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93rd Regiment, NY Volunteer Infantry
Civil War Newspaper Clippings

Capt. H. S. WILSON, of the 93d Regiment N. Y. V., passed through this village Thursday evening last on a short visit to his home in Bolton. Capt. W. is in command of a detachment of troops detailed from the 93d to escort unlucky conscripts to the seat of war. His command is now on Riker's Island, in New York bay.

Lieut. Henry C. Newton, of Glen's Falls, Company A, 93d regiment, has been promoted to the Captaincy of Company E same regiment. There are few better Captains in the service than Captain Newton, and few are better known or have more friends in this city. He takes the place of Capt. Andrew J. McNett, resigned--[Troy Whig.

ARMY CORRESPONDENCE.
HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
CAMP NEAR GERMANTOWN, VA.,
August 14th, 1863.
EDS. DEMOCRAT:—As we (the Army of the Potomac) are just now resting from our labors, and will at present most likely remain at rest during the warm weather, and until Lee is properly reinforced, and gets into position to withstand us for another six months' campaign; for be it known to all to whom it may concern that it would not do to destroy the Rebel army in Virginia just now, for that, with our success in the Southwest, would virtually close the rebellion. That would be against the policy of the powers that be at Washington, especially the War Department. It would be useless for me to give a minute history of our marches since we left Falmouth, our march through the state of Maryland. Its general history you already know; particulars I will reserve until I see you, which I hope to do at some future day "when this cruel war is over." I will only give you some general facts and opinion of things here, and the effects of the policy pursued by those who are troubled with the Negrophobia. My regiment--the gay 93d N. Y. V.—still hold the honorable and responsible position of General Headquarter's Guard of the Army of the Potomac. It has been our position since the battle of Williamsburgh [sic], of May 5, 1862. Our duty is both responsible [sic], arduous and honorable; always at or near the front, but on the reserve. Competent officers of the regular army say we are the best drilled volunteer regiment in the service. We march no more than others, but sometimes have to do it in less time. We have made over thirty miles in a broiling Southern sun. Nevertheless the general health of the regiment is good, what is left of us. We are nearly in the same position that we were last October, when Little "Mac" was relieved [sic] from his command, and our worthy President issued his famous Emancipation proclamation, which two ill-adversed measures prolonged the war at least a year. The one disheartened the soldiers--the other consolidated the South, and drove all Union men over to rebellion, as witness Sam Houston and a host of others. It has cost us the terrible battles of Fredericksburgh [sic], Dec. 13, of May 3d, Chancellorville and Gettysburgh, in each of which we lost in killed and wounded about twenty thousand men, total sixty thousand,--too high a price for Sambo and Abolitionism. Our present position also shows the wisdom of McClellan's plans of last year, as ours is almost identical with his when relieved. Burnside and Hooker proved incompetent for so large a command; the former made a sage remark when he said it wanted a General wider between the eyes than himself or Hooker to command so large an army. Such a man we now have (Gen. Meade). If he was not hampered by the War Department; if all communication between us and Washington had been cut off, after the great battle of Gettysburgh [sic], Meade would have gobbled up Lee's entire army. The Confederate army with an impassable river in front, defeated at Gettysburgh [sic], demoralized, nearly out of ammunition and disheartened, followed closely by an army flushed with victory, confident of success, coming up to the enemy, moving into line with a cheer; but during the night an order came from the War Department not to attack. Our men lay upon their arms in line of battle four days and nights in sight of the enemy, and within range, giving our boys more fatigue and anxiety than to fight a battle; during the time Lee safely crosses the Potomac, and is now south of the Rapidan. Surely the brave and unfortunate Army of the Potomac has to fight the Administration twenty-two hours and the rebels two every day; and now for fear North Carolina, Kentucky and other states may come back into the Union, Greeley, Lovejoy, Beecher, the soar [sic] headed Senator from Massachusetts, and other of their stamp, put the thumb screws to our most worthy President, and to what end? to inaugurate the policy of territorial dependence and vassalage of the seceded States, making emancipation a condition of loyalty. This beats the laws of the Medes and Persians, divesting the war from one for the Constitution and Union, to a full bred negro war. Whenever a prospect of victory and peace has been within our grasp, there has always been hatched a Damon just in time to save the Pytheus of rebellion, .... will so continue as long as the radicals mould the policy of the administration and our most worthy President. Strange, as true, these same Abolitionists claim that the soldier are Black Republicans. Oh, truth, what .... are asserted in thy name!-- .... Republicans charge of .... ons .... do they own us .... War Department and our .... ? I think not. In this .... others, the Democrats fight the battles of our Country. I do not complain of that, but am rather pleased with it. I never knew an opposer of Democracy to like the smell of gunpowder. I assert that at least three-fourths of the rank and file are Democrats. That none have deserted his love for their Country, but some of the Republicans have been converted, and more are on the anxious seat. We will take care of all negroheads when we get home. It is rumored that Meade is about to be removed. I think he will. He is a Democrat. He and Grant must be killed, or they might loom up in the future as dangerous Presidential candidates. That will not do. I lose all patience to write more or more minutely; perhaps it is already treasonable. I know it is to the negroites, but cannot find that it is by the constitution. Oh, for a man that would not throw overboard books, charts and compass, and then undertake to steer the ship of state amidst the breakers.
Governor Seymour, has in my opinion, distinguished himself nobly in his correspondence with the President.
Truly yours,
W. B. P.
Co. D, 93d Reg't, N. Y. V.

PERSONAL—Col. J. S. Crocker, of the 93d, is now at his home in Cambridge, for the purpose of regaining his health, which was seriously affected by the malaria or bad atmosphere to which our soldiers were subjected on Riker's Island.

Extortion in Maryland.
CAMP OF THE 93D N. Y. S. V.,
NEAR GETTYSBURG, PA., July 6, 1863.
To the Editor of the Press:
SIR—I find the accompanying extract in the columns of the Baltimore American and Commercial Advertiser of this date. It is perhaps a discordant note among the poeans of victory to allude to matters of this character, but the extortion of the people of Maryland, on the route from Frederick to Gettysburg, are too notorious to be passed without comment:
"Some of our Philadelphia papers have grossly slandered the unfortunate people in the vicinity of the battle-field and those of the adjoining counties of Maryland, by asserting that they have charged exhorbitant prices to the soldiers for the slightest refreshments. The fact is, that never was an army received by a grateful people with more cordial hospitality. They have not waited to be asked for food, but their doors are thrown wide open, their tables are kept constantly set, and the children sent out on the road to invite their defenders to partake of their abundance. On some occasions they have even sent food out on the roads, and everything that can be done to relieve the exhausted soldier has been cheerfully performed. Their houses are now filled with the wounded, and many of their barns, and they receive no grudging attention from the wives and daughters of the farmers. It has been a common remark among the soldiers that campaigning in Maryland and Pennsylvania is a different matter from operations in Virginia. Here there is an abundance of food, and kind hearts and willing hands to prepare it, while in Virginia starvation is the rule, and abundance the exception. Near every bush in their present campaigning ground they find, a friend, while from every bush in Virginia there was a miserable bushwhacker ready to waylay and murder them."
It is no trifling outrage to demand from the poor soldier, worn by long and wearisome [sic] marches, and longing for some alleviation of the army rations, prices which would cause the most shameless sutler to blush. To be specific, I know that the common prices paid by the soldiers of our regiment, on the rout from Frederick to Gettysburg, and from Taneytown to Westminster, were, for loaves of bread, weighing from two to three pounds, from thirty-five to fifty cents. Sweet milk usually sold from ten to twenty-five cents per quart. Skimmed milk was often sold for ten cents per quart. Pies, which would sell slowly in your bakeries for twelve cents, were sold for twenty-five. These prices were the rule, were not the prices of second-hand speculators, but of farmers, whose fields were covered with splendid harvests, and whose buildings gave evidence of ample wealth. There were exceptions, which will always be held in grateful remembrance by the Army of the Potomac; but I am afraid that the general wish of the soldiers consigned these rich and miserly farmers to the tender mercies of rebel rule. I am, sir, very respectfully, yours,
Lieut. E. S. CORSER,
93d Regiment N. Y. S. Volunteers.

MILITARY.—Two companies of the Ninety-third New York volunteers—company K, Capt. Samuel McConihe, and company H, Capt. Hiram Wilson—have been designated as provost guard for Gen. Meade, commanding army of the Potomac, in place of the Eighth regulars (infantry), recently relieved.

Army Intelligence.
Two companies of the Ninety-third New York Volunteers—Company K, Captain Samuel McConihie, and Company H, Captain Hiram Wilson—have been designated as provost guard for General Meade, commanding Army of the Potomac, in place of the Eighth regulars (infantry), recently relieved. These companies are under the immediate command of General Patrick, Provost Marshal General of that army.
Lieutenant Colonel Levin Crandall has been promoted to be Colonel of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New York Volunteers, vice Colonel George L. Willard, killed in action at Gettysburg. Maj. A. B. Myer has been promoted to be Lieutenant Colonel in place of Colonel Crandall, promoted as above.
Lieutenant Spencer W. Snyder has been promoted to be Captain of Company D, One Hundred and Sixty-..., New York ....

From the 93d Regiment N. Y. S. V.
("Morgan Rifles.")
Camp Near Falmouth, June 8, 1863.
My Dear Messenger:—Your face is pleasant to see in camp at all times. It reminds us of home, of friends, and all we hold dear, and the advertisements show us that pork, grow dearer and dearer every day.
By the time this reaches you, you will have received the 22d, and have heard from them the adventures, the privations, and the hair-breadth 'scapes of the last two years. The battles, sieges, fortunes, they have passed." A braver, nobler, more faithful set of boys do not exist. They have well sustained the pledge they made two years ago, to sustain the honor and dignity of the Empire State, against all who dare assail the rights, or assault the majesty, of our common country. We give a tear to those whom Death has made illustrious—and to the survivors—our late brethren in arms—we wish every success and prosperity in life, wherever they may be—whether meandering along the sunny slopes of peaceful pursuits, or climbing the rugged steeps  where fame and honors are still to be won, and worn.
For us, however, the path of duty is plain. While the civil commotions last, while cannons belch, bayonets glisten, and sabres are drawn—while demons seek to pluck out the stars from our nation's firmament—we cannot think of peaceful pursuits. We must repel force with force, until the national honor is vindicated, and the constitution reasserts itself over the entire Republic.
For the present, our mission is here—under the broad canopy—with branches for our couch, and the forest our shelter—our music the bugle, from reveille to retreat—our town the broad masses of canvass spread under the green pines and oaks. They form a gipsey [sic] encampment on a scale of grandeur the world has rarely seen.
Let the effeminate, the carpet knights, the fogies, the slow coaches, the jaundiced, the peevish, the speculators in blood, the opinionated, the cold hearted, the gangreened, the sore headed, remain at home to discuss what they have neither the wit to understand, nor the capacity to comprehend—while the generous, the warm, the chivalric, the gallant sons of a patriotic race—inspired by a generous emulation for noble deeds and daring—rush to arms, embrace Columbia encircled in the starry folds, and swear "with her to live, for her to die."
Our regiment are still the Headquarters Guard. We are 500 strong—and move with Gen. Hooker. We are classed with the reserves—that is, reserved for heavy work. You have heard how the regiment volunteered in November last, to lay the Fredericksburgh [sic] bridge, when the fire was too hot for the engineers; how the gallant Johnson and McConihe with their companies laid the bridge the other day, under the fire of the sharpshooters, while Col. Crocker's horse was shot under him—while Barnes, McNeft, Beckman and Smith, after guarding the bridge at Franklin's crossing to the lively tune of shot and shell, took it up (the bridge, not the tune) and relaid it just below the city. Our record is clear and unblemished thus far, and we shall endeavor to keep it so to the end. The good soldier is he who does his duty faithfully, manfully, and strictly obeys orders.
We notice a movement among a certain class for peace. Is not this a little premature? We have now Maryland, Delaware, Kentucky, Missouri, and full one-half of Virginia, to say nothing of Arkansas and Texas. We have lost nothing in population, as the figures show an increase of over 200,000 from natural causes and from emigration into the northern States. The entire present debt would be paid off within five years with the present resources. The new movement of arming the blacks will give us a half million additional troops who have shown at Port Hudson that they will fight, and to the last man. At least let us grind them out of this State of Virginia, and secure all west of the Mississippi, and then if our statesmen determine that there shall be peace, why, so be it. But our motto is "The Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable."

