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91st New York Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

EXPRESS & GENERAL BANK'S EXPEDITION.
BEFORE FORT HUDSON, LA.,
June 13, 1863.
Editor of the Express & Sentinel:
DEAR SIR:—Since writing you at Key West, Florida, I have witnessed and experienced the many variegated scenes of a soldier's life during the revolution of the year, both in quiet camp and battle's bloody strife, but the last two weeks has been by far the most exciting and destructive. Many brave and good men have by the hands of traitors, during this period, fallen a sacrifice to honors they are past enjoying upon earth, and been buried, minus sheet or shroud and with but a piece of wood at their heads, upon which is  inscribed the name, rank and regiment of heroes second to none of which bears record. Many have received wounds of which they pine and die, but receive christian burial, while others who have received wounds of a less serious nature, will again be able to fight and eventually return to loved ones at home, proud of the evidence they will bring of their action in assisting to put down rebellion. Our loss in killed and wounded to the present time will fall very little short of two thousand. Of the loss of the Rebels we have no means of ascertaining, but the probabilities are that it will not exceed one-half of our own, as they have for several days posssessed [sic] every advantage over us—the cover of woods, fallen timbers, deep ravines (almost impassible), and a thorough knowledge of the country being impediments to our near approach to their fortifications—all of which have been overcome and many of their rifle pits taken.
Our forces now form a line of battle seven miles in length, extending from the river above to the river below the fortifications of the Rebels. Our gunboats guard the river above and below, and a force upon the opposite side cuts off all communication there, hence the Rebels have no egress but to charge up on us in force, which they cannot now possibly do with success, as we are prepared to meet them at any moment with better guns, better soldiers, and in larger numbers than it is their s to boast of. We have also erected many batteries and breastworks, composed of live oak trees imbedded in the earth and trimmed with a large amount of cotton bales, which become very useful. We are within speaking distance of the Rebels and have occupied this position for two weeks. They call us "Yankee thieves," and we call them "Rebel trailers," but while such interchange of sentiment is being echoed to and fro heads are lying low, for the moment a head is to be seen upon either side "pop goes a gun," and down falls a soldier. Hence it is but prudent for them to cover under their earth works and for us to keep behind Uncle Sam's cotton. But this state of things will be of short duration. We are nearly ready to open a new scene with "peace makers" which speak trumpet-tongued and inflict punishment with every warning. Vigorous efforts have been put forth in making preparations to bombard the place, and the work is nearly completed, and if we fail to bring them to a sense of justice we will convince them of their danger and Yankee determination. The question of taking Port Hudson is only a question of time. It is doomed to fall into our hands with all its inmates, should weeks still be required to accomplish the work.
Below I will give you the number of killed and wounded in the 91st N. Y. State Volunteers, and a list of the names of all belonging to Capt. J. G. McDermott's Company "C," principally organized in Clinton county.
Number of killed and wounded of the 91st Regt., is 82.
The following is a list of the killed and wounded of Company C:
Captain John G. McDermott, wounded in left knee.
Color-Sergeant Edward Gill, wounded in right side.
Corporal Franklin Pelker, wounded in fore finger of right hand.
Private Joseph Bushey, wounded in two fingers of left hand.
Private Warren C. Fadden, wounded in right hand.
Private George Childs killed.
Private Albert Burnhart killed.
The last two were enlisted at Albany.
Respectfully yours,
H. C. E.

RETURNED HOME.—Lieut. William Diamond, of the 91st Regiment, who was wounded during the first assault on Port Hudson, reached his home in this city Saturday morning. He is in a debilitated condition, and suffers very much from his wound.

A CARD.—The following Card has been handed in:
ALBANY, N. Y., July 17, 1865.
To 1st Lieut. Andrew Dodds, 91st Regt. N. Y. S. V.;
SIR—We, the undersigned veteran members of K Company, Ninety-first Regiment N. Y. S. V., desire to return you our sincere thanks for your uniform kindness and courtesy towards us while in command of the Company. Your careful and painstaking attention to our welfare while in garrison or camp, and extending over the long period of nearly four years, and your bravery on the battle field, have won for you our highest esteem and admiration. We sincerely hope that you will speedily recover from the effects of wounds received in the service, and beg to assure you that you will always have our best wishes for your future happiness and prosperity.
Sergeants, Francis McCann, Henry Lodewick; Corporals, Abner D. Sneer, Augustus Krumm, Aaron Pulver; Musicians, Robert J. Hannah, William N. Hervy; Privates James Dennis, Charles J. Lord, James Mellon, Frederick Tucker, Fisher A. Green, Thomas D. Nicholas, Christian Rhodes, John M. Russell, Michael Smith, Peter Shaver, Philip Schrim, Reuben R. Tanner.

Death of John B. Moore.
Among the earliest volunteers from Columbia County were two brothers, John and David Moore, residing in the town of Austerlitz. They enlisted in the 91st Regiment, then expecting to be led by the gallant Cowles, and were dispatched to Key West, thence to Pensacola, and finally joined Gen. Grover's Division and participated in the memorable Texan campaign, being engaged in no less than thirteen different skirmishes. Both were subsequently taken sick and sent to the Hospital at Brashear City in May last. From there they were removed separately to the Marine Hospital in New Orleans, each being ignorant of the other's presence there. On the 4th of July, several weeks after their arrival, John died of chronic dysentery, and was buried without David's knowledge. The latter stills remained in the Hospital at last accounts so ill that the intelligence had not yet been broken to him by his brother Milo, of the 128th, who communicates this intelligence.
Mr. Moore leaves a wife and four children dependent at Austerlitz. He was a farmer about 38 years of age, a devoted husband and father, but above all a sincere patriot, declaring himself willing to give up his life in the service of his country, if God should so order. He has been as good as his word!

CASUALTIES IN THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT.
—The following is a list of inmates of the St. Louis Hospital at New Orleans, who were wounded in the storming of Port Hudson:
First Lieutenant W. S. Hurwert, Co. C; Sergeant S. Townsend, Co. D; Corporal A. Aumock, Co. D; Corp. M. Scripture, Co. C; Corp. P. H. Garity, Co. H; Privates Jacob Decker, James N. Wands, Co. D; Detor Delong,
Co. G; Samuel Sneade, Co. E; Michael Scott, F. Bartholomew, Co. A.

The following is a list of killed and wounded from the 25th to the 31st ult:
KILLED—Corporal George Cramer, Co. A; Corp. McKeever, Co. B; Orderly Sergt. McCormick, Co. D; Geo. Childs, Co. C; H. McGee, Sergt. Elms, J. O'Hara, Co. E; Corp. Salisbury, W. Duff; Co. F; W. Carson, P. Crain, Co. G; P. Austin, G. Vanderpool, M. Taylor, Co. H; Sergt. Smith, Co. I: W. Saxby, Co. K.

WOUNDED—Sergt. E. Grace, John Cradon, C. Christian, W. Allen, C. Marzy, J. O'Connor, Co. A; Geo, Davidson, Corp. H. Brown, J. Newberry, Co. B; Sergt. Gill, Corp. Pilky, J. Bushby, W. Fadden, Co. C; Corp. White, G. Salisbury, R. Watson, Thos. Haley, W. Devenlin, ____ Goodman, Co. D; Lt. Chase, Corp. Dash, J. Martin; P. O'Sullivan, J. Deach, M. Fitzgerald, J. Price, Martin; P. Bell, Co. E; Sergt. Leoper, J. Donnelly, C. Hartley, J. Blood, J. Bartlett, T. Kennedy, J. Allen, J. Goodrich, J. Goodman, Co. F; Sergt. Thoronton, Corp. Thoronton, D. Quackenbush, J. Carr, P. Gaffney, Corp. Haaman, H. Sweeney, P. Connolly, P. Keefe, J. Merry, J. O'Brien, Co. G; P. Snyder, Co. H; Lt. Bradford, F. Parsons, L. Gun, P. Johnston, C. Stickles, J. Blackburn, L. Richardson, Co. I ; H. Shook, A. Tremble, P. Chism, Co. K; J. McMahon, Co. H; Sergt. Owens, Co. E; Maj. Geo. W. Stackhouse, Capt. John Cook, and Capt. McDermott.

THE WOUNDS OF CAPT. "JOHNNY" COOKE AND MAJOR STACKHOUSE OF THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT.—We have heretofore announced that these officers had been wounded. The following is an extract from a letter of a member of the 91st regiment, dated New Orleans, May 31st:
Among the many wounded at the battle now pending at Port Hudson, is Capt. Johnny Cooke, of the 91st. While gallantly leading on his men to a rebel battery, he was struck by a musket ball in the arm, about half way from the shoulder to the elbow, shattering the arm terribly. The Doctors have come to the conclusion that they can save his arm and life. There is not an officer in the 91st regiment more respected or better liked than Captain Johnny Cooke.
Major Stackhouse is also wounded very bad, being shot through both legs. The 91st regiment met with the heaviest loss of any white regiment. Col. Van Zandt is now commanding a brigade, and Major Stackhouse was commanding the 91st regiment when he received his wounds.

Storming Port Hudson—Captain "Johny" Cooke and Major Stackhouse Wounded.
ST. JAMES HOSPITAL, NEW ORLEANS,
May 31st, 1863.
MR. HASTINGS—Sir: Among the many wounded at the battle, now pending at Port Hudson, was your old neighbor, Captain John Cooke, of the 91st Regiment New York Volunteersh [sic]. Wile gallantly leading on his men to a rebel battery, he was struck by a musket ball in the arm, about half way from the shoulder to the elbow, shattering his arm terribly, so it; was thought at one time he would have to lose his arm. But the doctors have come to the conclusion that they can save his arm and life. Nothing but the best of care can do it. I can say of truth, that there is not an officer in the 91st Regiment more respected and better liked, than Capt. Johnny Cooke, of Company F. Major Stackhouse of the 91st Regiment, is also wounded very  bad, being shot through both legs. The 91st Regiment met with the heaviest loss of any white regiment. Three negro regiments charged on one battery four times and got almost exterminated. Our loss in Colonels and Generals is heavy. Colonel Van Zandt is now commanding a brigade, and Major Stackhouse was commanding the 91st Regiment when he received his wounds. Port Hudson is ours, only Banks is now getting his heavy guns in position so he can throw a shell or two.
Yours,
S. B., 91st N. Y. Vol.

The Death of Joseph Martin.
DRUM CORP 91ST REG'T, N. Y. VOL.,
In the Field Near Washington, La.,
May 3d, 1863.
At a meeting of the Drum Corps attached to the 91st Regiment, New York Volunteers, in regard to the sudden and sad demise of one of its members, John Martin, by the accidental discharge of a musket in the hands of a private, the following preamble and resolutions were adopted:
Whereas, By the dispensation of Our Heavenly Father, we are called to mourn, in connection with our regimental officers and soldiers, the unexpected and sudden death of Joseph Martin, impressing solemnly on our minds, the injunction of Scripture that, "In the midst of life we are in death."
Resolved, That in the loss of our brother and companion, we tender our sympathy and heartfelt sorrow to the parents of the deceased, at the same time we are nerved with the assurance that he was ever prompt to the call of duty, worthy of a more general emulation.
Resolved, That the Drum Corps attend the funeral of the deceased this afternoon, (Sunday) May 3d, at 1 1/2 o'clock at Washington, Louisiana, and also that the proceedings of the meeting, by request, be published in the daily Knickerbocker and Express.
Resolved, That the officers of this meeting be requested to send a copy of these proceedings to the parents of the deceased.
JOHN T. STEWART, Drum Major,
President
DAVID VAN COTT, Secretary,

DEATH OF LIEUT. WILLIAMSON.—Among the many brave men who fell in storming the fortifications of Port Hudson, we are pained to add the name of Lieutenant Williamson, of the 177th Regiment. He fell while gallantly leading a charge on some of the works. He was a man highly esteemed by the regiment. He was brave and courteous, and entered the service from pure love of country. He has a large circle of friends in this city who will mourn his early death. He was a member of the firm of Williamson & Sons.

Death of Major Stackhouse and Adjutant Shepard—Wounding of Other Officers.
Albany is again called on to mourn the loss of more of her gallant sons. We have intelligence of the death of Major Stackhouse and Adjutant Shepard. The former died from the wounds received in the assault on Port Hudson on the 28th of May, and the latter was killed while gallantly leading his company to the attack made on the 14th instant. Major Stackhouse was an old and true soldier. For many years he was one of the most active members of the old Albany Artillery. He was among the first to offer his services when the rebellion broke out, and rallied to the defence of Washington with the Twenty-fifth Regiment. He afterwards joined the Ninety-first Regiment, and was made Major, in which capacity he had served with distinction on the coast of Florida, and in the campaign of the lower Mississippi, under General Banks. He was in all respects a true soldier, and died like a patriot, in defence of the old flag, which he so much worshipped. Peace to his ashes.
The loss of young Shepard is a terrible blow to his family and friends. Highly gifted and enthusiastic in his profession, had he been spared, he would have made his mark in the army. He met the fate worthy of a brave boy. He died with his face to the enemy, while leading his men up to the mouth of the enemy's cannon. His memory will be cherished by his many young friends, who sadly deplore his premature death.
We fear, from the accounts received, that we will be obliged to add to the list of deaths our boyhood's friend, Lieutenant Diamond, of the same regiment. We hear that he was mortally wounded in the attack of the 14th instant, and that his life was despaired of. We will not give him up for lost until we have further intelligence. We know his pluck, and will hope for the best.
Colonel Benedict, who led the Second Brigade in the assault of the 14th, writes to his mother: "On this advance I lost Colonel Bryan, shot through both legs. Ho fought as the brave only do, and so died, at eleven o'clock. Also, Major Bogart, struck by a shell, which tore away his sword hilt and carried it through his hip. He lived but a few minutes. It being impracticable to convey his body to Baton Rouge, he was buried at the foot of a tree, which is marked and a board put up.—Colonel Blanchard was not hit, though exposed to all the fire. Captain Hineford was touched on the hand, slightly. Lieutenant Neville was badly wounded. Several brave men of the One Hundred and Sixty-second were killed outright; about twenty-four wounded, some mortally. The Forty-eighth Massachusetts had two killed and twelve wounded. The One Hundred and Seventy-fifth lost heavily. Our medical attendance is good, and the wounded are well cared for."
A letter to a member of Mr. Shepard's family says of the Ninety-first: "Our loss, so far, has been very heavy indeed, having but five officers left out of all that went into action this morning. Captain Lee is badly wounded; Lieutenant Heremeth, badly; Matthias, badly; Diamond, badly; Stackhouse, badly (since dead); Hamburger, slightly, and a very great number of men; but the particulars are not known as yet, for the Ninety-first never has and never will flinch from the foe."
The same letter, in speaking of young Shepard, says: "Your brother has earned for himself the reputation of being a gallant and brave officer, and I have heard the men speak in glowing terms of his conduct in several hard –fought battles, especially those of the 25th and 27th of May, before Port Hudson."

HOME MATTERS
A Defence of the Ninety-first Regiment.
Correspondence of the Times & Courier.
IN THE FIELD, 26 MILES ABOVE ALEXANDRIA,
ON THE RED RIVER, La., MAY 26, 1863.
To THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES & COURIER—Sir: I forward a copy of a letter which has been sent to the New Orleans Era for publication, and which, by your publishing also, will confer a favor on the Ninety-first New York Volunteers, as the statement given in the Era on the 29th ult., disparages and that very unjustly the conduct of the Ninety-first in the action at Irish Bend, and which may be copied in the Northern papers. The writer of the article knew, as well as we did ourselves, that the Ninety-first never occupied or was placed in line of battle with the Thirteenth Connecticut and One Hundred and Fifty-ninth New York, or that we were within a mile of them at the time, but this is only of a piece with other transactions that take place in this Department, where every one seems happy to have a fling at the New York Regiments; and even where any regiment of the Empire State does any effective service, it is glossed over and scarcely mentioned, while some Massachusetts, Maine, or Connecticut regiment gets all the credit. And this is not only the case with the Ninety-first, but applies equally as well to the Seventy-fifth New York, as effective a Regiment as there is in the service of the United States, and which it has proved by its past service.
CAMP, ALEXANDRIA, LA., May 9, 1863.
To THE EDITOR OF THE ERA—Sir: Will you do justice to the Ninety-first New York Volunteers by publishing the following facts relative to the fight above Franklin, and correct the statement which appears in your pa­per of the 29th ult., in describing that battle, and in which your correspondent has made very many errors, (perhaps unintentionally,) es­pecially in relation to the Ninety-first New York Volunteers, a regiment that forms part of the First Brigade, commanded by General Dwight, and not of the Third Brigade, com­manded by Col. Birge, as appears in your pa­per of that date? This states that "Colonel Birge advanced in line of battle, with the Thirteenth Connecticut on the left, the One Hundred and Fifty-ninth on the centre, and
the Ninety-First New York on the right. The Twenty-fifth Connecticut and Twenty-sixth Maine were deployed in advance as skir­mishers," and again: "For some reason the Ninety-first New York on arriving at the line of skirmishers, made a halt under cover of a ditch, while the left (Thirteenth Connecticut,) and centre (One Hundred and Fifty-ninth New York) kept marching towards the enemy. This halting gave the enemy a chance to flank the One Hundred and Fifty-ninth New York, and he was not slow to take advantage of the mistake." So far as the Ninety-first New York is concerned this is all pure fiction, for it did  not go into the field or have any orders to move until the One Hundred and Fifty-ninth New York, Twenty-sixth Maine and Twenty-fifth Connecticut, together with a section of artillery, were falling back, and the One Hundred and Fifty-ninth New York had lost all its officers, and had met with the  whole loss it sus­tained for the day, as well as the other regi­ments engaged. The First Brigade being call­ed on to prevent a flank movement of the enemy's left and support the One Hundred and Fifty-ninth, who were falling back, the Nine­ty-first was selected, and that regiment, under charge of Cob Van Zandt, advanced by itself amid a storm of shot, some two hundred yards towards the enemy, who had, after the falling back of the Third brigade, formed in line of battle in a cane field, with woods in their rear. The Ninety-first halted and fired a volley, which broke the enemy's line of battle, who then sought shelter in the woods. Col. Van Zandt then commanded the Ninety-first to lay down and fire as sharpshooters, in which posi­tion they kept up a most galling fire at the en­emy, for whenever any one of them exposed himself from behind the shelter of a tree, he was sure to fall. This caused the enemy to fall further back, when the Ninety-first ad­vanced; and as they advanced, they deployed as sharpshooters, and effected a lodgement in the edge of the woods, and in a very short time drove the enemy completely through them, into an open clearing, until they got un­der the protection of their own artillery. The Ninety-first captured many prisoners in the woods, who said that they held a number of the 159th prisoners, and would have captured the battery had it not been for the advance and very destructive fire of the Ninety-first; and they admitted a loss at least of 140 to 150 men from the first volley fired by the Ninety-first.
Major Stackhouse, who had the right wing of the Ninety-first, saw a portion of the 159th New York in front of him in a ditch, held as prisoners. The rebel Twenty-eighth La. Had 100 picked men as sharpshooters on his flank, galling him considerably with their fire, and to avoid firing at the 159th, he had to direct the fire of Cos. B and F obliquely, which drove the enemy from his position, when the men of the 159th came in, and passed in squads thro' the right wing of the Ninety-first.
The Ninety-first was more than an hour in the woods, driving the enemy through them, without any support from any other regiment, till the Sixth New York appeared on their right—half of that regiment being deployed as skirmishers, the other half being held in reserve. I am sir, yours respectfully,

