon espied some Rebs, and immediately reported to the General, who sent out two of his aids,—one being Capt. RAULSTON of our Regiment,—across the Bridge to make what discoveries they could. A short ride soon brought them in face of the foe. In an instant a whole Plattoon [sic] of cavalry were after them. They, of course, changed front at double-quick and a sharp race ensued.
At one time the Captain thought his chances slim, as his horse fell with him and the Rebels were almost upon him; but he soon righted, and giving his horse an extra spur, he just escaped being taken prisoner.
The Rebels immediately planted a Battery and began shelling us; but we were prepared for them, and although they had the exact range, none of our men were killed, and but three wounded. We soon quieted them, but they would not stay so, and commenced a second attempt at shelling us, when we again drove them away with some loss.
Very soon the news came to us that the Cavalry,—the 3d N. Y., and by the way they are as brave a body of men as any army could ever boast of, —were all right, and were coming in. I met an officer who told me that they had destroyed one mile of the Wilmington Railroad, and with a machine they carried with them had put a double twist into the rails so they never could be used again, also that they burned some Factories, and busted up one Bank and raised the d—l generally. All seemed to feel quite satisfied with their labors.
We marched 10 miles that night, rested two hours, and marched all night, arriving at Newberne [sic] about 6 o'clock P. M., with a good number of prisoners. We came into town all right. About half of the men were barefooted, but all kept close in the ranks and marched to the music, and we were often saluted along the streets with—"Bully for the 81st."
* * * * We, of course, have just learned (since we arrived,) of the glorious success of MEAD and GRANT. "Hurrah for them and the Union!" We will swear by them after this. How feel the Copperheads now? I only wish that I could pull the string that would blow them all to —the other side of Jordan,—I would then be content to have this rebellion closed, as I trust it soon will be, now that the backbone is broken. As soldiers we feel that we can stand anything but this fire in the rear.—is it not disgraceful?
The health of the Regiment was never better, and we feel proud of its officers and men,—ever prompt and ready for action.

THE 81ST.—Many of the Eighty-First N. Y. Volunteers were recruited from the northern part of this county. To their numerous friends the following resolutions recently adopted by the regiment will prove of interest:
The soldiers and officers of the Eighty-First Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers, citizens of the State of New York, having had no recent opportunity of joining their voices with those of her loyal citizens at home, deem it proper in this manner to express their views and sentiments in regard to events and measures now absorbing the attention of the country, to the end that our friends in the North may strengthen their faith in our cause and increase their zeal for the suppression of the rebellion against which we fight;
therefore
Resolved,That our Government which start-ed with principles declared, objects and aims set forth, that must forever challenge the admir­ation of mankind, and that cost so much of patriot blood and treasure, hardship and privation, as was required to maintain and prosecute a seven years war with one of the most powerful nations of the world, is worth as firm pledges and as determined support as at the beginning of its existence, and that it pay justly demand and exact them of its citizens; therefore we hail with joy the recent action of Congress, placing in the hands of the President power and means adequate for such purposes,
Resolved, That while white men are liable to conscription, there can be no valid reason why "other persons," whose rights above all others have become involved in the issue of this contest, should be exempt or prohibited from giving such aid or support to our cause as they may give, and that whenever and wherever a colored man may be made available in suppressing this rebellion, then and there his services should be required.
Resolved, That when we enlisted in our country's service, we put aside all political differences, and left our homes to sustain her flag, maintain its glory and fame, and rather than see one star stricken from its azure field or one stripe torn from its borders, we would see every rood of the territory in which this viper, rebellion, nests, a desolate waste or savage wilderness. Sooner than consent to a peace that shall tarnish its glory or sully its fame, we would lay our bones to bleach beside the graves of our fallen comrades, upon soil already hallowed by their blood.
Resolved, That if the time comes when our country requires that our thinned ranks be filled and her strength again replenished, we will look for prompt and cheerful acquiescence at home and able and substantial men to help us. And if any remain at home whose cowardice conquers their patriotism, or whose mercenary love of gold exceeds their love of their own and their country's honor, we leave them to the scorn and indignation of our mothers, wives and sisters, whose prayers and hands are ever raised to sustain and comfort us here.
Signed, Jacob J. De Forest, Colonel; W. C. Raulston, Lieut.-Col.; D. B.  White, Major; W. H. Rice, Surgeon; H. Duryea, Chaplain; E. A. Fish, Capt. Co. A; A. G. Bennett, Capt. Co. B ; W. C. Newberry, Capt. Co. E; B. W. Richardson, Capt. Co. C; R. D. Tyler, Capt. Co. D; E. S. Cook, Capt. Co. F ; H. Anderson, Capt. Co. G; W. W. Ballard, Capt. Co. I; J. Martin, Capt. Co. K; Lieut. R. A. Francis, commanding Co. H; B. G. De Forest, Quarter-Master, and every Lieutenant, non-commissioned officer and private present.

FROM THE 81st REG'T.—Our readers will find on the first page a letter from Mr. M. S. MOSES, formerly of this village, addressed to one of our citizens, giving the particulars of an expedition, in which the 81st participated. We have not heard lately from our correspondent Lieut. WILLOUGHBY, of the 81st, but the last news was that he was engaged in organizing a regiment of contrabands, in whose capacity for soldiers he has great confidence.

FROM NORTH CAROLINA.
IN CAMP, MOREHEAD CITY, N. C.,
July 11th 1863.
FRIEND C _ _ _ _ :
Dear Sir—Thinking that you would like to hear from the 81st N. Y. Regiment once more, I thought I would write you a few lines and give you a description of the march of Heckman's Brigade into the interior of North Carolina.
The Brigade consisted of the 9th N. J., 17th, 23d and 27th Mass., and the 81st and 158th N. Y. vols, Battery "K.," belonging to the 3d N. Y. Artillery, and Belger's Rhode Island Battery.
The detachment of the 81st at Beaufort received marching orders Wednesday, July 1st, and left there about 11 o'clock P. M. for   Morehead City, where we staid until morning, and took the cars for Newbern; at which place we arrived about noon, and remained until Saturday morning, July 4th.
On the morning of July 4th we left Newbern about 3 o'clock A. M. for the country. We took the Trent road, and marched until noon, when we made a halt for dinner near a place called Pollocksville, about fifteen miles from Newbern. The day was exceedingly hot, so we were obliged to make a halt of a number of hours in the shade, or endanger the lives of many of the men by sunstroke. Late in the afternoon we resumed our march again, and marched until near dark, bivouacing [sic] for the night on a large plantation containing a number of thousand acres, and owned by William McDonold previous to the breaking out of the Rebellion.
The next morning at 3 o'clock we resumed our march again, passing through a place called Trenton. This place once contained several hundred inhabitants; the streets are regularly laid out with beautiful shade trees on each side, showing a display of good taste; but since the Rebellion the public buildings have been burned, giving it the appearance of many other Southern towns through which the armies have passed. After leaving Trenton we marched about four miles, to a place called Perry's Bridge, across the Trent River. On reconnoitering we found the bridge had been burned, when the order was given to countermarch, and we fell back about two miles, and came to a halt for dinner, consisting of salt horse and hard bread. As there was no appearance of the enemy in our front we bivouaced [sic] for the night.
The next morning we were not called out as early as usual, and it was not until then that we found out the object of the expedition, which was to cover the retreat of the 3d N. Y. Cavalry, which were out on a raid in the interior of the State. Late in the morning the General ordered two or three companies of the 23d Mass. to advance as skirmishers, supported by a section of Belger's Rhode Island Battery. At about 12 o'clock the advance of the enemy was discovered. Their first introduction was to salute us with a few shells of which we took no notice. After changing their position they opened on us with grape and canister, but with no effect. The General then ordered one piece of his artillery into position and opened on them with shell, which caused them to fall back across the Free Bridge, which crosses the South West Creek. There they made a stand again in some high earthworks. The General then ordered the remainder of the 23d forward and deployed as skirmishers to the front, with the 9th on the right and left of the road. The 17th and 27th were placed on a number of other roads to prevent a flank movement, and the 81st and 158th were left to support a battery in the reserve. The pioneers were then ordered to the front, in rear of the skirmishers, to clear the road if necessary for the artillery. I was on a detail from Co. "E." as pioneer. Shortly after getting to the front the enemy opened fire on us again with shell, which burst in our midst, wounding Lieut. Col. Chambers of the 23d Mass., severely in the shoulder and his horse in the head, also a Bugler of the 9th N. J., severely in the head, and one of the pioneers slightly in the foot. Our artillery again opened fire on them, which made them scatter in all directions. The enemy's force consisted of artillery, cavalry and infantry, but the strength of their force we were unable to ascertain. Shortly after we had driven them back our cavalry returned by another road, having crossed at Quaker Bridge, a number of miles above. It was the intention of the enemy to cut off the retreat of our cavalry at this place, but our presence prevented it.
As soon as the cavalry had got safely past us, the object of our expedition was accomplished, and we turned our steps toward home, marching until nearly 4 o'clock the next morning. After a few hours rest we resumed our march again, and arrived at Newbern a little before dark. The 81st had about 20 rebel prisoners in charge when they returned, and got the praise of coming in the best shape, after a march of some 80 or 90 miles through the hot sun and burning sand.
The next day we took the cars for Morehead City, and arrived at Beaufort Wednesday night, July 8th, after an absence of one week, on a tour through one of the most beautiful sections of the Southern States.
The amount of damage done by the cavalry was very great, and I presume that an account of it has met your eyes before this time.
Co. "E" was commanded by our gallant Lieut. N. Hiram Gilbert, of Fulton, Oswego Co., N. Y., Capt. Newberry being absent on Gen. Spinola's staff, on the Peninsula. The most of the boys came home with blistered feet,  therwise the health of the Company is very good.
Since we have come back, we have been ordered to Morehead City, to do guard duty, and find this duty lighter than at Beaufort.
Yours truly,
M. S. MOSES,
Co. "E." 81st N. Y. V.

LIFE IN CAMP—THE 81ST REGIMENT.—A correspondent of the  Mexico Independent, writing from Fort Macon, under date of July 26th, gives the following description of the bill of fare and the sanitary  arrangements at the Fort where part of the 81st regiment is now stationed:
* * * Truly we are having nice times here; we could not ask for any better. All the troops around here have gone up towards Goldsborough. Five out of eight companies have gone. Company I has gone to Beaufort, Company H to Morehead City, and three others (B, D and G) are here at the fort. We now live the best we have ever lived. We draw seven days rations of soft bread out of ten. The bread is baked here in the garrison, and is fresh and nice. We draw one and a half pounds of sugar every ten days. We have potatoes once in four days, baked beans once in three days, fresh beef once in four days, salt beef whenever we wish it, salt pork every day and coffee for breakfast and tea for supper. There was not room for us to cook inside the garrison, and so our company built a cook room outside the fort, and got some brick and built an oven and fire-place. There is hardly any sickness in the garrison this summer. It is kept clean and neat. Every Saturday we scrub and mop our quarters, and the rest of the day we have to wash our clothes. We are now kept as strict as any regulars. We are obliged to touch our hats to every officer. If we are reading and an officer comes along, we have to get up, lay down our book or paper, and salute him. Good bye.

Reorganization of the 24th Regiment.—By an advertisement in another column, it will be seen that Lieut. Col. Raulston, of the 81st regiment, N. Y. S. V., has been detached from that organization and ordered to reorganize the old 24th regiment.

The 81st Regiment.—The steamer Kennebec, took Col. De Forrest's Regiment per Yorktown to Newbern. An extract from a letter written by one of the officers to the Colonel, (who is in Albany,) says:
"The captain of the boat was disappointed, as he had prepared a fine dinner, supposing that we would remain with him till afternoon. This, he said, was in compliment to the most orderly, and best disciplined Regiment he had ever had on board his vessel. He had carried seventy-eight different regiments at different times, but had found us the most quiet and gentlemanly set of officers and men of all. He said he never saw men obey their officers better."

THE EIGHTY-FIRST.—It is probable that the 81st Regiment suffered more severely in the fight on Saturday than was at first supposed. The Oswego Daily Times of last evening has the following paragraph:

HEINTZLEMAN'S, June 2.—We were attacked yesterday. The Eighty-First fought nobly! Lieut.-Col. DeForrest is wounded; Major McAmbley is dead! Company B. has four killed and twelve wounded. Brother and myself shot through the leg. Wilson slightly wounded.
HUGH ANDERSON.
The Times pays a very handsome tribute to Major MCAMBLEY, but it has not a word to say for Col. DEFORREST; not even in mitigation of the disgraceful article of the day previous, in which it charged, what it now admits was untrue, that if the 81st fled it was owing to the imbecility of Col. DEFORREST.

Lt. Col. De Forrest, of the 81st, Wounded.—A private despatch to Ald.  HERRICK, of Oswego, reads as follows:
HEINTZLEMAN'S, JUNE 2.
We were attacked yesterday. The Eighty-First fought nobly! Lieut Col. De Forest is wounded; Major McAmbly is dead! Company B. has four killed and twelve wounded. Brother and myself shot through the leg, Wilson slightly wounded.
HUGH ANDERSON.
Although the 81st was in CASEY'S brigade, we have no doubt it "fought nobly." The record of its dead and wounded will prove them to have been in the hottest of the battle. Lt. Col. DE FOREST is a well known Albanian. His friends will be anxious to hear that his wound is not of a character to take him from the field. The Oswego Times (in which we find the above despatch) passes a glowing eulogy upon the lamented MCAMBLY—who was a man of high patriotism and honor, and who is mourned by the city where he lived, and by a stricken family whose hearts are torn by the sad intelligence of his heroic death.

MORE OSWEGO COUNTY VETERANS.
—L. B. ROBE, Esq., has kindly permitted us to copy the following from a private letter written by Lieutenant-Colonel JOHN RAULSTON:
HEADQUARTERS, 81ST N. Y. VOLUNNEERS [sic],
NORTH WEST LANDING, VA., January 5th, 1864.
L. B. ROBE, Esq.,
Dear Sir:—Agreeable to promise, I herewith forward to you the names of the veterans, who have been enrolled in the Regiment to-day, and count on the quota for Oswego County.
COMPANY K.—Jefferson Brockway, Henry Squires, George Anthony, Peleg Letson, Wm. Rylands, Henry C. Wells, Peter Conroy.
COMPANY E.—William Kent, John Jones, Orlando Reese, Wm. W. Shove, Lewis B. Close.
COMPANY F.—J. B. Titus, Jas. P. Dunham.
COMPANY H.—Adolphus Ladiant.
These, with one hundred and ninety-three you took yesterday, make two hundred and eight veterans, the 81st has furnished for Oswego county. There may be more yet, to-night.
The Eighty-First has done nobly, and we trust that on their return to this city they will receive a welcome that will be an honor to us, and to show to them that their action is appreciated. Who will move in this matter of a public reception to the gallant Eighty-first? The time is short, for we understand that they will be here about the 1st of February.

COMMERCIAL TIMES
Oswego, Monday Evening, January 11.
CITY AND COUNTY.
Veterans of the 81st regiment.
Through the courtesy of L.B. ROBE, Esq., who visited the 81st Regiment at the instance of the War Committee, we are this afternoon enabled to publish the names of those members of the Eighty-First Regiment who have re-enlisted for three years or the war. The following named persons are all residents of this county, and besides these there are several belonging to Oneida County. Much credit is due to Mr. ROBE for the energy and efficiency he has displayed in this agency. The work has not been accomplished without a great deal of labor on his part, and he is entitled to the thanks of the citizens, especially those who were subject to the draft, for the pains and labor he has endured.

