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92nd NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

[Written by Dr. Sutherland, a "live Yankee" of the 92d N. Y. V., who was taken prisoner at the battle of Fair Oaks, and confined with many others in "'Dixie's sunny land" during the summer and part of the autumn of 1862. Written while in camp at Fort Anderson, near Newbern, N. C., after the regiment had been paid off. The regiment had not been paid for the last six months, and many of the soldier's families were in a suffering condition at home, to say nothing of their privations in camp.]

GREENBACKS, OR PAY-DAY.
AIR—"THE FLOATING SCOW OF OLD VIRGINIA."

Hurrah! brave boys, pay-day has come,
Our troubles now are o'er;
We've got our pay of "Uncle Sam,"
Which we should had before.
We suffered much for want of it,
While others, I dare say,
Have suffered more for those greenbacks,
Which we have got to-day.
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little and send the rest
To "loved ones" far away.

We left sweet home with all its charms,
We left our kindred near;
And donned the soldier's uniform,
With all its glittering gear.
We bid our friends a long farewell,
In "Dixie's land" to stay;
And promised them a few greenbacks
When we should get our pay.
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little, &c.

We marched by night, we marched by day,
We marched through mud and rain,
And lay upon the cold wet ground—
Of this we didn't complain.
While we had wives and children dear,
Who often wrote to say,
"O, can't you send us one greenback?
Or haven't you got your pay?"
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little, &c.

We faced the cannon's "brazen mouth,"
And saw the shot and shell
Make fearful havoc in our ranks,
When many comrades fell;
While we had aged parents dear,
Whose heads are turning gray,
Who soon must have a few greenbacks,
Or in the poor-house lay.
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little, &c.

We meet contagion in the camp,
The rebels in the field;
And faced those deadly "showers of lead,"
To make those traitors yield;
While we had notes and bonds at home,
That brooked this long delay;
And needed much a few greenbacks.
Which we have got to-day.
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little, &c.

We eat our "scanty rations" here
Without a "nary red;"
While now and then a tear would fall
Upon our daily bread.
While health and strength were failing fast,
And friends died far away,
In want of some of those greenbacks
Which we have got to-day.
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little, &c.

We done our duty while in camp,
We toiled with axe and spade
Beneath old Dixie's southern sun,
Without one tree or shade.
Our letters went as "soldier's letters,"
We sent them every day;
We could not raise a three cent stamp,
The postage to pre-pay.
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little, &c.

And when we got an old greenback,
To town we could not go,
Unless our hair is cropp'd off short,
And whiskers* trimmed just so.
We'll charge this to their ignorance
Of facts; they're not aware
That Sampson lost most of his strength
When shorn by Delilah fair.
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little, &c.
And now we've got those old greenbacks,
To duty we will go;
And whip those rebels at the South,
That need a whipping so.
Our faces now look bright again,
Our wallets look more gay;
We like this rounded shape they take,
When we have got our pay.
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little, &c.

Now when this bloody war is over,
And ended, this sad strife,
I'll take my greenbacks, leave for home,
If the Lord will spare my life.
And if again I go to war,
I will enlist some other way;
Get a commission and then resign,
In this way, get away.
Repeat, &c.
Oh! we'll keep a little, &c.
*The author is refused a pass to Newbern, until he will submit to have hair and beard cut off.

HOME MATTERS.
THE 92D.--We learn that some one hundred of the furloughed soldiers of the 92d N. Y. Vols. passed over the R. W. & O. Road to their homes yesterday, for a few days. They were from Newbern, North Carolina.

SOMETHING ABOUT THE NINETY-SECOND AND ITS COLONEL.
Correspondence of the Evening Journal.
POTSDAM, St. Lawrence co., Jan. 16, 1863.
In your issue of the 10th inst. you say that "Col. STEVENSON, 14th Mass., Col. HUNT and Col. BECKMAN, New Jersey Volunteers," have been made Brigadiers in the Volunteer service of the United States army. Please to rectify the mistake so far as Col. HUNT is concerned, who is not of the New Jersey Volunteers; but was Colonel of the 92d New York Volunteers, and was promoted for his gallantry at the head of his regiment in the brilliant affair at Kingston, N. C.
The 92d New York is the third regiment sent from St. Lawrence county and left Potsdam on the 28th of February 1862, for the seat of war, since which time it has been in constant active service, fighting with honor at Yorktown, Williamsport, Fair Oaks, &c., unfortunately belonging to CASEY'S  Division, so hastily, and, as the facts show, unjustly stigmatized by MCCLELLAN as having disgraced itself. The 92d on that memorable day was detached from their own and attached to the third (NAGLEY'S) brigade, which, in his sweeping denunciation, the Commander-in-Chief especially excepted as having done themselves great credit At this battle Col. HUNT was badly wounded, and in all the subsequent movements of the 92d, up to the retreat to Yorktown, the regiment was commanded by one of our own boys, Lieut. Col. ANDERSON—a duty which was well performed. At this point Col. HUNT rejoined his regiment. From Yorktown the 92d moved to Suffolk and was one of the regiments selected by Gen, FOSTER to accompany him in his attack upon Goldsboro. In the fight at Kinston the 92d was, as usual, "on hand," and was particularly mentioned for its promptness and branery in all the incidents of the fight. For this Col. HUNT was recommended for promotion, and he will fill any place to which he may be appointed. The friends of the 92d are proud of the promotion and feel that in making the appointment the President fully recognizes the gallant services of the brave 92d.
Brigadier General LEWIS C. HUNT was, previous to his appointment of Colonel of the 92d, Captain in the 4th Regiment, Infantry, United States Army. ELMER.

THE NINETY-SECOND.—The Potsdam Courier of the 12th, says that T. S. Hall, late major of the 92d, who was mustered out when the regiment was consolidated has received a commission as colonel from Governor Seymour. The regiment has been placed upon its original footing of ten companies, and we understand is to be filled up with conscripts.

THE NEW YORK EXCELSIOR RIFLE LEGION.
This newly authorized regiment, whose principal officers are Colonel Bingham, a cavalry and infantry officer, and some of the principal members of the United States Chicago Zouave Cadets, of the three months' service, promises to be a splendid corps of picked riflemen, from Central and Western New York. It is expected that it will go into special service on some of the Southern expeditions; and Colonel Bingham hopes to arm the regiment with Henry's repeating rifle, a fifteen shooter. We have seen the rifle, which is a formidable weapon, and weighs but ten pounds; it will throw a ball twelve hundred yards, and will discharge sixty balls in three minutes, and not heat the barrel. A thousand men, armed with this weapon, will possess the fighting strength of more than ten thousand, for there is greater concentration of fire, with ten times less exposure to one thousand than to ten thousand men. It is a very valuable arm. Good young men, of the interior and western portions of the State, will find this a first class regiment, for none but good men will be received into the organization, and they will soon find service in a warmer climate. Lieutenant Colonel DeWitt is author of the new edition of the "Zouave Light Infantry and Bayonet Tactics." Colonel Bingham may be addressed for the present at New York; Captain Hand, at his native city, Utica; Captain True and Lieutenant F. G. Smith, at Auburn. Others will be assigned recruiting stations in a few days. (Nov. 30, 1861)

NINETY-SECOND REGIMENT.
1st Lieut. Theodore W. Smith to be Captain, May 13, 1862, vice O. Newton, resigned.
Sergeant George S. Thompson to be 2d Lieut. May 27, 1862, vice H. A. Munson, reigned.
Sergeant Alonzo Howard to be 2d Lieut., May 28, 1862, vice E. L. Hobbs, resigned.
2d Lieut. Sylvester B. Partridge to be 1st Lieut., July 12, 1862, vice V. S. Huntley, resigned.
Benjamin G. Minturn to be 1st Lieut. November 19, 1862, vice J. S. Buttolph, resigned.
Sergeant R. E. Sprague to be 2d Lieut., July 12, 1862, vice C. Fox, deceased.
1st Lieut. Giles T. Ward, Jr., to be Adjutant and 1st Lieut., May 12, 1862, vice C. P. Boswell, promoted.
Sergeant Edward J. Stowell to be 2d Lieut., July 12, 1862, vice S. B. Partridge, promoted.
Sergeant Horace Lee to be 2d Lieut., March 13, 1862, vice S. J. Arnold promoted.
Courtland G. Babcock to be 1st Lieutenant, November 16, 1862, vice G. F.
Ward, Jr., appointed Adjutant, 2d Lieut., Saxton J. Arnold to be 1st Lieut., March 13, 1862, vice R. T. Clary, promoted.