MORGAN RIFLES.
The camp of this regiment has been removed from Fourth street to Conrad's Park, in order to better accommodate the increased number of men. There was a regimental parade yesterday, in which all officers and men joined. The uniforms for the entire regiment will be ready in a few days. (1861)

THE CAPTURE OF COL. CROCKER AND MAJOR CASSIDY.
Albany, Tuesday, April 29, 1862.
A letter from Capt. McNett of the 93d Regiment gives an account of the capture of Col. Crocker and Major Cassidy. The two officers left the camp on foot at 6 1/2 o'clock of Thursday, and were last seen in the lines of the pickets. Hallooing was shortly after heard in the woods where they were walking. They doubtless fell into an ambush of Rebels and were taken prisoners.

Private Letter from Camp.
HEADQUARTERS Co. A, 93d REG'T N..Y. V.
Near Yorktoen, April 27th, 1862.
Friend C___: Imagine me this cold, cheerless, wet afternoon, seated in my little tent, thinking of you and my many kind friends at Glen's Falls, and thinking perhaps that they might be gratified to learn the position of the 93d Regiment. We were drawn up in line of battle twice after leaving Newport News, anxiously awaiting to receive the enemy. It was reported that three regiments of the Rebels had crossed Wormsley's Creek, a short distance below Lee's Mills, and were making their way towards us. They did not show themselves however, and we arrived safe in this place April 22d. Here we found the 77th N. Y. Regiment, (Col. MCKEAN,) and the N. Y. 43d Regiment (Col. VINTON,) among whom I found many familiar faces and old acquaintances; and also many other regiments. We are now encamped under the guns of the Rebel batteries; the nearest fortifications are something less than half a mile from our camp; our pickets are within talking distance, and it is said throw down their guns and meet each other and take a chew of tobacco, etc.—We are near the Gloucester batteries of 18 guns 100 lb. rifled cannon, and directly in front of them on our left, two miles from our camp, is a chain of six Rebel forts, mounting 240 guns; their calibre is not known, but supposed to be 32 lb. Columbiades. Still nearer to us (within one mile) is a fort mounting 120 guns. This is on the Rebel's second line of defence. The front line of entrenchments are within 160 rods of our camp; between the lines is a ravine of low and marshy ground, through which a large creek runs to the York river. On this creek is built dams, intended to flood us should we attempt to charge upon the batteries. They still hold James river on our left. Near us on our right is Rebel entrenchments, mounting 160 35 lb.  Columbiades, and still further on our right is a battery of 32 lb. Columbiades. These are all the Rebel batteries I can give you any particulars of.
You are aware or course that our Colonel and Major have been taken prisoners. This is a great misfortune to us, and we sincerely regret that they should be destined to such a fate, and should be taken from us at this time, when we so much need their counsel. We had placed in our Colonel our utmost confidence that under his watchful care and supervision we would reap the laurels we are so arduously striving to win. A more patriotic man than Col. CROCKER in my opinion never existed, and I can say the same of Major AMBROSE S. CASSIDY. He was highly respected by the officers and in fact by the whole Regiment. He is a brother of the editor of the Albany Atlas & Argus. Although we have lost our Colonel and Major, we are confident that you will hear a good account of the 93d Regiment in the coming battle. We have learned an important lesson, admonishing us to be cautious in all our movements, which is a safeguard to the soldier. I assure you that whenever our Regiment has a chance to retaliate they will do so with a vengeance.
Our batteries keep up a constant fire upon the enemy and they reciprocate in turn. Now and then a shell from the Rebel guns burst near us, but as our position is not exactly known to them, they cannot shell us accurately. We are expecting every hour to make an advance upon their batteries. Some of the regiments were drawn up in line of battle and remained in that position ninety hours, sleeping on their arms. This hapepned [sic] just before we joined them. The booming of cannon and rattle of musketry disturbed my slumbers during the first few nights, but now it is a welcome sound, and I have become so habituated to it that the report of a 32 pounder within sixty rods of me does not awake me.  Yours truly, H. C. N.

Letters from Major Cassidy.
The prisoners at Richmond have been sent to Salisbury, N. C. Before being transferred, Major Cassidy managed to forward to Albany, the following letter:
Advance Guard Union Army, Depot for Union Prisoners, Richmond, Va., May 7th, 1862.
Dear ____: Col. Crocker and myself were very much pained and extremely mortified this morning, upon being shown by some friends, Richmond papers containing extracts from the New York Tribune, accusing us of deserting to the enemy. I wrote to you this evening of the day we were captured. We were cautioned to be careful what we wrote, or it might not be forwarded. I could not say our pickets were not on duty, as they were not, judging from our not meeting them, for fear of exposing the negligence of our officers. I wrote you on the 23d the evening of the same day we were taken prisoners. Col. Crocker and myself left our camp and started to view the ground in the vicinity and go on as far as our pickets. We had arrived in that locality the night preceding, had been engaged about the camp, and had not had time to look around us. Lt. Col Butler went out in the morning mounted. We went out in the evening dismounted.
We met none of our pickets, saw none of our troops after leaving 7th Maine. We did see the tracks of men's and horses' feet leading towards our camp. We had gone but a short distance, as appeared to me, when I saw a person in a gray uniform stationed partially behind a tree, with his rifle aimed at us. I looked in another direction, and saw another similar object, and in a few moments were surrounded, taken prisoners, and conducted by a vile rabble to Col. Griffin's head quarters. Our captors were Mississippi riflemen. From Col. Griffin's we were taken to Gen. Magruder, when we were examined, and afterwards quarters were provided for us by Captain Alstin. We slept on the floor, a wolf-robe under us, covered with blanket. It was about 2 A. M. when we retired, and it was 3 A. M. when called and placed in a wagon, under guard, we proceeded towards James River. On arriving at the river we embarked on the "Curtis Peck," and were taken to Richmond and placed in the prison where we now are.
Is it not sufficient for us to be suffering imprisonment in such a place as this, without being subjected to the infamous charge of such paper as the Tribune? Three hundred and fifty of our prisoners signed a parole two or three days ago, and expect to go home daily. I may send this by one of them. I supposed I could sit down and write a few lines, but this extract from the Tribune haunts me so constantly that I can think of nothing else. I am exceedingly anxious to hear from home.
Col. Corcoran, Dr. McGregor, Lieut. Dempsey, Lieut. Baum, Capt. Farrish, Col. Crocker and myself, mess together. We have hash, dry bread and coffee for breakfast and tea; for dinner meat, bread potatoes and water. Coffee is $1,25 per pound; sugar 40 cents; potatoes $2,00 per bushel, and other things at the same rate. The Government provides bread and meat, and water. We must provide the rest. We are not allowed intercourse with outsiders. It is difficult to procure anything from outside. Papers or books are not admitted; they are smuggled in occasionally. Many officers have been prisoners since Manassas. They still hope for release. Those who were released will give you an idea of how we are situated here. Is it not sufficient to suffer with without being accused of desertion? I hope the Tribune and other papers may have the manliness to correct their unjust accusations. It is a pity that this miserable race of sensation reporters are not wiped out of existence. No matter how infamous or how utterly groundless and without foundation the accusation, it is aliment to them, and they must live. An infamous lie, made from whole cloth, without the shadow of foundation in truth, is published far and wide, injuring fatally two innocent parties. I cannot bear to dwell upon the subject. Time, I hope will vindicate our cause. The officers are confined in one room, 78 by 42—some 70 persons, officers and servants. Col. Corcoran's servant a young, intelligent Irish boy, was offered his release. He had been confined nerly [sic] ten months. He refused to go till the Colonel was released. Such an instance of devotion is extremely rare. Officers amuse themselves with cards, chess, backgammon, gymnastics, &c. There is a narrow passage between the beds, partly the length of the room which is used for a promenade. This is almost always crowded, as morning, noon and evening walks are quite the rage here. With billets of wood we have gymnastic exercise. My health is good, as is Col. Corcoran's. We were not provided with a change of clothing. Col. Corcoran kindly provides what we require. Send nothing to us—money or anything else, as it will be stolen. Col. Corcoran's servant does our washing—not much of a task, having but one pair of socks, one handkerchief, and one shirt and drawers when we arrived. Col. Crocker is quite ill over the Tribune's poisonous letter. It was so unexpected to him, that the shock entirely unnerved him. I hope the matter will now be presented to the public in its true colors, and merely justice meted out to those unjustly accused. Remember me to my friends.
May 11
P. S.—In passing out of our camp, we passed the 77th, 33d N. Y. and 7th Maine regiments. After leaving the latter we met no one, saw no one, spoke to living person until we saw ourselves surrounded by Mississippi Riflemen.
Lewis Benedict of Albany, of the 73d, was brought in with other prisoners, on the 9th inst., having been taken near Williamsburgh [sic]. His health is good, though he is suffering from a sprained ankle. At my invitation he has joined our mess.
[The following letter has since reached us from Salisbury, by the agency of a returned prisoner:]
Depot for Union Prisoners,
Salisbury, North Carolina, May 20.
Dear ___: I must take advantage of every apparent opportunity of writing home, even if my letters never reach you, for I am well aware how anxious you must be to receive some news from me. I have written several times since I have been a prisoner of war, and feel confident that some of my letters must have reached their destination. Those forwarded by returned prisoners will undoubtedly reach you, those promised to be forwarded by the Confederate officers probably never were sent on, as they are first to be carefully perused, and objectionable matter to be striken out, and frequently this is two troublesome, and they are thrown aside and destroyed. This is also the case with letters sent to us by our friends—the Confederates not having time or disposition to read them over, throw them aside, and that is the last of them. This accounts, perhaps for my not having received one letter from any source since I was taken prisoner.
Col. Crocker and myself were imprisoned at Richmond, on the 24th inst., in a foul den, formerly used for a pork packing room, the floors covered with grease inches thick, saturated with salt, damp as a vault, the sun never entering; seventy man and officers, closely packed; cooking, washing and every other necessacy [sic] duty performed in a space of seventy by forty-two feet. No officers ever allowed to leave the room, on any pretence whatever—no papers allowed to be procured, or books to be read. Beneath us was a stable, which was occupied by the horses of the rebel officers; above us the stories were occupied by several hundred Federal prisoners. The filth from the stories above was poured down upon us in a foul mass; a suffocating stench constantly pervading the room; with scarcely space to move about, you can imagine how we were situated and what we suffered. The Government provided us with bread and beef. We provided ourselves with what else we could procure. It was with great difficulty we succeeded in sending out for provisions. Coffee, such as it was, of a most miserable quality, we purchased at one dollar a pound; butter was one dollar and forty cents per lb.; of course we could not indulge in that luxury; molasses was twenty shillings a gallon; beans twenty-five cents a quart; sugar forty cents a lb.; and so on.
On the 12th of May, I, after having suffered for several days, was conveyed on a litter to the hospital, suffering from a violent pain in my head and a very violent fever. Fortunately for me, Dr. Gray, U. S. A., one of our young surgeons, was a patient in the hospital, just recovering from the measles, and well enough to take some care of me. I did not get any worse and although very weak was gradually recovering, when, Thursday morning, a guard appeared before my cot, and ordered me to get up and dress myself, the stage was at the door ready to take me, with other prisoners, to Salesbury [sic], N. C. This order I obeyed with the assistance of Dr. Gray. Up to this moment no one supposed I would be ordered to move with the other prisoners. But the order was peremptory that all should be removed. All were surprised that I stood the trip as well as I did; and all were astonished that I could be removed as low as I was. However, we arrived here safely on Thursday afternoon. During our trip here we were provided with beef and bread and nothing else. We were not allowed to leave the cars, and could not purchase anything of course. I could not eat anything provided for us, but managed to subsist on soda cracker and water. We have fine quarters here, compared to Richmond. There are eleven officers in a room fifteen by sixteen feet, sleeping on the floor, on the blankets we fortunately brought with us, Col. Crocker kindly caring for mine. The Government provides bread and meal--we can procure eggs at 50 cents per dozen, strawberries 40 cents a quart, butter 40 cents a lb., chickens 12 shillings each, and so on. Col. Crocker bought a white linen coat for $6 worth in New York $1.50; pants $4, worth $2 in New York, but being our Government pants, probably were sold cheaper than they would otherwise. Chairs were bought the first day of our arrival, at five shillings each; we purchased six on Monday at one dollar each, and to-day they are a dollar and a half. The fact is, the moment an article is enquired for, up it goes in price. We have a yard of some ten or twelve acres to exercise in, and having signed a parole not to make any
Attempt to escape, or aid any one to do so, are permitted the use of a portion of the ground.
The Rebel officers address us pleasantly, and treat us courteously. Some of our officers were singing a few evenings since, when a Rebel sang out to them, "Shit up, you d—d Yankee Abolitionists." An officer stepped up to the party and requested them to continue singing, and he would discover who made use of the insulting epithet, and have him punished. Of course, there was nothing offensive sung by our officers, but the singing was kept up until after ten o'clock.
This is in striking contrast to Richmond, where a civil word from an officer was a novelty. A person by the name of "Emack," of Maryland, rendered himself particularly obnoxious by his ungentlemanly conduct on all occasions. There are fifteen hundred non-commissioned officers and privates now here. They are to be released in detachments, all having been required to sign parole. There are also some one hundred and twenty (120) officers held here as prisoners of war, some of whom have been here since the battle of Manasses [sic]. Lieutenant Colonel Lewis Benedict is here quite well, having entirely recovered from a sprained ankle. Colonel Crocker, is quite well. Colonel Corcoran, I am sorry to say, is quite ill. The trip from Richmond here was too much for him. His constitution is not strong, and the fatigue, privation and exposure rendered him very weak. When he arrived here he took to his bed, and has been confined with a fever ever since. Dr. McGregor, who is his physician, tells me to-day that the Colonel's symptoms are better, and that he will probably soon be convalescent. Johnny Owens, who refused to leave with the other prisoners, when his liberty was offered him, remains with Colonel Corcoran, nursing him night and day; and Dr. McGregor says that it is owing to his never missing a minute in administering prescriptions, and his constant attention, that Col. Corcoran will recover. Again, to-morrow, Johnny Owens has been offered his release, but again refuses and says he will stay with the Colonel as long as he is a prisoner. Such devotion is seldom met with. He was taken prisoner with the Colonel at Manassas, and has a sister living in New York.
Col. Crocker has been accused of being a Virginian. If he were guilty it  would not be his fault; but the fact is, the Colonel was born at Cambridge, Washington County, N. Y., and has resided in that pleasant village ever since. His father and mother and two brothers resided, before the war, at or near Fairfax, Va. They were driven from there by the Rebels, their property destroyed, dwelling burnt, barns and crops destroyed, and they driven from their home, exiles, and only too glad to escape by night, to our lines. Wm. C. Crocker, a brother of the Colonel, was arrested by the rebels, confined in their jail, and promised his liberty only on condition of joining their army. He afterwards managed to escape and joined our army. The father of Col. Crocker was lying ill in bed when arrested, carried to Manasses [sic], stripped of his clothing, deprived of food and finally died in a stable, neglected, without a friend to carry a dying message to his wife and family.
There have been some escapes from here by digging tunnels under the earth, outside the walls, some have been brought back the fourth time, after attempting to escape. Still they persevere. No one appears to know anything of the time of our probable deliverance; every one has a different theory. Some say in a short time our Government certainly will have us released and not permit us to die here; others think when the war is over we will see our homes again, and not before.
The rebel officers here speak with great confidence of their success ultimately, and say the war has but just commenced, and will continue for years. This appears to be the universal opinion here; still they offer and pay two hundred dollars bounty to all recruits for the war. The people of Salisbury are said to be, very many of them, strong Union people. It was so said of many in Richmond. There are many confined at Richmond and here, for their Union sentiments only, and they are treated, if possible, even worse than the private soldiers. The weather is becoming warm here. I write about myself to you freely, because you may hear even worse than the truth, which is bad enough. I am getting much better, and hope soon to be strong and well. Do not allow any painful rumors to disturb you. I am anxious to hear from home. Direct to Salisbury, North Carolina, "Prisoner of War." I send this by a private soldier from Maine.
Five companies of the 93d, Col. Crocker's Regiment, have re-enlisted, and are coming home on their furloughs.