COMPANY A.—ELIAS A. FISH, CAPTAIN.
Amos M Copeland, Oswego Harmon Ernst, Schroeppel
Miles Sullivan, do                               George Reavy, Oswego
Geo G Gregg, do                                Valentine Lapointe, do
Christopher Hoye, do                         Jerry Mahony, do
Geo Charnie, do                                  Joseph Zeigler, do
John Wilson, do                                  Wm H Caston, do
Richard Wilson, do                 John Walker, Palermo
Ed J Anthony, do                               Alexander Jacket, Oswego
Jas Simpson, do                                  Michal Kelley, Scriba
Wm Ormsby, do                                 Nelson Emlow, Oswego
Earl G Prowty, Palermo                      Francis Coon, Scriba
James Fitzgerald, Oswego      James Prosser, do
James Tobin, do                                  John S Hugunin, Volney
Geo Wilkinson, Schroeppel    Adelbert Whitney, Scriba
Walter W Burch, Granby        John Shaen, Oswego
Martin Pangburn, do               Wm F Stafford, do
Geo H Stone, Scriba               Wm D Anthony, do
Michael Purcell, Mexico
COMPANY B.—M. J. DE FOREST, FIRST LIEUT.
COMMANDING.
Wm Moore, Oswego               John Wilber, New Haven
Wm M Horton, Scriba                        Chas Loungley, Oswego
Joseph V Perkins, Oswego     Frank Leroy,Oswego
Fred'k Beckstedt, Oswego     Chas Davids, Oswego
Joseph Greguire, Oswego       Lewis W Newton, Oswego
Levi Blair, Oswego                 Lorenzo N Borden, Scriba
Joseph Monett, Oswego                     Albert Sydman, Mexico
Frank Benford, Oswego                     Silas Virginia, Oswego
Chas Beckstedt, Oswego                    John Champing, Oswego
Frank London, Oswego                      Justin Morrell, Oswego
Marshall E Parker, Mexico      James G Foot, Oswego
Chas Button, Oswego                         John Darling, Phoenix
VanDuzen Babcock, Oswego             John White, Oswego
Geo E Darling, Phoenix                      Wm G Angell, Oswego
Neil Horton, Oswego             Albert Place, Oswego
James McGraw, Oswego                    John W France, Oswego

COMPANY D.—L. B. PORTER LIEUT. COM'G.
L V S Mattison, Oswego                    L D Northruo, Oswego
Wm F Stewart, Oswego                     Wm P Babcock, Oswego
Wm Strobeck, Oswego                       Higgins Coffinger, Oswego
John Hourigan, Oswego                     Hezekiah I Hall, Oswego
Sam'l Wiseman, Oswego        Charles E Hill, Oswego
Marshall Mattison, Oswego    Joseph W Hall, Oswego
David Sears, Oswego                         Wm Fetherly, Oswego
A Cunningham, Oswego                    Lewis H Felter, Oswego
John Henan, Oswego              James Low, Oswego
H B McComber, Oswego       Hiram J Knight, Oswego
C L Kennill, Oswego              Loren N Barnes, Oswego
J Remmington, Oswego                      Wm H Brackett, Oswego
David Gloud, Oswego

COMPANY E.—D. C. RIX, CAPTAIN,
William Bredow, Oswego      A J Johnson, Oneida Co
James Crothers, do                  Tim Campbell, Oswego,
Jonn J Owens, Madison Co    Wm H McKee, Oswego,

COMPENY F. —JOHN T. DE FOREST, CAPTAIN.
Joseph W King, Oswego                    Joseph Weeks, Granby
Sam W Dunham, Granby        Wm J Newman, Fulton
H H Patterson, Hannibal                     Martin Devox, Hannibal
A H Youmans, Granby                       Norton Carey, Granby
Samuel Wilson, Schroeppel    Peter Myers, Hannibal
Wm W Patten, Hannibal                     John E Smith, Fulton
Henry Hill, Fulton                               Robert McCulley, Oswego
W M Sutton, Schroeppel                    Jas W Fuller, Granby
Wm E Dunham, Scriba                       D C Vermilyer, Phoenix
J Tripp, North Volney                         A Barnard, Schroeppel
Wm H Brown Gilbert Mills    Arthur Youmans, Fulton
Julius B Reinhart, Oswego     Hezekiah Allen, Hannibal
Wm R Flemming, Granby       John Y Bright, Palermo
Geo W Haley, Volney                        A P Harp, Williamstown
Joseph Marshall, Fulton                      John D Kay, Fulton
Seiah Taylor, Fulton                R E Lawrence, Hannibal

COMPANY G.—HUGH ANDERSON, CAPTAIN.
Chas E Laton, Oswego                       Daniel Madden, do
Silas W Litchfield, Oswego    Robert Rodden, do
George W Kirk, Oswego        Samuel E Hardcastle, do
C H Ford, Williamstown        Michael Morris,          do
Stephen H Winans, Oswego   Richard Titus,             do
Geo A Hoag, Mexico              John Lynch,                do
J Sully, Town of Oswego       John Smith,                   do
Daniel B Becker, Oswego      Frank Martin, do
Wm E Miller, do                                 Edward N Blakely, do
Elijah S Curry, do                               Joshua Duley, do
Joseph Watley, do                               John D Gough, do

COMPANY H.—S. ZIMMERMAN, FIRST LIEUT.
COMMANDING.
Moses Dalby, Oswego                        H K Sanford, Oswego
Ira Lukentelley, Oswego                    James Callahan, Oswego
Edward Mitchell, Oswego      Simon LeRoy, Oswego
George Bell, Oswego              Wm Foreman, Oswego
Harvey Morton. Oswego                    Andrew B Bogue, Oswego
John Kinyon, Oswego                        Ezra Brower, Oswego
Wm Appleby, Oswego                       Riley Warner, Oswego
Wm Shay, Oswego                 John Liddle, Oswego
John Shippey, Oswego                       Joseph B Stanton, Oswego
C C Stanton, Oswego

COMPANY K.—JAMES MARTIN, CAPTAIN.
Eli B Crane, Albion                L K Aurringer, Constantia
Levi L Gilman, Palermo                      W Vandercook, Constantia
Luke J Tryon, Pulaski                         Morris Bookman, Oswego
Henry Thomas, Pulaski                       Decator Harmon, Pulaski
John P Wimple, Mexico                      Henry E Bedell, Oswego
David L Martin, Albion                      Chas D Wilson, Constantia
S D Mills, Williamstown         J Harrigan, Oswego
Nelson D Bates, Palermo        Robt Todd, Constantia
Benj Crandell, Oswego                       Isaac E West, Constantia
Daniel H Austin, Mexico        Wm F Noyes, Holmsville
Dexter Samson, Pulaski                      Chas H Sears, Pulaski
Henry M Allen, Parish                        Chas W Enslow, Albion
Geo O Spencer. Oswego                    John H Richardson, Oswego
Wm H Paddock, Pulaski                     Hiram P Ballard, Oswego

THE NEW YORK TIMES.
NEW-YORK, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 1864.
Honors to and Departure of Gen. Leslie's Brigade.
The veteran regiments of this brigade, viz.: The Eighty-first, Ninety-sixth and Ninety-eighth Regiments, New-York State troops, Wednesday left their barracks at the Park, and escorted by the Eighth and Thirty-seventh Militia Regiments, were reviewed at the City Hall by the Mayor and Common Council; they then marched up Broadway, and at the Fifth-avenue Hotel were reviewed by Maj.-Gen. BURNSIDE; from there they marched to the arsenal, corner Thirty-fifth street and Seventh-avenue, where a collation was prepared for them, and after partaking of it, they were escorted to the Hudson River Railroad depot, and took the cars for Albany. The Eighty-first Regiment was raised in Oswego and Oneida Counties, and is composed of a fine set of men. They were with Gen. MCCLELLAN all through the Peninsular campaign, and were afterward with Gen. FOSTER'S Charleston expedition, at which time their Colonel (DE FORREST) was in command of the brigade and won honors for his and their bravery. Since that time they have been in North Carolina doing outpost duty in the Dismal Swamps, fifteen miles from any other troops, and where their pickets were nightly firied [sic] upon by the enemy. Their original colors were so torn and service-worn as to be useless, and were sent to the State Department at Albany, where they now are. A second set was presented them by the Messrs. INGERSOLL, of Oneida County.
The Ninety-sixth Regiment was organized at Pittsburgh, under command of Col. JAMES M. FAIRMAN; the rank and file were principally enlisted in the northeastern section of the State, through the exertions of the late Col. CHARLES O. GRAY, of Warrensburgh, Warren County; they were also through the Peninsular campaign, the greater portion of the time under command of Lieut.-Col. CHARLES O. GRAY. At the siege of Yorktown, at Williamsburgh [sic], and in innumerable skirmishes along the line of the Chickahominy, under their gallant and favorite commander, the Ninety-sixth was distinguished for its dash, endurance and bravery. On the 29th of May, in one of the then common picket skirmishes, its Major, JOHN E. KELLY, was killed. At Fair Oaks it was one of the first regiments to engage the enemy, and the last to leave the field. At Suffolk, Lieut.-Col. GRAY was promoted to the colonelcy of the regiment, and in honor of the occasion, he presented to his command a beautiful stand of colors. When Gen. FOSTER organized his expedition to Goldsboro, the Ninety-sixth was with him, and at the battle of Kinston, the gallant Colonel, CHARLES O. GRAY, while leading a charge, was killed at the head of his regiment. The regiment built and finished the fort at Plymouth, N. C., which, in honor of their services, and in memory of their late Colonel, was, by order of the General Commanding the Department, called Fort Gray.
The Ninety-eighth Regiment were also with Gen. MCCLELLAN through the Peninsular campaign, and their decimated ranks show how well they performed their duty. They entered the field commanded by Col. DUTTON, a brave and excellent officer. He was taken with typhus fever at Fair Oaks, and died. He was succeeded by Col. DURKEE, who resigned while the regiment was at St. Helena Island. The command then devolved upon its present commander, Lieut-Col. WEAD, who has fully proved himself a gallant officer, and who is dearly loved by his men. The regiment after going through almost all the battles of the Army of the Potomac were assigned to duty at Pungo Bridge, Va., and here they remained until they came on to New-York.

ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
CAMP DETACHMENT 81ST N. Y. V.,
NORTH-WEST LANDING, Va., March 18.
To the Editor of the Oswego Commercial Times:
It was with the utmost satisfaction that we who were left behind here in the wilderness, read the account of the enthusiastic and cordial reception extended to our comrades, by the citizens of Oswego, on their arrival, published in your excellent journal. It is true, that with this feeling of satisfaction was mingled regrets that we were not present on that joyous occasion to share the hearty greeting; but we consoled ourselves with the thought that the stern exigencies of the service required some of us to remain and continue the dull routine of duty, or to encounter new perils while the "veterans" were home on furlough; and with the hope that "When this cruel war is over," we may return with the 81st "for good" and receive our full share of welcome with interest, all the more sweet and precious because of our present deprivation.
There are here about one hundred and seventy-five men and five officers belonging to the 81st, and five companies of the 139th N. Y. V., encamped in the midst of a dense pine forest near the North-West River, a small stream running from the Dismal Swamp to the Currituck Sound. On our right runs the old post road from Norfolk to Elizabeth City, N. C. All around us is a flat uninteresting country covered with swamps and impenetrable jungle, with here and there a clearing large enough for a respectable sized farm; these when improved have a small dwelling and outbuildings, the latter usually built of logs in the rudest manner, and so old and dilapidated as to look ready to tumble down at the first push of a good strong wind. When fenced these clearings or farms are surrounded by pine rails laid up after the "snake" or "worm pattern" so common in all parts of Virginia, but they are seldom wholly enclosed, sometimes a deep ditch is dug by the roadside, and this answers the double purpose of a fence and drain to carry off the water from the fields. When the ground on which we are encamped was first selected, it was covered with pines of gigantic stature and fifty years growth; but now that it is cleared and the debris removed from the surface, it shows evident signs of former cultivation. The broad furrows and ridges left by the ancient Virginia ploughs are plainly to be seen all over it. It is probable that this is a portion of the worn-out tobacco land, similar to those large tracts on the Peninsula. The woods, for miles about us, are crossed and re-crossed in every direction by blind roads and bridle paths—a very paradise for guerrillas and partisan rangers to carry out their operations in. It is, indeed, already famous in history as the field of Marion's exploits in the War of the Revolution, and many a brainless youth whose Southern blood has been "fired," either by Southern wrongs or corn whisky, (on which the modern chivalry depend so much for knight­ly courage,) has in these degenerate days fancied himself a second Marion, and mount­ing a steed of questionable breed and equip­ment, sallied forth (at night) to rob and murder in the most approved style of mod­ern knightly costume, slouch hat and linsey woolsey, in the name of the Southern Con­federacy, but alas! for poetry and romance, has had his career untimely checked by being "nabbed" by the "mudsills" of the 81st and ignominiously marched off to the Norfolk jail. One of these gentry was brought in last night. He claims to belong to Stuart's cavalry and to have been home on furlough—an assertion which he will have an opportunity to prove before the Provost Marshal at Norfolk, to whom he was sent. Since our arrival at this place these marauders have kept pretty quiet, not venturing on any bolder feat than firing from concealed thickets on unarmed travelers, and once or twice on our most exposed pickets under cover of the darkness. But since the departure of the regiment a large force of rebel troops has appeared in our front and kept us pretty busy. General Ransom's division of North Carolina troops, about 8,000 men of all arms, with twelve pieces of artillery, are about fifteen miles from us and scouting parties from them an­noy our outposts considerably. Soon after the regiment went home they made a for­ward movement, and for two days we ex­pected an attack hourly, and were prepared to make the best stand we could. But Gen. Hickman coming up from Portsmouth with a force on their left flank diverted their attention somewhat, but they sent out a party of cavalry and two howitzers, in all about eight hundred men, to capture and burn this camp. We went out three hundred strong the same morning, and taking the back track a few miles struck off to the right through the swamp and formed a junction with the troops under Heckman. We were seen by their scouts and reported as a fresh force from Portsmouth to rein­force Heckman, and fearing lest we should get in their rear and cut their communication with the main body, they dared not attack the small camp guard we had left behind, but fell back on their main body and the whole force afterward retreated to a place called "White Store," fifteen miles distant from here, thirteen miles across the North Carolina line. We returned to camp the next day and shortly after learned the facts, as stated, of their movements, by two citizens whom they had arrested and held to prevent them from giving us any information, but released when they retreated.
We are still expecting a visit from them one of these fine nights, and our exposed position leads us to exercise increased vigilance [sic]. We have no especial desire to add to the number of the unfortunate inmates of the "Libby" or "Belle Isle" hotels at Richmond, and therefore the rebels have as good a chance to "catch a weasel asleep," as to catch us napping. There can be little doubt but that the presence of these rebel troops, in North Carolina, is for the purpose of making another attempt on the places held by us, and thus feed with delusive hopes the hungry ones, who begin to despair of the success of the Southern Confederacy, and to keep down the rising Union sentiment among the people of the "Old North State." Yours, very truly,
WALLACE.

COMMERCIAL TIMES.
Oswego, Friday Evening, March 18.
CITY AND COUNTY.
FROM THE EIGHTY-FIRST.—The following letter from a member of the 81st, now in Virginia, to Lieut. E. A. COOKE, will be read with interest by many of the veterans now in this city:
DISMAL SWAMP, VA.,
March, 8, 1864.
MY DEAR LIEUT.:—A fortnight has passed since you left us, and the dull monotony has been broken by no routine of excitement; once only have we experienced any vivid change, and that was likely to produce anything but pleasant results. It seems it was the intention of the rebel Gen. Ransom to make this camp his especial notice; consequently he brought with him cavalry, artillery and infantry, numbering in all some seven thousand. His proximity to us was discovered Tuesday morning, and the intelligence was communicated to headquarters immediately. Orders soon arrived from Gen. Hickman for our forces here to form a junction with him at Bellihack, and to proceed forthwith for that purpose to Shingle Landing. The order was instantly complied with. One hundred men, and most of them invalids, were left to defend the camp.—Late in the afternoon our troops reached the little place, and saw the enemy awaiting them. Night dark and dismal, came, and our gallant little band rested from the fatigues of the day. In the morning it was observed that the rebel column was retreating in the direction of South Mills, and our cavalry followed them a distance of eight or ten miles. Our forces about faced and returned to camp at noon. Two Norfolk gentlemen, who were inside of our lines, and were detained by the enemy, were liberated when they commenced the retreat, and reported to us in substance as follows: Their sole object was to attack us, and destroy our camp, which was prevented by circumstances most fortunate. They supposed that we were still here, and if they moved down upon us they might expect a fire in their rear. Our troops going by way of Shingle Landing, instead of North-west, deceived them; if they had proceeded the latter route, the enemy, knowing that they came from here, would, of course, killed or taken them all prisoners, and then visited the little party here. The rebs believed Hickman's force was equal to their own, when in fact he did not have over a thousand men all told. Quite a "Providential escape."