AN OFFICER OF THE 91ST N. Y. S. V.
The foregoing was all that was considered necessary to refute the slur thrown on the Ninety-first in the Era of the 29th ult., though much more could have been written, but which, coming from a member of the Ninety-first, would have appeared too egotistic; for it is an undoubted fact, which cannot be gainsayed, that the Ninety-first did alone effect, unaided and unsupported, that which the whole of the Third brigade, consisting of the Thirteenth Conn., One Hundred and fifty-ninth N. Y., Twenty-fifth Maine, Twenty-sixth Conn., and a section of battery failed to accomplish; and if the application of Col. Van Zandt for four pieces of artillery, and a sufficient force thrown out on his right, had been complied with—and he made the application repeatedly—the whole of the rebel force would have been captured, including their artillery, and prevented Gen. Taylor from making the flank movement, by which he escaped.
There was certainly great culpability or criminality displayed somewhere, and the parties implicated can choose which term suits them best. The prisoners taken repeatedly told us that they were only playing with the regiments first engaged, and were sure of a very easy victory, but when the Ninety-first came into action, they found to their cost, that they had other kind of soldiers to deal with, and who knew how to fire, for they emphatically said "devils from hell" could not stand the fire of the men with the blue ribbons in their hats. A prisoner we captured yesterday, acknowledges he was in the fight at Irish Bend, and says they were in the battery when our regiment commenced firing, but they had to abandon it double quick. The men of the Ninety-first always had great confidence in their Colonel, and held him in great respect, but now that confidence is unbounded, for they have seen his calm courage on the field of battle, where he was as calm and collected, without a particle of excitement, as if simply going through a dress parade, continually cautioning the men to fire low, and pointing out to the men where to direct their fire when any rebel exposed himself from behind the shelter of a tree, and though the men of the Ninety-first would be sorry to lose Col. Van Zandt, yet they consider that he ought and is entitled to have a star on his shoulder and be in command of a brigade, to which his past services fully entitle him.
"Fair Play is a Jewel," is an old aphorism, and one of universal application, but one that is totally ignored in this department, so far as the New York regiments are concerned. All details for provost duty to occupy towns and places that we have passed through, are made from the New England regiments, and nineteen twentieths of the officers detailed for special duty, and on the different staffs are all selected from the same class of regiments. The 6th N. Y. V., was marched from Brashear City, on the borders of the Gulf of Mexico to above Alexandria on the Red River, La., though not having a month to serve, and are now waiting transport to be sent back again, yet the Twenty-second Maine was detached as soon as we commenced our advance from the same brigade to which the Sixth belong, leaving the First brigade at present with but three regiments, the Ninety-first N. Y. V., One Hundred and Thirty-first N. Y. V., and 1st La., in the field.
We notice and cannot shut our eyes to the fact that not only a difference exists between the New York regiments and those from New England, so far as the officers are concerned, but that the rank and file of the New England regiments are allowed far greater latitude than those from New York, and what is only considered venial for one of the former to do, yet in the latter becomes a crime, punishable by death, and which has been inflicted in more than one case, without even a trial, but simply on the order of a General. Our earnest prayer is that we may be removed from the Department of the Gulf and placed somewhere else, where justice may be shown to all and partiality to none, come from what State the regiment may.
I am, yours respectfully, FAIR PLAY.

EXTENSIVE STRIKE—EXCITING DEMONSTRATION.
—Yesterday morning, a general strike occurred among the Longshoremen in this city, who have thus closely followed up the example set in New York on Saturday. They claim an advance from $1.25 to $1.50 per day. It is alleged that this demand would have been complied with, if employers had been assured that these terms would be satifactory [sic] for the season. The strikers at first embraced laborers attached to the Swiftsure, Troy and Winne lines, but these soon after visited the Central railroad and drew the laborers there into the strike. They went to the Elevator of the road, in course of construction, and compelled the hod carriers to quit. In the afternoon the Central workmen, who demanded an increase from nine shillings to a dollar and a half, all quit. They then proceeded to the Central Elevator again and ordered the masons down from the scaffold, but this the latter refused to do, and threatened to punish the first man who should attempt to get upon the scaffolding.—They then visited the freights depots of the Northern road, closed the doors and drove the laborers out. They also made a demonstration upon the Central freight houses, but the doors were closed and they were prevented from entering. Subsequently, they paraded the streets in a body, headed by a band of music ...
Mr. Jeffers, the Freight Agent, has telegraphed to the West not to forward any more perishable freight for the present. There are 300 cars here loaded, which the strikers will not allow to be unloaded. Orders have been given to pay all the men off.
These strikers may be entitled to an increase of wages; that is a question that concerns exclusively their employers and themselves. But it concerns the public that they shall not be permitted to indulge in riotous demonstrations; and they should be advised to abstain from violence towards those who may be disposed to work. They will be far more likely to secure what they demand by conducting themselves in an orderly manner, and also avoid the punishment which will be certain to follow any violation of law.

HOME MATTERS
From the Ninety-First Regiment.
NEAR OF PORT HUDSON, LA.,
91ST REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.,
June 15, 1863.
To the Editor of the Times & Courier:
SIR:—Yesterday was fought the bloodiest battle the 91st has been engaged in, and we glory in the thought that the regiment not only sustained its previous character for gallantry and heroism, but that it exceeded anything it had ever achieved previously. But I sincerely regret and mourn our very heavy loss in killed and wounded. Among the former are Capt. Hurlburt, Co. K, and Adjutant Lieut. Shepard, both officers being shot down while leading that company to the charge, for on the fall of Capt. Hurlburt, the Adjutant took command of his company, and in gallantly cheering them on, received his death wounds; of all the officers that went into action only five remain for duty, the others being wounded, viz: Capt. Lee, and Lieuts. Herewith, Diamond and Matthias, severely; Stackhouse, slightly, and Barker got injured by a fall in a ravine, but he kept up until the battle was over. The number of men killed and wounded is reported to be 88 out of 293 that went into action, our regiment being reduced to that small number by battle and disease. A number of the wounds are slight, and many will again join the regiment, but still a good many will have to be discharged as unfit for service.
The 91st were armed with three and five pound hand grenades, besides their rifles, which they carried slung over their shoulders. They were to be covered by the 75th New York and 12th Connecticut as skirmishers, while they went up to the rebel entrenchments and hurl the hand grenades over, which they partially succeeded in doing through a tremendous fire, and with the loss of many men, the fire from the skirmishers not being so effective as could be wished to keep the rebels quiet.
When the 91st had gained the position it was to occupy, another regiment was ordered to advance and take position in front of the 91st. (I do not know what regiment it was,) It either refused or held back to make the advance, when our regiment was again ordered forward, the Colonel saying, "I know it is hard, boys, but it has got to be done, and we must do it" at the same time there was a moistening of the eye, for the Colonel felt for his men, knowing as he did, that he was leading them as it were into a slaughter house, and the regiment had lost many men in gaining the position they occupied. However, the regiment took him at his word, and nobly gained the desired point.
The officers vied with each other in deeds of gallantry, and it is almost invidous [sic] to mention names, but Capt. Evans, of Co. G, and Capt. Collins, of Co. H, were the observed of all observers. The former seemed to bear a charmed life, the balls falling about him like hail, and men dropping right and left of him, yet he passed unhurt through the fiery ordeal as he advanced, with his sword in one hand and his cap in the other, cheering the men on, and both Captain and himself with a few men, got so close up to the rebel works, that it was 10 o'clock at night before they could leave the place they were in, and get back to the regiment, yet both these officers never received a scratch.
And Our Flag! That beautiful emblem as it was when we left Albany, had grown pale and sickly from constant exposure, and its proportions measurably reduced, and with its shattered staff, lashed with line, showed many a rent and tear from shot and shell; but on this day its military career has ended, and though its existence was but brief, yet it has been a triumphant one, for it never fell back from the foe, and its only course was "forward." It has perished gloriously in the cause it represented, and as its historian let me give a desscription [sic] of its last hour.
On the charge of the "forlorn hope," when Col. Van Zandt gave the command "forward" there was a momentary hesitation, at which he ordered "Townsend," of Co. K, to bring on the flag. Townsend was the same who saved the flag from a fall at a charge on the 27th of May, and has carried it since, and into excellent hands it fell. On this occasion he promptly advanced, saying "boys, follow your flag,'' and they did, over the gully and up the knoll, and there he received five balls in his body. He sank down muttering "You _____, I plant you there yet." Lieut. Diamond, who was already wounded, caught the flag as Townsend fell, and the same instant was wounded again, this time dangerously. As he caught it, the staff was again shattered by a cannon ball, and the fragments flew around in all directions, and nearly every star was obliterated from the Union or "Blue Ground."—Corporal Garretty then sprang forward and caught its remains, receiving as he did so, two dangerous wounds which dropped him, but his grasp was so tenacious that it required the united strength of two men to get it from him. Now, our old flag is no more, which, on the morning of the 14th of April, at Irish Bend, was whole and intact, and is now lying in pieces in the knapsacks of different officers and men of the regiment as valuable relics, and neither gold or costly jewels could buy the insignificant pieces of what was once so vauntingly displayed at its presentation by Mrs. J. W. Harcourt, in Lydias street, to the 91st, when it left Albany, in December, 1861.
It is with great regret that I have to say that Port Hudson is still in possession of the rebels, and that so far we have as yet shed our blood in vain and uselessly against that rebel stronghold; but we have to take it, and fall it must and will, and I hope in my next letter to announce the glorious news, and that our present campaign is ended for the summer.
The following regiments were engaged on the 14th. 75th, 90th, 91st, 110th, 114th, 131st, 133d, 159th, 160th and 163d New York, 1st La., 4th Wis., 8th Vt., 8th and 15th N. H., 12th, 13th, 22d and 28th Conn., and 22d Maine, and all have suffered more or less, according to the position they occupied.
Quartermaster McKown is quite well; he has gone to-day to Baton Rouge, with the remains of Capt. Hurlburt. Lieut. Shepard's remains were sent yesterday; it was only last night that Capt. H.'s body could be recovered.
Gen. Banks has called for a volunteer force out of each regiment, to consist of from one to two thousand men, to make a grand attack on Port Hudson in a day or two. Every man and officer must be a volunteer, and come freely and if anything can take it, this will; if this fails we must abandon it for the present. Yours, &c. W. H. W.

THE NINETY-FIRST IN THE RECENT FIGHT.—The full facts are contained in a letter from Capt. Selkirk to Mr. Matthew Clark, of this city:—
In the late engagement near New Orleans, two of the 91st were killed. William Clark (who the day before had been promoted to be 2d Sergeant) was hit between the eyes, the ball passed out through the top of his head, causing his death soon after.
A private in Co. C. named Frand Freter, (a German,) was also killed. Several were wounded, but none dangerously.
Capt. Selkirk was reported shot, under the eye, the ball coming out in front of the ear. The eye was closed.

BATTLE OF VERMILLION.—The following are the names in the 91st Regiment, Col. Van Zandt, who were wounded in the engagement at Vermillion Bayou, La., on the 17th inst., in which, after a hard contest with the rebel batteries and a strong force of infantry, our troops gained a complete success, driving the enemy from his position, capturing his guns, and taking fifteen hundred prisoners. Chas. Tice, Co. F; Casper Godick, Co. E; Jacob W. Landt, Co. B; Corporal A. Hagadorn, Co. G; W. Newton, Co. C; Corporal J. W. Wilson, Co. H; A. Sinclair, Co. A; Barth Foley, Co. G.

Morning Express.
ALBANY, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 1863.
THREE ALBANIANS KILLED IN THE
BATTLE AT PORT HUDSON.
Deaths of Col. M. K. Bryan, Major James H. Bogart and Capt. Henry Hurlburt.
Our citizens were startled on Saturday at the announcement that Col. M. K. Bryan, Major James H. Bogart, and Capt. Henry Hulburt, of this city, had fallen martyrs to the cause of the Union, before Port Hudson, in the second attack on that stronghold on the 14th inst.

Colonel M. K. Bryan.
Col. M. K. Bryan, in command of the 175th Regiment N. Y. S. V., at the time of his death, was about forty years of age. He was born in Ireland, and came to this country in 1834. He located in New York for a short time, when he came to this city, and went into the employment of his cousin, Col. John McCardel. Subsequently he moved to New Orleans, where he engaged in business, and sometime after he again returned to this city, and assumed the charge of Col. McCardel's hotel, then located at the corner of Lydius and Quay streets. In time he became the owner of the establishment, and after doing a successful business there he purchased the Pavilion in Greenbush, from whence he again removed to this city to take charge of Van Vechten Hall, from which place he removed to Hudson street, where he carried on business until his departure for New Orleans.
Col. B. was one of the most accomplished military men we ever had in Albany. For twenty years past he had devoted himself to the service with an energy and will that won for him the respect and confidence of his fellow-citizens. He held the position of "high private" for several years, and went through all the non-commissioned offices, until he was elected to the command of the Worth Guards, which position he held with honor to himself and his command, until he was promoted to the Lieut. Colonelcy of the 25th Regiment, the lamented Col. Frisby being then in command. When Col. Frisby was appointed Brigadier General of Militia, Col. B. was promoted to the Colonelcy of the regiment, and remained in command until his appointment to the Colonelcy of the 175th Regiment.
When the rebellion first broke out, and Washington was threatened, in response to the call of the General Government for immediate aid, Col. Bryan, with a patriotic ardor which all will remember, called his officers together, and the services of the 25th were promptly tendered to Gov. Morgan, who gladly accepted them. Col. B., and his men, had not time even to arrange their business matters before orders were received for their departure. But they did not hesitate. They abandoned business, families, friends and all, and hastened to the defence of the Capital. Arriving in Washington, they were hurried across the river to Arlington Heights, being one of the first regiments to march over the Long Bridge. They were directed to take position on the Heights, which, at that time, was threatened by the Rebels, and immediately commenced the erection of the fortification now known as "Fort Albany, one of the most formidable and best constructed earthworks in the vicinity of Washington. The regiment remained on the Heights until the expiration of its term of service, and then returned home, not having been engaged in battle, but rendering most valuable services to the country during its three months' absence.
When Washington was a second time threatened, and Banks overpowered by superior numbers in the valley, another call was made for the militia of the State. The 25th Regiment was in a disorganized condition at the time, without uniforms and with thinned ranks. Col. B. resolved in his own mind, after consultation with some of his officers, to again enter the field. He devoted his whole time and energies to filling up the ranks, and placing the regiment on a war footing, and his indomitable perseverance was crowned with success, for in a few days after orders were received, he left town at the head of nearly six hundred men, and proceeded to Fortress Monroe, and from thence to Suffolk, Va., where the regiment remained for three months, and for the services rendered by it received the highest commendations of the General commanding.
After returning home, Col. Bryan devoted himself to the re-organization of the regiment, and was engaged in this work when Col. Corcoran announced his purpose to raise a brigade, having received the consent of the War Department to do so. Colonel Bryan, deeming it his duty to again enter the service, having received a request from Gen. Corcoran to take command of a regiment, promptly accepted the proposition, and again gave himself up wholly to the patriotic work. Those who knew the man best, and how unceasingly he labored to fill up his command, will bear willing testimony to his zeal and energy in behalf of the great cause of the Union
After his regiment was fully organized, he received orders to report to Fortress Monroe, and from thence went to New Orleans, having been detached from the brigade. Of the services performed by him in command of his regiment, during the Louisiana campaign, it is not necessary we should speak in detail. It is sufficient to say that he was always at his post, performing his duty to the satisfaction of his superior officers, and enjoying the entire confidence of his subordinates.
The manner of his death is stated in the following letter, written by Surgeon O'Leary, of the 175th Regiment to the Reverend Father Wadhams of this city.