The 93d Regiment.
This favorite Regiment which has, since its organization, been the Headquarters of the Army as the guard of honor of McClellan, Burnside, Hooker and Meade, returned on furlough to this city, on the 1st inst., the main body having re-enlisted for the war. Col. CROCKER commands the Regiment, which despite of its reduced numbers and war-worn looks, presented a fine aspect.
As the Regiment were marching up State-st. Gov. SEYMOUR invited them into the Capitol where they exchanged mutual congratulations. In a brief speech, full of pathos and stirring eloquence, he then welcomed them home, acknowledged the obligations of the State to them, and recounting his experience at the Cemetery of Gettysburgh [sic], where New York held its sad supremacy as Empire State, among the burial places, he rendered an impressive tribute to her fallen sons!
It was an unexpected New-Years' Call, and the felicitations exchanged were mingled with sad memories; but the occasion was an interesting one, and will be long remembered by all who participated in it.
Major McConihe remains in command of three companies in the field. About sixty of the re-enlisting soldiers will receive the County bounty here, and a like number in Troy.
The order assigning the officers to recruiting duties, locates Col. Crocker at Cambridge, Washington county, and Lieut. Col. Butler in Albany.

OUR VETERAN SOLDIERY--THE NINETY-THIRD
REGIMENT AGAIN OFF FOR THE WAR.—THE 93D Regiment, N. Y. S. V., Col. John S. Crocker commanding, made parade yesterday afternoon, preparatory to again leaving for the seat of War. This regiment, one of the finest raised in the Empire State, was one of the first to reenlist as veterans for three years more, or for the war, and returned home a little more than a month ago, two hundred and sixty strong, to enjoy their well-merited furlough and recruit their organization. It constitutes the guard to the headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, and so often has it been complimented in the army, and so seldom even mentioned in the newspapers, that a slight sketch of its history may not prove amiss.
This splendid regiment was raised in the fall and winter of 1861-2, in the counties of Washington, Warren and Allegany, and took its departure from the State in March 1862, one thousand strong, of whom but two hundred and sixty now remain. It formed a part of Palmer's brigade, Casey's division, Keyes' corps, and went down to the Peninsula with the rest of the army. In the advance from Fortress Monroe in April, the Ninety-third formed the extreme left of the army, and was encamped near the mouth of Warwick river, where it took part in many skirmishes and reconnoissances [sic], and performed much severe labor. While here, Colonel Crocker and Major Cassidy were taken prisoners within our own lines through the negligence of the officers of the picket. At the battle of Williamsburg it was the only regiment of the brigade that arrived on the field during the battle, which they accomplished by superior marching.
After the battle of Williamsburg, General McClellan ordered the regiment detailed as general headquarters guard, and complimented it highly for its fine drill and discipline. General Burnside, on assuming command of the army, retained the Ninety-third at his headquarters, as did also Generals Hooker and Meade, all of whom have spoken of it in the highest terms. Its drill, discipline and morals are unsurpassed, and no regiment can better perform the duties of its position. The noble, pure-minded and upright General Patrick, under whose command it is, greatly admires it, and says that no other regiment shall be headquarters guard while he is Provost- Marshal-General.
But we need say no more after these high compliments from some of the best soldiers in our eastern army. Below we give a list of the field officers of the regiment:
Colonel, John S. Crocker; Lieutenant-Colonel, Benj. C. Butler; Major, Samuel McConipe; Adjutant, H. Gifford; Surgeon, Strobridge Smith; Assistant Surgeon, Francis S. Wilcox; Quartermaster, Thomas P. Fuller; Quartermaster’s Sergeant, S. W. Wills; Commissary Sergeant, L. Osborn; Drum-Major, P. Ford.

The Ninety-third Veteran Volunteers.
This splendid regiment, commanded by Col. John S. Crocker, leaves Albany this morning on its second journey to the theater of war, and will be in New York some time this afternoon. After enjoying the hospitalities of Gotham, it will move on again in the morning to Washinton [sic] and Brandy Station. The 93d, one of the finest regiments raised in the Empire State, was one of the first to re-enlist as veterans for three years more or during the war, and returned home a little more than a month ago to enjoy its well-merited furlough and recruit the organization. It constitutes the guard to the general headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, and so often has been complimented there, and so seldom even mentioned in the newspapers at home, that a slight sketch of its history may not prove amiss.
This remarkable fine organization was raised in the Fall and Winter of 1861 in the Counties of Washington, Warren, Essex and Allegany, and took its departure from the State in March, 1862, one thousand strong, of whom but 260 now remain. It formed a part of Palmer's Brigade of Casey's Division, in Keyes' Corps, and went down to the Peninsula with the rest of McClellan's army. In the advance from Fortress Monroe in April, the 93d formed the extreme left of the army, and was encamped near the mouth of Warwich River, where they took part in many skirmishes and reconnoissances [sic], and performed much severe labor. While here, Col. Crocker and Maj. Cassidy were taken prisoners within our own lines, through the negligence of the officers of the picket, and until their exchange, several months later, the commander of the regiment devolved upon Lieut.-Col. Butler. At the battle of Williamsburg, the 93d was the only regiment of the brigade that arrived on the field during the action, and was highly complimented by Gen. Keyes for its promptness and energy [sic].
Soon after the battle of Williamsburg, Gen McClellan ordered the regiment to be detailed as guard to the General Headquarters of the Army, a high testimonial to its drill, discipline and morals. Gen. Burnside, on assuming command of the army, retained the 93d at his headquarters, as did also Gens. Hooker and Mead, all of whom have spoken of it in the highest terms. In drill, discripline [sic] and morals it is surpassed by no regiment in the Army of the Potomac, and none can better perform the duties of its position--The noble and pure-minded Gen. Patrick greatly admires it, and declares it shall remain at headquarters as long as he does.
God spare and bless the veteran 93d, and bring it home again laural-crowned and honored as now.—N. Y. Evening Post New York Times..

NEW-YORK, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1864.
OUR VETERANS RETURN TO THE ARMY.—The Ninety-third Regiment of New-York State Volunteers, Veteran Corps, commanded by Col. JOHN S. CROCKER, leaves Albany this morning on its second journey to the seat of war. Arriving in New-York this afternoon, it will remain here all night, going on in the morning to Washington and Brandy station. This splendid regiment—one of the finest this State has sent into the field—was one of the first to reenlist as veterans for three years more, or during the war and returned home but a little more than a month ago to enjoy its well-merited furlough and fill up its thinned and wasted ranks. It constitutes the guard to the general headquarters of the Army of the Potomac. This fine organization was raised in the Fall and Winter of 1861, in the counties of Washington, Warren, Essex and Alleghany, and took its departure from the State early in March, 1862, one thousand strong of whom but 260 now remain. (Tribune Feb. 5, 1864)

Military Affairs.
THE NINETY-THIRD NEW-YORK VETERAN
This splendid regiment, commanded by Col. John S. Crocker, was to have left Albany yesterday morning on its second journey to the theater of war, via New-York. After enjoying the hospitalities of Gotham, it will move on again to Washington and Brandy Station. The 93d, one of the finest regiments raised in the Empire State, was one of the first to reenlist as veterans for three years more, or during the war, and returned home a little more than a month ago to enjoy its well-merited furlough and recruit the organization. It constitutes the guard to the general headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, and so often has it been complimented there, and so seldom even mentioned in the newspapers at home, that a slight sketch of its history may not, prove amiss.
This remarkable fine organization was raised in the Fall and Winter of 1861 in the Counties of Washington, Warren, Essex and Allegany, and took its departure from the State in March, 1862, one thousand strong, of whom but 260 now remain. It formed a part of Palmer's Brigade of Casey's Division, in Keyes's Corps, and went down to the Peninsula with the rest of McClellan's army. In the advance from Fortress Monroe in April, the 93d formed the extreme left of the army, and was encamped near the mouth of Warwick River, where they took part in many skirmishes and reconnoissances [sic, and performed much severe labor. While here, Col. Crocker and Maj. Cassidy were taken prisoners within our own lines through the negligence of the officer of the picket, and until their exchange, several months later, the command of the regiment devolved upon Lieut.-Col. Butler. At the battle of Williamsburg, the 93d was the only regiment of the brigade that arrived on the field during the action, and was highly complimented by Gen. Keyes for its promptness and energy.
Soon after the battle of Williamsburg, Gen. McClellan ordered the regiment to be detailed as guard to the General Headquarters of the Army, a high testimonial to its drill, discipline and morale. Gen. Burnside, on assuming command of the army, retained the 93d at his headquarters, as did also Gens. Hooker and Meade, all of whom have spoken of it in the highest terms. In drill, discipline and morale it is surpassed by no regiment in the Army of the Potomac, and none can better perform the duties of its position. The noble and pure-minded Gen. Patrick greatly admires it, and declares it shall remain at headquarters as long as he does.
God speed and bless the veteran 93d and bring it home again laurel crowned and honored as now.

93d N. Y. Brigaded.--We hear by private letter, dated Headquarters,
Army of Potomac, April 19th, that the 93d Regiment, Col. John S. Crocker commanding, which has been acting as Headquarter Guard during the two
years past, has been ordered to report to Maj. Gen. Birney, commanding 3d
Division 2d Army Corps.—Argus.