NINETY-SECOND.
Lt. Col. Hiram Anderson, killed.
Co. A—KILLED.—Horace Lyon.
WOUNDED.—P. Reynolds, foot; M. Monson, arm; Corp. J. McQuinn, leg; H. Bordwell, hand; L. Carbino, leg; D. Lagrave, bowels; L. Howard, head; M. Kelly, leg.
Co. B—KILLED.—A. Tuckerman, J. A. Daniels, Chas. Parmeter.
WOUNDED.—Corp. L. W. Armin, shoulder; Corp. K. Thurston, leg; Corp. A. C. Howard, leg; Sergt. G. D. Morrison, wrist; Sergt, F. M. Hawley, hand; D. Peters, shoulder; J. Courier, finger; N. D. Bowhall, shoulder; H. W. Bellows, shoulder; L. Huntington, leg; M..P. Hendricks, hand; V. Trefrer, shoulder; G. Hartson, hand; Jas. W. Harmon, leg; Levi Drew, shoulder.
Co. D—KILLED.—J. E. Duncan, R Scott, W. Merritt,
WOUNDED.—SErgt, R. J. Hall, head; Corp. H. D. Leonard, leg, amputated; Corp. E. S. Seabury, leg; Corp. J. Malarney, hand; H. R. Worthen, thigh; W. H. Steinberg, hand; C. Merritt, ankle; J. Stone, thigh; D. D. Follett, leg; J. Sheridan, head; J. Godbaw, head; W. H. Barnhart, leg; J. Monsell, leg; E. T. Cooper; L. W. Gillett, lung; J. Scott, arm; A. Spears, hip; Geo. Foot, toe; J. Delamete, hand.
Co. E—WOUNDED.—J. Dushane, arm; H. Barden, head; Chas. Allen, head.
Co. F—WOUNDED.—R. Baker, leg; E. Bowen, arm amputated.
Co. G—KILLED.—Corp. J. Walbridge, M. S. Rockwell, George Wilson, H. Glenn, J. Drewry.
WOUNDED.—Capt. C. P. Boswell, leg; Sergt. W. A. Hamlin, leg; Corp. Geo. Lewis, leg; Corp. D. A. Stanton, hand; S. V. Griffin, foot; N. Besaw, head; P. Graves; W. Bugbee, thigh; L. S. Barnes, leg; J. Duqueth, arm; E. Scott, head; G. Shoen, foot; D. Moher, head; Sergt. H. H. Fuller, leg.
Co. H—WOUNDED.—Capt. H. C. Fay, head, slight; Sergt. G. F. Dorr, head; Corp. D. A. Moore, leg; D. Dudy, arm; S. L. Foss, wrist; T. O. Fowler, ankle; M. D. Ford, hand; J. Marshal, groin; J. McKenor, side; S. Riley, knee; T. St. Louis, arm; S. Raymond, leg. W. Eldridge, J. LeRock, M. Gadbow, missing.
Co. I—KILLED.—C. C. Cooper.
P. S.—Capt. Fay has reported for duty and Boswell is doing fine.

THE NINETY-SECOND.—The Potsdam Courier of the 12th, says that T. S. Hall, late major of the 92d, who was mustered out when the regiment was consolidated has received a commission as colonel from Governor Seymour. The regiment has been placed upon its original footing of ten companies, and we understand is to be filled up with conscripts.
The 92d was engaged in the severe fight at Coal Harbor on Wednesday. We have received no list of the casualties. The N. Y. Herald's correspondent has the name of Lt.-Col. Anderson in its list of wounded.

FROM THE 92D REGIMENT,
CAMP IN FIELD 25 MILES SOUTH CHATTANOOGA,
September 15, 1863.
Ed. Journal:
The 92d has been in the saddle nearly every day since the forward movement of Rosecrans began. On the 16th of August our Brigade left Dechera and encamped that night on University Mountain. The scenery from the top of this mountain was truly grand, far as the eye could reach, spread out in their beauty the hills, forests and valleys of middle Tennessee. Did not leave camp on the 17th until nearly noon, and traveled very slowly, as it was difficult for our train to keep up, the roads being so rough. Reached Tracy City on the morning of the 18th. It is a small town, situated at the terminus of the University Railroad. This Railroad makes a junction with the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad at Cowan. In times of peace nearly all the coal consumed by the people of middle Tennessee was taken from these mountains. Traveled rapidly all day and encamped in a heavily timbered section of country on the mountains. We saw a great many enormous yellow rattle snakes which had a tendency to make us look carefully about before we lay down at night, lest our sleep be troubled by some huge reptile. On the morning of the 19th we started early, Companies "F" and "C", under command of Major Bohn; were thrown ahead to protect the pioneers while they fixed the roads, and also to reconnoiter. Passed over a rough and heavily timbered section of country, soil sandy and the timber principally oak, with here and there a Norway pine, towering its head high in the air. On many of the ridges chestnut trees are abundant. Came down from the mountain into the Sequatchee Valley, about 10 o'clock a. m. Here our advance had a little skirmish with the rebels, capturing several. Moved up the Sequatchee Valley to Dunlap, where we encamped for the night. Left our train at Dunlap and started early on the morning of the 20th. Had to walk and lead our horses up Waldron's Ridge, but on reaching the top the road was fine, and we moved on rapidly. Came down from the Ridge into the Tennessee Valley towards evening, and encamped 18 miles above Chattanooga. Had plenty of fruit, potatoes, etc. Peaches especially were very abundant, and the boys did not fail to help themselves, on all occasions, to a full supply. I measured a fine clingstone for curiosity. It measured 12 inches in circumference [sic]. On the 21st inst. Our Brigade divided. Col. Wilder, with the 17th and 72d Indiana and the 123d Illinois and two sections of the 18th Indiana Battery, moved down the river to the very doors of Chattanooga. Wilder planted his cannon on the neighboring heights and cannonaded the rebel stronghold for several hours. The rebels replied, but without doing much damage. The 92d and 98th, under command of Col. Funkhouser, moved across the Valley, striking the river at Harrison Landing. We drove the rebel pickets over the river on the double-quick, and occupied the surrounding country, the inhabitants of which are as a general thing loyal; and it was really affecting to witness the demonstrations of joy manifested by them on the approach of our forces. Men, women and children rushed from their miserable log hovels, waving flags, dancing, shouting, and almost wild with delight, as our columns moved on in pursuit of the rebels.
We lay encamped at the base of Waldron's ridge until the 4th of September, during which time we lived on the fat of the land, and annoyed the rebels on the other side of the river as much as possible. Had two boys slightly wounded by rebel sharp shooters. They belonged to Co.'s D and K, and I have forgotten their names. On the 4th of Sept. our regiment received orders to report to General Thomas, to take the advance of his Corps, which was pushing on Chattanooga via. Bridgeport, Alabama. We moved down the Tennessee Valley to within five miles of Chattanooga, then recrossed Waldron's ridge, moved down the Sequatchee valley, crossed the Tennessee at Bridgeport, and overtook Thomas' corps in the valley situated between Lookout and Raccoon mountains, near the town of Trenton, Ga., on the 7th of Sept. Lay in camp on the 8th, but on the 9th the entire force moved on Chattanooga. The Ninety second had the advance, and Co. "F" was thrown ahead to feel the enemy. We advanced without meeting the rebels until within a few miles of the rebel stronghold, when a shower of bullets was poured into our advance, fortunately hurting no one. The rebels were posted on Lookout mountain, and had a good position, but Capt. Dunham deployed his company as skirmishers and soon drove them from the mountain. We
then mounted and charged after the cusses, but were unable to overtake them. Down the mountain we went, and over the plain in to Chattanooga, but the place had been evac­uated and the town almost desolate. Soon the Regimental colors of the Ninety-second waved in triumph from the top of the Spencer House, which is the principal hotel of the city. Not boastingly, but only that you may know the facts in the case, do I write that the Ninety second was the first Regiment in Chattanooga,   and   Co. "F" the first Company. Did not stay in Chattanooga but an hour or two, then moved up the Tennessee river to the mouth of the Chickamauga creek, where we went into camp.
On the 11th inst. our regiment joined the Brigade, and we received orders to go on a three days' scout in the direction of Rome, Ga. Left camp for that purpose in the middle of the afternoon, and travelled [sic] briskly forward until late at night, when we camped near Ringgold, Ga. The enemy were reported a few miles ahead. Early on the morning of the 12th the Brigade moved forward on Ringgold, where the rebels were said to be posted in considerable force. Co.'s E and D had the advance, and soon the cracking of their Spencer rifles anounced [sic] that the rebels were contesting our advance. Capt. Dunham was ordered to deploy his company on the left of the railroad, which was quickly accomplished, and the boys advanced on horseback under a galling fire upon the rebel line. Wilder's battery opened on the rebels with shell, and we were soon in possession of the ground, the rebels skedaddling as usual. Sergeant Harvey Ferrin and Corporal Eben C. Winslow, of Co. "F," were wounded badly in hip, but are doing well in hospital at Chattanooga. They will undoubtedly recover. There were no casualties in any company but F. Several of our boys had very narrow escapes. Frederick Petermier had his horse shot, his gun stock shattered, and a bullet hole through his pants, and strange to say did not receive a scratch. George Marl received a ball which passed through his pants and lodged in his pocket book, deeply imbedding itself among the green backs. We had several horses wounded. The rebel loss was thirteen left dead on the field. Their wounded I cannot give, as they were carried off as soon as possible by the rebels. Our regiment left Wilder at Ringgold and took the road to Chattanooga. We encamped for the night in an old rebel camp about five miles from Chattanooga. On the 12th inst. we were ordered to report to General Thomas. We ascended Lookout mountain near Chattanooga, and travelled [sic] nearly all night, reaching camp near Stevens' Gap towards morning on the 13th. On the 14th came down from Lookout mountain and went into encampment at foot of the mountain. Yesterday we were on a scout in the direction of Gordon's mill, but did not see any rebs. Since we left our Brigade at Ringgold it has had a fight with the cusses, the particulars of which are unknown to me. Everything is working finely. The army is advancing steadily, and all are in fine spirits, confident that Rosecrans will gobble Bragg some morning before breakfast. The health of the troops is excellent, and all are anxious to push the Confederate army to the wall. As our Brigade will probably leave here about noon I must close, but will write as often as practicable.
J. C. B.