NEW ORLEANS, June 18, 1863.
REVEREND SIR—It becomes my very painful duty to inform you of the death of Col. M. K. Bryan, of your city. He was killed in an engagement before Port Hudson on Sunday morning, 14th inst. He received two shots; the first supposed to be a round shot, grazing the skin and fracturing both bones of the lower left leg; the second, a grape shot mangling the flesh and bones of the right leg, below the knee. As near as I can learn, he lived about an hour after receiving his wounds. He seemed to be conscious of his approaching end, and died like one going to sleep. I have just arrived in this city with his remains, and shall send them home at the earliest opportunity. Connected as I have been for the last two years with the military career of the departed, it was a crushing blow to see him laid in the cold embrace of death. A nobler man never lived. A brayer soldier never wielded a sword. A truer christian never knelt before his Maker. He has left this earth of discord and strife for the bright home of the saints and angels. Let us hope that his reward will be as great in heaven as his noble services were underrated on earth. May God have mercy on his poor family and support them in this their dark hour of trial.
Believe me, dear father, to be,
Your very humble servant,
C. B. O'Leary,
Surgeon 175th Regiment, N. Y. S. V.
Not one of those who were present at the residence of the gallant soldier on the occasion of the presentation to him of his military outfit, on the eve of his departure for the seat of war, for a moment entertained the thought that he would so soon surrender his life in battling for his adopted country and its honor. They bade adieu to him with the full knowledge that wherever he might be assigned to duty he would distinguish himself. His devotion to the Union, and his willingness to fight for it, had been clearly demonstrated by the sacrifices he made when on two former occasions he abandoned his family and his business and hurried to the scene of danger to meet the foes of our distracted country and of liberty. If ever there was a pure patriot that man was Col. M. K. Bryan. He was actuated by no mercenary or sordid motives, and his works speak louder than any words we can utter. Like his lamented friend and associate—his tutor—Frisby, he felt that the country demanded his services, and he cheerfully gave them to aid in crushing out the accursed rebellion. Like the gallant Frisby, he will be mourned by every Albanian, and the unbidden tears, as they trickled down the cheek of youth and the furrows of age, when the sad news was announced Saturday, were silent but expressive messengers of the deep sorrow that it occasioned.
He died a hero. His last breath was the faint utterance of the departing spirit for his country. His memory will be cherished with reverence by all who honor the brave and fearless soldier, living or dead, and his name shall be inscribed on that immortal tablet which bears the record of patriotic devotion to country.

Wounded in the Ninety-First.--The following are additional names of wounded in the 91st Regiment: Wm. Clark, Co. A, head, fatally; C. Diedrich, Co. A, foot; Corp. G. O. Gilkee, Co. A. head, severely; F. Forsley, Co. C, abdomen; J. M. Sperry, Co. G, both legs; Corp. John Gibson, Co. H, leg; Wm. Neil, Co. H, leg.

CAPT. JOHN COOK.—This veteran officer reached New York yesterday, and will reach home on the boat this morning. This will be welcome intelligence to the Captain's host of warm friends. The old hero returns minus an arm lost in the service of his country.

LOCAL DEPARTMENT.
CASUALTIES IN THE 91ST REGIMENT N. Y. S. V.—In a letter just received from the camp of the 9lst Regiment, we are furnished with a list of casualties in the Regiment, from the 25th to the 31st.
KILLED—Corp. George Cromer, Co. A; Corp. McKeever, Co. B; Orderly Sergt. McCormick. Co. D ; George Childs, Co. C; H. McGee, Sergt. Elms, J. O'Hara, Co. E; Corp. Salisbury, W. Duff, Co. F ; W. Carson, P. Crain, Co. G; P. Austin, G. Vanderpool, M. Taylor, Co. H; Sergt. Smith, Co. I; W. Saxby, Co. K.
WOUNDED—Sergt. E. Grace, John Cradon, C. Christian, W. Allen, C. Marzy, T. O'Connor, Co. A; George Davidson, Corp. H. Brown, J. Newberry, Co. B; Sergt. Gill, Corp. Pilky, J. Bushby, W. Fadden, Co. C; Corp. White, G. Salisbury, R. Watson, Thos. Haley, W. Develin, ____ Goodman, Co. D; Lt. Chase, Corp. Dash, J. Martin; P. O'Sullivan, J. Deach, M. Fitzgerald, J. Price, P. Bell, Co. E; Sergt. Leoper, J. Donnelly, C. Hartley, J. Blood, J. Bartlett, T. Kennedy, J. Allen, J. Goodrich, J. Goodman, Co. F; Sergt. Thornton, Corp. Thornton, D. Quackenbush, J. Carr, P. Gaffney, Corp. Harman. H. Sweeney, P. Connolly, P. Keefe, J. Merry, J. O'Brien, Co. G; P. Snyder, Co. H; Lt. Bradford; F. Parsons, L. Gun, P. Johnson, C. Stickles, J. Blackburn, L. Richard son, Co. I; H. Shook: A. Tremble, P. Chism, Co. K; J. McMahon, Co. H ; Sergt. Owens, Co. E; Major Geo. W. Stackhouse, Capt. John Cooke, and Capt. McDermott.
There were quite a number of the 91st missing when the letter was written, but it was hoped they had been taken prisoners. The writer says he had been informed by a member of the 53d Regiment, that he had assisted in burying some of the members of the 91st, who were distinguished as such by the numbers on their caps.

Maj. Stackhouse and Lt. S. A. Shepard, of the Ninety-First, Killed.
Letters received this morning from New Orleans, announce the death of Maj. STACKHOUSE and Lt. S. A. SHEPARD, of the 91st.
Maj. S. was well known to many of our citizens, as a fine soldier and an ardent patriot. He was wounded in the assault at Port Hudson, on the 27th of May, in both thighs, but no serious consequences were expected to result from the wound. But it was more severe than was believed at the time it was received, and amputation was deemed necessary. The result was fatal.

Lieut. SHEPARD has been Adjutant of the 91st most of the time since its organization. When Capt. HURLBURT fell, the command of the company devolved upon Lieut. S., and he died while leading his men in the desperate assault of the 14th. He was a noble-hearted boy, and all who loved him, as all did who knew him, will mourn that one so gentle and brave should so soon have fallen.

FROM THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT—COL. VAN ZANDT ASSUMES COMMAND AGAIN—COL. WILSON UNDER ARREST—OFFICERS DISMISSED FOR MUTINOUS CONDUCT.—We learn by a private letter that Col. Van Zandt had been ordered to take command of his regiment again. He had been acting Brigadier, and was in command of the Second Brigade. After the attack on Port Hudson the 91st was put in the First Brigade, commanded by Brigadier General Dwight. The 91st was the advance guard at the bombarding of Port Hudson, and at one time they were within two miles of the enemy's works.
The First Brigade is composed of the following regiments: 6th New York (Wilson's Zouaves), commanded by Lieut. Col. Michael Cassidy; 22d Maine; 13th Connecticut; 91st New York; 131st New York and 1st Louisiana.
Col. Billy Wilson, of the 6th New York, is under arrest.
The following named officers in the 6th have been dismissed from the service for mutiny: Captain Duffey, Captain Latham and Lieut. Campbell. The above officers had their shoulder straps cut off in the presence of the whole Brigade, at Donaldsonville.
The writer says that the members of the 91st are enjoying excellent health, and were waiting patiently for orders to leave for Brashear City, where Magruder and Price were supposed to be waiting for them. The "Rebs" appear to have a dread for the 6th and 91st.
The writer also mentions the fact that it is impossible to tell when they will get paid off, as the regiment is continually on the march, and does not remain three consecutive days at one station.

THE 91ST REGIMENT IN BATTLE.—We see by the New Orleans Era that our 91st Regiment (Col. Van Zandt) was in the recent engagement under Gen. Banks. Among the wounded brought to New Orleans, we find the names of Charles Tice, of Co. F., Casper Godick, Co. E, Jacob W. Landt, Co. B., Aziel Hazadar, Co. G., Napoleon Newton, Co. C, Bart. Foley, Co. G., Corporal John Wilson, Co. H., and Alex. Sinclair, Co. F. They were placed under treatment in the Mechanics Institute Hospital.

LOCAL AFFAIRS.
Graphic Account of an Expedition in which the 91st (Albany) Regiment took part.
WASHINGTON, IN THE WOODS, LA.,
Saturday, May 2d, 1863.
My Dear Mother—
Our regiment left Bayou Boeuf about the 7th or 8th of April, for Brashear City, some 10 miles, on foot, arriving about 3 o'clock in the afternoon. The city, so called, is about as large as our Greenbush; but the amount of business in peaceable times is immense. It is situated on Berwick Bay, capable of floating the largest vessels, and also connects with New Orleans by railroad, and a railroad graded to Opelousas.
On the afternoon of Saturday, April 11th, our division were put aboard gunboats, steamboats, and steamers of various kinds—the 91st Regiment taking the steamer "John C. Calhoun," a vessel taken from the rebels. The vessel had on board three of the heaviest guns, besides a crew that were willing to do duty in any case. On Sunday morning, being all ready, we steamed up Grand Lake, somewhat cautious, and came opposite Indian Landing, where we laid-to until morning, when all hands landed as orderly as possible.
The 6th Regiment and 1st Louisiana went on shore, and were met by some rebel cavalry, but finally drove them into a sugar house, where our artillery gave them some shells, which sent them on a "right smart" run into the woods, where we left them for the night.
The 91st were stationed at the road, and opposite the residence of Madam Porter, an old secession lady, but as we were not on women, we left her to her own fate, taking, however, a considerable number of wagons and mules, and all the negroes disposed to go.
I will mention that when the "rebs" left, they undertook to burn the bridge, and the "darks," for once, done us good service by putting it out. The 91st laid here till dark, when they were ordered to cross the bridge, which was done in good order; and all hands took a sleep for the night.
Tuesday morning, April 14th, the troops were again on the march, shortly after daylight, without even coffee or crackers, and marched up the road, opposite to a sugar-cane brake, where the artillery and 13th Conn. were engaged with the enemy on one end of the field on the edge of the woods, and the 26th Maine and 159th New York more in the centre and on the right. These two last regiments were getting cut to pieces terribly. The 159th had their Colonel wounded and Lieut. Colonel killed, and the men being thrown into confusion, were firing too high or too low; and the Maine regiment taking themselves to the drains to avoid the fire of the enemy, were of no service.
Then came our turn. Gen. Grover rode up and ordered these regiments to retreat; and I heard him say, "Send the 91st." We got the order "right flank" into the field, and then the order "front," and went up in line of battle, so that we could cover the retreating regiments, and within about forty rods of the enemy, who were perched in trees, behind fences, and in the cane brake, sending their leaden messengers at us in good style—whistling over our heads and dropping at our feet. Our whole regiment gave them two rounds of balls, which staggered them considerably. We then dropped on the ground and fired several rounds in that situation, when we up and ran for the woods, and drove them completely out, picking up their wounded and taking some prisoners. We kept the woods until the afternoon—the rebels with their gunboat "Diana" shelling us—while they retreated over the bayou, and set fire to their gunboat and let her drift down the bayou. We then started out after them again, and came to a sugar house on a large plantation, the owner of which had left with his rebel friends, and here we went in for sugar, chickens, sheep, and everything that would satisfy the cravings of hunger.
The troops, after getting a sufficient supply, and supposing to have a good meal, were ordered back some two miles, where we started from in the morning, being obliged to leave their food behind. We encamped that night in a corn field, hungry, tired, foot-sore and reckless in regard to ourselves. About 9 o'clock we got some coffee and crackers, the first we tasted since the night, before. This was on Tuesday, April 14th.
On the morning of the 15th we were off again, and passed some of the most splendid residences to be met with anywhere; as rich a soil as I ever saw North. On each side of the road were thousands of blackberries, pears, onions and vegetables of every description. The 16th and 17th we still marched on—resting at night—and arrived on Friday evening at the Vermillion Bayou, where we had the rebels almost in our reach. Here they burnt another bridge, which stopped our further progress. They held up and gave us a slight skirmish, to make their work sure of burning the bridge.
We camped here until Sunday afternoon, the 19th. The 91st Regiment being located near a farm house, we had plenty of good water, sweet potatoes and fresh meat—one blessing, thank God. We rested here until Sunday afternoon 4 o'clock, when, the 91st being the rear guard, and the baggage crossing over, we then proceeded at almost "double quick," only resting once in 13 miles, part of the way over a prairie some eight miles in width, and at night it was almost impossible to keep the right road.
I will mention that, Sunday afternoon, we went through a small village called Vermillion, where white flags were as thick as snow flakes, the owners of which no doubt were firing at us on Friday night. That's my belief in their friendship. All along our march we get the curses of the whites and the prayers of the blacks. I may be somewhat mistaken in regard to the whites, but I think not. The negroes are sincere.
Monday, April 20th, we started again, chasing the "rebs" pretty close, and at 5 o'clock came within a mile of Opelousas, the capital of the "rebs" in Louisiana, where we heard that they had surrendered, and the Legislature broke up. Here we took a rest until Wednesday morning, the 22d, when we again started for Washington, passed through, and came to another bridge which they had burned; this delayed us till morning, when we were off again  at daylight—all the time at their heels; but they being better runners, kept ahead.
Thursday night we put up at a large plantation, which we took possession of, and helped ourselves to cotton, sugar, chickens, sweet potatoes and beef, and all the young "darks."
Friday afternoon we went into another plantation, and laid up until Tuesday morning, living very well.
On Saturday, between daylight and dark, I witnessed a sad sight—the shooting of one of the 131st Regiment for stealing from loyal citizens.
On Tuesday morning we started again for Washington, and came within four miles, where we encamped until Friday morning, the 1st May, and as we were about breaking up camp, the rebels gave our cavalry some trouble, but three or four shells sent them back in the woods. The cavalry being reinforced, drove them some 11 miles back. We have traveled some 300 miles taken some 2,000 prisoners, as much as a million dollars worth of cotton, any quantity of sugar, lots of horses, mules and "darks." The army and the expedition has been as successful as possible in a strange country.
With the bright side of our doings comes the dark. Our regiment lost some three men killed and eleven wounded. Other regiments were more unfortunate, which you will see by the papers. I think after these trials no man need be ashamed of belonging to the 91st Regiment.

From the 91st Regiment.
DONALDSONVILLE, July 27, 1863.
From this you will perceive that I have not been wiped out by "Johnny Reb.," but on the contrary continue to consume my allotted quantity of hard tack and salt junk, although occasionally my bowels yearn for a square meal, equal to Esau, and like that ancient simpleton I am at times disposed to gamble government promises for something to fill my individual "stomjack."
For the last seven months we have not received any pay, and the troops in this department feel as if they had been hardly dealt by. The paymasters or the government are greatly to blame for thus treating men who have accomplished as much as the 19th army corps. Alternately marching and fighting for the last four months, at times both hungry and almost naked, without a dime to buy a morsel for ourselves or send to our families at home, and when able to procure anything obliged to submit to the most shameful extortion by those modern Shylocks, the regimental sutlers—our case has been a hard one. But we can show a glorious record, and look back to the achievements of our corps with pride, which, in a measure, compensates for the hardships and deprivations we have endured.
The siege of Port Hudson was a weary work, and both parties fought with the greatest bravery. Our own regiment suffered severely, and the men behaved nobly. On the 14th of June we made an assault on the enemy's breastworks, but were repulsed, and such a scene of carnage I never again wish to witness. Our regiment acted as grenadiers, approaching the breastworks with hand grenades, under a perfect shower of bullets, which mowed down the brave fellows by scores, and but few reached the trenches, and those only to be repulsed or taken prisoners. I lay for five hours within half pistol range of the enemy, continually exposed to a cross-fire from their rifle pits, with my comrades falling around me, and eventually made my escape, through a shower of balls, without a scratch.
The New York troops have not been dealt by in a fair manner in the newspaper accounts of our late battles. The Eastern regiment has been given all the honor that belonged to New York alone, as the official statements will show.
No better men are to be found than those raised in Louisiana. The 1st and 2d Louisiana have done all that men could do, and deserve great praise.
Trusting that I am not forgotten by those among whom I once toiled in our glorious old profession, I remain, as ever,
Yours, fraternally,
GEO. LAWRENCE,
Co. C, 91st N. Y. V., Donaldsonville, La.

FROM THE 91ST REGIMENT N. Y. S. V.
Lieut. Barker not Wounded—Capts. Collins and Evans, and Lieuts. Hobbs and Walker Unharmed.
We are much gratified to learn from Lieut. Wm. P. Barker, of the 91st Regiment N. Y. S. V., now before Port Hudson, that the report that he was seriously wounded in the attack on the 14th, was incorrect and that he is still in command of his company and uninjured. In a letter written by him, dated the 16th inst., he says:
BEFORE PORT HUDSON, June 16, 1863.
DEAR BURROWS—When the Lieutenant Colonel arrived I was laying sick, but am better to-day, and am up to the front with my company (25 men). Sunday we had a pretty severe fight. We went into the fight with 13 officers and about 250 men, and came out with 5 officers and 135 men. Capt. Hulbert and Adjutant Shepard were killed. Capt. Lee, Lieut. Herwerth, Mattice, Diamond and Stackhouse wounded. Our army loss is great. I had the misfortune to sprain my knee, but could not get to the rear until 4 o'clock in the afternoon. We commenced the fight in the morning at 4 o'clock. Starting from camp at 1 o'clock A. M. yesterday, we got the Adjutant's body, boxed it up and sent it to be buried in the Magnolia Burial Ground at Baton Rouge. Captain Hulbert's body was got out to-day, and will be sent to the same place. Both bodies were very much decomposed. Capt. Collins and Evans and Lieut. Hobbs, Walker and myself came out all right. Our boys fought well. Give my love to all the family and regards to all friends. I am, most respectful1y, your o'bt ser'vt,
WM. P. BARKER, Lieut. Commanding
Co. A of 25 men, 91st Regiment N. Y. V.