CAMP OF 93D N. Y. V. VOLS.,
NEAR BRANDY STATION, VA.,
April 21st, 1864.
Editor of Messenger:--Please insert the following in your paper:
The 93d Regt. N. Y. Vet. Vols., commanded by Col. Jhn S. Crocker, have been relieved as Gen. Hd. Qrs. Guard at the Hd. Qrs. Army of Potomac, and ordered to report to Major Gen. Birney comd'g 3d Division 2d Army Corps, for duty in such Division. And after reporting, the 93d Regt. N. Y. V. V. has been assigned to the 2nd Brig. 3d Div. 2nd Army Corps, commanded by Brig. Gen. Hays. This fine Regiment has nearly two years retained the honorable position as Hd. Qrs. Guard A. of P. It being first detailed on such duty when the Army of the Potomac was commanded by Major Gen. McClellan, also retained by. Major Gens. Burnside, Hooker, and Meade, and have gained for themselves credit by their promptness and vigilance in attendance to duty; and have been relieved from this duty, carrying with them a good reputation of efficiency and discipline, and as this regiment is the only New York regiment in Brigade, to which it is assigned, to represent the Empire State, we feel, as a Regiment, that we shall do it with pride and honor to ourselves and our State. J. S. L., 93d N. Y. V. V.

From the Army of the Potomac.
(Extract from a Private Letter.)
Near Culpepper C. H.,
April 23d, 1864.
The 93d N. Y. is now on the right of the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, 2d Corps, Army Potomac. On the 20th the Corps was reviewed by Gen. Grant. A splendid sight it was, 40,000 men, and the formation of the ground was so favorable that all could be seen from one point, and nearly any point upon it. Gen. Grant was assisted by Gen. Meade on his left and Gen Sheridan on his right. The day was splendid, the first really fair day since February. The troops were in gallant trim, and altogether it was a most magnificent parade. We now number, present for duty, 613 officers and men—the largest Regiment in the Brigade, nine Regiments in the Brigade, two Brigades in the Division, and four Divisions in the Corps—ten thousand the strength of the Division—about 40,000 in the Corps, only three Corps in the army now.
Major General Hancock commands the Corps, Gen. Birney, son of former  candidate for the Presidency, commands Division, and Gen. Hays of Penn., commands Brigade.—The 93d, by seniority of Colonel, occupies the right of Brigade on nine regiments. Gen. Hays for the same reason places his Brigade on the right of Division. Gen. Birnery for same reason occupies the right of the corps l'armee, and so of the forty thousand men in the 2d Corps of the Army of the Potomac, the 93d N. Y. Vols. occupy a position on the extreme right. This will be its position in line of battle. It is the only regiment from New York State in the Brigade—three are from Maine, same number from Pennsylvania, the remaining two from Michigan. So you will perceive we shall have something to do to maintain the reputation of the Empire State in such company. There are but few sick; out of twenty who have recently been sent to hospital only four were veterans—all the others were new men.
I think from my experience that one veteran is in reality worth three raw recruits—to the Government I mean—for sometimes raw men fight as well as old soldiers, but the new men get sick so much, all have to become acclimated before they can be of great service. We are to have some great battles ere long—perhaps half of our regiment may be killed. We hope and pray for victory, and the close of the war in consequence. I may be among those doomed to be planted in old Virginia. If not, I shall write to you again. If so, this is my last letter to you, old friend, so farewell.—Albany Argus.

Letters from Corporal S. G. Payne, Jr., of the 93d Reg. N. Y. V., to his Father in this City.
BATTLE-FIELD, May 7, 1864,
Co. B, 93d N. Y. V.
DEAR FATHER:—Bill and I are safe so far, we were engaged yesterday afternoon; the Rebs attacked us in our breastworks; we repulsed them every time and drove them off; they left their dead and wounded in heaps in front of us. One regiment broke—ours took their place. The Rebs had got over our works when we got there; the left of our line charged them, capturing them all and two stands of colors which they had planted on our entrenchments. There were nine of our regiment hurt in the attack; both Lieutenants are unhurt; the Orderly Sergeant, who stopped with me when I was home, is wounded in the head or neck and gone to the rear (night of the 7th.) We were engaged again this morning and lost a few men—Bill and I are safe yet. I was made corporal this afternoon, and am on the color guard. I suppose we will move to-night. We have punished the Rebs severely. Brig.- Gen. Hayes was killed in the first day's fight. Our Colonel is in command of the brigade. He is a brave man as ever I saw. Love to all.
From your son, S. G. PAYN

BATTLE FIELD, May 13, '64.
Co. B, 93d N. Y. S. V.
Dear Father—I write you a few lines to let you know I am alive and safe. We had a hard battle yesterday. We started a line of battle at daylight in the morning, composed of one Division, took the Rebs by surprise, stormed their works, drove them two and half miles, capturing more prisoners than were in our own storming party, also 30 or 40 guns, 21 of which were taken off the field, 3 Generals, 2 Johnsons and 1 Stuart. We fell back about a mile and still hold our ground. The Rebs tried their best. It rained all day yesterday and last night we suffered a great deal; was without a blanket, overcoat, or tent-sheet; did not have anything to eat for twenty-four hours, except some crackers, but feel well after having some coffee this morning. William was wounded in| the hand, not very bad; has gone to the hospital. I was knocked down by a spent ball. I carry the colors now; the color-bearer was killed yesterday. I will write more the first opportunity. Both Lieuts. are wounded pretty bad; there are three privates, three Sergeants, and three Corporals in our company at present.
The Rebs have fallen back. I don't think our Division will be engaged to-day for they are all worn out. I have not received any letters from home for a long time. We got over fifty cannon off the field. Our Corps took over 300 prisoners to-day.
S. G. PAYN, Jr.

Ninety-third Regiment.—The Ninety-third regiment has lost heavily in killed and wounded. Killed—two captains, three lieutenants, thirty-none enlisted men. Wounded—four captains, eight lieutenants, one hundred and eighty-three enlisted men, making an aggregate of two hundred and thirty-nine killed and wounded.
In consideration of the heroic services of the gallant Ninety-third during the recent battles, Major-General Birney has addressed the following to Col. Crocker:
HD-QRTS, 2d Div. 2d Army Corps,
May 9, 1864—10 A. M.
COLONEL—Will you express to the officers and men of your gallant regiment my full appreciation of their distinguished services in the recent engagements. D. B. Birney, Maj. Gen'l.
To Col. Crocker, 93d N. Y. S. Vols.

ADJUTANT GIFFORD OF THE 93D.—We had the pleasure of conversing with this gentleman on his return home, via Troy, on Tuesday last. Adjutant Gifford resides in Easton, and has been with the 93d from its organization up to Thursdays wilderness fight, where he was disabled by a wound in the right arm. The adjutant has the credit of being one of the most active, brave and efficient men in the regiment. He gives a glowing account of the terrible battle which took place during the eight days fight, but speaks confidently of a glorious triumph in the end.—His wound is not considered dangerous, and he hopes soon to be able to return to his regiment.

Letter from Corporal Payn, of the 93d
N. Y. V., to his father, in this city.
BATTLE FIELD, May 9, 1864, Co. B, 93d
N. Y. V., 2d Brigade, 3d Div., 2d Corps.
Dear Father—As I have a chance to send, write these few lines to let you know that William and I are alive and safe yet. He is now on picket, he stands it well, has carried his knapsack all through so far. I have nothing but my rations and the clothes that are on my back, but pick up blankets wherever we stop for the night; sometimes move three or four times during the night. Our regiment has lost heavily in the several engagements, have
been engaged four times in three days—altogether, lost 256 killed and wounded, 17 of them commissioned officers; 45 killed, 4 of them commissioned officers.
We were not engaged yesterday, but went out on a reconnoisance [sic] towards evening, when the Rebs shelled us, but did not hit any of us. Have not been engaged to-day, but expect the Rebs will try and carry our works; we have heavy breast works, and hope they will try and take them for we shall be able to punish them if they try it. A few minutes ago we had read to us an order from Major Gen. Birney, congratulating our regiment for our bravery and the handsome manner in which we drove the Rebs when ever we were engaged. We have one-half of our Company in killed and wounded.
I have received four slight wounds, the first one is on top of me head, an inch over, and it would have laid me out, but a miss is as good as a mile. We are about two miles from Spottsylvania C. H. The army are entrenched, and we can whip all the Rebs who want to try and take our breast works. When we passed over the old Chancellorville battle ground, skeletons lay bleaching in the sun all around us, but we have become accustomed to such sights. I picked up a letter on the field yesterday, dated Powhattan county,
___, Match 29, 1864, written by a sister to her brother in the rebel army. She says in reference to some land: "My husband says he will but your 206 acres of land if you will sell, or will pay you in neighros [sic] or in money or let take land here just as you like. Please sell it to no one else. It is the opinion of every body that we will have Peace now very soon, now they say that France and Mexico is going to Reckosnize [sic] our indey pendance [sic], if that ___ wee [sic]will have peace very soon. I must now bring my letter to a close by Bidding you fare well until we meate [sic] again. The snow is nearly waste deep in some places hear."
S. G. P., Jr.

The Ninety-third New York in battle.
We have been favored with the following letter from Lieut. Bramhall to his brother, descriptive of the part taken by the 93d in the battle of the Wilderness. (Tribune, May 20, 1864)
FREDERICKSBURG, Va., May 10, 1864.
On Tuesday night of last week, at 11 o'clock, our brigade quietly broke up camp, and took up the line of march for Ely's Ford, which we reached at about 8 o'clock the next morning, having breakfasted at 7. Our march was a rapid and fatiguing one with few and far between, and the day was hot and sultry from early morning until 3 1/2 o'clock p. m., when we halted at Chancellorsville, moved forward into the line of battle to the right, and threw out our picket line. All were foot-sore and weary, especially our recruits, after the forced march of 27 miles, and our mess, like most others, drank our hot coffee with our "hard tack" and fried ham, and then laid down to delicious sleep and pleasant dreams among the Rebel graves on the old Chancellorsville battle-field. The next morning, before the first streams of daylight appeared, we were aroused, and as soon as we found time to stow away a little breakfast, we were again on the march for Todd's Corners. The day was very warm and sultry, but our pace was rather accelerated than abated, and at 1 o'clock we reached the "Corners." Shortly after we had thrown out our pickets, and sat down to lunch, an artillery and light musketry fire broke upon our ears, and in a very short space of time thereafter we had drawn in our pickets and were moving at a rapid pace in an almost opposite direction. Without stopping to rest, and nearly half of the time "double-quicking," we continued for more than an hour, when we were finally halted in the Wilderness, where we rested for about ten minutes, and filled our canteens with the best water we could procure. Then commenced a terrific fire of musketry away off to the right, which rolled along to near our front in continued waves, and assured us that the fight had now commenced in earnest. We immediately moved down the road to the right, on the double quick for nearly a mile, halted, and moved forward in line of battle through a thick, low growth of oak, for nearly half a mile, when all at once a Pennsylvania regiment, bearing the same figures as our own (93d), came running through our ranks in a manner too precipitate to call good order. On we went a few rods further, through a little ditch, and a few feet up a little roll of ground, when suddenly we were halted by a terrific volley from the enemy. Though halted, we did not flinch, but replied vigorously, and gradually advanced, the enemy failing back, but halting to give us a volley as we came up to them each time. Finally, we had advanced some few rods beyond the line of our brigade, our left resting under a little knoll, behind which the enemy's sharpshooters collected and swung round on to our flank, pouring a cross fire in upon us. One of the first to fall was Lieut. Gray, of Co. G. the ball passing directly through his head. He fell to the ground lifeless without a murmur. (He was slightly wounded by a spent ball a moment before, and after going to the rear a few steps, and finding the wound a trifling one, he returned.) One by one the men were pierced by the enemy's bullets, either wounded or killed outright. Not a groan or cry escaped one of them, but in the calm possession of every faculty, they would turn to an officer and cooly say, "I am wounded," and then pass, or be carried to the rear. One instance I would mention, I saw a corporal in the ranks of my company wounded in the leg, while in the act of loading his  gun; he deliberately aimed his piece and fired, exclaiming "Take that," he then turned and said "Lieutenant, I am wounded and can do no more." He went to the field hospital and had his wound dressed, and soon after came back to the line, saying, "I must have another pop at the rascals." That corporal must be promoted.
It was in this cross fire that I was wounded, and a close call it was too. I felt the ball strike, and the next I knew was, that, dizzy and weak, I raised myself off the ground and saw the blood spouting from my wound, and not a little "clot" on the ground. I spoke to the Captain, telling him I was wounded, and he replied, "Hurry to the rear and go low," which order I proceeded to obey, though too weak to attempt to go fast, and I started and went stumbling down, until I fell into a ditch—not that last ditch, but the one we had crossed. The sergeant-major helped me up, and assisted me out to the field hospital in the road.                        W. L. B.