An Interesting Day at Camp Union.
Friday last was a day of considerable interest at Camp Union. It was the occasion of a sword presentation to Capt. H. C. Fay, of Co. H, and a flag to Capt. Orange Newon's Co., (Co. F.) by the citizens of Stockholm.
A long procession of teams from Stockholm came into the village during the   forenoon, bringing the flag, and. escorted by the Brasher brass band, proceeded to Camp Union. Notwithstanding the very bad walking and a disagreeable rain, our citizens turned out quite numerously, and all the afternoon the grounds at the camp were crowded. At two o'clock the regiment was formed in hollow square, in the centre of which were the Colonel and Lieut-Colonel, the band, the ladies of Stockholm bearing the flag, the speakers, and the captains who were to be the recipients of these testimonials. The sword, sash and belt were first presented, with the following remarks, by the Hon. Wm. A. Dart:

CAPTAIN FAY: I am instructed by the citizens of Potsdam—the town of your adoption—in their behalf to present you with this sword, sash and belt, as a testimonial of their regard and confidence. They present it to you to be wielded manfully in the defense of their liberties, our country, and its cause.
Ponder well the import of the presentation. It is no Christmas gift, no holiday present. It is a weapon made for manly men only, and only suited to mortal combat. Its appropriate use is the vindication of the right, the defense of liberty. When worn by one worthy to wear it—when used for the objects I have named—it is a gem brighter than the East can afford, and a sure passport to the affections of a grateful country.
You take this to use in the defense and for the perpetuation of the government which our revolutionary fathers bequeathed to us. No better cause could be invoked. You take it voluntarily, and freely assume the responsibility of the trust. It is a fearful one. Yet one of your ancestors sleeps upon the battle-field of Bennington, slain in that convulsion which gave birth to our free institutions. Another freely shed his blood upon that field of victory. And another, but one degree removed from you, aided in adding another laurel to our arms, in the second war for independence, at Plattsburgh. You have the blood, the cause, the sword. We present it to you with the assurance that neither your cause nor your kindred will be disgraced while you wear it. Keep it as the apple of your eye, and if you shall hereafter be called to lie down upon the battle-field, with "the weary to sleep, or the wounded to die," it will be to you a souvenir of the confidence and affection of those you leave behind you; and if slain while striking manfully for your country and its cause, it will be a precious relic in the hands of your descendants. Take it, keep it, and sheath it not until victory shall call you home to enjoy a nation's plaudit: "Well done, good and faithful servant." One word more. You lead to the battle-field our sons and our brothers. Show them that you are worthy of your responsible command, and to represent the patriotic county of St. Lawrence wherever, duty or patriotism may call you.
Capt. Fay, who was considerably affected by the remarks of Mr. Dart, received the gifts and responded as follows:
FELLOW CITIZENS: GOOD FRIENDS: I thank you! Could my tongue express the emotions of my heart I would thank you as this token of your friendship deserves.
Eleven years ago, a printer boy, seeking fortune's favors, I made Potsdam my home. That it has been a pleasant home to me and mine I need not tell you. The history of the eleven years past is as familiar to you as the face of an old friend. You know every feature; you know every mark. You know my
short-comings better than I know them myself, and if I have any virtues you know them also. In my own behalf I can say I meant to do right, and I want no better evidence that you believe this, than that among my truest and best friends are those who have been my most bitter opponents. The heat of party strife has not severed the bonds of confidence and friendship. Today, thank God, I have no opponents. We are all friends. The sorrow of our good mother Union has driven all lesser thoughts from our minds, and with hands and hearts united we lay our lives at her feet, hoping and praying that our united efforts may bring joy to her heart and happiness to her children; and I most sincerely hope that my actions in the future may make me more worthy to be your friend. You know that the position I have occupied would of necessity beget enemies, or at least raise up around me those who would look with suspicion on my course. That it should be so is but natural. We all love our own, whether it be party or friends, and the most unreasonable of all love is love of party. Thank God, the scales are falling from our eyes! Love of country is taking the right place in our hearts, party is ignored, and he who best loves kindred and home will best serve his country. I have been a strong partizan; I am a partizan no longer! I am an American citizen, and he who stands back in this hour of peril on account of party, is unworthy to be America's son. If there are any such, let them seek out some other home, and not longer disgrace the land their forefathers won.
Gentlemen, I was born in the United States; for thirty years I have slept peaceably [sic] in our mother Union's bed, under the folds of her noble flag. I know there are those who have suspected of late years that I have no right there. I know I have; it is my bed, from birth-right, and while the pulsations of my heart give strength to this right arm I shall defend that right, and continue to sleep in it while life shall last.
Dear friends, kind neighbors, I can say no more. "When the heart feels most the lips move not." In a few days I shall bid you good-bye, perhaps for a time, perhaps forever. My wife and child have bade you goodbye already. But wherever the distracted state of the country may cast my lot, Potsdam and her citizens will never be forgotten. Your esteem and confidence will be my strength in the hour of trial. If I die in my country's defence, I only ask you to forget my faults, and give me, and those who love me, your prayers. My friends, again I thank you.
At the close, three rousing cheers were given by the regiment for Capt. Fay, three for Co. H, and three for Mr. Dart.
The sword is a very handsome one, and bears this inscription:—"Presented to Capt. H. C. Fay by his friends in Potsdam, Jan. 10, 1862." The sash and belt were also very fine.
The banner was then brought forward and presented to Capt. Newton's company by Rev. J . T. Fields, accompanied by the following speech:
CAPT. NEWTON AND Co. F: I have the honor and the pleasure of presenting you from the people of Stockholm the Flag of our common country, as a token of their respect for you. And never did that flag appear more beautiful, nor its colors shine brighter than at the present time. Never did the hearts of our people entwine more closely around it, nor feel a greater sympathy and earnest desire for its success. Never in the history of this republic were we called upon more strongly to regard it and have it again floating over every part of this glorious Republic. It has been abused and trailed in the dust, and we shall never forget Sumter and the scenes which transpired there. We have come and presented to you this banner as a representative of our honest hope that the cause in which we have engaged may prosper and triumph utterly.
Never was there a rebellion since the rebellion in Heaven of the great red dragon, more wicked than the rebellion against which we are struggling; and as the great red dragon drew a third part of the stars of heaven with him, so has the great black dragon tried to draw away a third part of the stars of this great nation, and sweep them by its tail, secession, into the black hell of slavery. We throw our whole hearts into this war for the preservation of our country. We have enemies at home and abroad. Foreign nations look on with jealousy, and hope we shall be blotted out of existence, and I have no doubt in my own mind that even the rebellion by old Apollyon might have found sympathy. Those who sympathize with the rebellion at the present time would perhaps have broken the blockade of the bottomless pit, provided there had been a little cotton there, and they could feather their nests by so doing. Our foreign enemies have threatened to break our blockade, and I have no doubt that if the devil had been on board a British steamer, and an angel had arrested him there, the British government would have demanded his surrender and required the angel to make an apology.
When you go down to Washington, Captain, tell Gen. McClellan to hurry up his work, and not kill us all off by allowing our patriotic blood to become feverish through impatience. When you go to Richmond call upon Jeff. Davis and give him your most profound respects; and never return home until victory shall crown your efforts with success—until the Southern Confederacy be shaken from centre to circumference, and be known only as a thing that was to be, but isn't! Remember that this banner is not given you under which to escort a black man back to bondage; but when he comes to you protect him as a fellow creature and a man, and stand up for his interests. Yea, never return till this slavery is crushed out forever.
Stand up for the banner, and never let it fall until you fall in death. Never suffer your enemies to trail it in the dust. Never come home until you can come shouting victory. Then will you return with our prayers. The sympathies of the people you leave are with you, and they pray that God will protect you and that you may return in safety; and that

