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Erie County, New York
Civil War Newspapers:
General War News

The Buffalo Meeting.
We shall publish the proceedings of the great meeting at Buffalo, in defence of Constitutional liberty to-morrow.
The Eve. Journal affects to contrast this meeting with the one held in Albany, for the same purpose. "Its utterances, it says, were generally patriotic. It was free from the coarseness and ran of Copperhead demonstrations."
The resolutions of the Buffalo meeting were the same as those adopted at Albany and indeed the Albany resolutions have been accepted and reiterated by a score of meetings out West. The letter of Gov. SEYMOUR received the unanimous endorsement of the meeting, and every mention of his name was received with applause.
The only letter published with the proceedings is that of Judge PARKER, who was invited to be present, but could not attend. The utterances of the meeting were patriotic; and the Administration will be wise if it heeds them in time.
There was one noticeable feature in the Buffalo meeting which we are surprised escaped the attention of the Journal. It is thus noticed in the Rochester Union:
The most notable feature of the meeting was the speech of Judge George W. Clinton, whose name was rallied around as a tower of strength last fall by the supporters of Wadsworth, and who up to the late blow against Constitutional Freedom acted with the Radicals and Republicans.
A cause which brings such a man as Judge CLINTON into the political arena, under such circumstances, must have a strong hold on the popular heart.

Liberality of the Buffalonians.
BUFFALO, April 22.
The Common Council this P. M. voted an appropriation of $50,000 to equip volunteers and support their families.
A resolution was also adopted that any employee of the city volunteering, should draw his salary while absent, and resume his position on his return.
The citizens' subscription for the aid of volunteers' families, has reached $25,000.
The enthusiasm in the city is unprecedented.

SECOND EDITION.
Governor Seymour and the Buffalo Meeting.
We trust Gov. Seymour will "pause" in his arduous official duties long enough to read the proceedings of the Buffalo meeting, and learn from them a lesson of prudence and moderation which will prove useful to him in the future.—Evening Journal.
The impudence of the above is refreshing! The Buffalo meeting not only responded to and sustained Gov. SEYMOUR'S action, with enthusiasm, but gave to his letter a specific endorsement of the warmest kind. We quote it:
Resolved, That the letter of His Excellency Gov. Seymour, to the Albany meeting, called to assert the right of free speech and individual liberty, has our full endorsement; that we recognize in his manly protest against the exercise of usurped and arbitrary power the spirit of a patriot and a statesman who, while he gives cheerful support to the Government in all its constitutional measures to suppress rebellion, will do all in his power to protect and preserve the rights and liberties of the citizens of the Empire State.
If the Journal would "pause" in its career of cant and falsehood "long enough to read the proceedings of the Buffalo meeting," it might learn a lesson of decency and regard for truth.

TO THE CITIZENS OF BUFFALO.
The late arbitrary arrest of over nine thousand citizens of the Unites States at Vicksburg, without civil process, by the hired minions of the "despotic" Lincoln, must awaken a sentiment of indignation in the heart of every freeman of the North.
Citizens—Your most sacred rights are invaded; your brethren and friends are arrested at the point of the bayonet.
Shall such deeds be perpetrated with impunity and meet with no rebuke from a justly outraged people?
That a proper expression of our "scorn and indignation" may be hurled at our "despotic" ruler, the "hated and detested" Lincoln, a meeting of all those who sympathize with our outraged and down-troden fellow citizens of the sunny South, will be held at St. James' Hall, on Hangman's night, May 29, to support the Constitution both North and South.
—Buff. Ex. COPPERHEAD.

BUFFALO, May 3.
Three companies of volunteers left this afternoon For Elmira. They were  escorted to the depot by the Home Guard, Major Millard Fillmore, Ex-President, commanding in person.—The Home Guard is being thoroughly organized by Millard Fillmore. About 150 members are already enrolled.

The Hon. Sanford E. Church on Arbitrary Arrests.
We quote the following from the able speech of the Hon. Sanford E. Church, at the indignation meeting held in Buffalo last Friday. Every word of his statement is a truth. He says:
The people are alarmed at these aggressions and assumptions of arbitrary power, and why? Within a year this Administration, like all its predecessors, is to come before the people for condemnation or approval, and it will be our duty then to pass upon it according to its merits or demerits. Now, these military arrests and unwarrantable interferences of which I have spoken, indicate—I do not say prove—a purpose to prevent that full and free discussion so necessary if the people are to form an intelligent decision as to the great questions presented to their judgment. I will not charge that this is the design of the party in power. I hope to Heaven it is not, and that some other explanation will be furnished of these acts. But, I tell you, the people never will tolerate even the attempt at a prohibition of their right to such free discussion as they shall deem proper.
The Government cannot appoint Provost Marshals and detectives enough between now and next election to prevent such discussion and to overawe the people. It is shortly to be decided whether the Administration has managed the affairs of the nation with statesmanship, with superior wisdom, with integrity and with a whole-souled desire to restore the Union. If it shall appear that affairs have been so managed, the people will give their verdict of approbation. But if the contrary shall be manifest—if it shall be found that the Administration has wrought for party more than for country; that it has discharged patriotic and able Generals for improper reasons; that while the country was bleeding at every pore corruption has rioted in every department of the Government; if, in short, the men in power are weighed in the balance and found wanting, the people will condemn them and will not tolerate the sign of interference while they thus pronounce their decision. I know that at least 300,000 citizens of this State will rise up as one man to vindicate their right in this regard.
—At Buffalo, the ladies are wearing patriotic aprons, described as follows:
The skirt of the apron is made of red and white stripes, and the square waist of blue, covered with small white stars, and fastened each side with a cockade. The fair Buffalonians are boiling over with excitement and enthusiasm, and many have already tendered their services, declaring themselves ready, any moment, to go as a Florence Nightingale or a Joan of Arc.
They are daughters of Revolutionary mothers.

The Nine Months' Men.
There are good regiments among them, but on the whole the levy for that period was a costly and disastrous experiment. Their term of service was so short that soldierly ambition and military knowledge have both been wanting, and they have rather too eagerly anticipated the end of their career to be very solicitous to make it beneficial to the country or illustrious to themselves.—N. Y. Tribune.
The fault in regard to the Nine Months' levies was that the Government misused them. They would have sufficed to garrison the Forts about Washington, and so have relieved equal numbers having longer terms to serve. Instead of that, they were sent to Florida, Louisiana, and distant points, where they could not become acclimated, and where the transportation to and fro, doubled the cost, and the peril and consumed their scant time. This has not been their fault, and yet the termagants of the Tribune pour out volleys of impertinence and epithet upon them!

Mass Meeting of the Citizens of Erie County.
The Protest of 5,000 Citizens against arbitrary arrests.
Speeches of Hon. Sanford E. Church, Judge Clinton, Dr. F. C. Brunck,
Rev. J. D. Benedict, &c.
From The Buffalo Daily Courier.
It is with unfeigned pleas are that we publish this morning the proceedings of the mass meeting of the citizens of Erie County, held last evening at St. James Hall. None of the appliances usually resorted to for convening large assemblages had been employed, and yet the responses of the people to the simple call of the County Committee was overwhelming. We had expected no such demonstration. In the afternoon a train on the Central road brought in fifteen carloads of citizens from various points in the country, and another train of twenty-eight cars brought about 400 persons from the stations this side of Dunkirk. The passengers on the Central brought with them the Batavia Brass band, and marched up the streets in procession.
About half past seven o'clock, the hall was full, and before eight its entrances were so crowded that many failed to obtain admittance. A little later, the assemblage increasing every moment, a meeting of several thousand people was organized outside. At the lowest calculation some 5.000 people participated in the meetings in and out of the Hall. The character of those composing the multitude was also noticeable. There was not the slightest sign of rowdyism manifested from beginning to end of the proceedings. The men present had come to discharge an earnest duty, and all were calm and thoughtful. In this regard we have never seen a meeting in Buffalo so impressive. It befitted the occasion of it. But neither was there any lack of enthusiasm on the subjects discussed at the meeting. Throughout all the addresses made, there was cheering loud and long, and at times it seemed that the audience in the Hall almost rose from their seats in response to the sentiments of the speakers.
WILLIAM WILLIAMS, Esq. in calling the meeting to order, said:
FELLOW CITIZENS—The Democratic Committee of this country, in view of the important events transpiring, have thought it best to call you together in mass meeting, that you may again renew your pledge of devotion to the Constitution, and your determination to stand by the Union of these States, and, also, to express your sentiments on the noble stand taken by the Governor of the State of New York, in his recent letter protesting against the usurpations of military power.
We stand, fellow-citizens, where we have always stood, ready at all times to furnish men and money to put down the rebellion and sustain the laws of our country. We are, also, prepared to stand by the great principle that no citizen shall be deprived of his property or his liberty without due process of law, and, if necessary, we are resolved to defend this right with all the power that God has given us.
I thank you, fellow-citizens, for the noble response you have made to the call of the Committee, and for the purpose of organization, I nominate the Hon. JOHN GANSON to preside over your deliberations.
On taking the chair, Mr. Ganson spoke substantially as follows:

MR. GANSON'S SPEECH.
Your invitation to preside at this meeting, has been accepted for the reason that you are "in favor," as the call under which you have assembled, declares, ''of sustaining the guarantees of the Constitution and the inalienable right of citizens to discuss public measures, and to express their opinions upon all subjects affecting the national interests." You are not here to manifest sympathy for any individual, nor to approve of the sentiments of Mr. Vallandigham, or to endorse his action. You are here, however, to avow your decided disapproval of the manner of his "'taking off." For in that you see a disregard by those high in authority, of constitutional obligations, and an infringement of the positive acts of Congress. You are loyal to the Constitution of your country and insist upon an enforcement of its laws. The Constitution declares that "Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech or the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition for a redress of grievances;" that "the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation;" that "no person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise infamous crime unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be deprived of life, liberty or property without due process of law." It further declares, that in "all criminal prosecutions the accused shall enjoy the right of a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury of the State and District wherein the crime shall have been committed."
At its recent session, Congress passed an act, which was approved by President Lincoln on the 3d day of March last, providing among other things, as follows:
"That the Secretary of State and the Secretary of War be and they are hereby directed, as soon as may be practicable, to furnish the judges of the Circuit and District Courts of the United States and the District of Columbia, a list of the names of all persons, citizens of States in which the administration of the laws continued unimpaired in the said federal Courts, who are now, or may hereafter be held as prisoners of the United States, or by order or authority of the President of the United States or either of said Secretaries, in any Fort, Arsenal, or other place as State or other political prisoners, or otherwise than as prisoners of war, the said list to contain the names of all those who reside in the respective jurisdiction of said Judges, or who may be deemed by the said Secretaries, or either of them, to have violated the laws of the United States in any of said jurisdictions, and also the date of the arrest."
The act was passed that the offence of such persons might be laid before a Grand Jury, and the offender, if presented, be punished according to law.
In 1862, Congress passed another law, prescribing the punishment traitorous offences as follows:
"That if any person shall hereafter incite, set on foot, assist or engage in any rebellion or insurrection against the authority of the United States, or the laws thereof, or shall give aid or comfort thereto, or shall engage in or give aid and comfort to any such existing rebellion or insurrection, and be convicted thereof, such person shall be punished by imprisonment for a period not exceeding ten years, or by fine net exceeding ten thousand dollars, and by the liberation of all his slaves, if any he have, or by both of said punishments, at the discretion of the Court."
The proceedings instituted by Gen. Burnside, and sanctioned by the President, are in direct violation of these constitutional guarantees, and of the provisions of these acts, thus recently passed by the Federal Congress and sanctioned by the Federal Executive. It is against these proceedings that we remonstrate. We claim the right to do so. We claim the right of free speech—the right to criticise [sic] the policy of the Government, and to oppose or condemn the action of those who are appointed to administer it. If the right is denied us, we are under a despotism, for no despot can ask for more than the permission to do as unto him may seem necessary, and to deny the right to his subjects to question his authority or to condemn or criticize [sic] his acts.
We are in favor of furnishing to those in authority the men and means necessary for the prosecution of the pending war, until the armed force of the rebellion is broken, and till those who are engaged in it sue for peace. We are opposed under any circumstances and in any event to a voluntary dismemberment of the Union, and continue to give a cheerful and cordial support to all proper efforts of the Administration to upheld the Constitution and enforce the laws on every foot of our soil. But we, at the same time, insist that while we demand an observance of the Constitution and laws by our citizens in the disloyal States, the same Constitution and laws shall not be disregarded by those in authority in the loyal States.
We concede that our discussions of public measures and men should in times like these be conducted with especial reference to the public interests, and with a spirit of candor and forbearance, but the right to discuss cannot be yielded one jot or title. The right contended for by us is as clear now in the loyal States as in times of peace. If it is abused, the offender can be punished under the civil laws. The courts are open there, and the course of justice is unimpeded. The right to punish the offender by martial law cannot there rightfully exist. It is forbidden by our constitution and our laws, and would be in direct violation of the first principles of civil liberty. Sir James McIntosh, a jurist of great eminence and ability says "when law is silenced by the noise of arms, the rulers of the armed force must punish equitably as they can those crimes which threaten their own safety and that of society, and no longer. Every moment beyond is usurpation. As soon as the law can act, every other mode of punishing supposed crime is of itself an enormous crime."
We, therefore [sic], say that the mode of punishing offenders in the loyal States, sanctioned by the President, is an "enormous crime," and as such we remonstrate against it.
You are for that purpose assembled. You will in your proceedings be peaceable, in your expressions temperate, in your resolves firm, not here to justify or condemn Vallandigham's speech. I, for one, am not to be drawn into any false issue in discussing this question. Whether he was justified in what he said or not is not the point in dispute. He was arrested at the dead hour of midnight by a military force, and tried by a court martial in a State where no martial law is proclaimed, where there is no rebellion or armed occupation. He has been sentenced by that court and sent across the lines into the hands of the enemy, for no other crime than that of criticising [sic] the administration. Bear in mind that this is a deliberate proceeding on the part of the administration. First came Burnside's "order No. 38" in which he declares that public presses and speakers will be held accountable to him for what they print or speak, and that neither expressed or implied treason will be tolerated in his department. After Vallandigham had been arrested and tried by Court martial, application was made to a Judge of a United States Court for release by writ of habeas corpus. General Burnside deliberately sent into that Court an elaborate justification of Vallandigham's arrest. I desire to call your attention to the principle upon which he claims to justify that act. First, he avers, he will himself support the policy of the government. That is right, and simply his duty as an officer of the army. He then says:
If the people do not approve that policy, they can change the constitutional authorities of that Government, at the proper time and by the proper method. Let them freely discuss the policy in proper tone; but my duty requires me to stop license, and intemperate discussion.
This is his justification, approved and endorsed by the administration in the fact that the findings of Burnside's military court have been sustained. What does it amount to? An army officer tells the free citizens of Ohio that he will allow free discussion in a 'proper tone,' but he will not permit 'license or intemperate discussion!' Where is our boasted right of free speech, if it is left to any man to say what may and what may not be spoken? The very moment you commit to an irresponsible authority, the power to decide what shall and what shall not be said or written, the right of free speech is gone. "You may speak what you please," says Burnside, "so long as I shall approve it!" What would my friend Clapp think of the freedom of the press, if an order from Washington permitted him to print only what I approved? Free press is a mockery with such a trammel upon it as this. And how dangerous is the principle! Burnside undoubtedly supposed that the speech of Vallandigham was treasonable, but another man will claim that it is all right and patriotic and proper. All depends upon the opinion of the man who sits in judgment upon the utterance. When the Administration changes—and, I take it, it has been decreed by Almighty God that it will change, within two short years, and the Democratic conservative party be restored to power—the judgment passed on what is, and what is not patriotic, will be very different.
How would our Republican friends like it and what would become of their Wendell Phillipses and Greeleys and the thousand and one radical leaders who have been preaching and printing hostility to the government for 25 years, if we should then apply this Burnside doctrine to them? How would they like to be "sent across the lines" to their rebel friends? And surely if they can do so legally and constitutionally to us, the time must come when we can retaliate, legally and constitutionally upon them.
Now, friends and fellow citizens, as an humble citizen of New York and, in common parlance, a loyal citizen, (for no man according to his ability, has done more than I have at least endeavored to do in arousing public sentiment to support the government in this war) I protest against the action of the government in interfering with these sacred rights of the citizen. I protest first, because it violates the Constitution. I need not read to you the language of that instrument which secures the right of free speech, free press, trial by jury and other of the most precious guarantees of individual liberty. These have been trampled on in the most direct and flagrant manner. And I say nothing of that other provision which forbids the infliction of any cruel and unusual punishment, such as that administered in the case of Vallandigham. I protest second, because this action is in direct violation of acts of Congress passed to meet precisely such emergencies as that alledged [sic] to have arisen on Ohio. The late Congress which, as you know, was intensely Republican in all its branches, passed an act requiring that in all such cases as that of Vallandigham, the culprit shall be dealt with by the Civil Courts. This law has been deliberately broken.
I protest thirdly, because, even if the apparent necessity for such proceedings be conceded [sic], and although we may grant that those concerned were actuated by purely patriotic motives, they furnish a dangerous precedent which bad men may use to our destruction. If the Constitution may be ignored, from patriotic considerations (and I am not here to question the motives of the men guilty of those lawless acts) what shall save us from the use of the precedent thus established by bad and unpatriotic rulers, in time to come? History teaches us that all bad precedents are established under this plea of necessity. It is the despot's plea. No despot ever lived, but will tell you that he used his power for the good of his subjects. The plea is fallacious; it can have no foundation in fact, in a government based, like ours, on public opinion. Under our institutions everything that the law cannot reach is taken care of by this public sentiment. If a man utters dangerous doctrines, you overwhelm him with the weight of a healthy popular opinion. If he goes beyond that, the law and the courts take care of him. But as long as he confines himself to that which may be morally, but is not legally, a crime, you combat error with truth and so annihilate him.
Again, I object to this unconstitutional policy, because it weakens the government and the cause of the Union. The example of those in high authority is all but omnipotent. The attachment of a party to its administration is so strong that reason cannot reach to sever it. Its members will adhere blindly to the power to which they look for patronage and favor. And, while I am happy to see that the leading journals of the Republican party have had the manliness to denounce these usury ations [sic] of the Administration, yet there are tens of thousands of Republican partisans who are justifying them and following those who peaceably assemble for a redress of their grievances, with threats, even to bloodshed. Thus the government is distracted by a side issue, and the people are themselves divided. You are met to-night to consider the danger which menaces your personal rights, and to a certain extent your attention is thus diverted from the great work of subduing the rebellion. The Administration has made for itself 10,000 enemies where Vallandigham would have made one. The blow struck at his rights has recoiled with a thousand fold force upon the government.
Let Vallandigham talk! Let Anna Dickinson talk! Let all the host of radical declaimers in petticoats or breeches talk! Who does not know that these abolitionists have assailed the Government far more malignantly than ever Vallandigham did? Yet we have yet to hear of the Administration arresting one of them. If the Washington authorities will only arrest a single individual who voted for Lincoln, I will give it credit at least for honesty. But no man of this class has ever been touched, though they have denounced the Government in every form of invective. They have declared in favor of another Government than that formed by our fathers, and have uttered the rankest treason to the Union and the Constitution, but unfortunately for the Administration, (not unfortunately for the Democratic party, because I believe each one of these arbitrary acts really strengthens it,) every illegal arrest yet made has been directed against those who opposed Mr. Lincoln at the last election.
The Administration has thus divided the North and weakened its own cause. I have already alluded to the unanimity of support rendered it by the loyal States at the beginning of the straggle, and I assert further that it requires but a small degree of statesmanship to keep the people united on the question of prosecuting the war. We ask no offices from the Administration—we want none of its contracts or its patronage—all we ask is that it shall vigorously carry forward the war, to restore the Union and preserve the Constitution. If they will adhere to this purpose, oh! if they had but adhered to it, instead of following the lead of their Anna Dickinsons, Greeleys, spiritualists and the devil, I believe the Union would now have been restored, and the people re-united in fraternal embrace. The grand difficulty at Washington is that the authorities there have no confidence in the people. If I could have the ear of Mr. Lincoln, I would implore him on my bended knees to trust the people. I would say to him, be not afraid of treasonable sentiment in the loyal States! The people will take care of that. Have the same confidence in the mass of the people which is manifested in the old watchwords of the Democratic party.
The people need no conscription act to drive them to defend their government. You and I love this country of ours! We love its institutions, its laws, the sacred rights and privileges we enjoy in it, which place us above every other people on earth! We will see to it that this government is preserved, if the Administration will only trust us. We ask no conscription, no forced loans. If necessary, we will give property, life, all, to preserve the blessings which are ours in this land of our birth and adoption. And, while I would make no forcible resistance to the conscription acts or any other act, but would resort to the courts to pronounce on its validity and abide by their decision, yet it has seemed to me that the Administration, not only by its laws, but in these arrests and in a hundred other ways, has evinced a suspicion of the faithfulness and integrity of the people. We want a united North and our greatest objection to the illegal acts against which we protest, is that they have claiming the right to petition the Government for redress of grievances, to criticise [sic] its acts, censure its policy, and thus correct the abuses of those who administer it.
Mr. Ganson's speech was received with enthusiastic applause, and at its close, Ahser P. Nichols, Esq., moved the appointment of the following Vice Presidents and Secretaries:

VICE PRESIDENTS.
1st Ward—     Thomas Edmonds, Richard Harris.
2d    "              C. K. Loomis, Levi J. Walters.
3d    " Joseph Zimmerman, Thos. O'Grady.
4th   " Geo V. Brown, Geo. Schwartz.
5th   " Chas. Beckwith, Sebastian Schwable.
6th   " Solomon Scheu, Henry Dillger.
7th   " Wm. T. Wardwell, J. L. Haberstro.
8th   " James Ryan, John S. Munderbank.
9th   " John T. Hudson, Isaac W. Brownell.
10th " Israel T. Hatch, John F. Morton.
11th " John B. Skinner, Elijah D. Etner.
12th " John Ambrose, H. A. Swartz.
13th " Orasmus Lee, A. T. Patchin.
Aurora—James M. Paine.
Alden—Henry Berick.
Amherst—T. A. Hopkins.
Boston—George Brindley.
Brant—Nathaniel Smith.
Cheektowaga—S. Joslyn.
Clarence—J. W. Dodge.
Colden—Daniel T. Francis.
Collins—Phiny Bartlett.
Concord—A. C. Ashman.
Eden—A. Thorn.
Evan—John Andrus.
Elma—Zina A. Hemstreet.
East Hamburgh—Allen Potter.
Grand island—Levant Ransom.
Hamburgh—Henry Canfield.
Holland—O. G. Rowley.
Lancaster—John Dykstar.
Marilla—Benjamin Fones.
North Collins—Edwin Gurney.
Newstead—Alfred Mead.
Sardinia—SylvesterHolmes.
Tonowanda—David Kohler.
Wales—Thomas Hill.
West Seneca—John G. Langner.

SECRETARIES.
David Gray, Fred. Held, George J. Bryan.

On motion of William Williams, Esq., the Chairman named the following Committee on Resolutions: William Williams, James M. Humphrey, Dr. C. F. Brunck, Asher P. Nichols, Joseph Warren, Stephen Lockwood and
Horatio Seymour.

HON. SANFORD E. CHURCH'S ADDRESS.
Mr. Chairman and Fellow Citizens:
After the able and comprehensive address of your presiding officer, I owe an apology for attempting to add anything to the force of his remarks. I am gratified, however, to meet the citizens of Buffalo and Erie County on an occasion so novel and interesting as this. You have assembled under the protecting shield of the Constitution, framed by our fathers and cemented by their blood, and under which you have enjoyed privileges exceeding those possessed by any other people upon earth. I am here among you not to excite your imaginations or irritate your passions, and, above all, I am not here, and you are not here, to do anything to weaken the power authority of the government. We are here to pledge anew, on the one hand, our best efforts to strengthen and invigorate this government in prosecuting the war against those in hostility to it; and, on the other hand, to implore those who administer the government not themselves to undermine the glorious fabric our fathers have reared.
Our government, as you well know, is a peculiar one. It is not, like nearly every other on the face of the earth, founded on military power or force. It does not depend for its perpetuity on the will or inclination of any one man or set of men, however high and talented these may be. It depends solely for its maintenance on the will of the great mass of the people—on public opinion. It is that power which has sent a million of men into the field to fight in its defence. It is that which upholds Abraham Lincoln in his presidential seat. It is that which has led our youth to lay their lives on the country's altar, and which has taken millions of treasure from the pockets of the people into the public coffers. It is that and that alone, which will preserve the government, and keep us a free people, if anything is to so preserve and keep us.
The government being thus founded on public sentiment, it follows that the right of discussion is indispensible [sic] to the successful operation of that government. Without that right, at all times and under all circumstances maintained, the government, in the form in which it was bequeathed to us, cannot exist for a moment. And whenever the humblest citizen is deprived of the right of free discussion by military authority, that moment our liberties receive a stab, which if persisted in, must prove fatal to the State.
I need not call to mind the scenes through which we have passed in the last two years. You remember well how, when the first gun was fired at the flag, the great heart of the people responded and throbbed in its defence. You remember how you rushed to the rescue of the Constitution and the Country. You did not stop to inquire the cause of the war, or to accuse your political opponents of the political crimes of which you knew them to be guilty. You saw only the government in peril—a force threatening its existence and striving to pull down the national ensign, and without regard to party feeling you rushed to the rescue. Never, in the history of the world, has an administration been so vigorously supported as this of Abraham Lincoln's has been. The people rallied round it with an unanimity unparalleled, and for two years they have continued so to support it. 75,000 men were called for, and they came at the word; 200,000, 500,000, and they ware forthcoming; and when again the call was made, 600,000 more volunteered in the nation's defence. The Government called for millions, and the bankers furnished it; more millions—and the people laid it in the lap of the country. They never have refused, and I trust in heaven, never will refuse, either men or money, till the Government shall be restored in all its ancient strength, and the old banner shall wave over every foot of American soil.
But while we thus give the government our unquestioning support, we do claim the right to criticize the action of the administration. The arbitrary arrests, concerning which there is now such excitement, interfere with this personal right. You remember that soon after the war commenced, certain citizens were taken without warrant or process of law, and confined in forts and military prisons. The people looked on in consternation, and did not at first comprehend what it meant. They did not know but that some urgent necessity existed for such unparalleled proceedings. They saw the editor of a country paper seized and immured in a dungeon. A defenceless woman was spirited away and confined in a cell without knowing the cause of her detention. You saw, yourselves, a minister of the gospel from your own county, illegally seized and imprisoned for the crime of preaching a discourse based on Christ's sermon on the Mount. [The chairman suggested at this point that the authorities at Washington hadn't probably heard of that sermon, an idea which amused the audience considerably]—The people looked on with alarm. Yet those acts of arbitrary power did not seem to be in pursuance of any settled policy, but rather dictated by the fitful impulses of men unused to the possession of power. All these acts, however, were brought to the notice of the people at last election. They were jealous, thank heaven! at even an indication of a purpose to encroach on their liberties; and when they cease to be thus jealous they will be fit for any yoke of despotism that may be placed on them—And this subject of arbitrary arrest's, more than anything else, I believe, caused the victory of the Democratic party, and the election of the noble and patriotic man who now fills the executive chair of the Empire State. [Tremendous cheering for Seymour.]
The election in New York seemed to be understood at Washington. It was regarded, rightfully, as a decision of the people against the whole system of illegal arrests, and for a time nothing more was heard of it. The Administration promptly desisted from its unconstitutional and lawless course.
A few months ago occurred an exciting election in New Hampshire. Soldiers were permitted by the Administration to go home and vote. You remember the case of Lieut. Edgerly, which took place at this time. This officer, being at home, deposited his vote for the Democratic ticket, a ticket which received a plurality of all the votes in the State, and which he had voted all his life. The Government sent an order from Washington dismissing him, for this offence, from the service, and that too, in language insulting to a majority of the people, not only in New Hampshire, but throughout the loyal States. The order read that he was discharged for "voting the copperhead ticket, and by this means aiding the rebel cause." I undertake to say, and I wish my voice could reach the White House as I speak it, that never was an outrage so foul, so tyranical, committed on a free people as that implied in this order! Nor did it only insult the person dismissed, and with him the whole Democratic party, but it indicated a disposition on the part of the Government to establish a policy of interference with the people's most sacred right.
It revealed a purpose to exercise an illegal and unproper authority over the officers and men in the service of the Government. It was basely insulting to the Democratic party, for it charged upon the organization the crime of "aiding the rebel cause"—the Democratic party, which laid the very foundations of the Government; which has administered through so many years of prosperity; which has always revered the Constitution and the Laws, and stood up in their defence; which at the beginning of the war, in disregard of political prejudges, poured out its equal share of blood and treasure. This is the party which is denounced in an official order from Washington, for the petty purpose of carrying a State election.
The people heard of this act with alarm.—They had a right to be alarmed. If one officer can be dismissed for voting as he deems right, every other officer can be so dismissed. And more than this, the Edgerly order evinced a determination to use the military for the purpose of controlling elections.
And now we come to the case of Vallandigham. He addressed the citizens of Ohio, a part of whom he has represented for two years in Congress, on public questions of the day. I am made a united South and, to some extent, divided North. The wise course would have been to divide the enemy and unite our own people.
The people are alarmed at these aggressions and assumptions of arbitrary power, and why? Within a year, this administration like all its predecessors, is to come before the people for condemnation or approval, and it will be on duty then to pass upon it according to its merits or demerits. Now these military arrests and unwarrantable interfences of which I have spoken, indicate—I do not say prove—a purpose to prevent that full and free discussion so necessary if the people are to form an intelligent decision as to the great questions presented to their judgment [sic]. I will not charge that this is the design of the party in power. I hope to heaven it is not, and that some other explanation will be furnished of these acts. But, I tell you, the people never will tolerate even the attempt at a prohibition of their right to such free discussion as they shall deem proper. The government cannot appoint provost marshals and detectives enough between now and next election to prevent such discussion and to overrule the people. It is shortly to be decided whether the administration has managed the affairs of the nation with statesmanship, with superior wisdom, with integrity and with a whole-soul desire to restore the Union. If it shall appear that affairs have been so managed the people will give their verdict of approbation. But if the contrary shall be manifest—if it shall be found that the administration has wrought for party more than for country; that it has discharged patriotic and able generals for improper reasons; that while the country was bleading [sic] at every pore corruption has rioted in every department of the government; if in short, the men in power are weighed in the balance and found wanting, the people will condemn them and will not tolerate the sign of interference while they thus pronounce their decision. I know that at least 300,000 citizens of this state will arise as one man to vindicate their right in this regard.
One word more, and I am done. I have fully defined my position on this subject of illegal arrests. I am now, as I have been, in favor of furnshinig [sic] all necessary men and means for the restoration of the Union. But, I will hold the administration responsible for the proper and patriotic employment of this means. Do not let us, on account of these indefensible and outrageous acts for a single moment desert the cause of the country. Though bad men rule it, it is our country still.
I pray God there may be enough of it left when they are done with it, to enable us to bring it again to its former condition of prosperity. It is a great mistake to think that Democrats are "peace" men, in the obnoxious sense of that word. I am for peace on the basis of the restoration of the Union as it was. I am utterly opposed to the peace which Horace Greeley advocated, in case three month's fighting should fail to put down the rebellion. If the Democratic party were restored to power to-day, while that fact would give to the South the assurance they might return with all their old rights and privileges under the Constitution secured, yet so long as they kept an armed force in the field against the Constitution, they would be fought till the last dollar and the last cartridge were exhausted. I believe the war might have been averted; but that is not the question. I believe, too, that, having begun, it might ere this have been ended; but that cannot be helped now.
The rebels are still in arms against the government, and they must be met with arms. May the day be hastened when this Union will be restored as our fathers made it; when the old banner will float over the whole territory of the country; when the people of the North and South, coming up from a hundred battle-fields drenched with human gore, will meet in fraternal embrace; when they will mourn together and unite their tears over the new made graves with which our land is dotted, and when, by united effort and patriotism, they will repair the injuries which have been inflicted upon the noble fabric cemented with the best blood of our fathers, so that free government may be perpetuated to all time.

READ! READ! READ!
John Magee expresses his Sympathy with Traitors and Rebels.
HERE IS THE PROOF.
The following letter from A. M. CLAPP, Esq., editor of the Buffalo Morning Express states facts which ought to deprive JOHN MAGEE of the vote of every loyal and honest man. Mr. CLAPP was the Republican candidate for Secretary of State in 1857, and is at present Post Master of the city of Buffalo, under appointment from ABRAHAM LINCOLN. What will Lucius ROBINSON, and DANIEL P. PICKERING, and ARIEL S. THURSTON, and A. S. DIVEN say to this. Read, read and circulate.
BUFFALO, Oct 21, 1861.
GENTS:—Your favor of the 16th inst., soliciting from me a statement of the substance of a conversation, held with John Magee, on the cars, some time last summer, has been received, and I accede to your request, in a brief narrative of the substance of what occurred between us, upon that occasion. The interview took place on the cars between Corning and Bath, as I was returning from Elmira, where I had accompanied the advance companies of the 21st Reg't. After the cars left Corning, Mr. Magee, on his own motion opened a conversation with me something in this manner:
What, sir, do you think of the present condition of the country and the war?  "I replied that I regretted the present difficulties which disturb the peace of the country, and menace the welfare of the Government; but I hoped before long to see the nation emerge from the dark prospects that at present shroud its affairs. I expressed the hope that it would vigorously prosecute the war to a speedy termination, crushing out treason and rebellion, and restoring peace and prosperity to the land."
Mr. Magee manifested great excitement of feeling, and rejoined with much apparent acrimony, and in substance as follows:
This war, sir, is an unrighteous war on the part of the Government. It is an unholy war, sir, got up by damned vagabond Editors and politicians, and pushed against the Southern States, for their gratification. It should be stopped, sir! It should not prevail sir!
Such language from one towards whom I had entertained respect as a good citizen and gentleman, took me by surprise. I was not used to, neither was I prepared for such sentiments from Northern lips, and I so informed Mr. Magee. I told him that I was surprised that he should utter such sentiments, even if he entertained them.
I further remarked, that if I thought so illy of my Government, and sympathised [sic] as strongly with treason and rebellion as be appeared to, I certainly would not claim a home at the North, but would remove at once to South Carolina where the utterance of such language, as he indulged, would be more congenial with the popular taste than here, where the people stand by the Government and the flag of the country. I told him that I regarded his language as disloyal, if not treasonable and I thought treason in New York as much deserving of punishment, as in South Carolina or Mississippi.
He was at once convulsed with passion, at this, and stalked through the car like a maniac, brandishing his cane over my head, and threatening me with personal chastisement, accompanying the performance with bitter oaths and imprecations. The Government, the war, and myself, all came in for a share of his offensive denunciation, profanity and abuse, during this paroxysm. The war was again and again denounced as unholy, and got up by a pack of damned abolitionists and vagabond editors.
I replied, that such language and conduct were illy becoming his age, his position, and his professions—that I could have no personal collision with one of his years, but if our ages were more equal, as I then felt, I would not shrink from any contest he might be pleased to court. Being much my senior, I could bear with him rather than to inflict the punishment that his abuse might deserve.
This was followed by another ebullition of wrath, on his part, which he continued in a vein of profanity and abuse, until he relapsed into quiet on his own account. The spirit, and language of Mr. Magee, during this interview, led me to regard him as a strong sympathiser [sic] with the rebellion, and to think that he would rejoice more over the success, than the defeat of the rebels. He paid much that I have not repeated. I regarded his sentiments and utterances in regard to the Government and the war, as unbecoming a good and loyal citizen, and his profanity and conduct as inconsistent with the deportmort [sic] of a christian gentleman.
I am with respect,
Your ob't serv't,
A. M. CLAPP.
Messrs. H. H. HULL, WM. IRVINE, A. P. FERRIS.

Union League Meeting.
On Thursday evening last the citizens of our village had the pleasure of listening to an address before the Union League by F. Montgomery, Esq., formerly editor of the Vicksburg Whig. The Hall was crowded by an audience who listened to his remarks with an earnest attention seldom witnessed. He narrated the leading features of the Slaveholders' Rebellion, showing how utterly without just cause was the war they had inaugurated. He described most vividly the situation of things at Vicksburg and in the South before and after the war had broken out, illustrating his narrative so clearly with facts and personal anecdote as to carry his audience along with him wherever he had witnessed anything concerning the bloody reign of terror there existing.
Being still a resident of Vicksburg at the time it was first bombarded, the speaker described in glowing language that most terrific affair. He told how it was captured by our naval force all but the taking possession of the city, and how for three months the mortar fleet rained down fire and iron hail upon that rebellious place. He narrated the manner of his escape from rebeldom—the sufferings, dangers, and privations himself and wife and children had endured in reaching a place of refuge where the Stars and Stripes could once more protect him in his Union sentiments.
This part of his narrative thrilled the heart of every one present, and moistened the eyes of many unused to the melting mood. All who heard it could not but feel how very little we know of the sufferings and trials to which the Union men of the South are subjected, as well as our disregard of the blessings of peace, plenty and prosperity so largely vouchsafed to us at the North. He (the speaker) had come North to see and be among Union men, but he had found so many Union men—BUT'S in his travels, that he had become disgusted with them, and hoped Grant might soon take Vicksburg, that he could once more go where the genuine, unconditional sort were to be found.
Mr. Montgomery's address was brim-full of humor and sarcasm, notwithstanding the seriousness of his subject—all which his audience seemed fully to appreciate right along from beginning to end—and seldom have we heard a speech better calculated to do good in the way of enlightening the people as to the wickedness of this infernal rebellion.
At the close of his address, Mr. A. H. Chase of New York, (formerly of Ridgebury,) made a few pertinent remarks, after which the meeting adjourned.
Canal Commissioner F. A. Alberger was in this village last week. We regret being absent at the time of his call. We understand that he was, with his usual thorough performance of duties, inspecting the condition of the canal.

The Dock laborers at Buffalo last week Monday attacked the negroes at work on the wharf or employed on vessels, and killed several.

APPEARANCE OF THE CITY LAST EVENING.
About all the stores and public places were closed last evening, and in the dull rain the city presented a cheerless appearance. At some places when drinking shops were open, numbers of the crowd pushed in and helped themselves. In the upper part of the city, fires were smouldering in almost every direction and small crowds were gathered about each. They amused themselves by chasing strangers a few blocks at a time, taking it for granted that they were abolitionists. It might have been fun for the crowd but it was evidently grim fun for the strangers.

COMING TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE FORTIFICATIONS.—It is announced that Col. Stephen H. Long, formerly professor at West Point, now in Boston, will soon leave to charge of the fortifications at Buffalo, Oswego, Erie and Niagara.

THE BUFFALO RIOT—A SHARP REBUKE.—In commenting upon the Rochester Union's attempts to palliate the mobbing of negroes in Buffalo, the Express of that city says:
It holds, and has taught its ignorant proselytes to believe, that "the negro has no rights which the white man is bound to respect." [Rochester Dem.
That is a wilful [sic] and unqualified lie. The Union never "taught" any such doctrine; the hoary-headed old hypocrite of the Express knows it never did. It is very proper for the "kindred spirit" of the Rochester Democrat to copy the lie—knowing as he knew it was a lie pure and simple.
—It is a singular fact that the three leading (!) Republican organs through the centre of this State are severally edited by men of professed "christian character," each of whom holds a most valuable federal office, neither of whom will hesitate to publish the most scandalous falsehoods if by so doing he can benefit his "party," and all of whom have been accused of little "obliquities" which ought to mantle even their brazen cheeks with a blush. Such are the men who are the principal assailants of the Rochester Union's "loyalty."

Levi, Allen & Co., of Buffalo, proprietors of a large distillery at Tonawanda, have paid government taxes upon their manufacture, during the past six months, only, to the almost incredible amount of fifty thousand one hundred and eighty dollars and sixteen cents.

Pastoral from Bishop Timon.
Never having joined, nor permitted the clergy subject to his direction to join, in the pulpit fulminations that have contributed so largely to bring the country to its present bloody situation and the brink of ruin, Bishop Timon esteems it his duty at a time like this to throw whatever influence he possesses upon the side of law and order. He has therefore caused the following pastoral to be read in every church of his diocese, as it was in the churches of this city yesterday:
To the Dearly Beloved Faithful Laity of the Diocese, Health and Benediction:
In the name of the God of Charity, and through that charity which He, who called us to be your Bishop, has given us for you; through that charity of Christ, in us, however unworthy, through which we would cheerfully give our life, if necessary, for each and every one of you; we beg of you, for Christ's sake, and for the sake of all that you love in heaven and on earth, to abstain from all resistance to law, from all riot, from all tumultuous  gatherings, from all violence.
In New York many misguided men, yet very few, we believe, of practical Catholics, have shed blood in the late riot; and "the voice of their brother's blood cried to the Lord from the earth." Some of the rioters have fallen, many more will, we fear, suffer much, many will, perhaps, be ruined; all will feel the painful sting of a guilty conscience, during the rest of life, and on their death bed; (if indeed rioters who aid in murder could die otherwise than as it is written: "He that shall kill by the sword, must be killed bv the sword." Apoc. XIII, 10;) they will, either through God's mercy, sincerely repent for their participation in the riot; or be lost forever! Dearly beloved, listen to the advice of a father who dearly loves you. Should there be a draft, fewer will be drafted than would probably be killed in an unholy struggle against law. And, if any of you be drafted, we will try to protect and aid; friends will protect and aid; God will protect, aid, and bless, in more ways than we know or dare name.
Withdraw yourselves, then, we beg and ex­hort, from all who would excite to associations against the law of the land, or to violence, and mob-law. For God's sake; for the sake of your dear families; for the sake of your fathers and mothers, whether still pilgrims on earth, or mingling with "the blessed crowd of witnesses," who from heaven, watch over your conduct on earth; we exhort you to trust in God, and not to lend yourselves to any exciter to mob violence which leads so often murder. If you follow this advice of your Father in Christ, we confidently assure you that: "Whosover [sic] shall  follow this rule: peace will be upon him, and mercy; and upon the Israel of God." Gal. VI.
We require that this letter be read in every Church, on the Sunday after its reception.
Given at St. Joseph's Cathedral, Buffalo, on the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, A. D. MDCCCLXIII.
JOHN, Bishop of Buffalo.