THE NINETY-THIRD NEW YORK.—The dispatches from the army speak in the highest terms of the conduct of the Ninety-third New York, the old body guard of MCCLELLAN, and which has done the same service for BURNSIDE, HOOKER and MEADE, and which in the recent battles of the Wilderness, held the post of honor. A letter to Major CASSIDY, late of that regiment, gives some details, and encloses the flattering order of thanks of Major-General BIRNEY.

NINETY-THIRD REGIMENT, N. Y. S. V.,
9th May, 11 A. M., '64.
Dear Major:—The 93d fought bravely in the actions of the 6th, 6th and 7th in the "Wilderness." We lost 240 killed and wounded. The officers killed were Capts. Barnes and Bailey, Lieuts. Eldridge and Gray. 18 officers wounded, 39 enlisted men killed, 184 wounded. Gen. Hayes was killed at the first onset, when Col. Crocker took command of the brigade.
He (Col. C.) has acted bravely. Major McConihe is in command of the regiment. Capt. Randalls, they say, will probably die. Capt. Judkins, of the Colonel's staff, killed last night, shot through the head. Gifford, Kincaid, Bramhall and Randalls, have been sent to Washington. All the officers acted bravely, the men fought like tigers, the Rebels before us were badly beaten. Capt. Smith unhurt, every one in the Corps praises the conduct of the 93d, Capt. Newton is slightly wounded in the groin.
Yours, in a hurry, S. S.

HEAD-QUARTERS, 2d Div., 2d Army Corps,
May 9, 1864—10 A. M.
COLONEL—Will you express to the officers and men of your gallant regiment my full appreciation of their distinguished services in the recent
engagements. D. B. Birney, Maj. Genl.
To Col. Crocker, 93 N. Y. S. Vols.

Names of the Killed and Wounded in the 93d New York Volunteer Infantry.
Washington, May 12th, 1864.
The following is a list of the casualties in the 93d Regiment of New York Veteran Volunteer Infantry, complete of the officers, partial of the rest, but all accurate. This splendid regiment, formerly the Guard to t h e General Headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, is in Hayes' (2d) brigade of the Third division (Birney's) of the Second corps, and fought most gallantly and bravely in the late battles, losing three-quarters of their number. On the death of General Hayes, Colonel Crocker took command of the brigade and Major McConihe of the regiment.
Major Samuel McConihe, very slightly.
Adjt. H. Gifford, flesh wound, upper right arm.
Capt. Dennis E. Barnes, killed,
Capt. Wm. V. S. Beekman, severely, in left side.
Capt. William Randles, right shoulder and neck.
Capt. John Bailey, killed.
Capt. Henry C. Newton, braised by two spent balls.
Capt. Edson Fitch, flesh wound in right side.
Lieut. F. S. Bailey, slight fracture left leg. .
Lieut. Wm. L. Bramhall, severe scalp wound.
Lieut. Norman F. Eldridge, killed.
Lieut. Wm. H. Kincaid, left wrist.
Lieut. William Ball, foot.
Lieut. John J. Sherwood, flesh wound, left thigh.
Lieut. Oscar B. Ingraham, right cheek.
Lieut. Robert Liston Gray, killed.
Lieut. Charles T. Barnes, lower abdomen.
Lieut. Thomas Fitch, instep left foot.
Sergeant Joseph Wood, Co. A, killed.

COMPANY A.
Privates Benj. H. Latham, Michael Warren; Finley Hospital, Washington.
Chauncey Davis, Edgar Bentley; Campbell Hospital, Washington.

COMPANY B.
Sergeant J. M. Conine, slightly.
Corporal John N. Grant, Privates Chas. Goebel, Orville Greene, J . M. Griffith, F. R. Jones, arm, John Shimble, Chauncey Wilmot; Finley Hospital,
Washington.

COMPANY C.
Sergeant C. W. Ross, slightly.
Color Sergeant Chas. F. Myers, right cheek.
Private John Sharon; Armory Square Hospital, Washington.
Private G. H. Bentley; Campell Hospital, Wash.
Privates Add. Ames, Lew. Bush; Stanton Hospital, Washington.

COMPANY D.
Sergeant George A. Blackman, breast and right fore-arm.
Sergeant Daniel G. Blackman, right leg.
Sergeant Henry Robins, flesh wound, left hip.
Sergeant H. A. Plank, left fore-arm.
Corporal F. M. Rood, leg.
Corporal H. Holden, scalp.
Corporal R. W. Lampman, left leg.
Corporal James K. Welch, left hip.
Private Jac. Aust, left elbow.
Private A. J. Allen, thigh.
Private Dennis Connors, third finger, right hand.
Private T. H. McKinn, right side.
Private Reuben Franklin, right shoulder.
Private Luman Ross, left arm.
Private Eli Brooks, right elbow.
Private Christ. Harrison, right fore-arm.
Private Mat. McMahon, right fore-arm.
Private H. McManiman, right leg.
Private Wm. H. Nelson, slightly.
Private John S. Green, right hand.
Private Daniel Simon, killed.
Private Henry McAlley, killed.
Private Isaac Race, killed.
Private N. S. Green, killed.
Private Timothy Marony, killed.
Private A. T. Hays, Killed.
Private C. L. Brown, slightly.
Private Torrence Russell, right hand.
Private J. C. Beldon, left hand.
Private Jas. H. Fairchilds, left hip.
Private E. Bristol, slightly.
Private J. C. Wheeler, toe right foot
Private ___ Briggs, bruised with shell.
Private O. Stephenson, face.
Co. A went in with 36 men, and on Saturday noon had 9.
Sergeant Clark Weir, both thighs slight.
Corporal Geo. Sheely, right leg and left hip.
Corporal Wm. B. Peck, killed.
Private Frank Hall, abdomen, mortally.
Private Alfred Mapes, second finger amputated.
Private Sylvester Weaver, left shoulder.
Private Joseph Woolman, breast.
Private Wm. H. Hoffman, killed.
Private A. Beattie, heart, killed.
Private B. F. Catlin, head, killed.
Private R. Emory, breast.
Private D. C. Shultus, hand.
Private Geo. Brimmer, missing.
Private Peter Duross, left hand.
Private S. Corbett, breast.
Private Patrick Conway, leg.
Private Stepher Brimmer, left shoulder.
Sergeant Geo. Smith, Co. H, killed.
Privates Moses Wright, A. J. Wickers, and Corporal Jno. Cullen, Co. H; Campbell Hospital, Washington.
Sergeant W. W. Hawkins, Co. I, right leg amputated.
Sergeant H. P. Eldridge, Co. I, slightly.
Corporal Jabez Eld ridge, Co. I, killed.
Private John Kithredge, Co. I; Carver Hospital.
Private J. Carey, Co. I; Campbell Hospital, Washington.
Privates Ira Hall, A. Vangilder, Co. I; Armory
Square Hospital, Washington.
Private Henry Bush, Co. I; Stanton Hospital, Washington.
Sergeant Wm. Mabb, Co. K, killed.
Sergeant Chas. Danford, Co. K, right thigh.
Private J. Egan, Co. K; Finley Hospital.
The bodies of Captains Barnes and Bailey, and Lieutenants Eldridge and Gray, were left on the field.
Captains Beekman, Randles and Fitch, and Lieutenants Bailey, Sherwood and Bartles are still at Fredericksburg.
Adjutant Gifford and Lieutenants Bramhall, Kincaid, Ball, Ingraham and Fitch, are at the Georgetown Hospital, and are doing well.
The papers of Troy and Hudson Cities, and Counties of Washington, Warren and Allegany please copy.     F. J. B.

Sam Peters on the Late Battle.
The following from S. M. Peters of the 93d regiment to his friends in this village, have been handed in for publication:

WASHINGTON, May 19, 1864.
DEAR FRIENDS: You will probably hear all kinds of stories about the battle of Spotsylvania Court House, fought on the 12th of May. Take the facts from an eye witness. Our division (Birney's) stormed the rebel line and carried two lines of entrenchments with the bayonet, killing, wounding and capturing a rebel division of three brigades and forty-two pieces of cannon.
We took one Major General and one Brigadier General. What was done in other parts of the field I know not, but I know what I write. The 93d took a battery of six brass twelve pounders, one of the guns was upside down, and while a party of men were laboring to turn the gun over, the rebel sharpshooters from the hills on the right and left peppered us all the time. I was standing on the rebel breastwork near Col. Crocker and Lieut. Newcomb, when a bullet struck me in the right groin and immediately another struck me in the left hip and knocked me down as quick as if I had "been shot." After expressing my sentiments awhile as I lay in the mud I was carried off by two men and laid down by a brook where I saw thirty-four captured cannon carried to the rear. A party of the 93d cast off the overturned gun from the carriage and buried it, and mounted guard over it all night, the next morning they dug it up, mounted it and hauled it away. The battle of Spotsylvania Court House was a touch above any general training I ever attended and the list of killed and wounded will be likely to prove it. We fought the gray backs from the 5th to the 12th, they under cover, we the attacking party, and my acquaintance with the boasted chivalry of the South has not exalted them much in my estimation. On the morning of the 6th our Brigade led by Col. Crocker pushed through the woods, driving the rebels from four lines of log breastworks, and keeping them on the flying run two miles. Their method of "breaking files to the rear" is on the whole rather undignified. They never rise to the perpendicular, but with the head lower than the seat of honor, bowse through the bushes like a drove of big woodchucks. I have been under fire eight conservative days, and consider myself competent to give an opinion, and my opinion is that on open ground with equal numbers we can manufacture the chivalry into sausage meat inside of an hour. Dr. Gray's son, Liston, was killed on the 5th. I hid his body and can find it again if not taken away.    S. M. Peters.

To the mustered-out Battalion of the 93d New York Veteran Volunteers:
Ye are mustered out, ye glorious men,
And the ringing peal of your battle shout
Is heard no more in the woodland glen
Where your earthlives poured so freely out;
Perhaps your spirits linger now
Amid the lurid smoke and flame,

Where every dying hero's brow
Was wreathed in never-dying fame.
Ye are mustered out, ye glorious men,
And I love to think as the hot tears gush
How ye thundered through that woodland glen,
With a wild hurrah and a headlond [sic] rush
Cheering, rallying, onward still!
The ranks grew thin, but the line swept on,
And the flower flag flew from hill to hill
Till the field was ours, and the victory won.
                   S. M. Peters.

TROY DAILY TIMES.
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, JUNE 18, 1864.
The Casualties in the Ninety-Third.
Correspondence of the Troy Daily Times.
WASHINGTON, June 14th, 1864.
I send you a correct list of the casualties in the Ninety-third New York regiment, Major Samuel McConihe commanding, up to May 31st. Some of the slightly wounded have returned to the regiment for duty, since the above date, and consequently are not reported. It is taken from the morning report books of the several companies.
W. M. C.

Company A.
Killed--Sergeant E. Fletcher, privates L. Frederick, J. C. Carpenter, J. Harvitz, H. Merrilo, L. Page, O. M. Russell, J. Scribner, A. Wells, A. Hastings, J. W. Hays, H. Johnson.
Wounded--Adjutant H. Gifford, Capt. Wm. Randles, First Lieut. Joseph S. Little, Second Lieut. O. B. Ingraham, First Sergeant Jos. M. Wood (since died), Corporals P. Hurson, P. Bump, C. A. Culver, L. J. Jenks, R. Bump, privates J. Benjamin, T. Bolton, E. Bentley, R. Church, P. McCabe, C. Cross, C. Devis, J. Strong, A. Fulton, W. Gifford, G. Green, J. Harris, A. J. Dickens, B. Latham, M. Marrion, H. Ross, H. Remington, H. Stevens, W. G. Russell, A. D. Smith.
Missing--J. Maholland, A. Sears.

COMPANY B.
Killed--Corporal E. M. Kown, privates W. Chelley, E. Hall, D. Van Buren, D. McVay.
Wounded--SFirst Lieut. E. S. Coner, Second Lieut. Geo. Bushnell, Sergeants J. N. Conine, I. M. Sedwick, T. J. Taylor, Corporals J. N. Grant, S. G. Payne, jr., provates Stewart G. Allen, C. H. Ashley, H. Burnham, U. Baker, D. A. Grant, O. Green, J. M. Griffith, C. Goebell, T. R. Jones, E. Vreeland, G. W. Loan, C. J. Wilmott, Wm. Nichols.