PROMOTIONS IN THE MERCHANTS' BANK.—A few days since we briefly noticed the retiring of Mr. Judson from the Merchants' Bank, but could, at that time, give no notice of the changes this would make necessary. We are now glad to learn that the Messrs. Wendell, so well known to us all for their many good qualities, have been promoted to the desks of Teller and Discount Clerk, and that our young friend James Maher accepts the  responsible position of individual bookkeeper. His long apprenticeship in the Merchants, combined with a good knowledge of the Banking business, and his gentlemanly deportment, eminently qualify him for this position, and have made him a general favorite of the friends and customers of this Bank.
The employees of the institution gave Mr. Judson a dinner at the McCardel House, where wit and sentiment went the round of the social board. Mr. J. carries with him in his new position the good wishes of his fellow citizens, and did it not intrude on privacy, which should be sacred, we might refer to certain circumstances as the best evidence of how kind a friend and companion they have parted with, and how faithful and worthy a Teller the Bank has lost.

Capt. Henry S. Hurlburt.
Capt. Henry S. Hurlburt, of the 91st Regiment, was killed in the assault on the 14th. Previous to the breaking out of the war he was in the employ of the Central Railroad. When the organization of the 3d Regiment, under Col. Fred. Townsend, was commenced, he recruited Co. F, of that Regt., and went away in command of it. Some time after the Regiment entered the service he resigned and came home, and the 91st Regiment being in process of organization, he accepted the command of a company attached to it. He was a young man of some soldierly qualities, and until the time of his death had escaped all the perils of battle. He had a large circle of friends and acquaintances in this city who will mourn the loss of the gallant soldier. His father, well advanced in years, resides in Utica.

From the 91st Regiment.
WASHINGTON, La., April 30, 1863.
* * * * On the 19th inst. we marched across the bayou and started for Opelousas. The roads were horrible from recent rains. We marched until 11 p. m., halted at Bayou Tesche, where we laid down on the ground, and were roused at 5 in the morning. We started again at half-past 6, and crossed what is called the nine mile prairie. There is only one house on it, and that is the only place to get water. The people had taken away the bucket, so we made a "moke" get down to the edge of the water and fill our canteens. I gave him mine, and  while waiting at the edge to get it, some one gave me a shove and sent me down top of the nigger. I got out with no more damage than a good dunking. The whole army had to cross a swamp half a mile wide, and mud    up to the knee. 
*   *  *   We arrived at Opelousas at 4 o'clock, and the Mayor surrendered unconditionally, and claimed the protection of our flag. Opelousas is quite a large place, with some splendid houses in it. We remained just outside the place until the 22d, when our brigade was put on detached duty. We started at 7 1/2 o'clock, passed through Opelousas and Washington, seven miles beyond, to the bridge where we are now stationed. At midnight we started again, marched three miles, then slept till daylight, waiting for the others to come up; then pushed on, and at 4.30 P. M. had marched twenty-three miles. Here we got a cup of coffee, and eat our last "hard tack." The Rebels tried to fool us. They set fire to three or four bales of cotton every half mile, and hid the rest in the woods, but we found it, and sent it back in carts. We had to live on mush and sugar and fresh meat without salt while here, as we could get nothing else. We stayed here until the 24th, when we marched four miles to another place after more cotton.
* * * Just before sundown the brigade was formed in line, and an order read, sentencing Private Henry Hammill, Co. F, 131st N. Y. V., to be shot, for pillaging. At sundown we marched into a field back of our camp, and formed a hollow square, when the prisoner was brought forward and his sentence read to him, stating that General Banks had repeatedly issued orders against pillaging when on the march, and imposed the penalty of death for disobedience. The prisoner confessed his crime, and was led out about twelve paces and blindfolded. He knelt down, the command was given, "ready—aim"—and then the fatal word "fire," and one more soul was launched into eternity.
* * * On the 27th we received two small plugs of tobacco from Uncle Sam, and as we had been very hard up, they were very acceptable. On the 28th we marched back to Washington, where we are now encamped.
* * * DAVID VAN COTT.

A MURDEROUS WEAPON.—Lieut. William P. Baker, of this city, commanding Co. A, 91st Regiment, Banks' Department, has forwarded to Tivoli Hose Co. of which he was formerly a member, an immense bowie knife—or more properly a cleaver—which he captured from one of the Mississippi "Wild Cats," at the bayou of Gonsales, La. The blade is between two and three feet in length, about three inches wide, and weighs several pounds. It is, without exception, the most murderous looking "Yankee Killer," as the Rebs. call these tools, we have ever seen. The curious will find it at G. Burrows' Drug store, corner of Hudson and South Pearl streets.

ALBANY M...
LOCAL DEPARTMENT.
CAPTAIN "JOHNNY" COOKE AND MAJOR STACKHOUSE
OF THE 91ST REGIMENT WOUNDED.—The following is an extract from a letter of a member of the 91st Regiment, dated New Orleans, May 31st:—Among the many wounded at the battle, now pending at Port Hudson, was your old neighbor, Captain John Cooke, of the 91st Regiment New York Volunteers. While gallantly leading on his men to a Rebel battery, he was struck by a musket ball in the arm, about half way from the shoulder to the elbow, shattering the arm terribly, so it was thought at one time he would have to lose his arm. But the Doctors have come to the conclusion that they can save his arm and life. Nothing but the best of care can do it. I can say of truth, that there is not an officer in the 91st Regiment more respected and better liked, than Capt. Johnny Cooke, of Company F. Major Stackhouse, of the 91st Regiment, is also wounded very bad, being shot through both legs. The 91st Regiment met with the heaviest loss of any white Regiment. Three negro Regiments charged on one battery four times and got almost exterminates. Our loss in Colonels and Generals is heavy. Colonel Van Zandt is now commanding a brigade, and Major Stackhouse was commanding the 91st Regiment when he received his wounds.

LOCAL MATTERS.
91ST REGIMENT.l— The 91st Regiment, Col. Van Zant, is at Donnelsville, La. Col. Van Zant still acts as Brigadier General. He commands the 1st Brigade. The number of killed and wounded in the 91st Regiment while at Port Hudson was 21 killed and 146 wounded. But very few of the wounded have died since. Capt. Cook has nearly recovered. Lieut. Diamond was wounded badly, with a rifle ball, in the fleshy part of the thigh. His wound is healing as fast as possible. He will be able to be removed in a few days. The next letter will bring a correct account of the names of the killed and wounded of this Regiment. So says a letter received on Saturday.

CAPT. HENRY HURLBURT KILLED.—With the news of the death of Col. BRYAN comes the sad intelligence that Capt. HURLBURT was killed in the same battle. Capt. H. was a young man of fine soldierly qualities. He was among the earliest to take the field, and, until now, has escaped all the perils of battle. An aged father will mourn the loss of a beloved son, and numerous friends will drop a tear to his memory.

Lieut. Col. NEWMAN, of the 91st New York, died in Washington yesterday from the effects of wounds received at the battle of Chancellorsville.

Death of Adjutant S. B. Shepard.
Extract from a Letter to the Family of Lieut.
SHEPARD, dated
91ST REGIMENT, N. Y. VOLS.,
REAR OF PORT HUDSON, La., June 14, '63.
It is with the greatest pain and regret that I have to communicate the sad intelligence that Lieut. SHEPARD, Adjutant of the 91st, was killed in battle this morning, when he was gallantly leading Co. K, of this regiment, into closer action with the Rebels—Capt. HURLBURT, commanding that company, having been previously killed.
Our loss, so far, has been very heavy indeed, having but five officers left out of all that went into action this morning. Capt. LEE is badly wounded; Lieut. HEREMETH (badly), MATTHIAS (badly), DIAMOND (badly), STACKHOUSE (badly, since dead), HAMBURGER (slightly), and a very great number of men; but the particulars are not known as yet, for the 91st never has or never will flinch from the foe.
Your brother has earned for himself the reputation of being a gallant and brave officer, and I have heard the men speak in glowing terms of his conduct in several hard fought battles, especially those of the 25th and 27th of May, before Port Hudson.
I was speaking with him last evening as late as 10 o'clock, when he was in fine spirits, though he spoke seriously of the dangers the Regiment would have to face, as it was known a grand Attack was to be made on Port Hudson to-day, and he hoped that we should not lose more than the odd numbers of the Regiment, that being 93, as our Regiment has been reduced by battle and sickness to only 293 men—Its strength this morning when it went into action. What it is now, it is hard to say.
You have the proud satisfaction of feeling and knowing that your brother died for his country's cause, and that he faithfully did his duty as an officer and a gentleman, and that he fell as a soldier should, with his face to the enemy, gallantly leading his men to the charge. He was a great favorite with the Colonel, who sincerely mourns his loss, as well as all the other members of the 91st, both officers and men. Yours, &c.,
WILLIAM HENRY WILSON,
Co. A, 91st N. Y. V.
JUNE, 15th.—Your brother's body, as well as that of Capt. HURLBURT, were received last night and are now in camp.
From the 91st Regiment.
The following letter from a member of the 91st regiment to Captain Selkirk, who is here wounded, gives additional particulars of the wounding of Major Stackhouse, and Captains Cooke and McDermott:
ST. JAMES HOSPITAL,
New Orleans, June 1, 1863.
DEAR CAPTAIN: I have just discovered that a mail leaves to-morrow, and all letters must be in the Post office before 5 o'clock to-morrow morning, so I can't say much, for it is nearly 9 P. M. now. There has been heavy fighting at Port Hudson. Banks came down the Red River and formed a junction with Auger's forces, when a combined attack was made on the rebel stronghold. There was terrific fighting on Wednesday, and our loss was very heavy. Major Stackhouse is here, shot through both legs; but the bones are not injured. Captain Cooke is wounded severely in the arm, the bone being broken, and much fractured. It was thought amputation would be necessary, but Dr. Avery examined it day before yesterday, and took out the pieces of broken bone. He is confident he can save the arm, and the Captain feels much better to-day. Captain McDermott is also here, with a flesh wound in the leg. Him and Stackhouse are doing exceedingly well.
They say our regiment is very much cut up, but fought like tigers. Captain McDermott says he don't think there is over 250 left. This is probably an exaggeration as the paper states to-day our losses are not so heavy as at first thought. Stackhouse says there are a number of Company R killed and wounded, but he couldn't recollect their names. Conlon, he says, he saw slightly wounded in the head, and Cleary with his hand in a sling. Barker was all right at last accounts. I can hear nothing of the rest. It is supposed the fighting has been going on ever since, but the papers say nothing, and I presume know nothing. Major Stackhouse feels confident the place, with its whole garrison, must fall into our hands in a few days. Yours truly,
F. T.
There is a report to-night that Port Hudson was taken at 4 P. M. this morning.

MAJOR JAMES H. BOGART.—His friends have till this morning rather hoped than dared to believe that there might, in the confused rumors of war, be some doubt of his death. But the confirmation, as the first tidings, comes from a source too sure and careful for error There is no eulogy born of the grave, even of a battle grave, to be uttered of this young soldier, which would not have been spoken of him while in the flush of life, it is not through the curtain of the shroud that the truth of virtue is clearest seen. His life was that of a pure and true hearted man. When the first breath of war reached us, his heart gave its impulses to his country, and believing in the right and chivalry of the struggle, he was of those who went to arms with a thought that understood the hour and had the heart to meet it. His kindred saw in his nature that which was true earnest, sanguine. They gave him up to his country's service with the consciousness that the camp and the battle field work their dread results most deeply into genial and generous hearts as his was.
He won our love by that which, in a young heart, always attaches men for its rarity—the devotion to home, the attachment to parents the determination for independence, and that which rises from the memories of the grave, like the Angel of the Resurrection—the clothing of a young heart in the bosses and with the promises of the Gospel.
Grief has but a limited vocabulary. The words are few and broken in which the heart tells its lamentation. Solitude and sorrow blend their shadows. He shall have the never-forgotten memory of an unfeigned love, and that will not obtrude itself, but he has in this city—amidst his associates—in the assemblage of the young—In the association of his church those who know that the holocaust which these days are offering includes no worthier name than of him who thus died in his duty.
SENTINEL.

FROM THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT.—A letter from an officer of the 91st Regiment, stationed at Fort Jackson, Louisiana, to a friend in this city, runs as follows:—
"I have not written to you before, for the reason that one located in this country cannot write just when he pleases, because of the almost incessant interference of the mosquitoes. Sometimes they render it impossible to sit quiet five minutes. Our sick list is very large and increasing daily, and the day that sees our Regiment embark, will be hailed by us with joy, for more than one reason. We expect to start for home about the 10th of next month (July), and I am sure there will be no disappointment this time. The Regiment will arrive in Albany under the command of Lieut. Colonel Tarbell, who now commands this Fort. I hear that the Albany Express published an article to the effect, that Col. Tarbell and other officers of the 91st were under arrest, for selling Government property. There is no truth in the statement. Colonel Tarbell, is not, nor has he been under arrest for any cause whatever, since joining his Regiment in front of Port Hudson. I cannot imagine for what purpose such stories are started, unless to injure the reputation of a brave and capable officer."

FROM PENSACOLA.
HEALTH OF THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT.
MOVEMENTS OF WILSON'S ZOUAVES.
A REBEL CAVALRY FORCE BADLY SCARED
BY A STEAM WHISTLE.
The following are extracts from a letter written by Mr. JOHN J. MCBRIDE, of Co. F, 91st Regiment New York State Volunteers, to his brother, ALEX. MCBRIDE, of this city:—CAMP MORGAN, PENSACOLA, Fla., June 22.
DEAR BROTHER—You speak of hearing so many reports about the sickness and deaths in the regiments at Key West; I say that there is not a healthier place in the whole South than that same little island of Key West; and our regiment, especially, has been and is one of the healthiest regiments in the service. There has been only nine died in the regiment since we left Albany, over six months. I do not think there is another regiment in the service can show such a healthy record as that.
I suppose you want to know something about what is going on in the town and vicinity. The Rebels have not made their appearance here yet, although we hear reports every day of their advancing on us in force.
On the 20th instant, our company received a despatch from the Colonel, ordering us to march up to the new fort, and garrison and guard it until further orders. This is a big thing for us, as it excuses us from all drills, parades or fatigue duty of the regiment. All we have to do is to go on guard once a week, and drill an hour each day to keep our hand in.

LETTERS FOR MEMBERS OF THE 91ST REGIMENT.
—Capt. Selkirk, having fully recovered from the effects of the wound received by him, will leave the city for New Orleans on Monday evening next. Persons having friends in the 91st Regiment, who may wish to send letters to them, can leave them at this office before Monday noon, and Capt. S. will take them with him.

MONEY RECOVERED.—Daniel Golden, a member of Co. C. 91st regiment, on Wednesday while walking about the streets was attacked with the chills. He was invited into a house in the lower part of the city where he was furnished a bed. He slept there several hours, and on awaking he discovered that his wallet containing six $20 Treasury Notes, a check for $181, a promissary [sic] note for $50, and some other papers, had been abstracted from his pocket. He informed Captain Hagadorn of his loss, and that officer proceeded to the house and recovered the money and papers. The property was delivered over to Mr. Golden. It does not appear from the Police record that any arrests were made.

From Pensacola.
By Our Regular Correspondent.
HEAD QUARTERS 91st Regt., N. Y. S. V.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, Aug. 28, 1862.
EDITOR REPUBLICAN & JOURNAL:
For as usually a place, this is a busy day here. It is not only muster day, but the 75th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., and four companies of regulars have just received orders to go to New Orleans.
Our men are in excellent spirits, and long for an opportunity to give their brother compatriots in arms a practical demonstration of their devotion to their country. This brigade is now attached to Gen. Butler's division, who is "the right man in the right place."
Since our arrival, the whole city, with the exception of the part next the Bay, has been surrounded by an abatis, and a fine substantial Redoubt is now finished.
Although in the very face of the enemy, we feel comparatively safe. It required a great amount of fatigue duty to make the abatis and Redoubt, but the men believing that there was a necessity for them, worked with a will.
The monotony of our sojourn here is relieved by an occasional expedition. One, consisting of two companies of the 91st embarked two weeks ago, on board the steamer Creole, for Milton and Bagdad. Upon their arrival they found that the principal inhabitants had abandoned both places. They secured some lumber which was much needed; also quite a quantity of naval stores such as spikes, copper nails, chains, rod iron, &c., which had been previously stolen from the Navy Yard. Another expedition, consisting of two steamers with several companies of the 75th, has just returned from the head of the Bay, bringing four prisoners and about one hundred head of cattle. Brig, Gen. Arnold had been previously informed that these cattle were being collected at that point by the Rebels for a different market.
Since the arrival of the 91st in Pensacola quite a number of the men were struck down with Congestive and Typhoid fevers, six of whom died. Besides these four others have died: two of Chronic Dysentery, one of apoplexy, and one poor fellow accidentally shot. During the past month the health of the Regiment has very much improved. Indeed the health of the whole Brigade is excellent.
There are several sloops-of-war and gunboats—seventeen in all—of Commodore Farragut's fleet, now in the Bay.
A salute was fired upon the arrival of Commodore Farragut.
You and your readers will be pleased to learn that thirty-five of the leading rebels of New Orleans are lately caged in Fort Pickens, among whom are seven Aldermen and the ex-Mayor.
R. MORRIS.

THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 25, 1863.
The 91st Regiment at Port Hudson.
Extract from a Letter to A. McBride, Esq., dated
CAMP OF 91ST N. Y. VOLUNTEERS,
BEFORE PORT HUDSON, June 10, 1863.
DEAR BROTHER—When I wrote to you last we were laying at Alexandria. Since then we marched down to Simsport, where we took transports to Bayou Sara; from thence we marched to within four miles of the fort, where we encamped for the night. The next morning, 25th of May, we started about 4 o'clock, without any breakfast, for the entrenchments, as we thought, to relieve the Third Brigade. We marched till eight o'clock, through woods and corn-fields, and at last came to a halt in a plowed field in front of a dense woods, where we formed in line of battle, and deployed two companies as skirmishers in advance of us. After a short rest, we advanced slowly towards the wood, picking our way through the bushes and fallen trees, and halted again about thirty rods in advance. Here the pioneers were sent forward to cut a road for the artillery. They had not progressed far before they came back reporting that one of their number had been shot by the Rebels.
We were now given the order to advance which we did slowly, and had gone about fifty yards, when the Rebs opened on us a perfect storm of grape and cannister and musketry; but which, luckily for us, were aimed too high to injure us. The Colonel gave the order to retreat. We accordingly fell back a short distance, reformed the line, and again advanced. This time we drove the Rebs from their breastwork, and occupied it ourselves. We lost six killed and sixteen wounded in the skirmish. The Ninety-first did all the fighting that was done this day.
We laid still that night, and the next day night, and the next morning, the 27th, we made the combined attack on all sides at once. The Ninety-first had the lead as usual. We were formed in line of battle, with the First Louisiana on our right, and the Thirty-first Massachusetts on our left, and the order was given, "Forward!" and forward we went, over fallen trees and through deep ravines, when, all of a sudden, the Rebels opened on us a terrible volley of muskesry [sic]]. All order was now broken,—the men rushed forward like tigers and drove the Rebels clean into their rifle pits, gaining the position we have now occupied for two weeks, within thirty yards of their works. There were two killed and ten wounded in our company, (F,) among the latter Capt. JOHNNY COOK. David and I are all right yet, and were among the first to gain the ravine of the enemy's rifle pits. Since then we have been banging away at them every day. I have no more paper, or I would give you a fuller account of the battle.
Your affectionate brother, J. McB.

From the 91st Regiment.
DONALDSONVILLE, La., July 27, 1863.
From this you will perceive that I have not been wiped out by "Johnny Reb.," but on the contrary continue to consume my allotted quantity of hard tack and salt junk, although occasionally my bowels yearn for a square meal, equal to Esau, and like that ancient simpleton I am at times disposed to gamble government promises for something to fill my individual "stomjack."
For the last seven months we have not received any pay, and the troops in this department feel as if they had been hardly dealt by. The paymasters or the government are greatly to blame for thus treating men who have accomplished as much as the 19th army corps. Alternately marching and fighting for the last four months, at times both hungry and almost naked, without a dime to buy a morsel for ourselves or send to our families at home, and when able to procure anything obliged to submit to the most shameful extortion by those modern Shylocks, the regimental sutlers—our case has been a hard one. But we can show a glorious record, and look back to the achievements of our corps with pride, which, in a measure, compensates for the hardships and deprivations we have endured.
The siege of Port Hudson was a weary work, and both parties fought with the greatest bravery. Our own regiment suffered severely, and the men behaved nobly. On the 14th of June we made an assault on the enemy's breastworks, but were repulsed, and such a scene of carnage I never again wish to witness. Our regiment acted as grenadiers, approaching the breastworks with hand grenades, under a perfect shower of bullets, which mowed down the brave fellows by scores, and but few reached the trenches, and those only to be repulsed or taken prisoners. I lay for five hours within half pistol range of the enemy, continually exposed to a cross-fire from their rifle pits, with my comrades falling around me, and eventually made my escape, through a shower of balls, without a scratch.
The New York troops have not been dealt by in a fair manner in the newspaper accounts of our late battles. The Eastern regiments have been given all the honor that belonged to New York alone, as the official statements will show.
No better men are to be found than those raised in Louisiana. The 1st and 2d Louisiana have done all that men could do, and deserve great praise.
Trusting that I am not forgotten by those among whom I once toiled in our glorious old profession, I remain, as ever,
Yours, fraternally,
GEO. LAWRENCE,
Co. C, 91st N. Y. V., Donaldsonville, La.

REINLISTMENT OF THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT—THEY ARE COMING HOME.—By a letter just received in this city, we learn that the gallant 91st Regiment, Col. Van Zandt, of this city, reinlisted [sic] for the war, on the 5th of January, and that they may be expected home in the fore part of February. Few regiments in the service has endured more severe hardships and dangers, or experienced more exposure to health and life, than these same men; they have waded through and slept in the swamps and trenches of Louisiana, where the atmosphere is even more stagnant the whole year round than that which prevails at a horse pond north in the month of July. They will return with thinned ranks, having sacrificed many a life in battle and by disease. The bravery exhibited by the 91st at the assault upon the works of Port Hudson was creditable in the highest degree. As the regiment is principally composed of Albanians, we trust that a due appreciation of their worth and gallantry will be exhibited by our citizens, and a public reception tendered them on their arrival.
The Ninety-first Regiment Coming Home.
The gallant Ninety-first Regiment arrived in Buffalo this morning, and will reach here about 8 1/2 o'clock this evening. It has been absent three years, and seen much service. It participated in nearly all the battles in Louisiana, and has made for itself a record that will live as long as the memory of the struggle in which it was engaged. The following sketch of its operations is furnished the Morning Express, from which we copy it:—
The 91st was organized on the 16th of December, 1861, under the following officers: Colonel, Jacob Van Zandt; Lieut. Col. Jonathan Tarbell; Major, Charles G. Clark. Recruiting for the regiment was commenced on the 1st of September, and when organized the muster roll contained the names of nine hundred men. The regiment left this city on the 25th of Depcember [sic], 1861, for Governor's Island. Just prior to their departure the wife of Col. John W. Harcourt presented to the regiment a very beautiful flag, the ceremonies attending which will be remembered by many of our citizens. This flag has been borne by these valiant men through many a bloody field, and though now in shreds, on a broken staff, it is dear to every surviving member.
The regiment was mustered into the United States service on or about the 3d of December, 1861, by Captain Updegroff, of the United States Army, and left Governor's Island for Key West on the 8th of January, 1862, arriving at that post on the 20th. Here the men were supplied with Enfield rifles. They remained at Key West until the 2d of May, when they were ordered to Pensacola, where they arrived on the 24th. Their first meeting with the Rebels was at Gonzales' Plantation, on the 27th of October, 1862, and in this engagement they won a name for valor and soldierly bravery that they might well feel proud of. On the 27th of December they left Pensacola for Baton Rouge, La., arriving there on the 1st of January, 1863.
At the opening of the Spring campaign they were before Port Hudson in an advanced position, and greatly distinguished themselves in engaging the Rebels while the fleet passed the river batteries. They returned to Baton Rouge on the 19th of March, and remained there without the least shelter until the 20th, when they started for Donaldsonville, arriving there on the 28th. From this time their trials, sufferings and privations may be dated. Between the 28th of March and the 24th of May they marched seven hundred miles! Frequently suffering terribly from exhaustion and hunger. But they were nothing daunted or discouraged. On the 2d of April they arrived at Thibodeau, and the next day left in the cars on the Jackson rail road, for Bayou Boeuf. Here they remained about a week, and on the 12th embarked for Irish Bend, where they fought the hotly contested battle of that name, and after a six hours' conflict drove the enemy from the field, pursuing him over a mile through a woods.
On the 15th they again started in pursuit of the foe, coming up with him at Vermillion Bayou on the 18th, just as the sun was setting. They had marched over thirty-six miles! on dusty roads, with scarcely a mouthful to eat, and very muddy water to drink. But they were full of pluck and spirit, and engaged in a skirmish with the enemy, lasting until dark, when a lull took place. During the night a severe storm prevailed, and the enemy taking advantage of the darkness, retreated. At break of day our gallant boys again started in pursuit, arriving at Opelousas on the 21st, and almost immediately started out on a cotton expedition, meeting with entire success, and returning to Moundsville, near Washington, La., on the 28th. Here they rested a day or two, but not without a skirmish with the enemy. From thence they commenced a march that carried them far beyond Alexandria, into the piney woods, and only terminated when they occupied the position assigned them before the works of the enemy at port Hudson, on the 25th of May. During that memorable march they made eighty miles in three days, doing battle also under many disadvantages.
On the 35th an assault was made on Port Hudson, the Ninety-first taking a leading part. On the 27th the conflict was renewed and lasted until noon, the loss being heavy on both sides. In this assault our boys held the position of honor, and nobly did they sustain it. It was on this day of blood and carnage that the gallant Major Stackhouse received a mortal wound. On the 14th of June another advance was commenced, the Ninety-first, as before, being assigned a prominent position. The record shows how well they deserved the honor. In this conflict the lamented young heroes Adjutant Shepard and Capt. Hulbert fell. From this time until the capitulation of the Rebel stronghold the Ninety-first lay in the entrenchments in the most exposed situation. On the 9th of June they marched into the town, and on the 11th sailed for Donaldsonville, where they again met the enemy in force on the 12th, fighting him over an hour, and idling back in good order under cover of the gunboats. The day following the enemy reteated [sic]. The Ninety-first remained at this post until the 29th of July, when it started for New Orleans, and shortly after its arrival the men received six months' pay, causing great rejoicing among the gallant fellows. On the 9th of August the regiment left New Orleans for Brashear City, reaching there the 2d of September. While there the heroes of so many battles re-enlisted as artillery, and were sent to Fort Jackson, below New Orleans, to garrison that very important post. Here they did duty until their departure homeward, on furlough.
The Twenty-fifth Regiment N. G., Colonel CHURCH, will receive the Ninety-first regiment at the depot this evening and escort them to the Capitol, where they will be received by Gov. SEYMOUR in behalf of the State and Mayor Perry for the city. They will then be taken to Congress Hall, where they will be entertained at the expense of the city.

91st Regiment N. Y. V.--The Ninety-first regiment New York volunteers, which re-enlisted January 1st, passed through this city, for their home in Albany, last evening. They are direct from Fort Jackson, below New Orleans, and present a more weather-browned appearance than any soldiers we have seen. They numbered about three hundred and fifty re-en listed men, beside some ninety who were left behind, not having re-enlisted with the regiment. They have been doing duty as heavy artillery, and wore the red stripes. Many of the men were sick from the malaria of the Louisiana swamps, though the northern air was fast improving them, and some sixteen or eighteen were confined to the hospital car. The men complained of a want of sympathy and cordiality, and a stingy dispositian [sic] on the part of the people of this state, as compared with those of other states through which they had passed, and one pertinently inquired if the people in this state were all "secesh." They have a furlough of thirty days, which has only now been given them because they could not be spared from the post before. There are several Oneida county men in the regiment, and the Assistant Surgeon is Dr. HILL, of this city, who was with the regiment.

MORNING EXPRESS.
ALBANY, TUESDAY, JULY 19, 1864.
The 91st Regiment New York Veteran Volunteers.
The 91st Regiment N. Y. S. Veteran Volunteers may be expected to reach this city to-day or to-morrow, on a furlough. As this gallant regiment is composed principally of our own citizens, it is fit and proper a hearty welcome should be extended to them. Whether any steps have been taken to insure a suitable reception to the war-worn heroes we are not advised, but it would be a shame and a disgrace if they should be permitted to enter our city without a formal recognition.
The 91st was organized on the 16th of December, 1861, under the following officers: Colonel, Jacob Van Zandt; Lieut. Col., Jonathan Tarbell; Major, Charles G. Clark. Recruiting for the regiment was commenced on the 1st of September, and when organized the muster roll contained the names of nine hundred men. The regiment left this city on the 26th of December, 1861, for Governor's Island. Just prior to their departure the wife of Col. John W. Harcourt presented to the regiment a very beautiful flag, the ceremonies attending which will be remembered by many of our citizens. This flag has been borne by these valiant men through many a bloody field, and though now in shreds, on a broken staff, it is dear to every surviving member. The regiment was mustered into the United States service on or about the 3d of December, 1861, by Capt. Updegroff, of the U. S. Army, and left Governor's Island for Key West on the 9th of January, 1862, arriving at that post on the 20th. Here the men were supplied with Enfield rifles. They remained at Key West until the 2d of May, when they were ordered to Pensacola, where they arrived on the 24th. Their first meeting with the Rebels was at Gonzales' Plantation, on the 27th of October, 1862, and in this engagement they won a name for valor and soldierly bravery that they might well feel proud of. On the 27th of December they left Pensacola for Baton Rouge, La., arriving there on the 1st of January, 1863.
At the opening of the Spring campaign they were before Port Hudson in an advanced position, and greatly distinguished themselves in engaging the Rebels while the fleet passed the river batteries. They returned to Baton Rouge on the 19th of March, and remained there without the least shelter until the 26th, when they started for Donaldsonviile, arriving there on the 28th. From this time their trials, sufferings and privations may be dated. Between the 28th of March and the 24th of May they marched seven hundred miles! frequently suffering terribly from exhaustion and hunger. But they were nothing daunted or discouraged. On the 2d of April they arrived at Thibodeaux, and the next day left in the cars on the Jackson railroad, for Bayou Boeuf. Here they remained about a week, and on the 12th embarked for Irish Bend, where they fought the hotly contested battle of that name, and after a six hours' conflict drove the enemy from the field, pursuing him over a mile through a woods. On the 15th they again started in pursuit of the foe, coming up with him at Vermillion Bayou on the 18th, just as the sun was setting. They had marched over thirty-six miles! on dusty roads, with scarcely a mouth-full to eat, and very muddy water to drink.
But they were full of pluck and spirit, and engaged in a skirmish with the enemy, lasting until dark, when a lull took place. During the night a severe storm prevailed, and the enemy taking advantage of the darkness, retreated.  At break of day our gal­lant boys again started in pursuit, arriving at Opelousas on the 21st, and almost immediately started out on a cotton expedition, meeting with entire success, and returning to Moundsville, near Wash­ington, La., on the 28th. Here they rested a day or two, but not without a skirmish with the enemy. From thence they commenced a march that carried them far beyond Alexandria, into the piney woods, and only terminated when they occupied the position assigned them before the works of the enemy at Port Hudson, on the 24th of May. During that memorable march they made eighty-four miles in three days, doing battle also under many disadvantages. On the 25th an assault was made on Port Hudson, the 91st taking a leading part. On the 27th the conflict was renewed and lasted until noon, the loss   being heavy on both sides. In this assault our boys held the position of honor, and nobly did they sustain it. It was on this day of blood and carnage that the gallant Major Stackhouse received a mortal wound. On the 14th of June another advance was commenced, the 91st, as before, being assigned a prominent position. The record shows how well they deserved the honor. In this conflict the lamented young heroes Adjutant Shepard and Captain Hulbert fell. From this time until the capitulation of the Rebel stronghold the 91st lay in the entrenchments, in the moat exposed situation. On the 9th of June they marched into the town, and on the 11th sailed for Donaldsonville, where they again met the enemy in force on the 12th, fighting  him over an hour, and falling back in good order under cover of the gunboats. The day following the enemy retreated. The 91st remained at this post until the 29th of July, when it started for New Orleans, and shortly after its arrival the men received six months' pay, causing great rejoicing among the gallant fellows. On the 29th of August the regiment left New Orleans for Brashear City, reaching there the 2d of September. While there the heroes of so many battles re-enlisted as artillery, and were sent to Fort Jackson, below New Orleans, to garrison that very important post. Here they did duty until their departure homeward, on furlough.
Surely, with such a record as this, the returning heroes are deserving of a most cordial and hearty welcome, and it will be discreditable in the highest degree to our people if they do not evince their gratitude to them by such a demonstration as will indicate their joy at their return to the city claiming them as it sons.                                              