A DISGRACEFUL RIOT—TWO NEGROES KILLED AND SEVERAL INJURED—CONSIDERABLE OF A PANIC.
Our citizens were intensely excited yesterday upon being acquainted with the fact that a riot was progressing on the dock; and now that the excitement has subsided, we can only tell the story as best we could acquaint ourselves with it. About two o'clock, yesterday afternoon, a difficulty occurred on Ohio street in front of Jewett & Taylor's store, between a negro and a white man or boy. A man named John McLaughlin undertook to interfere with the matter, when the negro pulled out an eight-inch pistol and shot him in the breast. Considerable excitement followed, and the assaulting negro was made the subject of attack at the hands of the excited crowd. The negro's name was Williams, we believe. In flagrant violation of law, Williams was very badly treated, before being placed under arrest. The violent assault of the negro upon M'Laughlin, was the signal for an excitement, such as we have never seen before. Although no organization, and no responsible society of the city partipated [sic] in the affair, the determination to do damage to the negro, became general, in the neighborhood of the dock, among the laboring men, and we heartily regret to say that the determination was made good as far as it could be. Although Officers O'Brien, Harris and Hennesy, succeeded in arresting the original offender, and for the time quieting the disturbance, the feeling was intense among those who sympathized with the wounded man. Chief of Police Darcy and part of his force were on the ground, about half an hour after the first difficulty, and that they did their duty magnificently afterwards, it is scarcely necessary to state here. The riot, for we can term it nothing better, being started, a negro on a boat in the Ohio Basin was attacked by an overpowering number of white men and abused terribly. Officers Morin and Hammersmith rescused [sic] him from death, in a manner that entitles them to especial credit. We might say here, that not the least exciting news on the dock, about this time was the rumor that Officer Morin who had a warrant for a negro on the Cuyahoga had been badly cut, while attempting to make an arrest. This necessarily made the matter more complicated, and was the origin of any number of unfounded rumors about the dock.
The crowd grew larger, as the various stories gained currency, and finally, in the language of the streets, 'a break' was made for the place known as the "Nigger Dive" on Commercial street. The immediate cause for excitement at this point was the running away of a colored man. A rush was made for the flying negro who sought refuge in one of the out-houses of the United States Hotel, but through the prompt interference of officers Kent, Battles and Hopkins the negro was saved from probable destruction. Officer Reynolds, and others whose names we have not obtained, succeeded in rescuing a large number from the "Douglas dive", and in taking them to the jail for shelter, they were followed by several hundred persons as far as Seneca street on Main. Missiles of various descriptions were thrown at both officers, but so far as we can learn without injury.
About half-past 4 o'clock, a raid was made upon the negro establishment known as the Emerald Hotel, on Lloyd street. From here a negro ran with a good will, till he deposited himself under Hutchinson's store on the same street. Officers Kent, Dan. Darcy and Harris brought him out of his hiding-place, and saw him safely through to the jail. The Emerald Hotel was cleaned of its colored inmates, after considerable trouble, and the fury of the mob was forced to waste its sweetness somewhere else.
The murderous feature of the riot is simply horrible, and although a thousand rumors were afloat last night in reference to them, we can only learn that two negroes lost their lives. From the Propeller Tonawanda at the Central Wharf a negro took flight, and in his efforts to escape from an imaginary assault, was drowned. He had no pursuers so far as we can learn, and was merely the victim of his own timidity. The Propeller Mary Stewart, at the New York dock was made the especial attention of the mob.—
Here a negro had been assaulted, and information being lodged at Station House No. 1. Officers Morin, Flynn, Caldwell, and Detective Kent, started for the scene of action. The officers here learned that the injured man had been sent ashore, but the crowd had discovered another negro on the boat. The poor fellow sought refuge on the fender ropes, and climbing down to the water's edge, he thought himself safe. He was pursued, however, by two wretches, who followed him down the fender ropes and with the heels of their boots kicked him into the water where he was drowned—Officer Kent and his really brave companions Flynn, Caldwell and Morin, kept the crowd back, and in Kent's efforts to save the drowning man, he so exasperated the crowd that before he was aware of it he was thrown into the creek. Being a good swimmer, he reached terra firma by means of a small boat without serious damage. We regard the conduct of the two men, who are responsible for the death of the colored man of the Mary Stewart, as outrageous and brutal, and we hope sincerely they will be brought to justice.
The officers of the propeller Stewart, fearing further disaster, fired up, and inviting some of the policemen that had defended her on board, she steamed down the pier. Two negroes were concealed in such a manner that they had to suffer, but they escaped the impending wrath of the mob. Several negroes were attacked, and the precise damages they sustained it is impossible to give, nor can we pretend to give the exact order of events as they occurred, owing to the varied and somewhat contradictory statements in regard to the question of time.
A new difficulty near Commercial street a little after 5 o'clock, in which a negro had his arm broken, proved, if possible, more exciting than any thing that had preceded it. At this point Mayor pro tem Chas. Beckwith, Esq., appeared and addressed the crowd. He was listened to with the best attention, and from the comparative quiet that followed, we cannot but believe that his words were as "oil upon the troubled waters." The Hon. John W. Murphy followed him, and made a speech, the force of which seemed to be fully recognized.
If we may except some difficuly [sic], and some arrests at the foot of Michigan street, we are not aware that the rioters attempted to do any mischief. Here, Capt. John Walsh of Station House No. 1, and a part of his force, arrested a fellow known as "Happy Jack" and three others, ringleaders, who were lodged in jail.
Still later in the evening, our citizens were furnished with new cause for alarm in the thousand one rumors that were circulated through the streets. Mayor Beckwith deemed it proper to obtain if possible, an additional police force, and at the chief's office he was engaged till late in the evening in swearing in a special police. Eagle Hose Co. No. 2, or at least a large number of their members were accepted, and assigned to duty on the streets.
The excitement became intense, when the news reached the Chief's office that a colored man named Henry or Hank Reavels had been killed in his own place on the corner of Oak and Batavia streets; and it was for a time supposed that the ruthless mob had determined upon a general destruction of life and property. The fury of the mob had, as we have before suggested, wasted itself earlier in the day, and had nothing to do with the shooting of the man Henry Reavels.
As near as we can learn the facts connected with the shooting of Reavels, they are, to the effect, that Reavels with others of his color had been ordered by the police to close their establishments about 8 o'clock, lest perchance the rioters might make an attack upon them. Reavels, at the urgent solicitation of his wife, was about to comply with the order, when a negro in the place, named Henry Smith used some offensive language, and refused to leave the saloon. A slight altercation ensued, ... a revolver and shot Reavels through the breast. The injured man, even after he was shot, exercised his strength, and threw his assailant into the street. We are informed that he died in the struggle. Reavels had a host of friends among the white population, and was generally considered entitled to favorable recognition where ever known.
It is simply next to impossible to give the full details of the disgraceful affair of yesterday, or to accord proper credit to those who are entitled to it. Chief of Police Darcy, was in the midst of the fray almost from the beginning, and with Kent, Riley, Battles, Watts and others did faithful service to the city. There was much unnecessary excitement during the afternoon and evening, but, we learned with what alacrity in the absence of our home military, our city could organize a force to put down rebellion.
Of the disgraceful riot of yesterday, we can only say, that we cannot characterize it in fitting terms. Whatever may have been the pretext furnished to the crowd in the shooting of McLaughlin, there was nothing in the way of justification for the murderous raid made upon unoffending negroes. From a careful investigation of the matter, we are satisfied that none of our "Union," had anything to do with it, and we have every reason to believe that the riot was incited and sustained by persons not belonging to the city. We sincerely hope that every offender will be brought to justice, no matter what the cost. The authorities must see to it at once, that the city is secured against a repetition of the disgraceful scenes of yesterday.

Another Copperhead Martyr.
The copperheads of this State have so long been pining for a ma... and who for want of one of their ... have grown hoarse over shouting ... those of other States, have at last a hero. The late copperhead riot in New York has developed a genuine man whom the disloyal sheets should ... once immortalize by their praise. ... claims of this new candidate for copy head favor are thus set forth by ... Buffalo Express:
"Our New York Copperheads have rather envied their Ohio brethren the superior consideration and advantage they enjoy in the possession of a first class "martyr." An opportunity ... now presented to them for putting the crown upon almost as eminent a scoundrel as the notorious Buck-eye. Andrews is their man. By all means let them elevate him, as the representative of New York Copperheadism, to a rank commensurate with the dignity of the Empire State. It is a shame to New York that the Buck-eye Vallandigham should lord it in the circles of treason as he does. Let Andrews dispute his throne with him. There's not a princelier villain to be found unhung. The royal blood of scoundrelism—the blood of the F. F. V.—is in his veins. The plebeian Val. would shrink from such a rivalry.
"And what has Val. done to compare, in 'bold defiance of the tyrant imbeciles at 'Washington' with the deeds of the heroic Andrews? Did he ever put himself at the head of the mob which his valorous words had stirred up to the vindication of Constitutional liberty, and burn, slay and plunder with it?— Did he ever lead the 'noble patriots' he had schooled in a nigger hunt? Did he ever head the 'unconquerable free men' of his district in a charge upon an orphan asylum? Did he ever show his lofty contempt for the abominable doctrines of Abolitionism by taking a wench for his mistress? No. He has nothing but words—empty words—to show his title to the name he has.—Andrews is the true 'champion of Constitutional right.' Andrews is the great Martyr.
"Mark you how indomitably he defied the 'despots' at the moment of his seizure by their 'minions.' He protested against the arrest without warrant, as arbitrary and unconstitutional. There's a dauntless spirit for you!—There's heroism of principle! Shall it go unrewarded? For the credit of New York Copperheadism let it not.—Let the heroic martyr be crowned with acclamations. Let his imprisonment be cheered by the shouts and clamor of an admiring party. Let him be nominated, the 'Democratic' candidate for Governor of New York, without a week's delay. Let him issue from the tyrant's Bastile an address to the people of New York, and let the Courier be "kindly enabled to publish it in advance of every other journal in the country."

The Theory of Self-Government.
AN ORATION,
BY PROF. ELLICOTT EVANS,
Of Hamilton College.
DELIVERED IN BUFFALO, N. Y.,
July 4th, 1863.
In a day when our institutions—our very existence as a nation—are in trial, I shall make no excuse for discussing, perhaps less popularly than may seem desirable to all, the nature of our government; and for stating my views of the manner of its growth, from the earliest formation of organized society, to the present combination of intelligence and freedom, in which it has long excelled all others. To begin with the first elements of this subject I call your attention to some remarks, which I promise shall be very brief, upon the subject of government. The test of a good government is two fold. It must combine security to the citizen with opportunities for progress. The first of these elements—security—is essential to the existence of any government worthy of the name. It does not, therefore, depend upon the form of a government. It may be perfectly consistent with an irresponsible despotism. Under an absolute monarch—wise, energetic and influenced by a sense of duty, the lives and property of his subjects may be as secure as under any other form of government. But the blessings to be enjoyed under such a rule are contingent entirely upon such a "happy accident" as the sovereign described. At his removal, matters return to their former condition, with increased temptations to the rapacity of his successor in the wealth acquired by his people during a beneficent riegn [sic]. It is not in the condition of things that a continued succession of good rulers can be ensured in a despotic government, and thus those who speak of the blessings of a patriarchal rule as the happiest state for a people, can only do so as a matter of abstract speculation. If any truth can be assumed from the teachings of history, we may be assured that no rights are secure except they be in the hands of those interested in retaining them—not only able, but habitually disposed to defend them. But, admitting that an ideally perfect despotic government may chance at some time to exist, it can belong only to those who are in the childhood of their political life and must be broken through to permit of advancement.
The second test of government—Progress—belongs only to States where the ruler is responsible. In this view, I deny entirely the popular idea that one government is best for one nation, and another for another. This means only that one nation has attained a greater political advancement than another, so as to be able to exercise powers not yet safely to be trusted to its neighbor. But there is an absolutely best form of government—one suited to the development of the highest and best powers and qualities of man. This is self-government. How this is to be attained, and what its form when its principles shall have been fully investigated—this is the great problem of political science. The discovery of truth is the great object of man's pilgrimage. The secrets of nature demand his investitigation [sic], and they repay the search, even when unsuccessful, by exalting the powers of the searcher. The absolutely best form of government is, as yet, not less a secret than other mysteries which nature is to yield to scientific investigation, and it is man's duty as a citizen to strive to develope it, just as it is his mission as a scholar to bring forth mental, and, as a Christian, moral truth. This, it is obvious, can be done only in a free State. It can only be where the demands of the people must be granted by the ruler, and this is only the ease when the ruler is responsible to the people.
The adage of Jefferson is somewhat hackneyed—"Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty"—and yet, even now, it cannot be too closely impressed upon the minds of a free people. It lies at the root of all self-government and all popular institutions. It is analogous to the care with which man must guard his own life and health—do his own business, and perform all his duties, if he would have them done. The citizens of a nation may delegate away its authority, but if they exercise it, they must do so as jealously as they would guard any other possession.—To delegate it—except under the most absolute guaranties of responsibility—this is not to exercise it. It may be that a nation cannot wisely exercise its political rights—it may be forced by imminent anarchy to surrender its powers. So far this may be prudent, but it is like the confession of the inebriate who enters the asylum, of his own accord, or like the bankrupt, no longer permitted to manage his own affairs. In a free and healthy state, every man has a sacred trust which he has no right to put away. In its exercise he is solemnly bound to accumulate the political light which is his debt to posterity. The talent buried in the ground shall as surely be required of him with usury, if he fail to discover—to vindicate and to exercise his true rights, as if he waste his other gifts in sloth and self-indulgrnce [sic]. But why have these political rights been so little known to a people? Why have nations permitted despotic rule? Why have they even ascribed a sacred character to irresponsible authority? To answer this, involves the great social problem—the inevitable struggle between liberty and civilization—the centrifugal and centripetal forces of the social system. The law which unites men into societies, does it for their advancement. Before the first step can be taken in civilization man has a great lesson to learn. That lesson is obedience. This lesson is the first to be taught to childhood—a lesson upon which all other instruction depends—perhaps the most difficult that childhood learns. But what comparison between the force needed to influence the tender, impressible nature of infancy, and that of the rugged self-willed, and absolutely independent barbarian—grown to manhood uncontrolled? The lesson which shall teach him obedience must absorb his whole existence; must crush out his freedom as incompatible with his preparations for social culture. Civilization is taught in the hard school of slavery. The history or the traditions of all races say that they emerged from barbarism to oppressive servitude. In no single instance has the instruction been lightly given. A new principle of life is to be enforced upon such a nature, rough and impetuous—with every pulse set to the assertion of its own power—with all its manhood enlisted to the idea of his sufficiency for his own protection, and remorseless in trampling upon me rights of others—a being utterly incapable of society until a new principle is given it. This must be burned into its very soul and sear as with the glowing iron—never to be effaced. No government can hold men together while in this stage, unless it have power—and continually exert it—over every action, and almost every impulse. Authority thus holds its subjects powerless until, after trial, they learn from experience and reason that some liberty is not destructive to their social life. This liberty is recovered inch by inch. The nation's first enslavement is far in the forgotten past. Its steps toward freedom are regarded as concessions from a power whose right to rule has been from time immemorial, and seems of divine origin. It remembers no liberties but such as have been yielded by the authority of the State.
Civilization and liberty appear in history as antagonists. We have seen that the latter must be surrendered to secure the first step towards the former, and examples are innumerable where liberties, just acquired and dearly prized, have been necessarily surrendered to avoid the disorganization of society. This is the secret of almost all military despotisms, immediately following a popular revolution. On the other hand, the destruction of ancient civilization and a relapse to comparative barbarism, was necessary to save Europe from the torpor of the Asiatic races. Thus only could a higher freedom be prepared. In these adverse elements of society—elements never constant, but varying as greater intelligence made greater freedom safe, and on the other hand making a stronger government necessary, as powers had been too rashly snatched—we can form some conception of the difficulties of the problem of self-government. We can also rejoice that the problem had begun to be fully stated before our nation's lot had been fixed in this western world—that the idea had obtained some credence in the mother country, before she sent forth her colonists, that the true source of government was the consent of the governed.
He who would understand our institutions and the origin of our national spirit, cannot merely take up the history of this continent, but must go back to other lands and obscure times, for the events which formed the character and inspired the views of successive generations leading after many centuries, to enlightened republican sentiments in those who first landed on our soil, and gave birth to our government. From the mixture of races in England, and the fact that no race became permanently dominant, their views of political rights became a matter of compromise at a much earlier period than on the continent of Europe. Even there they dawned very slowly, and although from the earliest period the English nation had been intolerant of oppression, yet it was not until the 17th century that a movement was organized which advoated [sic] as its principle, the right of the government to control the acts of their governors. This cry was hushed in military despotism, but it had made itself heard, and had awakened the perceptions of the men of England to rights after which they have never since that day ceased to struggle. But in our land the truth was born over unadulterated by those who refused to rest under the authority which had hushed its utterance. Our political career begins where the conservatism of rank and the authority of an established church had checked aspirations for a freer social system. This was found here when denied at home, and the doctrine of self-government was asserted, and gradually grew up under more favorable circumstances than the world had ever seen.
But even then, other provinces were preparing on this continent for the growth of principles which had driven our forefathers from their homes, and in the midst of what was to become a part of our country, developed sentiments and institutions of which we are now reaping the bitter fruit—sentiments widely at variance with those upon which rests our whole system of social and political equality. While the Northern Colonies received the seeker after that freedom and those political rights which had been denied to him at home, the settlement of the extreme South was the result of aristocratic and court patronage in the mother country. The Proprietary grants—of which South Carolina was the most marked example, and whose influences have controlled her to the present day—were the very highest reach of official favor. They conferred the exclusive right of government as well as ownership or the soil. Under the Lords Proprietary, orders of nobility even were established, and as marked distinctions of hereditary rank initiated as ever grew from the most arbitary [sic] feudalism. That such an offshoot of royal and aristocratic favor should grow up adverse in principle to the sentiments and institutions which make our Northern Republicanism, can be easily understood. Continuing, as they did, a resource for the patronage of favorites at court and the pensioning of the younger scions of the nobility, it is but natural that such a social system should remain less open to the advancement of equal rights than England itself, and that it should have been, at the Revolution as now, in strong contrast with the views of our Northern settlements. We could not hope to see the doctrine of equality make, in that region, any but the slowest growth.
The development of self-government in the Northern Colonies cannot be passed by in this hasty manner. These were founded by enlightened, thinking men—men seeking to work out their theories of progress for which they had fought but which they had not been permitted to test in their old homes—men who entered the State with all the intelligence of civilization, and yet entered it as free men—the first example of a distinctly formed social compact—the first founding of a State by men who fully understood the terms on which they entered into its new society. These were men who had learned already the lessons requisite for social life—who needed no instruction in that first lesson of obedience—a lesson so difficult to learn, which, in the infancy of races, makes society absolutely incompatible with freedom.
Each small province having its political existence secured under its own particular charter, and each being too weak to sustain itself alone against any formidable attack, they soon learned to rely upon one another for support, without relinguishing [sic] or fusing any of their own institutions.
They thus learned the Federative principle at an early period. From frequent exposure to danger, they were forced to develope that most essential democratic element of recognizing merit wherever it existed, and using it to their own preservation. The influence of character, from these circumstances, prevailed over that of birth, and the constant tendency was towards the consolidating and perfecting of the republican views with which their forefathers had set forth when denied the right of testing them at home. As they grew into large communities, modifications of their institutions [sic] became requisite—with such an increase of population, these could no longer rest upon pure democracy. Authority must to some extent be delegated—the representative must make its way, but not altogether. To one institution they still clung and will cling, so long as our republicanism shall endure. They have kept if unchanged now that we are a vast nation, as when it originally existed the sole government of the first few settlers on the coast. it still forms the basis of our political education—our first exercise in the art of governing ourselves and our fellow-men.—Through it our country may remain republican forever—its institutions equally suited to a petty State or to the most colossal nation on which the sun has ever shone. I refer to our system of local self-government, the principle of which is seen at our town meetings.
The theory of local self-government is that the people have reserved to themselves the right to legislate with respect to the matters which more immediately concern them. It exercises this power as self-possessed, and not as conferred by the government. It starts with the idea that each community knows its own business, and will display more wisdom in transacting it than can be done by any superior amount of intelligence which has no interest in its necessities. The great mass of their own business can be transacted by the various towns, without calling for the assistance of any others, and by acting thus independently it would be no more cumbersome for a, million of communities than for a single one. This species of legislation prepares the way for that of the counties which, unlike that of the towns, is representative, but under the immediate observation of every citi­zen. These town and county organizations are of vast importance in the aggregate amount of their acts which are more numerous than those of a legislature and bearing infinitely more upon each citizen than those of the national government.
Suppose that the whole or the interests now exercised, without interference with each other, by the several towns and counties, were to be immediately
surrendered to our representatives in work would not be done which is  needed for the most immediate wants of the people, and what was done would be most unequal and unfair. How long could the various interests of a thousand counties, spread over a tract wider than Europe, bear the tampering of legislators ignorant of their position, prejudiced as to their institutions, and indifferent to their wants? Is the enslaved Russian more ignorant of what he needs than his ruler—or rather, is the latter more likely to provide for those wants, having no interest in them? How much intelligence is required to enable a man to see what immediate local legislation is needed? I think that the degraded Russian serf would legislate more in accordance with the immediate necessities of his community than the enlightened statesman of America could do for the aggregated various interests of each organization of this vast republic. Give the regulation of each of these to its members, interested in having it wisely ordered, and very little wisdom will do it reasonably well—no very high grade of probity is needed for its frugal minis- ...

THE DAILY COURIER.
MONDAY MORNING, JULY 6, 1863.
The 4th of July in Buffalo.

At any other time than the present we should like to be enabled to exhaust our vocabulary of adjectives on a Fourth of July celebration in Buffalo; but we are not invited to any such task, in speaking of the celebration of the 87th Anniversary of our National Independence. Although there were many features of our celebration that were worthy of especial notice, the whole affair was decidedly subdued. Of course we do not refer so much to the programme of the day, and the manner in which it was carried out, as to the general expression of sympathy with the celebration, manifested by our citizens. The fact is our people were solicitous about the fate of the Army of the Potomac; they waited anxiously for news, they were feverish, and could not ...
This then is the wisdom of our system, preserved from the first settlement of the country. We aim to keep power where it belongs. We hope, with the growing intelligence, experience, and political wisdom of the people, to be able to delegate back to these local organizations much of the power which it has been necessary to surrender to the Legislature. This has already been the tendency in our state for many years, and it is the very best evidence of advancement in the knowledge how to use political rights. Through this system, instruction in self-government is made easier to us than it has ever before been made to man. To realize to a slight extent the beneficent workings of this system of local self-government, I have but to call the attention of this audience to the municipal authority under which they live. This must be stronger than is necessary in smaller towns and villages. The council more nearly resembles a legislature, and the executive is more like the governor. The necessity of this cannot be disputed where aggregated elements of discontent might work fearful ruin, or where individual selfishness or obstinacy might check all schemes of good. The effect, however, is to furnish us a faint, very faint type of what would be the effect of State legislation applied directly to the people, without the intermediate circles which now separate them. I say a very faint type, because, with all their power, the members of a city government are far more under the eye of their constituents, and can have interests far less at variance with any of them than is the case with a legislature acting for widely separated tracts of country, with interests apparently adverse. And yet, who does not remember loud complaints of oppressive action by the municipal authorities? This must be the case where action adapted to large bodies, is brought to bear directly upon the governed—where individual hardship cannot be allowed to enter into consideration as it would be in smaller communities. In its necessary inflictions, such authority gives us some idea of the organizations which make up the whole government of other countries without supplying the antecedents which have made their tone of public thought harmonious to it. Another advantage to be remarked in this
[Continued on Fourth Page.]

make the day ring with glee as of old. While our friends from the country were kind enough to pay us a visit, we have no doubt they were astonished at the apathy of our own people. The day itself was most propitious. Between 6 and 7 o'clock in the morning a most delightful rain set in and cooled the atmosphere to a point of moderation that could not but be appreciated by the sweltering multitude. The railroads brought in large delegations from various points in the country, and it needed no very close observation to detect the fact that our Buffalo celebration was witnessed and appreciated more by friends from the rural districts than by our own citizens.
In our movements we found, that above and beyond every thing else in importance was the expected news. Everywhere, we were met with the nervously put questions "What is there this morning?" "Will you issue an Extra?" and in not a few number of instances the despairing query was put "What do you think about it?" We could only assure our numerous interrogators that the office would issue an Extra, the moment that anything of importace [sic] could be received over the lines. We only speak of our reportorial experience, to show the anxiety of all whether from the country or belonging to our own city. We may safely say that we never saw a more anxious assemblage.
But the programme must be carried out as far as practicable, whatever the news of the conflict between Generals Meade and Lee might be, and so the celebration went on.
At sunrise a morning salute was fired at the Arsenal by a detachment of Capt. A. M. Wheeler's Light battery, and with the ringing of bells the day was inaugurated.
At 9 o'clock the procession formed on Niagara square, in accordance with the programme, and at 10 o'clock the procession moved, in the following order:
Col. Wm. F. Rogers, Marshal.
Capt, P. C. Doyle,
Capt. Daniel Meyers, Jr., Aids.
Lieutenant H. H. Halsey,

FIRST DIVISION,
Under the direction of Lieut-Col. Jonathan Austin,
Ass't Marshal.
Cavalcade of commissioned officers of the Regular
and Volunteer service, Col. H. K. Viele commanding.
Union Cornet Band.
Detachment of returned members of the 21st New
York Volunteers, under command of Capt. Layton.
The Tigers, Capt. Wm. T. Wardwell.
Ellsworth Guards, Capt. Wm. Weigel.
Richmond Zouaves, Capt. Jacob W. Scheu.

SECOND DIVISION.
Under the direction of Lieut. Robert Cottier,
late of the 116th Buffalo Regiment.
Miller's Band.
Thos B French, Chief Engineer and Ass't Engineers,
of Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1, Walter Savitz foreman,
Neptune Hose Co. No. 5, Wm. S. Sage foreman.
Niagara Hose Co. No. 7, Andrew Cable.
Hydraulic Engine Co. No. 9, John Ziea foreman.
Columbia Hose Co. XI, H. O. Dee foreman.

STEAM FIRE ENGINES.
C. J. Wells,
Niagara,
Seneca,
Huron,
Perry,
Buffalo.

THIRD DIVISION.
Under direction of Lieut. Col. C. W. Sternberg, 21st N. Y. Vol.
International Band.
Turners Society.

FOURTH DIVISION
Under direction of Lieut. Wm. A. Bird, Jr.
Seneca Indian Band.
Carpenters and Joiners' Union.
Bricklayers and Plasterers' Union.
Brass Band.
Buffalo Laborers Union.
Carmen on Horseback.

FIFTH DIVISION.
Under the direction of Capt. Robert P. Gardner.
Young's Band.
The Mayor, Chas. Beckwith; Chaplain, Rev. Dr. Ingersoll;
Orator, Ellicott Evans; Reader, Colonel James C, Strong.
Officers and Soldiers of the War of 1812.
Members of the Common Council and City Officers.

The procession moved down Pearl street to the Terrace, through the Terrace to Main street, up Main to Tupper street, through Tupper to Delaware street, down Delaware to Niagara street, along Niagara to Eagle street, thence to St. James Hall, where the procession was formally dismissed, and the exercises at this point commenced.
The grand feature of the procession was the Buffalo Laborers Union. The association numbered about 2700 men, so far as we could estimate the number. They were the subject of universal admiration. Marching with their coats hanging on their arms, they literally displayed their full strength, and one could only think how many men as fine looking as they, had been mowed down since the present terrible rebellion was inaugurated. The society was led by Mr. Thomas Hanley and Mr. Daniel Fitzpatrick. The banners, mottoes, and badges were very neat and appropriate [sic].
The 21st Regiment, under Capt. Layton, turned out, about fifty strong, and looked well. Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1 appeared to fine advantage. The carriage was beautifully wreathed, and each man bore a bouquet in his hand. The Hose carts and steam fire engines were exquisitely decorated. Hose Co. No. XI turned out well, and were led by a martial band of the old style. But it is unnecessary to particularize. The procession was as complete as it could be made in the absence of the Buffalo regiments, the 65th and 74th, and the non-attendance of the Continentals, and civic societies that were expected to participate.

AT ST. JAMES HALL.
The procession having been brought to a close, the exercises at the St. James Hall commenced about 11 o'clock. On the stage were the Orator, Chaplain, the Mayor pro tem., the Aldermen of the city; and the Soldiers of the war of 1812, whose names, residences and ages we take the liberty to give. They are as follows :—
Gen. Wm. Warren                   Aurora             aged 79
Philip Peckham                       Lancaster       "     77
Elisha Morse               Cha. Co         "     70
Daniel C. Cary                        Alden            "     69
Dan Bristol                              Buffalo          "     81
Thos. Carson                  "                  "     78
James Sloan                    "                  "     74
Wm. Wilcox                   "                  "     74
Lester Brace                   "                  "     73
Perez Cobb                                 "                  "     72
Moses Baker                  "                  "     71
Jas. C. Hall                                 "                  "     70
Benj. Homan                  "                  "     68
Henry Lovejoy                           "                  "     33
The Hall, owing to the rumor that had gained currency that it was filled to overflowing, did not entertain so large an assemblage as we should like to have seen. An appreciative audience was present, however, and we know that those who were there had reason to congratulate themselves. After a Voluntary, by the Union Cornet Band, the Chaplain, Rev. Dr. Ingersoll, read a most eloquent prayer. The reading of the Declaration of Independence by Col. James C. Strong, of the 38th N. Y. V., who was wounded at Williamsburg, was, as it seemed to us, listened to with unusual interest. The Oration by Prof. Ellicott Evans, of Hamilton College, proved particularly satisfactory to the thinkers of the audience; and we hazard but little in making the declaration that no finer address was delivered in the country on Saturday last.
The oration will be found in full on our second and fourth pages this morning, and we advise every reader of the Courier to read it, and make
it a study. At the close of the oration the Hon. Horatio Seymour, jr., was introduced to the audience by Mayor Beckwith, and read from the proof sheet, the special dispatch to the Courier office, announcing the glorious success of the Army of the Potomac. Each dispatch was accepted with a perfect storm of applause, and as Mr. Seymour finished the last sentence, the enthusiasm became absolutely sublime. The anxious faces became softened, the rigid, solemn lines which had been noticeable on almost every physiognomy during the day, disappeared, and a general determination to enjoy the Fourth, seemed to succeed the circulation of the Federal victories over Lee. A Benediction pronounced by Chaplin Robie, brought the exercises to a close, and the audience separated.
So far as the programme is concerned, it involved in addition to what we have given a National salute at noon and ringing of bells: an evening salute at sunset and ringing of bells; and a display of Fire Works on the Terrace under the supervision of Morris & Son. We should take great pleasure in saying something handsome about the enterprise of our well known pyrotechnists, Messrs Morris & Son. We scarcely ever knew them to fail in doing justice to the city when they agreed to do it; but we are forced to say in all candor that the display of Saturday night on the Terrace was nothing more nor less than a grand pyrotechnic fizzle.
Outside of the regular order of the d... and perhaps first in importance, was the dinner of the Continentals at the Mansion House. Our inevitable reporter was there, and he informs us that at half-past four the party sat down to dinner, mine host, one of the Continentals, being numbered among the absent. Hon. George R. Babcock, President of the Continentals, presided. The dinner, which was a good one, being disposed of with all imaginable gusto, the President called the Society to order, and as at substitute for the first regular toast, read a letter from the Chaplain, the Rev. Dr. Lord who was compelled to be absent, at the same time presenting the Chaplain's toast. The first regular toast announced was The Day we celebrate. To this the Hon. N. K. Hall responded in a most appropriate manner.
To the next toast, which our reporter failed to remember, Hon. Henry W. Rogers responded.
The Memory of Washington was drunk standing in silence.
Hon. George R. Babcock spoke to the sentiment, the
President of the United States;
and Hon. A. M. Clapp made a neat speech to
The Army and navy.
To the
Trade and Commerce of Buffalo,
O. G. Steele addressed himself; and
The Press
was well taken care of in a somewhat elaborate
and well written speech by C. F. S. Thomas,
Esq.
Our Volunteer Army
called out S. G. Cornell, Esq., who did the subject
justice.
Perhaps the most exquisite speech of the afternoon
was made by Asher P. Nichols, Esq.,
in response to that most inspiring of all toasts;
The Ladies.
We have full reports of the various speeches made on the occasion, but we have not the space for any of them at present. At some future time it is possible that we may do the subject full justice. To-day, in our somewhat hasty report, we can only mention the dinner of the Continentals as one of the features of the Fourth of July in Buffalo.
Several pleasant affairs have come under our notice, and we shall refer to them at some other time, but we cannot overlook a presentation made on the morning of the Fourth, to Columbia Hose Co., No. XI. It consisted of a magnificent silver trumpet, donated to the company by none other than the foreman H. O. Deo. It is needless to say that the gift called forth all necessary gratitude. In the afternoon the Company threw open the doors of their house to the ladies of their particular neighborhood, and the banqueting that prevailed can better be imagined than described.
Our notice would lack completeness did we fail to accord the proper credit to Chief Darcy and his force. The Main Street squad, organized by the Chief recently, and of which we shall have something to say hereafter, appeared to good advantage in every position assigned to them, while the day force attended to duty in a manner that gave satisfaction to all. And thus we have told the simple story of the Fourth of July in Buffalo.

INCIDENTS OF THE FOURTH.—The celebration of the Fourth, on Saturday, was attended by few accidents. Stephen Mulhall, a civil constable of the 8th Ward, was injured in the face while firing off a cannon near his residence in the forenoon. He had overcharged the gun, and in the act of firing it off some of the powder flashed up in his face and burned it considerably.
A fight occurred among some Germans in front of the St. Louis church, during the afternoon, which resulted in damaged heads and faces to several of the participants.
At the Grove where a dance was advertised, a large congregation, made up of the worst characters of the city, assembled, and during the afternoon about thirty distinct fights occurred. In the evening, about half past seven o'clock, officer Nispel, while undertaking to arrest a disorderly man on one of the cars, was attacked by a party of about fifty, and the man was rescued.
Several of the cars on the Main street road were broken down by their overweight of passengers, much to the discomfiture of the occupants, and those who were going and returning. There is a fatality hanging over the place known as the Grove, and if our tax payers could only furnish a police force to take care of it, it might be made respectable, although perhaps not as profitable to the Main Street Railroad Co.
During the afternoon a disturbance occurred at the saloon of Mr. Horace Thomas on Main street, a party we understand claiming that they were overcharged. In the melee Mr. Thomas and one of his assistants were rather severely handled. We do not learn that any of the offending parties were arrested.

THE RIOT.—The riot was not continued yesterday as many had feared it would be. Those participating in it either satisfied with the outrages they had committed or fearful of the last anger of the community which began to threaten them with proper punishment, refrained from further acts of violence. Several of the supposed ringleaders have been arrested and are now in jail. The injured negroes have been cared for, and it is now thought that all of them will recover.
Yesterday afternoon, on the arrival of the propeller Mendota, five colored men employed upon her were taken to the Chief's office by officers Watts, Marvel and Mills, No demonstration was made against them.
The colored crew of one of the N. Y. C. Railroad propellers were transferred to a tug outside the breakwater and conveyed to Canada.

The Riot at Buffalo.—The Buffalo Express says: The riot was not continued yesterday as many had feared it would be. Those participating in it either satisfied with the outrages they had committed or fearful of the just anger of the community which began to threaten them with proper punishment, refrained from further acts of violence. Several of the supposed ringleaders have been arrested and are now in jail. The injured negroes have been cared for, and it is now thought that all of them will recover.
Yesterday afternoon, on the arrival of the propeller Mendota, five colored men employed upon her were taken to the Chief's office by officers Watts, Marvel and Mills. No Demonstration was made against them.
The colored crew of one of the N. Y. C. Railroad propellers were transferred to a tug outside the breakwater and conveyed to Canada.
A gentleman residing in this city who witnessed the whole of this brutal affair, gives us a few particulars, which differ from the accounts of the Buffalo papers. The riot first originated in a beer saloon, where the negro was sitting. A boy came in to get a drink and asked "all hands" up, when the negro availed himself of the invitation.
To this the boy objected, and a fight ensued when the negro drew a pistol and shot the boy, wounding him severely. From this the riot arose the dock swarmed with over 5,000 of the excited mob, and the air was perfectly black with stones and other missiles. One negro was thrown from a vessel into the water and being unable to swim was drowned. Another got hold of the stay chains and attempted to pull himself out of the water, when a man reached down and kicked him in the head until he released his hold and fell back and sank.

General Doubleday Ordered to Buffalo.
Major General Abner Doubleday, has been ordered to Buffalo to take command of the depot of drafted men to be established at this point. Capt. Tidball, who was first detailed for this duty

having asked to be relieved on account of poor health, has been ordered again to recruiting.—Two officers, Capt. R. F. O'Beirne of the 14th Infantry and Lieut. McKay are, we understand, ordered to report for service under Gen. Doubleday. We judge, from the fact of Gen. Doubleday's appointment, that the rendezvous here is designed by the Government to be one of great magnitude and importance, and Fort Porter will undoubtedly have to be subjected to a radical process of improvement. Gen. Doubleday has not yet arrived, but is expected every day.
Gen. Doubleday is a native of New York, from which State he entered West Point. He graduated June 30th, 1842, the twenty-third in his class, and was appointed brevet 2d Lieut. in the 3d artillery. In 1845 he was made 2d Lieut. Of the 1st artillery, and in 1847 1st Lieutenant of the same regiment. At the breaking out of the war he commanded his company of artillery in Fort Sumter, and it is said fired the first gun on the rebels from that point. He behaved with great firmness and gallantry on that occasion, and on the 14th of May, 1861, he was promoted to a majority in the 17th Infantry. He received his commission as Brigadier General of volunteers Feb. 3d, 1862, and for a considerable time commanded a brigade under Gen. McDowell in Virginia. At the battle of Fredericksburg he commanded the 1st Division of the 1st corps, and shortly after was made a Major General of volunteers. A division composed partly of troops withdrawn from Washington and constituting the 2d Division of the 1st (Rerynolds [sic]) corps was given him, and in command of that he remained till the death of Reynolds at Gettysburg. At that battle, we believe, Gen. Doubleday was wounded in the shoulder. From all we can learn Gen. Doubleday is an officer of great vigor and ability. We trust he will find Buffalo and duties here as agreeable as he can wish.

THE LATE RIOTS.—The series of riots that disgraced our city on Monday last, bear with them a strong admonition to the business men and capitalists of Buffalo. The outrages to which we refer, had their origin in a combination, which not only seeks to control the price of labor, and to dictate the terms of employment, irrespective of the interests of the capitalists, but which retorts to a high-handed violation of law and right to compass its purposes. While we sympathize with the laboring classes, and stand ready to defend their rights to the last, we cannot shut our eyes to the dangers that lurk in these bursts of passion which result in acts of violence and blood-shed such as characterized our city on Monday. We cannot do less than denounce this conduct and do our duty. The only offence that the colored men, who have been hunted and slaughtered like wild beasts, is that they are willing to labor and receive a fair compensation therefor [sic]. Is this an offence worthy of death? Are men to take the law in their hands and force either white or black to yield to requirements which find no justification in right? Never. It becomes the business men of Buffalo to meet these demonstrations promptly, and protect the future against a recurrence of these disgraceful scenes. There is but one way in which this can be successfully accomplished, and that is by a combination on the part of all businessmen—whether connected with the commerce of the lakes or the canals—whether engaged in merchandise or manufactures—which will secure a unity of interest and action in behalf of their own rights, and which will establish safeguards against violence and outrage on the part of men who are stimulated with a mistaken sense of what belongs to the relations of business, to a policy of compulsion that respects neither personal rights nor human life.
While each man has a right to decide for himself the price he will charge and the number of hours he will labor, there his right terminates. He has nothing to do with his neighbor, and he violates not only the principles of common right, but the law and the welfare and peace of society when he transcends that point and interferes with the actions of others. It therefore becomes the business men of Buffalo to unite in behalf of their own interests, and form an organization which will not leave them or the welfare of the city at the mercy of infuriated mobs. We appeal to the business men of Buffalo—the merchants—the manufacturers—the commercial men—the mechanics—the managers of railroads and all interests which wield capital, to act promptly and efficienty [sic] in behalf of a fair, honorable and independent line of policy that will place them and their city above and beyond such outrages as have marked its history of late. We do this by way of admonition and under a sense of duty that has been forced upon us by the scenes that we have just passed through. It is a matter worthy of serious consideration, and we leave it with the business men for their decision.

THE BUFFALO RIOT.—The Buffalo papers of this morning bring us particulars of a bloody riot in that city on the dock. The fight began at two P. M., yesterday, between a negro named Williams and a white boy. One John M'Laughlin interfered when the negro shot him in the breast with a pistol. An excitement ensued which the Police endeavored to abate and they took Williams into custody. But the alarm spread and ere long the mob became uncontrollable. A negro on a boat in Ohio Basin was attacked and the Police saved him from death. An attack was made upon a "nigger dive" in Commercial street. There the Police were ready and rescued a number of negroes who were sent to jail for their own safety. The Emerald Hotel, another negro house, was then attacked and there the Police saved more colored people from the vengeance of the mob.
A negro undertook to escape from the propeller Tonawanda and was drowned. He had no pursuers, but fell a victim to his timidity. A negro on the propeller Mary Stewart sought refuge in the fender ropes. He was pursued by two wretches who kicked him into the water and he was drowned. A Policeman who sought to secure the man was thrown into the water. The propeller fired up and left the dock to get away from the mob.
A negro on Commercial st. had his arm broken in a new row about five p. m., then acting Mayor Beckwith and J. W. Murphy addressed the crowd and the excitement subsided. Nothing of a serious character followed.
In the evening a negro named Henry Reavels was shot by another of his own color, in which affair the mob had no hand. Ravels had been ordered to close his place, by the Police, as a measure of precaution. A negro named Henry Smith was ordered out, and refused to go. Reavels sought to put him out, and was shot fatally.
The riot was a disgraceful one, and is denounced by the Courier in befitting terms.
The Express makes out the affair more serious than the Courier, so far as the injury to negroes goes, though but two who were drowned are the only fatal cases reported.

BUFFALO RIOTS—The excitement at Buffalo has subsided and no further outrages have been committed. Precautions have been taken, however, not to excite the mob spirit again by keeping colored people out of the way of of danger. We notice by the papers that the colored crew of a Central Railroad propeller were taken off by a tug outside the harbor and conveyed to Canada. The papers are discussing the subject of protection against a repetition of such acts as have disgraced the city. What can be done consistent with individual liberty to prevent such occurrences is not set forth by the Express which has taken up the subject. There is no way in a free country so effective to prevent riots as the cultivation of respect for constitutions and laws. The tendency has been of late to override law and trample constitutions under feet. If these things are done in green places, what may we expect in the dry? Mobbing printing offices and denying free speech to citizens under threats of personal violence, has become quite common of late and had official sanction. The disease has become infectious. Certain classes of society find in mobs a ready means to redress their real or fancied grievances and they resort to such proceedings. They are no greater sinners than the other mobocrats who cry out against them after having tolerated the acts from which they took example.
We learn that on Sunday last Rev. Mr. Moore read to his congregation a patriotic letter from Bishop Timon, of Buffalo, in which the Bishop strongly urged a strict observance of all laws of the land, and a hearty co-operation on the part of every one in sustaining the Government in its efforts to put down rebellion. Father Moore after reading the letter strongly enforced the sentiment of it. The letter and remarks are timely, and cannot fail of having a good effect. Very many are misled as to the draft by the efforts of wiley [sic] politicians, and those who do not read for themselves are made to believe that the law is unequal and severe, particularly on the poor man.