COMPANY C.
Killed--Capt. D. E. Barnes, Corporal A. A. Perry, privates R. Wallace, W. H. Ross, Geo. Hettinger.
Wounded--First Lieut. S. D., Second Lieut. C. Barnes, Sergeants C. W. Wallace, C. F. Myers, Corporals R. C. Wallace, W. R. Johnson, H. C. Taber, privates J. M. Brown, B. F. Emerson, C. L. Hastings, J. Hanratty, W. Holden, P. Lally, T. Mason, H. G. Morse, O. McGuire, J. McNealy, B. M. Richardson, M. Riley, M. Rodgers, T. Ryan, J. C. Shaw; H. D. Spicer, J. A. Tupper, J. Whitehead, M. Harrigan, J Burns.
Killed--Privates T. Kennedy, A. Lewis, E. Moore, T. Wilson, E. Rice.
Wounded--Sergeants T. Kirkham, A. T. Potter, T. Purcell, Corporals E. Brown, G. H. Bontly, Privates A. Armes, H. F. Babcock, J. Costello, A. J. Cook, W. J. Evans, A. Gardner, J. Masters, L. Swart, E. Van Slyke, W. E. Osborn, Erwin Green, J. Booth, J. H. Lawrence, A. C. Bently, J. Moore.

COMPANY E.
Killed--Privates H. W. McCauley, D. Sullivan, N. P. Greene, J. F. Holmes, J. D. Barker, S. C. Bennett.
Wounded--Capt. H. C. Newton, First Lieut. W. L Branhall, Second Lieut. J. J. Sherwood, Sergeants G. H. Blackman, G. D. Blackman, H. Robins, H. Plank, Corporals F. M. Rood, H. Holden, R. W. Lampman, T. Bruse, J. O. Welsh, privates E. Cronk, D. Mapes, R. Franklin, J. Oust, A. T. Hayes, H. McManaman, M. McMahon, J. Fairchild, T. Russell, E. Brooks, T. Pendergast, O. Stevenson, N. Ross, G. Ballard, J. C. Wheeler, S. W. Moore, A. J. Allen, J. S. Greene, C. Harrison, P. Comers, J. Beiden, C. N. Briggs, T. Maroney, B. F. Nolts.
Missing—Privates Peter Carr, J. Brooks.

COMPANY F.
Wounded—First Lieut. W. H. Kincaid, privates A. J. Merithew, J. Manler, A. Knowlton, D. McWhorter, C. Rhodes, S. Wait, J. Ray, J. Turner, Wm. Tombs, O. Bently, J. Kennedy, L. Close, A. Cook.
Missing—Second Lieut. W. B. Mosiere.

COMPANY G.
Killed—Second Lieut. Liston Gray, Corporal W. B. Peck, Provates A. Beattie, B. F. Catlin, W. H. Hoffman, A. J. Slason.
Wounded—Capt. W. V. S. Beekman, First Lieut. F. S. Bailey, Corporal G. W. Shealy, Privates S. Brimmer, P. Duress, R. Emery, W. Maloney, A. L. Mape, D. Shultes, J. Noolman, J. Keer, S. Weaver, A. H. Esterbrook.
Missing—Sergeant E. Dubois, Privates G. Briner, B. F. Hall.
Killed—Sergeant George Smith, Sergeant L. S. Gibson, Privates J. Donnelly, W. Emerson, J. Mehan.
Wounded—Corporals C. Larose, T. Callan, S. W. Peters, C. Russell, Privates R. Balcom, J. Bentley, J. Campbell, B. H. Decker, J. Duell, C. Golden, W. Hagen, A. Lord, B. Langdon, D. Monger, P. Worton, M. Wright, A. J. Nickens.

COMPANY I.
Killed—First Lieut. N. P. Eldridge, Corporal J. B. Eldridge, Privates B. Murray, Geo. Balcom.
Wounded—First Sergeant W. B. Barber, Sergeant A. Robertson, Sergeant W. W. Hawkins, Corporal G. W. Orentt, privates A. P. Agott, J. Easy, Ira Hall. J. R. Kittridge, J. Lellen, J. L. Morehouse, H. Moon, O. Sprague, A. J. Smith, W. Thomson, A. Vanguilder, E. A. Granger, Thomas Davis, I. Barrington, J. J. Learles, H. Bush, L. Kennedy, S. H. Hunlers.
Missing—Privates Jacob Young, M. Davis, J. Kenyon, J. Pettis, D. E. Jones, B. Stevens.

COMPANY K.
Killed—Sergeant W. H. Mabb.
Wounded—Capt. Edson Fitch, Sergeants S. K. Huggins, C. H. Danforth, Corporals George H. Crabb, (died since), A. H. Tracy, J. Glade, W. O. Baldwin, L. C. Bradley, P. Collins, A. B. Cole, J. L. Clark, Privates R. Flunery, D. Fish, W. Gallaghar, J. Handerham, W. Jones, J. Lenman, J. Lotrace, C. Markham, T. O'Hare, P. O'Shea, J. Rourk, J. Roony, G. T. Sawbrook, A. Slat, J. W. Shaw, D. Vanderveer, J. White.

TROY DAILY TIMES.
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, JULY 27, 1864.
From the Ninety-third—List of Killed and Wounded.
Correspondence of the Troy Daily Times.
WASHINGTON, July 25, 1864
I have not written you of late on account of again laying down my pen and taking up the sword in defense of the capital and our country. The clerks volunteered and were immediately armed and equipped and marched to the trenches in front of Forts Stevens and Slocum, where we remained four days, doing guard duty and improving the rifle-pits. Our rations of "salt horse" and "hard tack" were in abundance, and the few old soldiers among us knew how to "forage," and chickens, geese and vegetables adorned the "officers' mess."
An alarm in camp reminded me of times in the Old Second when a pig appearing on the picket line would cause the long roll to be beaten and the whole camp would be under arms. Gen. Phelps would swear that the "Second" were on a pig-stealing expedition, ("and he was right,") and order us back to our quarters. The second night we were in the trenches a colored soldier sleeping on the porch of the house, probably sleeping too soundly, and having an attack of the night-mare, got up and at a _.40 gait ran through the house and through the camp, crying, "the rebels are coming." We were up and in arms immediately, horses saddled, and all eager for a brush. The picket officer reported that all his pickets were captured, and he "only remained to tell the story." I had my battalion in line about fifteen minutes, and as "I could not see it," they were dismissed and we retired to our blanket and slept soundly till morning, when we found out that the "captured pickets" had as good a nap in their tents as we had. After the rebels left we were ordered home again and complimented on general orders by Gen. Meigs, Quartermaster General. We are now drilling every night, and if occasion requires, we will be found at our posts.
Capt. Plumb, of the Harris cavalry, is in the city, wounded, but doing well. He will probably return home in a few days.
From the Ninety-third regiment I hear good accounts. They are in the first line of rifle pits, and out of the "Corporal's guard" constituting the regiment they are daily losing men—more than their share. I enclose a list of casualties in the regiment during the months of May and June, which is official. Washington county papers please copy.
MAY
Killed--S. Daniel, J. F. Berger, A. T. Hayes, E; J. Walsh, F.
Wounded—Co. B—Corporal E. Stevens, privates F. Newdorf, C. J. Wilmott, Co. C—Private E. Morley. Co. E—Privates E. Bristol, E. Ozoak, W. H. Nelson. Co. F—Corporal A. C. Gibbs, privates A. J. Merithew, D. S. French, E. A. Sweat, S. Murdock, Wm. Snow, J. Windell, First Sergeant A. J. Gibbs. Co. G—Sergeant C. Wier, privates J. Royce, J. Slyfield. Co. H— Sergeant O. Allen. Co. I—Sergeant J. Sears, privates B. Stevens, S. W. Sampson, John Kenyon. Co. K—Corporal J. S. Fales, private T. Burke.
Missing—F. A. Granger, Co. I.
JUNE
Killed—G. W. Cook, J. Walsh, F; A. Lawton, J. M. Wilson, G.
Wounded—Co. A—Private Chas. French. Co. B—Private J. H. Shinkle. Co. C—Sergeant J. W. Ross. Co. P—Private E A. Ogden. Co. E—Privates W. W. Moore, J. Conners, Co. F—Privates John Kelly, G. McDonald, J. E. Aulen, A. Conklin, A. Fisher, D. Farr, W. Marshall, Co. G—Lieut. J. Kennedy, Co. I—Private C. W. Harrington. Co. K—Sergeant G. Hagner,
Corporal W. Maddington, privates B. F. Barker, M. Cahill, L. Swan, W. Jamison, W. J. Halefeule.
Missing—Privates W. J. Roscraft, B; W. H. Rising, E; Sergeant W. W. Clash, G; privates M. Hagan, H; C. Wagner, John Austin, Thos. Carroll, P. Leroy, D. Millington.
RECAPITULATION.
Killed                    56
Wounded            300
Missing                24
Total                   380
We have had a fine rain last night and to-day, which ought to have one good effect, and that is to bring down the price of vegetables and market truck generally.
Truly yours, "EGO."

TROY DAILY TIMES.
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, AUG. 6, 1864.
A Letter from the Ninety-Third.
The following extract from a recent letter written by an officer in the Ninety-third regiment, which was principally raised in Washington county, one company of which was recruited by Capt. Samuel McConihe, of this city, (now Major in the same regiment,) may be of interest to many who have friends in the regiment:
"The Major is well, never better. He has led us in many a long and Weary march and many a hard-fought battle. In the former he has given the men all the rest he possibly could, which, I am sorry to say, some leaders study but little; in the latter, he is brave and cool; the men see it and will follow him with respect and confidence. It was by his presence of mind that many of our regiment were saved from being taken prisoners on that unlucky day, the 22d of June. Our men were throwing up breastworks, had their knapsacks unslung when the regiment on our left broke in a panic. Our men started to run, also, but a word from the Major—'Men, to your works'—brought them all back in line, but when he saw we were flanked, he gave the order to 'left face,' and we retired in good order under the circumstances. Our men kept all together, but had they run in the first place, they might like a great many others have run right into the enemy's arms, for they were behind, before and on one flank, a pretty bad position for us. It was the first time the old Second corps had ever been known to run. The men felt very badly, but it could not have been prevented by them, and was no fault of the old Third division. We have been busy tearing down old works, and day before yesterday were out building a covered way for troops. Our corps has done nothing else since we left the front line. It rained all day—being the first rain in eight weeks—and I was completely drenched through. As I had no change of clothes, I rolled myself up the blanket at night, and slept well; but the next morning the clothes did not feel quite so the first going off, I can assure you. We went to the left, last Monday, expecting to meet the enemy, but after waiting all day and night and him not forthcoming. Since then we have been in camp. We have put up more breastworks, in this campaign, than the army of the Potomac did in the two previous years. When the boys in my company complain of being tired, I say, 'Boys, it may be the means of saving even one life, and that will pay for all your trouble.' They see it in that light and work cheerfully on. Every day adds strength to our works. We have some very heavy guns, and every night there is an artillery duel, but we have become so accustomed to the noise that it does not disturb our rest. Gen. Patrick met our regiment one day, on the march, when he rode up and said: 'Boys, you have done well, I am proud of you.' He fought hard to keep us as provost guard, but Gen. Meade wanted Pennsylvanians. The money you sent was a perfect God-send. I had borrowed all I could--and that was but little, as the Paymaster has not been around for some months and everyone is out. And then everything is so high—butter $2.50 a can, and I do not believe there are two pounds in one of them."

Ninety-third Regiment.
List of casualties in the Ninety-third regiment New York volunteers, Second Brigade, Third division, Second Army corps, in the action of Aug. 16th, 1864, near Deep Bottom, Va.
Killed--Corporal Richard A. Burn, Co. C; privates Andrew Peterson, B; John Pettys, I; Jas. Dorsey, K.
Wounded--Capt. Wm. H. Kincaid, Co. I, leg, since amputated; Sergeant-Major Geo. E. Spencer, groin, leg and foot; Sergeant Jerome Sears, I, lung and arm amputated; Corporal Ziba Remington, A, arm; privates Robert Irving, A, hand; Thomas Barney, B, hand; John Miller, B, foot; Addison Burnham, B, leg, slight; Charles W. Cowles, C, lung and arm; John Johnson, F, shoulder and taken prisoner; Lewillen Solomon, G, hand; Leander Bartlett, H, left arm; Andrew Neiss, H, breast; John McGrath, K, foot, and taken prisoner; James L. Clarke, K, arm; Edward Stone, K, thigh, slight.
Missing--Capt. Henry C. Newton, Co. E; Sergeant Thos. J. Taylor, B; Corporal Robert C. Wallace, C; privates Frederick Bonta, Nathan B. Haller, ____ Swiftriger, A; Michael Rogers, Chas. Jencks, C; James Lainson, Francis Marks, John Minsing, D; W. Brooks, E; Albert Cork, Lewis Close, F; James Stewart, Patrick O'Mallie, Dawrence Phum, James Murier, Chas. McKenon, Antoine Landrock, G; Nathan I. Eldridge, Jas. McCarthy, Edward Bremer, James McKenzie, Idoniah Carmile, Stephen Dorsey, I; George Carey, K.
Recapitulation--Officers missing, 1; officers wounded, 1; enlisted men killed, 4; enlisted men wounded, 17; enlisted men missing, 27; total,
50. Losses in brigade, 268.
The following order in relation to the brigade to which the Ninety-third is attached, will be read with interest:

HEADQUARTERS BIRNEY'S DIVISION,
TENTH ARMY CORPS, August 17, 1864.
Orders.--In compliance with order from Corps Headquarters, the Second brigade, Third Division, Second Army corps, is hereby relieved from duty with this division, and will report to its own division commander for duty.
The Brigadier-General commanding cannot part with this brigade without testifying his high sense of its gallantry on the field while under his command. He was an eye-witness of its stand in the rebel works, which was worthy of its old reputation for hard fighting. By command of Brig.-Gen. Wm. Birney.
M. Bailen, Captain and A. A. G:
HEADQUARTERS, SECOND BRIGADE,
THIRD DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS,
August 17, 1864.
Official.
P. E. MARBLE, Captain and A. A. G.