ARRIVAL AND RECEPTION OF THE 91ST REGIMENT N. Y. S. V.—The Ninety-first Veterans arrived yesterday morning about 4 o'clock, on board the Thomas Brooks, and was generously cared for by the Citizens' Committee, at the various hotels. The boys return in excellent health, but eight having to be sent to the hospital.
The Ninety first was mustered in December 16, 1861, with 1,007 men, and re-enlisted as a veteran regiment January 1, 1864, some three hundred strong. When it started for Baltimore on the last campaign with Gen. Grant it had 1,807 men, of which about 300 were veterans. Some 678 of the one year men arrived a few weeks since, leaving about 200 of the veterans of the old Ninety-first in the field. The One Hundred and Forty-seventh Regiment was consolidated with the Ninety-first soon after, and accompany the regiment. There are about 275 of them. Two commissioned officers of the One Hundred and Forty-seventh only were transferred, viz:—Capt. R. A. Penfield and Second Lieutenant George B. Hill. There were about 700 transferred, of which number some 425 are in Camp Parole and various hospitals. Seven hundred and one men return, 225 of whom are one year men, whose term expired subsequent to October 1st next.
The Ninety-first went from Governor's Island to Key West, Fla., and then to Pensacola, where it remained some six or seven months, doing garrison duty, and occasionally scouting in the interior. From there it went to New Orleans, were in the Teche campaign, comprising Irish Bend, Donaldsonville, Siege of Port Hudson (where it lost some 320 men in the celebrated charge.) After the surrender of Port Hudson, it returned to the neighborhood of New Orleans, was converted into Heavy Artillery, and ordered to garrison Fort Jackson. On the removal of the Nineteenth Corps to the Shenandoah Valley, it was detached to garrison all the forts in the vicinity of Baltimore. It was recruited up to the maximum strength of a Heavy Artillery regiment, 1,800 men, where it remained until the 29th of February last, when it was ordered to report to General Warren, commanding the Fifth Corps, and was placed in the old Iron Brigade. On the advance, it took part in the battles of Gravely Run and Five Forks, and followed up Lee's army to the surrender, enduring some severe marching. In these battles, it will be remembered, it fought gallantly and lost heavily, in men and officers. On the return of the army to the neighborhood of Washington, it remained camped at Ball's Cross Roads until Wednesday last, when it started for home.
The following is a list of the officers:
Colonel and Brevet Brigadier General—J. Tarbell.
Lieutenant-Colonel—Wm. J. Denslow.
Major—Alfred Wagstaff, Jr.
Adjutant—James W. Kirk.
Quartermaster—Charles O. Henry.
Surgeon—Robert Morris.
Assistant Surgeon—Charles A. Hamilton (formerly of the One Hundred and Forty-seventh).
Sergeant Major—Robert Davidson.
Quartermaster Sergeant—John Babcock.
Commissary Sergeant—Benjamin A. Foote.
Hospital Steward—Fisher A. Green.
Company A—Captain, William Harty; First
Lieutenant, Wm. S. Hutman; Second Lieutenant,
A. A. Reese.
Company B—Captain, James H. Stewart; First Lieutenant, Amasa J. Spaulding; Second Lieutenant, H. G. Loper.
Company C—First Lieutenant, Edward R. Cone, commanding; Second Lieutenant, D. V. L. McCulloch.
Company D—Captain, George W. Hobbs; First Lieutenant, Harvey J. Danforth; Second Lieutenant, Wm. Chapman.
Company E—First Lieutenant, Wm. Smythe; Second Lieutenant, H. Van Arnum.
Company F—Captain, Wm. L. Herwerth; Second Lieutenant, James Murphy.
Company G—Captain, James Reilly; First Lieutenant, Cornelius Gill; Second Lieutenant, Harvey J. Moses.
Company H—Captain, R. A. Penfield; First Lieutenant, John Palmer; Second Lieutenant, A. M. Dederick.
Company I—Captain, J. W. Felthousen; First Lieutenant, James De Lamater; Second Lieutenant, W. L. McCormick.
Company K—Captain, P. M. Culins; Second Lieutenant, George B. Hall.
After breakfast, the regiment marched through Broadway, Church, Lydius, Pearl, Hudson, Eagle, State and Broadway, back to Stanwix Hall, and from thence to the Barracks. It passed before the residence of Col. Harcourt and the Executive Mansion, giving three hearty cheers at each place. The boys were greatly disappointed when they learned that the Governor was absent.

ARRIVAL OF THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT—THEIR RECEPTION.—The veteran 91st (Albany) Regiment reached thus city from New Orleans last night. Thousands of our citizens, among whom were many friends of the members, turned out to meet and greet them. The 25th Regiment, under Lieut. Col. Cassidy, was also out, and acted as an escort to the war-worn veterans. The members looked neat and trim, and presented a fine appearance. They return home with 351 men, very few of whom are sick. Only two were left on the way, and they are at Cairo. The regiment numbered 445 before they started. Those that did not come, did not reenlist, and are now doing d u t y at the Pontchatrain Lake House, just out of New Orleans, under Capt. Felthousen. The following is a list of the officers who return with the regiment:
Lieut. Col. Tarbell, commanding.
Acting Adjutant Shirley.
Drum Major Stewart.
Co. A—Cpt. Selkirk, Lieut. Hutman.
Co. B—Capt. Hobbs, Lieut. Stewart.
Co. C—Capt. McDermott, Lieuts. Harwood and Danford.
Co. D—Capt. Hamberger.
Co. E—Capt. Lee.
Co. F—No officers, Capt. Hobbs in command.
Co. G—Lieut. Hardy in command.
Co. H—Capt. Collins, Lieuts. Culins and Wideman.
Co. I—Lieut. Geo. Walker in command.
Co. K—Capt. Dinslow, Lieut. Dodds.
The regiment was received on Broadway by the 25th, and escorted to the Capitol, where it was welcomed back home by Mayor Perry, the Governor being indisposed. After the reception by the Mayor, the Committee of Arrangements escorted them to Congress Hall, where they partook of a good supper. After supper they proceeded to the City Hall, where they stacked arms and dispersed for the night. This morning at 10 o'clock they meet again, when they will proceed to the Barracks on Troy Road, and there disband, to enjoy the benefit of their furlough.

DEPARTURE OF THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT.—This regiment, which has been home on furlough for thirty days, left this city last night on the steamer St. John. Only about 200 went off. The rest have not reported. During the past month four hundred recruits have been obtained for the regiment, and those men are now on Riker's Island, where they will join the regiment. The straggling members will doubtless join the regiment before it leaves for Washington.

PARADE OF THE 91ST REGIMENT—RECEPTION BY THE GOVERNOR, THE MAYOR, GEN. TOWNSEND AND COL. HALCOURT.—Our city was enlivened by a parade of the 91st Regiment under command of Col. Tarbell. This regiment had just returned from New Orleans, and was yesterday quartered at the Barracks on the Troy road.
At an early hour this morning, preceded by Schriber's Band, it passed through Broadway and State street to the residence of Major Perry, where some appropriate remarks were made by the commanding officers, to which the Mayor responded.
The regiment was then marched to the residence of Gov. Seymour, who addressed them in words of praise and congratulation.
Passing the residence of Gen. F. Townsend the regiment halted and gave him a military salute.
Resuming their march the regiment proceeded to the residence of Col. J . W. Harcourt, for the purpose of presenting him with the torn and tattered battle flag which they received from him just as they were leaving this city, a long time ago, in the defence of their country. Col. Tarball [sic] in restoring the flag eulogized his command and spoke in glowing terms of their conduct in the field of battle. Col. Harcourt in receiving the blood stained relic of the field of battle, complimented the regiment upon what they had done in battle and for their good and soldier-like appearance on their return home.
After partaking of some refreshments, the regiment resumed their march to the depot where they receive their furloughs.

Local Affairs.
DRESS PARADE OF THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT— PRESENTATION OF THEIR BATTLE FLAG TO THE ORIGINAL DONOR—INTERESTING OCCASION.—Yesterday was one of the eventful days in the history of the 91st Regiment, New York Volunteers. As all are aware, the regiment has just returned from Louisiana on a furlough and previous to dispersing for the purpose of enjoying the privileges of said furlough, they embraced the opportunity offered, to have a full dress parade through the streets of our city, which event took place yesterday. The regiment was preceded by Schrieber's Brass Band, and under the command of Lieut. Col. Tarbell. There were about 200 men in line, all as neat and trim as so many regulars. They marched and manoeuvered well, and reflected great credit upon themselves by their well regulated discipline. They paid their respects to Gov. Seymour, Mayor Perry and Col. Fred Townsend, by forming line in front of their respective residences, and giving enthusiastic cheers for the above named distinguished persons. Each gentleman responded to the compliment paid in a very happy and pertinent speech. The next place before which the regiment halted, was the residence of Col. John W. Harcourt, on Lydius street, between Pearl and Rose streets. The scene that presented itself here was indeed grand. American colors of all descriptions were hung and festooned from the front of the dwelling, across the street and around the beautiful foliage of the trees, with which that portion of the street is so handsomely shaded and laid out. The crowd of people assembled was even as great as that which convened on the same spot nearly three years ago, when the estimable, patriotic and noble lady of Col. Harcourt, gave to the 91st Regiment not only a stand of colors, but her son, to be carried to the scenes of strife and danger. That, indeed, was a proud day in the annals of all concerned, but yesterday was still a prouder one. On the first occasion, the 91st Regiment received from the hands of Mrs. Harcourt a flag, the emblem of our nationality. It was placed in the hands of Color Sergeant Gill, of Co. C. It was accepted with feelings of pride and gratitude, and with a solemn, earnest and patriotic vow, that while one man held out, that flag would be protected and defended against its foes. How nobly the members of the 91st Regiment have fulfilled their obligations, is shown in the fact, that in the heat of battle no less than three of that flag's bearers were shot down. Sergeant Gill was the first. He was supposed to be mortally wounded, but recovered. He had no sooner fallen than Sergeant Townsend seized the color, raised it aloft, and bore it onward in utter defiance of the rebel hosts. His daring was soon checked, however, by a rebel bullet. He, poor fellow, also fell, mortally wounded, and died from the effects. Sergeant Garrity was the next who undertook to redeem their pledge. He grasped the colors from his dying comrade's hands, and onward it went once more. He also received a wound while carrying it, but it was not of so serious a nature as to prevent him from sticking to the old standard. The flag has been on all the hotly contested battle fields of Louisiana, and all that is left of it is the staff and about half a yard of the silk, adjoining the staff. This bears the inscriptions of the following battles: Irish Bend, Vermillion Bayou, Port Hudson, May 25th and 27th, and June 14th; also Cox's Plantation. After nearly three years hard service, the 91st returns, and yesterday appeared at the residence of Col. Harcourt to redeem their pledge and present to his estimable lady all that was left of that once beautiful flag. Sergeant Gill, who first received it from Mrs. Harcourt, had the pleasure of returning it back to her again.—Sergt. Garrity was also present, bearing the color of the regiment. The tattered and war-worn flag was received from the regiment, on behalf of Mr. and Mrs. Harcourt, by W. S. Havenor, Esq., the same gentleman who presented it to the regiment on its departure. He made a very happy speech, which was enthusiastically cheered by the members of the regiment.—When he had concluded, Col. Tarbell dismounted, and taking the flag from Mrs. Harcourt, caused arms to be stacked, and then gave the order, "Rally round the flag, boys," which they did. He made a few very appropriate remarks, relative to the old flag and their connections with it. He looked upon the flag as an old friend, but allowed "the best of friends must part." He, therefore, proposed three cheers for the old flag, which was given with a will, and followed by three times three, from the throats of those whose howls while defending it on the battle-field struck terror to the enemy. The occasion was indeed a happy one, and will long be remembered. After partaking of some refreshments provided by the noble hearted Col. Harcourt, the regiment re-took their arms, and proceeded to their quarters on the Troy Road.

A CARD IN BEHALF OF THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS.—In behalf of the officers and enlisted men of the Ninety-first New York Volunteers, I desire to express the most cordial thanks and deepest gratitude:—
To the Michigan Southern Rail Road, through their large-hearted and gentlemanly Agent, Samuel C. Hough, Esq., for refreshments for the entire regiment, both at Chicago and Toledo; for first class passenger cars for the men, and a sleeping car for officers; and for the active, zealous and most efficient personal attentions of Mr. Hough, who is truly the prince of rail road Agents and of whole-souled men.
To the Ladies, and to the representatives of the Soldiers' Home of Chicago, from whom we were waited upon by Committees inviting us to refreshments in readiness and waiting, which we were compelled to decline in  consequence of the prior invitation of Mr. Hough on behalf of the R. R.
To the people of Erie, Pa., who turned out en masse, old and young, men, women and children, rich and poor, not only furnishing ample refreshments for the occasion, but forcing upon every one the most abundant supply for the remainder of the journey. God bless the entire people of Erie for their cordial and warm hearted attentions, and their grateful supplies in such bountiful and unlimited abundance.
To the people of Albany for their generous and noble reception of the veterans I have the honor to command, showing that the valor, bravery and patient endurance of the men of the 91st have found a lasting place in the hearts of the citizens of the city. The members of the regiment will ever hold in grateful remembrance the outpouring and the enthusiasm on the occasion of their return, and it will nerve them to renewed exertions in the cause of their country when again called to the field.
May the choicest of Heaven's blessings rest on all those who were so kind and generous to the 9lst Veteran Volunteers, whether by thoughts, words or deeds.
ALBANY, August 3, 1864.
J. TARBELL, Lieut. Col. Com'dg.

FROM THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT.—The 91st (Albany) Regiment is now doing garrison duty at Fort Jackson, La. The following extracts from a letter written by one of the members of this regiment to a friend in this city, will be read with interest by those having relations in the regiment:
As I promised before I left old Albany to write to you on my arrival in this benighted land, vulgarly called Dixie, I shall now endeavor to fulfill that promise to the best of my ability We arrived here three weeks yesterday, after laying in New Orleans about a week, where we arrived after ten days' sail from New York, encountering heavy storms and head winds almost the entire passage. I don't know as I can say much in favor of this place, and I think I am just about as near the infernal region as I can get on this continent. Fort Jackson is situated about sixty miles below New Orleans, and lies on low, swampy ground, and mounts about fifty guns. The mosquitoes are as thick as the hairs on your head, and about as large as bees. There is a water moat around the fort, about twenty feet in width, with any quantity of hideous alligators therein; so if any of you fat printer men wish a pair of alligator boots, send on your cash orders. Here I came across the famous Tommy Clark and Packard. They are both good soldiers and well liked in the regiment. The regiment is better off now and more comfortably situated, than at any previous time since they left at home. We have our good loaf of fresh bread every day—and hard tack is unknown; we have also ticks filled with moss to sleep on. Fort St. Philip, across the river, is garrisoned by a colored regiment, and a very soldierly looking lot of men they are. We had a pretty gay time in New Orleans, and you can bet we made the most of our time, for we thought we might not have another chance in a good while. How long before the regiment will be home I cannot tell, but the boys don't expect to go before this campaign, so disastrously opened, is closed and the rebs driven out of Louisiana.

Morning Express.
ALBANY, MONDAY, MAY 23, 1864.
The Whereabouts and Condition of the Ninety-First Regiment.
The Ninety-first Regiment is still at Fort Jackson, below New Orleans. Lieutenant Colonel Tarbell is still in command of the regiment, and succeeds General T. W. Sherman as Commandant of the fort. When General S. left, the officers expressed their appreciation of his high character in a very appropriate letter, which was as appropriately responded to.
On the 4th inst., General Sherman, in a congratulatory and complimentary order, passed over the command of the fort to Colonel T., and in doing so, General S. took occasion to speak in the highest terms of the excellent condition of the regiment.
The following letter from the Colonel will be read with interest by the friends of the regiment, here and elsewhere:
HEADQUARTERS 91ST REG'T N. Y. VOLS
FORT JACKSON, La., May 2, 1864.)
Capt. John G. Collin, 91st N. Y. Vols., on Recruiting Service, Albany, N. Y.
CAPTAIN—My attention has been called to an article in one of the Albany papers, stating that there were a variety of reports in circulation in regard to the Ninety-first going home; one, we were waiting for transportation, and the other, that we would not get our furlough till Col. Van Zandt went in command.
Please to allay the anxiety of the friends of the regiment by stating that we are neither waiting transportation nor for Col. V. Z ; that about the time we were to have our furlough, the battle up Red river occurred, the result of which leaves no troops to spare to relieve us; that we occupy a very important post, which cannot prudently be left to the care of a reduced garrison, and that as soon as consistent with the public service we shall embark.
No true patriot, whether in the Regiment or among our friends at home, will find fault with this. The conduct of southern women might be quoted with profit. Many cases have come to my knowledge in which Southern men have been forced into the Rebel army by their female friends, who would refuse to speak to, or recognize any man disposed to stay at home. If there are relatives, friends, or "sweethearts" waiting the return of the Ninety-first, I call their attention to this example of the Southern women, and ask them to bid their "soldier boys" to be content with whatever duty enjoins. Thus will this "cruel war" be soonest ended.
Please use this letter, or the facts stated, so as best to enlighten our friends in regard t o the Regiment.
J. TARBELL, Lieut. Col. Commanding,
91st N. Y. Veteran Vols.

FROM THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT—The following letter was received here yesterday by Mr. Moses Hamburger, from his son who is a Captain in the 91st Regiment, Col. Van Zandt. It will be seen that the regiment expected to be paid off and would start for the North as soon as the Paymaster arrived with the greenbacks: FORT JACKSON, La. June 29th, 1864.
DEAR PARENTS:—I take up my pen once more to let you know that I am getting much better. I had a very severe attack of the chills and fever, when I last wrote you, but I have been getting better ever since, and I will be ready for duty in the course of a few days. I have some good news to communicate to you. On Saturday, the 25th, after I got through inspecting my company, the Chaplin stepped in front and asked me to stop a minute as he had something to tell me. I waited, and to my surprise my company presented me with a splendid sword, sash and belt, valued at $125. It is a magnificent present—as pretty a sword as ever you laid eyes on. The Chaplin made a very appropriate speech, to which I replied. It took me completely by surprise. I never dreamed of anything of the kind, and it pleased the boys very much. As for other news, I know of none. We are now awaiting muster and pay, and as soon as we get paid we will start for the North. Give my love to all my friends and relatives.