Letter from Morris Island.
MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., April 22, 1864.
the Editor of the Oswego Commercial Times:
SIR—We have perused your paper with uncommon interest since the veteran portion of the 81st N. Y. Regiment went home on furlough. It may be forgotten by some that eleven of the original members of that regiment volunteered about a year ago for three years longer service, in the 3d South Carolina Infantry, now the 21st U. S. C. T. I here give their names and positions in the regiment: Lieut.-Colonel Augustus G. Bennett, Commanding Regiment; Captains R. H. Willoughby, Henry Sharp, Edgar Abeel; Lieutenants B. G. Read, J. E. Jacobs, (Acting Adjutant,) N. Milz, James Anderson, and Commissary Sergeant O. L. Cook. All these would have been home as veterans but could not be allowed the gratification. Lieut. E. Slack, Adjutant, one of our number, died in September last. He left the government of his own native country to enlist in our cause and few, indeed, possess more zeal for the freedom of all mankind than he did; neither are there any more brave in battle than he was. Lieut. W. G. Cornwell, another of us, was discharged for disability.
Our Regiment has never yet been under fire except the officers, who are tried veterans. We were held as a reserve at the battle of Olustee, Florida. Your readers all know the result of that unfortunate affair. At Jacksonville we were put in Col. Jas. Montgomery's brigade (of Kansas notoriety) and went with him on the expedition to Palatka. When it was decided to evacuate that place our brigade was ordered to Picolata, some 30 miles down, and on the opposite side of the St. Johns River. We landed without opposition and fortified the place by constructing earthworks, stockades and abattis, and when completed we was relieved by two companies of the 3d U. S. C. T., who will garrison it. I will here mention that the steamer Maple Leaf, a boat well known in Oswego, was on her down trip after our Regiment when she was blown up and sunk by a torpedo of Manderiene. The General Hunter, which suffered the same fate by one of these infernal machines, only a few yards from the former, had our commissary stores aboard on her way to Jacksonville. We left Picolata on the 19th instant, and arrived here on the 21st, where we are doing guard and picket duty and keeping an eye out generally for the evil doings of the enemy. Our present camp is not as pleasantly situated as others we have lately occupied among the orange groves of Florida. The officer's tents are located on sand hills, interspersed along sand ridge or bluff on the margin of the sea shore and overlooking on one side the "rolling deep," on the other a dismal marsh with numerous meandering creeks, channeled by the ebb and flow of the ocean's tide. Beyond and not three miles distant is James Island; around its edges in plain view to the naked eye is a chain of the enemy's defiant fortifications. Away to our right surrounded by water lay the ruins of Fort Sumter. Occasionally a smothered cannon gasps for life, opening its mouth toward the Sodom of secession, but the city's only response is the echo of her deserted halls; more to our front the church spires tower above the tree tops; while near Fort Gregg the streets can plainly be seen and in still weather the Fort sends her morning and evening (and at any optional intermediate time) greeting messenger, saluting the city by exploding a bomb shell in her midst.
Last night the enemy gave our camps on this Island a tremendous shelling. Fortunately only one person was killed and five wounded. Our forces took refuge in their bomb proofs. They have become too wise to waste much saltpetre and iron on our formidable works. To-night is cloudy and dark. The Ironsides is moving around the bay illuminating the heavens and water for miles, with her revolving electrical light.
The late storms have exhumed large numbers of our dead, as well as those of the enemy, by the washing away of the beach. Col. Montgomery is in command of the post. Lieut.-Col. Bennett commands his (Col. M.'s) brigade. It seems to be the intention of the Government to send away the white troops from this unhealthy Department and replace them with U. S. C. Troops, who are by nature suited to a warm climate, as large numbers of them are daily arriving. More anon, if this is not contraband.
JAKE.

THE 81ST REGIMENT.—We last evening received a communication from Lieut. E. A. COOK, of the 81st Regiment, giving an account of the part our boys played in the battles of the 2d and 3d inst., to which is appended a list of the casualties in the Regiment up to the 4th of June. As the account varies in no particular from that published by us yesterday, and the casualties are precisely the same, it would be superfluous to publish it. We return our thanks to Lieut. COOK for his kindness and regret that we did not receive the communication earlier. It is dated June 4th, but did not reach us till yesterday. Lieut. COOK is acting Adjutant of the Regiment, during the disability of Adjutant MALLETTE.

FROM THE EIGHTY-FIRST REGIMENT.
—A couple of private notes, written on the battle-field by Major WHITE, of the 81st, have been handed us by his brother in this city, to whom they were addressed. They were written hurriedly in pencil, on a blank leaf of his diary, and bear upon their envelope the stamps of the U. S. Sanitary Commission, through whose agency they were forwarded to Washington. Though brief and devoid of details, they show us something of the fearful work in which our second Oswego regiment has been engaged, and will be read with interest by every one who has a relative, friend or acquaintance in that gallant body of veterans. With great anxiety we await the arrival of the list of casualties among the officers and men:

BATTLE-FIELD NEAR RICHMOND,
June 2, 1864.
DEAR BROTHER:—We are in the fight again. We commenced yesterday. We have lost about sixty killed and wounded. We are still under fire. We have lost some noble men. The regiment has done nobly. You will no doubt be interested to know that I am, by the providence of GOD, uninjured. Everything seems to be going well.
D. B. WHITE.

CAMP 81ST N. Y. Vols.,
Near Gaines' Mill, June 8, 1864.
DEAR BROTHER:—This morning we charged upon the enemy's works, taking their first line of rifle-pits. Our loss was very severe. Twelve officers were killed and wounded, and about two hundred men, which, with our loss of sixty men yesterday, has reduced the 81st very much. Thus far, by the providence of GOD, I have been spared from any injury. Lieut. Seward Zimmerman is reported badly wounded. Capt. Tyler is wounded in the arm. Capt. Ballard is reported killed. Capt. Richardson is wounded.
We hear that heavy reinforcements are coming. The firing is continual; and though we are in a tolerably secure position, we are continually harassed [sic] with all kinds of missiles that can be shot with guns.
D. B. WHITE.
Other private letters have also been received to-day. Capt. RICHARDSON is wounded in three places. Lieut. COVILLE lost an arm. JOHN LYNCH, brother of B. LYNCH, of this city, is at White House, severely wounded in the right hand, and en route for a Northern hospital. Adjutant MALETTE is in hospital at Washington, with good prospects of recovery. His horse was shot from under him in the fight of the 1st inst.
COMMERCIAL TIMES.
Oswego, Wednesday Evening, June 8. (1864)
THE EIGHTY-FIRST REGIMENT.—We find in the special correspondence of the Philadelphia Inquirer, the following relating to the conduct and loss of the Eighty-first regiment in the battle of Friday last:
The Eighty-first New York Regiment, of Marston's brigade, Brooks division, had the front of that brigade in making the charge, and suffered terribly. Nearly every officer of the regiment is either killed or wounded. General Marston was struck by a fragment of shell early in the morning, but remained on the field throughout the day. The list of wounded in the Eighty-first includes:
Adjutant J. E. Mallette, side, serious.
Capt. M. J. DeForrest, left leg, amputated below knee.
Capt. B. W. Richardson, arm
Lieut. Coville, hand.
Capt. R. D. S. Tyler, arms.
Lieut. M. P. Tidd, shoulder.
Capt. Hugh Anderson, thigh.
Lieut. Seward Zimmerman, arm.
Lieut. E. A. Cook, leg.

COMMERCIAL TIMES.
Oswego, Friday Evening, June 10.
PARTIAL LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED OF THE OSWEGO COUNTY REGIMENTS IN THE LATE BATTLES.—We compile from our New York City exchanges the names thus far reported killed and wounded belonging to regiments raised in this vicinity. This list is only a partial one, but it exhibits nevertheless a record of bravery and gallantry on the part of Oswego's sons of which we may well be proud. While we rejoice in the never dying glory they have won, our keenest sympaties [sic] still are due to those whose homes are made desolate by the cruel fortunes of the battle field.

LOSSES IN THE EIGHTY-FIRST.
Killed.
Captain James Martin.
Lieut. J. W. Brooks.
Capt. W. W. Ballard.
Joseph Hager, Co K
Sergeant Greggs, Co K
Color Sergt Evans Michaels, Co E
Corp. W. W. Birch, Co E
Corp. Nelson Emlow, Co A
Corp. Levi Blair, Co B.
John Wilber, Co B
Albert Potter, Co C
Charles Walrath, Co C
J. Cleveland, Co C
W. Matteson, Co D
W. T. Stewart, Co D
Corp. Dan. Aldrich, Co E
Timothy Crowley, Co E
John J. Owens, Co E
Alvin S. Rudd, Co F
Geo. A. Hoag, Co G
Allen Smith, Co F
James Sully, Co F
Sergt. D. Fordred, Co H
C. A. Redfield, Co H
Corp. W. Ballard, Co I
Chas. Dunn, Co I
Henry R. Hardy, Co I
Fred. Byre, Co I
James C. Lewis, Co I
Henry E. Wright, Co I
Joseph Elliston, Co K
Corp. C. B. Tuttle, Co I
C. Gyer, Co B
Sergt. W. E. Dunham, Co F

Wounded.
J. G. Patterson, Co G, back and arm
S. Meykel, Co C, breast
J. W. Lara way, Co C, hand
G. Smith, Co K, foot and shoulder
F. Derby, Co E
G. Morrison, Co D
C. Wimple, Co D
W. Ormsbee, Co A
C. C. Stanton, Co H, thigh
___ Patterson, Co F, leg
Capt. R. S. Tyler, arm, slightly
Capt. Hugh Anderson, thigh
Capt. B. W. Richardson, leg and hand
W. H. Brown, Co D, arm
W. L. Stewart, Co D, arm
Ed. A. Davis, Co G, arm
G. W. David, Co D, ear
W. Churchill, Co D
W. T. Jones, Co C
Sergt. J. E. Perkins, Co B, leg amputated
C. Toughley, Co C, leg and back
L. Hall, Co D, head
Sergt. J. Bartlett, Co I, thigh
Hugh McDarklin, Co C, leg
F. Hagermer, Co E, leg
Henry Rich, Co C, thigh
J. Howell, Co H, leg
G. Leary, Co I, arm
Joseph Remington
Lieut. C. C. Covelle, Co K, wrist
Lieut. J. M. Baxter, Co B
J. Simpson, Co A
A Marshall, Co B
J. Tooney, Co B
P. J. Eastman, Co A
A. Snyder, Co I
Capt. M. J. DeForrest, foot, amputated
Sergt Crolius, knee
J Fitzgerald, Co A, foot
Corp. Wallartin, Co D, finger
A. Walling, Co. I, shoulder
C. Hotaling, Co C, thigh
Corp. J. Hager
Lieut. Seward Zimmerman, Co H, arm.
F. Le Roy, Co B, legs and arm
R. E. Lawrence, Co F, legs
J. Lookentely, Co H, hand and face
R. G. Sanford, Co E, hip

COMMERCIAL TIMES.
Oswego, Friday Evening, June 17.
LETTER FROM LIEUT, E. A. COOK.—We are permitted to make the following extracts from a letter written by the above officer to his sister—Mrs. B. D. BARNES of this city:
HEADQUARTERS 81ST N. Y. VOLS.
In the Field, June 11th, 1864.
Since our engagement of the 3d, the 81st has been mainly engaged in occupying the front line carried by us in the charge of that day. Our line has been strengthened and is now holding a position not two hundred yards from that of the enemy. No heavy fighting has taken place in our front within two days, but the two armies are lying almost breast to breast, and watching each other with the most unceasing vigilance [sic].
Sharpshooters and riflemen are constantly at work and occasional compliments are exchanged in grape and canister when either side become so bold as to raise their heads above their works to observe the movements of the other. The weather is pleasant, but at times exceedingly hot.
The troops are generally in good health. The most unwavering confidence exists in Gen. Grant's ability to bring this campaign to a successful termination.
For the first time since the war three Oswego Regiments are together--the 24th, 81st and 147th are here, and the boys are enjoying the opportunity for a visit with their friends.
Since writing you before we have learned of the death of Adj. Mallett who died of wounds received during the engagement of Friday last.
We have now but a few officers with the Regiment.—Besides those wounded during the recent engagements Col. DeForrest and Lieuts. Clark and Brockway are in Hospital, Capt. John T. DeForrest has not yet returned from the north, where he was left when the Regiment returned to the field. You will no doubt hear important news from here within a few days.

Correspondence of the Patriot and Gazette.
The Gallant Eighty-First.
This Regiment was among the first to enter the service; their three years were nearly gone and all had enlisted for three years more, or the war. They had been in engagements at the seige [sic] of Yorktown, at Williamsburg, Bottom Bridge, Savage Station, Seven Pines, Chickahominy, Malvern Hill and White Oak Swamp, and passed through the raids at Wilmington, Trenton and Murfreesboro, N. C. In all these engagements their losses had been small, though their ranks had been thinned by disease. But at last the time came for that Regiment of well trained heroes to lead the charge; and most bravely they did their duty. On the 3d instant they were ordered to lead the assault on the rebel earthworks at the battle of Cold Harbor, Va. Here they proved themselves soldiers.—While others with them faltered, they pressed on, three of their number mounting the parapets, and each one fell by the rebel sharpshooters. Two only of the nine Captains escaped, two being killed. More than one half the Regiment were killed and wounded. Never was greater bravery displayed by any Regiment. So well they fought, that they were especially complimented by their Brigade and Division commanders. The surviving heroes deserve a lasting tribute of praise from all loyal hearts; and the names and memory of the honored dead should be kept green by every lover of his country, and handed down to posterity by our children's children, to be honored as the saviors of our country in this her darkest hour.
Among these names will stand foremost that of W. W. Burch, son of George Burch, Esq., of Granby. He was a true soldier, and was selected to the important post of color-bearer and fell while faithfully doing his duty. Thus a brave and promising young soldier and patriot has fallen while fighting for his country, and, although he was young in years, he fell as a brave soldier delights to fall.—if fall he must,—with his face to the foe and in defence of a noble cause, the maintenance of an undivided country with freedom secured to all. G.