We are indebted to Lieut. D. H. King, for the following list of casualties in the 93d N. Y. Vol., Oct. 27th, 1864:

KILLED.
Co. H—Corporal Isaac R. Knapp. Co. I—Private, Henry Dorscher. Co. C--Private, John Whitehead.

WOUNDED.
Co. A—Corporal, Henry Remington, fingers; Private John Haneford, side; Co. B—Privates William Rath__, head; Gottleib Zeib, head; John Smith. Co. C—Sergeant, Patrick Dougherty, head; Privates—Frank Murray, wrist; Horatio Miels, hand; George Harrison, Wrist; Hiram Babcock, thigh. Co. E—Corporal, Harvey Holden, side; Drummer, Fitz Green Hill, thigh, (shell). Co. G—Sargeant [sic] Bernhold Earish, hand. Co, H—Corporal, Samuel Peters, bowels; Privates George Lloyd, face; James McCaffey, leg; James Taylor. Co, K—Private John Rourk, hand.

MISSING.
Co. A—Privates, Harvey Merrill, John W. Hayes, John Becker, John Duchey, Albert Grabiel. Co. B—Privates Richard Murray, David Hartwich, Fred Wheeler, James R. Green. Co. D—Privates Willard A. Gorton, John F. Holmes, Daniel B. Morgan, John Welch, Charles Gardiner. Co. F—Private, James Law. Co. G—Privates James R. Sherman, John L. Grant, Benj. F. S___, Arch. McNavn, Christopher N____. Co. H—Privates George Luther, Michael Burk. Co. I—Privates, David E. Jones, L___ Andrews, John D__, Edward Buck, Thomas Conoly. Co. K—Priate Sylvester Baldwin.

NARROW ESCAPE. —Colonel Crocker, of the 93d regiment, acting Brigadier-General in place of General Hayes, killed, in a letter dated May 12th, states that he has had three horses shot from under him, and that every officer in his s t a f f had either been killed or wounded.

PERSONAL.—Lieut. James Kennedy, of the Ninety-third regiment, reached home this morning, wounded in the arm. He has letters from members of the regiment which friends can obtain by calling at his residence.

Honor to whom Honor is Due.
Mr. Editor: Will you please inform us why it is that the papers of Rensselaer county, in speaking of the bravery of the New York regiments in the late battles, have taken especial pains to speak of the 93d as one of their regiments. We were surprised at this as we supposed the county of Washington was in a great measure identified with it, as we are sure it is with us. Here is a regiment which was organized and recruited as a Washington county regiment, officered in a great measure by Washington county men, and yet the Trojans, in their usual modest way, claim it as their regiment. As to the residence of some of its present officers we cannot tell, but it is led by a Washington county man who recruited it and has always been its Colonel. Its rank and file were gathered from our hills, and are the patriots here in Washington county who have been made widows and orphans during the last two weeks claiming too much when they insist on claiming the honor won by the 93d as theirs only?
Troy has one or two companies in this noble regiment, and, like their comrades, they fought heroicly [sic]; but aside from this Rensselaer county has had no connection with the regiment. It was encamped at Albany; its Major (until recently) was from Albany; but its Colonel, its officers, its privates were from old Washington county. It was here that its officers came to recruit its ranks a few months since. It is here that friends assume the habiliments of mourning for its gallant dead, and it is here that the dust of some already sleep their last sleep—and the diffident, unassuming Trojans tell us it is "our regiment." As well might we claim the 169th as a Washington county regiment because we furnished two complete companies from this county, although its officers were furnished and many raised in Rensselaer county. We hold, sir, that Washington county has a right (and for her we claim that right) to insist that the honor achieved by the 93d in this its first heavy fighting belongs to us, and that the names of its heroes shall be inscribed on our Roll of Honor.
Hoping you will favor us with your ideas on this subject in your columns soon, I am Yours truly,  JUSTICIA.

—The Ninety-third Regiment N. Y. V. is not likely to be unknown to fame —for somehow or other it gets into the papers quite frequently. A few days since the N. Y. Tribune had three letters from the regiment each one of which contained precisely the same list of the killed and wounded, besides the telegraph the same day repeated the same list. There must be somebody in the regiment whose business it is to keep the papers posted about their achievements. If all other regiments did the same thing the newspapers, would be well supplied with army correspondence.—Troy Whig.
Since the Whig has found out that the 93d is not a Troy regiment, instead of commending it for its "achievements," it has opened its battery of abuse upon those noble heroes lest the people should know how many of them had been slain upon the altar of their country. According to the Whig's own statement, the awful crime which the 93d has been guilty of consists of having three letters containing the list of killed and wounded sent to a New York paper, and for the purpose, as the Whig assumes, of becoming known to "fame." The Whig does not deny that the lists were correct, and the fact that three letters were sent containing the same number of killed and wounded not only substantiates their correctness, but shows conclusively that there was no "somebody in the regiment whose business it is to keep the papers posted about their achievements," otherwise but one letter would have been written. We notice that the Whig relies upon other papers for its army correspondence, and hence he is the last one that should complain of a superabundance of it. This unprovoked attack upon the gallant 93d is both cowardly and mean, and its author is either a fool, copperhead or rascal.
Desirous of adding insult to injury, the Whig further renders itself ridiculous in saying—
"The following which has not yet been in print will be read with pleasure by friends of the regiment in this city and vicinity."
The order of General Birney, which the Whig publishes for the first time, had been "in print" about a week. Enterprising Whig! Fit libeler of a regiment, one-half of whose number are either numbered with the dead or suffering with wounds received in the gallant defence of the old flag. Shame on your jealous, puny soul!

NINETY-THIRD REGIMENT.—We have been shown a very interesting letter from Drum-Major Wm. Witbeck, of the Ninety-third regiment, to his mother in this city. The gallantry of this regiment seems to have been only equalled [sic] by the terrible loss that they have suffered. He says: "While we were falling back the Johnnies followed us pretty close, when Major Mc- Conihe turned the regiment and charged back, driving them over the plank road on a fly.—Major McConihe was alive and well two hours ago; he was as cool as a piece of ice on a December day." Corporal Henry Crabb, of Troy, is dangerously wounded;—the ball went in his shoulder, through his lungs and out at his backbone. Among the other Trojans wounded are Bradley, slightly; G. Hayner, slightly; Danforth, slightly; Gallagher, slightly in the hand.
A telegram was received, last night, from Capt. W. W. Braman, of this city, stating that he was alive and well. We fear the Drum-Major Witbeck is right in fearing "that there will not be many left of the Ninety-third after the fight."

DEATH OF CAPTAIN ELIJAH HOBART.
Captain E. Hobart, formerly of the 93d New York Vols., and for several years a resident of this city, more recently employed in the Treasury Department, having charge of the Transferring Engraving Department at Washington, was one of an excursion party of some twenty persons from Washington city on the 4th of July. Upon arriving near Point of Rocks the party in a pleasure boat was fired upon by a band of guerrillas who were in waiting for the purpose of plundering an expected train on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Captain Hobart refused to leave the boat or to surrender himself a prisoner and was killed by a shot from the guerrilla force, the rest of the party escaped. His remains were interred in the vicinity of Harpers Ferry. The relations of Captain Hobart reside at Hingham, Massachusetts.

DEATH OF A BRAVE OFFICER.—We learn with regret of the death of Capt. H. S. WILSON, of the Ninety-third Regiment N. Y. V., which  occurred night before last at the Island of Three Rivers, in the Harbor of New York, whither he had gone in the charge of recruits. Capt. W. was one of the most prominent officers whose exertions organized, and sent the 93d Regiment to the field. He has served continuously with the regiment ever since its organization, and has participated with it in all the engagements in which it has taken part. He was with Gen. McClellan through all the exciting scenes of the peninsular campaign—a detachment of the regiment with which he was connected being on duty at that General's headquarters. He was a most brave and accomplished officer, and always discharged the arduous and responsible duties imposed upon him by his military position with personal credit to himself and with distinguished advantages to the country. We understand that the disease which caused his death was erysipelas. It is only a few days since he was in this city, apparently in the enjoyment of exuberant health and spirits, and we judge, therefore, that his death must have been very sudden and unexpected.