The star spangled banner in triumph may wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Capt. Newton then took the flag, passed it to one of his men, and spoke as follows—as nearly as our reporter could take it down, his phonographic fingers having by this time become pretty thoroughly benumbed by the cold:
FELLOW CITIZENS: In reply to the able speech that has accompanied the presentation of that banner, I would say to you that I receive it at your hands as an emblem of your patriotism and love of free government; and as we receive it the emotions of our hearts are too great for utterance. I speak in behalf of the company which I have the honor to command. We take the banner and we intend to bear it forth to the field of conflict, if called away as we now anticipate, and we expect to show by our valor that we are worthy of receiving at your hands such an evidence of your patriotism and your benevolence. It is afforded to us through your contributions; we as a company receive it as such, and we have already pledged ourselves to stand by that flag as long as there is a rebel either North or South who shall open his lips in opposition to the cause of freedom. And we shall teach them that we are of the pilgrim fathers, in whose veins the blood of freedom always surged with warmth and vigor. Should we die on the field of battle, it will be a joy and pride to know that the same glory-crowned banner which overshadowed the sainted form of Washington, shall be our funeral pall.
Remember us, who have been reared in your midst; remember us in your prayers, re-remember that we have volunteered to defend your rights and your privileges, and by the Power over all, we will defend them to the best of jour abilities; and when we give up it will be when we have all fallen prostrate. In conclusion let me say, that when we are far away we shall remember the loved ones at home. We go cheerfully and firmly, determined to defend that banner and its cause now, henceforth and forever. God bless you, fellow citizens and friends, of Stockholm and vicinity. God speed and bless the right.
At the close three times three were given with a will by the regiment.
It had been the intention to next witness the presentation of a sword to Capt. Walcott, but the soldiers had become so cold and tired, Capt. Walcott gave notice that he would receive his sword in the barracks, and after the parade the regiment was dismissed. When Co. G had reached their quarters, Elder Miles, of Stockholm, presented Capt. Walcott with a superb sword, in behalf of the citizens of Lawrence and adjoining towns, asking him to accept it as a token of their respect and esteem. Our reporter was not present to obtain his address, but succeeded in getting Capt. W.'s reply, which was as follows:
FRIENDS OF THE UNION: I thank you for this mark of your personal favor. I thank you for this generous exhibition of your esteem for us as servants in the cause of the Union; more than all, I thank you and pronounce
a fervent "God bless you," for this manifestation of your patriotism, your loyalty to the cause we serve. Oh! it does cheer and gladden the heart of the soldier, as he goes forth to meet the dangers of battle for his country's good, to know that the continued affection of his friends goes with him and such gifts as these are the best assurances we can have of your good wishes for ourselves and the work in which we are engaged. Especially I thank you for this glittering blade because of its emblematic significance, rather than for its monied value; though for this I am truly grateful, as it comes in a time when most needed. The sword, all over the world, is the emblem of law and government. The ancients personified Justice with a sword in her right hand, that she might have power to execute her judgments and enforce her decisions. And to-day, as the pen is the type of education and intelligence, so is the sword the representative of law and right. Either may be abused; the pen may be prostituted to the vilest ends and spread moral death on every hand, while the sword may be put forth to uphold a wicked rebellion; but the proper purpose of each is the diffusion of light on the one land, and the upholding of good government on the other. Our Savior says, "I came not to bring peace but a sword," signifying that he came to overthrow the powers of darkness, by the majesty of His great teachings and holy deeds.
We are a peace-loving people, and to us there is something peculiarly repulsive about war. So there is about many things when viewed alone and without a cause, but when sanctified by a great and useful end they become holy in the sight of Heaven. This war in which we are engaged is not only just, but it is a great moral duty, inasmuch as it is a war for the establishment of perpetual peace. So let us be cheerful and brave, remembering that God will eventually favor the righteous cause, that He permitted this trial to come upon us to chasten and reprove us for our many national sins, but that He will not always chide. Let us remember that storms are sometimes necessary in all departments of nature, and that they purify the atmosphere and make more beautiful the sunshine. Let us work earnestly and faithfully in this time of trial and suffering, that when we have earned an honorable peace we may be worthy of it, and be able to prize it and transmit it to posterity as pure and holy as it was bequeathed to us ...
Finally, let me assure you that this sword, which you have kindly presented me, shall not be surrendered to cowardly traitors, but leaning on the strong arm of our Heavenly Father, and nerved to courage by the justness of our cause and your sympathies and prayers, I will carry it to victory or an honorable death.
The brave fellows who have so nobly volunteered in the cause of the Union, as well as the spectators in attendance, will long remember the scene with pleasure.
It is stated by Washington correspondents that Gen. Franklin's brigade will compose a portion of the Burnside expedition. This brigade includes our Sixteenth and Eighteenth regiments.—Og. Republican.