Fulton, June 20, 1864.
Casualties in the Eighty-First.
The following is a list of killed, wounded and missing of the 81st regiment, in the action of June 2d and 3d:
OFFICERS KILLED.—Capt. W W Ballard, Capt. Jas. Martin. 1st Lieut. John W Burke, 2d Lieut. Drayson Fordred.
OFFICERS WOUNDED.—Capt. R D S Tyler, Capt. H Anderson, Capt. R A Frances, Capt. B W Richardson, Capt. M J DeForest, Adjt. J E Mallette, Lieut. J M Baxter, Lieut. C C Covell, Lieut. Seward Zimmerman, Lieut. E D Cook, Lieut. Maurice P. Tidd.
Co. A, KILLED—1st Sergeant George G Griggs, Corp. W W Burch, Corp. Nelson Emlow.
WOUNDED—Corp. Frank Coon, privates George W Stone, Wm Ormsby, John Shippy, James Prosser, Jas. Simpson, Valentine Lapoint, James Fitzgerald, Richard Wilson.
MISSING —Private Frank Welch.
Co. B, KILLED—Corp. Levi Blair, private John Wilber.
WOUNDED—1st Sergeant W M Horton, Serg't J V Perkins, Corporals Wm Angel. George Darling, Thos Lawton; privates S W Newton, Clein Peere, Henry Marshall Frank LeRov, Peter Furnia, Joseph Mennette, V D Babcock, J K Kent.
Fifteen of this company are missing whose names can not be obtained at this time.
Co. C, KILLED—Albert Potter, Archibald Hotaling, John Cleveland, Charles Walrath.
WOUNDED—Sergeants David Nethaway, Charles C Hotaling; Corporal Franklin Edie; privates James Wilcox, John B Theall, John W. Laraway, John E Patterson, Patrick Mitchell, Hugh McLaughlin, S Michaels, Marshal Crisman, Oscar B Holden, James Fitzgerald, Joshua Bennett, James Hane, Wm F Janes, Lorenzo F Vannatter, Jacob Kilbourn, Wm H Hane, Thos Flynn, James Pruyne
Co. D, KILLED—William Mattison.
WOUNDED—Sergeant W P Babcock; Corporals Seth Morrison, H Martin; privates L Barnes, W H Brown, W T Churchill, G W Davis, D Gload, Joseph Remmington, C Hall, L Hall, James Low, W F Stewart.
MISSING—C Hill.
Co. E, KILLED—Serg't Evan Michaels; Corp. Daniel Aldrich; privates Timothy Crowley, John I. Owen.
WOUNDED—Sergeants Henry H Clark, Charles Hay; Corp'ls Christopher C Williams, John E Boyle; privates Henry J Elllis, Geo W Sodden, John Jones, Wm Kemp, Alonzo Maine, Joseph Witzeuber, Calvin Wheat, P. O'Brien, Alvinza Barnes. F M Durby, Phillip J Eastman, Theodore Hazener, Hiram J. Palmer. Raphael G Sanford, Geo Hamilton, Wm Rudy. MISSING—Martin Warner, John Meyres.
Co. F, KILLED—Serg't Wm E Cunham, private Alvin S Rudd.
WOUNDED—Serg't Jeremiah Tripp; Corporals Isaac W Bunn, Samuel W Dunham, Daniel C Varmilye; privates Robert E Lawrence, Morris T Gordon, Hezekiah Allen, Henry H Patterson, Selah Taylor, James Dyne, Wm Bishop, Allen Harp, John Lynch, Arthur Hall.
MISSING—Alfred Buck, Charles Kendall.
Co. G, KILLED—Geo H Hoag, Allen Smith, James Sully.
WOUNDED—Sergeant Stephen H Winans; Corporals Frank Martin, Myron C Peters; privates Daniel F Becker, Casper J Bunn, Thos C Bridges, John Drain, Charles H Ford. Daniel Madden, Marshal D Purdy. James B Penfield, John McCatherine, Richard Titus, Nathan Dimon, Henry Hamel, Edward A Davis, Abram Kitts, Joshua Duly.
Co. H, KILLED—Charles A Redfield.
WOUNDED—Corporals E M Paine, William Shay; privates Ira Lukentally, James L Howell, Hugh Rhoddy.
MISSING—Benjamin F Hills, Henry J Soper, Christopher Stanton.
Co. I, KILLED—Corporal Chas B Tuttle; private Charles Dunn, Frederick Hyre, Henry E Wright Henry R Hardy, James C Lewis.
WOUNDED—Serg'ts Joseph Bartlett, Charles Byam, Corporals Roselle Proctor, Chauncey Town, George Larcy, Ransford Zimmerman, Emery Sexton; private Francis Benedict, Harvey S Cornish, Newell Doty Geo Fetterly, J Ferguson, F J Graves, W C Graves, Thos Hamersley, C C Halsted Jacob Hyde, Hanse Kinney, Thomas McDonald, A B Smith, A Snyder A Sterns, James Ward, Andrew Whalen, William Wood, John Jarvis.
MISSING—James Thayer, Daniel Drake.
Co. K, KILLED—Corporal Joseph Hager; private Joseph Ellison.
WOUNDED—Sergeants John King, Eli B Crane, Jas M Crolius; Corporals David H Austin, Luke J Tryon; privates George W Anthony, Henry M Allen, Morris Bookman, Charles W Enslow, Samuel D Mills, David L Martin, John H Richardson, Dexter Sampson, Henry Thomas, David Tanner, Robert Todd, Winslow Vandercook, John Wimple, Charles Wimple, Henry C Wells, George Smith.
MISSING—Peleg C Letson, Wm Reynolds, Charles H Sears.

COMMERCIAL TIMES.
Oswego, Monday Evening, June 20.
FROM THE 81st REGIMENT.
Its Brilliant Achievements.
The Bloody Battle of June 3d.
THE REGIMENT IN THE ADVANCE.
It Plants its Flag on the Enemy's Works
COMPLETE LIST OF CASUALTIES.
The following extracts we copy from the army correspondence of the Rochester Express It vividly describes the brilliant achievements of the gallant veterans of the 8lst Regiment, in the bloody battle of Friday June 3d. Oswego county may well be proud of her sons. The gallant boys evidently remembered the promises they made here at the time of their furlough, that if the fortune of war should again place them in front of the enemy they would surpass, if possible, their former exploits. Right nobly have they redeemed that promise.—They have covered themselves with imperishable glory. Those who have fallen are mourned by their fellow citizens; the wounded have their sympathy, and the unscathed the heartfelt wishes of all for their future safety. We subjoin a complete list of the casualties in the regiment:
HEADQUARTERS 81st VET, VOLS , IN THE FIELD, NEAR GAINES' FARM,
June 4th, 1864.
* * * * On the night of the 1st our regiment was held in reserve during the attack of our division (Brook's) upon the enemy's works, in. which our forces carried a long line of rifle pits and captured a large number of prisoners. At 10 o'clock the same night our brigade relieved the front line and during the night repulsed several efforts of the enemy to retake their lost position. At three o'clock the next morning we were deployed as skirmishers, and advanced for the purpose of ascertaining the position of the enemy's next line. We advanced steadily through the dense fog and darkness until we came within fifteen paces of the enemy's line, where we encountered such opposition as rendered it impracticable to advance farther without support. They soon came up and the works were quickly carried, but not without considerable loss on both sides. It was here that our gallant and esteemed Lieut. John W. Burke was killed, while cheering on his men. During the operations of that day we lost about sixty, including M. _. Fields, who was severely wounded.
At three o'clock on the morning of the third we were again in line. The rain was falling furiously, and the men stood drenched and shivering, wondering what was to come next. The order was given to forward, and we advanced in double column on the centre. We were to assault the next line of  fortifications, which were more formidable than those we had already captured; and as they hove in sight from the clearing beyond the woods, their long lines of musketry and artillery waiting to pour out their deadly vollies as soon as our columns should come within their range, was a prospect not at all inviting to those who were to participate in the conflict.
The 81st was again selected to lead the advance. The order was given to charge, and with a deafening yell the regiment plunged in. The scenes that followed baffle description and can only be imagined by those who have seen and heard the carnage of a desperate battle field. Two-thirds of our number fell in the charge. The survivors planted the colors of the 81st on the captured works.
The enemy fled in confusion, and those who did not fall in their flight, rallied again behind another and still stronger breastwork, which is but one of the continuous lines which, I suppose, lie at distances of a quarter of a mile from here to Richmond. Your readers will understand something of what we have before us when they learn how these works cover each other over our whole line of approach. During the several recent engagements in which our regiment has participated, Lt. Col. Raulston has been in command, and his conduct, as well as that of the regiment, has received from our division and other Generals the highest praise. All the other officers have behaved splendidly, and it would be unjust to leave out the names of either of them as less worthy of mention than the others.
The regiment is very much cut up, and is temporarily formed into two provisional companies. We are all still in the front, however, and hope soon to bring up enough from our sick and wounded to be ready for heavy work again.
The following is a list of the killed, wounded, and missing in the 81st regiment:
Officers Killed.—Capt. W. W. Ballard, 1st Lt. John W. Burke, Lt. Drayson Fordred.
Officers Wounded.—Captains James Martin, R. D. S. Tyler, Hugh Anderson, R. A. Francis, B. W. Richardson, M. J. De Forest; Adjt. J. E. Mallette; Lieuts. J. M. Baxter, C. C. Covill, Seward Zimmerman, E. D. Cook, Maurice P. Field.
Co. A—Killed—Sergt. George G. Griggs, Corp. W. W. Birch, Corp. Nelson Frulow.
Wounded—Corp. Frank Coon, George H. Stone, Wm. Ormsby, John Shippey, James Prosser, James Simson, Valentine La Point, James Fitzgerald, Richard Wilson.
Missing—Frank Welsh.
Co. B—Killed.—Corp. Levi Blair, John Wilber. Wounded.—Sergt. W. M. Horton, Sergt. J. V. Perkins, Corp. W. M. Angell, Corp. Geo. Darling, Corp.
Thos. Lawton, S. W. Newton, Clem. Pearce, H. Marshall, Frank Le Roy, Peter Furnia, Jos. Marlette, V. D. Baboock, J. K. Kent.
Missing—Sebastian Stone, Wm. Blair.
Co. C—Killed—Albert Potter, Archibald Hotaling, Corp. John Cleveland, Charles Walrath.
Wounded—Serjt. David Nethaway, Sergt. Chas. C. Hotaling, Corp. Franklin Edic, James Wilcox, John B. Thrall, John W. Laraway, John E. Patterson, Patrick Mitchell, Hugh McLaughlin, Stephen Michael, Marshal Christman, Oscar B. Holden, James Fitzgerald, Joshua Bennett, James Hane, Wm. F. Jones, Lorenzo F. Vannatta, Jacob Kilbourn, Wm H. Hane, Thos. Flynn, James Pruyne.
CO D—Killed—William Mattison.
Wounded.—Serjt. W. P. Babcock, Corp. Seth Morrison, Corp. H. Martin, L. Barnes, W. H. Brown, W. F. Churchill, G. W. Davis, D. Gload, Joseph Remington, C. Hall, L. Hall, James Law, W. F. Stewart.
Missing—O. Hill.
Co. B—Killed—Sergt Evan Michaels, Corp Daniel Aldrich, T Crowley, John J Owen.
Wounded—Sergt H H Clark, Sergt Chas Hayes, Corp C C Williams, Corp J E Boyle, H J Ellis, G W Godden, John Jones, Wm Kemp, Alonzo Maine (dead), J Witzengater, C Wheat, P O'Brien, A Barnes, F M Durby, P J Eastman, T Hagener, H J Palmer, R G Sanford, G Hamilton, Wm Rudy.
Missing—Martin Warren, John Myers.
Co F—Killed—Sergt W E Dunham, Alvin S Rudd.
Wounded—Sergt J Tripp, Corp J W Brown, S W Dunham, D C Vermilyer, R E Lawrence, M T Gordon, H Allen, H H Patterson, Selah Taylor, J Dyne, Wm Bishop, A Hart, J Lynch, Arthur Hall.
Missing—Alfred Buck, Chas Kendall.
Co G—Killed—George H Hoag, Allen Smith, James Sulley.
Wounded—1st Sergt Stephen H Winans, Corp Frank Masters, Myron C Peters, Priv Daniel C Becker, Casper I Brown, Thos C Bridges, John Drain, Chas H Ford, Daniel Madden, Marshall D Purdy, Jas B Penfield, John McCatharine, Nathan Dimon, Richard Titus, Henry Hamel, Edmund Davies, Abram Kitts, Joshua Duly.
Co. H—Killed—Chas A Redfield.
Wounded—Corp E H Payne, Wm Shay, Priv Ira Lewkentally, James L Howell, Hugh Rhoddy.
Missing—Benj F Hills, Henry J Loper, Christopher Stanton.
Co. I—Killed—Corp Chester B Tuttle, Priv Chas Dunn, Frederick Hyer, Henry E Wright, Henry B Hardy, James C Lewis.
Wounded—Sergt Joseph Bartlett, Chas Ryan, Corp Roselle Proctor, Chauncey Town, George Leusy, Ramsford C Timmerman, Emory Sexton, Priv Francis Benedict, Harvey S Cornish, Newell Doty, George Fetterly, Jay Ferguson, F P Graves, W C Graves, Thomas Hammersley, Cassius C Halstead, Jacob Hyde, Handsell Kinney, Thomas McDonald, Albert Schnider, Allen Storms, Almon B Smith, Andrew Whalen, Samuel L Willard, James Ward, William Wood, John T Davis, Daniel Fetterley.
Co. K—Killed—Sergt Eli B Crane, Corp J G Hager, Joseph Elliston, Pelig C Letson.
Wounded—Sergt John King, Corp Luke J Tryon, Corp Daniel H Auston, Geo W Anthing, Henry W Allen, Morris Boakman, Chas W Eoslow, Samuel D Mills, David L Martin, John H Richardson, Wm Rylands, Dexter Samson, Chas H Sears, George Smith, Henry Thomas, Robt Todd, David Tanner, W Vandercook, John P Wimple, Chas Wimple, Henry C Wells.

THE EIGHTY-FIRST.—This regiment which has seen much hard service under Butler, is thus alluded to by a correspondent of the N. Y. Tribune:
I have mentioned that two regiments of this corps (the 10th) received the personal thanks of Gen. Weitzel of the 18th corps, and it ought to be stated that Gen. Gilmore in a similar way complimented the 81st New York, Col. De Forrest, for gallantry on the left at Drury's Bluff. This regiment has done a very large share of hard work since its arrival, having been on picket duty much of the time.
It will be gratifying to every true Oswegonian to learn that our regiment has been thought worthy of a special compliment from its commanding General.

THE WAR MEETING LAST EVENING.—The meeting was addressed last evening by Wm. M. McNall, Esq., who for an hour held the large assemblage spell-bound by his eloquence. Dr. RICE, Surgeon of the 81st Regiment, who but a few days since returned from the headquarters of that organization in the field before Petersburg. He detailed the labor performed by the Army of the Potomac during the present campaign and urged the necessity of enlistments for the purpose of reinforcing them. During the doctor's remarks a heavy shower passed over the city, and the meeting was abruptly brought to a close.
Another war meeting will be held this evening at the same hour and place.

THE EIGHTY-FIRST.—The Oswego Companies of this Regiment, as we have a ready announced left here for Albany yesterday, but there are a number of men on the "sick" roll, and other absentees not sick who should immediately report to First Lieut. E. A. COOK, at the Recruiting office near the TIMES establishment. The Lieutenant does not know how long time he may have to remain, and suggests that those soldiers who are going with him will need to report quickly.

HOME MATTERS.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE COUNTY.
RETURN OF VETERAN REGIMENTS.—Yesterday morning the 81st, 96th and 98th Regiments, attached to Ledlie's Brigade, arrived in this city. These regiments have been in the army two years, during which time the members have seen pretty severe service. Each regiment returns with about four hundred men, most of whom have re-enlisted for the war. Upon their arrival in this city the regiments proceeded direct to the barracks, where the members will remain for a few days and then go to their homes in the West—having received furloughs for thirty days. The regiments are composed of a fine looking body of men—all young and active. The following is a brief history of these gallant regiments:
The 81st New York Volunteers were recruited in the counties of Oswego and Oneida in the fall of 1861, and left the State early in March, 1862, under Colonel Edwin Rose. On the 1st of April, disembarked at Fortress Monroe for the peninsular campaign. At the siege of Yorktown it performed picket duty opposite. Winn's Mills; was at the battle of Seven Pines, in which engagement Major McAnebly and one hundred and thirty-six men were killed. Captain Raulston here assumed command, and held an important position for two hours unsupported. It was held in reserve during the battle of Malvern Hill, and while at Harrison's Landing performed outpost and picket duty. In December, 1862, joined Major General Foster's command, and accompanied the expedition to South Carolina during the summer of 1863. Was divided in three detachments, one in Fort Macon, the others at Beaufort and Morehead, N. C. In November last was sent to Northwest Landing, Va., where, under its present brigade commander, it has been successful in breaking up smuggling. The regiment is now commanded by Colonel De Forest.

