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Equal Employment Program protects each of us from discrimination in employment, promotion, training and other personnel actions regardless of race, color, religion, gender including sexual harassment, national origin, age, mental and/or physical disability, or reprisal (for participating in protected EEO activity).

Who is covered?

EEO is for EVERYONE (not solely for protected groups); it’s the LAW!

If you are New York National Guard technician or military personnel, applicant for technician or military employment, and feel you are being discriminated against, please contact the State Equal Employment Manager (SEEM) office for assistance.


   Holocaust Remembrance Day (5 May 2016) 

&

Days of Remembrance  (1 - 8 May 2016)

 “Learning from the Holocaust:  Acts of Courage”

Each year, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum leads the nation in commemorating Days of Remembrance. Days of Remembrance was established by the U.S. Congress to memorialize the six million Jews murdered in the Holocaust, as well as the millions of non-Jewish victims of Nazi persecution.

What is the Holocaust?  Who are we remembering?

The Holocaust was the state-sponsored, systematic persecution and annihilation of European Jews by Nazi Germany and its collaborators between 1933 and 1945. Jews were the primary victims—six million were murdered; Roma (Gypsies), people with disabilities, and Poles were also targeted for destruction or decimation for racial, ethnic, or national reasons. Millions more, including homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, Soviet prisoners of war, and political dissidents, also suffered grievous oppression and death under Nazi Germany.

Why do the Days of Remembrance dates change from year to year?

The Israeli Parliament (Knesset) established Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom Hashoah), to be observed on the 27th day of Nisan of the Hebrew calendar. The Hebrew calendar is a lunar calendar so the date changes each year in the United States. Observances and remembrance activities occur throughout the week of Remembrance, which runs from the Sunday before Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom Hashoah) through the following Sunday. Please view the Museum’s Remembrance Day calendar for future dates, www.ushmm.org/remembrance/dor/calendar.

References:

www.ushmm.org/remembrance/dor/calendar

https://www.deomi.org/

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Asian Pacific Heritage Month (May 1 – 31)

“Walk Together, Embrace Differences, Build Legacies.”

The month of May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, a time to commemorate and celebrate the many accomplishments and contributions of immigrant, refugee, and American born Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders who through sacrifice, perseverance, education, government, and leadership have helped transform this country into the greatest and most benevolent nation in history. Early Asian Pacific-Americans worked long hours for little pay and were discriminated against just for being different. Today, Asian Pacific-Americans earn more, own more, and are better educated than all other American minorities (U.S. Census, 2007). It is through vision, sacrifice, and perseverance that Asian Pacific-Americans have accomplished so much since they first arrived in this land of opportunity in 1843. Let us take time this month of May to celebrate the many achievements and contributions Asian Pacific-Americans have made to the United States.

Asian Americans:

 Americans of Asian descent having origins in any of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent, to include Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Vietnamese, Korean, and Japanese. According to the 2010 Census, Asian Americans comprise 5.6% (17,320,856) of the U.S. population and grew 46% faster than any other racial group between 2000 and 2010. Census projections expect the number to increase to more than 40 million by 2050.

Pacific Islander:

Americans who have ancestry in Polynesia (including Hawaii, American Samoa, New Zealand), Melanesia (including Fiji Island, New Guinea), and Micronesia (including Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Marshall Islands, Palau). According to the 2010 Census, Pacific Islanders make up .40% (1,225,195) of the U.S. population and grew 40% faster than any other racial group between 2000 and 2010. Census projections expect the number to increase to more than 2.6 million by 2050.

 

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Reference:   https://www.deomi.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asian Pacific Heritage Month (May 1 - 31)

"Many Cultures, One Voice:  Promote Equality and Inclusion."

The month of May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, a time to commemorate and celebrate the many accomplishments and contributions of immigrant, refugee, and American born Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders who through sacrifice, perseverance, education, government, and leadership have helped transform this country into the greatest and most benevolent nation in history. Early Asian Pacific-Americans worked long hours for little pay and were discriminated against just for being different. Today, Asian Pacific-Americans earn more, own more, and are better educated than all other American minorities (U.S. Census, 2007). It is through vision, sacrifice, and perseverance that Asian Pacific-Americans have accomplished so much since they first arrived in this land of opportunity in 1843. Let us take time this month of May to celebrate the many achievements and contributions Asian Pacific-Americans have made to the United States.

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DEOCS Training Slides

 

NY National Guard Complaint Activity:

New York is proud to post the record of its compliance with the “Notification and Federal Employment Anti-Discrimination and Retaliation Act” (No FEAR Act):

 

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URL: http://dmna.ny.gov/eo/
Page Last Modified: 04 May 16