The 92d Regiment.
The friends of Capt. T. S. Hall will be gratified to learn that he has been promoted to the post of Major in the 92d regiment. Cool, self-reliant, and perfectly competent, he is just the man for the place. His appointment gives perfect satisfaction to the regiment.
We believe St. Lawrence County will hear a good report from her regiment, and have reason to be proud of her sons. Col. Sanford, although he has arrived at the age when most men prefer to retire from the active scenes of life and let the burdens fall upon younger shoulders, has shown great activity and energy in getting up this regiment. He is possessed of great endurance, great perseverance, and an iron will—good qualities for a soldier—and what he undertakes he generally accomplishes. If he is as successful in overcoming the forces of secession as he has been in overcoming the obstacles in the formation of this regiment, the 92d will want no better leader. Lieut.-Col. Bingham, although appearing here as an utter stranger, has already gained the esteem and confidence of the whole regiment, as well as of the citizens here with whom he has had intercourse. He is a stirring, energetic man, understands the drill thoroughly, and seems perfectly at home on the "tented field." He formerly belonged to the famous Chicago Zouaves. We shall hear a good account of him. To Major Hall the profession of arms is entirely new, but if he is not made of the right kind of stuff for a soldier, then there is nothing in appearances. It is the opinion of those who know him best that he will do.  The remainder of the staff, as well as the officers of the companies, are all capable and efficient men, and will do their duty faithfully. We think the material of the 92d regiment will compare favorably with any yet sent into the field. Some of the best blood of St. Lawrence is in it.
Capt. Remington's company of cavalry left Canton yesterday to join Swain's regiment now encamped on Staten Island.
Lieut. Eastman, of Co. B, 16th Regiment is home on a short furlough. He is looking quite healthy, and says camp life agrees with him. Lieut. Hopkins' foot still troubles him. The 16th is in winter quarters near Alexandria, Va.
We would tender our thanks to Mr. Thatcher, of the firm of Usher & Thatcher, for a demijohn of pure elderberry wine—a very nice article, if we are capable of judging. If Messrs. Usher & Thatcher keep as good an article of other liquors—and we persume [sic] they do—as the sample we have, the public may feel sure of getting at their store the very best to be had.
The ladies of Edwards will give an oyster supper at E. E. Brand's hotel, Thursday evening, Jan. 23, 1862.
The winter is remarkable for sudden changes—one day it is very cold, the next it snows, the third it rains, and the fourth is like the first. With so sudden changes it is not strange that we have had very little sleighing. As we write the ground is frozen very hard, there is a little snow, sleighing poor, but the clouds forbode more snow, which will, of course, make business more brisk than ever.

Camp Incident.
A rather amusing incident occurred at Camp Union not a great while ago. One of the soldiers was found on the ground intoxicated with a bottle in his pocket, and was, as is the custom, put in the guard house. Col. Sanford was informed of the matter, and he ordered the soldier before him, had the bottle put upon his head, and was thus marched over the grounds under guard, to the tune of the rogue's march. A few such examples, if they do not prevent drinking among the soldiers, will compel them to be more secret in their potations. Flags and Swords Presented.
Yesterday was a great day in Potsdam. In expectation of the departure of the 92d to-day, a great many people were in town to give a parting word to the soldiers, and the ground at the barracks was crowded.
A sword was presented to Capt. Chas. R. Knowles from Knowles & Bicknell, by the latter, whose speech, as well as that of Capt. Knowles, was replete with patriotic sentiments. A sword was also presented to Lieut. Royal J. Whitney, of Capt. Knowles' Company, by the citizens of Philadelphia.
Capt. Miller also received a token of their esteem from the ladies of Louisville and Waddington, in the shape of a beautiful flag, the cost of which was $80.
But the most splendid affair of the day was the Regimental Flag, presented by T. S. Clarkson, Esq., on behalf of his daughters, to Col. Sanford, for the Regiment. A more magnificent emblem of American liberty we never saw, and we doubt if there were a dozen persons upon the ground who had ever seen anything more beautiful in the shape of an American flag. Mr. Clarkson's remarks on presenting the flag were fired with the patriotism of a veteran, uttered distinctly, and received with applause. Col. Sanford replied appropriately, accepting the banner in behalf of the Regiment, and pledging their honor and lives to defend it.
We have not time to give further particulars this week. As the orders to leave to-day have been countermanded, because the authorities have not decided where the regiment is to go, we shall probably give our readers full details next week.

War Meeting in Lawrenceville.
Gen. Jonah SANFORD being on his way to visit his friends, held a meeting at North Lawrence on Saturday afternoon and at Lawrenceville in the evening, and was attentively listened to by intelligent and appreciative audiences. The meeting at Lawrenceville was well attended, though the night was dark and rainy, and the roads—indescribable.
After the meeting had been called to order by ZENAS WOOD, R. P, WILSON, Esq., was chosen President and T. GROW TAYLOR Secretary. Gen. SANFORD was then introduced and addressed the meeting. His remarks were judicious and eloquent,—less of the enthusiasm of youth than of the wisdom of age and experience. His earnest sincerity won the respectful attention of all, and he was heard with the utmost interest, and frequently interrupted by storms of applause which shook the house. He said that the war was no angry contention about opinions; but that the great struggle between barbarism and civilization, between freedom and slavery, had come at last, and must now be met and settled forever; and hence that this is the most glorious day we ever saw. He declared that he had no doubt of the result of this war, but that, as in raising crops or in any work, we must do our share and God will do the rest. He enumerated some of the inducements offered to men to come out and serve their country. He urged it as a duty, inasmuch as the blessings and privileges which we enjoy and which make us superior to every other nation in the world, in general intelligence, are not ours by right, but an inheritance from our fathers, and we owe it to our children to transmit to them the boon as our fathers bequeathed it to us. He affirmed that a gentleman who volunteers returns more a gentleman than when he left, a nobler and stronger patriot, and receives the respect and esteem of his friends and the public. He spoke of the working men, and averred that the men of his regiment are today saving three dollars while the laboringmen throughout the country are saving one, because they receive board and clothing from the government, and their wages are clear gain. He urged the importance of coming forward in the work at once, that the war may be brought to a speedy close. He excused none and declared there is no such thing as neutrality, he who is not for us is against us, discouraging others by his assumed indifference. He closed by calling on all to embrace the glorious privilege of taking a part in this patriotic work. His speech was timely and well delivered, and we regret that we did not report more of it.
Mr. HACKSTAFF arose and said he was present to say his word for the Union, that when the war cry sounded in 1812 he came forward and put his name down, and when the war cry sounded in 1861 he did the same.
Capt. WOLCOTT, of Nicholville, was called for, and came forward and spoke with zealous earnestness. He said we should all be interested in this war, for our liberties are at stake, and though all have not the ability of Gen. SANFORD, all can do something. He referred to the National Fast Day, how we then prayed that God would save the country; but that unless we offer ourselves and our means as instruments in his hands, our prayers are as vain mockery; but if we act as we pray, God will put down the rebellion. He appealed to the ladies to do their share, saying he believed their influence greater ... defend the right. He mentioned some of the absurd excuses that were made to him while recruiting, all generally anxious to put down the rebellion, but unwilling to let their sons or their husbands do it, as they were feeble and could not endure camp life, and so on. He showed the selfishness of such conduct, and mentioned in contrast the noble efforts of many of the greatest and best men who are enlisting in the ranks and calling on others to follow. He said that we have some patriotic ladies in our land, and they are doing wonders. One lady, for instance, said: "This rebellion must be put down, and my husband might as well go as anybody's and I wish I had another to send, too." [Laughter.] He told the audience that it is no worse for members of their families to go than for others, but that all ought to go who can, and the more the better and the sooner will be the end. He declared that he had decided to go, and he believed God had blessed his decision and his efforts. He referred to the good order existing at Camp Union, and said that prayer meetings are held in his company (G) by the unanimous approval of the soldiers. He said that he put his truth in God, confident that if we serve him aright, he will shield us and fight our battles for us. He hoped and believed Lawrence would do much better than she had done, and that a score of fine, hardy fellows will soon be ready to go up with us to camp.
Mr. WOOD was called for, and said he did not know as he ought to add anything to what had been so eloquently said by older and wiser men, but he wanted to shake in his word somewhere. He directed his remarks principally to a defence of Mr. LINCOLN'S administration [sic], saying that as General JACKSON took the oath to support the constitution as he understood it, and as Congress and the Judiciary take the oath to support the constitution as they understand it, so has Mr. LINCOLN taken the oath to support the constitution as he understands it, and this he must and will do.
Dr. WHITNEY was called for, and spoke principally on the subject of slavery, claiming that it is the cause of the war; and, therefore, the cure consists in its removal.—He illustrated by the case of a man with a hemlock knot driven into his system, and asked:
"What would you think of me as a surgeon if I sought to cure that man without extracting the knot from his body?"— He thought that General Fremont was the first man who had the manliness to do right-Hon. O. F. Shepard was called for and spoke with much spirit of what Lawrence had not done but ought to do. He declared that for one, he was willing to offer himself or his property for the support of the government. He said the rebellion is the great fact we have to deal with, and when that is put down we will see who has been wronged. He did not think it right to confiscate the  slave property of the Union men, as for instance, in the States of Delaware, and Kentucky, that are now doing so nobly. General Sanford added that everything urges us to come out and battle for the right, our government calls for help, the Union men of the South call for help, then let us help them. Lieutenant Webster of Stockholm was called for and said that he was not much accustomed to speakingbut could say he was one of the first to act—one of the first to volunteer from his town. The Presieent [sic] was then called on for an … aging signs of the times, the sentiment manifested by the number and kind of men that are enlisting, the position which Kentucky has taken, and the spirit of patriotism shown in Western Virginia, and on the Carolina coast, where troops have obtained a footing. He said that the people at the South hemmed in as they are, cannot exist on cotton alone, but our grain will soon sell for high prices, while their cotton will be rotting in the South. He mentioned the reforms being made in the military departments, and feels confident that if we have not the right man in the right places, we soon shall have and men shall go more rapidly forward to the sure and successful end.
Several appointments were then given out and the meeting adjourned.
T. G. TAYLOR, Secretary.