RECEPTION OF THE 81ST REGIMENT.—At a meeting of the Committee of Arrangements for the reception of the 81st regiment, the following ladies were added to said Committee:
1st Ward—Mrs. MARSH, ANDREWS, OLIVER and PADDOCK.
2d Ward—Mrs. GARLAND, TOWN, ALVORD and DOOLITTLE.
3d Ward—Mrs. J. N. BROWN, H. L. DAVIS, THOMPSON KINGSFORD and S. DOOLITTLE.
4th Ward—Mrs. Mayor GRANT, W. O. HUBBARD, W. H. WHEELER and O. J. HARMON.
The following Committees were announced:
COMMITTEE ON RECEPTION.—His Honor the Mayor and
1st. Ward—W. H. HERRICK.
2d Ward—A. J. COWLES.
3d Ward—H. L. DAVIS.
4th Ward—D. G. FORT.
DECORATION COMMITTEE.—H. L. DAVIS Capt. HENRY WILLIAMS, Capt. FAULKNER, Capt. SWEATLAND and Capt. JOHN TYLER.
COMMITTEE ON SALUTES—MUSIC—Ald. KIRK and Ald. MILLER.
COMMITTEE TO PURCHASE MEATS.—Ald. RATIGAN and D. C. BUEL.
COMMITTEE ON CARRIAGES.—D. C. BUEL and S. B. BURCHARD.
The ladies composing the Committee of Arrangements are requested to meet at the City Hall on Wednesday morning, at 10 o'clock.

RECEPTION OF THE 81ST.—A small number of ladies met at Abbey Hall this morning, pursuant to notice published yesterday, to consult as to the best mode of setting up an entertainment on the return of the veterans of the 81st regiment. But little business was done. The meeting adjourned to meet at the City Hall this evening to act in conjunction with the gentlemen who may be there. We are requested to ask the ladies who will take part in the reception to be present at the meeting tonight.

THE 81ST REGIMENT.—The Common Council last evening appropriated $300 to provide a suitable reception to the gallant war dogs of the 81st Regiment. These men, after having served out two years of their time, were discharged, and have reenlisted for a new term of three years, and are now on their way to enjoy the pleasures of home for a month.
The Committee having the matter in charge consists of the Mayor and Aldermen NORTH, RATIGAN, MILLER and KIRK.

THE 81ST REGIMENT.—Capt. W. W. Ballard and Capt. B. W. Richardson, of the 81st, have opened a recruiting office at the Seymour House in Rome. We would recommend these gentlemen and their regiment to volunteers. The 81st has seen much honorable service, and officers and privates are a fine lot of men. The regiment now numbers 536. Of this number 378 have re-enlisted, and 146 of the 378 volunteered from Oneida and Herkimer counties. The regiment will return to Norfolk April 5th, and those who wish to join it should do so without delay. The county again offers $300 as bounty; the President has ordered another draft; volunteering is the way to get the money and avoid the draft. Give Captains Ballard and Richardson a call—Utica Herald.

LEFT.—Two companies of the 81st left last evening in a special train for their homes in Onondaga and Oneida counties. We trust they may have a good and pleasant visit among their friends and families.

COMMERCIAL TIMES.
Oswego, Saturday Evening, March 19.
CITY AND COUNTY.
The following poem was composed by a boy and read in a village school-house on the occasion of the return of the Eighty-First (Oswego) Regiment N. Y. V., and sent to this office only a day or two since. It breathes forth a hearty welcome to the brave men to whom it is dedicated:

Welcome to the Eighty-First.
BY J H.

Welcome them back to our hearts once more,
Pride of our country, the brave of the land!
Ring the bells wildly! let cannons loud roar!
Welcome back proudly the veteran band!

Press close around them; greet them with cheers!
Clasp the hard hand of each battle-scarred one;
Kiss their bronzed cheeks, no matter if tears
Fall, in your joy, on each patriot son.

Crown them with honor; sing to their fame!
Teach to your children how nobly they fought;
Cherish as sacred each loved hero's name;
Wreathe them with laurels, that dearly they've bought.

Bravely they stood, in the face of the foe
Fighting, like Spartans, for country and right;
Scores from their number met calmly the blow,
Staining, with heart-blood, the bayonet, bright.

Weep not! for though in a far sunny clime
Brothers may lie, where they fell in the strife—
Brave men ne'er died in a cause more sublime
Than those, who seek death, to give liberty life.

Nations unborn shall yet hallow their graves;
Cover with glory the spot where they lie;
Shed not your tears o'er the still-sleeping braves,
For ever, "'T is sweet for one's country to die."
Let the dead rest "in their glory" to-day;
Honor the heroes returning again;
Never let coming posterity say
We "were unworthy such glorious men."

Cheer for their banners, all riddled and torn!
Banners dyed red in the blood of our sons!
God bless the soldiers! We hail their return
With clangor of bells, and the thunder of guns!

March 7th, 1864.

THE EIGHTY-FIRST—RECRUITING.—The heroes of the Eighty-first do not propose to lose time while visiting their friends. With a few days rest from the toils of the battle-field, they have now set about the work of recruiting up their numerical force. Several recruiting offices will soon be opened, and in the meantime Lieut.-Col. J. B. RAULSTON will receive volunteers in this Regiment at the Munger House, where he has taken up his quarters, and can be found by those desirous of serving in this tried and efficient organization. We hope the patriotic efforts of the veterans will receive that encouragement at home they have well earned abroad, and that they may leave Oswego with full ranks. Young men who want to enlist, now is your time!

PRESENT YOUR BILLS.—All persons having bills against the Committee for the reception of the 81st Regiment, are requested to present them at once for payment. Parties having dishes at their homes, taken from the Hall, will please leave them at BRIGGS' crockery store, tomorrow. Dishes, baskets, table-clothes, knives and forks, belonging to individuals, but which have not been returned to the owners, will find them at the Police office.
By order of the Committee.

THE EIGHTY-FIRST REGIMENT.—Those members of this veteran regiment who have spent the time allowed by their furloughs in Oswego leave at two o'clock (according to orders) this afternoon for Albany, At Rome they will be joined by some three hundred of their comrades. Brig-Gen. LEDLIE and Col. DEFORREST, with nearly all the the [sic] latter officer's staff, are now at the State Capital, as we learn from an officer here, who also informs us that about one hundred and fifty men have been recruited in Oswego. The Knickerbocker says the regiment will leave Albany during the present week for the seat of war. We hope to see them return in peace ere their new term expires.

COMMERCIAL TIMES.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE CITY.
Oswego, Monday Evening, March 7.
A GRAND DEMONSTRATION.
ARRIVAL OF THE RE-ENLISTED
VETERANS OF THE EIGHTY-FIRST REGIMENT.
Their Glorious Reception.
MAYOR GRANT'S WELCOME ADDRESS.
The Banquet at Doolittle Hall!!
History of the Regiment.
Scenes, Incidents, &c., &c.
STREET DECORATIONS.
Saturday, West First Street presented a gala-day appearance, owing to the announcement that the re-enlisted veterans of the gallant Eighty-first Regiment, N. Y. S. V. would arrive in our city by the afternoon train. Perhaps at no former time, in Oswego, was a greater amount of bunting thrown to the breeze than on that day floated from windows and halyards from the Railroad depot to the foot of West First Street. The large number of vessels that have made our harbor their winter quarters, furnished colors in abundance, and the National ensign waved from public buildings, places of business and private residences. The Jefferson Block presented a fine appearance. Flags of "red, white and blue" alternated from each window, and the Bridge Street front of the Provost Marshal's office was almost hidden from view by banners of the Union which hung from every window.

VISITORS TO THE CITY.
Early in the day, large numbers of people from the country came into the city, either for the purpose of greeting relatives and friends expected to arrive with the regiment, or to evince by their presence their sympathy with the cause for which the returning heroes had so nobly struggled, and to assist in giving them a hearty welcome.

THE SCENE AT THE DEPOT.
Notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather—a drizzling rain prevailing—and the muddiness of the streets, an immense throng had assembled by three o'clock in the vicinity of the Railroad depot, and there awaited—some with patience, but more with impatience—the arrival of the train. Every device was resorted to for the purpose of wiling away the tediousness of waiting. Mud, nearly ankle-deep, lay in the gutters and crossings; and if, through a mishap, any person—male or female—was unfortunate enough to miss footing and arise with a wardrobe polished by "corporation blacking," the sympathy he or she received from the more fortunate spectators, was not of a soothing character.
An extempore fight was organized in front of the Mooney House, which, for a few moments served to engage public attention. The combatants were young men, and illustrated the "manly art," no doubt to their own satisfaction, and apparently, the intense delight of numerous spectators who immediately formed a compact ring about them. The close fighting quarters they occupied, however, prevented their inflicting any very serious injury upon each other with their fists, and a "knock-down" was out of the question. Fortunately, the encounter was confined to the originators, and peace was again soon restored.

THE ESCORT.
Between three and four o'clock, the 48th Regiment N. Y. S. N. G. formed on East Bridge Street, and headed by the Mechanic's Sax Horn Band and marshaled by Robert Oliver, Esq., proceeded to the depot to re­ceive and escort the veterans upon their arrival.

THE   FIRE   DEPARTMENT.
As the 48th Regiment passed the Munger House, the Fire Department fell in the rear and accompanied the military to the depot.

THE SALUTE PARTY.
A detachment of the Oswego Guards was detailed as the salute party, and a finely polished brass six-pounder belched forth its thunder notes of welcome when the first whistle of the approaching train was heard.

THE ARRIVAL.
Amid the roar of artillery, the ringing of bells, the whistling of steam engines, and the cheers of the vast multitude in waiting, the train reached the depot about five o'clock. Some time was occupied in the debarkation, owing to friends crowding around the veterans to extend the warm grasp of welcome greeting. At length, however, the line of march was formed, and under escort of the 48th Regiment, proceeded down First Street, as far as Market Street, where a halt was made.

THE APPEARANCE OP THE VETERANS.
Notwithstanding the privations the men have endured since their embarkation for home, they presented a fine soldierly appearance which elicited universal praise. Their bronzed countenances show that service in a southern clime is not calculated for "bleaching" purposes. The regiment was fully armed and equipped, and the men evidenced, at first, fatigue, owing to their long journey, which appearance, however, was quickly dispelled when they witnessed the interest of every one in their reception and hearty welcome.
The regiment being halted, Mayor GRANT, from the balcony of the Littlefield Block where was displayed the old regimental colors, delivered the following WELCOME ADDRESS:
OFFICERS, SOLDIERS:—As the executive officer of this city, I have been requested to congratulate you on your safe return to your homes, and to extend to you that cordial welcome which a grateful and generous people are ever ready to bestow on the brave defenders of their rights and the liberties of their country. To me, personally, it is a great pleasure to be the medium of communicating the high appreciation of your townsmen and fellow citizens of your heroic deeds, your gallantry and your noble bearing as soldiers. You come not unheralded. You have not been forgotten while absent. The eyes of your immediate friends and fellow citizens have been upon you. Already have they watched you, and deeply have they sympatized [sic] with you in your long and fatiguing marches—your exposures and self denials—your patient endurance of trials, hardships, perils and the deprivations of a soldier's life, as well as the determined spirit and unflinching bravery exhibited on the battle field, in the midst of death, carnage and the roar of artillery; when your brave fellows and compatriots were falling around you like the ripe grain before the sickle. We are happy to greet and welcome you beneath these gloriously dilapidated flags of the noble Eighty-first. If they are tattered, torn, pierced and blood-stained, they have never been soiled by the unhallowed hands of the enemy. Under these flags fell the gallant MCAMBLEY. Most nobly have you sustained and bravely have you defended them.—We are proud of you—we honor and respect you.

OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS:—Your record is a glorious one. That of participating in the attack, bombardment and capture of Yorktown—in the bloody skirmish of Williamsburg, in the fatigue and inevitable hardships of the camps, marches and battles on the Peninsula—in the unavoidable exposure and intense suffering in the swamps of the Chickahominy—in valiantly and successfully sustaining the attack, and holding the position against a vastly superior force of the enemy for three and a half hours, in the unequal yet glorious encounter of Fair Oaks, in which heroic and sanguinary encounter, about 1,800 of your brave comrades were slain or wounded out of 5,000—in the terrible and glorious seven days fight of that memorable and skillful retreat to James river. You occupying the rear position in that successful movement —your embarkation for South Carolina, your raids in North Carolina, and your trip to the Dismal Swamp, we have convincing proof of your heroic and daring deeds and of your loyalty to your country.
Amid the hilarity and convivial congratulations of this proud and glorious day, is to be seen the evidence of real sadness interspersed among this assembly. The mournful eye beholds the remnant of this once full but now decimated regiment, with feelings of sorrow and affliction, with the only reflection that the slain valiantly sacrificed their lives in behalf of the cause of their country. Their return we cannot welcome; but their daring deeds, their patriotic devotion to their country, its constitution and laws, and to the good old Union under which we have become so powerful a people—are engraven in letters of living light upon the hearts of their countrymen; and their memories will be hallowed by future generations.
It has been your fortune to escape the terrible fate which befell so many of your comrades, and once more to visit your homes, and again to embrace the dear ones who have so anxiously and constantly watched your return.
The exhibition of public feeling and respect manifested by this large gathering of your fellow citizens who have come together to do you honor, is a flattering testimonial of their confidence and high regard for you. The noble cause in which you are engaged has had much do in rousing up and bringing forth this demonstration of public sentiment.
A great outrage had been perpetrated upon the flag and liberties of our country.—The execrable and intolerable dogmas of the right of secession of municipalities was proclaimed—the Union was separated—the Constitution entirely disregarded, and the laws set at defiance. Treason raised her hydra-head; open rebellion was announced, and civil war with all its horrors was inaugurated.
The country called for troops and (to your honor will it be ever credited) you answered promptly, and voluntarily offered your lives upon your country's artar [sic], and for the preservation of her liberties. The people deem it to be a duty, as it is a pleasure, thus to give a befitting reception to their brave defenders. This duty we shall ever be happy to perform so long as there shall be an absent soldier to return. And our joy and gratitute [sic] at your return is only marred by the recollection of the absent faces left behind.
Well has the poet said—
"Princes and Lords may flourish or may fade,
A breath can make them as a breath has made;
But a brave soldier is his country's pride,
And once destroyed can no more be supplied."