HIGHLY IMPORTANT LETTER FROM THE 91st REGIMENT.—The following letter from Lieut. Culins, furnishes highly important information relative to the 91st Regiment and its officers:
FORT JACKSON, LA. June 30, 1864.
MR. EDITOR—By the mail received here this morning, I received a letter from Albany, in which was inclosed [sic] a slip cut from one of your papers, headed "Important from the 91st Regiment," stating that Lieut. Colonel Tarbell, Lieut. Culins, and Lieut. Van Arnam were arrested for defrauding the Government. Allow me to state that Lieut. Colonel Tarbell is in command of the regiment, Lieut. Van Arnam is A. P. Q. M., and Lieut. P. M. Culins is in command of Co. H, and that neither of them is or have been under arrest since the regiment has been here.
Please inform the citizens of Albany that the regiment will be home soon, and that Lieut. Colonel Tarbell will come in command. Col. Van Zandt is under arrest, and in prison, where he has been for the last three weeks; and if he were here he could not come home with the regiment, as his term of suspension does not expire until next December, by orders from the President. The Lieutenant who sent you the infamous letter for publication has put up a bad job for himself, as he will find it when the regiment arrives home. Yours, truly, P. M. CULINS,
1st Lieutenant 91st N. Y. V.

MORNING EXPRESS
ALBANY, FRIDAY, SEPT. 23, 1864.
The Ninety-first New York Volunteers.
The most favorable reports reach us in regard to this regiment. Its popularity is attested by the large number of recruits that have joined the regiment, and are still flocking to its ranks from all parts of the State. Among these are some of the best men, both physically and intellectually, that have ever entered the service.—including mechanics, clerks, merchants, professional teachers, professors, clergymen, physicians, &c., &c. Charolettville (Schoharie county) Academy furnished its principal, two professors, one a clergyman, and several students.
The officers of this regiment recently promoted have no superiors. These are Major W. J. Deuslow, Capt. Geo. W. Schaffer, Quartermaster Chas. V. Henry and Chaplain A. McN. Thorburn, the three last being well known citizens of Albany. An Adjutant of like character is wanted. In every respect this regiment is being renovated and renerved, so that it will soon be one of the best in service. Its prospects were never as promising as now. With full ranks, of the very best material, perfect in discipline and drill, and with a band, now almost a certainty, the 91st is a regiment of which the people of Albany may well be proud. They to whose care the destiny of the regiment is confided in the field, are deeply grateful for the kind and generous interest of the citizens of this city. Long wave the 91st.
The office for enlisting in the 91st regiment is in the old Stage office, Museum Building.
E. A. SELKIRK,
Captain, and Recruiting Officer.

MORNING EXPRESS.
ALBANY, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 1864.
FROM THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT.—The following letter was received here from a member of the 91st regiment:
HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT,
8TH ARMY CORPS, BALTIMORE, MD., OCT. 18, 1864.
Hoping this may find you well, I will again take the pen in hand to write a few lines to you. I will give you a little account of our times at this place.
Our regiment now numbers between sixteen and seventeen hundred men, and three companies are stationed at Fort Marshall, five companies at Fort McHenry and four companies have gone to the front, to drive out the Guerilla Mosby with his band. Drafting is going on very lively. There was great excitement here the other day, about some stores having been shut up and every one arrested within them and sent off to Washington. The cause of it was that these gentlemen were in a regular trade with the Rebels, and on the same day when Mosby's guerillas captured our trains, it was found out that this was all a made up thing between them and merchants at Baltimore, as the latter had a great amount of goods on the train which were to reach the Rebel lines by capturing the train. A Rebel mail was also captured by our pursuing party, in which all those concerned were named and accordingly arrested.
The election is now coming close to hand, and I expect there will be quite a hot time here. How is the prospect in New York State? Maryland citizens, at all appearances, will vote for McClellan, but among the soldiers it don't look very good. I think there will be a grand advance made before long by our army, as I have never heard of so many regiments going to the front as there is now. I hope that this advance will be successful so that we will soon have peace and we can return to our homes, for no poor man stands any sight here for promotion. There are now in our regiment over 68 officers who have been promoted from civil life to officers in the army, over men who have served over three years in the ranks and have gone through all the hardships of a soldier. There is now again several vacancies in our regiment as there are now 12 companies.

A DESERTER ARRESTED.—About four weeks ago James Osborn enlisted at Schenectady, received $415, the county bounty, and was attached to the Ninety-first regiment, N. Y. S. V. He was sent to Fort McHenry, where the regiment is stationed, where he remained until last week, when he left Baltimore and came to this city. He was arrested by officer McDuffie and brought before Captain Parsons. He did not deny the charge of desertion, but said that he was intoxicated when he enlisted. He enlisted in hid proper name. He will be sent back to his regiment.

Local Affairs.
FROM THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT.—The following interesting letter we publish for the benefit of the numerous friends of the Ninety-first in this city:
FORT MCHENRY, MD., Oct. 25, 1884.
Editor Albany Knickerbocker—Dear Sir:
Presuming you will excuse the liberty I take in addressing you, I will proceed to give you a short sketch regarding the movements of the veteran 91st N. Y. V.
It is well known to Albanians that our regimental headquarters are at Fort McHenry, Md., where they are likely to remain until spring. We are pleasantly located; the fort is situated upon a narrow neck of land jutting out into the bay, which forms the harbor of Baltimore, and overlooks the proud city of monuments, threatening devastation and desolation to its inhabitants should they presume to lift their hands to "aid the abettors of treason."
Outside of the fort, and within the inclosure [sic], are several fine barrack buildings, which our boys occupy, and which are being rapidly metamorphosed into comfortable habitations. The boys are in excellent spirits, and eager to acquire the requites of a soldier. Soon we shall be able to boast that we have as fine a regiment as ever left its parent State. The men are being thoroughly drilled in the manual of arms, and are commanded by a class of officers of whom Albanians may well feel proud.
The regiment at the present time is commanded by our adopted son, Major William J. Donslow, whose record will brighten the pages of our State Volunteer History, and of whom we are proud to dub with the title of Major.—Our Colonel and Lieutenant Colonel are both absent on temporary duty in New Orleans, but are expected to rejoin us in a few days. Our jovial and accomplished Quartermaster, Henry, makes the "welkin ring" with his practical jokes, and with him, as usual, "everything is lovely." His business qualifications cannot be beat, as the general appearance of our boys can testify, when they come out on guard mounting and parade in their neat and substantial uniform and splendid equipments.—They are such as will make the rebels weep when our boys get an opportunity of testing them.
When we arrived here, we found the place garrisoned by the Fifth Massachusetts Militia (a hundred days' regiment.) The detachment at this post has been relieved, and their places filled by our men, who now do the garrison duty. It is designed to cut us up and distribute the companies in the several forts which overlook the city, and include the defences of Baltimore. The design has been somewhat delayed on account of a certain guerilla raid upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which necessitated the sending of several companies to do temporary guard duty between here and Harper's Ferry. However, this will not probably interfere with the ultimate design, as Companies A, E and I, under command of Capt. Wm. Lee, are already doing duty at Fort Marshall, and another detachment has recently been sent to Fort Carroll, an "island fort" some four miles down the bay.
We cannot but consider ourselves fortunate as a regiment to be thus so comfortably situated, almost, as it were, in the city of Baltimore. We have easy access to the city and its markets, and the men are constantly receiving memento packages of eatables and other good things from their friends at home, all of which adds materially to our comfort, and brings us nearer to our once happy firesides.
Of late our camp has been visited by agents from various parts of New York State to canvas for the coming election, and as the results of canvassing in other regiments have frequent­ly been given through the columns of your pa­per, I will give you a rough estimate of the voting in ours, which was handed me the other day by Quartermaster Henry, which is as fol­lows, viz: Democratic, 196; Union, 860.—Union, majority, 664. Since the above, many others have voted, and are voting every day, so that the probability is that the regiment will go the Union ticket by a very large majority. "Little Mac" might as well "bury the hatchet," for the veteran 91st can't see blue.
There is just enough excitement going on here to make the time pass off agreeably. Al­most every day for several weeks past large numbers of rebel prisoners have arrived here from the Shenandoah Valley, enrouts to Point Lookout. They are a scaly looking set of men, so far as clothing is concerned, but they all, as a general thing, appeal to enjoy good health, and look tough and hardy. They are abun­dantly supplied with "graybacks," but there appears to be a lack of "greenbacks," for they are offering Confederate notes of the last issue at  the rate of ten cents on the dollar. It is safe to judge, from the depreciation of Confederate notes, and the high value they place on Treasury notes, that the so called Confederacy is about on its last pins, and we confidently look forward to a speedy termination of the war on the re-election of "Old Abe."
Before closing this, I would respectfully call the attention of the Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Association of your city to the fact that there is a deficiency of material in the line of old rags, with which to make dressings, &c., for the afflicted ones, and that a contribution of some of the said article would be a welcome donation. Yours, &c., "WILL WALNUT.”

From the Ninety-First  Regiment.
Middle Department, 91st N. Y. V.
Fort McHenry, Md., Nov. 6, 1864.
Editor Albany Knickerbocker:
Dear Sir—A short time since I noticed in the columns of the Express a statement written by a nondescript that there were sixty-eight (68) officers in our regiment, and that a great past of them were "appointed from civil life," thereby giving the "old veterans" no opportunity for promotion. I wish to correct the impression that such a statement would naturally have upon the old friends of the regiment, and which would, if believed, have a tendency to depreciate the standard of the officers in command. The communication was a fabrication gotten up expressly to create a malignant feeling among the veterans towards their officers, because a few ambitious and undeserving ones had failed to obtain commissions. To my personal knowledge there has not been but three officers added to this regiment from "civil life" since I became a member of it. Several officers have returned to the regiment, recommissioned, who were members of it when first organized, two of whom were obliged to resign in consequence of ill health, and the others had retired on the reception of commissions in other commands. Two have been adopted from other regiments whose term of service had expired, and who felt that their honor and patriotism were at stake did they forsake a cause so just while their country needed the talents they possessed. None of these have given us occasion to regret their connection with the regiment; rather have they been a boon to us of priceless value, which needs but to know them to prove. Of such material is our worthy Major, Quartermaster and Chaplain. As regards promotions in the regiment, a number have occurred within the last few months, and several now hold commissions and will be mustered in when a vacancy occurs to warrant it, so it can be plainly seen that the meritorious "poor men" can and do obtain commissions. The roster of our regiment gives the name of but 32 officers, and it is well known by every military man that no regiment ever had sixty-eight (68) officers in its command. We have but ten companies in the regiment, and not twelve, as their informant stated. Our Band has arrived and are rapidly organizing. Soon we expect they will be able to take the feathers off from the regulars, through the efforts of their able and efficient leader, Richard Willis. We are jogging along as usual. Nothing particularly new has occurred since my last communication. We expect lively times between this and election, and there are prospects of the "Vets" being required at Baltimore to keep the peace. Yours, &c.,
"WILL WALNUT."

THE NINETY-FIRST NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.—On the grand march through Richmond on Saturday, the 91st presented over 900 bayonets, more than twice, and nearly three times as large as the largest regiment in the service—an array to be proud of. The troops went into camp for the night just outside the city, and were to start on the road to Washington on Sunday morning. Contrary to the impressions given by the newspapers, the distance is to be made by easy marches, twelve days' rations being supplied, intending to consume that time, rather than 7 or 8 days, as intimated in the public papers.
The friends of the regiment, therefore, may not expect letters before the last of next week. A list of killed and wounded was some time since given in this paper. Quite a number of men have since been sent to hospital on account of sickness, or lameness, caused by the hardships of forced marches, but it is impossible to give names at present.
If in any case friends at home do not get letters they will always be able to obtain correct and prompt intelligence by writing to the regimental commander. We are promised the names of those in hospital at an early day.

THE MICHIGAN SOUTHERN RAILROAD AND
THE NINETY-FIRST N. Y. REGIMENT—COMMENDABLE
LIBERALITY.—We find the following in the Chicago Journal of Monday evening. It speaks well for the kindness and liberality of the officers of the Michigan Southern Railroad:
The 91st New York re-enlisted veteran regiment, from the lower Mississippi, arrived here from Cairo last evening at 8 o'clock, and left in a train on the Michigan Southern Railroad at 11 o'clock. They go to Albany. The regiment numbers 330, quite a number of whom are sick. The officers of the Michigan Southern Railroad exhibited their patriotic generosity in a most commendable and praiseworthy manner, in their treatment of these war-worn veterans. They furnished omnibuses at their own expense for the conveyance of the sick officers and men from the Illinois Central to the Michigan Southern depot, and prepared coffee for the entire regiment last evening, and breakfast at Toledo this morning. The sick officers were provided with free accommodations in a sleeping car, and all was done that could be, by these patriotic and liberal railroad officials, to render the transportation of the regiment as safe and comfortable as possible. It would be well if other railroad companies that have the transportation of troops would follow the noble example of the Michigan Southern.

COL. TARBELL AND OUR CITIZENS.—Col. Tarbell, in command of the 91st Regiment, arrived in town on Tuesday, and one of his first acts was to prepare a card of thanks for courtesies extended to the Regiment on its way home. He concludes as follows: "To the people of Albany, for their generous and noble reception of the veterans I have the honor to command, showing that the valor, bravery and patient endurance of the men of the 91st have found a lasting place in the hearts of the citizens of the city. The members of the Regiment will ever hold in greatful rememberance [sic] the outpouring and the enthusiasm on the occasion of their return, and it will nerve them to renewed exertions in the cause of their country when again called to the field. May the choicest of Heaven's blessings rest on all those who were so kind and generous to the 91st Veteran Volunteers, whether by thoughts, words or deeds."

THE NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT.—This favorite Albany Regiment has been transformed into Heavy Artillery. It will be home about the first of April. Most of the veterans have re-enlisted, and a recruiting party is now here to fill up its ranks. Its reputation is equal to that of any of the gallant regiment of the Gulf; and the highest praise has been awarded to it in orders by the General Officer of the Department.

PERSONAL.—We are in receipt of a copy of the New Orleans "Era" of the 26th ult., from Dr. C. J. Hill, Assist. Surgeon, of the 91st N. Y. Vols., for which he has our thanks. The paper contains a complimentary card to the Capt. of the bark Alamo, signed by Dr. Hill and a number of other officers, thanking him for the kindness with which he ministered to them during their passage from New York to New Orleans. The Doctor was on his return to his regiment after leave of absence, part of which was passed in this city.

MONEY RECOVERED.—Daniel Golden, a member of Co. C, 91st Regiment, on Wednesday while walking about the streets was attacked with the chills. He was carried into a house in the lower part of the city where he was furnished a bed. He slept there several hours, and on awaking he discovered that his wallet containing six $20 Treasury Notes, a check for $181, a promissory [sic] note for $50, and some other papers, had been abstracted from his pocket. He informed Captain Hagadorn of his loss, and that officer proceeded to the house and recovered the money and papers. The property was delivered over to Mr. Golden. It does not appear from the Police record that any arrests were made.

LIBERAL CONDUCT OF A RAILROAD COMPANY—The 91st New York volunteers, who passed through this city the other day on their way eastward, to recruit, were treated with unusual generosity by the officers of the Michigan Southern Railroad. Omnibuses were provided in Chicago for the conveyance of the sick officers and men from the Illinois Central to the Michigan Southern depot, and coffee supplied to the regiment Sunday evening, and breakfast at Toledo Monday morning. The sick officers were provided with free accommodations in a sleeping car, and all was done that could be, by these patriotic and liberal railroad officials, to render the transportation of the regiment as safe and as comfortable as possible. It would be well if other railroad companies that have the transportation of the troops would follow the noble example of the Michigan Southern.

ARRIVAL OF CAPTAIN JOHNNY COOKE.—The veteran Captain Johnny Cooke, of the 91st Regiment, arrived in this city on Saturday morning. He was met at the boat by a few intimate friends, who had secured a barouche, into which the old "war horse" was seated, and preceded by the Brigade Band, proceeded to his residence in Jefferson street, followed by an immense concourse of citizens. Although suffering great pain from a wound received in the right arm at the storming of Port Hudson, Captain Cooke looks remarkably well, and is enjoying the best of health. He will remain here until this wound is sufficiently healed up to admit of his taking the field of active operations. Then his watchword will be "We have met the enemy, and he is ours!" Capt. Cooke has seen severe service, and notwithstanding sixty summers have passed over his head, he is to-day as hale and hearty, as sprightly and as full of fight, as an officer of twenty-five. Let us hope that he may be spared to witness the termination of this unholy and cursed rebellion.

Maj. Stackhouse and Lt. S. A. Shepard, of the Ninety-First, Killed.
Letters received this morning from New Orleans, announce the death of Maj. STACKHOUSE and Lt. S. A. SHEPARD, of the 91st.
Maj. S. was well known to many of our citizens, as a fine soldier and an ardent patriot. He was wounded in the assault at Port Hudson, on the 27th of May, in both thighs, but no serious consequences were expected to result from the wound. But it was more severe than was believed at the time it was received, and amputation was deemed necessary. The result was fatal.
Lieut. Shepard has been Adjutant of the 91st most of the time since its organization. When Capt. HURLBURT fell, the command of the company devolved upon Lieut. S., and he died while leading his men in the desperate assault of the 14th. He was a noble-hearted boy, and all who loved him, as all did who knew him, will mourn that one so gentle and brave should so soon have fallen.