...was dark and rainy, and the roads—indescribable.
After the meeting had been called to order by ZENAS WOOD, R. P. WILSON, Esq., was chosen President and T. GROW TAYLOR Secretary.
Gen. SANFORD was then introduced and addressed the meeting. His remarks were judicious and eloquent,—less of the enthusiasm of youth than of the wisdom of age and experience. His earnest sincerity won the respectful attention of all, and he was heard with the utmost interest, and frequently interrupted by storms of applause which shook the house. He said that the war was no angry contention about opinions; but that the great struggle between barbarism and civilization, between freedom and slavery, had come at last, and must now be met and settled forever; and hence that this is the most glorious day we ever saw. He declared that he had no doubt of the result of this war, but that, as in raising crops or in any work, we must do our share and God will do the rest. He enumerated some of the inducements offered to men to come out and serve their country. He urged it as a duty, inasmuch as the blessings and privileges which we enjoy and which make us superior to every other nation in the world, in general intelligence, are not ours by right, but an inheritance from our fathers, and we owe it to our children to transmit to them the boon as our fathers bequeathed it to us. He affirmed that a gentleman who volunteers returns more a gentleman than when he left, a nobler and stronger patriot, and receives the respect and esteem of his friends and the public. He spoke of the working men, and averred that the men of his regiment are today saving three dollars while, the laboringmen throughout the country are saving one, because they receive board and clothing from the government, and their  wages are clear gain. He urged the importance of coming forward in the work at once, that the war may be brought to a speedy close. He excused none and declared there is no such thing as neutrality, he who is not for us is against us, discouraging others by his assumed indifference. He closed by calling on all to embrace the glorious privilege of taking a part in this patriotic work. His speech was timely and well delivered, and we regret that we did not report more of it.
Mr. HACKSTAFF arose and said he was present to say his word for the Union, that when the war cry sounded in 1812 he came forward and put his name down, and when the war cry sounded in 1861 he did the same.
Capt. WOLCOTT, of Nicholville, was called for, and came forward and spoke with zealous earnestness. He said we should all be interested in this war, for our liberties are at stake, and though all have not the ability of Gen. SANFORD, all can do something. He referred to the National Fast Day, how we then prayed that God would save the country; but that unless we offer ourselves and our means as instruments in his hands, our prayers are as vain mockery; but if we act as we pray, God will put down the rebellion. He appealed to the ladies to do their share, saying he believed their influence greater than that of the men, in encouraging and assisting their husbands and sons to go and noble efforts of many or the greatest and best men who are enlisting in the ranks and calling on others to follow. He said that we have some patriotic ladies in our land, and they are doing wonders. One lady, for instance, said: "This rebellion must be put down, and my husband might as well go as anybody's and I wish I had another to send, too." [Laughter.] He told the audience that it is no worse for members of their families to go than for others, but that all ought to go who can, and the more the better and the sooner will be the end. He declared that he had decided to go, and he believed God had blessed his decision and his efforts. He referred to the good order existing at Camp Union, and said that prayer meetings are held in his company (G) by the unanimous approval of the soldiers. He said that he put his truth in God, confident that if we serve him aright, he will shield us and fight our battles for us. He hoped and believed Lawrence would do much better than she had done, and that a score of fine, hardy fellows will soon be ready to go up with us to camp.
Mr. WOOD was called for, and said he did not know as he ought to add anything to what had been so eloquently said by older and wiser men, but he wanted to shake in his word somewhere. He directed his remarks principally to a defence of Mr. LINCOLN'S adminstration [sic], saying that as General JACKSON took the oath to support the constitution as he understood it, and as Congress and the Judiciary take the oath to support the constitution as they understand it, so has Mr. LINCOLN taken the oath to support the constitution as he understands it, and this he must and will do.
Dr. WHITNEY was called for, and spoke principally on the subject of slavery, claiming that it is the cause of the war; and, therefore, the cure consists in its removal.—He illustrated by the case of a man with a hemlock knot driven into his system, and asked: "What would you think of me as a surgeon if I sought to cure that man without extracting the knot from his body?"—He thought that General FREMONT was the first man who had the manliness to do right.
Hon. O. F. SHEPARD was called for and spoke with much spirit of what Lawrence had not done but ought to do. He declared that, for one, he was willing to offer himself or his property for the support of the government. He said the rebellion is the great fact we have to deal with, and when that is put down we will see who has been wronged. He did not think it right to  confiscate the slave property of the Union men, as for instance, in the States of Delaware, and Kentucky, that are now doing so nobly.
General SANFORD added that everything urges us to come out and battle for the right, our government calls for help, the Union men of the South call for help, then let us help them.
Lieutenant Webster of Stockholm was called for and said that he was not much accustomed to speakingbut could say he was one of the first to act,one of the first to volunteer from his town.
The Presieent [sic] was then called on for an address, but spoke briefly owing to the lateness of the hour. He referred to the encour- …
…house—then let us receive them in open arms, have the fatted calf killed, and have a great day of rejoicing in this great land. But if they will not accept of the olive branch, and will not listen to reason and truth, then we will speak to them in thundering tones from the cannon's mouth, and say to them thus far and no farther shall you go.
Sir, I need not say it, for we all know it and feel it, that we have truth, justice and right on our side of this great question. And we have power and might, too. We behold in this land of the free one unanimous, spontaneous uprising and coming forth at their country's call. They are coming, and have gone, from the East, from the West, from the North, and I may say, also, from the South, and we are now having organized one of the grandest armies that ever christian nations beheld.
Sir, we believe in a God who rules the destinies of men and nations. We believe that our cause is just, and that the God of battles will sustain us. We stand before you but a handful of men, a grain of sand, a drop in the bucket, in comparison with our grand army. We are now ready to go forth to the seat of war, and we pledge ourselves before God and these witnesses that we will never allow that flag to be wrested from us. We will fight for that flag—we will stand or fall by that flag.
Should kind Providence permit us to live to see peace and prosperity again restored to our happy land, then we will return with joy to our homes and our firesides.
Sir, we stand before you, volunteers ready to do service for our country. We have come with our lives in our hands, and are ready to offer them a willing sacrifice on the altar of Liberty, to save our cherished Constitution and our country. And we ask not to return until our proud banner, the glorious stars and stripes, shall float in triumph over Sumter's walls, and peace and happiness shall reign supreme and triumphant over our land.
Sir, allow me again to thank you for that beautiful flag. Long, long may it wave.