MORE REGIMENTS ARRIVED.—Two more regiments have passed through the city since our last, viz. the 15th New Hampshire, which arrived at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon, and the 26th Maine, which arrived at 11 o'clock last night. The acting members of the committee, Col. Viele, B. F. Felton and Jonathan Sidway, together with a number of ladies, were, as usual, at their posts, and received and entertained the hungry and weary soldiers with all kindness and hospitality.
The 15th New Hampshire numbered about 800 men. Six of them were so much reduced by sickness and fatigue that it was found necessary to remove them to the hospital, where, we understand [sic], two of the number have since died. The 20th Maine numbered about 750. All these men, officers, and soldiers, are loud in their praises of the people of Buffalo for the kindness shown them.
W e understand from the committee that no more are expected before Sunday or Monday, on which days, it is supposed that four regiments, who were at Cairo last night, homeward bound, will pass through. Ample provision will be made for their entertainment. So liberally was the last call of the committee responded to, that a large quantity of food remains on hand. This, as the weather will not admit of its being kept for any length of time, will be taken to the Orphan Asylum.
There is at present in the depot table accommodations for about 1500 men; and this can be extended to accommodate 2000 if necessary. Too much praise cannot be lavished upon the ladies and gentlemen who have charge of this matter. They are always on hand, and no pains or labor are spared.

ARRIVAL OF THE 24TH MAINE REGIMENT.— The Twenty-fourth Maine Regiment reached this city last evening at half-past seven o'clock, over the Lake Shore Road from Port Hudson. They had intended originally to pass over the New York and Erie from Dunkirk, but upon reflection concluded to take the New York Central.
The Reception Committee ascertained that the Regiment had lunched at Dunkirk, and consequently it was not deemed practicable to make any formal preparation for their entertainment. Most of the full Committee were on hand, however, when the train arrived, and sandwiches and an abundance of ice water were prepared, and when a change of cars was effected, they were passed to the men.
The Regiment is in command of Col. G. M. Atwood, and hails from Augusta, Maine. It went into the service 900 strong, and is now enabled to muster about 600,—but not effective men. The six hundred men whom we saw emerge from the Lake Shore cars, and drawn up in line, were only spectrally suggestive of the splendid men they once had been. About twenty- five of the number were very ill, and had to be carried to the cars where conveniences for rest had been prepared. At various points on the route members of the Regiment had to be left, we fear to die.
The following is a list of the principal officers:
Colonel C. M. Atwood.
Lieutenant Colonel Eben Hutchinson.
Adjutant C. C. Hine.
Surgeon R. L. Hanrell.
Assistant Surgeon ___ Morton.
Qurtermaster M. O. A Fillebroome.
The Twenty-Fourth reached Port Hudson on the night of the 21st of May, and entered at once upon active duty. The loss in officers is two Lieutenants and two Assistant Surgeons. One man a private, named Marcellus W. Grant, Co. A was unable to proceed farther than this city, and was sent to the General Hospital. The regiment as it was, must have been one of the finest in appearance that ever entered the field, but poor fellows they return to their homes the mere shadows of their former selves. The whistle of the locomotive, which signalled [sic] their departure, left many sad hearts behind.

Commercial Advertiser.
Monday Evening, July 27, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
Mayor's Proclamation.
To the Citizens of Buffalo:
Recent events demand the serious attention of all friends of law and order. Prevention is better than cure, and the citizens of Buffalo should take care that no breach of the peace or destruction of property under any pretext shall occur. These e... fall with far heavier weight upon the poor than on the rich. Every disorderly proceeding but increases our taxes and diminishes the demand for labor. All property destroyed by illegal assemblages must be paid for by the city and county. The State and National Government bear no part of it. If insured, the Companies are not answerable.
Capital, which is the food as well as the product of labor, will not seek investment where it has not the protection of the law. Enterprises which promise employment to thousands will be abandoned if the fair fame of our prosperous city is tarnished by violence and blood. It is our boast that a far greater proportion of our citizens own the houses in which they live than in any other city in the State. This is a guaranty for order if only self-interest is consulted. But not alone is the house holder concerned. Increased taxes produce increased rents. Insecurity to persons and property diminish the demand for labor.
Fellow-citizens, stand by the established principles of law and social order which are the foundations of civil society. The law is your surest protection. He who urges you to break it is your enemy and the enemy of your wives and children. He would desolate your homes and fill your eyes with tears of anguish.
Give no heed to the advice of had men, who seek to create disorder that they may pillage and destroy. Spurn those who tell you to seek redress, for real or supposed wrongs, by any other than lawful means, and through the constituted authorities. If laws are bad we can repeal or amend them in due time. The courts must construe them, in cases of difficulty, and all are bound by their ultimate decision.
Let us, then, fellow-citizens, give no cause to the enemies of free institutions to say that liberty means license, and freedom, disorder; that man is incapable of self government, and that force and prerogative are the only stable foundations of the social fabric. Stand by the Union, the Constitution and the Laws. Then peace, freedom and prosperty [sic] will be secured to you and to your children after you. Any other course brings ruin, desolation and death in its trains.
C. BECKWITH, Mayor pro tem.
Mayor's Office, Buffalo, July 25th, 1363.
Committee.

AN APPROPRIATE AND DESERTED TRIBUTE.—As we have already announced the Common Council, last Monday, changed the name of Hospital street to Wilkeson, in honor of the gallant and lamented Lieutenants John W. and Bayard Wilkeson. The following is a copy of the resolutions presented by Alderman Gates and unanimously adopted:
Whereas, Hospital street, in the city of Buffalo, derived its name from a hospital that was once situated on said street; and
Whereas, The late Judge Wilkeson owned most of the land on said street at the time it was so named, and the title to much of it yet remains in his descendants; and .
Whereas, Two of the grandsons of said Wilkeson have lately fallen in battle in defence of their country —Lieut. John W. Wilkeson, of the 100th regiment of N. Y. V., who fell at the battle of Seven Pines, and Lieut. Bayard Wilkeson, of the 4th regiment, United States artillery, who fell at the battle of Gettysburg; and
Whereas, It is the desire of this Council to do honor, so far as possible, to oar gallant fellow citizens who have gone forth to battle in the cause of our beloved country, in this its hour of sorest trial, and particularly those who have laid down their lives in her defence. Therefore, as a fitting testimonial to the memory of the gallant dead, it is
Resolved, That the name of Hospital street, in the city of Buffalo, be changed to, and the same hereby is, and shall hereafter be known as Wilkeson street.

Commercial Advertiser.
Tuesday Evcening, July 28, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
THE COMMON COUNCIL.—There was a quorum of the Council in attendance yesterday. Not much business of general importance was transacted.
A communication was received from the Comptroller, stating that at the Annual Tax Sale, held June 1st, 1863, there was struck off to the city lands upon which the taxes with interest and expenses amount to $26,771.87.
A resolution by Ald. Hopkins that the Mayor and Comptroller be authorized to issue city bonds to the amount of $26,171.87 to pay for the purchase made, was adopted.
A communication was received from the City Attorney, notifying the Council that a contract had been executed on behalf of the city with the Buffalo Water Works Co., for supplying water for public purposes for nine months from May 1, 1863, upon the terms fixed by the Council. The action was approved.
A petition was received from "The Citizens' Gas Light Co. of Buffalo," for permission to lay conductors for conducting gas through the streets, etc., of the city of Buffalo—when Ald. Scheu offered the following, which were adopted.
Resolved, That permission is hereby granted to the Citizens' Gas Light Company, of Buffalo, to lay the necessary conductors for conducting gas through the streets, lanes, alleys, squares and other public grounds and highways of the city of Buffalo, provided such streets, lanes, alleys, squares and other public grounds and highways of the city are left in as good condition as they were previous to laying such conductors, and with as little obstruction to the passage of such streets lanes, alleys, squares and other public grounds and highways, as is possible in the process of laying such conductors down, subject to the supervision and control of the Common Council.
Resolved, That the Citizens' Gas Light Company of Buffalo, be and hereby is exempted from taxation on their personal property for such period till the company declares, or will be enabled to declare, from their profits a semi-annual dividend of three and one-half per cent on their stock, but such period of exemption shall not exceed the term of three years.
Resolved, That these grants are based upon the conditions following:
1st, That the said company will submit their books and affairs to investigation by a special committee to be appointed by the Common Council, whenever so disposed.
2d. That said company shall not change its name or consolidate with any other regularly organized Gas Light Company.
3d. That in case said company should, nevertheless, consolidate with any other Gas Light Company, then all their conductors or other property, laid down under ground in our streets or other highways, shall revert to and become and be the sole property of the City of Buffalo, with the right to apply them to any use the Common Council may see fit,
Ald. Hanavan offered the following:
Whereas, Section 7 of title 5 of the city Charter provides "that in case of some great public calamity, the Common Council may borrow a sum for the contingent fund equal to the emergency," and
Whereas, The civil war now existing is one of the greatest of public calamities, and called for unexpected and therefore unprovided for expenditures and sacrifices, and
Whereas, A draft has been ordered which must fall heavily upon those who earn their bread by the sweat of their brows, and who have families dependent on them for support, and
Whereas, It is just that the burthen of providing for the relief of these men and their families should fall upon the taxable property of the city of Buffalo, therefore
Resolved, That the Common Council of the city of Buffalo hereby borrow from the contingent fund of the said city, the sum of three hundred thousand dollars for the purpose of paying the sum of $300 for the relief of the families of each and every person who may be drafted, and is not by law exempt from such draft, and who shall apply to the same within 10 days after receiving official notice that he has been drafted in the city of Buffalo.
Resolved, That a special committee of five Aldermen be appointed by the President of this Council to whom all applications of drafted men for relief shall be referred, and upon the report and certificate of a majority of this committee that the person applying has been drafted, and is not by law exempt from such draft, and that the application was made within ten days after he received official notice of said draft, the City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to draw a warrant upon the City Treasurer, payable out of the conscription relief fund hereafter created, to be signed by the Mayor and countersigned by the Comptroller, for the sum of $300 in favor of each drafted man so certified and reported on by such committee, to be delivered and paid as other warrants upon the City Treasurer, are now delivered and paid.
Resolved, That the sum of $300,000 is hereby borrowed from the contingent fund, and shall constitute a fund to be known as the conscription relief fund, upon which fund all warrants for the relief of drafted men and their families shall be drawn.
Ald. Hopkins offered the following as a substitute to the above:
Whereas, The Common Council of the city of Buffalo on the 1st day of September, 1862, borrowed from the contingent fund and appropriated $50,000 to be used for the purpose of contributing to the support and assisting the families of such residents of this city as should thereafter enter the military service of the United States; and
Whereas, About $20,000 of the said $50,000 has already been used, and there remains thereof for future distribution about the sum of $30,000.
Now, therefore, for the purpose of again expressing the loyal and patriotic sentiments of this Council, and to give renewed assurance to such persons as may hereafter enter the service, either as volunteers or conscripts under the proposed draft, it is
Resolved, That, it is the intention of this Council to distribute the balance of said $50,000 so appropriated among the families of such as may hereafter enter the service, either as volunteers or conscripts, and when such sum is exhausted the faith of the Council is hereby assured and pledged, that a further sum shall be appropriated for the like purpose until the end of the war.
The matter was referred to a special committee consisting of Ald. Hanavan, Scheu, Hopkins, Dayton and Robert Mills.

Returning Soldiers.—Yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock the 45th Massachusetts regiment of nine months men passed through this city on their return home from Port Hudson.—This regiment was sent to join Gen. Banks at New Orleans last autumn, and returned by way of the Mississippi, haying made a complete circuit of the insurrectionary country. The soldiers were in miserable health, over one-third of the number being on the sick list. Three died on the route before reaching Buffalo, and another at the latter place. This regiment was engaged in the taking of fort Hudson.
Another Massachusetts regiment is expected through here to-day.

EASTERN REGIMENTS ON THEIR WAY HOME.—On Thursday night at eleven o'clock, another Eastern regiment passed through here on its way home. Another also passed through yesterday. They belong either in Maine or Massachusetts, and have come from Port Hudson by way of Cairo. Several regiments have already returned to their homes by this route—one having passed through this city about every day of this week. These were nine months men, and left with Gen. Banks when he started on his expedition, have served a memorable campaign in Louisiana, and assisted in the capture of Port Hudson. They are to be mustered out of service upon their arrival home.

REFRESHMENTS WANTED AT THE DEPOT.—We learn that another Massachusetts regiment will arrive in this city, about 8 or 9 o'clock this morning, and it is desirable to furnish them with some refreshments. The kind hands who supplied the edibles for the 52d regiment, felt themselves repaid in witnessing this gratitude of the war-worn men, and the ample supply of provender entirely disappeared, leaving only the bare tables, which remain across the whole western half of the depot, waiting for the contributions of our liberal citizens, who have done so much already. The ladies, especially, are invited to take this matter in charge, and will be furnished with rooms in the depot for the arrangement of the contributions.
P. S.—Since the above was in type, we learn that the regiment (22d Maine) will not reach here until 3 o'clock P. M.

RECEPTION OF THE 52ND MASSACHUSETTS REGIMENT.—The 52d regiment Massachusetts volunteers arrived in this city, over the Lake Shore road, yesterday afternoon at half-past one o'clock, from Port Hudson, on their way to Greenfield, Mass., where they are to be mustered out. As soon as it was known that the 52d was coming, the congregation of Rev. Dr. Hosmer, whose son, Rev. James K. Hosmer, is a member of Co. D, in the regiment, determined to prepare such a collation for the wearied soldiers as would reflect credit upon the patriotic hospitality of our city. For that purpose they were dismissed at morning service by their pastor, and at once set busily to work. Temporary tables were hastily erected across the upper end of the Exchange Street Depot, and by the time the regiment arrived were loaded with a bountiful and substantial repast.
The hasty preparations for the reception were scarcely completed when the long train, bearing 789 brave New England soldiers, moved slowly through the large concourse of people assembled in the depot. The troops were heartily welcomed by Dr. Hosmer in a brief speech, and invited to partake of the repast prepared for them. The response was a general and eager acquiescence, which proved how sorely the wearied soldier guests stood in need of refreshment. The members of the Unitarian Church resolved themselves into a grand committee of the whole on waiting, and successfully repelled the hungry attacks which met them on all sides, with well directed volleys of hot coffee, sandwiches, and other edibles.
Meantime fifty-two of the members of the regiment, who were unable from wounds or sickness to leave the cars in which they were laid, were not forgotten by their kind hearted stranger friends. The ladies passed like ministering angels from pallet to pallet, bathing the fevered brow, cooling the parched tongue, and speaking words of loving comfort to ears that for long weary months had heard only the thunder of cannon or the stern voice of command. We heard one poor fellow, to whom a lady had just given a drink of wine, say to another, "George, I guess we must be getting near home." Could a higher compliment have been paid to the kindness of their attendants? Three of the sick were so weak that it was deemed advisable to remove them to the hospital, where they now are, we regret to say, in a very precarious condition. Four others died on the journey, and it was found necessary to leave some others at different places on the way.
The Regiment is composed of a fine looking, intelligent and remarkably orderly body of men, whose bronzed complexions, thin faces and almost threadbare garments, show they have seen severe service in the Southwest.
The following is a list of the Field and Staff Officers and Captains:
Col. H. S. Greenleaf; Lieut. Col. S. J. Storrs; Major Henry Winn; Adjt. John M. Becker; Quarteraster E. Clark; Surgeon F. A. Sawyer; Ass't Surgeon __ Richardson; Chaplain F. A. Moore.
Co. A, Capt. A. C. Long; Co. B, Capt. B. Nelson; Co. C, Capt. M. H. Spaulding; Co. D, Capt. H. Hosford; Co. E, Capt. J. Richmond; Co. F, Capt. L. H. Stone; Co. G, Lieut. J. P. Kellogg; Co. H, Capt. ___ Perkins; Co. I, Capt. C. Tileston; Co. K, Capt. E. C. Bissell.
The regiment left for Albany at half-past three o'clock by special train. Superintendent Chittenden, with a thoughtful kindness worthy of all praise, placed the only sleeping car he could procure at the disposal of the wounded, whose painful journey will thus be rendered much more comfortable. While speaking of good acts, we should not forget our generous townsman Mr. T. T. Bloomer, who, although not a member of the Unitarian Church, made a truly Christian contribution of various kinds of edibles.
Within a few days a number of regiments are expected to pass through here. Two Maine regiments will arrive to-day. We do not deem it necessary to urge either congregations or individuals to emulate the good example of the Unitarian Society.

RECEPTION OF THE 52D MASSACHUSETTS REGIMENT—AN IMPROMPTU DEMONSTRATION—The 52d Regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, whose term of nine months' service recently expired, arrived here yesterday, en route from Port Hudson for home, about half past one 1 o'clock. Through the exertions of the members of Dr. Hosmer's Church and others, the returning soldiers were most hospitably received and entertained on their arrival in the city. The fact that a son of the estimable pastor of the Unitarian Church was a member of the regiment, had participated in all the "bloody business" in which it had been engaged, and accompanied them on the homeward march, was the moving cause of the demonstration on the part of the church society.
A bountiful repast was provided in the depot, the tables, eleven in number, having in the shortest possible space of time been covered with everything which could tempt the appetites of the hungry soldiers. A blessing having been invoked by Dr. Hosmer the soldiers "fell on," and did ample justice to the good things set before them.
After the collation, the Chaplain, Rev. Mr. Moores, made a brief response, expressive of the gratitude of the regiment, and earnestly bespoke the same kindness for other regiments of their comrades, which may come this way hereafter. The ladies and gentlemen at the depot, assisted by Mr. Chittenden and other railroad gentlemen, did everything possible to supply the wants of the men, canteens were filled, a stock of provisions for the farther journey laid in, and the sick were furnished with stimulants [sic], &c.
It is expected that other returning regiments will pass through the city shortly, and we feel that we do not promise too much when we say that they will meet with the same hospitality as did the 52d Massachusetts.

RECEPTION OF THE 52ND MASSACHUSETTS REGIMENT.—The 52nd regiment Massachusetts volunteers arrived in this city, over the Lake Shore road, yesterday afternoon at half past one o'clock, from Port Hudson, on their way to Greenfield, Mass., where they are to be mustered out. As soon as it was known that the 52d was coming, the congregation of Rev. Dr. Hosmer, whose son, Rev. James K. Hosmer, is a member of Co D, in the regiment determined to prepare such a collation for the weary soldiers as would reflect credit on the patriotic hospitality of our city. For that purpose they were dismissed at morning service by their pastor, and at once set busily to work. Temporary tables were hastily erected across the upper end of the Exchange St. Depot, and by the time the regiment arrived were loaded with a bountiful and substantial repast.—Buffalo Express.

Commercial Advertiser.
Tuesday Evening, August 4, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
MEETING OF THE WARD WAR COMMITTEES.—An adjourned meeting of the Ward War Committees was held at the Council Chamber last evening, to hear the report of Wm. Wilkeson, Esq., who, at the request of the former meeting, had visited Washington for the purpose of obtaining information as to whether the number of men (992) recruited in this city since February 7th—being in excess of former quotas—could be credited in the coming draft. The substance of Mr. Wilkeson's report is as follows:
Having obtained an interview with Provost Marshal General Fry, he ascertained that the State had been credited with more than had been claimed by Adjutant General Sprague. That the surplus in the various localities had been aggregated and credited to the State at large, and that under this arrangement the records showed that the surplus claimed by the Committees had already been credited, having been included in the State allowance. Mr. W. endeavored to procure a postponement of the draft for a time, that efforts might be made to fill the quota by enlistments, assuring Col. Fry that if time was given the quota of the district could be raised by volunteering, and that a regiment could be raised in Buffalo in thirty days. To this Col. Fry responded that if the privilege was allowed to this district, it would be demanded by every other, and the draft would become a nullity. While Mr. W. was in conversation with Col. Fry, a dispatch from Major Diven, Assistant Provost Marshal for this part of the State, came in, announcing that the draft had been ordered to commence here on Wednesday. This Col. Fry seemed to regard as a final disposition of the whole question.

THE 22D MAINE REGIMENT.—The 22d Maine Regiment arrived in the city between 2 and 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon, over the Lake Shore Road, on their way home from Port Hudson. Notwithstanding their arrival was much earlier than was anticipated, a splendid repast was prepared in the Central depot and the will with which the hungry, war-worn soldiers "'charged" upon the viands, showed that the kind offices of the ladies and gentlemen to whose exertion they were indebted for this very appropriate "reception" were keenly appreciated.
Such acts as these do honor alike to those immediately concerned, and to the city. If anything can repay the returning soldier for his toils, and sufferings and sacrifices, these practical demonstrations of sympathy and appreciation will contribute largely to that result.

MEETING FOR FURNISHING REFRESHMENTS TO REGIMENTS PASSING THROUGH THE CITY.—At a meeting of the citizens of Buffalo, held at the Mansion House, on the evening of the 3d inst., for the purpose of making arrangements for supplying the various regiments which will pass through this city within a few days, with necessary refreshments, T. T. Bloomer, Esq., was called to the Chair, and Dr. John S. Trowbridge appointed Secretary.
On motion of Geo. B. Gates, Esq., Jonathan Sidway, H. K. Viele, B. F. Felton, Henry Clifton, E. P. Dorr, W. B. Peck, Joseph Stringham, Wm. Sherwood, H. G. White, D. S. Bennett, Wm. Kasson and T. T. Bloomer were appointed by the Chair to solicit subscriptions and donations for the purpose ot carrying out the object of the meeting.
On motion the meeting then adjourned.
Subsequently a meeting of the above named Committee was held, and Geo. B. Gates, Esq., called to the Chair, and Dr. J. S. Trowbridge appointed Secretary.
Handsome subscriptions of money were made by the New York Central and State Line Railroads through Superintendent Chittenden of the former road.
The following sub-committee on reception and donations was appointed:
H. K. Viele, B. F. Felton, Jonathan Sidway.
The above committee will be in attendance at the Central Depot after today, and all desiring to know what donations will be acceptable should call on them.
JOHN S. TROWBRIDGE, Secretary.

DEMOCRAT & AMERICAN.
SATURDAY MORNING, AUG, 8.
A Difficult Job.
The Buffalo Courier strives hard to break force of its own statement with regard to action of the State authorities in causing excess of volunteers in various localities in interior districts to be credited to the State large, thus enabling the cities of New York, Brooklyn, which are many thousands below their quotas, to profit by the activity and patriotism displayed elsewhere in the matter of volunteering. Our Buffalo cotemporary now ... that "the basis upon which the draft is ... expressly precludes any specific credit be given to districts." Of course it does ... that basis was established at the request of ... Seymour's Adjutant General, by giving credit to the State at large for the surplus volunteers furnished from localities like Rochester and Buffalo. The injustice of this arrangement can be shifted from the shoulders of Gov. SEYMOUR to those of any Federal official, for Provost Marshal General Fry's circular, from which the following is taken, throws the whole responsibility upon His Excellency:
"If it shall be made to appear to the Provost Marshal General, by the Governor of any state, particular towns [or wards] to which ... have been assigned, have heretofore actually furnished a surplus of men over their quotas, and will be issued discharging from the service of the United States a number of men called into service by the present draft from said towns (or wards] equal to the surplus proved to have been furnished heretofore. Towns [or wards] will thus get credit actually for their excess on ...mer calls."
But it appears that Gov, SEYMOUR had no ... of making it appear that "particular towns (or wards)" had furnished a surplus of men ... their quotas," for that would involve his New York "friends" in the necessity of making ... their own deficiency. He accordingly ... Adjutant General SPEAGUE to Washington ... procure "the crediting of all the men who ... certificates of muster in the State he co... ... bring, to the State at large."
According to the Courier, "Col. FRY repeatedly and emphatically told Mr. WILKESON that any attempt to credit districts would be accompanied with so many difficulties that the thing was out of the question." Of course he di... ... and why? Because the preparations for the draft in this State had been completed according to the plan proposed by Adj't Gen. Sprague and in order to make any change now it would

be necessary to perform the whole of the work over again, and invalidate the draft in the localities where it has been completed. Gov. SEYMOUR'S views had already been communicated to the Provost Marshal General through his official representative, the Adjutant General of the State, and the authorities at Washington could not go back of them to consult the wishes of committeemen from the various "towns (or wards)." Under these circumstances, it is simply ridiculous for the Courier to say: "The fact that the State at large has been duly credited, cannot, we repeat, properly constitute an obstacle to the obtaining just credit for the respective districts." The simple fact that Gov. SEYMOUR, through the agency of the Adjutant General, has expressed his desire that the surplus volunteers in the various localities shall be credited to the State at large, militates decidedly against the idea of crediting "the respective districts"—to say nothing of the fact that the draft has been completed in numerous localities, according to that plan.
The Courier will find it hard work to relieve the Governor in this matter.

NINTH WARD DRAFT MEETING.—At a meeting of the residents of the Ninth Ward, held at the Common Council Chamber, Thursday evening, 6th inst., for the purpose of devising means to aid those who may be drafted from the Ward, Johnathan Mayhew, Esq., was called to the Chair.
On motion of P. M. Vosburgh, the Chairman appointed David Kissock. Dr. H. M. Congar and James H. Davis a committee to select officers for a permanent organization; and upon their recommend the following were chosen:
Peter M. Vosburgh—President.
Dr. Wm. King—Vice President.
E. O. Salisbury—Secretary.
David W. Burt—Treasurer.
The President suggested that some plan of operations be agreed upon, and that instructions be given to the officers as to the duties expected of them, whereupon a motion was made and adopted, that the officers be directed to procure a copy of the Conscription Act, and all the necessary blanks to be filled out free of expense, for those who are entitled to exemption, and that the Secretary give public notice that all requisite information will be furnished by applying at the Mayor's office.
On motion, a committee was appointed, consisting of Wm. Wilkeson, Wm. Williams, Eben P. Dorr, A. B. Fitch and Wm. C. Sherwood, for the purpose of raising funds, and to co-operate with the officers to carry out the objects of the organization.
The meeting then adjourned, subject to the call of the President.

CORPORATION PROCEEDINGS
Reported for the Buffalo Morning Express.
IN COMMON COUNCIL,
Monday, Aug. 10, 1863.
In the absence of the President of the Council, Ald. Goemble was called to the Chair.
COMMUNICATIONS FROM THE MAYOR.
A communication was received from the Mayor pro tem., stating that Hon. Wm. G. Fargo, the Mayor of this city, took his departure from San Francisco on the 23d ult., and that by the favor of Providence he would arrive in New York some time during the present week.
After alluding to the sudden outbreak of prejudice against the colored people which occurred on the 12th of last July, which was attended with the most heartless outrages upon helpless negroes, and by the most pusillanimous acts of murder, and the unpopularity of the draft with a large class of persons, which reqired [sic] the employment of a large number of special policemen and citizens, the Mayor demonstrated the necessity of submitting to law; and as will be seen from the following extract from his communication, favors the appropriation by the Council of a sufficient sum to relieve the poor citizens from the draft:
"Permit me to urge upon you the necessity of immediate and decisive action for the relief of those of our fellow citizens who are now conscripts. If you have not the power to extend complete relief it should be known at once, in order that no one may hang a deceptive hope upon you. In my opinion, it is both competent and proper for you to make ample provision to alleviate the afflictions induced by the draft.
The people of this country had not bargained for this new institution, conscription, and are unprepared in mind and estate. It is competent for every community to relieve its own poor or distressed. While our rulers must decide upon the expediency of given law, and while it is true that general laws cannot be so ordained as to operate with exactly equal pressure upon individuals, it is nevertheless just and proper that any family or community should extend its help to those members who are unable to bear alone the load placed upon them.
I have no doubt you will make ample provision for the families of those who may go into the service. This provision should not be niggard. It is true taxation swells up enormously, but money placed in the balance against the  sacrifices of the industrious poor man, who, laboring to secure a little property for his family, or to educate and prepare his children for life, is suddenly forced from his home, the central spot of all patriotic desire, and compelled to surrender his family to the guardianship of the public his children to the charity of the rich, and to himself bear in unwilling exile the deprivations of the camp and the dangers of the field.
I submit whether you should not also provide means to buy substitutes or to pay the commutation of at least those men of family, who being unwilling to enter the service are either wholly or in part unable to provide for themselves."
The communication was received and filed.
The following communication was then presented by the Mayor:
HEADQUARTERS 31ST BRIGADE, N. Y. N. G.,
State Arsenal, Buffalo, Aug. 10, 1863.
To His Honor the Mayor and Common Council of the City of Buffalo:
Gentlemen: You are respectfully invited to review the 31st Brigade, comprising the 65th and 74th Regiments N. Y. N. G., on the Terrace to-morrow, Tuesday evening, at 5 o'clock.
I am, gentlemen, very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,
WATSON A. FOX,
Col. 74th Reg't N. Y. N. Y., Com'd'g Post.
H. G. THOMAS, A. A. G.

On motion of Ald. Hopkins the invitation was accepted.
The annual statement of the Comptroller was presented and received and filed, and 500 copies ordered to be printed.
The Street Commissioner furnished a statement of works completed under his direction. Received and filed.
The accounts of Special Policemen, amounting to $631 52 were presented by the Chief of Police, and orders directed to be drawn.
The officers of the 74th and 65th Regiments N. Y. ... presented a petition to the Council, represent- ... the national conscription falling heavily …members of the National Guard will have … to break up the organizations in this case.
... ...cast to discourage many of them, especially their officers, who devoted years of time, and made large personal sacrifices to maintain them. The petitioners, therefore, respectfully urged upon the Council to make an approprition [sic] sufficient to pay the exemption of such members of the National Guard as might be drafted into the United States service.
The petition was laid on the table temporarily.
A number of petitions signed by a large number of tax-paying citizens, was presented to the Council, asking that body, as early as its convenience would permit, to take such action as may be necessary to secure the means of support contemplated by the law passed by the Legislature of 1863, to the families of those persons in our city as may enter the military service, and that such support might be made definite and permanent, and easily accessible to the recipients of it, as in the judgment of the Council it could be made, and that each of the families benefitted [sic] by it should be allowed to receive it upon the mere written direction or request of the person entering the service, without being subjected to further proof of the propriety of the demand; and further that each family should be provided with a sum equal to the monthly pay allowed to a private soldier. Petitions laid on table temporarily.
The following preamble and resolutions offered by Ald. Gates were adopted:
Whereas, it appears from a communication from James B. Fry, Provost Marshal General,, to a Committee of the Rochester Common Council, that credit will be given to cities, towns and wards for the number of men enlisted in excess of the quotas on previous calls for men for the service of the United States, upon the proper proof of such excess being filed in the Adjutant General's Office at Washington, and
Whereas, it appears by the said communication that the proof as to the facts upon which discharges are to be granted, must be presented by the Governor of the State.
Resolved, That a committee of three members of the Common Council and two Citizens be appointed by the Chair, to proceed to Albany for the purpose of presenting to the Governor the evidence in regard to the excess of men enlisted in this city over and above all previous calls, and of taking such other steps as may be necessary to secure the proper credit to the city of Buffalo. Adopted.
Aldermen Hanavan and Dayton, from the Special Committee to which was referred the resolutions of Ald. Hanavan and the substitute therfor [sic] offered by Ald. Hopkins relative to providing for the families of drafted citizens, made a majority report embodying the following resolutions, the adoption of which was moved:
Resolved, That the sum of $150,000 be and is hereby appropriated for the relief of the indigent families of all who are or may be drafted into the service of the United States from the city of Buffalo under the Conscription law.
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be and are hereby authorized to borrow upon the credit of the city, the said sum of $150,000, on such part thereof as shall from time to time be necessary for the purpose above mentioned, and for the purpose of procuring the sum so borrowed, the said Mayor and Comptroller are hereby authorized to execute under the corporate seal of the said city and deliver to the persons or corporations of whom such sums or any part thereof shall be borrowed, the bonds or other obligations of the city, which bonds or obligations shall not be for sums less than $1,000—each one shall bear interest at a rate not more than seven per cent. per annum, and shall be payable at periods not less than three years nor more than twenty years from the time of the issuing thereof; and said bonds shall be so payable that not more than $15,000 shall become due thereon in any one year.
Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to distribute and apply such sum for the purpose above mentioned, or such part thereof as shall be necessary, and such distribution and application shall be made as far as practicable, as follows:
This said committee shall inquire into the circumstances and pecuniary ability of each person drafted, who is the head of a family, or who shall have any one depending on him for support, and who shall not be exempt under any of the provisions of said conscription law, and who shall apply to such committee for relief; and of the money above appropriated the sum of $300 shall be used and appropriated by such committee for the relief of the family of such person, in the manner hereinafter provided, whenever it shall appear to the satisfaction of said committee that such person is not exempt from military service under said conscription law, and is not of sufficient pecuniary ability to procure a substitute or to pay the commutation of $300 provided by said law. And if said committee are satisfied that such person is pecuniarily able to pay part of such commutation, but not the whole, then they may appropriate to the relief of his family such part of the sum of $300 as in their opinion will enable him to procure his exemption from such draft, and in all cases said committee may use and appropriate any part of the sum of $300 for the relief of the family of such person.
The relief of families as herein provided may be made as follows:
In case such drafted person shall elect to go into the military service of the United States under said draft, the paid sum of $300 shall be paid to such person or to his family for the relief of said family. In case such person shall not so elect, then the said sum of $300, or such part thereof as the committee may think proper to appropriate, shall be used to procure a substitute, in case where a substitute can be procured thereby; and in case such person do not elect to enter such service and no substitute can be procured for the sum appropriated for that purpose, then the sum of $300, or so much thereof as, together with the amount contributed by the person so drafted shall amount to $300, shall be paid to the proper officer, to procure the exemption and release of such person from service under paid draft. And it being the true intent and meaning hereof, that the money hereby appropriated shall be expended for the purpose of procuring men for the military service of the United States as well as relieve the families of persons drafted, the said committee are hereby required and directed to expend said money for the procuring of substitutes in all cases, where a substitute can be procured for the amount appropriated for the relief of the family of any person dratted.
Aldermen Hopkins and Mills from the committee presented a minority report containing the following:
Whereas, For the purpose of carrying on the existing war successfully and securing the final and permanent overthrow of the enemies of our government, all persons who are drafted shall be encouraged, as far as possible, actually to enter the military service, and for that purpose the support of their families should be placed beyond any contingency during the time of such service: therefore,
Resolved, By the Common Council of the city of Buffalo, that the city of Buffalo will support and maintain the families of all such drafted persons as may enter the United States military service from said city, and for that purpose will from time to time pay to each of such families the sum of $13 per month for such a time as such drafted person may continue in said service.
Resolved, That a committee of five shall be appointed from this council to ascertain the families of those persons who may be drafted from this city into same, and that said committee distribute the said moneys to said families from time to time, and that such distribution shall commence from the time the drafted persons shall enter said military service.
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller of said city are hereby authorized and empowered to borrow money upon the bonds of said city, to create the necessary fund for the support of such families of said drafted persons entering said service, and that such bonds may be issued by them for the purpose of raising said money.
Resolved, That the amount of money so to be borrowed shall not exceed in the aggregate the sum of two hundred thousand dollars, without the further order of this Council, and that no greater sum than twenty-five thousand dollars be paid at any one time; and that said bonds be disposed of and said moneys raised from time to time, as directed by this Council; and that said bonds bear interest at the rate of 7 per cent. per annum, and become due and payable at the rate of ten thousand dollars in each year after the same may be issued.
Ald. Hopkins moved the adoption of the minority report as a substitute for the majority report. Lost by the following vote:
Ayes—Crowder, Hopkins, Hoyt, Klink, R. Mills, W. I. Mills, Yaw—7.
Noes—Ambrose, Bangasser, Burgard, Colie, Dayton, Flach, Goembel, Gates, Hanavan, Moores, Persch, Walsh—12.
The question was then taken on the report offered by Ald. Hanavan, and the same was lost for the want of 18 votes.
Ayes—Ambrose, Bangasser, Burgard, Colie, Dayton, Flach, Goembel, Gates, Hanavan, Hoyt, Moores, Person, Walsh—13.
Noes—Crowder, Hopkins, Klink, R. Mills, W. L. Mills, Yaw—6.
Ald. Hopkins then moved the adoption of the minority report.
The Chair decided that the question having been once put and decided on the adoption of said report, could not be renewed.
Ald. Hopkins appealed from the decision of the Chair.
The Chair was sustained by not being overruled by a vote of 9 ayes and 9 noes.
Ald. Dayton then offered the following, taken from the Council minutes of two weeks ago:
Resolved, That it is the intention of this Council to distribute the balance of said $50,000 so appropriated among the families of such as may enter the service hereafter, either as volunteers or conscripts. And when said sum is exhausted, the faith of this Council is hereby assured and pledged, that a further sum shall be appropriated for the like purpose until the end of the war.
Ald. Walsh moved that same be referred to the Committee on Finance. Lost. Ayes—Colie, Hanavan, Walsh—3.
Noes—Ambrose, Bangasser, Burgard, Crowder, Dayton, Flach, Goembel, Gates, Hopkins, Hoyt, Klink, R. Mills, W. I. Mills, Moores, Persch and
Yaw—16.
The said resolution was then adopted by a unanimous vote.
Ald. Hopkins then offered the resolutions in the Minority Report above alluded to.
Ald. Ambrose offered as a substitute those embodied in the Mayor's report.
On motion of Ald, Colie both of said sets of resolutions were referred to the Committee on Finance.

Great Scare—"Nobody Hurt."
The Buffalo Express, a short time since published an article which created considerable stir among certain gentlemen eager to convict the Democratic Administration of this State, and Governor Seymour in particular, of unworthy motives, and dishonorable and unpatriotic practices. The article was headed "Startling devlopements [sic] in Niagara Co." and as it charged Governor Seymour with making extraordinory efforts to organize the militia of the State for the purpose of resisting the draft, it was, of course, eagerly copied by the Reformer and every other abolition paper in the State. We publish a reply to the Express article, from the Rochester Union, an original and persistent war paper. The whole subject is there fully ventilated and shown to be a wicked and malicious publication. Will the Reformer show as much alacrity in publishing the refutation as it did in publishing the charge? It can have the article of the Rochester Union in type, free of charge. Will it publish? We shall see.

EIGHTH WARD MEETING.—The citizens of the Eighth Ward are requested to meet at E. Casey's, 39 Erie street, this (Monday) evening at 7 ½ o'clock for the purpose of devising means to relieve such as have been drafted in the Ward.—
SUNDRY CITIZENS.

[From the Courier and Republic of yesterday.]
THE MISSION OF MR. WILKESON TO WASHINGTON.—NO SURPLUS ENLISTMENTS TO BE CREDITED.
It is not perhaps generally known that the Ward War Committees, after discovering the large excess of enlistments creditable to this District over the quota of last year, commissioned Wm. Wilkeson, Esq., to visit Albany and Washington, for the purpose of having this surplusage allowed on the present quota. That gentleman arrived this morning, and we regret to say he brings back the peremptory decision of Provost Marshal Fry, to the effect that no such credit can be permitted to any district, it being claimed that all the men raised here or elsewhere, up to a recent date not particularized, have been credited to the state at large.
At Albany Mr. Wilkeson found no difficulty in establishing the fact, previously published in our columns, that on the 6th of February Erie county had raised 78 men over its quota of last year, and that since that time, in this city alone, 992 men had been enlisted. It was to obtain credit for this last number, that Mr. W. was commissioned to go to Washington.
Arriving there, he was allowed a lengthy audience with Col. Fry, the substance of which is given above. It was explicitly stated that in no case can a district be credited with its overplus, and that in no case has this been done, reports to the contrary notwithstanding. Adjutant General Sprague, in his mission to the national capital, had procured the crediting of all the men whose certificates of muster in the state he could bring, to the state at large, and the Provost Marshal argued that he could devise no system of more specific operation, which would not involve the administration in inextricable confusion. Mr. Wilkeson states that on his list being examined
in Col. Fry's office, nearly all the names upon it were identified as having been presented by Gen. Sprague for allowance to the State. He says also that some 200 of his names were discovered as being of men who were really enlisted at Lockport and elsewhere, though they were mustered here. How this could be we do not very well understand, as the list was certified to by Capt. Sturgeon, U. S. Mustering Officer, as containing only the names of those enlisted, as well as mustered, here.
Mr. Wilkeson says he assured Col. Fry that if time was given, the quota of the district could be raised by volunteering, and that a regiment could be raised in Buffalo in thirty days. To this Col. Fry responded that if the privilege was allowed to this district, it would be demanded by every other, and the draft would become a nullity. While Mr. W. was in conversation with Col. Fry, a despatch from Major Diven, Assistant Provost Marshal for this part of the State, came in, announcing that the draft had been ordered to commence here on Wednesday. This Col. Fry seemed to regard as a final disposition of the whole question.
Mr. Wilkeson also informs us that the subject was referred by Col. Fry to the War Department, and his decision was ratified by that authority.
An important fact comes to light in this connection, to wit, that the arrangement in New Jersey, by which the draft is deferred and thirty days time allowed, in which Governor Parker pledges himself to raise the quota by volunteering, was obtained by personal application of the Governor to President Lincoln himself. We are at a loss to know why Gov. Seymour should not be able to obtain for New York, the same favor which Gov. Parker obtained for New Jersey.

THE MAYOR'S ADDRESS.—A correspondent speaks as follows, in deserved praise of the Mayor's proclamation:—
EDITORS COURIER:—The address of acting Mayor Beckwith, which appeared on posters early Sunday morning, attracted the attention of many others equally gratified with myself, of various political views pertaining to passing events, as not only appropriate but well timed. All agree, who are familiar with the present state of feeling among a portion of our citizens who apprehend that they may be aggrieved by the anticipated draft, that neither precautionary measures or judicious advice can be considered out of place. The Mayor seems to have weighed the subject discussed by him with legal ability and the prudence belonging to his station. While the address does not partake of the too much indulged in inflammatory spirit of the clay, its calm and decided annunciation of the consequences sure to result from the overt and inconsiderate acts always attending the outbursts of an incensed and unlawfully organized mob, can but have an important influence in allaying any excited feeling that may exist. T.

BUFALO DISTRICT ASSOCIATION.—The Buffalo District Preachers' Association will meet at Grace Church, Buffalo, Monday evening, August 10th. The opening sermon by Rev. H. C. Welch, at a quarter to 8 o'clock. The exercises of the Association will continue on Tuesday, and the Donation Visit for the Presiding Elder, will occur in the evening of the same day. It is hoped that all the brethren will be present from the beginning to the end of the session.