FUNERAL OF THE LATE MAJOR STACKHOUSE.—
The remains of Major George W. Stackhouse, of the Ninety-first New York State Volunteers, arrived here Friday under the charge of his brother, Lieut.  James Stackhouse, of the same regiment. Major Stackhouse was born in this city, and for a number of years was Second Lieutenant in the old and honored Republican Artillery. At the first call of his country for troops, he and his company entered the service in the Twenty-fifth Albany Regiment, under command of Col. Bryan, and remained with the regiment for the term they enlisted in defence of the Capital at Washington. On his return, Lieut. Stackhouse raised a company for the Ninety-first Regiment, New York State Volunteers, mostly from the Ninth Ward, where he resided, and received the appointment of Captain, and went to the defence of the Gulf. He was with the Regiment in the campaign on the Teche, acting as Major, participating and rendering valuable service in the several engagements in which the Regiment took part in the memorable march from Donaldsonville to the Red River. While on this march, Capt. Stackhouse received, for his heroic conduct and experienced qualifications, his promotion as Major of the Regiment.
On the 27th of May last, was fought the terrible battle in front of Port Hudson, in which he was shot through both legs, while gallantly leading on the Regiment in the defence of his country. He was taken to New Orleans, where he died from the effects of his wounds. He leaves a wife and four children to deplore his loss. His remains will be buried to-day, the Common Council, Twenty-fifth Regiment, Col. Church, and the Fire Department participating in the funeral obsequies. His remains will lie in state at the City Hall, from 10 until 2 o'clock, under a guard of honor detailed from the Albany Republican Artillery. From thence they will be taken to the city vault and delivered over to his friends for interment.

RUMORED DISMISSAL OF COL. VAN ZANDT.—We have just learned the result of the recent trial of Col. Van Zandt, of the 91st Regiment New York Volunteers, which we referred to some days since. It is said that he has been dismissed the service by the Court Martial which tried him. Subsequently, however, Gen Banks, in whose Department he is, recommended the President to modify the sentence so that he would be dismissed the service for six months, and to receive no pay for the time being.

The Arrest of Col. Jacob Van Zandt, of the 91st Regiment.
A correspondent, who fails to affix his signature to his communication, takes exception to our statement relative to the arrest of Col. Jacob Van Zandt, of the 91st Regiment, and wishes to know the source whence the information was derived. In our article yesterday morning, we distinctly stated that the New Orleans correspondent of the Herald communicated the intelligence, and we may add that he also gave detailed particulars of the plans of the "D. M. D.'s," with which secret filibustering organization the Provost Marshal of New Orleans charges Col. Van Zant with being connected, and for which he was again placed under arrest. We rejoice to know that he was not in anywise implicated in this matter, but we have strong reasons to believe that he is guilty of all that is alleged against him; and if it shall he proven that he is, he should not only be immediately disgraced, but severely punished.
P. S.—Since the above was written we find the following relative to Col. Van Z. in the Journal:
We have a letter from an officer in the Ninety-first, dated Fort Jackson, La., June 9. It announces the arrest and imprisonment in the parish prison of New Orleans, of Colonel Jacob Van Zandt, formerly of the Ninety-first, on a charge of engaging in recruiting soldiers for the Mexican Government. While he was suspended from his command, he opened a drinking saloon, where he became implicated with men employed to __t out a fillibustering [sic] expedition against the French in Mexico. Just previous to his arrest, he had resumed his command, and had brought charges against many of the officers of the regiment with whom he had been at war almost from the moment they took the field. His absence from the regiment will be a great relief to both officers and men.
The regiment having re-enlisted was long ago promised a furlough for thirty days, but the exigencies of the service have thus far prevented it. This letter, however, says: "I have assurances that the regiment shall go home soon."

Col. Jacob Van Zandt of the 91st N. Y. S. V. Again Arrested.
The New Orleans correspondent of the Herald, writing, under date of the 9th inst., says that Major Pitcher, of the Provost Marshal's department in that district, had been making additional arrests of the "Defenders of the Monroe Doctrine," or "D. M. D's," and among the number Col. Jacob Van Zandt, (of this city,) of the 91st Reg't. N. Y. S. V. These "Defenders," according to a speech of Col. Dugan, who was also arrested, one of the number, are banded together for the ostensible purpose of assisting the Mexicans against the French, but really, it seems to us, as fillibusters [sic]. Col. D. claims to have been commissioned by Cortinas to "raise a regiment of Americans to repel French invasion, and to hold the line on the Rio Grande." He says Cortinas wishes him to garrison Matamoras and other towns contiguous to the Rio Grande. Col. Van Zandt is charged with being a member of the secret circle, and fully implicated in the movement. If the statement be true, we think he should be dismissed the service at once. We should suppose he would have quite sufficient to attend to in the discharge of his legitimate duties; and if fillibustering [sic] suits him better, why then he should retire from the command of the 91st. He may be able to show he is not a member of the "D. M. D's," and we really hope he will be able to clear the matter up.

A LOYAL DOG.
When our 91st Regiment was at Pensacola, they became possessed of a handsome pup, which they christened Jim, and were all very fond of Lieut. RILEY took him under his special supervision, and he soon grew up to the full stature of magnificent doghood. He shared in all the perils of the Regiment in its subsequent marches, until they reached "Irish Bend," La. There the Regiment had a very pretty fight with a brigade of Rebels, who threatened, for a time to have their own way. But the 91st went at them on a charge, and drove them from the field after a short contest. In the retreat, the Rebels had to jump over a fence, and while one of the ragged rascals was in the act of making the leap, "Jim" (who had joined in the charge with all the spirit and enthusiasm of a veteran) seized the Rebel with his teeth, and held him tight until one of the boys came up and released "Jim" from his novel vocation. When marched to the rear the Rebel said, "he didn't mind so much being a prisoner, but to be captured by a dog was rather mortifying." "Jim is still hale and hearty, ready for any new fight which may turn up and is more than ever the pet of the Regiment.

The 91st Reg't N. Y. Vols. (those who have re-enlisted) returned to Albany last week under command of Lt. Col. J. TARBELL, and were properly received and complimented by the civic and military-authorities of that city. Co. "C," Capt. J. G. MCDERMOTT, recruited in the western part of this county and mustered into service at Redford, Sept. 12, 1861, arrived here on Saturday last. The re-enlisted men have a furlough of thirty days. We were pleased to notice that our friend W. L. HERWERTH, who went out with this company, as Orderly Sergeant, returns with the "shoulder-straps" of a Captain, commanding Co. "F," Heavy Artillery, vice our venerable friend Capt. JOHNNY COOK, of Albany, honorably discharged.

IN THE FIELD.—We stated a few days since that Capt. Cuicci, on account of delicate health and the fear that by camp life exposure would render him unfit for duty, had resigned his command of Company G in favor of Morgan L. Filkins. The fact was subsequently contradicted, but it now appears that the contradiction was unauthorised [sic], and that Captain Filkin is now in command of Company G. Captain F. will immediately canvas the several towns in this county when he expects to get recruits sufficient to fill up his company. Captain Cuicci is also energetically working for the purpose of filling the company, to proceed to the seat of war under Captain Filkins, and he only regrets that his health prevents his own presence in the field. Captain C. is a brave soldier of established European reputation, and his friends will warmly commend his efforts here, and sympathise [sic] with him that he cannot be in active service. A man who does his duty well is entitled to respect wherever that duty may be performed.

ADDRESS
AT PRESENTATION OF SWORD AND UNIFORM TO LIEUT. SHEPARD, 91ST REGT. N. Y. S. V.,
DEC. 12, 1861,
BY REV. A. D. MAYO, ALBANY, N. Y.
LIEUTENANT—I have been invited by your friends to offer you this sword, and the uniform becoming your military rank, with the request that I would speak a few words appropriate to the occasion. I thank you for the opportunity to testify my regard to yourself, my interest in the patriotic 91st Regiment, into which you have enlisted, and my devotion to that sacred cause of national integrity, honor, and freedom, which we, as citizens and soldiers, are bound to uphold.
In asking you to accept this beautiful present, I need not remind you that great as your pride and pleasure may honestly be over your recent promotion, a sense of solemn obligation must, at this moment, surpass all other feelings. In the flower of your youth, before the generous impulses and heroic dreams of boyhood have cooled down into the calculating selfishness of later life, you now dedicate yourself to the service of your country. In the presence of your parents, your family relations, your numerous personal friends, the officers who are to be your leaders and associates, the soldiers you are to command and instruct, surrounded by honored citizens of your native State; here in the open air, in full view of that venerable city where the first meeting was held before the Revolution, to debate the propriety of a union of the colonies for common defence; with nature in her grandest and loveliest forms arresting the roving eye, you receive that investiture of arms which is your sacred pledge to become a true soldier of the Republic. It is not I that place this sword in your hands; your Country, through me, her citizen, now gives you this sword. Take it, Lieutenant; wear it, and use it in her glorious cause. It is now no private weapon with which you can do what you will; it is a consecrated instrument of justice and liberty, only to be drawn at the command of your Government, and to be sheathed at her command. Receive it as a precious trust, and resolve that you will never lay it down till that country is victorious over all her foes.
It would be an impertinence in me, in the presence of your superior officers, representing the military authority of this great Republic, to offer any advice concerning the technical duties of your new profession. You will learn from them—from the many able works on military science, which I trust you will carefully read—especially from experience, which is the greatest schoolmaster, how to be a skillful officer. Resolve, now you have chosen your calling, to excel in it. The profession of arms, in a just war, is one of the most honorable in which any man may engage. It is a difficult and dangerous profession, and, therefore, demands the uttermost diligence, fidelity, and perseverance to insure success. Do not waste your time, but begin at once to learn all that can be learned of the duties of your position. Be more desirous to be the best lieutenant in your regiment, than ambitious to reach a higher rank in the service. The honor of the soldier consists, not in an uneasy craving for exalted position, but in a perfect performance of the duties of his present office. It is glory enough to be the smallest drummer-boy to play the quick-step of advance toward the land of rebellion; it is only disgraceful to be the highest commander who fails in his duty to the flag. Your responsibility will be all you can shoulder; learn to bear it with unswerving fidelity and unconquerable courage and constancy. Thus only can you become a soldier worthy the holy cause in which you draw this sword.
But remember you were a man and a citizen before you became a lieutenant; and your new rank is only an additional reason why you should be a good citizen and a true man. If you lose any interest which you, as one of the sovereign people, are bound to cherish for the highest welfare of your country; if you sacrifice one jot of your manly character, you will sink in the scale as a soldier. Do not believe any man who tells you that intemperance, impurity, a false sense of honor, or any other quality dishonorable in the life even of a minister of Christianity, is a mark of a gallant officer. The greatest soldiers the world has ever seen have declared that military fame is only to be established on the corner-stone of a noble manhood. It is vulgar and dishonorable to be a mere fighter for the love of strife and blood, and the license of a godless camp. It is noble to be the best kind of a man, accomplished in all the culture, and strong in all the principles of a Christian life, and then grasp the sword to strike down those who would overturn the most progressive society and the best Government on earth. In such a cause it is an honor to fight; for such a cause it is a privilege to die. Let this sword remind you that the Republic expects every soldier in her army to be a good man; and if you are tempted to swerve from the high path of virtue, let your Country entreat you to spare yourself for her sake.

COLONEL, OFFICERS, AND SOLDIERS OF THE 91st REGIMENT—We, the friends of this young man, entrust him to your protection and companionship. Teach him his duties; bear with his inexperience; sustain him in the faithful performance of his lawful obligations; help him to become a good officer, and a man in whom you and we can rejoice. You are all more than sol­diers. It is the special glory of your service that you are not the unwilling slaves of a mili­tary despotism, driven to your ranks and kept there by the rigor of military law, but volun­teers, who have thrown aside the occupations of your private life to defend your own Govern­ment from destruction. The armies of other great nations are chiefly composed of men who are compelled to become soldiers and fight often in wars for which they care nothing, to sustain the very despotism that crushes out their own life. There are thousands of soldiers in the armies you are to oppose who have been driven into the ranks and kept there against all the better convictions of their nature—compelled by a power they hate and despise, to fire on the dear old flag, and shoot down the citizens of their own native land for defending the cause of human rights. But it is your pride and privilege, above all other armies that ever marched upon the earth, to be the saviors of liberty and that true order which is the establishment of all that is best in human affairs.
You go to fight for a Government which you have made; to execute laws enacted by yourselves, under a Commander-in-Chief elected by your own votes. It is as if a man should build a noble house, and then call around him his stalwart sons and blooming daughters to defend it against one of his children, who had become insane, and threatened to burn it, unless he would make it a mad-house. It is as if a father should call on his family to resist one of their sons who had become a pirate, and threatened to destroy the household and disgrace the family name, because all would not embrace the unholy profession of piracy. These thirty-four States and Territories of the United States of America constitute one nation. These 30,000,000 of people of all nationalities under the sun, are one great family. But accidents happen in the best families; and certain boisterous and ambitious members of our household insist that the whole character of the nation shall be changed from a democracy to an aristocracy, in which the great landowner, the politician, the rich and powerful men of the country, shall crush the poor man, and use the laboring classes for their own pleasure and profit. The vast majority of the people have declared again and again that this shall not be done; and now these bad men have alienated the feelings of great communities, and threaten to destroy the Union they can no longer rule. They were our brothers while they remained good citizens and obeyed the laws. When they took up arms against their Government, and involved us in the horrors of civil war, they became the worst kind of criminals known to society—they became traitors; and while they persist in this treason, they are as much worse than any foreign invader, as a son that tries to poison his mother is worse than a stranger who should attempt her life.
I sometimes hear it said that we shall not succeed in this war, because we have no cause to fight for, while our enemies contend for their independence, their native soil. I listen to such assertions with mingled amazement and contempt—amazement that a man should be so blind as to fancy there ever was, since God made man, a cause so sacred as that for which we fight—contempt at the weakness that con­founds this insurrection of a cabal of tyrants, with the uprising of a people for liberty. What sort of independence are these Confede­rate rebels fighting for? What kind of liberty are they in arms to assert? There is not a man of them who has not broken his solemn oath to be an obedient citizen of the United States; are they fighting for the liberty to make perjury respectable? Every leader in this rebellion secretly plotted against the Government which had made him all he ever was, and given him the only honors he ever wore; do they fight to exalt conspiracy to one of the Christian virtues? Every mother's son of them has helped to steal the public property purchased by the money, and pilfer the territory won by the blood of the whole people; do they desire to be independent of the obligations of common mercantile honesty? Every traitor in command of their armies was taught his military art, supported, clothed, promoted by the country he seeks to destroy; glorious liberty to cut the throat of a mother, whose only crime is that she had not whipped these bad boys into decency thirty years ago! They want the liberty of refusing to pay their debts; of burning our defenceless merchant-ships on the ocean; of tarring and feathering the Northern schoolmasters who teach them to read and write; of hanging ministers who preach the Gospel of freedom; of plundering and driving away every man in eleven States who asserts that the Government established by GEORGE WASHINGTON and his associates is better than the league of in­iquity organized by Jefferson Davis and his gang of disappointed politicians! They fight for the liberty to enslave 4,000,000 of human beings and their posterity to the end of time; to make 1,000,000 square miles of the continent what the farms of old Virginia are to-day; to blast the seas with the presence of their accursed slave-trade; and, in an age when every Christian nation is marching towards freedom, to turn right about face, and march towards a despotism the meanest and most oppressive on the earth. They want the liberty of making the whole United States such an infamous State as South Carolina is now; or if that cannot be done, they want the liberty of placing alongside the United States a barbaric power, to threaten her borders, hold the mouths of her greatest rivers, invite foreign nations to assail her in her weakest parts, and breed disturbance among her States.
And this unholy conspiracy against the ten­dencies of the age, the common-sense of Chris­tendom, the holiest impulses of mankind, they call fighting for their independence! Why, there is not one of the movers of that war, or one officer, civil or military, of this Confederacy, who has not, under cover of this pretension, committed crimes enough to entitle him to a residence within the walls of yonder Peniten­tiary during the remainder of his natural life. Liberty, forsooth, to overturn the only free Gov­ernment on the face of the earth, and install in its place such a government as Toombs and Ma­son and Price and Parson Polk would invent! When the Hudson river runs up towards John Brown's tract, and the Catskills stand on their head, and yonder sun rises in the West, and that firmament is seen under our feet, then will this scandalous outrage against the reason and religion of the human race be a war of independence! I doubt not these men will fight for even this wretched cause. The wild Indian fights bravely for the liberty to scalp his victim; the tyrants of the earth always fought well to oppress mankind. Give them all the honor that courage in committing a crime can impart; but never insult the sacred name of liberty by using it in connection with their murderous rebellion, and never offend the soldier of the Republic by saying he fights without a cause.
Do you, fellow-citizens, soldiers of the 91st Regiment, want any better cause than the defence of a Government that makes every one of you a sovereign, a legislator, a free man? Do you need to have anything worse about an enemy than that he is trying to destroy the only successful Republic in the world? If this Union stands, some of us may live to see every human being among all its countless millions a free man; is not that worth fighting for? If we succeed in trampling out this conspiracy, our nation will be the foremost of all the powers of the earth; who will not fight for that? If we crush this godless league against liberty, our posterity will enjoy all the blessings that make us the happiest people on which the sun has shone. Cannot you fire a few cartridges for the baby in the cradle, and the boy upon your knee? If we triumph now, we shall have a peace that no traitor henceforth will dare to disturb; don't you love peace well enough to fight for it three years? If we fail—but as we are not to fail, I will not look into the black abyss of war and   slavery and infamy and sorrow that would come of that. We have the best cause that ever enlisted an army. We have the most intelligent army the world ever saw—better armed, equipped, fed, cared-for than was ever yet seen. There was never a braver host than the half million that now uphold the banner of the free. We need nothing but to learn the art of war; and that we shall learn as we have learned everything else, quicker than any other people. And then will come a swift success to our arms. Then will traitors be sent to their own place. Then will the armies mustered by them be dis­solved, and their deluded soldiers be restored to their right mind. Then will every prodigal State come back from her riotous wandering, and the parent go out to meet the repentant child while yet a great way off. Then will the Union mean Liberty, and your flag wave above the first nation that ever represented the justice and love of God to the children of men.                

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: February 24, 2014
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/91stInf/91stInfTable.htm

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