About three years ago, a wicked and gigantic rebellion was projected and inaugurated, to sever and to destroy this then happy and glorious Republic. Our laws were violated; our shipping, our forts, our munitions of war, and our revenues were seized by the ruthless hands of misguided men in open acts of sedition and conspiracy. Even our noble flag, the priceless legacy handed down to us by our illustrious ancestors, was most insultingly fired upon. A civil and vindictive war being thus instigated, you, with others, most nobly offered your services—your lives, your all—in your country's cause. Your achievements, your heroism, your perils in war, your comrades fallen on the battle field—all, all will be recorded in the history of your country. And the glorious 81st will live on the historic pages when those here assembled shall be no more.
The country has again called for troops. Your friends and fellow-citizens, knowing your gallantry and lofty devotion to your country, and to the cause so dear to your hearts have solicited a renewal of your  services in these times of most imminent peril—relying confidently upon your cheerfully acquiesence [sic] in the demands and wants of your government. Noble and veteran warriors! correctly did they judge that  you possessed the patriotism, courage and indomitable spirit of our revolutionary sires; that you would again volunteer to participate in the hardships, perils, toils, and bloody conflicts necessary to quell this  wicked rebellion.
For this purpose you have cheerfully reenlisted for three years more. For this great sacrifice and devotion to the rights and interests of your country, we cannot repay the debt of gratitude we owe you by any acts of ours.
With joy and pleasure do the multitude, here assembled, hail and congratulate your return.
If your return has produced this delight and raised up this sentiment of public respect, with what real, heartfelt gratitude and enthusiasm will your fellow citizens receive the pleasing intelligence that your prowess and patriotism have prompted you again to volunteer, and to re-enter upon this terrible strife, and see it through to the bitter end.
OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS:—For this great sacrifice of yours, as well as for your former achievements, you have our thanks—our unfeigned gratitude. Our most ardent desire and sincere wish is, that your future career may be as prosperous and successful as the undertaking is praiseworthy and glorious.
May success attend you in every effort. May the fortunes of war be with you in every undertaking, and may all of you live to return again to your friends after having conquered a peace—quelled this monstrous rebellion—restored the Union, maintained the Constitution, and vindicated the outraged laws.
You are enlisted in a glorious cause. In it you have an ardent desire for a successful and triumphant termination. May your movements by guided by wise counsels, and your progress be onward and forward, until the last rebel is forced to lay down his arms, sue for mercy, and ask for an honorable peace.
Finally, in the name and in behalf of the citizens of Oswego, and in behalf of your numerous friends, and of all such as are dear to you, I bid you a most cordial and hearty welcome.
Col. DEFORREST briefly and appropriately responded, thanking the citizens of Oswego for the generous welcome extended to them, and of the determination of the regiment to perform its duty in the future as it had in the past.

THE BANQUET HALL.
The 48th Regiment formed on Market street, in open ranks, and the veterans marched into the hall to do justice to the viands prepared for them. From the gallery of Doolittle Hall were suspended several of our national ensigns and from the north wall of the hall the stars and stripes also hung in graceful folds.

THE TABLES.
The tables were arranged almost the entire length of the hall, and fairly groaned beneath every substantial viand and luxury of the season.
We should utterly fail if we attempted to give the bill of fare; suffice it to say, that everything which could tempt the appetite of an epicure was there, and in quantities more than sufficent [sic] to have supplied four times the number who partook of them.

THE LADIES.
We cannot do adequate justice to the fair ladies of our city who were in attendance in the capacity of hosts to their gallant guests. Notwithstanding they had been busily engaged the entire day in  preparing the tables, and of necessity must have been much fatigued, the ladies seemed to vie with each other in their attendance upon those they—were serving, and with cheering words of welcome made each war worn veteran feel perfectly at home.—Clothed in their dimity aprons, they flitted from table to table and from man to man with the easy grace of "professionals," and anticipated their every want.
It was a pleasing sight to witness, and one which was fully appreciated by the veterans. To hear their grateful remarks was a reward to the ladies, aside from the gratification experienced in honoring those who had done noble service in their country's defence.

THE REPAST.
During the partaking of the refreshments, the band occupied the gallery, and struck up the heart-cheering melody—"Home, Sweet Home," which was followed by "Hail Columbia."
The veterans did ample justice to the viands before them, and we venture to say that a more orderly assemblage never graced a festive board. Intend on supplying the wants of the "inner man," they found time, however, to gentlemanly respond to each cheering remark of their fair waiters, and not a word was uttered or an incident occurred during the repast to mar the genial hilarity which prevailed.
The officers of the regiment occupied a table in front of the platform of the Hall and evinced as evident gratification in the welcome as the rank and file.
At the conclusion of the repast cheers were proposed for the officers and men of the 81st Regiment, which were given with a hearty good will, after which three cheers and a "tiger" were given by the regiment for the citizens of Oswego.
Ex-Mayor FORT announced to the members of the 81st that upon their arrival at Fort Ontario, furloughs would given to those who resided in the city or vicinity, that evening, so as to enable them to visit their families and friends, and those living at a distance would be furnished with furloughs as soon as transportation could be provided. Also that on Monday afternoon those who had enlisted for Oswego county would receive their County Bounty of $300 at the Marine Bank.
It was announced that Capt. FISH, of Company A, wished to address a few words to those present and that officer ascended the platform and remarked, substantially as follows:
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN--I would say Mr. Chairman, if I could see one present. It has been announced that I wished to say a few words. I do not know how it was ascertained. There are some things which are not difficult for a soldier to do, and other things which are. It is difficult to face, unabashed, such an array of beauty as I see here before me to-night; but I fall back on my own good looks, and a knowledge of the fact that "birds of a feather flock together." In behalf of the regiment I return you our heartfelt thanks for the glorious reception you have bestowed upon us, and we appreciate it the more from the privations we have endured since we started on our return. It will be twelve days to-morrow morning since the regiment embarked at Fortress Monroe. For three days and nights the men were cooped up in the confined hold of a transport, amid the foul atmosphere and filth necessarily engendered there. In the city of New York we received a hearty welcome. But what can I say of the city of Albany? There, for forty-eight hours, nearly four hundred men were confined in a room not one quarter the size of this Hall, certainly not as large as the space occupied by three of those tables. They were furnished with salt beef—salt enough to make a pig squeal, bread and coffee, but without anything to drink it out of. I do not know who was to blame for these arrangements; no one assumed the blame. Perhaps it was one of those cases where no one is responsible. But upon our arrival here our hearts were cheered with the hearty greeting which we have received, and I can assure you it will never be forgotten by a man in the regiment, and when we return to our duties in the camp, or on the battle field, if we are again called upon to face the enemy, this glorious demonstration in our behalf will ever be held in grateful remembrance.  There is one thing more I wish to mention. It is this: Write to your friends in the army. If you have a father, a husband, a brother or a sweetheart there, and I will venture to say there is no one before me but has one or the other, write to him. You cannot imagine the anxiety with which the soldier looks for a letter from home. As the Company Sergeant deals out the mail and calls the name of John Smith or Geo. Brown, each eye is dilated and each ear opened by every man in anxious anticipation of hearing his own name. I have known sick men cured by a letter from home; in fact, I have been in that situation myself. Write to your friends in the army; a letter from home is the most of anything to the soldier; it makes him a better man and a better soldier. I again thank you for this glorious reception. If there are any among us who have not done ample justice to the bountiful repast before us, it is not because we do not appreciate it but because we have today partaken of refreshments before. And I do not know what you will do with the "twelve baskets full" that are over. Perhaps you will bestow them upon the wives and families of soldiers who are in the army. I now propose three cheers for the ladies of Oswego.
The cheers were heartily given, and the veterans adjourned from the Hall, and resumed their arms and accoutrements. Preceeded by the Band they were marched to Fort Ontario, which is the present headquarters of the regiment.
Yesterday and to-day furloughs were furnished the men, with directions to report at headquarters on the 5th day of April next. Company E, which was recruited in Oneida county, left for home by special train, about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. In connection with our report of the re­ception oh Saturday, it is appropriate that we give a brief
HISTORY OF THE REGIMENT.
The Eighty-first Regiment, N. Y. Vols. was recruited principally in this county, in the fall of 1861, was mustered and left here seven hundred and fifty strong on the 20th January, 1862. At Albany it was filled to the maximum with part of a Regi­ment, recruited at Rome, Oneida county, and left the State early in March, following, under command of Colonel Edwin Rose.
Upon reaching Washington it was assign- ed to the Army of the Potomac, and attached to Casey's division, Keys' corps.— On the first of April it dis-embarked at Fortress Monroe for the Peninsular cam-pain, in the exposures, hardships and privations of which it fully shared. During the siege of Yorktown, it per­formed picket duty in front of Winn's Mill, one of the strongest positions in the enemy's line. While at this place, ill health compelled Col. Rose to apply for leave of absence; the command devolving upon Lieut. Col. J. J. DEFOEREST.
On the morning of the 4th of May, when it was discovered that the enemy's works in front were evacuated,—this was among the first regiments ordered in pursuit
At Seven Pines it was again in the front and on the first day of the battle it performed good and important service. Its position on that day was on the extreme left of Casey's line in an open field, separated from the rest of the line by a strip of abatis and thick undergrowth, a hundred yards wide.
On the opposite side of the field the enemy were seen moving about among the bushes, and evidently watching our movements.
Lieut. Col. DEFORREST promptly led the men in the field, but they were scarcely in position when a volley of musketry saluted them from among the bushes, which they quickly returned, and for thirty minutes they stood in that open field receiving and returning fire with the coolness and precision of veterans. By that time the storm had increased from pattering rain to a fearful hail storm of bullets. Lieut. Col. DEFORREST had fallen severely wounded; Maj. MCAMBLY killed, Capt. KINGMAN killed, three others and several lieutenants wounded; and one hundred and twenty-five men had fallen, killed and wounded.
They were then ordered to fall back and take shelter in the edge of the woods, just over the fence, which they had thrown down on entering, where they reformed, Capt. W. C. RAULSTON in command, and maintained their position two hours longer, unsupported.
It has since been ascertained that a brigade of the enemy had planned to cross the field and effect a flank movement upon our rifle pits and batteries covering the road, and upon which the first and most furious assault was made, but the apparent audacity of a single regiment entering that open field in their front and facing their fire, then falling back, led them to suppose that we were heavily supported in the woods and had fallen back to lead them into a trap. They hesitated and sought to penetrate farther to the left and get around, so the left flank was saved for two flours and a half, by the eighty-first alone.
At one time word came to the regiment to hold their position at all risks till re-enforcements, which was on the way, could come up; and Gen. MCCLELLAN'S late report states that a brigade was ordered to that part of the line, but they never came. By this time that part of the line on the road was forced back, and to avoid being flanked from that direction we fell back to Couch's line and continued the fight till night.
Soon after, this regiment was among the forces sent to guard the approaches by White Oak Swamp, till the movement to the James River, during which it was in the advance to Malvern Hill, where it was among the reserves during the battle. After this it was a part of the rear guard of the army during its march to Harrison's Landing, and was the last regiment that crossed the ravine, behind which was to be our line. During the six weeks at this place, it was constantly on outpost and picket duty.
Upon the withdrawal of the army of the Potomac from the Penensula [sic] it was among the forces retained at Yorktown by General KEYES.
The last of December, 1862, it was ordered to North Carolina, and joined Gen. FOSTER'S expedition to Port Royal, returning in April, 1863, to relieve him while besieged in Washington, N. C.
During the summer it was divided into three detachments, occupying Morehead, Beaufort and Fort Macon.
In November, under Col. DEFORREST, the Regiment was sent to Northwest Landing, Va., where it has been successfully engaged in breaking up guerrilla organizations, and guarding the Dismal Swamp Canal.
The Eighty-first is at present attached to LEDLIE'S Veteran New York Brigade, and after the re-enlistment of a majority of its members, was placed on transports at Norfolk in company with the 96th and 98th N. Y. V., of the same brigade, for transportation [sic] to New York, in accordance with the provisions of the War Department giving a furlough of thirty days to veterans re-enlisting, at which city they arrived safely on Sunday, the 28th inst. The brigade was quartered at the Park Barracks, and received a fine reception from the city authorities. On the 2d inst., escorted by the 8th and 87th regiments N. G., under command of Brigadier-Gen. HALL, the Brigade passed in review before the Mayor and Common Council, in front of the City Hall. They then marched up Broadway and Fourteenth street and Fifth Avenue to Madison Square where they formed in line on Twenty-second street, and were reviewed by General BURNSIDE. The demonstration wound up with a solid banquet at the State Aresnal [sic] in the Seventh Avenue, and the Brigade afterwards proceeded to the Hudson River Railroad depot, and took the cars for Albany. The New York Evening Post says that a finer looking body of soldiers than LEDLIE'S Brigade were never seen in that city.
The following are the staff and field officers who arrived here with the regiment:
Jacob J. DeForrest, Colonel.
John B. Raulston, Lieut.-Colonel
David B. White, Major.
Edmond Malette, Adjutant. 
B. S. DeForrest, Quartermaster. 
Wm. H. Rice, Surgeon.
Co. A.—Elias A. Fish, Captain; George C. Smith, First Lieutenant.
Co. B.—Martin J. DeForrest, Captain.
Co. C—Benj. W. Richardson, Captain.
Co. D.—Lewis B. Porter, Lieutenant
Co. E.—Daniel C. Rix, Captain; Julius H. Clark, Lieutenant.
Co. F.—John T. DeForrest, Captain; E. A. Cooke, Lieutenant.
Co. G.—Samuel Dolbier, Lieutenant.
Co. H.—S. Zimmerman, Lieutenant; E. D. Cooke, Lieutenant.
Co. I.—Willard W. Ballard, Captain; E. A. Stimson, Lieutenant.
Co. K.—James Martin, Captain; Jeff. W. Brockway, Lieutenant.
Three hundred and seventy-eight privates and non-commissioned officers of the regiment have re-enlisted, and to-day are receiving their furloughs and county bounties. Before leaving Northwest Landing, Va., the men received the national bounty of $100, and at Albany the State bounty.

INCIDENTS OF THE RECEPTION.
The widow of the lamented Major McAMBLEY, who so nobly fell in the performance of his duty at Fair Oaks, sent to the Committee two large cakes, and a brief note containing the words: "With the compliments of Mrs. MCANBLEY. I have given my husband, I have but little more to give." Brief and eloquent
The veterans were highly pleased with the bill of fare, and drew comparisons between the light spongy biscuits on the tables and their own "hard tack" which was not very complimentary to the latter. Many of them had a supply of the article in their haversacks, which they freely distributed among their fair waiters, each of whom seemed desirous of procuring a piece to keep as a relic of the soldier's fare.
The battle-worn colors of the regiment which were recently presented to the city, were displayed from the platform during the entertainment. We saw several of the veterans approach and reverently kiss the tattered colors, and as they gazed upon them the fire of enthusiasm was in their eyes, speaking more plainly than words that they would lay down their lives, if necessary, in defense of them.
The crowd outside of Doolittle Hall during the repast was very large. A guard was stationed at the entrance to prevent the ingress of any except those authorized by the Committee of Arrangements. Of course the desire to enter was universal, but the sentinels were inexorable and persuasion was unavailing. Some parties, however, succeeded in opening the northern entrance to the Hall, where no guard was placed, and suddenly an influx of humanity poured into the Hall, which, if allowed to continued for a moment or two threatened to fill the building to overflowing. Some of the Committee, fortunately, however, happened to be in the immediate vicinity and quickly checked the tide which was setting in. This course was necessary, because, had admission been given to all, every nook and corner would have been occupied, and it would have been impossible to have attended to the wants of the veterans.

Personal.
COL. EDWIN ROSE, Eighty-first New York Volunteers, acting as Provost Marshal First Congressional District, died at his headquarters,
Jamaica, L. I., on Tuesday evening, after only one hour's illness, from dropsy of the heart. Col. Rose was a native of Long Island, having been born at Bridgehampton, Suffolk County, Feb. 14. 1817. He was a graduate of West Point, but resigned from the army in 1837, to enter the service of the State of Michigan as civil engineer. He re-entered the service in 1861 as Colonel of the Eighty-first N. Y. Volunteers, and served with honor through the Peninsula campaign, when his health becoming impaired, he accepted the appointment of Provost marshal of the First Congressional District of this State. Col. Rose twice represented Suffolk County in the Legislature. He was beloved by all who knew him.