Camp Items.
On Thursday last the welcome intelligence came that the paymaster had arrived, and on Saturday the entire regiment was paid off, with the exception of the captains and first lieutenants. As all these officers have commissions from Gov. Morgan, bearing date Oct. 15, the matter will undobubtedly [sic] be satisfactorily arranged.
At this date, Tuesday noon, the regiment has not received marching orders. It will probably leave this week.
A few more men are still wanted to fill up this splendid regiment, and all who wish to join them on their passage to the seat of war, can do so ay any station on the P. & W. R. R. Presentation of Colors to the Ninety-Second Regiment N. Y. S. V.
The Ninety-second regiment New York State Volunteers, Colonel John Sandford, was presented with a splendid set of colors, at half-past five o'clock Wednesday afternoon, in front of the City Hall. The snow fell heavily during the presentation, which made it very disagreeable, and prevented anything like a popular gathering.

SPEECH OF JUDGE DAVIES.
Judge Davies, of the Court of Appeals, in presenting the colors, spoke in the following eloquent and effective mariner:—
COLONEL SANFORD, OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE NINETY-SECOND REGIMENT NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS:--It has become my pleasing duty to present you, soldiers of my native county of St. Lawrence, this standard of colors to be borne by you at the head of your regiment as you go forth to battle for freedom, constitutional rights and our glorious Union. You have left peaceful and happy homes, the pursuits of healthful agricultural life, at the call of your country, for the dangers, hardships and trials of a soldier's life. You will often recur with tender emotions to the loved ones you have left behind you, but such recollections should only nerve you to more earnest efforts to duty, and fix deeper your determination to strike for liberty with firm hearts and steady hands. What a spectacle do we present to the nations of the world! But a few months since we were a most happy and propserous [sic] people; rich in all the blessings a bountiful Providence could bestow, with a government the envy of freemen in every clime, securing life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness to all. Now this is sought to be overthrown and blotted out by traitors without cause. I say without cause, for the fact is now apparent that no cause in reality existed for this unholy rebellion, save the mad ambition of its wicked leaders. They are now at issue as to the causes of this traitorous movement, and they are ready, as the occasion calls for it, to shift their ground, and assume any and every position which they regard as plausible. Day by day, as the rebellion develops its purposes, do we see that the true motive has been artfully concealed; that hatred to republican institution's is in fact the nursery and fountain of this great treason, and that the demagogues of the Southern States, failing longer to rule the free States of the Union, determined to set up a government of their own, and subvert that which they hate only because it is just, and secures equal rights to all. A rebellion thus conceived in iniquity, deceit and fraud, could only be maintained, as it has been, by mendacity, subterfuge and violence. Private rights have been violated to sustain it. Millions upon millions of property have been wantonly destroyed in its support, and all the usages of civilized warfare have been trampled on and disregarded by its armed hordes. But thanks to the loyalty of our patriotic citizens, to those brave men who, like you, have bean willing to brave all for their country, its honor and its flag, guided and encouraged as this Spirit has been by our noble, honest and true President, to whom the nation owes a debt of gratitude it cheerfully acknowledges and. will abundantly repay, our armies now march in triumph through rebel States now returning to their allegiance, and the strong places of rebeldom are laid low. A brighter day has dawned upon us, and we have only to follow up the blows so gallantly given and peace and tranquillity [sic] will soon reign throughout our whole land, and wicked men will be compelled to submit to the Union arid its laws. This glorious flag, which I this day entrust to your care, already floats to the breeze in every State of our widely extended Union. Sacreligious [sic] hands have been laid upon it, and those who have insulted it are reaping the reward of their infamy. It is not a year since that a solemn procession marched through Memphis, carrying it on a bier to its pretended grave, and there they, as they foolishly thought, interred it, with solemn mockery. Now the same people are fleeing, panic stricken with terror and guilt, from the advancing footsteps of our brave soldiery, who carry this flag in triumph, and plant it firmly on the soil where it was insulted, never to be removed. These guilty men are now threatening to burn their own city, the scene of this crime and folly, through madness, by the recollection of their great offence. We hear daily how this flag is again welcomed by those who have lived long lives under its protection, who have shed their blood in its defence, and whose lifelong hope has been that they might die under its protection. When our gallant tars bore it in triumph the other day up rivers and through towns, where it had not been seen for a year, old men and maidens, young men and children, rushed to look again upon its Stars and Stripes—a harbinger to them of days of peace and happiness, of returning prosperity, and of the end of a reign of terror, despotism and iniquity. You have heard of the old man who was taken down to the river by his servant, sick unto death, that he might once more behold, before his eyes closed upon all of earth, the flag of his country, under which he had lived, for which he had fought and bled, and which symbolized his country's glory and renown. As he beheld it once more, tears coursed down his manly, pallid and furrowed cheeks, and seeing it now waving in triumph over his country and his country's foe he exclaimed, "It is enough;. I am now ready to go; God be praised;" and he expired. Be yours the mission to carry such joy to thousands of loyal hearts, and aid in the glorious work of re-establishing peace, order and prosperity throughout the whole land. Go on, Christian soldiers and patriots. Go as friends of law, order, constitutional liberty and freedom, and aid in placing our institutions on such a basis that no future attempt shall ever be made to subvert them. Be animated with the thought that to attain this end much must be endured, but nothing must divert you from its accomplishment.
Whatever stands in the way of the restoration of peace, order and tranquility [sic], must be removed. No disturbing element must remain. "The Union, it must and shall be preserved" and whatever cannot exist within it must go out of it. We can never have another rebellion, costing its millions of money, its tens of thousands of precious lives, the hard earnings of the sons of toil, and such suffering and hardships. No idol, however heretofore cherished, but must give way, if need be, to a permanent restoration of tranquility [sic], and no seeds of future discontent must be left to grow and bring forth bitter fruit. I have such entire confidence in the wisdom and patriotism of the man whom a wise Providence at this eventful crisis called to the head of our nation, that I am quite certain that this war will not be concluded until all this rebellion against the government shall submit to its peaceful and benign sway, the wicked leaders shall be brought to condign punishment, and such guarantees and securities are obtained as will ensure peace hereafter. It is your glorious mission, brave and gallant sons of St. Lawrence, to go forth to aid in this noble work. Bear these flags in triumph, and do no act to tarnish them or bring dishonor upon the fair fame of citizen soldiers. Bring them back unsullied by any stain, and never, no, never, let them be taken from you by rebel hands. A grateful country, on your return, will award you Its unbounded praise, and its unrestrained confidence and highest honors. I now commit these flags to your protecting care.

Take thy banner! may it wave
Proudly o'er the good and brave.
Take thy banner! and beneath
The war cloud's encircling wreath
Guard it—till our homes are free;
Guard it—God will prosper thee.
In the dark and trying hour,
In the bursting forth of power,
In the rush of steeds and men,
His right hand will shield thee then.

Colonel Sandford took the colors, and having placed them in the proper hand, returned them briefly, concluding by assuring Judge Davies that these emblems of Liberty which had been thus consigned to the regiment would never suffer dishonor with them.
We have already published a list of the officers, &c.