A CITY MISSIONARY APPOJNTED.—The Young Men's Christian Union have engaged the services of Mr. W. J. Brace, as city missionary. It is designed that Mr. B. shall especially labor in connection with the Mission Sunday Schools, and seek to awaken the people in the more destitute portions of the field to the importance of religious effort. We bespeak for him the confidence and support of the whole Christian public.
—Advocate

NINTH WARD MEMORIAL.—At a meeting of the Sheriff's posse of the Ninth District, held at the Genesee House, Saturday evening, M. S. Hawley was chosen Chairman and James F. Sawyer Secretary.
Salmon Shaw, Esq., Captain of the district, presented the following memorial:
To the Honorable Mayor and Common Council of the City of Buffalo.
The subscribers respectfully represent that they are tax paying inhabitants of said city. That in consequence of the Draft now being made for the purpose of increasing the military force of the country, many persons who are the sole dependence of their families, will be separated from them, leaving them unprovided with any adequate or reliable means of support. The apprehension of this constitutes with many men the chief objection to entering the military service, and with some is made the excuse for even forcibly resisting law, and sacrificing public and private property. It is just and right that those who are left to follow their peaceable pursuits at home, should share the burthens of those entering the military service. For the purpose of securing that result, the Legislature, with commendable patriotism, by Chapter 514, of the Laws of 1863, enacted that the Common Councils of the respective cities of this State shall, ex-officio, constitute a board of relief for their respective cities, and, as such board shall have power, from time to time, to grant such relief to the indigent families of persons ordered into the military or naval service of the United States, as shall seem necessary and proper, and the amount of such relief shall be a city charge, etc.
We are convinced that by the immediate action of your Honorable Body, under the authority thus granted, providing ample means for the certain and adequate support of the families of those persons who may be ordered into the military service, the prominent ground of objection alluded to will be at once removed, and the apprehensions of many worthy persons relieved. In the judgment of the subscribers, justice requires that this action should be taken with as little delay as the proceedings of your Honorable Body will allow, so that the persons to be benefitted [sic] will at once be assured of the liberal provision made in their behalf.
We therefore respectfully and earnestly memorialize your Honorable Body, as early as your convenience will permit to take such action as may be necessary to secure the means of support contemplated by this law to the families of such persons in our city as may enter the military service; and that such support may be as definite and permanent, and readily and easily accessible to the recipients of it, as in the judgment of your Honorable Body it can be made; and that each of the families to be benefitted [sic] by it shall be allowed to receive it upon the mere written directives or request of the person entering the service, without being subjected to further proof of the propriety of the demand.
And your memorialists would most respectfully suggest that each family should be provided with a sum equal to the monthly pay by the United States to a person entering its military service.
Dated BUFFALO, August 7th, 1863.
And moved that it be adopted as the sense of this meeting, which motion was unanimously carried.
On motion of Chas. E. Young, a committee of three, viz.: Charles E. Young, Alonzo Tanner and A. A. Blanchard were appointed to attend upon the Common Council to further the matters embraced in the memorial.
On motion, it was resolved that the proceedings of this meeting be published in the daily papers. M. S. HAWLEY, Chairman.
JAS. D. SAWYER, Secretary.

IMPORTANT MEMORIAL.—At a meeting of the Sheriff's special posse, for district No. 11, in the city of Buffalo, held at their headquarters, on the 7th day of August, 1863, the following memorial was presented for consideration, and it was unanimously resolved that the same be adopted as the sense of this meeting, and cordially recommended to the favorable action of the Common Council of the city of Buffalo, and to that end each of our members subscribe the same.
S. V. R. WATSON, Captain.
LEWIS W. EVANS, Secretary.

To the Honorable Mayor and Common Council of the City of Buffalo:
The subscribers respectfully represent that they are tax-paying inhabitants of said city. That in consequence of the Draft now being made for the purpose of increasing the military force of the country, many persons who are the sole dependence of their families, will be separated from them, leaving them unprovided with any adequate Or reliable means of support. The apprehension of this constitutes with many men the chief objection to entering the military service, and with some is made the excuse for even forcibly resisting law, and sacrificing public and private property. It is just and right that those who are left to follow their peaceable pursuits at home, should share the burthens of those entering the military service. For the purpose of securing that result, the Legislature, with commendable patriotism, by Chapter 514, of the Laws of 1863, enacted that the Common Councils of the respective cities of this State shall, ex-officio, constitute a board of relief for their respective cities, and as such board shall have power, from time to time, to grant such relief to the indigent families of persons ordered into the military or naval service of the United States, as shall seem necessary and proper, and the amount of such relief shall be a city charge, etc.
We are convinced that by the immediate action of your Honorable Body, under the authority thus grant­ed, providing ample means for the certain and ade­quate support of the families of those persons who may be ordered into the military service, the prominent ground of objection alluded to will be at once removed, and the apprehensions of many worthy persons relieved. In the judgment of the subscribers, justice requires that this action should be taken with as little delay as the proceedings of your Honorable Body will allow, so that the persons to be benefitted [sic] will at once be assured of the liberal provision made in their behalf.
We therefore respectfully and earnestly memorialize your Honorable Body, as early as your convenience will permit to take such action as may be necessary to secure the means of support contemplated by this law, to the families of such persons in our city as may enter the military service; and that such support may be as definite and permanent, and readily and easily accessible to the recipients of it, as in the judgment of your Honorable Body it can be made: and that each of the families to be benefitted [sic] by it shall be allowed to receive it upon the mere written direction or request of the person entering the service, without being subjected to further proof of the propriety of the demand.
And your memorialists would most respectfully suggest that each family should be provided with a sum equal to the monthly pay by the United States to a person entering its military service.
Dated Buffalo, August 7th, 1863.

THE 21ST MAINE REGIMENT ENROUTE FOR HOME.—At a very early hour yesterday morning the 21st Regiment of Maine Volunteers, came in by the Lake Shore road, being en route for home from Fort Hudson. The men were properly received by the citizens, committee, and a substantial breakfast provided them in the depot. This regiment is one of the nine month's organizations. It went in 890 strong, and has now about 611 men. Thirty of its sick were left at Baton Rouge, and twenty were at Mound City, near Cairo. It has lost two officers, one by disease, the other killed before Port Hudson. In various fights there the regiment sustained a loss of about 100 killed and wounded. The following is a list of its principal officers:
Colonel—Elijah D. Weston.
Lieut-Col.— ___ Stanley
Major—Benj. Merry.
Adjutant—Joseph T. Woodard, sick.
Acting Adjutant—Lieut. W. H. Pierce.
Quartermaster—Wm. S. Brown.
Surgeon—George E. Brickett.
Assistant do—D. P. Bolster.
Assistant do—S. C. Thomas.
This regiment after being much refreshed by the kind treatment it received, proceeded on its way rejoicing at 8 o'clock.

MILITARY MOVEMENTS—NINE MONTHS MEN RETURNING HOME FROM THE SOUTHWEST.—The 62d Mass., regiment from Port Hudson, passed here Sunday night, and the 22nd Maine, Monday night. The 24th Maine left Buffalo at 9 o'clock last evening, and will probably pass this city at an early hour this morning. This regiment was expected to go by the Erie Road, but upon reaching Dunkirk, the Colonel refused to go that way, and came on to Buffalo, Their destination is Augusta, Maine.
At six o'clock last evening, the 21st Maine, was at Elmore on the Cleveland and Toledo Road, and will probably leave Buffalo at 8 o'clock this morning, passing Syracuse during the afternoon. The 26th Connecticut left Chicago yesterday morning, and will go by the Erie Road, if they do not follow the example of the 24th Maine.
The 15th New Hampshire is between Cairo and Chicago, and will come by the Central Road. There are some fifteen other regiments to follow as fast transportation can be furnished. These troops are all nine months men from General Banks army at Port Hudson. They went out with the Banks expedition last fall.

The 52d Massachusetts Regiment—A Collation at the Depot.
On the "laborare est orare" principle, the Central Depot yesterday was as sacred a place as any of the city churches. It came about in this wise: Early yesterday morning, word was received by some members of Rev. Dr. Hosmer's church, that the 52d Massachusetts, a nine month's regiment, would arrive here at 12 M., on its way home from Port Hudson. This being the regiment in which Rev. James K. Hosmer, son of Dr. Hosmer, is a corporal, all the sympathies of the Unitarian Society were at once aroused, and preparations were at once started for a collation to be given in the depot to the men. A delay incurred by the train near Dunkirk, by which its arrival was postponed till an hour and a half later in the afternoon, favored
the project.
At Dr. Hosmer's church the regular service was dispensed with, and. after, singing, prayer and the reading of the President's proclamation, the congregation set about showing their faith by their works. The time was short, but it was well improved, and at twenty minutes after one, when the train came in, the depot had been effectually turned into a refectory. Eleven tables were erected, on which a bountiful supply of sandwiches was laid. But these only formed mere suggestions of what was to come. The ladies followed that first course by others, consisting of cold meat, pickles, pies, cakes, cheese, &c., &c., dainties to which the men had long been strangers. Two of the tables were set and furnished by Mr. Bloomer, who was a host on the occasion. Mr. Bonney, of the Bonney House, and Mr. Clifford, of the Mansion, furnished the coffee and other necessaries, and, altogether, the men were treated to a hearty meal. The contributions of supplies were most liberal, and not a few families solaced themselves yesterday for the loss of their Sunday dinner, by

the reflection that it had been eaten by hungrier diners than themselves.
The regiment, on emerging from the cars, was received in a brief address by Rev. Dr. Hosmer, who welcomed the men as the gallant defenders of our homes, our rights and our institutions. He invoked a blessing on the repast, and immediately some eight hundred half famished soldiers set to work.
The 52d, as we have said, is a nine months regiment, its time having expired on the 11th of July. It sailed from New York on the 2d of December last, was stationed the greater part of last winter at Baton Rouge, and reached the field before Port Hudson on the 31st of May. It was on the assault on the 14th of June, and for 26 days thereafter, till the surrender of the stronghold, lay in the abattis before the rebel works, dodging bullets, and scarcely getting enough hard tack to keep body and soul together. I has, however, had remarkably good fortune, going in with 938 men and coming home about 800 strong. About 60 sick are in the two hospital cars attached to the train. The regiment was the first to return by the now opened route of the Mississippi, having left Port Hudson a week ago last Thursday. It came to Cairo by water, and from there, via Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Cleveland, to this city. The following is a list of its staff officers:
Colonel, Halbert S. Greenleaf, of Shelben Falls; Lieut. Col., Samuel J. Storrs, of Amherst, and a gradate of Amherst College; Major, Henry Winn, of Boston; Adjutant, J. M. Decker, of. Lawrence; Chaplain, Rev. J. F. Moores, of Greenfield; Surgeon, Fred. A. Sawyer, Greenfield; 1st Asst. J. F. Richardson, of Chesterfield; 2d Assist. M. K. Sabin, near Boston; Quartermaster, Lieut. Ed. C. Clark, Northhampton.
Among the losses sustained by the regiment was one Captain, George Bliss, killed ; and, also, as our citizens well remember, Sergeant Edward Hosmer, the brave and lamented son of Rev. Dr. Hosmer, who died and was buried at Baton Rouge. The meeting of Color Corporal J. K. Hosmer, with his family here, was a scene too sacred for newspaper description. It is enough to say that after having made sacrifice of everything but life in his country's behalf; after having tended the death-bed and planted flowers on the grave of his brother, the hero had come back to home and honor and the love of friends. Would to God that all who have gone as he, might so come back.
The appearance of the men spoke volumes in regard to the hard and perilous experience which has been theirs. To say nothing of the faces of the sick which were visible, ghastly and emaciated, through the car windows, there was not a man who did not show signs of rough usage. Privation, hard service and the climate seemed to have worn them down; the light is quenched in their eyes, and the enthusiasm in their hearts. It was only after they had eaten and drank, and had been refreshed by the cool breeze and the warm welcome, that their faces began to brighten into something like their normal appearance. Their uniforms, too, tattered and soiled, were in keeping with the wearied look that met one in almost every face.
After the collation had been thoroughly discussed, the Chaplain, Rev. Mr. Moores, made a brief response, expressive of the gratitude of the regiment, and earnestly bespoke the same kindness for other regiments of their comrades, which may come this way hereafter. The ladies and gentlemen at the depot, assisted by Mr. Chittenden and other railroad gentlemen, did everything possible to supply the wants of the men, canteens were filled, a stock of provisions for the farther journey laid in, and the sick were furnished with stimulants, &c. In short, too great praise cannot be accorded those of our citizens who managed and so well carried through the affair. Buffalo has earned a long credit-mark by the Sunday's work.
The train departed about three o'clock, and as it moved out of the depot the men gave vent to their gratitude by such a cheer as, we presume, they have not been able to give since the fall of Port Hudson, at least. The only man left behind was Henry W. Ladden, of Northampton, who was too sick to be carried farther and was taken to the General Hospital. We learn that several other regiments are to return home by this route from the army of the South-West. The 22d Maine, it is expected, will reach here about 3 o'clock this afternoon.—Several other Maine regiments, and one from Massachusetts, are also looked for in the course of a week or two. We trust that the example of the ladies and gentlemen, who did so well yesterday, will be emulated by others this afternoon. Let there be bountiful preparation made. Our citizens should make it a point before they eat their own dinners, to see that a plenteous provision is made for the men of Maine.

MORE ARRIVALS OF REGIMENTS.—Between 6 and 7 o'clock Thursday evening the 15th New Hampshire, from Concord, N. H., came in, and were duly suppered. Its officers are Col. John W. Kingman, left at Baton Rouge, sick; Lieut. Col. H. W. Blair, with the regiment, but both sick and wounded; Major John Aldrich, left at Chicago, sick; Adjutant Edward Brigham; Surgeon ____ Hosh; Quartermaster Ira A. Moody; Chaplain Rev. Mr. Wheelock. The reg't went in with 917 men, and has now 618 en route for home. It participated in the charges at Port Hudson on May 27th and June 14th, and its banner, a New Hampshire one, and colors are shattered and riddled with bullets. On the way up 40 sick were left at Memphis, and a number at Chicago. Eleven died on the boat, and were buried on the banks of the Father of Waters.—One man died this side of Erie, Pa., all these deaths occurring suddenly. Eight sick were left here and taken to the General Hospital.
About midnight the same night the 26th Maine Regiment came into the city on its way home from Port Hudson, and was duly received and taken care of by the indefatigible Committee on Reception. This regiment went in 900 strong and numbers now about 667. It was in the fatal charge of the 14th June, and suffered considerably. On its way home some sick were left at Mound City, and some at Chicago. Five deaths occurred while it was on the river. Eight of the sick were left here and taken to the General Hospital, leaving 50 invalids to go on home. The officers of the regiment are Col. M. H. Hubbard; Lieut. Col. Philo Hersee, who is at home, having been wounded in the battle of Irish Bend; Major J. N. Fowler; Adjutant D. C. Simpson; Surgeon Chas. Abbott; Chaplain Samuel Bowker; Quartermaster Timothy Thorndike. The regiment, nothwithstanding [sic] its rough experiences, looked well.
We are informed that no additional regiments are expected till Monday, so that the Committee have a brief respite from their arduous labors. Notice will be given through the papers of what articles are wanted.

FRAUDULENT INCOME RETURNS.—The Buffalo Express says:—The preliminary examination of Origen Storrs, of Lockport, on complaint of S. H. Murphy, U. S. Assessor of the 29th Coll. District, was had before U. S. Commissioner Gorham yesterday, in the U. S. Court Rooms in that city. United States District Attorney Dart conducted the examination on the part of the government. It was proved that the defendant in making his income returns to the Assistant Assessor, neglected to return an amount of money received in the year 1862 as his share of the profits of the firm of Loyd & Co., engaged in the oil business in the State of Pennsylvania. After a full hearing, the defendant was held to bail for his appearance at the next term of the United States Court at Auburn next week.

FUNERAL OF NEW ENGLAND SOLDIERS.—The funeral of the New England soldiers who have died at the Buffalo General Hospital, will be attended at Forest Lawn Cemetery at 4 1/2 o'clock this (Monday) afternoon. Services by the Rev. Dr. Lord. The public are invited to be present.

VOLUME XXVIII.
CORPORATION PROCEEDINGS.
IN COMMON COUNCIL,
BUFFALO, Monday, Aug. 10th, 1863.
At 2 o'clock, P. M.
Present—Aldermen Ambrose, Bangasser, Burgard, Colie, Crowder, Dayton, Flach, Goembel, Gates, Hanavan, Hopkins, Hoyt, Slink, R. Mills, W. I. Mills, Moores, Persch, Walsh and Yaw.
Absent—Aldermen Clark, Dubois, Scheu, and Taylor.
In the absence of the President pro tem, Alderman Goemble was called to the Chair.
The minutes of the last meeting were approved.

COMMUNICATIONS FROM HIS HONOR THE MAYOR,
MAYOR'S OFFICE,
Buffalo, Aug. 10, 1863.
Gentlemen of the Common Council:
Hon. Wm. G. Fargo, the Mayor of this city, took his departure from San Francisco on the 23d ultimo. By the favor of Providence he will arrive in New York some time during the present week.
So far, during the absence of his Honor, the administration of municipal affairs has not been attended by any difficulties of a very serious nature.
Circumstances have, however, supervened, which have affected the public mind with unusual concern. Anxiety for the safety of life and property, and the security of the public peace, has been extensively felt.
The sudden outbreak of prejudice against the colored people, which occured [sic]   on the 12th of July, which was accompanied by murder and the most heartless outrages upon helpless negroes; the great riot of fearful omen in the city of New York; the impending draft, obnoxious to a large class of persons, from the belief that in its operations, if not by design, it is unfairly burdensome to laboring men of limited means; the violence and intemperate zeal of party presses—powerful organs laboring, it seemed, to force the great political parties of the State into hostile antagonism; one portion of the community exposing publicly a lack of confidence in another, and the other reciprocating the feeling; political discussions lapsing into personal accusation; antipathies seemingly about to become the ruling forces in civil society—these may be instanced, I think, as among the circumstances which have occasioned so much concern for the public peace and safety.
This state of things required action on the part of the authorities to encourage a feeling of security and to prevent any temptation which might be offered discontented persons taking effect in public disturbance,
I accordingly appointed a large number of temporary policemen, and made such other preparations as I deemed necessary to secure the peace of the city. The Chief of Police will present to your body the payroll of such police force. I stated to the men so employed that they would receive the same pay as the regular police. The time of their actual service has been accurately kept, and the accounts presented by the Chief will be correct. With a few exceptions, they have performed the duties assigned them attentively, many of them having been on duty, day and night. They should be promptly paid.
Mr. Best, the Sheriff of Erie county, is entitled to public thanks for his valuable co-operation in maintaining public order.
The officers and soldiers of the 21st and other New York regiments, who at present constitute the armed police of the city, are deserving of all praise for the good order preserved by them and their strict attention to duty. They are soldiers in discipline, gentlemen in conduct.
The regular police are also performing their whole duty, remaining at their posts day and night.
It is unpleasant to act on the presumption that any considerable body of our fellow citizens are liable to engage in a disturbance of the public peace. I prefer to believe, and for myself I hold to the faith that, treated with a proper regard, every portion of the people of Buffalo have not only the intelligence to see the necessity of public order, but also honesty and order enough to aid in maintaining it.
The peace and order of society must be preserved as long as the power of the whole people is competent to the task. No act of the Legislature, however oppressive; no law of Congress, however unjust it may be deemed to be, can justify or excuse a mob. A mob which blindly seeks the destruction of property and life makes war upon the existence of society. It violates those ultimate principles of public and personal safety, whose sway is the soul and life of the social world. Those all-pervading and inestimable principles, which are compendiously expressed among men by the term "law and order," belong to a domain which lies back of the acts of the government
—back of the government itself. They are as necessary, and often as potent, in countries subject to arbitrary rule as in free America; as necessary to the happiness of the people of the State of New York as the subjects of the Czar of Russia. Under their protection the highway is safe to the traveler; men are secure in their property and homes; the humblest citizen when he departs from his house to perform his daily labor submits his wife and children to their care, and when at night he returns from his toil no forebodings as to the fate of his family disturb his peace of mind.
Therefore it results, so indispensible is the rule of law and order that while the mob may be often largely composed of those whose fault is ignorance or passion, rather than a wicked intent personal to them, the public good and safety may sometimes require its abrupt and bloody extinguishment by hand of power.
Gentlemen—Permit me to urge upon you the necessity of immediate and decisive action for the relief of those of our fellow citizens who are now conscripts. If you have not the power to extend complete relief it should be known at once, in order that no one may hang a deceptive hope upon you.
In my opinion it is both competent and proper for you to make ample provision to alleviate the afflictions produced by the draft. Conscription is an institution the people of this country never bargained for, and they are unprepared for it both in mind and estate. It is competent for every community to relieve its own poor or distressed. While our rulers must decide up on the expediency of given laws and while it is true that general laws cannot be so ordained as to operate with exactly equal pressure upon individuals, it is nevertheless just and proper that any family or community should extend its help to those members who are unable to bear alone the load placed upon them. I have no doubt you will make ample allowance for the families of those who may go into the service. This provision should not be niggardly. It is true taxation swells up enormously, but money cannot be placed in the balance against the sacrifices of the man who is suddenly forced from home, the central spot of all patriotic desire, compelled to surrender his family to the tender guardianship of the public, his children to the gracious charities of the rich, and to bear himself in unwilling exile the deprivations of the camp and the dangers of the field.
I submit also whether you should not provide means to buy substitutes or to pay the commutations for at least those men of families, who, being unwilling to enter the service, are either wholly or in part unable to provide for themselves. Are not the 65th and 74th Regiments, in consideration of their sacrifices in the public behalf, entitled to the benefit of such a provision? Many from those regiments have already enlisted and done honorable service in the field.—Equity would seem to require that they should be exempt at least from the first conscription, and the public good requires that no discouragement should be offerred [sic] to those who are, at this moment, our reliance for safety.
There is nothing, it seems to me, in the objection, that by such a course you will countervail the law.—While the Government has the right perhaps to expect that the conscription law will be accepted by the people in good faith, and allowed its natural operation without undue opposition, yet the option is extended to every one to enter the service or pay a commutation. It could not be supposed that a father should refuse to help his son; that a family should not combine to help one of their number, if needy; that a community should relinquish the right to provide for its own welfare.
It cannot, I trust, be the case that every person drafted who is able to pay $300 will decline to enter the military service. It cannot especially be presumed of those persons of intelligence who are able to appreciate the necessity of immediately filling up the decimated ranks of the army, and who, when they take their departure from their homes, can carry with them the consolation that their families are comfortable, or that they have no families, and who can go forth buoyant with elevated sentiments, respecting the obligations of loyalty and the honorableness of acting a noble part in the service of their country. It cannot be possible they will refuse to answer the call of their country, because they happen to be more fortunate than others in their worldly possessions. If indeed everybody who is master of $300 is going to decline the honors of the draft, then in my opinion we should  disgrace our common humanity, by placing the great burdens of the country upon those whose poverty and misfortunes, if any distinction were to be   made, ought to be their excuse and protection.
There was a time in the history of our ancestors while under the crowns of Europe, when the rule prevailed, that military service was due to the State in proportion to the power and influence of the subject.
Let us not be so destitute of magnanimity as to place the greatest burdens upon the shoulders of those who are least able to sustain them.
Respectfully,
C. BECKWITH, Mayor pro. tem.
—Received and filed.

THE DAILY COURIER.
TUESDAY MORNING, AUG. 11, 1863.
A. P. LANING, Erie.
THE ACTION OF THE COMMON COUNCIL.
It will be seen by the proceedings of the Common Council that that body by a vote of thirteen to six (eighteen votes being necessary) refused to make an appropriation for the immediate relief of the families of drafted men; or, in other words, refused to place the poor man with a dependent family upon an equality with the man able to pay $300. The vote was a strictly partisan one—every Democrat present voting for this relief, and every Republican against it. Only nineteen Aldermen were present, Alds. Dubois, Scheu and Taylor, (Democrats) and Clark (Republican) being absent.
The debate upon the majority and minority reports was not extended. Ald. Hopkins advocated the minority report. He thought the tax-payers favored it. He opposed the majority report on the ground that it would fail to do any good to the families of conscripts. He did not think it legal, and besides it did  not encourage the conscript to enter the army. Ald. Hanavan knew that many tax-payers favored the majority report. Similar resolutions had been adopted in Albany, Rochester, Batavia and other places. He was authorized to state that one man would take $50,000 of the bonds, if the resolutions were adopted.
Ald. Dayton said he had not intended to say anything in regard to this subject; but he could not suffer the attempt of Ald. Hopkins to throw the responsibility for the defeat of the measure, proposing municipal relief to the families of conscripts, upon democrats to pass unnoticed. From the outset, the Alderman from the 11th Ward had endeavored to defeat the majority report, and now, the Republicans under his lead resort to a paltry expedient to prevent any valuable relief from being extended to conscripts and their families. They have suddenly come to talk of the Charter in Buffalo, when they have rode rough shod over Constitutions and Laws in every possible way. What would have been the result had not the Council last year overstepped the letter of the law in borrowing money for the relief of the families of volunteers, when the first call for troops was made? This sudden veneration for law on the part of the other side of the house was all a humbug. It was a mere pretense by which they expected to compel the poor man to go to the war, while the rich man could remain at home, if he chose. Ald. Klink (Republican) did not know who was to be bought off. There were many Germans with a little property who could not pay $300, and yet were not so poor as to come within the resolution. He would vote to raise money to pay the exemption of every drafted man, but would not vote for the majority report.
And so the proposition to raise $150,000 for the benefit of the families of poor conscripts was defeated, Aldermen Hopkins, Crowder, Klink, R. Mills, W. I. Mills and Yaw, voting "No."
Upon motion, of Ald. Dayton, the Council adopted a resolution pledging the faith of the Council to the support of the families of conscripts, to the end of the war.
Ald. Hopkins endeavored to force a vote upon the resolutions attached to the minority report; but it was clearly shown by Ald. Gates and others that there was no occasion for adopting them. The Council has $30,000 for the relief of families yet unexpended, and the Committee are willing to pay $13 a month to families of soldiers, or any other sum the Council may direct. When this money was gone, the Council had power to raise more. It was also shown that there was no justice or propriety in giving $13 a month to all families, without reference to their size or pecuniary condition. For some families it would be more than sufficient; for others utterly inadequate.
In connection with the Council Proceedings, relating to this subject, no one should omit to read the message of Ald. Beckwith, Mayor pro tem. It recites briefly his efforts, in co-operation with Sheriff Best, to preserve the public peace which have, happily, been crowned with complete success. The message is an able paper and embodies a convincing argument upon the duty of the city to provide relief for the poor conscript The message is creditable alike to the head and heart of Mayor Beckwith.

Military Movements.
The 17th Rhode Island Vols. passed through the city yesterday morning, bound for home. A detachment of the 27th Conn. Vols. also arrived and departed.
All the militia regiments in the city, who performed duty in Pennsylvania, will be mustered out of the U. S. service to-day and to-morrow, and, by order of Gen. Canby, will report to Gov. Seymour for instructions.
The Governor's room in the City Hall has been allotted to the military for storing the fixed ammunition belonging to the batteries now quartered in the Park.
The cavalry patrol the up town wards daily.

ARRIVAL AND RECEPTION OF THE SIXTEENTH NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT.—The Sixteenth New Hampshire Regiment arrived in this city yesterday afternoon, about half-past 3 o’clock, from Port Hudson, on their return home. They were duly feasted at the Central Depot by the Citizens' Committee and citizens generally, while those of the number who were ill, received the very best of attention at the hands of the ladies. The regiment is officered as follows: Colonel, James Pike; Lieut. Colonel, H. W. Fuller; Major, Samuel Davis, Jr.; Adjutant, L. T. Townsend; Chaplain, R. M. Manly; Surgeon, Cyrus M. Fiske; Quartermaster, A N. Brown. The Sixteenth Regiment was organized in Merrimac county, New Hampshire, and went into the service about 850 strong. It left Port Hudson with about 550 men, some 75 of whom were left at Vicksburg, Cairo and other points along the route. Nearly a hundred men ot the regiment are scattered in various directions, most of them probably alive. The remaining 200 died from disease contracted in the swamps of Butte la rose, and aggravated in the vicinity of Port Hudson. In the former place, five hundred of this Regiment were in hospital at one time, a fact rather strongly suggestive of the hardships through which the Regiment passed long before reaching Port Hudson. The loss in the officers was as follows:—Capt. Buffum, of Co. I; Lieut. Jones, Co. E; Lieut. Baker, Co. F; Lieut. Wilds, Co. K, and Assistant Surgeon Campbell. About one hundred of the men were on the sick list at this point, ten of whom had to be sent to the General Hospital. The loss coming up the river from Port Hudson to Cairo, was four men, one of whom fell overboard and was drowned. The Regiment was accompanied by a fine Brass Band, of fifteen instruments, which discoursed most eloquent music prior to the departure of the Regiment from the depot. Colonel Pike was formerly a Methodist Minister, and served one term in Congress. He is spoken of in most flattering terms by his men. The Sixteenth took its departure a little before six o'clock, much pleased with the reception it had received at the hands of the citizens of Buffalo.

RETURNING REGIMENTS.—The 28th Maine and the 47th Massachusetts, from Port Hudson, will leave Buffalo to-morrow for this city—one in the morning and one in the evening. The first may be expected here to-morrow evening between 10 and 12 o'clock.

RETURN OF THE SIXTEENTH NEW HAMPSHIRE.—This Regiment, Col. J. Pike, reached this city, from Port Hudson, this forenoon at eleven o'clock. It numbered but 500—officers and men, although it took the field 850 strong. Of the 500, some fifty or seventy-five were sick, and eighty-nine sick had to be left behind at various points on the route. Only four remained here.
Two hundred of the original 850 found Southern graves—most of them from sickness contracted in the Tesche campaign, and in garrisoning Fort Burton, on Grand Lake. In this latter service, nearly the Whole regiment suffered from fever. The closing services of the Regiment were in front of Port Hudson.
After partaking of abundant rations in the depot—consisting of fresh sandwiches, tea, coffee and ice water—the Regiment crossed the river, and were immediately reshipped on the Boston cars for home.
The Buffalo Express makes the address of the old militia officers in the 2d Assembly District the occasion of a bitter assault upon Gov. Seymour and Col. McRae.—It will be seen by the statement from the later gentleman, which we publish to-day, that the charges are utterly false and malicious and we trust that it will make a proper _eparation.
The Express also publishes a bitter extract from a letter written by some person in this county. If it will give us the name of its correspondent we doubt not we can prove that he has pursued a more disrespectable ... in this matter than he falsely charges ... McRea with.
The Buffalo Courier and other papers have at times evinced a commendable
enterprise in picking up local news from this section, but of late several instances have occurred where gross falsehood has usurped the place of plain truth. Stories grossly exaggerated, or entirely untrue, have gone abroad and returned to add to any ill feeling that might exist. It is useless to particularize; we only refer to the matter to ask our contemporaries to exercise a little more discretion in publishing evil tidings without some decent evidence of their truth.

CONCERT OF THE CONTINENTALS.—It will be seen from an advertisement that the Continental Society, assisted by Signor Gariboldi, tender, this evening, in St. James Hall, a grand complimentary concert to Messrs. S. C. Campbell and Wm. Castle. Mr. Castle will be remembered as formerly a resident of this city and a fine tenor singer. Such an array of musical talent will certainly ensure one of the finest concerts ever given in the city.

THE FLOWER QUEEN FESTIVAL.—The Flower Queen Festival, in which five hundred "young people" are to participate comes off this afternoon at Moffat's Grove, and is to be followed by a succession of lively sports in imitation of the olden time. A procession will be formed on Main street opposite the Arcade in the forenoon as preliminary to the exercises of the day. The attendance at the Grove will no doubt be very large. We have the most positive assurances that the programme will be thoroughly carried out, and that the best of order will be preserved

RECEPTION OF THE FIFTIETH MASSACHUSETTS.—The Fiftieth Massachusetts Regiment reached here from Pt. Hudson yesterday morning between 3 and 4 o'clock, and was handsomely entertained at the Central Depot by the citizens' committee and a large number of ladies. Although the hour was an unseasonable one, the __ants of the Regiment were promptly and carefully attended to.
The Regiment is officered as follows:—Colonel, _. P. Messer; Lieut.-Colonel, John W. Locke; Major, John Hodges; Adjutant, H. A. Wentworth;
Surgeon, William Cogswell; Assistant Surgeon, John Hancock; Quarter Master, Henry Degen. The Fiftieth was organized in Essex county, Massachusetts, and went into the service 960 strong. It has now a force of 830 men, showing a smaller loss than was sustained by any one of the Regiments that have recently passed through here. Ten of the men died coming up the river from Port Hudson to Cairo, and were buried along the banks of the Mississippi. Fifteen or twenty were left sick at Cairo, and about twelve at Cleveland. There were about twenty on the sick list, with the Regiment, most of whom will probably reach home alive. The officers all return to their homes with the exception of First Assistant Surgeon, French, who died at Port Hudson. The Regiment was accompanied by a fine Brass Band, organized from the members of the Regiment,—The Regiment left for the East about 7 o'clock, and as the train passed out of the depot the cheers for Buffalo were as lusty as one could wish.

MEETING AT CLARENCE.
The citizens of Clarence have been agitating the question whether it was not practicable to make some arrangement to equalize the burdens of the conscription. The following notice was posted for a meeting:—
READ AND TELL YOUR NEIGHBORS.
All persons enrolled for the coming draft are requested to meet at Clarence Centre next Saturday, Aug. 8th, 1863, at 3 o'clock, p. m., for the purpose of devising means whereby we may avoid paying Three Hundred Dollars each, by making it more on an equality with all concerned. Come out, one and all, and let us see what we can do.
Those not liable to the draft are requested to come and assist in making the arrangements.
Dated Clarence, Aug. 6th, 1863.
By order of many citizens.
Before the holding of this meeting, the following petition to the Town Board was circulated and signed by some thirty or forty tax-payers of the town, among whom were J. B. Bailey, J. H. Magoffin, Orsamus Warren, Charles Seib. H. B. Ransom, P. Heath, Lyman A. Parker and David Van Tine:—
We, the undersigned citizens of the town of Clarence, county of Erie and State of New York, would respectfully petition the Town Board to call a special town meeting forthwith, for the purpose of taking a vote upon the proposition to raise by tax the sum of $300 for each man who may be drafted from this town in the coining draft.
On Saturday, some one hundred and fifty citizens assembled at the village; but the Republicans immediately assumed the most violent hostility to the project which many of them had before indorsed. The petition above was presented to the Supervisor by a Committee, but he refused to call the meeting on the ground that the Administration wanted men, not money, and that it was not exactly "loyal" to pay exemption fees, when blood and muscle were demanded.
The town meeting, of course, fell through, but the young men organized a club for mutual protection, each member paying in $50 to a common fund. As in Aurora, the young men, without distinction of party, favored the raising of the money, and the Republicans opposed it. Of course, all the Republicans, drafted in Clarence, will go to the war without a murmur. They would not be guilty of buying themselves or their sons off, since the administration wants "men not money." On Saturday, some one-hundred and fifty citizens assembled at the village; but the Republicans immediately assumed the most violent hostility to the project which many of them had before indorsed. The petition above was presented to the Supervisor by a committee, but he refused to call the meeting on the ground that the Administration wanted men, not money, and that it was not exactly "loyal" to pay exemption fees, when blood and muscle were demanded.
The town meeting, of course, fell through, but the young men organized a club for mutual protection, each member paying $50 to a common fund. As in Aurora, the young men, without distinction of party, favored the raising of the money, and the Republicans opposed it. Of course, all the Republicans, drafted in Clarence, will go to the war without a murmur.—They would not be guilty of buying themselves or their sons off, since the Administration wants men not money."

SOLDIERS PASSING THROUGH.—The 4th Massachusetts Militia regiment, nine months men, from the South-west, passed through this city, yesterday at 2 o'clock P. M. on a special train of eighteen cars.

21st Regiment Rec. Committee—38 yds cloth.
Articles made from materials furnished by Society:
Evans Society—10 shirts, 10 prs drawers.
Little Girls, First Ward—7 sheets, 23 handkerchiefs.
Universalist Church—22 sheets, 1 shirt, 37 prs cotton drawers, 3 prs flannel drawers, 1 pr socks.
South Wales Society—20 cotton shirts.
Alden Baptist Society—12 shirts, 12 prs drawers.
St. Paul's Society—5 shirts, 3 prs socks, 23 prs drawers.
Unitarian Society—9 shirts, 8 prs drawers.
East Aurora—12 prs drawers, 2 bed ticks, 12 shirts
(August 5).
Grace M. E. Society—23 shirts.
Unitarian Society—(Aug. 5) 9 shirts, 12 prs drawers.
Harris Hill—10 prs drawers, 5 shirts.
Presbyterian Society, Black Rock—5 prs socks.
Dr. Lord's Society—15 prs drawers, 2 prs socks.
North Buffalo—(Aug. 5) 10 prs drawers.
Griffin's Mills—25 prs drawers, 15 shirts.
Methodist Society, Black Rock—12 shirts, 12 prs drawers.
Mrs. B. H. Austin—(Aug. 5) 3 prs drawers, (Aug. 12)
3 prs drawers.
Mrs. Lapham—5 prs cotton drawers.
Mrs. E. J. Relf—2 shirts.
Mrs. Harris—6 sheets.
Mrs. Francis—6 shirts.
Miss Hannah Whittaker, for Little Girls Aid Society,
First Ward—4 prs drawers.
Mrs. Van Weller—6 prs drawers.
Mrs. Mount—2 prs drawers.
Mrs. S. L. Marvin—12 prs drawers.
Mrs. Beam—12 prs drawers, 4 shirts.
Miss Jenny Barnes—6 prs drawers.
Miss Westcott—3 prs drawers.
Miss Costello—4 prs drawers.
Miss Greenwood—3 prs drawers.
Mrs. Jenkins—2 shirts, 1 pr socks.
JOSEPH WARREN.

CORPORATION PROCEEDINGS.
IN COMMON COUNCIL,
BUFFALO, Monday, Aug. 17th, 1863.
At 2 o'clock, P. M.
Present—Charles Beckwith, Esq., President of the Council, and Aldermen Ambrose, Bangasser, Burgard, Clark, Crowder, Dayton, Dubois, Flach, Goembel, Gates, Hanavan, Hopkins, Hoyt, Klink, R. Mills, W. I. Mills, Moores, Persch, Scheu, Walsh and Yaw.
Absent—Aldermen Colic, and Taylor.
The minutes of the last meeting were approved.

COMMUNICATIONS FROM HIS HONOR THE MAYOR,
MAYOR'S OFFICE,
BUFFALO, Aug. 12, 1863.
GENTLEMEN:—The Committee on Arrangements for the celebration of the Fourth of July, have audited and allowed accounts for music to the amount of $125. Please direct an order to be drawn on the 4th of July fund in my favor for that sum.
Respectfully,
C. BECKWITH, Mayor pro tem.
Ald. R. MILLS moved that the same be filed, and an order drawn as recommended. Carried.

OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION.
FROM THE COMPTROLLER.
BUFFALO, Aug. 17th. 1863.
GENTLEMEN:—In order to perfect the sales made by me of city property on the 14th instant, it is necessary that I should have revenue stamps. I therefore recommend that an order be drawn in my favor for $15, to purchase said stamps.
Respectfully submitted,
P. M. VOSBURGH, Comptroller.
Filed, and an order directed to be drawn.

FURTHER FROM THE COMPTROLLER.
BUFFALO, Aug. 17th, 1863.
GENTLEMEN,—Pursuant to a resolution of your honorable body, passed on the 13th day of July, 1863, and after giving the notices thereby required, I did, on the 14th day of August inst., at 10 o'clock. A. M., at the Common Council chamber, sell at public auction, to the highest bidder the following city property, as described in the notice of sale:
Lot on the south side of Delaware Place, 482 feet west of Delaware steet [sic], 25 feet front by 190 feet deep, for $120.
Lot on the east side of Chicago street, south corner of Carroll street, 50 feet front be 103 feet deep, for $1355.
Lot containing 12 acres on the northwest side of Batavia street, east corner of Walden, 420 3/4 feet front by 1448 feet deep, for $1400.
Lot on the northwest side of Rhode Island street, northeast corner of Fourteenth street, 148 1/4 feet deep by 297 feet front, for $520.
Lot on the northeast side of Tenth street, 197 feet southeast of Massachusetts street, 100 feet running to Eleventh street, for $480.
Lot on the south side of Eagle street, 88 3/4 feet east of Pine street, 28 feet front by 127 feet deep, for $25.
Lot on the south side of Eagle street, 170 3/4 feet east of Pine street, 26 feet front by 127 feet deep, for $480.
Undivided half of lot on south side of Eagle street, 236 1/2 feet east of Hickory street, 51 1/2 feet front by 127 feet deep, for $265.
Undivided half of lot on south side of Eagle street, 84 3/4 feet east of Spring street, 29 3/4 feet front by 127 feet deep, for $100.
Undivided half of lot on east side of Spring street, southeast corner of Eagle, 80 feet front by 84 3/4 feet deep, for $384.
Undivided half of lot on north side of North Division street, 84 3/4 feet east of Spring, 29 3/4 feet front by 127 feet deep, for $150.
Lot on the north side of North Division street, 88 3/4 feet east of Pine street, 28 feet front by 127 feet deep, for $25. This lot and the lot on Eagle street were sold for $50, subject to the Dougherty mortgsge [sic] of $800, and interest.
Lot on the east side of Chicago street, 25 feet south of Mackinaw street, 75 feet front by 100 feet deep, for $930.
Lot on the west side of Terrace, 45 27-100 feet south of Charles street, 25 15-100 feet front by 84 5-100 feet deep, for $420.
Lot on the north side of Henry street, 101 86-100 feet west of the Terrace, 25 feet front by 79 feet deep, for $305.
Lot on the north side of Henry street, 276 feet west of the Terrace, 25 feet front by 70 feet deep, for $250.
Lot on the north side of Batavia street, 153 feet east of Michigan, 34 64-100 feet front by 113 57-109 feet deep, for $1100.
The lot on Hospital street was not sold, it having been dedicated as and for a public highway.
Respectfully submitted,
P. M. VOSBURGH, Comptroller.
Ald. HOPKINS moved that the same be received and filed, and that the action of the Comptroller be approved.
Carried.

FURTHER FROM THE COMPTROLLER.
BUFFALO, Aug. 17th, 1863.
GENTLEMEN—On the 10th day of June 1863, I caused the City Hall Buildings to be insured to the amount of $5000, in the Western Insurance Company. The premium is $31 25, and I respectfully ask that an order may be drawn in my favor for that sum to pay said premium.
Respectfully submitted,
P. M VOSBURGH, Comptroller.
—Filed and an order directed to be drawn.