Death of Capt. Hiram S. Wilson, 93d N. Y. V.
Headquarters 93d N. Y. Vet. Vol. Inf.
Gen. Headq. Army of the Potomac,
Near Brandy Station, Va., March 24, 1864.
Who can speak as his heart would prompt of the death of a true and beloved friend and companion in arms? Who can utter his emotions on hearing that one who has shared his heart, his troubles, his sufferings and privations, has passed away into the Silent Land? Can we, therefore, put upon the cold paper the hot well of grief that filled our hearts to overflowing, when we heard that he whom we had loved so well was at last no more? For Capt. Wilson was dead, no, not dead, for the brave and true never die; but his generous soul has left this world of suffering and gone to that of peace and glory, leaving his name in the hearts of men.
This morning about 10 o'clock the following dispatch was received,
NEW YORK, March 24, 1864.
Col. Crocker: Capt. Wilson died on South Brother's Island, last night, at half-past nine, of erysipelas.
GEO. HARRIS.
and in the absence of Col. Crocker, was handed to Maj. McConihe, who at once communicated the mournful intelligence to the regiment and called a meeting of the officers. We cannot speak of the gloom the awful news occasioned; it was most deep. As delicately as possible it was communicated to the Captain's eldest son, Clarance, who was unable to contain his grief, which was most heart-rending. Through the kindness of his officers, a furlough was immediately procured for him, and he was started on his melancholy journey as soon as possible.
The officers being assembled, the meeting was called to order by Major McConihe, who, in a few-touching remarks introduced the object of the meeting, as follows:
"It is my painful duty, gentlemen, to impart to you the mournful intelligence that our beloved brother-officer, Captain Wilson, is no more. A dispatch to that effect I have just received.—Would that I were able to speak of the sad events as I could wish. His death was sudden and unexpected, and has taken us all by surprise. He was identified with the organization from the commencement and was beloved by us all. Your faces tell how we mourn him. Noble, kind and generous in his nature; sympathizing and benevolent, he was a true friend and brother to us all. To his company he was as a father. So warm-hearted and genial was he, such a friend to all, that all who knew him loved him, no enemies had he. The lone and wearied wayfarer, roofless and homeless, always found a bed in Capt. Wilson's tent. His heart was open to the private soldier as well as to the officer, for he had no feelings of caste. He was a true and practical philanthropist and humanitarian [sic], a modest and unassuming, self-abnegating man; a true patriot, a brave soldier, an efficient and capable officer. My brother officers, we all lament and deplore his loss. We shall mourn him ever and for aye, and his name we shall ever carry deeply enshrined in our hearts. Never shall we forget him, ever shall we remember him, and our love for him shall never die."
For some moments all were mute, for all were too full for utterance. Many a surcharged heart found vent in tears, and many a strong man wept. At length the senior captain, Dennis E. Barnes, arose and moved
"That a committee of three be appointed to draft resolutions, expressive of the deep emotion of the meeting, and in condolence with the grief of the family of the deceased. The motion being seconded by Quartermaster Fuller, and unanimously adopted, Major McConihe appointed Captains E. Barnes, N. J. Johnson, and P. P. Smith, as such committee. On motion of Captain Johnson, the meeting then adjourned to meet again at seven o'clock P. M.
In the afternoon Colonel Crocker arrived, and at seven o'clock called the meeting to order.
The cairman [sic], Captain Barnes, arose and said:
"Your committee beg leave to report the following preamble and resolutions.
Whereas, we have this day received the mournful intelligence of the death of Hiram S. Wilson, Captain 93d N. Y. Vols., which occurred on the night of the 23d inst., therefore
Resolved, That we deeply deplore the loss to our Regiment and to the Army, by the decease of our brother-in-arms, Capt. Hiram S. Wilson, of this Regiment. By his death this Regiment has sustained an irreparable loss, his brother officers loose a warm-hearted, generous, honorable friend, a genial companion, and our country a brave and chivalrous officer.
Resolved, That the commissioned officers of the Regiment wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days and that the Regimental Colors be draped in mourning for the same length of time.
Resolved, That we sincerely sympathise [sic] with the family of the deceased, in their great affliction, and forward a copy of these resolutions to them as an expression of our sympathy, and that a copy be forwarded to the leading news papers for publication.
On motion of Capt. John Bailey, the resolutions were unanimously adopted.
Captain Nathan J. Johnson then rose and said:
"Gentlemen, at the meeting this morning, though I fain would have spoken
a few words in tribute to our brother, I could not, my grief was too big for words, and though they struggled for utterance [sic], I could not speak them. I loved Captain Wilson, as you all did, as a brother; but I never realized the depth of my affection for him till I received the sad tidings of his death. So unexpected was it to me, for I had but lately heard of him in good health, that it shocked me as I have seldom been before. It overwhelmned [sic] me, the thought that I had lost so true and noble a friend. My heart was swelled in grief, and I found relief but in tears. Oh, I never till then knew how I loved him, how I revered his generous and truly noble character, his high moral worth. His warm and sympathizing heart that loved us all, shall beat for us no more. Lost to us is he now, and never more shall he counsel us as he has counseled us in the past. Oh, how we shall mourn him and cherish his memory in the deepest corners of our hearts.
To all men was he a friend, to none an enemy. He welcomed all to his tent, to his bed, to his table. So generous was he, that he would have shared his last crust with the beggared stranger. What was his was not his alone, but others also and as well. Where will we ever meet another like him? Nowhere; alas, nowhere. We never shall look upon his like again. His large and noble heart was open to all, sharing and sympathizing with us, and the soldier, too, in our troubles and disappointments, our vexations and privations. He made another's woes his own, another's cause was his, and he battled for another's rights as bravely and valiently [sic] as for his own. Why then should we not love him? How can we help loving him? he whose heart has ever been with ours. He has gone, but not from our hearts.
"Of the original captains of this regiment but three of us were left. Now death has taken away one of us, our most beloved brother Wilson. But two of us now remain, and God knows how long we may be spared, or how soon the same shaft may pierce our hearts, that has pierced that of our dear brother. My friends, let us ever, ever mourn him, and never let us forget him. In this heart that has so long beat in unison with his, his memory will be enshrined."
Colonel Crocker arose and spoke substantially as follows:
My friends and Brother Officers: I can add but little to what has already been so well and so worthily said by the able officers who have preceded me, but I too desire to raise my voice in merited praise of that noble spirit which has but lately left us for that Better Land. I have known Capt. Wilson well for some fifteen or twenty years—longer and perhaps better than any of you. I know the pure and noble sentiments that actuated his life; I know what warm and generous impulses ever moved his manly heart, that now, alas, lies cold and motionless in death; his high and lofty patriotism, and his strong and holy integrity of purposes. He was one of the few we met in our life journey whose heart and right hand of fellowship is extended to each and all, high or low, rich or poor. With you I mourn him most deeply, most sadly, for he loved us all, every one of us, I know it well and truly.
Identified as he was with this regiment from its organization, his heart was bound up in it, as well as it could be in any one thing. He cherished its honor and its fame as his own. Never would he admit that it had its equal in the service. He always claimed it was better officered, better drilled, better disciplined, than any other,—that no higher or holier purpose ever stirred the hearts of men than that animating the hearts of the Ninety-Third. You, gentlemen, were his pride and his boast, and he loved you truly and faithfully. Let us return it if possible in like measure, for well was he worthy of our deepest love. His high moral nature rebelled at anything wrong or unjust, and if an unguarded moment of passion he let fall an unjust word, scarcely had it died from his lips but all anger was gone, and he was ready to make amends for it; and not in words alone, but in deeds also,—by every means in his power he showed it was not meant. Such was that spirited, noble, generous heart that is now stilled in the silence of the grave. God bless him, for aye and ever more.
On motion of acting Adjutant Bramhall, it was unanimously
Resolved, That a copy of the above resolutions be suitably engrossed, and presented to the family of the deceased after receiving the signatures of the commissioned officers of the regiment.
On motion of Captain N. J. Johnson, seconded by Captain Edson Fitch, it was unanimously
Resolved, That a committee be appointed to confer with the widow of the deceased in regard to the erection of a suitably inscribed monument to his memory, by the officers of this Regiment.
And Colonel Crocker appointed Captains Dennis E. Barnes, Edson Fitch,
Henry C. Newton, Nathan J. Johnson, and John Bailey, to constitute such committee.
On motion of Captain William Randles, the meeting then adjourned.

ARRIVAL OF THE NINETY-THIRD.—The Ninety-third Regiment New York State Veteran Volunteers arrived in Albany this morning, the 3d inst., thus completing three and half years of active warfare. They were   handsomely cared for by the Citizens' Committee. This regiment left Albany on the first day of February, 1862, for the seat of war, mustering 38 officers and 983 men, and at various times since that date there have joined the command 684, making an aggregate of 1705 men. The regiment on the 29th day of June, 1865, near Bailey's Cross Roads, Va., mustered out 23 officers and 515 men; of the original number, only 2 officers and 85 men go home with it. The following are the battles in which the regiment has participated, viz.:—Yorktown, Williamsburg, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomy,
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, Poplar Spring Church, Boydton, Plankroad, Jettersville, Sailor's Creek, High Bridge, and the surrender of the Rebel army of Northern Virginia, and Gen. Lee at Clover Hill, Va., April 9th, 1865. The following comprises the field and staff officers:
Colonel--Haviland Gifford.
Lieutenant-Colonel--Jay H. Northup.
Major--George Bushnell.
Surgeon--Strowbridge Smith.
Assistant Surgeon--Lorenzo W. Bailey.
Acting Adjutant--Second Lieutenant Berthold Emisch.
Quartermaster--First Lieutenant David H. King.

The following compose the line officers, viz:
Company A--Captain, Thomas P. Fuller; First Lieutenant, Campbell W. Wallace; Second Lieutenant, Orville T. Perkins.
Company C--Captain, Charles F. Myer; First Lieutenant, Albert J. Muzzy; Second Lieutenant, George Haynor.
Company D—Captain John J. Sherwood; First Lieutenant, Archibald Robertson; Second Lieutenant, William Bull.
Company G—First Lieutenant, James Kennedy; Second Lieutenant, Charles L. Russell.
Company F—First Lieutenant; Griffin W. Wilson; Second Lieutenant, James W. Nutting.
Company H—Captain, James W. Godden; First Lieutenant, George H. Blackman; Second Lieutenant, Lewis W. Hamlin.
Company I—Captain, John M. Conine; Second Lieutenant, Berthold Ernisck, Acting Adjutant.
Such in brief is a partial history of this regiment and of the officers and men who were a part of that Grand Old Army of the Potomac and the Army of Liberty; and in assuming the garb of the warrior, they have never lost their domestic character, fully believing they were engaged in a solemn duty, and in the future will adopt, either in the North or South, the pursuits in which they were engaged before the rebellion broke out. They will not be puffed up or boastful, nor restless and lawless, but return to the walks of civil life. The domain which they have helped to conquer opens a larger field for industry and energy than ever known before on this continent. The landowners of the South are impoverished and helpless. The labor system is overthrown and society is disorganized. The rehabilitation of the South will be based upon the Northern enterprise and Northern labor, and the men who will eventually raise those States from their present decaying and wretched condition, are our soldiers of the army. They have seen with glistening eyes the fruitful fields and prairies laden with their merry wealth, and they will find their way thither and there make the land they have robbed of its baneful curse again to blossom like a garden. Thus they will have performed a double duty, first in destroying the fancied prosperity of the Slave States and then in raising then to true wealth and greatness.
(Alb. Journal, July 3d, 1865)

TROY DAILY TIMES.
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, AUG. 6, 1864.
A LETTER FROM THE NINETY-THIRD.
The following extract from a recent letter written by an officer in the Ninety-third regiment, which was principally raised in Washington county, one company of which was recruited by Capt. Samuel McConihe, of this city, (now Major in the same regiment,) may be of interest to many who have friends in the regiment.
"The Major is well, never better. He has led us in many a long and weary march and many a hard-fought battle. In the former he has given the men all the rest he possibly could, which, I am sorry to say, some leaders study but little; in the latter, he is brave and cool; the men see it and will follow him with respect and confidence. It was by his presence of mind that many of our regiment were saved from being taken prisoners on that unlucky day, the 22d of June. Our men were throwing up breastworks, had their knapsacks unslung when the regiment on our left broke in a panic. Our men started to run, also, but a word from the Major--'Men, to your works'--brought them all back in line, but when he saw we were flanked, he gave the order to 'left face,' and we retired in good order under the circumstances. Our men kept all together, but had they run in the first place, they might like a great many others have run right into the enemy's arms, for they were behind, before and on one flank, a pretty bad position for us. It was the first time the old Second corps had ever been known to run. The men felt very badly, but it could not have been prevented by them, and was no fault of the old Third division. We have been busy tearing down old works, and day before yesterday were our building a covered way for troops. Our corps has done nothing else since we left the front line. It rained all day--being the first rain in eight weeks, and I was completely drenched through. As I had no change of clothes, I rolled myself up the blanket at night and slept well; but the next morning the clothes did not feel quite so the first, going off, I can assure you. We went to the left, last Monday, expecting to meet the enemy, but after waiting all day and night found him not forthcoming. Since then we have been in camp. We have put up more breastworks, in this campaign, than the army of the Potomac did in the two previous years. When the boys in my company complain of being tired, I say, 'Boys, it may be the means of saving even one life, and that will pay for all your trouble.' They see it in that light and work cheerfully on. Every day adds strength to our works. We have some very heavy guns, and every night there is an artillery duel, but we have become so accustomed to the noise, that it does not disturb our rest. Gen. Patrick met our regiment one day, on the march, when he rose up and said: 'Boys, you have done well; I feel proud of you.' He fought hard to keep us as provost guard, but Gen. Meade wanted Pennsylvanians. The money you sent us was a perfect God-send. I had borrowed all I could--and that was but little, as the Paymaster has not been around for some months and everyone is out. And then everything is so high—butter $2.50 a can, and I do not believe there are two pounds in one of them."

THE ARGUS.
Established in 1813.
TUESDAY MORNING, JULY 4, 1865.
ARRIVAL OF THE NINETY-THIRD REGIMENT.--
The 93d N. Y. Volunteers arrived in this city yesterday morning, having been in the service three years and a half.
They were handsomely cared for by the Citizen's Committee. This regiment left Albany on the first day of February, 1862, for the seat of war, mustering 38 officers and 983 men, and at various times since that date there have joined the command 684, making the aggregate1of 1705 men. The regiment on the 29th day of June, 1865, near Bailey's Cross Roads, Va., mustered out 23 officers and 515 men; of the original number, only 2 officers and 85 men go home with it. The following are the battles in which the regiment has participated, viz:--Yorktown, Williamsburg, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomoy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, Poplar Spring Church, Boydton, first, Plankroad, Jettersville, Sailor's Creek, High Bridge, and the surrender of the Rebel army of Northern Virginia, and Gen. Lee at Clover Hill, Va., April 9th, 1865. The following comprises the field and staff officers:
Colonel--Haviland Gifford.
Lieutenant- Colonel--Jay H. Northup.
Major--George Bushnell.
Surgeon--Strowbridge Smith.
Assistant Surgeon--Lorenzo W. Bailey.
Acting Adjutant--Second Lieutenant Berthold Emisch.
Quartermaster--First Lieutenant David H. King.
The following compose the line officers, viz:
Company A--Captain, Thomas F. Fuller; First Lieutenant, Campbell W. Wallace; Second Lieutenant, Orville T. Perkins.
Company C--Captain, Charles F. Myer; Second Lieutenant, Albert J. Muzzy; Second Lieutenant, George Haynor.
Company D--Captain, John J. Sherwood; First Lieutenant, Archibald Robertson; Second Lieutenant, William Bill.
Company G--First Lieutenant, James Kennedy; Second Lieutenant, Charles L. Russell.
Company F--First Lieutenant, Griffin W. Wilson; Second Lieutenant, James W. Nutting.
Company H--Captain, James W. Godden; First Lieutenant, George H. Blackman; Second Lieutenant, Lewis W. Hamlin.
Company I--Captain, John M. Conine; Second Lieutenant, Berthold Ernisck, Acting Adjutant.

 

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