Regimental Flag Presentation.
The "Excelsior" Regiment, Col. Sanford, received a handsome regimental flag, the gift of T. S. Clarkson, Esq., of this place, on Tuesday, the 14th inst. The flag is of dark blue, full size and seamless. It is beautifully painted, bearing on its broad folds the State and Union arms in the centre, over which  is the inscription, "92d Regiment N. Y. State Volunteers," with the motto, "Deo fidendum," —the whole lettering being in gold. It was mounted on an elegant standard, surmounted with a silver spear, the whole forming a regimental flag excelled by none. The presentation was made by Mr. Clarkson, as follows:
COL. SANFORD, OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE 92D REGIMENT: On behalf of my daughters I have the pleasure to present this emblem of our constitutional liberty to your regiment. It is needless for me to portray its history, for from your cradled infancy you have been taught to love it, and for nearly a century it has waved as a banner of peace over the homes of the American people. No foreign foe has plucked it from its lofty height and trailed it in the dust. Not one star within that field of blue shines unrecognized by other nations. Far otherwise. It still remains a beacon of liberty to many an oppressed foreigner, and when it has triumphed thus far, must we see it disgraced and leveled to the ground by fellow-countrymen of our own native land? No! far from it. America has stout hearts, and strong hands, who will sustain it to the last, and we look with pride upon the volunteers who leave their peaceful homes and cheerful firesides, to fight under the banner of American liberty. Brave soldiers! the flag is yours, and we feel assured from our own personal acquaintance with many of you, it will be well defended by the noble sons of St. Lawrence and her sister counties; and as you march to the battle-field and see it float upon the breeze, before your path, whether leading you to victory or death, always cherish its motto in you hearts, not merely because it points you to your only true hope of success, but it will remind you of the Christian's faith, and the christian prayer of many a loved one, offered for you in your homes far away. Yes, our prayers will be yours, and though you now bid adieu to the familiar scenes of your childhood, and will soon say, farewell to home, kindred and friends; yet I trust it may be for a short time, and may Almighty God in his infinite mercy bestow his choicest blessings upon you—watch over you in the hour of danger, and grant you all a safe return, crowning your efforts with the triumphs of victory, and winning for your laurels the olive branch of Peace.
Col. Sanford responded in a brief but very patriotic manner—applauded the family not only for their present gift, but their patriotism displayed on other occasions towards the regiment, concluding with three cheers for Mr. Clarkson and family, and three cheers for the citizens of Potsdam.

Sword and Flag Presentations.
Tuesday, the 14th inst., was a gala day in Potsdam. Swords were presented to Capt. Knowles, Co. D, Lieut. Whitney, of Capt. Knowles' Co., and to Capt. Levi Miller, of Co. K. The sword to Capt. Miller was presented by E. W. Foster, Supervisor of Potsdam, on the part of the Board of Supervisors of St. Lawrence County, in the following appropriate remarks:
CAPT. MILLER: It is a noble sight, when traitors are seeking to overthrow the government, to see the spontaneous uprising of an intelligent, and the only really free people, in support of those beneficent laws, under the influence of which our people have enjoyed the most wholesome freedom,—our nation grown to be one of the great powers of the earth. To you, sir, as a leader of one of those gallant bands of our patriot host, I am delegated by the Board of Supervisors of St. Lawrence County, of which you was a highly esteemed member, to present to you this sword, to use in defence of the violated laws of our country. They wish me to express to you their earnest desire for your welfare, and that in drawing this sword as you do in a most sacred cause, you may do it with success. That it will be bravely drawn and honorably wielded, none who know you can doubt.
The important duties which you and the thousand true hearts of this fine regiment so cheerfully assume to perform are full of peril and danger; but wherever you are and whatever may be your fortune, knowing as we do that you will not disgrace the flag you fight under, be assured that the heartiest sympathy will be felt, and the most earnest invocations offered for your protection, to Him who careth for us all, by many a loving heart at home.
Capt. Miller made the following reply:
SIR: I thank you, and through you the Honorable Board of Supervisors of St. Lawrence County, for this precious gift. Time will not permit, nor am I adequate to express to you, the grateful emotions of my heart for their interest in my behalf. We are now about to leave for the seat of war. We have to tear ourselves away from the embrace of our friends and dear loved ones, to meet an internal foe. None but the volunteer can fully appreciate these heart-rending scenes. But we go, trusting in God. He will be our guide and our shield. We go forth at the call of our country to take a part in putting down this rebellion. Please tell the Hon. Supervisors that I go to the seat of war with a heart glowing with gratitude for their kindness. Tell them that I will never sheath this sword nor shall it be wrested from me, until peace is restored or this arm is palsied in death.
Let us still hope for better things. Let us hope that the God of Peace will restore our deluded brethren to their right minds, and that peace will again reign supreme and triumphant over our happy land. Allow me again to thank you for this noble gift.
Then followed the presentation, to the same company, of a richly embroidered silk flag, got up by the patriotic ladies of Louisville and Waddington. The flag was presented by the Rev. J. R. Whitney, who spoke at length, in a very feeling and appropriate manner, to which Capt. Miller replied as follows:
SIR: I have not language to portray nor will I attempt to express all the grateful emotions of my heart, and also the hearts of these brave soldiers of mine, for this expression of your kind regard. We thank you for your kindness, and we thank you for this mark of your esteem.
Sir, the meeting of this numerous concourse—the organization of this regiment—speaks to us in language not to be misunderstood that we are living in perilous times. Dark upheavings of political degradation are manifested in open rebellion against our laws, and they seek to rend asunder the ties of our long cherished and beloved institutions. They say to us let the degraded institution of slavery reign supreme over this land of liberty, or we will trample that flag —those glorious stars and stripes, that emblem of our national glory and prosperity—in the dust. We will sever the Constitution—that holy bond of our union and national greatness—and we will set up an ensign for ourselves. Sir, they have done it, and they are now bidding defiance to our government and our laws.
Let us still bear the olive branch of peace to our erring brethren. Let us say to those troubled waters, Peace, be still. If they will hearken to the voice of reason—if they will repent of their folly and their shame—if they have long enough fed on the husks—if they are ready to say, I will return to my father's …

Bible Presentation to the 92d Regiment.
On last Sunday afternoon an interesting and impressive ceremony took place at Camp Union, consisting of the formal presentation of nine hundred copies of the New Testament and Psalms neatly bound together, for the use of the soldiers—a gift of the St. Lawrence County Bible Society.
At three o'clock P. M. the Regiment was formed in a hollow square with the regimental and company colors, when the Rev. P. D. Gorrie, as the organ of the Society, in a short speech, presented to the Colonel and through him to each of the officers and men a copy of the above book, with a patriotic label, bearing the flag of our common country, with each man's name and the company to which he belongs.
Mr. Gorrie, in the course of his remarks, stated it was not the wish or design of the Society to interfere with any man's denominational views or opinions. "He that is a consistent Protestant, let him be a Protestant still; he that is a good Catholic, let him be a Catholic still; he that is an Episcopalian, or Baptist, or Presbyterian, or Methodist, let him be either still; but let every man who receives this book be a true Christian, and the wishes of the Society will be met."
At the conclusion of the presentation speech, Col. Sanford replied in behalf of the regiment, returning thanks to the Society, and assuring his men that the little book thus donated was the best gift of Heaven to man, and exhorting them to read it and conform their lives to its sacred precepts; then turning to the Chaplain, the Rev. M. R. Pierce, he committed the distribution of the copies to him, and charged him as an officer of the regiment to be faithful in the inculcation of the truth contained in that book among the men whose spiritual interests were committed to his charge.
The Chaplain responded by pledging himself thus to do, and exhorted all to keep the Commandments of God and abide by the instructions of the New Testament.
Rev. O. C. Cole, being present, added a few pertinent remarks in reference to the value of the Scriptures and the consolation to be derived from them in the hour of danger and exposure, after which he engaged in prayer, and invoked the blessings of Heaven upon the distribution of the word of God among the men of the Regiment.
The Orderly of each company having been detailed for the purpose of direct distribution immediately at the close of the parade, the men were each supplied with a copy, and thus in addition to all former tokens of kindness by way of the presentation of swords, colors, horses, &c., the good people of St. Lawrence County have shown their love for the soldier and the cause in which he is engaged, by the betowment of what is indeed the "best gift of God to man"—the Holy Bible.
It was a matter of regret that it was found inconvenient, if not impracticable, for others of the resident Clergymen of the village and many of the citizens to be present, although one Colonel kindly fixed upon an hour when it was thought the largest number might be convened. As it was, there was a goodly number of the members and attendants of the different churches present.

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
Last modified: February 6, 2009
URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/92ndInf/92ndInfCWN.htm

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