FROM THE CITY ATTORNEY.
GENTLEMEN—I respectfully call your attention to sec. 30, of title 4, of the city charter, which provides that the salaries of officers to be elected at the next general election, shall be fixed on or before the 1st day of September in each year.
The salaries of the officers elected in 1859 were not fixed till the month of October of that year, and it is now claimed by one of these officers that by reason of his salary not having been fixed before September 1st, he is entitled to the increased compensation prescribed by the action of the Council in 1857, and a case is now pending to determine the validity of such claim. To avoid such controversies in future, I respectfully suggest that the salaries of officers to be elected at a general election shall in all cases be fixed on or before the 1st day of September, prior to such election, and that such action be taken by your honorable body as will secure that result for the present year.
H. S. CUTTING, City Attorney.
Ald. FLACH moved that the same be received and filed, and that a committee of three members of the Council be appointed for the purpose of considering and reporting on the subject matter thereof. Carried
The following Aldermen were appointed by the Chair as such Committee: Flach, Hanavan and Hopkins.

FROM THE STREET COMMISSIONER.
BUFFALO, August 17, 1863.
GENTLEMEN—The following works have been done and completed under my direction, at the ... ...inafter specified, to wit:

STREETS.
Manhole in Michigan street near the northerly line of Eagle street     $20 00
Perry street repaired on the easterly side of Mississippi street              17 00
Bouck Avenue opened and worked from Delaware street to Main street
                                                                                                                               200 00
Mariner street repaired from Allen street to a point 650 feet southerly from North street                                                                                                            50 00
Mariner street repaired from North street to a point 650 southerly therefrom                                                                                                                                         100 00
Elk street repaired from the old city line to Smith street                      50 00
Mackinaw street repaired from Tennessee to Alabama streets             63 75
Hospital street repaired between Sixth and Seventh streets.                 10 00
—Referred to the Committee on Streets.

SIDEWALK.
Sidewalk repaired on the northwesterly side of Lloyd street, from the bridge crossing the Erie Canal to Main street                                                  20 75

CROSSWALK.
Crosswalk constructed across Church street on the west side of south junction of Jackson street                                                                     19 47
—Referred to Committee on Side and Crosswalks.

CULVERT.
Culvert repaired and extended across Seventh street, between Georgia and Carolina streets                                                                                     25 00
—Referred to Committee on Streets.

SEWER AND RECEIVER.
Sewer and receiver repaired at the southeast corner of William and Hickory streets                                                                                                     9 98
—Referred to the Committee on Sewers.

BRIDGE.
Bridge over Erie Slip on River street repaired, by replanking same  112 45
—Referred to Committee on Streets.

WELL AND PUMP.
Well and pump repaired at the southwest corner of Bennett and Batavia streets                                                                                                  97 25
—Referred to Committee on Water.
Respectfully submitted,
J. O. BRIAN, Street Commissioner.

FURTHER FROM THE STREET COMMISSIONER.
BUFFALO, August 17th, 1S63.
GENTLEMEN—Since the last meeting of your Honorable body, the platform at the southeast corner of Louisiana and Exchange streets has become broken. Deeming it unsafe to leave the street in that condition, I have caused a new platform to be placed over the gutter at an expense of ($14 71) Fourteen 71-100 Dollars. I would respectfully ask that my action in  causing said work to be done without an order of the Common Council be approved.
Respectfully submitted.
JAS. O'BRIAN, Street Commissioner.
Filed.
Whereupon Ald. SCHEU, offered the following resolution:
That the action of the Street Commissioner in causing Louisiana street to be repaired by placing a new platform over the gutter at the southeast corner of Louisiana and Exchange streets at an expense of $14 71 without an order of this Council be and the same is hereby approved and confirmed. Adopted.

FURTHER FROM THE STREET COMMISSIONER.
The Street Commissioner reported the amount due Isaac Holloway to apply on contract for grading and

FURTHER FROM THE STREET COMMISSIONER.
BUFFALO, August 17, 1863.
GENTLEMEN—Bouk Avenue has been opened and worked from Main street to Delaware street as provided in your order passed on the 22nd of December last but the sum limited in the order was not sufficient to construct the necessary bridges, and before the street can be used for travel with teams a bridge must be constructed across the deep Ravine 160 feet easterly from Delaware street, and in consequence of the great expense and difficulty in obtaining materials and labor at the present time, the undersigned would recommend that a temporary wood bridge be built across the Ravine. Such a bridge will probably be sufficient for the term of five or six years and cost about $100.
Respectfully submitted,
J. O'BRIAN, Street Commissioner.
Referred to Committee on Streets.

FURTHER FROM THE STREET COMMISSIONER.
Buffalo, August 17th, 1863. Gentlemen:—Since the last meeting of your Honor-able body, the platform at the southeast corner of Louisiana and Exchange streets has become broken. Deeming it unsafe to leave the street in that con­dition, I have caused a new platform to be placed over the gutter at an expense of ($14 71) Fourteen 71-100 Dollars. I would respectfully ask that my action in causing said work to be done without an order of the Common Council be approved.
Respectfully submitted.
JAS. O'BRIAN, Street Commissioner. Filed.
Whereupon Ald. SCHEU, offered the following reso­lution:
That the action of the Street Commissioner in caus­ing Louisiana street to be repaired by placing a new platform over the gutter at the southeast corner of Louisiana and Exchange streets at an expense of $14 71  without an order of this Council be and the same is   hereby approved and confirmed. Adopted.
             FURTHER FROM THE STREET COMMISSIONER.
The Street Commissioner reported the amount due Isaac Holloway to apply on contract for grading and paving Genesee street from the easterly line of Sherman street easterly to a point 695 feet easterly from Walden street and recommended that an order be drawn for $1,500.
—Filed and an order directed to be drawn.

FROM THE CITY SURVEYOR.
The City Surveyor reported the amount due A. S. Swartz to apply on contract for constructing an iron swing bridge across Evans ship canal on Water street and recommend that an order be drawn for $500.
—Filed and an order directed to be drawn.

FROM THE CITY SURVEYOR.
The City Surveyor reported the amount due Thomas Dunbar to apply on contract for dredging Buffalo Creek outside the North Pier and  recommended that an order be drawn for $200.
—Filed and an order directed to be drawn.

FURTHER FROM THE CITY SURVEYOR.
BUFFALO, August 17, 1863.
Messrs Strong and Dunbar ask for a payment to apply on their contracts, for dredging Buffalo creek, from the northerly end of the north Pier, to the easterly line of Main street:—
Total amount of contract $6 450
Amount of work done by W. A. Strong 4 253
Amount paid 3 250
Amount due 1 008
Amount proposed to be paid W. A.
Strong 490
Amount of work done by Thomas Dunbar
$1 029
Amount paid 710
Amount due 319
Amount proposed to be paid Thomas
Dunbar 150
I would recommend that orders be drawn in their favor for the above amounts.
F. P. CURRY, City Surveyor.
Filed, and orders directed to be drawn.

 

FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
BUFFALO, August 17, 1863.
GENTEEMEN—In obedience to your instructions, I have purchased the property known as the Fillmore Church. It is proposed to repair it and fit it up for the use of School District No. 27.
Before this can be done, it will be necessary to raise it and build a stone foundation underneath.
I am informed by Mr. Bartholomew that it will cost $200 to raise and straighten it up, ready for the under pinning.
In my opinion it will be economy to take the building down and use the material in building a new house; yet many of the tax payers prefer the repairing of the present property.
I would suggest that the Committee on Schools examine this building, and report at the next meeting of this Council.
Respectfully submitted,
J. B. SACKETT, Sup't of Schools.
Received, and the subject matter thereof referred to the Committee on Schools.

FROM THE RECEIVER OF TAXES.
BUFFALO, Aug 17, 1863.
GENTLEMEN—On Saturday last, the City Treasurer notified me that hereafter I must make my weekly deposites with him in currency. I have accordingly since then, refused checks in payment for taxes, but as this is not only inconvenient for myself in counting so much currency, but also a great bother and inconvenience to a large portion of our citizens who are accustomed to pay in checks, and who (very justly too) feel vexed and offended in being refused their checks in payment for taxes; and as currency is plenty, and the Treasurer meets with no difficulty in obtaining the necessary currency for the transactions of the business of his office on his own checks, I would respectfully ask your honorable body to authorize me to receive checks in payment for taxes, provided they are certified to, and payable in currency; and to authorize and direct the Treasurer to receive these checks, or my own in making my weekly deposites with him.
Respectfully submitted,
J. DOMEDION, Receiver of Taxes.
Ald. HOPKINS moved that said communication be referred to the committee on finance.
Ald. HOYT moved as an amendment, that said communication be received and filed, and that the request therein contained be granted.
The question was then taken on the motion of Ald. Hopkins, and the same was carried.—Ayes 13; noes 5.
The City Clerk reported that at a meeting of the Board of Health, held Saturday, August 15th, 1863, the following resolution was adopted, and the Clerk directed to report the same to the Council, viz:—
That the Common Council be and they are hereby requested to amend Sections 3, 4 and 5, of Chapter 12, of the City Ordinances, by inserting the word "agent" in each of said Sections, immediately after the words "owner or occupant," now contained in said Sections.
—Received and filed.
Whereupon Ald. DAYTON offered the following resolution:—
That the Common Council, of the city of Buffalo, do hereby ordain and enact, that Sections 3, 4 and 5, of Chapter 12, of the Ordinance of the city be amended so as to read as follows:—
§3; No owner, occupant or agent of any tenement or lot in this city, shall permit any substance mentioned in the last two sections to be or remain in or upon said tenement or lot, or between the same and the centre of the street adjoining, under the penalty of two dollars for each and every twenty-four hours during which the same shall be or remain thereon.
§4. Any owner, occupant or agent, of any grocery, cellar or tallow chandler's shop, soap factory, tannery, stable, barn, privy, sewer, or other house or place, who shall suffer the same to become naseous, or injurious to the health of the inhabitants of the city, shall forfeit the penalty of ten dollars for each and every offence.
§5. It shall be lawful for the mayor, any alderman, or commissioner of health, to order the owner, occupant or agent, of any vacant lot, grocery, cellar, tallow chandler's shop, soap factory, tannery, stable, barn, privy, sewer, or other unwholesome or naseous house or place, to cleanse, remove or abate the same as often as may be necessary for the health, comfort and convenience of the inhabitants of this city; and any person refusing or neglecting to obey such order, shall forfeit the penalty of twenty-five dollars for every twenty-four hours he shall so neglect or refuse.
—Adopted. Ayes 29; Nays 0.
The City Clerk also reported that—
Mr. Edwin Rose, owner of Local Fund Order No. 581, dated July 27, 1863, (amount $130) desired to have the same divided, and recommended that he be authorized to divide the same.
—Filed and recommendation adopted.
The City Clerk also reported that the Committee on the Relief Fund had directed him to report the following Monthly Pay Roll for August, for the relief of the several Families annexed, with a request that orders be drawn for the several amounts opposite each name:
August 17, 1863.
Mrs Robert Henderson 100th regt                  8
Mrs William F Thompson Scott's 900th         7
Mrs James Ferguson 116th regt                      7
Mrs John Leonard 100th regt                                     4
Mrs Donald McKay 100th regt                                  6
Mrs Geo W Hammond 116th regt                  5
Henry Krein, 155th regt                                              6
Mrs Jacob Deshinger Weidrich's Battery        10
Mrs Charles Buckleiter     "              "                         6
Mrs Frederick Frier 49th regt                          6
Mrs Frank Hoffmann 49th regt                                  8
Mrs Jacob Hehr Weidrich's Battery                6
Mrs Mathew Johnson 100th regt                    4
Mrs Charles B Adams 116th regt                   9
Mrs August Dryer 100th regt                                     4
Mrs Elijah Bennett 100th regt                                    10
Mrs Samuel Wortman, Light Battery                         4
Mrs Joseph Miller 100th regt                          6
Mrs John Swab         "       "                            4
Mrs Henry Schaup    "       "                            8
Mrs Charles F Ayrhart Scott's 900th              8
Mrs David Smith 155th regt                           8
Mrs Bernard Wein 155th regt                                     6
Mrs John McNamara 49th regt                                   8
Mrs William Lynch     "       "                          6
Mrs Frederick Schlem Weidrich's Battery      4
Mrs John H Dolan 116th regt                                     8
Martin Cotton, 132d regt                                            7
Mrs Delevan Newkirk 155th regt                   4
Mrs Christopher Wineraber 116th regt           7
Mrs Lawrence Redy                                       6
Mrs John M Scheffler Weidrich's Battery      4
Mrs Felix Levi 49th regt                                             5
Mrs Charles L Otto 100th regt                                   5
Mrs Peter Glass Weidrich's Battery                4
Mrs Michael Lawler 155th regt                                  8
Mrs August Aumaum, 116th regt                   7
Mrs Charles Kankelwitz 116th regt                4
Mrs Jacob Nebergall 100th regt                      7
Mrs Samuel Widmer                                       7
Mrs Lewis E Filbert 116th regt                                   4
Mrs William Braun Weidrich's Battery           5
Mrs George Kaufmann 100th regt                  8
Mrs William Shupbach 116th regt                  8
Mrs Conrad Benzinger 49th regt                    6
Mrs Christian Miller 100th regt                      4
Mrs William Guenther 116th regt                   5
Mrs. Sanford M Randall, 116th regt              7
Mrs Jacob Winter, 116th regt                                     7
Mrs Dermis Clark, 100th regt                                     5
Mrs William Poss,          "                                7
Mrs William Koch, 49th regt                          5
Mrs James H Corwin Scott's 900th                7
Mrs William B Turner Buffalo Light Battery 5
Mrs James Curren 155th regt                          8
Mrs William Williams, 94th regt                     7
Mrs Christian Schmidt Weidrich's Battery     7
Mrs Alexander Sorrell, 155th regt                  4
Mrs Adam Schmidt 116th regt                                   9
Mrs James Mcintosh 155th regt                      7
Mrs Seth J. Harrison 116th regt                      4
Mrs Alexander Bingham 155th regt               4
Joseph A Ingraham,                                        5
Mrs Theodore Dedo 49th regt                                    4
Mrs John G Harlan 100th regt                                    7
Mrs August Lilia 116th regt                           4
Mrs Albert Fettea          "                                4
Mrs Mathew Robinson "                                             4
Mrs Lanson Demming Scott's 900th              4
Mrs Phillip Berry 155th regt                           5
Mrs Charles H Russell                                                5
Mrs Adam Brown 49th regt                           6
Mrs Herbert McNamara 155th                                    7
Mrs Robert Wiggins 100th regt                                  5
Mrs James H Phelps 155th regt                                  6
Mrs John Dempsey          "                              4
Mrs John L Main Light Battery                                  7
Mrs George S Wheeler    "                              4
Mrs Charles A Sayer 49th regt                                   4
Mrs Burton Slocum 116th regt                                   7
Mrs Samuel H Albee Light Battery                4
Mrs Timothy O'Bryan 155th regt                   6
Mrs Nicholas Mangold Weidrich's Battery    4
Mrs John Felz 116th regt                                5
Mrs Mathew Keller Weidrich's Battery          6
Mrs Otto Schwitzke             "                                     7
Mrs John DeWitt Light Battery                                  3
Mrs Edward A Galligan Light Battery           3
Mrs John Messinger Weidrich's Battery         4
Mrs Henry Langraf 155th regt                                    5
Mrs Nicholas Diebold Light Battery              6
Patrick McGowan 155th regt                                     6
Mrs Abraham Goodenough Scott's 900th      5
Mrs John Glenning 155th regt                                    6
James Clark                    "                               5
Mrs Edward Aykroyd 116th regt                   6
Mrs John McConville Light Battery               5
Mrs John Milling 116th regt                           5
Mrs Daniel McFaul    "                                                5
Mrs Thomas Cunningham 155th regt                         3
Mrs Charles Roder 49th regt                          3
Mrs Albert L Hoist 94th regt                          3
Mrs George Tepping 155th regt                      10
Mrs Geo N Brown, 116th regt                                    6
Mrs Herman Schoy 116th regt                                    8
Mrs Jacob Boggert 116th regt                                    4
Mrs Peter Nash 116th regt                              6
Mrs Wm Summers 100th regt                                     7
Mrs Michael Solomon, Light Battery                         8
Mrs James G Barnnm 100th regt                    4
Mrs Patrick Sullivan 116th regt                      8
Mrs Peter Kuhn 151st regt                              6
Mrs Louis Sloat, 116th regt                            4
Mrs Charles Chittenden, 116th regt               6
Mrs John Kernahan, Scott's 900th                  7
Mrs John Seymour 155th regt                                     10
James Redshaw 100th regt                             4
Mrs James H Johnson 116th regt                    5
Philip Clabeaux, 155th regt                            5
Mrs Daniel McDade 155th regt                                  4
Mrs Michael Geisdorfer 116th regt               5
Mrs Joseph H Parker 116th regt                     6
Mrs Charles O'Brien, 155th regt                     6
Mrs John McIlvana, 116th regt                                   4
Mrs Powell Herr 100th regt                            6
Mrs Geo H Stowitts 100th regt                                  8
Mrs Cornelius Sullivan 116th regt                  6
George T Bale 116th regt                               4
Mrs Peter Koch 116th regt                             7
Mrs John Myers 116th regt                             6
Mrs John Breson 155th regt                            4
Mrs Henry Hewitt 155th regt                                     5
Mrs Adam White 116th regt                           6
Mrs Dean Wilson 155th regt                           6
Mrs Wm H Edwards 155th regt                     6
John G White 155th regt                                            4
John C Rusch 116th regt                                            3
Ernst Buse 116th regt                                                 4
Mrs James O'Connell 155th regt                     6
Mrs Michael Banner Jr 116th regt                  5
Mrs Adam Karn 100th regt                            6
Mrs Michael Guenther 116th regt                   5
Mrs John Hennesey 116th regt                                   6
Mrs Russell J Walker Light Battery                6
Mrs John Nesser, 155th regt                           5
Mrs Valentine Merkle 116th regt                    6
Mrs Peter Paule 116th regt                             5
Peter Krauskopf, 116th regt                           5
Mrs Owen Sweeny 100th regt                                    7
John Cahill 116th regt                                                 4
Lewis J. Carpenter 155th regt                                     5
Mrs John B Handfrist 100th regt                    4
Mrs Wm B Clancy 155th regt                                     8
Mrs Nicholas Riess 116th regt                                    5
Mrs Joseph Smith, Buffalo Light Battery      3
James Fox 155th regt                                      6
Patrick Kinane 155th regt                               6
Mrs Geo J Webb 100th regt                            7
Mrs John Bagly 155th regt                             6
Mrs Allen Gray 155th regt                              3
Wm Holden 116th regt                                               4
Mrs Philip G Bauer 116th regt                                    6
Patrick Dorsey Buffalo Light Battery                        5
Mrs Sylvester Keller Buffalo Light Battery   8
Mrs Christian G Hirsch 116th regt                 5
Mrs Joseph Strickland 155th regt                   5
Mrs Peter Blondell, light battery                    8
Mrs Charles Snow 155th regt                                     3
Mrs Charles Lederer 116th regt                                  5
Mrs Asa A Edmonds 116th regt                     8
Mrs Dennis Driskle 155th     "                                    7
Mrs Patrick Gaskin     "         "                                    6
Mrs Wm Schenckel 116th     "                                    5
John Frees, 49th                     "                                   5
Mrs Barny McDermott light battery               5
Andrew McCarthy 155th regt                                    5
Benjamin F Wisewell Scott's 900                   4
Mrs Michael Holfelt 100th regt                                  6
William H Barry 155th   "                               5
William Wilson, 49th reg't                              5
Mrs Lewis Herzel, 116th reg't                                    5
James Sweeney, 155th      "                            5
Edward Byrne,       "          "                           5
H A Ruprecht, 116th regt                               5
Geo F Batty, light battery                               5
Spencer Rose, 100th regt                                4
Michael McCabe, 155th regt                          3
Charles Bamberg 151st     "                            4
Mrs John Casper      "        "                            5
Mrs William H Schcu 116th regt                    4
R W Franke                     "      "                                   4
James Etchingham 155th        "                                   4
Patrick McGaroll       "            "                                   4
John C Nial 116th                   "                                  4
Mrs William A Austin 100th  "                                   6
George Kress                                                  4
Mrs Frances Operfield 116th regt                   10
Mrs Charles B Holman    "       "                     6
Harman Wemple 8th New York cavalry        4
Mrs Warren Brown Scott's 900      "               4
Mrs William L Husted 116th regt                   6
Roderick C Conner          "       "                     5
Mrs Theodore Hansel       "       "                     5
Mrs Luke Pearson             "       "                    6
Mrs John Menorash 154th         "                    6
Mrs John Kelly 155th reg't                             3
Mrs William May 164th "                               3
Frederick Henn 116th     "                              4
Mrs Charles O'Conner 155th "                                    5
Mrs Carl Schaeffer          "                              5
John Riley, 160th            "                              3
Mrs John Goetz               "                              8
Mrs Charles Priest 155th regt                                     5
Mrs Frederick Schwarz 131st regt                  6
Mrs John Dennison 155th         "                    5
Mrs Christopher Ditmer 49th    "                    3
Joseph Kleiber 116th                 "                    6
George Guenther 116th regt                           4
Thomas H Doolittle 10th New York cavalry 5
Mrs John Geis, 155th regt                               6
Mrs David Ransler, Eaton's Battery               5
Philip I Webber, Scott's 900                           5
Mrs W H Valentine, Eaton's Light Battery    3
Mrs James Bulger Ira Harris cavalry               3
Mrs Wm Feldhahn 116th regt                                     5
Michael Casey, 155th regt                              5
John H German    "       "                                             3
Mrs Wm Willey, 155th regt                            5
Christian Helfinger, 116th regt                                   4
Mrs Wm O'Neil, 155th regt                            4
Mrs Royal A Miller, 10th N Y Cavalry          5
Mrs Jacob Weber 100th regt                           5
Mrs David B McDonald 116th regt               5
Peter Roth 100th regt                                                 6
Mrs Francis Downs 116th regt                                   8
Frank Humbert           "        "                          6
Mrs Dennis A Hubbell 100th regt                  6
Michael Manaher 155th regt                           5
John Command 164 regt                                             4
David Roberts Light Battery                          6
Lewis J Catrick 155th regt                              4
Joseph Hencke 44th regt                                             6
Mrs Jacob M Smith 155th regt                                   7
Mrs Phillip Bingemheimer 49th regt               10
Jacob Weller Weidrich's Battery                     4
Mrs Paul R Gilan 164th regt                           7
Mrs John A Micherelis 94th regt                    5
Jessie K Corwin Scott's 900                           5
Mrs Henry Holch Weidrich's Battery                         7
Mrs James H French 100th regt                      6
Mrs Cornelius Mahony 155th regt                  3
Mrs Patrick Whalen 78th regt                                     8
Mrs. John Schaffer 116th regt                                    6
Phillip Shoemaker 116th regt                          6
Harvey De Graf, 100th regt                            6
Mrs Hugo Beiler 116th regt                            6
Mrs Henry Mathews Ira Harris' Cavalry         6
Miron H Ludlow 94th regt                             6
Mrs Edward E Patridge 100th regt                5
Mrs David Kirsch             "       "                    6
Wm Wilke, 116th regt                                                4
Arthur Redmon 116 regt                                            3
Henry S Bolson                                                           4
Anthony Brantlacht 155th regt                                   5
Louis Leonard, 151st regt                               6
Martin Drumb 116th regt                                3
Mrs Michael Cullin 155th regt                                    6
Patrick Cluan Eaton's Battery                                     8
Jerry Stephens 164th regt                               4
Charles Holschlag Weidrich's Battery                        3
Martin Ellard, 116th regt                                            4
Frederick Frick Ira Harris' Cavalry                 6
Joseph Humphrey 155th regt                          4
Dennis Donavan 49th regt                              8
Ernst Obermeier, 116th regt                           4
Anthony Figler, Ira Haris' Cavalry                 7
Wm J Curphy     "      "           "                                   4
Wm Chapman, Light Battery                                     8
Charles Naval                                                  6
Charles Miller, 49th Regt                                6
Frederick Schultz, 49th Regt                          5
Morris Kelly, 155th Regt                                3
Mathias Foegen, 100th Regt                           3
Michael Grace, 164th Regt                             6
Felix Zimmerman Weidrich's battery              4
Nicholas Metz                                                             4
Theodore Skillman, Ira Harris Cavalry           5
Eugene Randall, 116th Regt                           6
John Michel           "        "                               6
Orris Martin, Scott's 900 Cavalry                   4
Mrs Martin Moersdorf, Light Battery                        6
Julius Burckhart 49th Regt                             4
Michael Sullivan                                                         5
George Kramer, 49th Regt                             5
William Foster, 100th                                                 4
William A. Foeting, Ira Harris Cavalry           6
William Keef 155th regt                                 3
Julius H. Hale 94th regt                                  6
Jeremiah Sheehan Ira Harris Cavalry              5
Henry Walter, 176th regt                                5
Joseph Gettie 49th regt                                               6
Charles Nelson 164th regt                              5
Miles Skillington 116th regt                           4
Cyrus Baker Ira Harris Cavalry                                  4
Denis Cullin Ira Harris Cavalry                      7
Patrick McCabe 155th regt                             4
Peter Kibbler 49th                                                       3
Marius Van Holst                                                        5
William T. Brown                                                       3
William Hetzel 49th regt                                             4
William Feldemacher 116th regt                     4
Hugh Crean                                                                 4
John Gathicker                                                            4
George Roessell                                                          4         
Franklin Lallath                                                           4
Mrs John Veit Traeger 100th regt                   8
Mrs John Tixier 5th regt U S Army                6
Patrick O Brien 164th regt                              5
Jacob J Benzino 116th regt                             4
Jacob Schmidt Mix Cavalry                            5
Mrs George Glasson Ira Harris Cavalry          8
Mrs Thomas Kilduff           "                           5
WilliamBattie, 164th regt                               5
William T Hoag, Indiana and Pennsylvania
battery                                                                         6
John Moynahan, 155th regt                            6         
Tracy Ramond, 116th regt                              4
Henry Miller                                                    6
Mrs. Patrick O'Mara, 164th regt                     4
Mrs. Nicholas Fahler, Ira Harris' cavalry        4
William Ellis, 49th regt                                               3
Elijah A Wood, 50th regt NYSV Engineers 4
Mrs John H T Lang, 50th regt N Y S Y "       6
Joseph Bretcher, 116th regt                            4
John Mishler, 116th regt                                             7
Peter Foster, 116th regt                                              4
William Smith, Mix's cavalry                          4
James H Page, Scott's 900th cavalry              4
George W Miller, 155th regt                           4
Mrs Henry G Wakefield, 5th U S Artillery    5
Mrs Benjamin Kellett, 49th regt                     4
Jacob Boyer, 116th regt                                              5
Mrs John Smith, Ira Harris' cavalry                4
Frederick Coster, 100th regt                           6
Samuel Aff holder, 176th regt NYSV                       4
William C Hillam, Ira Harris' cavalry              4
Mrs Thomas Smallshaw, 100th regt                4
Herman Gutel, 116th regt                               3
John Kalliher, 155th regt                                            8
Thomas Carpenter, 49th regt                          4
Edward Endee, 116th regt                             4
Charles Uglitz, 137th regt                               6
Edson Green, 7th regt artillery                                   6
Christopher Parrott, Ira Harris' cavalry           4
John Blanck, 116th regt                                              4
David Lingerback, Ira Harris' cavalry                         5
Thomas Shelton, Scott's 900th regt                4
Philip Lehman, 116th regt                              4
Mrs. Thomas Graham, 10th N Y cavalry        6
Nicholas Bougemer, 155th regt                                  4
Milton W Paine, Scott's 900th                                    4
Ansell R Chamberlain, 100th regt                  4
Samuel Mills, Ira Harris' cavalry                     4
Frederick Poppenberg, Ira Harris' cavalry      7
Joseph Dix, 176th regt                                                4
Paul Scheffel, 164th regt                                            3
Louis Kraft, Sprague's Light cavalry              4
Bernard Donahoo, "        "          "                   5
Michael Lillch       "        "          "                    6
C. Warren Hall, 164th regt                             4
Hugo Loepert, 116th regt                               4
Philip Deitrick, 151st regt                               7
Charles Haas, 94th regt                                               4
Thomas Fay, Ira Harris cavalry                                   6
John Deuler, Sprague's    "                              5
Michael Bruner, "            "                              3
George J. Vitty,  "            "                             4
Jacob Frinck,      "            "                              3
Daniel Frawley, 155th Regt                            4
John Zintt, Sprague's Light Cavalry               4
Thomas Delanty, 11th Heavy Artillery           7
John Sheehan, Sprague's Light Cavalry          3
Mathew Dillon,      "           "          "               4
Peter Offner, Sprague's Light Cavalry                       6
John Killhoffer, Sprague's Light Cavalry       8
Nicholas Schleiger, 132d Regt                                   5
John Britting, 116th Regt                               4
Charles K. Emory, Scott's 900 Cavalry          6
John Herring, Sprague's Light Cavalry           4
Jacob Theobold, 15th Regt Heavy Artillery   6
Nicholas Smith, Co. F, 100 Regt. N.Y.S.V.   5
Jackson F. Smith, Sprague's Light Battery     6
Thomas Bonnan, Wheeler's Light Battery      7
Christian Bessenger, 15th Regt H. Artillery   6
John C Butler, Scott's 900                              7
Jacob Schmidt, Sprague's Light Cavalry        6
Milton A. Gray, 21st Regt. N.Y.S. V.                        6
Frank Knops, Wheeler's Light Battery           6
John F. Diehl, 1st Regt. N.Y.S.V.                  5
Peter Nash                                                                   10
                                                                           $2,107
—Filed and orders directed to be drawn.
The City Clerk further reports that the Relief Committee have directed him to report the following, and ask that an order may be drawn for the same. Samuel Fursman, for services from the 16th July to the 16th August. $40
—Filed and an order directed to be drawn.

ARRIVAL OF THE 28TH CONNECTICUT.—This Regiment reached this city last evening at 10 o'clock, en route from Port Hudson to their native State. It numbered, when it went out, 529 officers and men, and 390 return—30 sick. They were first stationed at Pensacola, and from there moved with Gen. BANKS through the Tesche country, and thence to Port Hudson, where it remained through the siege. It has suffered a great deal from sickness. Col. FERRIS went home, sick, in advance of the Regiment, and the Lieut. Colonel is on his way home by sea—being to ill to bear the fatigue of a land journey. Major WESCOME is in command. After partaking of refreshments, the Regiment took the Boston cars, and expected to reach home at noon to-day.

ARRIVAL OF THREE REGIMENTS FROM THE SOUTHWEST.—The Fourth Massachusetts Regiment arrived here from Port Hudson yesterday morning, about half past three o'clock, over the Lake Shore Railroad, and were informally received by the citizen's reception committee, at the Central Depot. After the sick were well taken care of, the regiment departed for Rochester at which point, in accordance with arrangements made by Superintendent Chittenden, of the New York Central, a bountiful repast was prepared for them. The Regiment was officered as follows: Lieut. Col. Colby, Major Chas. Howard, Quartermaster Lathrop, Adjutant Crocker, Surgeon Waldock, Assistant Surgeon J. F. Gould. The Regiment when organized numbered 996 men. It left Port Hudson with 650 strong, and left some 60 sick at different points on the way. About the same number were sick at this point. The Fourth has evidently seen hard service.
The Twenty-eighth Maine Regiment arrived here about 5 o'clock on the same morning from Port Hudson, and were most bountifully entertained.
Its officers are: Col. E. W. Woodman; Lieut-Col. W. E. Hadlock; Major ___ ___, killed at Fort Donelson; Adjutant Cutter; Surgeon Lake; Quartermaster Merrill. The regiment left Maine in September, 1862, 950 strong, as nine months men, and now return 615 in number, including 64 sick left at different points on the way. There were about 60 on the sick list at this point, three of whom were sent to the General Hospital. The men cheered lustily for the citizens of Buffalo as the train moved out of the Depot.
A little after 8 o'clock last evening the Forty seventh Massachusetts Regiment arrived, and were greeted by a large assemblage at the depot. Ample preparations had been made for their entertainment, and the good things with which the tables were loaded had justice done them.—The officers of the Regiment are: Colonel, Lucius B. Marsh of Boston; Lieut. Colonel, Albert Stickney of Cambridge; Major, Austin S. Cushman, Mew Bedford; Adjutant, Eli Kingsley, Cambridge; Quarter Master, George N. Nichols, Boston; Caplain [sic] Clark; Surgeon  Blackmer, Somerville; Assistant, Mercer, Boston. The Regiment was recruited in and around Boston, and originally numbered. 976 men, and is now about 780 strong. Fifty men were left at New Orleans and other places, sick, and about 40 were on the sick list here. The Regiment spent a large portion of its time in New Orleans, but more recently had been held as a reserve force at Camp Parapet, near Port Hudson. The Regiment was accompanied by a brass band of eighteen pieces, composed of men selected from the ranks, and looked well, perhaps better than any that has passed through the city from the Southwest. The train bearing them eastward took its departure at about 9 o'clock.

THE CONSCRIPT'S BENEFIT.—If there be not a crowded house at the theatre tonight, then the people of Buffalo are not the folks we take them for. The performance is for the benefit of Mr. M. M. Lawrence, the door-keeper, who was conscripted one day, and are to go for the procurement of a substitute for that clever and courteous young gentleman. The attractions are manifold. Among the "stars" announced to appear are: J. M. McCullum, the leading man at the Cleveland Academy of music; Mr. B. McCaulay, a Buffalo boy and a favorite, at present stage manager of the Louisville theatre; Miss Jennie Hosmer, formerly of this city, and now of McVicker's, Chicago; Miss Rachel Noah, Mrs. Kate Ward, &c. In addition to the above are Billy Allen, Madame Zoe, the pretty danseuse, Mons. Yates, and Donaldson, the pantomimist. E. K. Clark, the popular vocalist, will also lend his valuable aid. The programme for the evening is as follows: Othello, with the following cast: Othello, J. C. McCullum; Iago, B. McCaulay; Emilie, Miss Jennie Hosmer; Desdamona, Miss Rachel Noah, supported by the entire stock company. "Essence of old Virginny," Billy Allen; Ballad, Mrs. Kate Ward; Pas de Boquette, Mlle. Marie Zoe and Mons. B. Yates. Mr. E. K. Clark will sing the popular ballad, Vive L' Amerique, and Mr. Donaldson will appear as Jacques in "The Conscript." At 7 o'clock in the evening Mr. Donaldson will make an ascension from the theatre to the roof of the building opposite on a single rope.

Commercial Advertiser.
Tuesday Evening, August 18, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
COMMON COUNCIL.—Mayor Fargo having returned and resumed the duties of his position, President Beckwith was in the Chair at the meeting of the Council yesterday. But little business of importance, save the appropriation of money for the relief of drafted men was transacted.
A communication was received from the City Attorney, calling the attention of the Council to Sec. 30, of Title 4, of the City Charter, which provides that the salaries of officers to be elected at the next general election shall be fixed on or before the first day of September in each year.
Ald. Flach moved that the communication be received and filed, and that a committee of three members of the Council be appointed for the purpose of considering and reporting on the subject latter thereof. Carried, and Ald. Flach, Hanavan and Hopkins were appointed such committee.
The following petitions were received and temporarily held on the table. Of the 8th Ward for an appropriation of money for the relief of conscripts; of Geo. W. Tifft, Pratt & Co., and others, asking the Council to appropriate $30,000 for the purpose of procuring substitutes for the eighty members of the National Guard that have been drafted in this city; of the firemen, asking the Council to appropriate $10,500 for the exemption of those of their number drafted; of the 31st Brigade, similar to above. They were subsequently referred to the Committee on Finance.
Alds. Dayton and Walsh, from the Committee on Finance, to whom was referred the resolution offered by Ald. Hanavan, to provide relief for the  indigent families of persons drafted into the service of the United States, reported the following:
Resolved, That the sum of $75,000 be and is hereby appropriated for the relief of the indigent families of all persons who are or may be drafted into the service of the United States from the city of Buffalo under said conscription law, and that the Mayor and Comptroller be and are hereby authorized to borrow upon the credit of the city the said sum of $75,000, or such part thereof as may be necessary for the purposes hereinafter provided, on the bonds of the city, which shall be issued in accordance with the provisions of chapter five hundred and fourteen of the laws of 1863, entitled "An Act providing relief to indigent families of volunteers and persons who may be ordered into the military and naval service of the United States," and the faith of the corporation is hereby pledged for the payment of the principal sum required to be paid by the said bonds and other obligations, and of the interest to accrue thereon.
Resolved, That the bonds or obligations so issued shall not be for sums less than $1,000 each, and shall bear interest at a rate not more than seven per cent. per annum and shall be payable at periods not less than three years nor more than twenty years from the time of the issuing thereof; and said bonds shall be so payable that not more than $15,000 shall become due thereon in any one year.
Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to distribute and apply such sum for the purpose above mentioned, or such part thereof as shall be necessary, and such distribution and application shall be made as far as practicable as follows:
The said committee shall inquire into the circumstances and pecuniary ability of each person drafted who is the head of a family, or who shall have any one depending on him for support, and who shall not be exempt under any of the provisions of said conscription law, and who shall apply to such committee for relief; and of the money above appropriated, the sum of $300 shall be used and appropriated by such committee for the relief of the family of such person in the manner hereinafter provided, whenever it shall appear to the satisfaction of said committee that such person is not exempt from military service under said conscription law, and is not of sufficient pecuniary ability to procure a substitute, or to pay the commutation of $300, provided by said law. And if said committee are satisfied that such person is pecuniarily able to pay part of such commutation, but not the whole, then they may appropriate to the relief of his family such part of the sum of $300 as in their opinion will enable him to procure his exemption from such draft; and in all cases said committee may use and appropriate any part of the sum of $300 for the relief of the family of such person. The relief to families, as herein provided, may be made as follows: In case such drafted person shall elect to go into the military service of the United States, under said draft, the said sum of $300 shall be paid to such person or his family, for the relief of said family. In case such person shall not so elect, then the said sum of $300, or such part thereof as the committee may think proper to appropriate, shall be used to procure a substitute in cases where a substitute can be procured hereby. And in case such person does not elect to enter such service, and no substitute can be procured for the sum appropriated for that purpose, then the sum of $300 or so much thereof as, together with the amount contributed by the person so drafted, shall amount to $300, shall be paid to the proper officer to procure the exemption and release of such person from service under said draft; and it being the true intent and meaning hereof, that the money hereby appropriated shall be expended for the purpose of procuring men for the military service of the United States, as well as to relieve the families of persons drafted, the said committee are hereby required and directed to expend said money for the procuring of substitutes in all cases where a substitute can be procured for the amount appropriated for the relief  of and person drafted.
Resolved, That any conscript accepting the relief contemplated by this action must accept it in lieu of all claims upon the city for the support of his family by weekly or monthly orders upon the "Relief Fund" in case he should elect to enter the service of the United States.
Alderman Hopkins offered the following as a substitute for the report of the Finance Committee:
Whereas, Under the conscription now being enforced in the city of Buffalo, many persons who are the sole dependence of their families, will be separated from them, leaving them unprovided with any adequate means of support which in many cases would be the means of extreme hardships and suffering.
And whereas, The Legislature of the State of new York has given the Common Councils of the cities the power to grant such pecuniary relief and assistance in such cases as may be necessary and proper, and therefore, for the purpose of alleviating the burthen and hardship of said conscripts, and providing the necessary means for furnishing such assistance and relief, it is by the Common Council of the city of Buffalo,
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller be, and they are hereby, authorized and empowered to issue the bonds of the city in such convenient sums as they may think proper, to the amount of $75,000, bearing interest at 7 per cent, payable at the rate of $10,000 per year from and after July 1, 1866. That they be authorized to negotiate said bonds and deposit the proceeds thereof in the city Treasury, and the same shall
be known as the Conscript relief Fund, and shall be kept and paid out by said Treasurer, upon the checks or drafts of the Committee appointed by this Council on the 6th day of October, 1862, who shall be charged with the duty of the distribution and payment of said fund, and the performance of the other duties specified in these resolutions. No part of said fund shall in any case be drawn or appropriated for any other purpose than for the relief of conscripts who enter the service and who have families or aged and infirm parents or relations dependent upon them for support or substitutes of such conscripts who shall enter the military service of the United States under and in pursuance of said subscription, and the same shall be distributed as follows:
Said Committee shall enquire and ascertain the pecuniary condition of the families of such persons as may enter the military service of the United States as conscripts from the city of Buffalo, and shall afford such relief, and pay over to such families such sums, from time to time, as in the opinion of said Committee such family shall necessarily require, during the time such conscript shall remain in the service; but such advance or relief shall in no case exceed in the aggregate the sum of $300 to any one family during said service, but in case any said conscript, who is the head of a family, having a child or children, or aged or infirm parents, or relation entirely dependent on him for support, and who is not exempt, and who shall not desire to enter said service, and shall furnish or desire to furnish a substitute, who shall be accepted and enter said service in his stead, such Committee shall enquire into the circumstances of such case, and when it shall appear to said Committee that the family of such conscript would be entitled to relief under these resolutions—provided said conscript entered the service, and that said conscript's entering the service would be a case of peculiar hardship to his family—they shall be at liberty to pay to such substitutes, or their families, on his order, such sum from time to time, or at one time, as in the opinion of said Committee, the family of the conscript for whom such substitute enters the/service would be entitled to receive tinder these resolutions, provided he had personally gone into said service, but such sum shall in no case exceed $300.
The resolutions offered by Ald. Hopkins were lost, and those of Alds. Dayton and Walsh then adopted by a vote of 21 to 1.
The Chair appointed as the Committee to distribute and apply the said sum of $75,000, Alds. Gates, Flach, Walsh, Yaw and Clark.
The Committee appointed under the resolution of Ald. Gates to proceed to Albany for the purpose of securing to this city proper credit for men enlisted here, submitted the following report:
That pursuant thereto the Committee proceeded to Albany to procure the proper evidence of volunteers heretofore furnished under the previous calls for troops by the General Government.
Under the requirements announced by Provost Marshal General Fry, the subject is not free from difficulties.
The General Government admits that the State, under all former calls, furnished a surplus of about 5,000, which it has assumed., in making the draft of July 1863, to allow and apportion to the different districts of the State. This seems to have been done regardless of the fact whether the particular district has furnished a surplus or is chargable with a deficiency under former calls. Thus 100 is allowed to the Erie County District, which has more than filled its former quota, while the Cataraugus and Chautauqua districts, and the St. Lawrence and  Franklin districts, both of which show large deficiencies under former calls, are each allowed 150 on the present draft. By this process the 5,000 surplus of the State is disposed of. After thus apportioning the surplus, the present draft is made by taking one-fifth of the enrolled men in each district and adding thereto 50 per cent for exemptions.
In ascertaining and determining the number of volunteers and militia furnished by the respective districts, under the 12th section of the Conscription Law, it will be borne in mind that previous to the call of July first, 1862, there were no quotas assigned to separate districts in this state. The entire number of troops required were furnished to fill the call, but it was done by voluntary enlistments throughout the State. That Erie county, prior to the call of July 1st, 1862, sent forward the 21st and 49th and 100th regiments, numbering over 2,700 men and various other companies and battalions [sic],
making in the aggregate more than its fair proportion,  still as no quotas to counties or districts was in any way assigned, it is impracticable to show previous to the 1st of July call, the filling of any particular quota. It therefore becomes necessary to produce evidence of the surplus furnished by Erie County District, commencing under the 1st of July and 4th of August calls of 1862. The copy of such evidence obtained from the Adjutant General's office, duly certified by the Governor, is herewith returned. This evidence should, in our judgment, be forwarded by some proper representative to Washington, and we cannot doubt that a proper allowance for the surplus of volunteers will be made to said district by the National Authorities. All of which is respectfully submitted.
HORATIO SEYMOUR,
RICHARD FLACH,
ROBERT MILLS,
GEO. B. GATES,
CHARLES E. YOUNG.
The evidence furnished by the Adjutant General shows that the quota of Erie county, under the July and August calls of 1862, was 2,195 three years men, and 2,195 nine months men. The county has furnished to Nov. 7, 1862, 3,406 three years men, and from November 7, 1862, to February 7, 1863, 1,062 men, making a total of 4,468 men furnished—a surplus of 78 above the quota. That since the 7th of February, 1863, to the 10th of August, 1863, the county has furnished 1, 058 three years men, which, added to the surplus of 78 above named, gives 1,136 surplus over and above the calls of 1862.
The Chair was authorized to appoint a committee of two to proceed to Washington and confer with the authorities with reference to the quota of this city. The Council then adjourned to Thursday evening next, at half past 7 o clock.