PRESENTATION OF A SWORD TO COLONEL J. J. DE FORREST, OF THE EIGHTY FIRST REGIMENT.—The 81st Regiment, commanded by Colonel J. J. De Forrest, of this city, is now home on furlough. They have been in service over thirty months, and have reinlisted [sic] for the war. Few colonels that entered the field stands higher in the appreciation of his officers and men than Colonel De Forrest.—Recently, the officers of the regiment presented their Colonel with a most magnificent sword and steel scabbord, with heavy ornamental gold and silver plated mountings. It is now on exhibition at Benjamin Marsh's Jewelry Store, in State street. It is a beautiful gift, but no more so than deserving. The presentation speech was made by Major D. B. White, of the regiment, who spoke of the good feeling existing between the Colonel and his officers, of the sacrifices made, and the energy devoted by the Colonel in the organisation [sic] of the regiment, &c. As regards Colonel D.'s bravery, he used the following language:
Sir, we always found you ready for action, in the most trying hour; and, at those times when the thunder of battle was so fierce, you heard nothing but your country's call; and when the carnage was beyond description—when the dead and wounded were on every side—when the battle waxed hot, and was arrayed in its most revolting garb, you saw nothing but the enemy before you."
The Colonel's' reply was short, but pointed, and only added another link in the chain of friendship that bound him and his officers together.

Complimentary.—The following copy of a letter to Col. DeForrest, of the Eighty-first regiment, complimenting his regiment, has been furnished us by Adj. Mallette. Col. DeForrest is a resident of this city. We notice that a correspondent of the New York Times who was with Gen. Wild in his guerrilla hunt in N. Carolina, speaks in high terms of the Eighty-first, whom they encountered at North West Landing, on their return:—
HEADQUARTERS COLORED TROOPS.
NORFOLK, VA., Dec. 29, 1863.
Col. J. J. DeForrest, Eighty-first N. Y. V.:
I take pleasure in acknowledging my gratitude to you for your kindness in warning me of the recent danger of my small force being cut off' by the enemy, and in informing me of the way of safety. It seems to me that you allowed an unusual degree of efficiency and promptitude of action, as well as a clear appreciation of the emergency and zeal for the service. I wish also to express to you the pleasure I took in witnessing the excellent condition of your regiment; its high state of drill. It cannot be other than a most effective body of men. I remain, Colonel,
Yours, very respectfully,
(Signed) E. A. WILD, BRIG. GEN. VOL.

PROMOTED.—We are glad to learn that Capt. JOHN RAULSTON of this city, who has been in constant service with the 81st regiment since it left for the seat of war, has been promoted to the rank of Lieut. Colonel. This appointment is doubly valuable because it was made against the fierce opposition of Col. D E FORREST, who is cutting up the same capers which excited so much indignation when the regiment was quartered at Port Ontario. He has already got three brothers in the regiment, whom he has placed in official positions over the heads of citizens of Oswego who have nobly discharged their duty since the regiment had an existence. He is even now engaged in an attempt to place his brother in the position of Captain, when the promotion is due to Lieut. Gibbert. We are glad that Capt. RAULSTON has secured the position to which he was entitled, and hope the schemes of D E FORREST may be frustrated as often as he attempts injustice.

KILLED IN BATTLE.—Miss Maggie Martin, of his city, received a letter yesterday from Lieut. Col. J. B. Raulston, of the 81st N. Y., informing her of the death of her brother, Capt. James Martin. He was killed on the 3d inst. while leading his men in a charge upon the rebel works. He was struck with a musket ball in the breast, and almost simultaneously received another in his forehead. Death followed in a few moments.
Capt. Martin formerly resided here and learned the trade of a machinist. Some years ago he moved to Oswego and became foreman of a shop there. He enlisted as a private in the 81st, and rose by dint of merit and gallant service to the rank of Captain. His sister is his only surviving relative, and by his death deprived of her main support.
The above we copy from the Rochester Union of Tuesday. A report of the death of Capt. MARTIN was received in this city a few days after the battle of the 3d. Subsequently, however, the rumor was contradicted, and he was reported as having been seriously wounded. In a communication received from Lieut. E. A. COOK, Acting Adjutant of the regiment, Captain MARTIN is placed in the list of "missing," from which we inferred that after receiving his wounds he had been taken prisoner by the rebels. The above, however, from Lieut. Col. RAULSTON, speaks with certainty of his death. We sincerely regret that the hopes of his many friends in this city are thus dashed. Captain Martin was a young man of amiable qualities, and endeared himself to all with whom he came in contact by his unassuming and gentlemanly deportment. Pure patriotism prompted him to join the ranks of his country's defenders, and his death adds another name to the long list of noble men immolated on the shrine of treason.

THE LATE CAPT. W. W. BALLARD.—This gallant officer who fell while leading his company in a desperate charge at the battle of Cold Harbor, on Friday, June 3d, had many warm friends in this and Oneida county. His death is regretted as sincerely by them as by his associate officers in the regiment, and the men whom he commanded. A correspondent of the Utica Herald furnishes that paper with the following brief sketch of the lamented officer's history since the breaking out of the rebellion, and bestows a tribute to his memory which will be endorsed by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance in life: "Capt. Ballard early espoused his country's cause. He enlisted in the Fall of '61, in the regiment then being raised by Col. O. B. Pierce, of Rome, and worked faithfully to raise a company, till the regiment was consolidated with an Oswego regiment, forming the 81st. He then was commis­sioned First Lieutenant, and as an officer was ever faithful to duty and patriotism;—Two years ago he was detailed as recruit­ing officer and succeeded in adding nearly 100 to his regiment. On returning he was promoted to Captain. As an officer he was counseled and appreciated by his superiors, and loved and respected by his men. He lived three hours after he fell, but ... not then be removed from the ... deadly messengers from rebel sharpshooters, thwarting all efforts.. Few men will be more missed among the circle of his ac­quaintance than he, possessing a clear head, a warm heart, a nature ever earnest in the cause of right, modest and unassum­ing in demeanor with an undercurrent of wit, none the less sparkling that it was not boisterous. He was really, to those who knew him best, one of nature's noblemen. Capt. Ballard leaves a wife and three children to mourn his death. His oldest, now 18, was with him fighting for his country, and saw his father fall. Many friends sympathize with his family, and would say to them, 'Weep not; your husband and father nobly fell, in a noble cause.' Spring and summer shall again come to our distracted country, the flowers of freedom bud and blossom, bearing fruit meet for the sacrifice that has been given."

FROM THE 81ST REGIMENT.—A letter from Capt. D. C. Rix of this Regiment, addressed to JAMES JUDGE ESQ., Teller of the Oswego River Bank, is published in the Fulton Patriot & Gazette of yesterday, from which we glean some interesting particulars of the regiment in the severe engagements it has participated in. It has been in two battles and lost heavily in both. On the 3d inst., the 81st lead the assault on the rebel earthworks in front, and lost in killed and wounded 227 officers and men—more than half the number engaged. In that engagement two Captains were killed and five wounded. The Regiment was in command of Lieut. Col. Raulston, who is stated to have behaved splendidly, and escaped unhurt. The 81st has been highly complimented by the brigade and division commanders. At the date of the letter, (June 5th,) the Regiment was on picket duty in the extreme front, and constantly exposed to the fire of rebel sharp-shooters. At the time of writing, the 81st had but 121 men performing duty.

LETTER FROM LIEUT. M. P. TIDD, OF THE 81ST REGIMENT.—We are permitted to copy the following extracts of a letter from Lieut. Tidd to his mother, written since the battle of last Friday. The letter is dated "White House, June 4, 1864:"
* * We joined Grant at Mechanicsville on Wednesday, the 1st inst., and then went to Gaines Mills where we became engaged, and in this vicinity the regiment has been fighting a part of the last three days. I was wounded on the morning of the 2d, at daylight. We were enfiladed by the rebels and a bullet struck me just below the right shoulder blade and glancing on a rib passed across the spine and into the left shoulder, and here struck the  shoulder blade and stopped two inches under the spine. Dr. Rice extracted the bullet quickly and without much pain, and now I am doing well. I came from the front yesterday. Should think about three-fourths of the regiment, officers and men, were either killed or wounded, though the proportion of killed is very ... and many are but slight wounds. After laying ... some strong rebel works about forty hours, ..., and carried them, but with terrible loss to us. * * * I expect to get off to-day, and as soon as my wound will permit, I shall try to come home."

From George Fero.
We make the following extracts from a letter received by Henry Hulsaver from George Fero, a member of the 81st Regiment N. Y. S. V., now in front of Petersburgh:
It is very warm here, and the shells from the enemy's bullets which fly over my head while I am writing this do not make the weather any cooler. We are within a mile and a half of the rebels, and can see them and their works plainly. Considerable fighting is carried on here daily, principally at night, with heavy losses on both sides. We had in our regiment, the 1st of May, when we advanced, about 600 men; and now we have nearly 200 left.
Concerning the length of the war: my observations lead me to believe that  unless the North banish their partisanship, and become a unit, and determine to crush this rebellion, and get off their easy chairs and come down and help do it, this war will not end in a long time.
One of the causes of our ill success I attribute to the fact that a majority of our officers have not seen years enough—such as Captains and  Lieutenants—and the men do not have that confidence in them which they would have if they were more experienced.—Besides, drunkenness prevails among them. Staff officers on a march, generally take about a gallon of whiskey for three of them. A soldier has to take four days rations, sixty rounds of cartridges, a canteen of water, knapsack containing a great coat, two blankets, shirts, &c, weighing about 30 pounds, besides his gun; and with this load upon his back he has got to keep up with a gallon of whiskey and these three gallant young officers on horseback, at the rate of 4 miles per hour.—If a private happens to fall out on account of excesive [sic] fatigue or sickness, one of these popinjays rides up and says, "what are you doing down there, G—d d—n you?" This is a fact, Henry—no joke about it.

THE REV. I. G. DURYEE, Chaplain of the 81st N. Y. Volunteers, now a veteran regiment, will preach in the Second Dutch Church on Sabbath evening next, exercises to commence at 7 o'clock. Subject: "The Southern Secession and Its Results." Mr. Duryee is expecting to leave for the field in the course of next week.

FROM CHAPLAIN DURYEE.—The following letter explains itself:
YORKOWN, Va., April 26th, 1864.
LANSING OOTHOUT, Esq.—Dear Sir: Allow me to express to you, in behalf of the 81st Regt. N. Y. Vol's, our thanks for the box of papers and pamphlets you had the kindness to present to us while I was at home. Could you have heard the cordial "Thank you's" from the officers and soldiers, as I passed around, last Sabbath, from tent to tent, you would, I think, have felt yourself well repaid for your expenses and trouble. Nothing seems to do the soldiers so much good as little attentions from friends whom they have left behind.
Troops are being collected here in large numbers, and a forward movement is expected soon. The weather is warm and pleasant. Fruit trees are in bloom. Yesterday I gathered a handful of wild flowers a short distance from camp.
My health is good and I have high hope as to the result of the coming campaign.
Yours truly,
I. G. DURYEE, Chaplain 81st N. Y. V.

CHAPLAIN DURYEE, of the Eighty-first regiment, dating Camp in the Field, 7 miles from Petersburg, Va., May 16, writes as follows to Mr. John Bront: I snatch a moment this morning to write you a few lines. We are in the midst of exciting times. You have heard of the expedition up the James river under Gen. Butler; thus far it has been a grand success. We obtained a foothold here with the 18th and 10th Army Corps before the rebels were aware of it. With t h e exception of a day or two, there has been fighting for eight or ten days and we have driven the rebels like sheep. We hold the railroad from near Petersburg up to opposite Fort Darling. Our forces, some of them, were yesterday within the first line of entrenchments. Our regiment has been under fire six days out of seven. Loss, one killed and about thirty wounded; what the aggregate loss is we have not yet learned, but it is not large considering the work done. Last night we received orders to move our camp to the front near Fort Darling, but early this morning we were attacked on our left by the enemy, our pickets were driven in and every man in camp, sick and well, was ordered to the rifle pits. There is a continuous firing along our whole line, and yells are occasionally heard as if there was a charge made now and them. At the present writing we appear to be driving the enemy. We shall no doubt be able to hold our entrenchments and we have good news from the front thus far. On our right the cannonading has ceased and there is reason to believe that the enemy have completely failed in this attack. Our troops have stood firm and fought with great bravery. Our next movement will be, as is supposed, on Fort Darling. This will be made a base of supplies, and then on to Richmond!
Yours truly,
I. G. Duryee.

FROM THE 81ST REGIMENT.—We are under obligations to Rev. L. D. White, of this city, for a copy of the following note, received from his brother, Major D. B. WHITE, of the 81st Regiment:
CAMP 81ST REGIMENT N. Y. V.,
1ST BRIG., 1ST DIV., 18TH ARMY CORPS,
NEAR PETERSBURG, June 17, 1864.
DEAR BROTHER :
We are now within 1 1/2 miles of Petersburg. Night before last the Eighteenth Army Corps charged upon the rebel works and took a very important redoubt and a line of rifle pits. It was a fine achievement, in which our regiment took an important part. When the order was given to charge, our men were perfectly wild—wild with enthusiasm. They were so anxious to go ahead, that it was difficult to keep them back in their proper place. When the steeples of the town came in sight, they cheered so enthusiastically that they could have been heard for miles. Our loss has been very slight, none killed and but a few wounded. Last night we made a demonstration on the right, while the Second Corps made an attack upon the left, which was partially successful. We have had a rest to-day, but are now ordered to be ready to march at a moment's notice. An advance will no doubt be made to-night.
I am well. Truly yours,
D. B. WHITE.

THE CASE OF LIEUT BROCKWAY.—IN THE TRENCHES BEFORE PETERSBURG,
Thursday, August 11th, 1864.
Editor of the Commercial Times:
In your paper of the 6th inst. is an article taken from the Pulaski Democrat, headed "A Testimonial," and relating to the dismissal of J. W. Brockway from the 81st.
For the sake of the honored father of the late Lieut. B., I am exceedingly sorry that it becomes necessary to notice that article. It would seem to be better for the young man in question not to thrust his name before the public in newspapers, or if he did do so, to state the exact truth, instead of making a bad matter worse by statements which every officer and man in the 81st knows to be untrue.
The Editor says, "We don't believe any intimation that Lieut. B. is a coward, and his friends don't believe it." Who has intimated that Lieut. B. is a coward? The Editor further says, “before the battle of Cold Harbor, Lieut. B. was on detached duty in a safe place, but after that severe fight he asked permission to join his regiment, preferring that post of danger."—There is not the shade of a shadow of truth in this statement. The Editor's authority for the above statement is doubtless found in a letter from Mr. Brockway himself, published in the Democrat some weeks ago, to the effect that at the time of the battle of Cold Harbor, he (Brockway) was acting Brigade Commissary. Lieut. B. was not at the time acting Brigade Commissary, nor on any other detached duty, but simply a straggler. When the regiment passed Fortress Monroe on the 29th of May, Mr. B. had verbal permission to stop for a few days on the plea of sickness, (and I think he was not well,) and did not rejoin the regiment till our return to the White House on the 12th of June. He did not come up to the front at Cold Harbor at all. If he had claimed to have been sick, as a reason for not being with his regiment during those terrible two weeks, no notice would have been taken of the matter; but it is due to those officers and men who stayed by their colors during those bloody days, that the truth should be known. Epsilon.

FROM THE EIGHTY-FIRST REGIMENT.
—Adjutant MALLETTE, of the 81st Regt., writes to one of our compositors, Mr. CHARLES HAMEL, a very interesting letter, from which we make the following extracts. The letter is dated "Headquarters 81st Regt., N. Y. V., North West Landing, Va., November 20th":
On the morning of the 18th inst., in obedience to orders from Gen. Heckman, the 81st embarked on the Teansport [sic] Steamer Champion, from Newport News, Va. After reporting to Brig.-Gen. Getty, at Portsmouth, we lrnded [sic] at Norfolk and toak [sic] up the line of march for this place. We arrived yesterday afternoon; the distance is 24-miles from Norfolk and 2 miles from the North Carolina line. Our march for the last 14 miles was through swamps and woods, infected with guerillas. Our advance guard has allowed three of the men to pass them, with a cart containing about 25 knapsacks; these three men were attacked by a band of these bushwhackers, and before the advacce [sic] guard could reach the ground, one of the boys named Martin L. Wells, of Co. F., was carried away, one was left in the road for dead, but was only wounded, the ball passing through his right arm and lodging in the left shoulder. His name is Richard Fleming, Co, F.—Dr. Rice has taken out the bullet, and thinks he can save his life. The third, John Darling, Co. B, escaped without a scratch. The citizens in the neighborhood tell us that these guerillas take no provisions; we have sent out parties to scour the woods, but no trace of Wells could be found; he must have been taken away. Gen. Butler means to occupy the territory which Gen. Naglee abandoned several months ago; this is our mission here. Our regiment is the only one for 14 miles around. Company C, of the 3d N. Y. Cavalry is to reinforce us; they number 45 men present, I understand.