CORPORATION PROCEEDINGS.
Reported for the Buffalo Morning Express.
IN COMMON COUNCIL,
Monday, Aug. 17, 1863.
His Honor, Mayor Fargo, having returned to the city, Alderman Beckwith resumed his position as President of the Council.
Minutes of the last meeting allowed to stand approved.
A communication was received from the Comptroller, containing a list of the city property sold by him, at public auction on the 14th inst. Received and filed.
From same, notifying the Council that he had caused the City Hall to be insured to the amount of $5, 000, and asking an order for $31 25 to pay premium. Order directed to he drawn.
A communication was received from the City Attorney, calling the attention of the Council to Sec. 30, of Title 4, of the City Charter, which provides that the salaries of officers to be elected at the next General Election shall be fixed on or before the 1st day of September, in each year.
Ald. Flach moved that the communication be received and filed, and that a committee of three members of the Council be appointed for the purpose of considering and reporting on the subject matter thereof. Carried, and Aldermen Flach, Hanavan and Hopkins were appointed such committee.
The Street Commissioner presented a statement of work done under his direction. Referred to the appropriate committee.
A communication was received from the Street Commissioner advising the construction of a wooden bridge, at a cost of about $100, over a deep ravine in Bouck Avenue near Delaware street. Referred to the Committee on streets.
An order for $1500 was directed to be drawn in favor of Isaac Holloway to apply on his contract for paving Genesee street.
At the recommendation of the City Surveyor, an order for $500 was directed to be drawn in favor of A. S. Swartz, and one for $200 in favor of Thos. Dunbar and orders for $400 and $150 in favor of Strong and Dunbar to apply on contracts for work.
The Superintendent of Schools notified the Council that he had purchased the property known as the Fillmore Church, which it was proposed to repair and fit up for the use of Schools District No 27, and stated it as his opinion that it would be cheaper to erect a new building. Subject matter referred to committee on Schools.
The Receiver of Taxes asked permission to receive checks in payment of taxes, provided they be certified to and payable in currency, and requested that the Treasurer be directed to receive said checks as those of the Receiver, for the reason that the Treasurer had notified him that hereafter he must make his weekly deposits in currency.
On motion of Ald. Hopkins it was referred to the Committee on Finance,
The City Clerk reported that at a meeting of the Board of Health, on the 5th inst., the following resolution was adopted, and the Clerk directed to report the game to the Council, viz:
Resolved, That the Common Council be, and they are hereby requested to amend Section 3, 4 and 5, of chapter 12, of the City Ordinance, by inserting the word "agent," in each of said sections, immediately after the words "owner or occupant" now contained in said section. Resolution adopted.
The City Clerk reported names of sundry persons for relief from Relief Fund, and the amounts apportioned to each. Orders directed to be drawn.
The City Clerk reported sundry assessment rolls that had remained on file in his office more than ten days since first publication of notice in the city paper and no applications for correction had been made. Rolls confirmed.
The consideration of Rolls No. 2954, 2555 and 2959,
was deferred for one week.
The report of the Commissioners appointed by the Superior Court to ascertain the compensation to be paid for property taken to extend Linwood Avenue from Barker street to Bryant street, was taken up, and the report was, after a debate of an hour, adopted.
The Chief of Police presented the pay roll of the special and armed policemen. Orders directed to be drawn.
The petition of F. A. Alberger and others to have Linwood avenue opened, from Ferry street to Delavan avenue, and to have the carriage-way therein graded and worked, was, on motion of Ald. Scheu, granted.
The petition of citizens of the 8th ward for an appropriation of money for the relief of conscripts, was laid on the table temporarily.
The petition of Geo. W. Tifft, Pratt & Co. and others, asking the Council to appropriate $30,000 for the purpose of procuring substitutes for the eighty members of the National Guard that have been drafted in this city, was temporarily laid on the table.
The same disposition was made of the petition of the officers of the 31st Brigade, similar to above.
The petition of the firemen, asking the Council to appropriate $10,500 for the exemption of those of their number drafted, was laid on the table temporarily.
Aldermen Dayton and Walsh, from the Committee on Finance, to whom was referred the resolution offered by Ald. Hanavan to provide relief for the indigent families of persons drafted into the service of the United States, reported the following:
Resolved, That the sum of $75,000 be and is hereby appropriated for the relief of the indigent families of all persons who are or may be drafted into the service of the United States from the city of Buffalo under said conscription law, and that the Mayor and Comptroller be and are hereby authorized to borrow upon the credit of the city the said sum of $75,000, or such part thereof as may be necessary for the purposes hereinafter provided, on the bonds of the city which shall be issued in accordance with the provisions of chapter five hundred and fourteen of the laws of 1863, entitled "An Act providing relief to indigent families of volunteers and persons who may be ordered into the military and naval service of the United States," and the faith of the corporation is hereby pledged for the payment of the principal sum required to be paid by the said bonds and other obligations, and of this interest to accrue thereon.
Resolved, That the bonds or obligations so issued shall not be for sums less than $1,000 each, and shall bear interest at a rate not more than seven per cent. per annum, and shall be payable at periods not less than three years nor more than twenty years from the time of the issuing thereof; and said bonds shall be so payable that not more than $15,000 shall become due thereon in any one year.
Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to distribute and apply such sum for the purpose above mentioned, or such part thereof as shall be necessary, and such distribution and application shall be made as far as practicable, as follows:
The said committee shall inquire into the circumstances and pecuniary ability of each person drafted who is the head of a family, or who shall have any one depending on him for support ,arid who shall not be exempt under any of the provisions of said conscription law, and who shall apply to such committee for relief; and of the money above appropriated, the sum of $300, shall be used and appropriated by such committee for the relief of the family of such person in the manner hereinafter provide [sic], whenever it shall appear to the satisfaction of said committee that such person is not exempt from military service under said conscription law, and is not of sufficient pecuniary ability to procure a substitute, or to pay the commutation of 300, provided by said law. And if said committee are satisfied that such person is pecuniarily able to pay part of such commutation, but not the whole, then they may appropriated to the relief of his family, such part of the sum of $300, as in their opinion will enable him to procure his exemption from such draft; and in all cases said committee may use and appropriate any part of the sum of $300 for the relief of the family of such person. The relief to families, as herein provided, may he made as follows: In case such drafted person shall elect to go into the military service of the United Stales under said draft, the said sum of $300 shall be paid to such person or his family, for the relief of said family. In case such person shall not so elect, then the said sum of $300, or such part thereof as the committee may think proper to appropriate, shall be used to procure a substitute in cases where a substitute can be procured thereby. And in case such person do not elect to enter such service, and no substitute can be procured for the sum appropriated for that purpose, then the sum of $300 or so much thereof as, together with the amount contributed by the person so drafted shall amount to $300 shall be paid to the proper officer to procure the exemption and release of such person from service under said draft; and, it being the true intent and meaning hereof, that the money hereby appropriated shall be expended for the purpose of procuring men for the military service of the United States, as well as to relieve the families of persons drafted. the said committee are hereby required and directed to expend said money for the procuring of substitutes in all cases, where a substitute can be procured for the amount appropriated for the relief of any person drafted.
Resolved, That any conscript accepting the relief contemplated by this action must accept it in lieu of all claims upon the city for the support of his family by weekly or monthly orders upon the "Relief Fund" in case he should elect to enter the service of the United States.
Alderman Hopkins offered the following as a substitute for the report of the Finance Committee.
Whereas, Under the conscription now being enforced in the city Buffalo, many persons who are the sole dependence of their families, will be separated from them, leaving them unprovided with any adequate means of support, which in many cases would be the means of extreme hardships and suffering.
And Whereas, The Legislature of the State of New York has given the Common Council of the cities the power to grant such pecuniary relief and assistance in such cases as may be necessary and proper and the amount of such relief shall be a city charge, Now therefore, for the purpose of alleviating the burden, and hardshisp [sic] of said conscripts and providing the necessary means for furnishing such assistance and relief, it is by the Common Council of the city of Buffalo.
Resolved, That the Mayor and Comptroller, be and they are hereby authorized and empowered to issue the bonds of the city, in such convenient sums as they may think proper, to the amount of $75,000, bearing interest at seven per cent., payable at the rate of $10,000 per year from and after July 1, 1866. That they be authorized to negotiate said bonds and deposit the proceeds thereof in the city Treasury, and the same shall be known as the Conscript Relief Fund, and shall be kept and paid out by said Treasurer, upon the checks or drafts of the committee appointed by this Council on the 6th day of October, 1862, who shall be charged with the duty of the distribution and payment or said fund, and the performance of the other duties specified in these resolutions. No part of said fund shall in any case be drawn or appropriated for any other purpose than for the relief of conscripts who enter the service and who have families or aged and infirm parents or relations dependent upon them for support, or substitutes of such conscripts who shall enter the military service of the United States under and in pursuance of said conscription, and the same shall be distributed as follows:
Said Committee shall inquire and ascertain the pecuniary condition of the families of such persons as may enter the military service of the United States as conscripts from the city of Buffalo, and shall afford such relief and pay over to such families such sums. from time to time, as in the opinion of said Committee such family shall necessarily require, during the time such conscript shall remain in the service; but such advance or relief shall in no case exceed in the aggregate the sum of $300 to any one family during said service, but in case any said conscript, who is the head of a family, having a child or children, or aged or infirm parents, or relations, entirely dependent on him for support, and who is not exempt, and shall not desire to enter said service, and shall furnish, or desire to furnish, a substitute, who shall be accepted and enter said service in his stead, such Committee shall inquire into the circumstances of such case and when it shall appear to said Committee that the family of such conscript would be entitled to relief under these resolutions—provided said conscript entered the service, and that said conscripts entering the service would be a case of peculiar hardship to his family—they shall be at liberty to pay to such substitutes, or their families, on his order, such sum from time to time, or at one time, as in the opinion of said Committee, the family of the conscript for whom such substitute enters the service would be entitles to receive under these resolutions, provided he had personally gone into said service, but such sum shall in no case exceed $300.
The resolutions offered by Ald. Hopkins, were lost, and those of Ald. Dayton and Walsh then adopted by a vote of 21 to 1.
The Chair appointed as the committee to distribute and apply the said sum of $75,000, Ald. Gates, Flach, Walsh, Yaw and Clark.
The committee appointed under the resolution of Ald. Gates to proceed to Albany for the purpose of securing to this city proper credit for men enlisted here, submitted the following report:
"That pursuant thereto the committee proceeded to Albany to procure the proper evidence of volunteers heretofore furnished under the previous calls for troops by the General Government.
"Under the requirements, as announced by Provost Marshal General Fry, the subject is not free from difficulties.
"The General Government admits that the State, under all former calls, furnished a surplus of about 5,000, which it has assumed, in making the draft of July, 1863, to allow and apportion to the different districts of the State. This seems to have been done regardless of the fact whether the particular district has furnished a surplus, or is chargeable with a deficiency under former calls. Thus 100 is allowed to the Erie County District, which has more than filled its former quota, while the Cattaraugus and Chautauqua Districts, and the St. Lawrence and Franklin Districts, both of which show large deficiencies under former calls, are each allowed 150 on the present draft. By this process the 5,000 surplus of the State is disposed of. After thus apportioning the surplus, the present draft is made by taking one-fifth of the enrolled men in each district and adding thereto 50 per cent for exemptions.
"In ascertaining and determining the number of volunteers and militia furnished by the respective districts, under the 12th Section of the Conscription Law, it will be borne in mind that previous to the call of July 1st, 1862, there were no quotas assigned to separate districts in this State. The entire number of troops required were furnished to fill the call, but it was done by voluntary enlistments throughout the State. That Erie County, under the call prior to July 1st, 1862, sent forward the 21st and 49th and 100th regiments, numbering over 2,700 men and various other companies and battalions, making in the aggregate more than its fair proportion, still as no quotas to counties or districts was in any way assigned, it is impracticable to show previous to the 1st of July call, the filling of any particular quota. It therefore becomes necessary to produce evidence of the surplus furnished by Erie County District, commencing under the 1st of July and 4th of August calls of 1862. Tie copy of such evidence obtained from the Adjutant General's office, duly certified by the Governor, is herewith returned. This evidence should, in our judgment, be forwarded by some proper representative to Washington, and we cannot doubt that a proper allowance for the surplus of volunteers will be made to said district by the National Authorities. All of which is respectfully submitted.
HORATIO SEYMOUR,
RICHARD FLACH,
ROBERT MILLS,
GEO B. GATES,
CHARLES E. YOUNG.
The evidence furnished by the Adjutant General shows that the quota of Erie county, under the July and August calls of 1862, was 2,195 three years men and 2,195 nine months men. The county has furnished to Nov. 7, 1862 3,406 three years men, and from Nov. 7, 1862, to Feb. 7, 1863, 1,062 men, making a total of 4,468 men furnished: a surplus of 78 above the quota. That since the 7th of February, 1863, to the 10th of August, 1863, the county has furnished 1,058 three years men which added to the surplus of 78 above named, gives 1,136 surplus over and above the calls of 1862.
The Chair was authorized to appoint a committee of two to proceed to Washington and confer with the authorities with reference to the quota of this city.
The various petitions asking relief from the draft were referred to the Committee on Finance.
The Council finally adjourned to Thursday evening next at 7 1/2 o'clock.

REVENUE DECISIONS IN RELATION TO SHIPBUILDING.—Buffalo feeing very largely interested in ship building, the following recent decisions by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, in relation to Ships, Masts and Spars, will be found of interest:
1st. The tax on ships and vessels of two per cent. Ad valorem is a tax on the whole value of the ship including all that goes to make it up, whether hull, cabin, masts, spars or rigging.
2. When masts and spars are constructed to order for a particular vessel, and are placed for use therein, they are not taxable under the general head of manufactures, but enter into the total value of the vessel to which they belong, paying 2 per cent. ad valorem.
3. But if masts or spars are produced as articles of commerce, or are sold as such; as in quantities or extra spars, not part of a vessel, but a resort in case of loss at sea, they are manufactures, and must be taxed as such 3 per cent. under the general clause of the act of Congress.
4. Boats built or constructed for the purpose of carrying coal, are to be taxed where built, and on their value where built; not on their value when they have reached their destination.
5. The proviso to the 69th section of the act of July 1st, 1862, is in these words: "That the taxes on all articles manufactured and sold in pursuance of contracts bona fide made before the passage of this act, shall be paid by the purchaser thereof, under the regulations to be established by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue" This proviso with all other special regulations of that act, is explicitly and in terms re-enacted and re-inserted in the act of march 3, 1863, by the proviso to section 37, "That the existing laws shall extend to and be in force as modified for the collection of the duties imposed by this act." etc., etc., "as fully and effectually as if every regulation penalty, forfeiture, provision, clause, matter and thing to that effect in the existing laws contained had been inserted in and reenacted by this act." It is, therefore, decided, that where a bona fide contract for the construction of a vessel was entered into for a specified sum before the 3d day of March, 1863, the tax of two per cent on such vessel shall be paid by contractor or purchaser thereof, and not by the builder."

THE ARGUMENT OF MR. WHITING.
The Express endorses, though in rather a sneaking manner, the views of Mr. Solicitor Whiting; calls his letter a "masterly argument" and him a "great lawyer," and defies the Courier to refute a single proposition of the document addressed by him to the Philadelphia Union League, which we published a few days ago.
The chief proposition of this "masterly argument" is that all the inhabitants of the South are now, and will be, even after the war, "public enemies," having "no rights, either state or personal," except the right to be hanged or other" wise punished at our earliest convenience. We say nothing of the monstrosity of this position as it relates to actual rebels even, who, if such a theory be adopted by the government, will be apt to postpone the execution of Mr. Whiting's sentence some time. Nor do we pause to consider the case of the loyalists of the South, who have suffered the loss of all things by clinging to the Union, while Mr. Whiting and his breed, clinging to the ship of State in the capacity of barnacles merely, have made great gain of their godliness. It is not to be expected that Mr. Whiting, a man of fourth-proof "loyalty," should reck what becomes of faithful and suffering white patriots.
But what shall be said of the "loyal blacks," who are thus swallowed up in the indiscriminate doom pronounced by Mr. Whiting upon all the inhabitants of the South? In another breath the "great lawer" [sic] says of this class that "the Government has invited them to share the dangers, the honors, and the advantages of sustaining the Union, and has pledged itself to the world for their freedom." So that a double feast is provided for the negroes of the South. They are invited at once to the "honors and advantages, &c," and to the good things in store for "public enemies." We do not claim to have refuted Mr. Whiting's leading proposition. It is absurd, as well as brutal. It refutes itself.
Mr. Whiting's theory of the war, which is also the theory of Chase, Sumner, Stanton and the whole pack of Revolutionists who form the radical wing of the Administration party, is, in brief, that the old Union is gone, never to be restored; that the Constitution is no more of force as a bond of national unity; that all State lines and State sovereignties at the South have been obliterated; that we are fighting to subjugate the South and liberate their slaves, and that when subjugation is completed the conquered people must either be held subject to military government, or their territory be colonized by negroes and Northerners, who shall at some future period construct new States on the ashes of the old. This is the programme of the entertainment to  which the people are now called by the radical party, to send in liberal contributions of men and money. We are impatient to hear the indignant response which the people will give at the earliest opened polls to such dishonorable and altogether infamous proposals. We tell these Revolutionists in advance, that even if their scheme did not involve contempt of the Constitution and insult to its framers—did not involve the violation of Mr. Lincoln's oath and reiterated pledges—did not involve the reversion of the solemn action of Congress—even if it involved none of these, the people would still scout it, for it is equivalent to a declaration of a new war, which has no end but chaos, and which would make the present struggle, by comparison, the mere pastime of a summers day. The war for the Union chastises the country indeed with whips, but the war of Mr. Whiting and his fellow Revolutionists would chastise it with scorpions.
It is not to be wondered that the majority of the Republican press hesitate to plant themselves squarely on the ground occupied by Solicitor Whiting. Aside from the New York Tribune and Forney's twin organs, the Chronicle of Washington and the Press of Philadelphia, the Express stands almost alone in this ultima thule of radicalism. But there are half way stages on the highway thither, which are abundantly patronized by an influential portion of the Republican party. It is contended, for instance, that the abolition of slavery must be made a condition in the reception of seceded States into the Union. The N. Y. Evening Post, of Wednesday, noticing the disposition of North Carolina to return to her former allegiance, says flatly that "there can be no re-admission of North Carolina into the Union with Slavery." Now we have to sat to these halting and compromising Revolutionists that there is no tenable half-way house on this road. The revolted States are either where they were when Mr. Lincoln declared that he had neither the power nor the will to interfere with their institutions and sovereignty, or they are where Mr. Whiting puts them. To the Express and all others who choose the latter conclusion, we commend the words of a member of the present Cabinet. We quote from a letter of Postmaster General Blair, addressed to a New York Committee who proposed to call a meeting to indorse the views expounded by Mr. Whiting:
"I do not concur in the proposition that certain States have been recently overturned and wholly subverted as members of the Federal Union,' upon which the call is based. This is, in substance, what the Confederates themselves claim; and the fact that secession is maintained by the authors of this call, for a different purpose, does not make it more constitutional, or prevent them from being actual aiders and abettors of the Confederates."
"Actual aiders and abettors of the Confederates," in very deed, are Mr. Whiting and all who support his "masterly argument." They are so recognized, South as well as North. "They curse the old Union, and despise it, and so do we," says Mr. Forsyth, one of the ablest of Southern writers, in an article from the Mobile Register, which we publish elsewhere. As we have said on a previous occasion, let there be a quick "division of the house" on this all important issue. Could our voice pierce through the cordon of fawning parasites that surrounds the President, we would implore him and his Cabinet to give a decisive utterance on the question which now surpasses all others in practical moment. "Eastern Virginia, Florida and Louisiana," says Mr. Whiting in his "masterly argument," "are now knocking at the door of Congress for admission into the Union." Why in Heaven's name is not the door opened; or rather, why is a knot of political banditti—thieves, fanatics, contractors—suffered to crowd around that open portal of the Constitution, making the scoundrelly [sic] pretence that the door is shut? If we wish to put down this rebellion, let us strike it, by a quick eager welcome of these knocking States, through the heart! If Mr. Whiting speaks the truth, we have reached a point where, for the administration to remain silent is a crime. Inaction is almost treason.

—FRED DOUGLAS issues a farewell address in the August number of his Monthly, which is hereby discontinued. Fred goes to help Gen. Thomas to organize negro regiments on the Mississippi.
[Correspondence of the Courier.]
THE TOWN MEETING IN NEWSTEAD.
NEWSTEAD, August 18, 1863.
MESSRS. EDITORS:—While the draft was impending, a deep and painful anxiety generally prevailed in this town, and a disposition was manifested by all, save a few party wire-pullers, to do something to mitigate the hardships of this lottery for human life."
It was proposed to the Town Board, on the 8th inst., to call a special town meeting by several tax-payers, to decide upon the proposition to issue the bonds of the town, bearing interest, and payable in equal instalments [sic] in two, three and four years, in sums of three hundred dollars, to each inhabitant of this town drafted and found liable to serve under "the Conscription Act." The members of the Board consulted (a majority) expressed a willingness to call the meeting, if petitioned for by a respectable number of taxpayers. Accordingly a meeting was called on the 8th inst., "by order of many citizens," to meet at Patrick's Hall, in Akron, on Monday evening, to consider the proper course to be pursued to promote the objects above stated, and the notice was read next day (being Sunday) in all the churches in town.
Near three hundred persons assembled at the hour appointed, and organized by choosing G. K. Lester, Chairman, and George Parsell, Secretary.

A. Prince introduced resolutions favoring the proposed action, and after full discussion by A. Prince, S Tabor, E. J. Newman, E. P. Goslin, G. K. Lester and L. W. Paxon, they were unanimously adopted. Our Supervisor and ex- Supervisor, who had opposed, were seemingly astounded by the ayes, and refused to vote alone, when the other side was called.
These two worthies found themselves in an ugly fix in the meeting, face to face with those who had heard them elsewhere either laud or condemn the same provisions of this law. With the rich it was as near right as possible. No law could suit everybody. In the presence of the poor, it was an unequal, unjust and oppressive law, but in the meeting they were mum about the law, assuming to know better what the Administration wanted than it did itself. "It wanted men and they were not willing to hire men to stay at home," (a very logical deduction to be drawn from the proposition before the meeting,) yet, our ex-officio intimated that he should hire his own son to stay at home if he drew a prize but "he did not ask any help."
The opinion prevailed in the meeting, that it was the duty of the Town Clerk to call a special town meeting upon the petition of twelve freeholders, and a committee was appointed to wait upon him to learn if he would call the meeting on the 14th inst., the day of the draft in this town, as requested in the resolutions passed. He replied that "he would call the meeting as requested, upon a proper petition, but that he felt it his duty to give eight days notice." The petition required was laid before him on the 11th instant. Still no meeting is noticed, and I understand that this reliable functionary has given out that none will be called. The Town Clique has so decided. Thus ended our town meeting. The poor must go to the war; the rich may go. The people have been defrauded and insulted by their own servants, and it remains to be seen whether it will be soon forgotten. Perhaps their loud professions of patriotism and loyalty, and their bitter denunciation of Democrats may fool somebody! The deception, double dealing and hypocrisy that has been so long and successfully practiced by these shoddy patriots is being unmasked by our trials, and presented to the indignant gaze of an outraged community. P.

DR. SMITH'S SERMON.—It will be seen by the following correspondence that the Army Committee of the Young Men's Christian Union have requested a copy of Dr. Smith's sermon, referred to yesterday, for publication; and we are pleased to add that arrangements have been made by which a large edition of this excellent sermon will be circulated gratuitously in the army and navy:

BUFFALO, Aug. 21, 1863.
To the Rev. Henry Smith, D. D.—
Dear Sir: The Army Committee of the Young Men's Christian Association, acting in behalf of the U. S. Christian Commission, at whose request you kindly delivered a sermon before a Union meeting of various churches of this city, on the day of our recent National Thanksgiving, believing that an extensive circulation of that sermon will be productive of great general good, most respectfully ask of you a copy of the same for publication by them, to be distributed especially among the brave men and officers of our army and navy. With high esteem, yours truly,
J. D. Hill, M. D.,                     Rev. John F. Ernst,
N. A. Halbert,                         Jason Sexton,
Frederick Gridley,                   Otis F. Presbrey,
S. D. Sykes,                S. H. Fish,
J. B. Sweet,                             Wm. L. French.
H. H. Otis,

BUFFALO, Aug. 21, 1863.
Gentlemen of "The Army Committee"—
Your favor, of this date/asking a copy of my Thanksgiving Sermon, preached at your request, in the interest of the U. S. Christian Commission, has been received.
The manuscript is no longer in my possession, having been yielded to other parties for publication. But if, in your judgment, an edition designed for distribution "especially among the brave men and officers of our army and navy," would contribute anything toward the furtherance of the great cause in which they are so nobly periling their lives, a copy will be cheerfully placed in your hands for that purpose.
I am, gentlemen, very faithfully yours,.
HENRY SMITH.
Messrs. Hill, Ernst, Sexton and others.

THE FORTY-SEVENTH MASSACHUSETTS.—This regiment, which was expected to arrive in Utica yesterday morning between 7 and 8 o'clock, did not come until 10 o'clock. The people had again made generous contributions of refreshments, which were served out to them during their half-hour's stay. The sick, of which there were about forty with the train, were provided with broth, jellies, wine, lemons and othere [sic] delicacies suited to their condition, and a number of kind ladies assisted in the distribution. The Major informed us that the regiment now numbered about 700 men, in addition to some 50 sick that have been left on the way. It numbered 970 when it arrived at New Orleans, about a year ego. It was mustered in by companies at different times last year, some of which have been in the service nearly a year, the entire regiment having been retained until the expiration of the time of the last company, July 31st—Some of the men complain of this treatment, it seems to us with reason, unless the emergencies of the campaign rendered their retention essential. The regiment has never been in battle, though some of the men have been permitted to have foretastes in the way of skirmishing. It was on guard duty at New Orleans the most of the time after its first arrival in that city. Some of  the officers told of a march up into the Teche region after it had been cleared out by our army; we did not inquire into the particulars. A fine brass band of sixteen performers is attached to the regiment. The following are the regimental officers:
Col. Lucius B. Marsh, Lieut. Col. Albert Stickney, Major Augustus S. Cushman, Adjutant Eli C. Kinsley, Quartermaster Geo. M. Nichols.
The Surgeon, Dr. BLACKMAN, was left sick at Cleveland, Ohio. The Lieutenant Colonel was left at Indianapolis, Ind., in the same condition. Only one of the men died on the way. One of the sick was left at this city, and is now being cared for at the City Hospital
Four companies of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts were raised at Boston, two at Cambridge, and other companies at Concord, Charlestown, and Attleboro.
We are indebted to Major CUSHMAN for copies of New Orleans papers.

ROME.—LIEUT. Col. ARMSTRONG has received instructions from the U. S. recruiting officer at Albany to sell at auction on Thursday, the barracks, buildings and fixtures at Camp Huntington.

FUNERAL OF NEW ENGLAND SOLDIERS.—Yesterday afternoon the funeral of three soldiers left here by returning New England regiments, took place from the General Hospital. The burial place was Forest Lawn, where an unexpectedly large concourse of people had assembled. Rev. Dr. Lord conducted the service at the graves and delivered a discourse which is spoken of by those who heard it as not only eminently appropriate to the occasion, but in a high degree eloquent,
Thus ten of the way-worn travelers from Port Hudson have gone home—but not to New England. Under the green sod of Forest Lawn, they rest from their labor and fever and wars.
We are told that of the twenty or thirty patients remaining, several are probably fated to die here, though all, yesterday, seemed much invigorated by the change in the weather.

To VISITORS AT THE HOSPITAL.—We are requested by the officers of the Buffalo General Hospital to state, that for the present no person can be admitted to the wards of the hospital to see the soldiers, except such persons as are required to attend upon the sick. Those visiting the hospital with delicacies or ... articles for the soldiers, are respectfully requested to leave them in the Reception Room, where they will be most thankfully received, and any inquiries that may be made in regard to any of the sick, will be answered. This becomes necessary on account of the feeble and prostrate condition of a number of the poor, worn out soldiers, who need quiet and rest.

ANOTHER REGIMENT THIS MORNING.—The following dispatch was received at the Utica Telegraph Office last evening:
BUFFALO, Aug. 21, 1863.
JOHN J. FLANAGAN:
The 48th Massachusetts will leave Buffalo at 12 o'clock to-night. They have taken supper at Erie, and will not eat here. The ladies of Utica will be appreciated if they do by them as by other regiments. There are 690 in all, of whom 30 are sick. W. L. DOYLE, Operator.
And now good ladies, good citizens, it is necessary that you should hurry in your contributions to the Fuller House, and that they should, in the matter of bread and meats, be very liberal. Sliced meats are especially wanted; the previous supply is exhausted; they are what the brave soldiers relish most and need most; send in all you can prepare. The regiment will probably reach here about 9 or 9 1/2 o'clock this morning; hence the donations should be sent to the place designated as early as 8 o'clock. Let us be quite ready to extend to the 48th Massachusetts hospitalities equal to those of last evening to the 49th.
The Business Committee are requested to meet at the Fuller House at 8 o'clock this morning. The 49th Massachusetts.—It was about fifteen minutes before eight o'clock last evening when the 49th Massachusetts regiment arrived at the depot on a train of twenty cars. The vigilant committee and their vigilant aids had made their preparations on a more extensive scale than heretofore, in order that the large regiment of 715 men might be suitably accommodated and refreshed. The long neat tables were again put up in and east of the depot, and lengthened some hundreds of feet. Below the depot where the gas fixtures were not, the kerosene lamps of Wide Awake and Little Giant days were thickly distributed and made to assist in dispersing the darkness of the hour and place. Contributions had come in liberally, and before the train arrived the tables were supplied with cheerful crockery, and abundantly laden with yet more cheerful food. Besides the usual complement of coffee, biscuits, sandwiches, cakes, and meats, there were platters heaped with warm boiled potatoes, a good supply of different varieties of pickles, pies and other niceties—a feast fit to make all who locked upon it hungry. The ladies who lent their assistance never looked more kind and smiling, and many of them stood ready to wait on the sick, with wines and cordials, and such other delicacies as were needed.
Such a crowd as was at the depot, to see and greet the 49th, has not been there since the reception of the 14th and 26th regiments. The people began to gather before 7 o'clock, and continued to flock depot-ward until the number was estimated at five or sis thousand. It was found expedient, in consequence of the press, to detail a number of the 14th Heavy Artillery to stand guard and keep the thousands outside the prescribed boundaries.
The regiment was greeted with cheers, and thunders from DUNN & MORRISON'S battery on its arrival, and responded with other cheers and martial music. It was pleasant to see the soldiers faces light up as they looked over the well-spread tables and smelt the fragrance of the coffee cups. They had had nothing to eat since morning, at Buffalo. As they filed out of the cars and into position it was remarked by many that a finer appearing body of soldiers had not been seen in Utica. A much more stalwart regiment physically than most others, it also appears to have considerably more than its share of intelligence; and as to their faces the ladies were charmed. And such cheery prattle and bustle as these good ladies distributed among the handsome soldier faces cannot be out-did by any other ladies of any other town; of this we are absolutely certain; and the owners of the handsome faces will remember them to the everlasting honor of Utica—we heard them say they would. They had received handsome treatment, they said, at Buffalo, Cleveland, and other places along their route, but Utica was ahead—Utica ladies did beat all. And so it is no wonder that they went off cheering vociferously for the ladies of Utica. Although not deputized to do so, we think we can safely take the responsibility of thanking the ladies of Utica, in behalf of Utica, for contributing so much to our good name. And they will do in like manner again to-day, of course, and whenever there is occasion. Some of the ladies had prepared pretty bouquets, and did not forget to distribute them.
The field officers of the 49th Massachusetts are:
Col. W. F. Bartlett, of Boston; Lieut. Col. S. P. Sumner, of Great Barrington; Major Charles T. Plunkett, of Pittsfield; Adjt. B. C. Mifflin, of Boston; Quartermaster H. B. Brewster, of Pittsfield; Surgeon E. Winsor, of Boston; Asst. Surgeon A. R. Rice, of Springfield.
The Colonel, Lieut. Colonel and Adjutant were wounded in the assault on Port Hudson on the 27th of May, and have not been in the service since. Major PLUNKETT, a splendid looking officer, some inches over six feet tall, was in command. The other officers were not much behind him in fine looks. Citizens who looked after the sick inform us that they were all very comfortable, and better cared for than those of the previous regiments have been. They say that Surgeons Winsor and RICE are evidently just the men for their positions, and deserving of the highest credit.
The 49th Massachusetts was mostly raised in Berkshire county, Mass. It was mustered in with 960 men at Pittsfield August 18th, 1862, for nine months, and has therefore served three months over its time. Before going to the seat of war, it did provost duty about a month at New York city. It went to New Orleans with the rear of the BANKS' expedition, remained about two weeks in the Crescent City, then proceeded to Carrolton, then to Baton Rouge, at or near which place it continued until the investment of Port Hudson. It was at the latter place with the advance of the besieging army, and there constituted a part of the 1st Brigade of the 1st (Gen. AUGUR'S) Division. The regiment was engaged in the first assault on Port Hudson, May 27th, and fought with conspicuous gallantry. Its brigade was commanded by Gen. Chapin, of Buffalo, who was killed. Its Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel and Adjutant were wounded in the same engagement, as we have stated. Col. BARTLETT who had before this been attached to the 20th Massachusetts, and had lost a leg at Yorktown, was the only officer who went into the fight mounted, and thus became a special mark for the rebel bullets; he was hit in the foot and arm. Sixty per cent. of the officers of the regiment engaged were either killed or wounded, and thirty-three per cent. of the privates. In the assault of the 14th of June the regiment also bravely participated, and lost 40 men. After the surrender of Port Hudson, it went to Donaldsonville, and assisted in the fight at that place of the 13th of July, losing about 30 men. Is had returned to New Orleans with the expectation of returning home by way of the Gulf and Ocean, when on the 9th instant it received orders to move up the Mississippi. It reached Cairo so as to leave that place on Tuesday last, and see, hear, taste, impliment [sic] and cheer for Utica last night,

ARRIVAL OF THE 49TH MASSACHUSETTS.—About 6 o'clock yesterday the 49th Massachusetts Regiment arrived at the depot on their homeward journey, and were treated to a bountiful breakfast by the unwearied Committee on Reception. The 40th was raised in Berkshire county, Mass., and was originally 979 strong; it numbers now 745 men. The Colonel, Wm. F. Bartlett, wounded, and Lieut. Col. Samuel B. Sumner, sick, were left behind, and the regiment is under command of Major Charles T. Plunkett. The Adjutant is B. C. Mifflin; Assistant Surgeon, Rice; Quartermaster, M. H. Brewster. The regiment has forty-eight sick. These were kindly cared for, and about 9 o'clock the train moved eastward, amid enthusiastic cheers of the refreshed and comforted soldiers.

ARRIVAL OF RETURNING REGIMENTS.—The 53d Massachusetts and 23d Connecticut regiments passed through the city on their way home, since our last. The first reached the city between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday night. They did not stand in immediate need of refreshments, having supped at Erie a short time before. The committee were at their post, however, and ministered to the wants of the sick. The officers of this regiment are—Colonel, J. W. Kimball; Lieut. Col., Geo. H. Barrett; Major, Jas. A. Pratt; Adjt., Henry A. Willis; Quartermaster, Edward A. Brown; Chaplain, B. F. Whitemore; Surgeon, J. Q. A. McColester; Assistant Surgeon, Mr. Bond. The Regiment, when organized, was 934 strong, and now numbers 645 men, including five or six left at various points on the way, and about fifty sick at this place. None of those on the sick list are dangerously ill. The 53d participated in the terrible charges on Port Hudson in May and June. The loss in officers was three Captains and three Lieutenants. Both officers and men are now doing well. The 23d Conn. arrived about 11 o'clock yesterday forenoon, and not having been so fortunate as their friends of 53d, were in a condition to do ample justice to the bountiful repast provided for them by the kind committee and citizens. It numbers between seven and eight hundred, and has not suffered as severely as most of the other nine months' regiments. In the fight at Brashear City seven companies were captured, and the officers of four of them are now prisoners in Texas. Col. C. L. Holmes, who has been at home some time on sick leave, came west and met the regiment here.
The following "card of thanks" is from the officers of the 23d:
BUFFALO, Aug. 23, 1863.
The officers and soldiers of the 23d Conn. Regiment would take this method to express their gratitude and pleasure to the citizens of Buffalo for the kind greeting and sympathy, and the excellent repast received at the hands of the committee at the depot, and we beg leave to assure them that the kind and delicate attention of the ladies of the city to the sick of the regiment will ever be gratefully remembered by them, and from many a Connecticut mother's and wife's and sister's heart the grateful prayer shall rise to the soldiers' God that their kindness may be repaid by tenfold blessings, and the sweet consciousness of a labor of love well performed.
C. W. WORDEN, Lieut.-Col. Command'g.
DAVID H. MILLER, Major.
J. H. WHITING, Adjutant.
C. W. HALL, Quartermaster.
Wm. H. TROWBRIDGE, Surgeon.

THE CONSCRIPTION RELIEF COMMITTEE.—The Conscription Relief Committee may be found at the Council Chamber each afternoon, ready to receive applications for assistance. The Committee require the observance of the following regulations:
Before recording any application, the conscript shall have submitted himself to examination by the Board and been declared liable and able to perform military duty. A book has been prepared, in which the applicant is required to record his residence, age, where employed, amount of wages, habits, trade or occupation, and the amount of rent paid. He must also give the names, ages, occupation and wages of the several members of his family dependent on him for support. He is also obliged to answer, in writing, the following questions:
Does the applicant belong to any benevolent association?
If applicant is married, when, where and by whom?
Has he property, real or personal, and of what value?
Has his family property, real or personal, and of what value?
Who is owner or agent of the house in which he lives?

THE CONSCRIPTION RELIEF COMMITTEE.—The committee are holding meetings at the Council Chamber every afternoon, and, as yet, few applications for relief have been made.—The committee require, before recording any application, that the conscript shall have submitted himself to examination by the Board and been declared liable and able to perform military duty. A book has been prepared, in which the applicant is required to record his residence, age, where employed, amount of wages, habits, trade or occupation, and the amount of rent paid. He must also give the names, ages, occupation and wages of the several members of his family dependent on him for support. He is, also, obliged to answer, in writing, the following questions:—
Does the applicant belong to any benevolent association?
If applicant is married, when, where and by whom?
Has he property, real or personal, and of what value?
Has his family property, real or personal, and of what value?
Who is owner or agent of the house in which he lives?
This record having been completed, the committee at once investigate the case. The theory is that every conscript can do something for himself, and that they will aid those who cannot leave their families or procure substitutes. This information will be valuable to conscripts who propose to make application for aid.

The following CARD OF THANKS, issued by the Commanding Officer and Staff on behalf of the Regiment, speaks for itself :—
Buffalo, Aug. 23, 1863.
The officers and soldiers of the 23d Connecticut Regiment would take this method to express their gratitude and pleasure to the citizens of Buffalo for the kind greeting and sympathy and the excellent repast received at the hands of the Committee at the Depot, and we beg leave to assure them that the kind and delicate attention of the ladies of the city to the sick of the Regiment will ever be gratefully remembered by them, and from many a Connecticut mother's and wife's and sister's heart the grateful prayer shall rise to the soldier's God that their kindness may be repaid by ten-told blessings and the sweet consciousness of a labor of love nobly performed.
For the Regiment,
C. W. WORDEN, Lieut.-Col. Comd'g.
DAVID H. MILLER, Major.
J. H. WHITING, Adjutant.
C. W. HALL, Quartermaster.
WM. H. TROWBRIDGE, Surgeon.

OFFICE OF THE SOLDIER'S RECEPTION COMMITTEE, N. Y. C. RR. DEPOT,
August 21, 1863.
The citizens of Buffalo are informed that three more regiments will pass through this city between this time and Monday next.
The Committee need the following articles to supply these regiments: boiled potatoes, baked apples, pickled beets and other pickles, boiled eggs, &c.
A supply of these articles will enable them to sustain the reputation for hospitality to soldiers that the city has already acquired. The first regiment will arrive early to-morrow morning.

RETURN OF A NINE MONTHS' REGIMENT.—The 52d Massachusetts Regiment, seven hundred strong, arrived in this city at nine o'clock yesterday morning. This regiment was with Banks's army, and suffered all the privations incident to the campaign ending in the fall of Port Hudson. Their uniforms are much the worse for wear, and the men look as though the application of soap and water would be quite acceptable to improve their "physiogs."