—Mrs. B. D. BARNES, of this city, was in receipt this morning of a letter from her brother, Lieut. E. A. COOK, of the 81st regiment. He came out of the terrible ordeal of battle on the 3d instant without injury of any sort, though out of forty-four men his company lost all but seventeen.—It had hitherto been supposed that Lieut. E. D. COOK named among the wounded of the 81st was the writer of this letter; but it turns out that there are two subalterns of the same name in the regiment. Lieut. E. A. COOK is now acting as Adjutant of the regiment—the position he filled when the organization first left this city.
—Lieut. Col. J. R. RAULSTON, who led the 81st through the battle on Friday of last week, has been highly complimented by his commanding General for the gallant conduct displayed by himself and his regiment. The charge of the 81st is spoken of as one of the most terrible of the war.

ARRIVED HOME.—JAMES A, CROLIUS, of the 81st Regiment, who was wounded in the desperate assault of the Regiment on the enemy's works, June 3d, arrived home yesterday. His injury is a flesh wound in the right leg, and though painful is not dangerous.

DIED IN HOSPITAL.—The Washington correspondent of the New York Times of Saturday reports the death in hospital in that city of E. SEXTON, CO. G, 81st N. Y. Regiment.

Camden,—RAPHAEL SANFORD, of the 81st regiment, died at White House, Va., two weeks since, of wounds received at Cold Harbor. He leaves a widowed mother, a brother, and several sisters.

—BRUCE MCINTYRE, son of HORACE MCINTYRE, of Camden, member of Company B, 117th, has returned home severely wounded in the hip at the battle of Drury's bluff.

WOUNDED.—In the list of casualties published in the New York Herald yesterday we notice the following names of members of the 81st Regiment:
M. Bailey, G. Breivin, and M. Delby.—The latter is wounded in the arm.

WOUNDED.—Dr. AUSTIN, of this city, has received a letter from his brother, D. H. AUSTIN, of the 81st Regiment, informing him that he was wounded in the foot, during one of the recent battles. He left the White House on the morning of the 9th, and arrived at Emory Hospital,  Washington, on the evening of the 10th, where the second toe of his left foot was amputated. The wound is a painful one, and at the date of the letter, June 12th, there were symptoms of inflammation.

A PLEASING CORRECTION.—The letter of Lieut. E. A. COOK, of the 81st Regiment, published in the TIMES yesterday, stated that information had been received of the death of Adjutant MALLETTE. We are happy to correct this statement. A letter was received by his brother yesterday from him, dated the 15th inst. Adjutant MALLETT is in hospital at Washington, and rapidly recovering from his severe wound. He anticipated, at the time of writing, being able to stand removal in a couple of weeks. His many friends in this city will be rejoiced to learn this fact.

SWINDLING THE GOVERNMENT—LAWRENCE J. STEELE, formerly of the Eighty-first (Oswego) regiment, N. Y. V., was put on trial in the U. S. District Court in Philadelphia, on Tuesday last, on a charge of forgery. He had swindled the Government by means of forged pay rolls with which he obtained from paymasters of the army various amounts—as the pay of Majors, Colonels, and others. He become emboldened by his success, and went to the same office several times and drew money each time, until at length detection occurred. His detection and arrest took place in New York city, where, while under arrest, he made a full confession; this was done with the evident intention of mitigating the punishment, but Judge GADWALADER ruled it out, his being under military arrest making it of no effect. The proof of his guilt was most conclusive, and he has probably ere this received his sentence.

FROM THE EIGHTY FIRST REGIMENT.
—A couple of private notes, written on the battle-field by Major WHITE, of the 81st, have been handed us by his brother in this city, to whom they were addressed. They were written hurriedly in pencil, on a blank leaf of his diary, and bear upon their envelope the stamp of the U. S. Sanitary Commission, through whose agency they were forwarded to Washington. Though brief and devoid of details, they show us something of the fearful work in which our second Oswego regiment has been engaged, and will be read with interest by every one who has a relative, friend, or acquaintance in that gallant body of veterans. With great anxiety we await the arrival of the list of casualties among the officers and men:
BATTLE-FIELD NEAR RICHMOND,
June 2, 1864.
DEAR BROTHER:—We are in the fight again. We commenced yesterday. We have lost about sixty killed and wounded. We are still under fire. We have lost some noble men. The regiment has done nobly. You will no doubt be interested to know that I am, by the providence of GOD, uninjured. Everything seems to be going well.
D. B. WHITE.

Camp 81st N. Y. VOLS.,
NEAR Gaines' Mill, June 3, 1864.
DEAR BROTHER: —This morning we charged upon the enemy's works, taking their first line of rifle-pits. Our loss was very severe. Twelve officers were killed and wounded, and about two hundred men, which, with our loss of sixty men yesterday, has reduced the 81st very much. Thus far, by the providence of God, I have been spared from any injury. Lieut. Seward Zimmerman is reported badly wounded. Capt. Tyler is wounded in the arm. Capt. Ballard is reported killed. Capt. Richardson is wounded.
We hear that heavy reinforcements are coming. The firing is continual; and though we are in a tolerably secure position, we are continually harrassed with all kinds of missiles that can be shot with guns. D. B. WHITE.
Other private letters have also been received to-day. Capt.  RICHARDSON is wounded in three places. Lieut. COVILLE lost an arm. JOHN LYNCH, brother of B. LYNCH, of this city, is at White House, severely wounded in the right hand, and en route for a Northern hospital. Adjutant MALETTE is in hospital at Washington, with good prospects of recovery. His horse was shot from under him in the fight of the 1st inst.

MILITARY SWINDLERS.—Of all the renegades and vagabonds attached to the United States service, none are so deserving of speedy punishment as these fellows; and why there is so much delay in sentencing such men as Capt. Larned, indicted by the Grand Jury of New York, and others, we cannot imagine. If the President and the War Department would turn their attention to ferreting out the delinquencies and abuses of the hundreds of swindlers, who, under cover of a military commission and uniform, are robbing our soldiers and people out of millions of dollars, they would confer a greater benefit upon the country than by enforcing an unpopular and expensive conscription.
It is a well-known fact that men have been appointed to commands at the post of New York who not only sell and buy commissions—who not only rob soldiers, to accommodate swindlers, but who openly boast of their Secession sympathies, and associate with the relatives of distinguished Rebels residing at New York hotels. That a certain Colonel, answering to this description, has been prominently officiating in connection with the troops in this vicinity, can be proved, and also that the same man was convicted of cowardice in the face of the enemy. Yet, having good friends in high authority, the facts are withheld, and may most likely be suppressed. Doubtless the same thing is being tried in the case of Capt. Larned, and he will be let off with a merely nominal punishment.
To show how badly posted, how utterly inefficient some of the Government officials are, not only here but elsewhere, let us cite the subjoined confession of Lieut. Lawrence J. Steele, Jr., alias Lieut. M. J. De Forrest, alias Lieut.-Col. Wm. C. Raulston, alias Major White, alias Capt. A. D. S. Tyler, alias Lieut. Isaac F. Messey, now in Fort Lafayette, along with his friend Menkler. It is only one of a hundred cases which prove the stupidity and incompetency of the Administration through the officers whom it places in power. The following confession is in his (Steele's) own language:
In February last, I drew from Paymaster Major Taggart, of Philadelphia, as Lieut.-Col. William C. Raulston, of the Eighty-first New York Volunteers, I think, four months' pay, amounting to between. $600 and $700, under tie following circumstances: I had been introduced by E. D. C. Harrington, an acquaintance of mine, to Jake Menkler, who was living with his woman. I became intimate with Jake, and made my home at his house, rooming with a girl named Bonnie, who was living there. I also had a room at the Continental Hotel for a while, when I first went to Philadelphia. Jake and I talked the thing up—how we could manage to defraud the Government by drawing pay on officers' leaves of absence; and, as I had been some time in the service, and understood military matters pretty well, we concluded to try it.
We made our first attempt in Philadelphia upon Major Taggart, and succeeded as above stated; Jake and I being in my room at the Continental Hotel, we called a servant and sent him to Taggart's office for blank pay-rolls, which he brought to us; we took the rolls and went up to Jake's house; remained all night, and next day took a carriage at the Continental Hotel, and went to Surgeon Smith's, on Locust street, where I got a certificate of disability. We made out the pay account, and went to the Paymaster and received a check payable to bearer; I drew the money at the Treasury, and divided it with Jake; in about a week or so, being again out of funds, we concluded to try Harrisburg; we went there, I think, about the last of February or first of March, and succeeded in obtaining from Paymaster Major Lyon two months' pay, as Major White, of the Eighty-first Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers; the pay accounts and papers on which we obtained the pay were made by us in Philadelphia, before we went to Harrisburg; we received over
$300; the check was drawn payable to the order of Major White, and the money drawn at a bank in Harrisburg. We returned to Philadelphia, and in about a week or so went to Harrisburg again, and drew another two months' pay as Major White, amounting to over $300, as before. A few days after Jake and I, getting broke again, we went to Maltby's House, and whilst there succeeded in obtaining from Major Price between $500 and $600, as Major White, Eighty-first N. J. V., A. D. C. to Major-General Rosecrans. Having received this, we again returned to Philadelphia, and remained there, as near as I can remember, two weeks. Concluded then to go to Washington; I think last March; stopped at Willard's; succeeded, while there, in obtaining the pay of a second lieutenant, for four months, amounting, I believe, to about $400, as Lieutenant De Forrest, Acting Aid-de-Camp on the Staff of General Steele, from Major Hutchins, Paymaster.
Returning to Philadelphia, and remaining awhile, until again our money was gone, we went to New York, to try our fortunes there. We arrived in New York early in April, and stopped at the St. Nicholas Hotel. We succeeded in obtaining, directly and through the aid of agents, from Paymaster Major Lee, up to the time of arrest by Major Lee, about $900, as Lieutenant De Forrest, Captain Tyler, and Lieutenant Massey; and from Paymaster Major Pratt, through the aid of agents, $223.20, as
Captain Tyler and Lieutenant Massey. I prepared all the leaves of absence upon which pay was obtained, in my own handwriting. That at Washington and that in New York were in the same language in nearly every case.
Now, almost every school-boy knows that there is no such an organization as the Eighty-first N. J. V., never has been, and, most likely, never will be. Yet here we find agents of the Government intrusted [sic] with its funds paying out money to scamps who had no military existence, and who represented themselves as belonging to a bogus regiment. What apology can be made for such glaring stupidity?

WELCOME HOME
—OF THE—
Eighty-First New York State Volunteers.
Composed by R. D. BABCOCK, Company D, Eighty-First Regiment.

WELCOME home, welcome home, ye vet'rans brave,
Who in the Southern traitorous clime have stayed;
You've suffered heat and storms, and cold,
And many a friend in death's cold embrace laid.
Welcome home, welcome home, ye vet'rans brave,
Welcome, welcome home.

Welcome to our hearts and homes once more,
Ye small but true and patriotic band—
Your ranks have thinned since you left this shore
To defend our own—your own true native land.
Welcome home, &c, &c.

Once more we bid you welcome to our homes—
Though time is brief you have with us to stay—
You're welcome to our halls and castle domes
You've seen through dreamy visions far away.
Welcome home, &c., &c.

When first for war our country blew its loudest call
You flew to arms, and marched to battle's deadly strife,
Not fearing death by sword or swiftly flying ball,
When battling for your homes, your country, and your life.
Welcome home, &c., &c.

And when for vet'rans brave another call was made,
Your names were freely placed upon the roll;
And many a friend you have by it made,
Whilst onward to the battle-field our armies stroll
Welcome home, &c., &c.

We hear the cars a-whistling, we see your banners dip,
Our daughters bid you welcome, our parents bid you come
To clasp their hands in kindest friendship,
Upon your sure and safe arrival home.
Welcome home, welcome home, ye vet'rans brave,
Welcome, welcome home.

Arrival of the 81st Regiment N. Y. S. V.—The 8lst Regiment N. Y. S. V., arrived here yesterday morning, about 8 o'clock, entirely unannounced. The Citizen's Committee, although not notified of the departure of the regiment from New York, received and entertained the boys to their entire satisfaction.
The regiment was organized in this city December 20, 1861, and consisted of one thousand one hundred men, mostly from Oswego county, under command of the lamented Edwin Rose as Colonel and Jacob I. De Forest as Lieutenant Colonel. It left in Februrary [sic], 1862, landed at Fortress Monroe, and participated in General McClellan's Campaign on the Peninsula. In the battle of Seven Pines it lost heavily, and a large number in the Seven Days' Fight.
After the retreat to Harrison's Landing, it went to Newbern, N. C., and joined Foster's expedition, and from thence to Hilton Head, and took part in the bombardment of Fort Sumter. It then went back to Newport News, Va., and from there to Northwest Landing, a place 28 miles from Norfolk. Here it re-enlisted—some 500 of them—came home on a veteran furlough, and recruited up to a thousand strong.
At the expiration of their furlough, the veterans went to Yorktown, and were organized in the Eighteenth Corps (Baldy Smith's). The regiment was at Bermuda Hundreds, Swift Creek and Violet Station. In the three days at Cold Harbor it lost more than half its men, eight out of the nine Captains, and three Lieutenants. It was at the successful storming of Petersburg Heights, where sixteen guns were captured, and then lay before Petersburg under fire for twenty-two days. On the 24th of June the Rebels made a terrible charge and were repulsed, leaving eighty-one of their dead in front of the Eighty-first alone. From here it went over to the north side on a surprise, captured Fort Harrison, and was at Fair Oaks. It then aided in keeping the Chapin's Farm line, until the night of the 2d April, when the word was received "On to Richmond," and on the 3d it entered that renowned capital of the late Rebeldom. It aided in putting out the conflagration, marched to Libby prison and liberated some three or four hundred of our soldiers, placing 2,500 Rebels in their stead, over which it stood guard for two weeks, when it was sent to Williamsburg, where it has remained until sent home. It has a most noble and glorious record. The following is a list of its officers:
Colonel—David B. White; went out as Captain.
Lieutenant-Colonel—L. V. S. Mattison; went out as Orderly Sergeant.
Adjutant—J. W. Kimmey; went out as private.
Surgeon—John Miller.
Assistant Surgeon—John Oliver.
Quartermaster—John Chisholm.
Company A—Captain Joseph Bartlett; went out as private. First Lieutenant Theodore Harter; went out as private.
Company B—Captain, H. P. Ballard; went out as private. First Lieutenant James Berry; went out as private.
Company C—First Lieutenant, Wm. Brackett.
Company D—Captain, Wm. P. Babcock; First Lieutenant, Wm Brailey.
Company E—Captain, James J. Butler.
Company F—Captain, Byron B. Morris; First Lieutenant, Harvey C. Taft.
Company G—Captain, E. A. Blakeley; First Lieutenant, George W. Haley.
Company H—Captain, William Bredow; First Lieutenant, James B. Foote.
Company I—First Lieutenant, John Walker.
Company K—Captain, Charles R. Johnson; First Lieutenant, Henry Squires.
All these officers entered service as privates, and have won their way to their respective positions by dint of personal bravery and devotion.

 

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