THE DAILY COURIER.
TUESDAY MORNING, AUG. 18, 1863.
THE $75,000 APPROPRIATION.
The Common Council, yesterday, with creditable unanimity, authorized the issuing of the bonds of the city to the amount of $75,000, to afford relief to the families of married conscripts in indigent circumstances, and appointed a committee consisting of Aldermen Gates, Flach, Walsh, Clark and Yaw, to disburse this fund. It will require the most judicious management and the closest investigation to derive the greatest posible [sic] amount of public benefit from this small appropriation. If applied simply to paying exemption fees, the fund will relieve only two hundred and fifty men; but we are satisfied that adequate relief can be furnished from the $75,000 to five hundred conscripts.
We suggest that the committee should at once adopt certain rules to govern their action, which should be printed for the information of the public, and that the Aldermen in the several wards should lend their active co-operation in investigating applications for aid. The object of the appropriation is to mitigate cases of actual suffering, and to assist laboring men with large families in procuring substitutes. Every good citizen should take pleasure in assisting the committee, whose labors at the best will be arduous, in affording the greatest practicable amount of relief.

[Correspondence Buffalo Express.]
The Returning Soldiers in Erie.
ERIE, August 8, 1863.
A. M.CLAP, ESQ.—Dear Sir: Perceiving no notice in your truly excellent paper, which circulates largely in Erie county, of the kind manner in which the returning soldiers from the Southwest have been received and entertained by the Ladies' Aid Society of this city, assisted, of course, by gentlemen, I desire to make mention of the fact in your columns, that on Tuesday of last week the 24th Maine regiment, and on Thursday the 15th New Hampshire and 26th Maine regiments were treated to bountiful repasts. The utmost good feeling was manifested on each occasion, and the gratitude of the brave soldiers for these exhibitions of interest and regard was expressed with a frequency and fervency which precluded all doubt of its sincerity. The regiments departed pronouncing blessings upon the good ladies of Erie and upon the Keystone State whose hospitality and patriotism they have so well represented. The same attention will be bestowed upon the regiments expected to pass down the Lake Shore Railroad, homeward, during next week. ERIE.

The 28th Maine regiment, nine months men, from Port Hudson, passed through here at 6 o'clock last evening, on their way home, on a special train of seventeen cars.
The 47th Massachusetts volunteers left Buffalo at ten o'clock last evening, on a special train of twenty-three cars and are expected to pass through here at about six o'clock this morning.
All of the above regiments have a number of sick with them, in cars devoted especially to their use.

From the Democratic Union.
VERY SELFISH.—The Dispatch editor finds fault with us because we purchased a paper at the book-store containing the list of drafted men in this County, and furnished the most of our subscribers with EXTRA UNIONS on Friday. This is remarkable selfishness, though characteristic of our Dispatch neighbor.
The editor of the Union is laboring under a misapprehension. We did not find fault because he purchased one of our Extras to copy for his readers, but because he was so "selfish" that he would not give the proper credit. His "selfishness" caused him to appropriate matter which cost us no little pains and expense to procure, while his pride would not allow him to acknowledge to whom he was indebted for it. He wished to deceive his readers in the country into believing that he had equal enterprise and facilities with the DISPATCH, while it is well known that he issued no Extras to his readers in this place, for the evident reason that the same deception could not be used upon them. They would know where he obtained his copy. It will be seen from this where the "selfishness" lies.
But there is one point of considerable importance which he omits to mention in his item on "Enterprise," and that is, that it took him some eight hours to issue his Extra, it being after 10 o'clock at night when it appeared, while this office accomplished the same work in four hours!
We received the list of names between three and four P. M. on Thursday, and commenced printing Extras about half-past nine—six hours from the time of commencement. The Union editor, we are informed, was at his office between five and six o'clock, Friday morning, making preparations to issue an Extra to his readers in the county, and succeded [sic] according to his own confession, in getting off only a few packages for the afternoon mail, which leaves here at 4 o'clock—nine hours, or more, after  commencement. Thus it will be seen that in this, also, the "Enterprise," if any, was on the part of the DISPATCH.

SIXTEENTH NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT.—Another regiment, the 16th New Hampshire, arrived here between three and four o'clock yesterday afternoon. They were properly taken care of by the refreshment committee at the depot, and left for Concord at six o'clock. The 18th is officered as follows: Colonel, James Pike; Lieut. Colonel, H. W. Fuller; Major, Samuel Davis, jr.; Adjutant, L. T. Townsend; Chaplain, R. M. Manly; Surgeon, Cyrus M.  Fiske; Quartermaster, A. N. Brown. The 16th Regiment was organized in Merrimac county, New Hampshire, and went into the service about 850 strong. It left Fort Hudson with about 550 men, some 75 of whom were left at Vicksburg, Cairo and other points along the route. Nearly a hundred men of the regiment are scattered in various directions, most of them probably alive. The remaining two hundred died from disease contracted in the swamp of Butte la rose, and aggravated in the vicinity of Port Hudson. The loss in officers was as follows:
Captain Buffum, of Co. I; Lieutenant Jones Co. E; Lieut. Baker, Co. F; Lieut. Wilds, Co. K; and Assistant Surgeon Campbell. Several of the men were sick on their arrival here, and ten of them were sent to the hospital. Among the warrant officers of the regiment was Sergeant Major Chas. J. Wright, formerly a resident of this city, who has a large number of friends
here. He was formerly a pupil in Central School.

ARRIVAL OF THREE REGIMENTS FROM THE SOUTHWEST.—The Fourth Massachusetts Regiment arrived here from Port Hudson yesterday morning, about half past three o'clock, over the Lake Shore Railroad, and were informally received by the citizen's reception committee, at the Central Depot. After the sick were well taken care of, the regiment departed for Rochester, at which point, in accordance with arrangements made by Superintendent Chittenden, of the New York Central, a bountiful repast was prepared for them. The Regiment was officered as follows: Lieut. Col. Colby, Major Chas. Howard, Quartermaster Lathrop, Adjutant Crocker, Surgeon Waldock, Assistant Surgeon J. F. Gould. The Regiment when organized numbered 996 men. It left Port Hudson with 650 strong, and left some 60 sick at different points on the way. About the same number were sick at this point. The Fourth has evidently seen hard service.
The Twenty-eighth Maine Regiment arrived here about 5 o'clock on the same morning from Port Hudson, and were most bountifully entertained at the Central Depot by the Citizens' Committee, and citizens generally. Their officers are, Col. E. W. Woodman; Lieut-Col. W. E. Hadlock; Major ___ ___, killed at Fort Donelson; Adjutant Cutter; Surgeon Lake; Quartermaster Merrill. The regiment left Maine in September, 1862, 950 strong, as nine months men, and now return 615 in number, including 64 sick left at different points on the way. There were about 60 on the sick list at this point, three of whom were sent to the General Hospital. The men cheered lustily for the citizens of Buffalo as the train moved out of the Depot.
A little after 8 o'clock last evening the Forty-Seventh Massachusetts Regiment arrived, and were greeted by a large assemblage at the depot. Ample preparations had been made for their entertainment, and the good things with which the tables were loaded had justice done them.—The officers of the Regiment are: Colonel, Lucius B. Marsh of Boston; Lieut. Colonel, Albert Stickney of Cambridge; Major, Austin S. Cushman, New Bedford; Adjutant, Eli Kingsley, Cambridge; Quarter Master, George N. Nichols, Boston; Captain Clark; Surgeon Blackmer, Somerville; Assistant, Mercer, Boston. The Regiment was recruited in and around Boston, and originally numbered 976 men, and is now about 780 strong. Fifty men were left at New Orleans and other places, sick, and about 40 were on the sick list here. The Regiment spent a large portion of its time in New Orleans, but more recently had been held as a reserve force at Camp Parapet, near Port Hudson. The Regiment was accompanied by a brass band of eighteen pieces, composed of men selected from the ranks, and looked well, perhaps better than any that has passed through the city from the Southwest. The train bearing them eastward took its departure at about 9 o'clock.

DEATH OF SOUTH-WESTERN SOLDIERS.—Five of the soldiers recently returned from the Southwest died at the General Hospital yesterday. Two of them belonged to the 15th New Hampshire regiment, two the 16th New Hampshire; and one the 26th Maine.

MILITARY TRANSFER.—The company of cavalry from Elmira, Capt. Morgan, which has been on duty at Fort Porter for the past two weeks, left the city Saturday for Dunkirk, to act as Provost Guard during the draft in that place.

A REQUEST FROM MAJOR JENNINGS.—Major Jennings, commanding the troops at Fort Porter, requests that contributions of food for his men, be handed hereafter to the surgeon. Some of the soldiers have eaten too freely of the good things sent them by the ladies, and have been made sick in consequence.

GENERAL AID SOCIETY FOR THE ARMY.—BUFFALO, July 17th, 1863.
We wish every soldier languishing on battle-field or in hospital could have witnessed the scene at our Aid Rooms this morning. A deputation of young girls called upon the President and handed her the proceeds of a Festival, which came off in a Cooper shop on Elk street, which was decorated for the occasion, and dignified by the name of "Cooper Union."
The result of this enterprise, as seen by the communication below, considering the time and the number engaged, compares favorably with its great predecessor. We can hardly find words to express our gratitude at the multiplied evidences of confidence in us and interest in our cause.
BUFFALO, July 17.
MRS. PRESIDENT:—We, the little Misses of the First Ward, held a Festival, and hand you the proceeds, which amount to $71 61, to be used for the sick and wounded soldiers.
Miss MARIA MELVIN, President.
Miss KATIE JOHNSON, Vice-Pres.
Miss LAVANCHA STANAND, Sec'y.
Miss GEORGIANA HUME,
Miss EMMA HAYWARD,
Miss ETTA HAYWARD,
MISS LOUISA GOODWIN,
Miss SARAH BIDWELL,
Committee of Arrangements.

A MEETING AT CLARENCE.
The citizens of Clarence have been agitating the question whether it was not practicable to make some arrangement to equalize the burdens of the conscription. The following notice was posted for a meeting:—

READ AND TELL YOUR NEIGHBORS.
All persons enrolled for the coming draft are requested to meet at Clarence Centre next Saturday, Aug. 8th, 1863, at 3 o'clock, p.m., for the purpose of devising means whereby we may avoid paying Three Hundred Dollars each, by making it more on an equality with all concerned. Come out, one and all, and let us see what we can do.
Those not liable to the draft are requested to come and assist in making the arrangements.
Dated Clarence, Aug. 6th, 1863.
By order of many citizens.
Before the holding of this meeting, the following petition to the Town Board was circulated and signed by some thirty or forty tax-payers of the town, among whom were J. B. Bailey, J. H. Magoffin, Orsamus Warren, Charles Seib, H. B. Ransom, P. Heath, Lyman A. Parker and David Van Tine:—
We, the undersigned citizens of the town of Clarence, county of Erie and State of New York, would respectfully petition the Town Board to call a special town meeting forthwith, for the purpose of taking a vote upon the proposition to raise by tax the sum of $300 for each man who may be drafted from this town in the coming draft.
On Saturday, some one hundred and fifty citizens assembled at the village; but. the Republicans immediately assumed the most violent hostility to the project which many of them had before indorsed. The petition above was presented to the Supervisor by a Committee, but he refused to call the meeting on the ground that the Administration wanted men, not money, and that it was not exactly "loyal" to pay exemption fees, when blood and muscle were demanded.
The town meeting, of course, fell through, but the young men organized a club for mutual protection, each member paying in $50 to a common fnud [sic]. As in Aurora, the young men, without distinction of party, favored the raising of the money, and the Republicans opposed it. Of course, all the Republicans, drafted in Clarence, will go to the war without a murmur. They would net be guilty of buying themselves or their sons off, since the Administration wants "men not money."
On Saturday, some one-hundred and fifty citizens assembled at the village; but the Republicans immediately assumed the most violent hostility to the proejct [sic] which many of them had before indorsed. The petition above was presented to the Supervisor by a committee, but he refused to call the meeting on the ground that the Administration wanted men, not money, and that it was not exactly "loyal" to pay exemption fees, when blood and muscle were demanded.
The town meeting, of course, fell through, but the young men organized a club for mutual protection, each member paying $50 to a common fund. As in Aurora, the young men, without distinction of party, favored the raising of the money, and the Republicans opposed it. Of course, all the Republicans, drafted in Clarence, will go to the war without a murmur.—They would not be guilty of buying themselves or their sons off, since the Administration wants "men not money."

Correspondence of the Buffalo Morning Express.
EAST AURORA, Aug. 7, 1863.
MR. A. M. CLAPP:—SIR: Yesterday the town of Elma (or a part of it,) resolved to call a special town meeting to vote a tax on the town to help pay the commutation of drafted men. It was amusing to see with what zeal certain wealthy individuals, who have always been opposed to the war, labored to carry the thing through. They are willing to contribute, or be taxed, to any extent, to keep men out of the army, but not one cent would they give to have men go into it. There are three classes who favor the measure—first were nearly all those enrolled in the first class, second, the unprincipled near relatives of those liable under this draft, and last (but not least, either in zeal or influence) were the Copperheads. This combination will undoubtedly carry the town in favor of the tax, although it will not receive the votes of the representatives of one third of the property of the town. It was not the fear of taxation that caused the better class of citizens to oppose it, for they were willing to vote any sum to induce men to go into the army, but did not think it good policy to vote anything to induce them to stay out of it. It is thought by some that there may hereafter be some little difficulty about the matter. It is one thing to vote the tax and another to get the money. The town has no authority to vote such a tax and it will require an act of the legislature to make it valid. In the mean time some one will have to advance the money and take the bonds of the town, and run the risk of their being made valid by the Legislature. Capitalists recollect how unanimous the last Legislature were in legalizing the action of towns to fill up the ranks of the defenders of the Union, and are not so sure that the next will favor an opposite policy, that they wish to invest very largely in such risks. Several have been heard to say that they will not give ten per cent. of the face of the bonds for them. In the town of Aurora, the same classes have taken the same action.
In this movement the cloven-foot is fairly obtruded to view. It is a sheer device of the enemies of the government, which we trust will not be allowed to prevail. There would be some propriety in raising money by a tax upon the people, with which to pay bounties to those who are drafted and will go or furnish substitutes, or to aid in the support of the families of those who enter the service, but to tax the property of our citizens to keep men away from a service which is in absolute need of greater strength, is a little too preposterous to be seriously entertained by any loyal mind. It is nothing more nor less than giving aid and comfort to the enemy. The hope of securing legal sanction to such a performance we think will be vain. The Legislature will scarcely lend itself to a measure of such doubtful propriety, unless it shall be composed of men who desire to see this government overthrown, which is scarcely probable. Without this sanction, the bonds issued by the town to raise monies for such a purpose, would be no better than the bonds of Mississippi that were repudiated by Jeff Davis, or than Confederate script itself. We hope that the people of Erie County will do all in their power to fill the ranks of the army, and nothing to diminish its numerical strength under the draft. This much is simple duty to the country.

MEETING TO ARRANGE FOR FEEDING REGIMENTS.—The meeting at FULLER'S Hotel, last evening, for the purpose of perfecting arrangements for supplying all regiments that may pass through this city with  refreshments, was well attended. JAMES H. READ was chosen Chairman, and HENRY W. CHASE, Secretary. A Committee consisting of E. A. HAMMOND, JOSEPH A. SHEARMAN, H. W. CHASE, JAMES E. HITCHCOCK, THOS. FOSTER and JOHN G. BROWN was appointed to collect funds for the object proposed. A Business Committee of twelve was also appointed to take the whole charge of collecting, receiving and distributing provisions for the passing regiments. The following gentlemen constitute the Committee:—
J. H. Read, H. W. Fuller, Hugh Crocker, A. D. Crocker, Horace Barnard, Homer Townsend, John Munn, M. T. Meeker, E. H. Roberts, Thos. Van Embergh, N. A. White and J. H. Prentiss.
The Business Committee request persons who wish to assist in the good work, to send in donations of bread, meats, and such other articles as will refresh and cheer the soldiers, to FULLER'S Hotel or the store of J. H. READ, as soon as possible, whenever the coming of regiments is announced.
—We learn by telegraph from Buffalo that the 28th Connecticut Regiment left that city this morning at 8 o'clock. The regiment numbers 454 men, and 30 sick. They will pass through this city about 6 1/2 o'clock this P. M.
All persons desirous of contributing articles to be dispensed to the regiments that are to pass through this city are requested to send to the store of J. H. READ or the FULLER House, blackberry wine, jellies, pickles and cold meats other than hams. Such articles should be sent before 6 o'clock to-day for the regiment which will arrive this evening, and by noon to-morrow for the other two regiments which are expected to arrive.

FUNERAL OF THE NEW ENGLAND SOLDIERS—DR. LORD'S ADDRESS.—Monday afternoon at half-past 4 o'clock, under a bright but cool August sky, in the beautiful Forest Lawn Cemetery, and in the presence of a large collection of some of our most respectable citizens, among whom we saw many ladies, appropriate funeral solemnities were performed at the graves of the returning New England soldiers, who have recently died in the Buffalo General Hospital.
Of the forty-three soldiers that have been left there by the returning regiments up to last evening, thirteen have died. The body of but one, we believe, has been taken to his home, and the rest have been buried here. Their names and residences are as follows:
Levi L. Tyrrel, Littleton, N. H., 15th Regt., Co. C.
W. L. Stanton, Salem,        "         "      "              K.
Henry Cook, Campton,      "         "      "              B.
John Hill, N. Barnstead,     "         "      "              G.
Henry Baker, Goshen,        "      16th   "               F.
James H. Dowes, Lebanon, "        "      "              E.
Joseph W. Morton, Rockland, Me., 26th "           F.
Minot N. Barnes, Camden,       "        "    "           F.
J. Warren Curtiss, Monroe,       "        "    "          G.
James B. Newell, Searsmont,   "         "    "          F.
Nathaniel Frye, Warren,            "     24th  "          B.
Charles W. Turner,                    "        "    "          G.
Henry W. Gladden, Mass., 52d.
The clergyman who officiated on the occasion, was the Rev. John C. Lord, D. D. of the Central Presbyterian Church, who threw his great power and great heart into an eloquent address and prayer, which brought tears to many an eye. Below, we give the substance of the address, from which the reader may form some idea of its effect, when accompanied by the impassioned manner and fine delivery of the distinguished gentleman.
For the satisfaction of the families and friends of the soldiers who, born in different States of the Union, have, on returning from a most severe but triumphant campaign in the South-west, found an asylum in the Buffalo General Hospital, it may not be out of place here to add, that the Hospital is a noble institution, erected by the citizens of Buffalo for the reception of the sick and unfortunate of all religions and nationalities, is new, spacious and cleanly, situated in the highest and healthiest part of our healthy city, and is under the care of able surgeons and physicians and experienced nurses. The latter have been constantly aided by some of bur most respectable ladies, who, like ministering angels, have visited the Hospital, and stood over and tended the suffering soldier, as if he were a son or brother.

SUBSTANCE OF REV. DR. LORD'S ADDRESS.
It is a solemn thing to look upon the face of the dead; it is a solemn thing to look into the grave's mouth, to hear that word from Heaven proclaimed in the ears of the Hebrew prophet three thousand years ago, and which has come down the line of centuries to us, "The voice said cry! and I said what shall I cry?" "all flesh is grass, and the goodness thereof as the flower of the field when it withereth." But upon this occasion, when we are about to consign to the dust the bodies of these young strangers, soldiers in their country's cause, dying in our Hospital, within a day's journey of home and kindred, the case is one to excite our deepest emotions, and touch the sympathies of every hearer in this large assembly who have come here to-day to testify their respect for the dead.
For these departed soldiers what longing eyes have been looking out of the windows of New England habitations,—what ears have been attentive to hear their familiar tread! Wives and mothers, fathers and children, waiting for them as those that "look for the morning." Alas! what tidings of sickness and death fall heavily on the expectant households, whose loved ones we bury to-day, far from the familiar faces of their kindred, far from the graves of their fathers, with strangers standing around their graves, and not a solitary mourning relative to aid in the last sad offices of burial. God help and comfort the wives and mothers whose husbands and children we commit to the dust to-day, the victims of a causeless and wicked rebellion. Victims did I say?—rather should I call them martyrs—martyrs for their country and its laws, for God and liberty. If they have not fallen in the front rank of battle with their laces to the foe, as many gallant men have done whose mortal remains have heretofore been laid in this beautiful cemetery [sic], yet have these men also faced death on the battle field, they have stood in the "deadly imminent breach," they have breasted the cannon's mouth at Fort Hudson and Vicksburg, they have pitched their tents in the pestilential swamps of Mississippi and Louisiana, and as a result of these perils and their exposure have found their graves with us, so near their waiting homes and kindred. Looking down upon these coffins, considering all the dreadful results of this war, which has made fifty thousand wives widows, and innumerable mothers childless; which has devastated with fire and sword so large a portion of our country, we are compelled to believe that the originators of this rebellion against the best government on earth, the men whose pride and haughtiness, whose lust of power and place have caused such fearful calamities [sic], must suffer a penalty commensurate with their crime. It does not become me as a gospel minister nor you as a christian people, to utter imprecations against the guilty, however great their guilt, but we cannot fail in the light of the divine Word find Providence to believe that a suitable retribution awaits the originators of this unholy revolt as certainly as Heaven has judgments and God has thunderbolts.
One thing I should say here by way of consolation to the friends of our deceased brethren whose mortal remains we are about to commit to the earth; all has been done for them that their nearest kindred and dearest friends could have done. Nothing has been wanting. Our citizens have provided everything that they could have done had the case been that of their own sons; the best medical attendance, the most careful nursing, and more than this, the presence and sympathy and care of many of the noble women of our city, who, forsaking the comforts and elegencies [sic] of their houses, have devoted themselves with admirable christian charity to the care of the sick soldiers day and night. May God abundantly reward them and fulfill to them that royal word "blessed are the merciful for they shall obtain mercy, "the Lord shall reward them in the day of their trouble. He shall make all their bed in their sickness." And what now remains but to commit to the earth the bodies of our brethren, 'Earth to earth, dust to dust ashes to ashes' their souls are with God, to whom also we commend our own souls, through Jesus Christ our Lord, entreating him for the sake of His dear Son to visit with compassion in this day of their sorrow the kindred of these departed ones, giving to them "the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness, and beauty for ashes." Amen.

Fourth Assembly District Union Convention.
The Union Electors are requested to appoint three delegates from each of the several towns composing said district, to attend a Union Convention to be held at BOSTON CENTRE, on THURSDAY, the 27th inst., at 1 o'clock P. M., for the purpose of choosing three delegates to the "Union State Convention," and two delegates to the "Eighth District Judicial Convention" and to transact such other business as may be brought before it.
JOSIAH SOUTHWICK,
L. B. TOTSLEY,
SETH FENNER,
Fourth District Union Committee,
Dated August 11th, 1863.

Eighth District Judicial Convention.
The Union Electors are requested to appoint Two Delegates from each Assembly District, to attend a Convention to be held at the MANSION HOUSE, in the city of Buffalo, on WEDNESDAY, the 24th day of September next at 11 A. M., to nominate a candidate for Justice of the Supreme Court, to be supported at the next election, in place of Hon. E. P. Marvin, whose term of service will expire on the first of January next.
E G. SPAULDING, Erie county.
CHARLES BARTOW, Genesee.
L. F. BOWEN, Niagara.
E. R. REYNOLDS, Orleans.
L. A. HAYWARD, Wyoming.
S. M. RUSSELL, Allegany.
ALEX. STORRS, Cattaraugus.
Dist. Com., 8th Dist.

DESTRUCTIVE STORM.—A furious storm passed over Buffalo Sunday afternoon, unroofing a number of houses, and doing other damage.

NEW ENGLAND SOLDIEERS AT THE GENERAL HOSPITAL.—There are now some fifty sick soldiers at the General Hospital, from the various New England Regiments which have passed through here.
Ten of the poor fellows, who were left to the care of our citizens, will never see their New England homes again. Two of them, wrapped in that sleep whose couch is the grave, have been taken away by their friends, the other eight were fittingly laid to rest in our own beautiful home of the dead—Forest Lawn. Yesterday three of them were buried there, Rev. D. Lord officiating at the ceremony.
The "Ladies Aid Society" have taken exclusive charge of those at the Hospital, which is a sure warrant for their receiving the kindest of care. Mrs. H. R. Seymour acts as Matron, and a certain number of the ladies of the society are selected each day as nurses. At night their places are supplied with gentlemen.
We are requested by the officers of the Buffalo General Hospital to state, that for the present, no person can be admitted to the Wards of the Hospital to see the soldiers, except those who are required to attend upon the sick.
Persons visiting the hospital with delicacies or any articles for the soldiers, are respectfully requested to leave them in the reception room, where they will be most thankfully received, and any enquiries that may be made in regard to any of the sick, will be cheerfully answered.
This becomes necessary on account of the feeble and prostrate condition of a number of the poor worn out soldiers, who need quiet and rest.

Buffalo Commercial Advertiser.
Tuesday Evening, June 2, 1863.
LOCAL & MISCELLANEOUS.
U. S. CHRISTIAN COMMISSION.—In a recent visit, as far as Washington city, we had an opportunity of observing the operations of the U. S. Christian Commission, in behalf of our soldiers. And though favorably impressed in its behalf before, these impressions have been greatly strengthened by personal examination. Energetic action, and cheerful generosity, charactize [sic] the doings of this Commission. The labor is all rendered gratuitously, except at a few central points, where clerk hire and superintendence are absolutely necessary. Offices and storage are furnished free of rent. In Philadelphia, by Geo. H. Stuart, Esq., the indefatigable chairman of the Commission, who travels more miles, makes more speeches, and spends more time in this cause than any other man in the United States. In Washington city the accommodation for offices and storage is gratuitously furnished in the building of the Young Men's Christian Association. This is the central depot and the distributing office for the supply of the Army of the Potomac and its dependencies. Boxes and barrels and bundles in vast numbers are received here daily, containing everything needful for the comfort and blessing of the bodies and souls of our brave men. Originally, the Christian Commission proposed only to administer to the moral and spiritual wants of the soldier, principally by supplying them with religious literature, but it was soon found that this was only half work. And now, in addition to the piles of religious periodicals and tracts and Soldiers Hymn Books and Bibles, we find delicacies for the sick and wounded, jellies and jams and changes of clothing and slippers and wrappers and every thing that money and skill and affection can provide. It really does one's heart good to enter this great storehouse of supplies in the city of Washington, and witness the industry and eagerness with which they are dispatched to meet the demands of suffering and want. We noticed the numbers on the barrels and boxes from Philadelphia indicated that about 5000 had been received from that city alone, and on others, that were being seat to Aquia Creek, the number indicated that more than 500 had gone to that one place. There is, too, a directness and facility in the operations of the Commission which greatly commend it. There is no tedious formality; no red tape process; no questioning whether the supply be for the hospitals or the camp; for the sick or the well; if there be need and a responsibly application, it is responded to at once. We met the faithful Chaplain of one of the brave New Jersey regiments who said he had made frequent application in various quarters for certain supplies needed for his men, and failed to get them. It then occurred to him to solicit aid from the Christian Commission, and he wrote to the chairman, Mr. Stuart, and received the prompt reply that "he had knocked at the right door.'' arid his wants were supplied. The men employed by the Christian Commission to visit the camp hospitals and the armies in the field do a vast amount of good. They return from the scenes of their labors with narratives of thrilling interest. These laborers are all volunteers; they seek the soldiers' spiritual and temporal good, influenced by pure Christianity and patriotism. And hence we wonder not at their success in leading souls to the Saviour. We cannot too earnestly commend the Christian Commission to the favor of the public. We are satisfied that there is no organization for the benefit of the soldier more efficient in action, or more worthy of confidence. The branch Commission in this city, we learn, is making increased efforts to raise supplies. Our citizens who have already established a character for benevolence, need have no hesitancy in directing their bounty in the channels of the Christian Commission. D. D. LORE
Buffalo, June 1, 1863.

GREAT UNION MEETING IN BEHALF OF THE CHRISTIAN COMMISSION.—Yesterday afternoon a great union meeting, under the auspices of the Army Committee of the Young Men's Christian Union, and in behalf of the U. S. Christian Commission, was held in the Central Presbyterian Church. The announcement that Geo. H. Stuart, of Philadelphia, President of the Commission, and Rev. C. P. Lyford, a delegate to the army, would be present, sufficed to completely fill the house, and the audience remained, exhibiting every sign of the deepest interest, from half past two till six o'clock. The leading pastors of nearly all denominations were present, and the assemblage was of a similar catholic character.
The meeting opened with the hymn, "Watchman tell us of the night," by the choir, after which Rev. Mr. Moore, of the Washington Street Baptist Church, read passages from the Old and New Testament scriptures. Rev. Dr. Clarke then gave the hymn, "Coronation," which was sung by the congregation. Dr. J. D. Hill, Chairman of the Army Committee, then made a brief prefatory address, in the course of which he mentioned, as the contribution of the Buffalo branch:
Stores and publications sent forward valued at                      $800 00
Cash paid to the Army Committee,                                          929 39
Raised by Ladies' Festival, and now on hand,                    2500 00
Total,                                                                                 $4229 39
It has also sent one delegate to the army of the Cumberland.
Rev. C. P. Lyford was then introduced to the audience and delivered an address, nearly an hour and a half in length, and which we can only liken to one of Gough's for its surprising effect upon the audience. At times, scarcely a dry cheek, man's or woman's, could be seen in the audience, and not a symptom of weariness was visible. Mr. Lyford is a young man, of considerably less than thirty, slight in figure and evidently in bad health, but possessing a voice of great power and sweetness, and an earnestness and enthusiasm which form the secret of his oratory. He began by stating that he started to come to Buffalo five years and a half ago. At that time he was on his way here, a poor, dissipated miserable play actor, in the hope of getting an engagement in the Buffalo theater. He stopped at Troy, and there by God's grace was converted and led off on to a far different stage. By a strange and eventful route he had at last arrived.
Mr. Lyford then proceeded rapidly to show the urgent need for missionary work in the army.—The demoralizing influences at work there are fearful. At the Fame time no body of men are so receptive in their character. An intellectual starvation prevails, and the men eagerly seek religious reading. The speaker argued also that not only are souls to be saved by labor in the army, but our cause will be made stronger by adding to it the strength which virtue and religion give.
Mr. Lyford is now permanently stationed at Camp Convalescent, and he gave a thrilling account of his labors there. He told how, at the prayer meetings held, ten to fifty soldiers rose nightly to ask for prayers, the number of conver­sions being proportionately large. In fact, it is the speaker's belief that the spirit of God, in an especial manner, is visiting the army, and in­clining its heart to hear the gospel. His address was largely made up of anecdote, by which he illustrated the noble work of the delegates of the Commission; how they bore to the sick, wound­ed, and dying, the comforts needed for the body first, and then poured into the ear, thus won by kindness, the message of a Saviors love. We cannot pretend to give even a sketch of Mr. Lyford's discourse. It was a most moving, and at times thrilling one, and evidently made a deep impression upon all who listened. The gentleman went aside once or twice to make known that he is an abolitionist, but we can afford to pardon that, in view of the genuine Christian earnestness he exhibited in the good work to which he is devoted.
After a hymn had been sung, Mr. Stuart took the stand and the feeling aroused by Mr. Lyford was intensified by his long, rapid and surpassly interesting address. He gave a more practical exposition of the Commission, an organization by which we believe, it owes its existence more to his large heart, brain and purse than to any other cause. The delegates, of whom, at various times 608 have been sent out, go with "the bread that perisheth" on one hand, and in the other "the bread of life." The work has been recognized by and has received the hearty co-operation of the Administration, and is every where aided on by army officers, railroad and express companies, &c., &c. At a recent interview had by Mr. Stuart and others with Secretary Stanton, that official declared that "if we expect to put down the rebellion we must look to God for his blessing," and gave the assurance that the Commission would be helped in every possible manner. One Major General has placed a Commission delegate on his staff, in order to give him better facilities.
The Commission has three classes of delegates, all of whom work without remuneration. The first go to camps, and remain permanently with the different armies. The second are stationed at hospitals or other permanent posts. The third are "battle-field delegates," or "minute men," who, in various cities of the North, hold themselves in readiness to start at an hour's warning, for the field where a battle has been fought. Of the million of men now in the army and navy, Mr. Stuart stated that 100,000 are now sick or wounded. Some idea of the magnitude of the field may be gathered from this fact. The delegates have been at nearly every battle that has taken place since the Commission was organized, in November, 1861. They hold prayer meetings at night, distribute reading matter, stationery, delicacies of many kinds, and on occasion take part with the surgeons in caring for the sick and wounded. Everywhere they are welcomed and blessed by the soldiers.
Mr. Stuart gave a score of anecdotes to show the rich reward for its labor which the Commission has already reaped. Its work has made songs of triumph to be sung on the field of the dying, and has turned the house of pain into a vestibule of heaven. It has raised $105,000; distributed 5,488 boxes of stores; 338,953 bibles and testaments, and a vast quantity of other reading matter. The aggregate value of stores &c., exclusive of reading matter, sent to the army would amount to a value over $300,000.
We have no space to mention one in ten of the topics touched upon by Mr. Stuart in his masterly discourse. He concluded with a stirring appeal to the hearts and purses of his audience, which was responded to by a liberal collection. With a benediction by Chaplain Robie, the meeting was dismissed.
In the evening, Rev. Mr. Lyford and Rev. W. H. Shaw, the delegates from Buffalo to the army, addressed a large meeting at Grace M. E. Church. Mr. Stuart and Chaplain Robie also spoke to an equally crowded and interested house in the Washington street Baptist Church. Both of the gentlemen from abroad may rest assured that they have made an impression on the mind of the religious community of this city which will not soon be effaced.

LADIES' CHRISTIAN COMMISSION.—The Treasurer acknowledges the following contributions, in cash, in aid of the late Strawberry Festival held by the Ladies' Christian Commission:
S. G. Austin, S. F. Pratt, Esqs., Mrs. Wm. G. Fargo, Mrs. Gaius B. Rich, Chas. E. Ensign, S. S. Jewett, F. H. Root, L. C. Woodruff, D. S. Bennett, Bush & Howard, $100 each.
Dean Richmond, Esq., Howard, Whitcomb & Co., Sidney Shepard, Sherman & Barnes, Hamlin & Mendsen, E. Corning & Co., $50 each.
Ed. S. Rich, S. O. Barnum, Bronson Rumsey, Esqs., Mrs. P. L. Sternberg, Mrs. G. H. Bryant, Mrs. J. D. Shepard, $25 each.
Dr. Wright, $20.
Young, Lockwood & Co., $15 75.
Wm. H. Glenny, $12.
Mrs. O. Bugbee, Nimbs & Gibson, Horace Utley, Henry Richmond, Thomas Clark, Mrs. E. E. Hazard, Mr. Zadoc Allen, Mrs. T. D. Patchin, $10 each.
Geo. Palmer, H. L. Lansing, Jason Sexton, Wm. O. Newman, L. K. Plimpton, A. G. Williams, I. D. White, Mrs. P. Bennett, Edward Marvin, S. H. Fish, S. Cary, J. D. Sawyer, S. F. Schoellkopf, J. L. C. Jewett, Chas. Rosseel, Wm. F. Miller, Robinson & Co., I. V. Vanderpool, Mrs. O. G. Steele, Mrs. G. G White, Wm. B. Peck, W. I. Mills, L. B. Lent, T..T. Bloomer, Mrs. W. T. Miller, Mrs. David Morse, Judge I. Verplanck, C.
D. Norton, Mrs. P. P. Pratt, Mrs. Fisher, of Batavia, Mrs. J. C. Evans, Mrs. A. Rumsey, $5 each.
Mrs. T. S. Hawks, C. Hitchcock, E. P. Selmser, A. T. Blackmer, Dr. Cary, Mrs. J. Lathrop, $3 each.
Jesse Ketchum, Mrs. I. N. Seateherd, $4 each.
Mrs. J. C. Evans & Son, $8.
Geo. J. Bryan, $6.
A. T. Taylor, Judge J. G. Masten, Mrs. Dr. Pratt, $2 each.
A. W. Cutter, Henry Morse, Archie Hudson, Preston Hodges, Henry Childs, Mrs. J. R. Martin, Mrs. Rathbun, R.D. Sherman, Mrs. Lyons, $1 each.

BRANCH U. S. SANITARY COMMISSION,
GENERAL AID SOCIETY FOR THE ARMY,
BUFFALO, July 13th, 1863.
The Ladies of the General Aid Society desire to express their gratitude for the generous assistance they have received the past week. On the 14th of June, when the invasion of Pennsylvania was thought a joke, the agent of the Commission, Mr. OLMSTED, telegraphed this Society to gather in and save supplies for Harrisburg.
Friday, July 10th, he telegraphed to send assorted hospital stores as fast as possible to Gettysburg, a supercargo to accompany them.
As soon as this was made known, supplies poured in, a responsible gentleman offered to go with them, the Superintendent of the Erie Railroad gave passes, and the Express Company with their usual liberality, carried them without charge. All interested in the soldiers will rejoice to know that seventy boxes and barrels were shipped to-day.
This exhausts our stock, and as another great battle is imminent, we would beg all to assist in providing for the next call. Let every woman who can, make one shirt this week. They will find them ready cut at our rooms. Slippers are called for, to be made of carpet or heavy cloth,—also wines, jellies and delicacies. A generous response to this appeal is expected.

Union of the Relief Associations—One Agency for Receiving and Distributing Hospital Supplies.
The Ladies of the Hospital Relief Association would respectfully call the attention of the public and their Auxiliary Societies to the following communication, emanating from the United States Sanitary Commission at New York, which will explain itself:
NEW YORK, April 11th. 1863.
To the U. S. Sanitary Commission:
GENTLEMEN:—The New York Committee of the U. S. Christian Commission, have recently had assigned to them a definite District, from which we are expected to gather all the means required for carrying on the work.
This District includes the States of Connecticut, New York and the Eastern half of New Jersey. We have undertaken to send delegates and a supply of reading matter to the Armies and Hospitals of the Atlantic coast, the Gulf of Mexico and the Lower Mississippi. This division of the field at home and the labor abroad is well understood by the Central Association in Philadelphia and its eastern branches, and they will not send any agents or employ any other means to collect money or stores in any portion of our District.
While we are still auxiliary to the Central Commission and cordially co-operating with it in its leading objects, we now think we may without embarrassing any other branch of the Christian Commission, enter into some arrangement with you, in regard to stores, which will be satisfactory to all parties. With the hope of securing an entirely cordial co-operation in the labors of our respective commissions, we are willing to agree to send to your Depository all the stores that may come into our possession. And, further, we will agree to state the arrangements between us in regard to stores, in the public meetings which may be held in the different portions of our field, and to recommend that all stores be sent directly to you. On your part, we presume you will be willing to agree to instruct your agents stationed on the Atlantic coast, in the Gulf of Mexico, &c, to furnish the few stores which our delegates may need to use in prosecuting their spiritual work, on the personal application to your agents, and at the same time showing their commissions from us.
OFFICE OF THE N. Y. COMMITTEE, Of the U. S. Christian Commission,
No. 30 Bible House.
"Ordered that the Commission will accede to the proposal contained in the foregoing letter, and that its agents on the Atlantic coast in the Gulf of Mexico, and the Lower Mississippi, be directed through the General Secretary to conform thereto."
At the last monthly meeting of this Association it was resolved that we make the united commissions the channel through which we hereafter send our hospital stores to be distributed by their agents in the departments of our army above designoted [sic]; reserving to ourselves the right to send elsewhere as the needs of our soldiers at any time may require.
Let no one conclude that the wants of our hospitals and suffering soldiery are not of the most pressing character. It may be said that a large army is constantly passing through our hospitals, many to the grave, some crippled for life to their distant homes, and others back to camp. We believe the numbers and efficiency of those who have left the hospital for camp, have been doubled by the labors of the women of the North. In this efficient mode of aiding to suppress this rebellion, more, much more may yet be done; and whilst armies are saved to the Republic and millions to the public treasury, the highest duties of humanity and religion are peformed [sic].
Let no loyal woman fail to engage in this work, and let no one falter who has begun.
By order of the Association,
MRS. L. GARDNER, Cor. Sec'y.
Since writing the above a letter received from a member of the Committee in New York, says:
"We want now cotton drawers, and socks, bed-ticks, corn and oat meal, corn starch, pickles, preserved fruits, and horse raddish put up in vinegar. We hope our friends in city and country will respond to this call immediately."
"A word to the wise is sufficient."
Cor. Sec'y.

LADIES' THIRD WARD VOLUNTEERS AID SOCIETY.—A meeting will be held at the house of Mrs. Everard Peck, S. Washington street, on Wednesday, 22d instant, at 2 1/2 p. m. CAROLINE HILLS, Sec'y.
The Ladies' Soldier's Aid Society have shipped during the last week to the Sanitary Commission at Buffalo, three boxes of goods valued at $183 21. The following is a list of the articles:
_ feather pillows,                    6 comforters,
_2 16. corn starch,                   4 straw pillows,
_ shop pillows,                        12 pr. cotton socks,
_ doz. Napkins,                       1 doz. fans,
_1/2 doz. combs,                     1 doz. Hankerchiefs [sic],
_3/4 lb. soap,               16 pr. slippers,
_1 new shirts,              13 second hand shirts.
_ pairs pillow cases,    13 towels,
_ dress growns [sic],   27 prs. drawers,
_ 1/4 lb. crackers, Quantity old cotton, Lint, Reading matter.

The following is a list of articles donated by the Young Ladies' Society of this village:
9 pr. sheets,                             12 prs. pillow cases,
94 handkerchiefs,                    6 white shirts,
8 wool shirts,               12 pr. socks,
50 towels,                                13 doz. compresses,
80 rolls bandages,                   30 1/2 lb. dried fruit,
12 packages finger bandages,
2 1/2 lbs tapioca,                     4 lb. corn starch,
Large package,                        Old linen,
Valued at $60 00.
By Order Secretary.

BRANCH U. S. SANITARY COMMISSIION,
GENERAL AID SOCIETY FOR THE ARMY,
BUFFALO, July 30, 1863.
Lyman K. Bass, Esq.,
Chairman Lecture Committee:
Dear Sir—Your note tendering to the General Aid Society one half of the net proceeds of the first two evenings' lectures and exhibitions of "Fallon's Stereopticon," is just received.
We accept with pleasure your generous offer, and hope the proceeds, not only for our suffering soldiers but for the noble institution you represent, may be such as we have a right to expect from the citizens of Buffalo. Very respectfully yours,
Mrs. HORATIO SEYMOUR,
President.

ROOMS OF THE CHRISTIAN COMMISSION,
No. 1 WEST SENECA STREET,
BUFFALO, July 30, 1863.
Lyman K. K. Bass, Esq.,
Chairman Lecture Committee.
Dear Sir: Your communication of this date, on behalf of the Young Men's Association, tendering to this Commission and to the General Aid Society the net proceeds of the first two lectures and exhibitions of "Fallon's Stereopticon," is received, and it is with great pleasure that I communicate to you our acceptance of the offer, and through you tender the thanks of this Society to the Young Men's Association for their liberality, and the spirit of their offer.
Very respectfully yurs [sic],
Mrs. WM. G. FARGO,
President.
The course will begin, in St. James Hall, on Tuesday evening next. It promises to be the most attractive thing of the season.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.—The Ladies of the Christian Commsssion [sic] acknowledge the following contributions for the week ending July 31st:
Mrs. Gazlay—two bottles currant wine, 40 illustrated papers, 5 magazines.
Mr. Daniel Webster—24 papers.
Mrs. L. K. Bogert—7 volumes books, 6 pamphlets, package papers.
Mrs. Phechar—1 bottle raspberry shrub, 1 do cherries, 6 1/2 pounds dried apples.
Mrs. J. D. Sawyer—5 quarts currant jelly, 4 pairs of socks, 2 pillow cases, package papers.
Mrs. S. S. Guthrie—4 jars jelly.
Mrs. E. Stanberry—1 mosquito bar, package papers.
Mrs. D. G. Collamer—1 roil linen, 1 bottle catsup.
Miss Sarah Collamer—12 towels.
Miss Eva Collamer—24 towels.
Miss M. W. Bemis—12 towels, 1 fan
Mrs. Wm. Stimpson—6 bottles currant wine, 2 do strawberry syrup, 2 do tomato, 4 bowls jelly, 1 1/2 lbs., dried raspberries, 1 1/2 do corn, 4 1/4 oz. lint, 4 volumes books, package pamphlets, 10 papers.
Wm. E. Stimpson—4 volumes books.
Lafayette Street S. S—56 housewives.
Mrs. J. H. H. Wheeler—6 pounds prepared codfish, 1 1/2 pound butter.
Mrs. T. J. Conry—10 volumes books, 25 magazines, 20 papers.
Mrs. Holmes—6 shirts, 2 bottles wine.
Mrs. T. A. Budd—
Mrs. Beecher—7 pounds dried apples.
Master Charles R. Smith—1 1/2 pound lint, 40 magazines.
Mrs. B. Timmerman—5 bottles wine, 7 bottles jelly, 1 gallon preserved strawberries.
Mrs. John Benson—2 bottles old Port wine, 2 bottles raspberry wine.
Mrs. Claflin—1 jar pickles.
Mrs. George Palmer—7 bottles currant shrub.
Mr. D. R. Hamlin—1 can currant, 1 can cherry pickles, 26 N. Y. Observers.
Mrs. J. E. Emst—3 jars pickles.
Mrs. Gazlay—2 shirts from material furnished by the
Commission.
DELLA S. AUSTIN, Ass't Sec'y.

The Treasurer of the Ladies' Christian Commission acknowledges the receipt the past month of the following sums:
The Young Ladies' Benevolent Society—$73 39.
Master Warren Brown—$10.
Miss Helen Bull—$5.
Mrs. Dr. Pratt—$5.
A Lady—$5. Mrs. J. F. ERNST.
Treasurer.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS OF THE CHRISTIAN COMMISSION.—The ladies of the Christian Commission ac­knowledge the following contributions for the week ending July 25:
Mrs. J. B. Sweet—6 cans raspberry jam.
Mrs. C. J. Wells—4 hospital shirts, 1 undershirt, 3 prs drawers, 9 books, 6 bottles rasberry shrub.
Mrs. Orlando Allen—3 cans peaches, 1 keg pickles, 3 cans blackberry jam, 1 pkg pamphlets.
Mrs. L. L. Lewis—2 hospital shirts, 6 magazines.       
Mrs. S. D. Sykes—5 lbs dried cherries.
Miss Nellie Jones—1 bottle wine, 1 do cordial, 1 pkg _nt, 3 vols books.
From Brocton, Chautauqua Co.—1 barrel containing jars pickles, 3 bottles wine, 2 do preserved fruit, 12 __s dried currants, 7 1/2 do plums, 12 do cherries, 20 do peaches, 7 do raspberries, 27 do apples, 10 do lint, 1  pkg bandages, 3 vols books, 1 pkg tracts and pamphlets.
Mrs. W. J. Mack—2 gal pickles.
Mrs. Wm. C. Grant—1 lb soap, 1 roll old linen, 1 do cotton, 1 large mosquito net, 1 small do, 1 Bible.
Unknown—14 oz dried cherries.
Mrs. John D. Shepard—14 bowls jelly.
Mrs. T. S. Hawks—1 ream commercial note paper, 100 envelopes.
Mrs. N. H. Gardner—12 qts jam, 6 qts. shrub, 16 lbs dried fruit.
Mrs. J. L. Alberger—3 bottles cordial, 1 bottle wine, 1 do catsup, 6 jars jelly, 22 magazines.
First Presbyterian Church Aid Society—13 prs drawers, 2 shirts, 4 prs  woolen socks.
Master Warren Brown—$10.
Mrs. James H. Mills—1 barrel containing 1 pr linen sheets, 2 do pillow cases, 2 towels, 1 vest, 1 bottle wine, 3 lbs dried fruit, 450 newspapers, 12 magazines.
Mrs. Watkins Williams—3 bottles wine.
Master Johnnie W. Danforth—2 pkgs corn starch, 2 lbs dried apples, 4 oz lint.
Mrs. H. H. Hale—14 Independents.
Mrs. Hugh Webster—1 jar pickled peaches.
Mrs. Lot Clark—6 linen shirts, 2 broadcloth coats, 1 pkg pamphlets and books.
Mrs. S. S. Jewett—4 hospital shirts, 1 linen coat.
Mrs. P. R. Stover—2 hospital shirts.
Miss Helen Bull—10 Testaments, $5.
Mrs. J. D. Sawyer—3 3/4 lbs sugar.
Mrs. M. Darrow—1 can brandy peaches.
Miss Louise Walbridge—13 bottles preserved cherries.
Mrs. Dr. Loomis—3 gal pickles.

Acknowledgments.— The Ladies of the Christian Commission acknowledge the following contributions for the week ending August 7th:—
Mrs. T A Budd—12 handkerchiefs, 2 pillow cases, 1 roll linen, 53 bandages.
Mrs Towns—1 hat, 1 coat, 1 pkge magazines.
Lafayette Street Church—15 shirts.
Miss Hattie Grant—5 housewives, 2 books.
Miss Hannah Windslow—4 prs drawers.
Mrs Wm Ketchum—1 jug rasberry shrub, 10 bottles do, 1 jar pickled plums, 3 pkgs N. Y. Observers.
From Cowlesville through Rev. Mrs. Richardson—1 box containing 89 lbs dried fruit, 6 oz lint, 4 cans preserved fruit, 1 peck onions, 2 towels, 1 pkge tracts and papers.
Freddy and Harry Gridley—2 housewives, 1 roll old linen.
Mrs. J C Evans—14 lbs dried apples, 2 galls cherry shrub.
Mrs Geo H Chase—4 shirts, 3 prs socks, 1 pillow case, 20 magazines.
Mrs D D Bidwell—1 cotton sheet, 1 linen do, 10 prs socks, 2 towels, 1 lb lint, 2 vests, 3 rolls old cotton and linen, 30 magazines.
Mrs Oscar Cobb—2 cans jelly, 1 pkge of papers and magazines.
Mrs F Gridley—1 pkge magazines and papers.
Mrs L L Lewis—2 shirts, 2 bottles raspberry shrub.
Mrs A Reynolds—1 dressing gown, 2 shirts, 1 vest.
Mrs J D Hill—33 magazines.
Mrs P L Sternberg—4 jars cherries, 1 do raspberries, 4 pr socks, 4 handkerchiefs, 1 roll linen, 24 magazines.
Mrs R Eames—12 handkerchiefs, 1 pkge magazines, 1 do papers.
Mrs S N Callender—2 bottles shrub, 1 can pine apple, 72 magazines.
Mrs F W Breed—100 envelopes.
Mrs A McArthur—6 lbs dried apples, 22 lbs Indian meal, 1 jar currant jelly.
Mrs Dr Royce—6 vols books.
A Friend—8 bottles black currant syrup, 30 volumes books.
Mrs James Moffatt—10 bottles old currant wine.

FROM MATERIAL FURNISHED BY THE COMMISSION.
Mrs Newman—3 prs drawers.
Pearl Street M E Church—11 sheets, 7 bandages.

U. S. SANITARY COMMISSION.—Report of the Receipts and Disbursements of the "General Aid Society for the Army" for the month of July, 1863.
RECEIPTS.
From St. Mark's M E Church Society                                     $ 5 00
A friend                                                                                    5 00
Miss Lottie Eustasbieve, Miss Clara Nims and
Master Nathan Williams                                                           6 62
Mrs J A Newbold                                                                     1 00
C F S Thomas                                                                           3 00
Young Ladies Society, East Hamburgh                       4 00
Little girls, East Eagle street                                       12 25
Bazaar                                                             7,554 25
" French Booth                                                     14 50  7,568 75
Griffins Mills Aid Society                                           20 00
Mrs Sarah Van Rensselaer                                             5 00
Jeanie Aldrich                                                                               50
H B Haskell, (Mina Lake)                                              1 00
Young Ladies' Society, First Ward                              71 61
Mrs George Bryant                                                       10 00
Newstead Aid Society                                                                5 00
Attica Aid Society                                                                    60 00
Forestville Aid Society                                                                  50
East Aurora Aid Society                                                 5 00
Miss Lou and Master Deshler Welch                              7 25
Membership fee____                                                      1 00
Mrs. Thomas Hutchinson (Lancaster)                             3 00
Harlow and Lottie Curtis                                                1 50
  From sale of rags                                                         1 75
                                                                                          7,798 73
                        On hand from June                        1,161 14
                                                                               8,959 87                                                          
              
DISBURSEMENTS.
To paid for papers, stamps and printing                      $ 8 42
2,939 yards of cotton                                                692 72
Expresses from New York to Annapolis                        9 60
Expenses of messenger with supplies to Har-
 risburg                                                                                       17 80
162 lbs. crackers                                                                         10 53
40 lbs. corn starch                                                                        4 00
2 lbs. Sponges                                                                              5 00
360 lbs. corn meal                                                                        5 40
5 gallons whiskey                                                                       10 00
40 dozen bottles blackberry cordial                             120 00
146 lbs. sugar                                                                 21 32
6 lbs farina                                                                                      90
The porter for two months                                             10 00
10 1/2 yards linen                                                                         2 63
Buttons and tape                                                                          7 65
24 dozen socks                                                                           72 62
6yvards Valencia                                                                         6 57
305 1/2 yards flannel                                                 155 68
300 fans                                                                                     12 00
Current expenses                                                                          5 17
Discharged soldiers                                                          2 50
Cartage                                                                                         2 00
                                                                                            $1183 01
                                                                                                8959 87
Cash on hand August 1st                                                        7776 80
MRS. JAMES P. WHITE, Treasurer.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS OF THE GENERAL AID SOCIETY, for the week ending Aug. 13, 1863.
Elma Soldier's Aid Society (acknowledged as Elmira)          $5 00
Griffin's Mills                                                                          10 00
Church of the Epiphany, Niagara City                                     5 00
St. Paul's Church                                                                                  57 73
East Hamburgh Y. L. Aid Society                                            4 00
Williamsville, from collection on Thanksgiving Day   25 00
East Aurora—19 lbs dried fruit.
Dansville—3 boxes, containing 6 comforters, 16 lbs corn starch, 102 handkerchiefs, 19 flannel shirts, 56 cotton shirts, 24 pillow cases, 19 sheets, 17 pillows, 27 prs drawers, 9 bed gowns, 144 towels and handkerchiefs, 34 prs socks, 16 prs slippers, 19 lbs lint, 168 lbs dried fruit, 33 1/2 lbs groceries, 150 papers and books, 30 combs and fans.
Harris Hill—16 handkerchiefs, 7 cans apple butter, 9 cans cherries.
De Veaux College, Miss W. J. Miles—2 dressing gowns, 9 prs woolen socks, 6 prs slippers, 29 pocket handkerchiefs, 5 lbs old cotton, 8 lbs white sugar, 10 lbs farina, 2 lbs green tea, 1 pkg reading matter.
Griffin's Mills Soldier's Aid Society—1 package, containing 64 lbs dried apples, 21 lbs currants, 1 3/4 lbs blk currants, 8 3/4 lbs blackberries, 1 lb plums, 4 3/4 lbs cherries, 1 lb sage, 1 lb hops, 124 papers.
First Presbyterian Church Society—10 prs drawers, 5 prs slipper soles, 6 shirts, 3 rolls furniture binding.
Dr. Lord's Church Society—26 handkerchiefs and towels, 1 pr socks.
Presbyterian Church, Black Road—10 papers, 5 pamphlets.
Cheektowaga, Mrs. Grove Clark—2 pillows, 1 sheet, 2 pillow cases.
Mrs. George R. Babcock—12 jars currant jelly.
Mrs. J. L. Waters—6 jars currant jelly.
Miss Bailey—18 papers.
Mrs. E.G. Root—2 qts black currant jam.
Mrs. Francis—1 jar plums, 1/4 lb old cotton.
Mrs. Eustaphieve—52 pamphlets, 3 games.
St. Paul's Church Society—283 prayer books, 50 books, 4 bottles preserved cherries.
St. John's Church Society—4 jars black currant jam, 1 bottle currant jelly, 4 lbs dried currants.
Mrs. J. Maxwell—4 lbs dried apples, 4 lbs dried currants.
East Hamburgh—39 magazines, 6 prs drawers, 7 shirts.
Miss Sue Thomas—5 books.
De Veaux College, Miss Kedie—1 box, containing 3 dressing gowns, 9 pairs slippers, 30 handkerchiefs, 4 towels, 21 pin-cushions, 3 lbs linen and cotton, 1 bunch thread, 8 1/2 lbs crackers, 1/2 lb mint, 1 jar plum preserves, 1 drum figs, 3 1/2 lbs corn starch, 1 pkg note paper, 2 pkgs envelopes, 10 lbs farina, and 3 of the handkerchiefs sent by 3 little boys, 167 magazines and papers.
Mrs. Chas. Rathbone, Eden—6 lbs dried fruit.
Breed, Butler & Co.—15 pencils, 22 holders, 1 box pens, 3 pkgs envelopes, 5 quires paper.
Mrs. McGilvray—7 lbs dried apples, 5 lbs plums and cherries.
La Grange—1 box, containing 18 lbs cherries, 37 lbs apples, 1 lb peaches, 1 jar pickled cabbage, 1 1/2 lbs raspberries, 1 lb plums, 3 quills, 4 fans, 2 prs drawers, 5 new shirts, 18 napkins, 3 prs pillow cases, 1 pr sheets, 1 linen coat, 1 pkg tracts, 5 1/2 prs slippers, 3 1/2 lbs linen and cotton, 5 eye shades, 7 shirts, 9 pin-cushions, 1 needle-book, 2 handkerchiefs, 4 arm slings, 1 pr socks, 1 dressing gown, 1 firkin pickles.
S. O. Barnum—15 pkgs books.
Chinese Tea Store—5 boxes.
Sidney Shepard & Co.—6 dozen cans.

U. S. SANITARY COMMISSION.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS OF THE GENERAL AID
SOCIETY, FOR THE WEEK ENDING AUGUST 13TH, 1863.
Elma Soldiers Aid Soc'y (acknowledged as Elmira                           $5 00
Griffins Mills                                                                                      10 00
Church of the Epiphany, Niagara Co                                                               5 00
St. Paul's Church                                                                                             57 73
East Hamburg Y. L. A. Soc'y                                                                           4 00
Williamsville, collection on Thanksgiving day                                   25 00
East Aurora—19 lbs dried fruit.
Dansville Relief Society—3 boxes, containing 6 comforters, 16 lbs corn starch, 102 hdkfs, 19 flannel shirts, 6 shirts, 24 pillow cases, 19 sheets, 17 pillows, 27 prs drawers, 9 bed gowns, 144 towels and hdkfs, 34 prs sock's, 16 prs slippers, 19 lbs lint, 168 lbs dried fruit, 32 1/2 lbs groceries, 150 papers and books, 30 combs and fans. Harris Hill—16 hdkfs, 7 cans apple butter, 9 cans cherries.
De Veaux College, Miss N. J. Niles—2 dressing gowns, 9 prs woolen socks, 6 prs slippers, 29 pocket hdkfs, 5 lbs old cotton, 8 lbs white sugar, 10 lbs farina, 2 lbs green tea, 1 pkg reading matter.
Giffins Mills Soldiers' Aid Soc'y—1 package, containing 64 lbs dried apples, 21 lbs currants, 8 3/4 pounds blackberries, 1 lb plums, 4 3/4 lbs cherries, 1 lb sage, 1 lb hops, 124 papers.
First Presbyterian Society—10 prs drawers, 5 prs slipper soles, 6 shirts, 3 rolls furniture binding.
Dr. Lord's Church Society—26 hdkfs and towels, 1 pr socks.
Presbyterian Church, Black Rock—10 papers, 5 pamphlets.
Mrs. Grove Clark, Cheektowaga—2 pillows, 1 sheet, 2 pillow cases.
Mrs. G. R. Babcock—12 jars currant jelly.
Mrs. L. J.. Waters—6 jars currant jam.
Miss Bailey—18 papers.
Mrs. E. C. Root—2 qts black currant jam.
Mrs. Francis—1 glass jar plums, 1/4 pound old cotton.
Mrs. Eustaphieve—52 pamphlets, 3 gowns.
St. Paul's Church Society—283 prayer books, 50 books, 4 bottles preserved cherries.
St. John's Church—4 jars black currant jam, 1 bottle currant jelly, 4 lbs dried currants.
Mrs. J. Maxwell—4 lbs apples, 4 lbs dried currants.
East Hamburg—39 magazines, 6 prs drawers, 7 shirts.
Miss Sue Thomas—5 books.
De Veaux College, Miss E. Kedie—1 box, containing three dressing gowns, 9 prs of slippers, 30 hdkfs, 4 towels, 21 pincushions, 3 lbs linen, cotton, &c., 1 bunch thread, 8 1/2 lbs crackers, 1/2 lb mint, 1 jar plum preserves, 1 drum of figs, 2 1/2 lbs corn starch, 1 pckg note paper, 2 pckgs envelopes, 10 lbs farina, and 5 of the hdkfs sent by 3 little boys of the College, 167 magazines and papers.
Mrs. Chas. Rathbone, Eden—6 lbs dried fruit.
Breed, Butler & Co.—15 pencils, 22 holders, 1 box pens, 3 pkgs envelopes, 5 quires paper.
Mrs. McGilvary—7 lbs dried apples, 5 lbs plums and cherries.
La Grangs—1 box containing 18 lbs cherries, 37 lbs apples, 1 lb peaches, 1 jar pickled cabbage, 1 1/2 lbs raspberries, 1 lb plums, 3 quilts, 4 fans, 2 prs drawers, 6 new shirts, 18 napkins, 3 pillow cases, 1 pr sheets, 1 linen coat, 1 bundle tracts, 5 1/2 prs slippers, 3 1/2 lbs linen and cotton, 5 eye shades, 7 shirts, 9 pin cushions, 1 needle-book, 2 hdkfs, 4 arm-slings, 1 pr socks, 1dressing gown, 1 firkin pickles.
S. O. Barnnm—15 pkgs books.
China Tea Store—5 boxes.
Sidney Shepard & Co.—6 doz cans.
21st Regt. Rec. Committee—33 yds cloth.

ARTICLES MADE FROM MATERIAL FURNISHED BY THE SOCIETY.
Evans Soc—10 shirts, 10 prs drawers.
Little Girls of 1st Ward—7 sheets, 23 hdkfs.
Universalist Soc.—22 sheets, 1 shirt, 27 prs cotton drawers, 3 prs flannel drawers, 1 pr socks.
South Wales Soc.—20 cotton shirts.
Alden Baptist Soc.—12 shirts, 12 prs drawers.
St. Paul's Soc—6 shirts, 3 prs socks, 23 prs drawers.
Unitarian Soc—9 shirts, 8 prs drawers.
East Aurora—(omitted) 12 shirts.
East Aurora—12 prs drawers, 2 bed ticks.
Grace M. E. Soc—23 shirts.
Unitarian. Soc—(omitted) 9 shirts, 12 prs drawers.
Harris' Hill Soc.—10 prs drawers, 5 shirts.
Presbyterian Soc., Black Rock—5 prs socks.
Dr. Lord's Soc.—15 prs drawers, 2 prs socks.
North Buffalo—10 prs drawers (Aug. 5th).
Griffin's Mills—25 prs drawers, 15 shirts.
Methodist Soc, Black Rock—12 shirts, 12 prs drawers.
Mrs. B. H. Austin—8 prs drawers (Aug. 5).
Mrs. Lapham—5 prs cotton drawers.
Mrs. E. J. Relf—2 shirts.
Mrs. Harries—6 shirts.
Mrs. Francis—6 shirts.
Miss Hattie Whittaker, for Little Girls' Aid Soc, 1st Ward—4 prs drawers.
Mrs. Van Weller—6 prs cotton drawers.
Mrs. Mount—2 prs cotton drawers.
Mrs. S. L. Marvin—12 prs drawers.
Mrs. Ream—12 prs drawers, 4 shirts.
Miss Jenny Barnes—6 prs drawers.
Miss Wescott—3 prs drawers.
Miss Costello—4 prs drawers.
Miss Greenwood—3 prs drawers.
Mrs. Jenkins—2 shirts, 1 pr socks.
Mrs. B. H. Austin—3 prs drawers.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS OF THE CHRISTIAN COMMISSION.—The ladies of the Christian Commission acknowledge the following contributions for the week ending August 13:
Master. Edgar Reynolds—8 bottles Whisky, 3 bottles Sherry wine, 1 do pickles.
Albion, N. Y.—1 box containing 53 lbs dried fruit, 3 cans currant jelly, 31 pairs new drawers, 19 new shirts, 3 pails, 3 towels, 4 waste pkgs paper and magazines.
Mrs. Dr. Snow—1 hat, 1 vest.
Ladies' Aid Society, Westfield, N. Y.—9 new shirts, 20 pairs new drawers, 2 dressing gowns, 4 quilts, 1 pair slippers, 2 pillows, 5 pillow cases, 20 towels, 8 handkerchiefs, 34 lbs dried fruit.
J. D. Shepard—5 quarts pickled cherries, 1 lb dried do.
Mrs. Lyman Dunbar—1 coat, 1 linen sheet, 1 pair drawers, 1 roll old linen, 3 oz lint, 14 bandages, 1 bottle wine, 1 do catsup.
Mrs. L. L. Lewis—1 vest, 2 hats.
Mrs. John Gowans—7 magazines.
Mrs. U. D. Moore—1 jug blackberry wine.
Ladies' Aid Society, Fredonia, N. Y.—2 boxes containing 65 lbs dried fruit, 2 bottles currant juice, 1 jug do, 1 jug wine, 3 jars currant jam, 1 jug do, 1 jar currant jelly, 12 quarts shrub, 1 can preserved fruit, 1 bottle cider molasses, 1 jar and 1 can dried fruit, 10 shirts, 5 vests, 4 towels, 17 pairs drawers, 10 oz lint, 3 pkgs magazines and papers.
Mrs. S. G. Austin—12 jars currant jelly, 5 bottles wine, 6 do raspberry shrub, 6 do currant shrub, 3 cans raspberries, 1 roll old cotton.
Mrs. Oscar Cobb—3 gallons wine, 1 coat, large quantity of papers and pamphlets.
Mrs. R. Barnard—1 box Christian Advocates.
Mr. Edward Harris—1 ball twine.
Mrs. Mack—2 shirts from material furnished by the Commission.

ACKNOWLEDGMEDN.—The Ladies of the Christian Commission acknowledge the following contributions for the week ending August
13th:—
Master Edgar Reynolds—8 bottles Whiskey, 3 do. Sherry Wine, 1 do. Pickles.
Albion, N. Y.—1 box containing 53 lbs. dried fruit, 3 cans currant jelley, 31 pairs new drawers, 19 new shirts, 3 pails, 3 towels, 4 waste pkgs. paper and magazines.
Mrs. Dr. Snow—1 hat, 1 vest.
Ladies Aid Society, Westfield, N. Y.—9 new shirts, 26 pairs new drawers, 2 dressing gowns, 4 quilts, 1 pair slippers, 2 pillows, 5 pillow cases, 26 towels, 8 hdkfs., 34 lbs. dried fruit.
Mrs. J. D. Shepard—5 quarts pickled cherries, 1 lb. dried do.
Mrs. Lyman Dunbar—1 coat, 1 linin [sic] sheet, 1 pair drawers, 1 roll old linen, 3 oz. lint, 14 bandages, 1 bottle wine, do. catsup.
Mrs. L. L. Lewis—1 vest, 2 hats.
Mrs. John Gowans—7 magazines.
Mrs. U. D. Moore—1 jug blackberry wine.
Ladies Aid Society, Fredonia, N. Y.—2 boxes containing 65 lbs. dried fruit, 2 bottles currant juice, 1 jug do, 1 jug wine, 3 jars currant jam, 1 jug do, 1 jar currant jelly, 12 quarts shrub, 1 can preserved fruit, 1 bottle cider molasses, 1 jar and 1 can dried fruit, 10 shirts, 5 vests, 4 towels, 17 pairs drawers, 10 oz lint, 3 pkgs magazines and papers.
Mrs. S. G. Austin—12 jars currant jelly, 5 bottles wine, 6 do raspberry shrub, 6 do currant shrub, 3 cans raspberries, 1 roll old cotton.
Mr. Oscar Cobb—3 gallons wine, 1 coat, large quantity of papers and pamphlets.
Mrs. R. Barnard—1 box Christian Advocates.
Mr. Edward Harris—1 ball twine.
Mrs. Mack—2 shirts from material furnished by the Commission.
D. S. AUSTIN, Asst. Sec'y.

THE LADIES' CHRISTIAN COMMISSION.—The work of this association has greatly increased. The room kindly offered by H. H. Otis has become too small. More and larger ones have generously been granted by Stephen G. Austin, Esq. They have been accepted, and are now occupied by the ladies of the Christian Commission. Boxes and barrels containing the generous contributions of patriotic and Christian men and women are daily received, repacked when necessary, and forwarded for the comfort and relief of those noble souls who at their country's call refused not to hazard their lives in her defence. Christians, friends of our Soldiers and Sailors, all your donations sent to this association shall be disposed of as you may direct. Wines, dried fruits, clothing for sick men and suitable for hospitals, are needed. Send them, we pray you, as soon as possible. Address your packages to No. 1, 2d floor, West Seneca street. The ladies have found a most effectual way of comforting our Soldiers and Sailors while absent from their homes. Their wives and children in many instances are destitute of

all food and money. Let us provide for these also. Any contributions for them specially designated, will be judiciously distributed by the ladies of the Christian Commission of Buffalo. Be so good as to enclose in each package an inventory of articles therein contained. MRS. WM. G. FARGO, President.

The Sanitary Commission at Buffalo acknowledges the following from La
Grange:—1 box containing 18 lbs. cherries, 37 lbs. apples, 1 lb. peaches, 1 jar pickled cabbage, 1 1/2 lbs. raspberries, 1 lb. plums, 3 quilts, 4 fans, 2 prs. drawers, 5 new shirts, 18 napkins, 8 pillow cases, 1 pr. sheets, 1 linen coat, 1 bundle tracts, 5 ½ prs. slippers, 3 1/2 lbs. linen and cotton, 5 eye shades, 7 shirts, 9 pin cushions, 1 needle book, 2 hdkfs, 4 arm slings, 1 pr. socks, 1 dressing gown, 1 firkin pickles.

FROM THE GENERAL AID SOCIETY.—Acknowledgments of the General Aid Society, for the week ending Aug. 20, 1863.
Miss Olive Hamilton                                                               $1 25
Misses Ida Thomas, Maggie and Alice Bacon                        15 00
Miss Anna Porter Dorr                                                                        37 00
Misses Hattie Griffin, Ella Gold and Katie Miller                   7 35
Suspension Bridge Soldier's Aid Society                                 1 55
St. Mark's Church Society                                                        5 00
Alden, Mrs. Charles Ely—80 papers.
German Ladies' Aid Society—10 bottles currant and raspberry wine.
North Evans, Mrs. W. S. Piper—4 lbs cherries.
East Hamburgh Soldier's Aid Society—8 cans currant jelly, 5 bottles raspberry vinegar.
East Hamburgh, Mrs. Read—2 gals 1 qt blackberry syrup.
Richville Soldier's Aid Society—12 prs slippers, 4 ounces lint.
West Hamburgh, Mrs. Wm. Prescott—4 cans jelly.
Universalist Society—8 pamphlets.
Boston Corners—4 lbs choice fruit, 1/2 lb old linen.
Suspension Bridge Society—238 papers, 23 pamphlets, 6 books, 2 prs pillows, 6 towels, 1 vest, 52 second-hand shirts, 4 bbls soap, 13 boxes salve, 4 combs, 1 bottle gooseberries, 6 bottles currant wine, 4 bottles grape wine, 1 bottle currant jelly, 1 bottle honey, 2 jars currant jelly, 1 can tomatoes, 1 can currants, 2 cans cherries, 112 1/2 lbs dried fruit, 1/2 lb wormwood, 1/2 lb tea, 15 lbs linen and cotton.
Forestville—2 boxes containing 5 qts blackberry wine, 17 cans currant jelly, 6 cans currants, 3 cans blackberries, 3 lbs dried sweet corn, 13 1/2 lbs dried cherries, 15 lbs dried currants, 5 3/4 lbs blackberries, 17 napkins, 11 shirts, 7 prs slippers, 6 bedsacks, 2 prs woollen [sic] socks, 1 3/4 lbs lint and bandages, 8 sheets, 1 pr drawers, 4 lbs dried apples, 1 bottle raspberry shrub, 14 bottles currant jelly, 58 lbs dried apples.
Sardinia—1 bottle red raspberry wine, 54 lbs dried apples, 5 sheets, 5 shirts, 4 towels, 2 prs pillow cases, 3 handkerchiefs, 1 pr stockings, 3 lbs linen and cotton, 1 bottle blackberry wine, 1 bottle cherry wine, 18 papers, 10 lbs dried currants, 3 1/2 lbs dried cherries, 5 1/2 lbs dried blackberries, 15 lbs maple sugar, 9 1/2 lbs cheese, 6 cakes soap, 11 combs, 2 1/2 yrds old linen, 1 1/4 lbs dried black raspberries. 2 quires paper, 50 envelopes, 1 second hand coat, 1 new coat.
First Presbyterian Church Society— 3 hospital shirts, 2 bottles blackberry syrup.
St. Paul's Church Society—1 coat, 1 pr shoes.
Mrs. Wm. P. Ketchum—25 yrds cotton cloth.
Miss Hattie Griffin—Some lint.
Miss Serena Kibbe—2 qts currant jelly, 1 housewife, 1 testament.
Mrs. A. Morgan—1 lb linen and cotton.
A. H. Frank—90 papers and magazines, 100 lbs farina.
Mrs. Z. Ferris, East Hamburgh—6 bottles blackberry syrup.
Mrs. Dr. Barnes—2 coats and 2 vests.
Mrs. George B. Gates—64 magazines, 2 papers.
Miss Minnie Battell—9 papers, 29 magazines.
Grace Warren—1/4 lb lint.
Miss Sarah Jane Hause—13 jars pickles.
St. Ma__'s Church—15 books, 9 papers.
Miss T____—244 magazines, 3 books.
Miss Ab___—74 papers.
Katy Do___tle—1/4 lb lint.
Mrs. E, . Lyon—9 magazines, 20 papers.
Mrs. Grifan—1 coat, 1 pair shoes, 2 bottles wine.
Mrs Thomas Farnham—100 papers.
Mrs. C. Coit—15 papers.
Mrs. E. Sterling Ely, Cheektawaga—6 cans white currants, 8 cans cherries, 6 lbs white cherries and currants
rants, 8 cans cherries, 6 lbs white cherries and currants
Miss C. E. Ely, Cheektawaga—12 cans white cherries
Mrs. E. Ely, Cheektawaga—2 cans cherry juice.
Articles made from materials furnished by Society.
Unitarian Society—5 shirts, 13 pairs drawers.
Lafayette St. Church Society—7 shirts.
St. Mark's M. E. Society—4 shirts, 3 pairs drawers.
Boston Corner's—18 shirts.
Richville Soldiers Aid Society—15 shirts, 10 pairs drawers.
1st Presbyterian Church Society—6 arm slings.
Alden Presbyterian Society—12 shirts,
Dr. Lord's Church Society—14 pairs cotton drawers, 4 pairs socks.
Presbyterian Society, Black Rock—5 pairs socks.
Universalist Society—20 pairs cotton drawers.
Miss Waxwell—2 pairs drawers.
Mrs. Haines—3 pairs drawers.
Mrs. G. Clark, Cheektawaga—4 pairs drawers.
Mrs. J. A. Armstrong—6 shirts.
Miss Mary Hancock—2 pairs drawers.
Mrs, J. Z. Nay—4 shirts, made by Mrs. Ruth Ray, aged 80 years.
Mrs. E. G. Relf—4 pairs drawers.
Mrs. Lapham—5 pairs drawers.
Mrs. A. Morgan—4 pairs drawers.
Mrs. Barnes—2 shirts.
Mrs. Philander Hodge—2 shirts.
Miss M. Abbott—2 pairs drawers.
St, Mark's—23 shirts, acknowledged as Grace M. E. Work done for the Buffalo City Hospital—22 sheets, 31 pillowcases, 50 pillow ticks.
Our cash receipts would have been 0, but for the enterprise of the children. Misses Maggie and Alice Bacon, and Ida Thomas have brought us $15, the proceeds of their Bazaar, and Miss Anne Porter Dorr gives us $37 with the secret of her great success, which we will tell any little girl of the same age, just six years. And this moment comes another offering from Olive Hamilton $1 25. We are grateful for these generous gifts, and pledge ourselves they shall be used for the sick and wounded soldiers.
We have shipped this week to Louisville Ky., 54 boxes and barrels, containing 302 sheets, 372 shirts, 49 bedsacks, 290 pairs drawers, 673 lbs. dried fruit, 2005 books and papers, a large quantity of groceries and miscellaneous stores, and our rooms are nearly empty Where are our faithful workers? The demand is steady, and should be met. A momentary enthusiasm is not desired. The Commission offers its agency to all who wish steadily to contribute to the relief of the sick and wounded. Let those who have not worked systematically begin now. Let those who have been working steadily become more steadfast. Sheets, shirts and drawers are imperatively called for. We have never a superabundance of these articles. Now is the time to preserve wines and fruit for hospital use, Let every housekeeper, while providing for the luxury of her own household, remember, substantially, those who make long marches, and win victories, undismayed by summer heat and weariness. Let the renewed assurances that our work is blessed, urge us to greater efforts. Hear Dr. G. B. Mitchell writing from an hospital near Vicksburg:—
It has been a source of great satisfaction to me to have been able to comfort the wounded and suffering soldiers, by exchanging their bloody and soiled garments for clean and comfortable clothing; to soothe their burning, parched tongues, by delicious ice-water, or to tempt the appetite (almost destroyed by the coarse food of the camp) by the luxuries procured by the labor of loving wives and daughters in their far off homes. I cannot speak in language strong enough to express the great benefit the Sanitary Commission has been to our army. I have seen it in the Army of the Potomac after the bloody battle of Fredericksburg, and during the siege of Vicksburg, promptly upon the ground with attentive agents and all that could comfort or soothe the poor, sick or wounded soldier, acting in harmony with the government in supplying the Hospitals with articles of necessity and luxury, without delay, whilst government is obliged to use routine which occasions the loss of valuable time.
The real objects for whom we have labored for the past year, have been brought to our doors. Of the regiments returning from Port Hudson and New Orleans to their New England homes; nearly all have left some very sick. Their presence has awakened the most abundant sympathy of our citizens, and offers of assistance have been overwhelming. We have had our faith in the value of systematized benevolence, working through surgeons, thoroughly strengthened. Excessive attention has been an injury to those we would gladly relieve, but with all these difficulties it is a satisfaction to know we have been able to do much good. Our nurses have been faithful, and if the patients are to be believed, most acceptable. We have written letters, sent and received telegraphs, and been the medium of communication between the soldier and his distant home.

"They are going home, but not as they went,
With the flying flag and stirring band,
With the tender word, and message sent
From the distant waving hand.
Up the steps and into the door
With hidden faces their loved ones come.

They may cry their names out o'er and o'er,
But their pallid lips are dumb.
Oh, friends, untimely snatched from hence,
May they find beyond Heaven's lowering doom,
Some blissful future recompense
For this sorrowful going home."

The committee of ladies and gentlemen who are at the depot, early and late, with substantial aid and lov­ing sympathy [sic], deserve the thanks of our citizens, and the loud cheers from the departing regiments attest to their keen appreciation of the kindness bestowed.
A letter just received from the Postmaster at Concord, N. H., says:
"On my own part, I must say I am very much obliged to you for the interest you have taken in our poor soldiers in assisting and comforting them as you have done. Our soldiers have spoken of the kind treatment they have received from your society, Poor fellows! they have suffered much for our country, while many of us have been quiet and happy at home with our families.
Most respectfully,
R. N. CORNING, Postmaster.

Just as we close our report, comes a very handsome donation of $7 35 from Misses Hattie Griffin, Ella Gold and Katy Miller. If "doing good brings its own reward," these little girls who do so bravely for the cause, must take their pay as they go along. May others be inspired by their example.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS OF THE CHRISTIAN COMMISSION.—The ladies of the Christian Commission acknowledge the following contributions for the week ending August 20:
Mrs. Wm. Fleming—2 bottles elderberry wine, 1 bottle blackberry syrup, 9 hdkf's, 1 shirt, 10 ozs lint and bandages, 1 testament, 17 newspapers.
Mrs. T. S. Hawks—100 pictorial papers for the soldiers at Fort Porter.
Master Joseph Dart—24 newspapers, 12 pincushions, 29 bandages.
T. T. Bloomer—2 doz bottles.
C. M. Horton—18 packing boxes.
No. 11 Public School—1 1/2 lbs lint, old cotton and linen.
Mrs. G. L. Hubbard—1 bush dried apples, 3 shirts, 50 Independents, 50 magazines.
L.E., of Springville—$25.
A Friend—23 Independents.
Mrs. E. N. Fellows—20 vols.
Mrs. F. H. Root—12 hdkfs, 2 bottles raspberry shrub.
Mrs. A. Twichell—24 magazines, 1 vest, 1 pr socks, 2 handkerchiefs.
Mrs. Inglesant—1 bottle raspberry vinegar.
Mrs. H. Webster—2 shirts, 4 neck-ties.
Mrs. P. R. Stover—1 coat, 3 prs pants, 2 hats, 1 cap, 1 vest, 1 bottle wine, 6 pin-cushions, 1 bottle catsup.
Mrs. Geo. G. Barnum—7 1/2 lbs black currants, 2 ½ lbs dried currants.
Mrs. T. B. Tilden—4 bottles.
Gracie Warren—21 bottles.
Mrs. J. D. Sawyer—4 bottles raspberry vinegar.
A Friend—25 bottles raspberry vinegar.
Katie Holloway—18 napkins, 22 pin-cushions, 1 housewife, 2 ozs lint.
Tillie Holloway—32 pin-cushions, 6 napkins, 1 housewife, 2 bandages, 1 oz lint, 6 sheets letter paper.
Mrs. WM. B. PECK, Secretary.

DONATION—The following correspondence speaks for itself: We hope to be able to record a number of similar donations.
GENERAL AID SOCIETY FOR THE ARMY,
No 2 ADAMS BLOCK, WASHINGTON ST.,
Buffalo, Aug. 25th. 1863.
Mrs. H. Seymour—I enclose to you $100 it being the sum raised at a Pic-Nic given at the "Grove" for my benefit as a drafted man.
Subsequently finding myself discharged by reason of physical disability, and thereby exempted from the payment of this money, I take pleasure in donating it to your benevolent society, feeling confident that it will be wisely disposed of for the benefit of our brave soldiers.
Respectfully yours, DANIEL HARTNETT,
Driver on Main Street Railroad.
Buffalo, Aug. 25th, 1863.

DANIEL HARTNETT, DEAR SIR:—It gives me great pleasure to express for myself and the Society, our gratitude for your generous donation. May you and all who have assisted in this noble act, realize that it is more blessed to give than to receive.
With the assurance that its disposal shall justify the confidence in us, so tenderly expressed in your note,
I am very respectfully, &c.,
Mrs. HORATIO SEYMOUR, President.

CHILDREN'S AID FOR THE SOLDIERS.—
MR. EDITOR—Dear SIR.—It is not often our privilege to witness as happy a gathering and for so happy a purpose as we did last Saturday. A few weeks ago Miss Sarah Shedd, a lady of our town who is noted for a persevering do-good sort of spirit, bethought herself that she might do something for our "brave boys" in the field. So she visited the schools in town and gave the scholars an invitation to prepare something by way of dried frut [sic] for the soldiers. Well, last Saturday the different schools gathered themselves together for the purpose of bringing in their offerings and enjoying a picnic.
The day was beautiful, and everything seemed to conspire to render the occasion pleasant. The proceeds of the labor of the children were collected.
Dried fruit of almost all kinds and in handsome quantities—all the work of the children—was contributed to be sent to the noble 116th. Patriotic exercises by the scholars of the different schools were gone through with; patriotic speeches were made; patriotic songs were sung, and a deal of patriotic feeling was exhibited in various ways. Nor were they unmindful of their own wants. Tables bountifully loaded with the good things of this world, were relieved of their burden by willing little hands, and, after all had enjoyed themselves to their heart's content, they returned home well pleased with the events of the day.
Perhaps this may serve as an example to your readers, and if they will allow themselves to be animated by a go-and-do-likewise spirit, a sight of good may be done. Will not our brave soldiers feel encouraged when they think that the little children even, remember them and are working for them? God bless the children.
WELL PLEASED.

THE Draft.—The exemptions granted by the Board of Enrollment yesterday were as follows:
Physical disability                                           41
Furnished substitutes                            7
Father of motherless children                           1
Over forty-five years of age                 4
Over age and married                                     31
Underage                                                        13
Error Enrollment                                              -
Alienage                                                          25
Furnished substitutes                           2
Paid three hundred dollars                   1
Only son of widow                              7
   "       "       aged parents                     1
Total                                                           134
In addition to the above five substitutes offered were rejected upon examination, and sixteen passed for duty.
Among those who presented themselves to be examined for service was a conscript contraband, who has been employed on the farm of Mr. Fenner, in the town of Aurora. He had arrayed himself for the occasion in a military cap and a gorgeous calico shirt, and was in such a hurry to enter the service that he objected to the delay consequent upon an examination. He passed a No. 1, and is now a happy as well as a patriotic darkey.

To the BENEFIT OF THE LADIES CHRISTIAN COMMISSION.—The following note, containing the sum of $5, was received by Dr. J. L. Trowbridge, at Fort Porter, yesterday. Of course it was a small bid for special attention out of the regular order of business. The motive which prompted the contribution to the Doctor's purse, may not have been a bad one, but here it is, without the signature, which we do not feel at liberty to publish:—
Buffalo, August 25, 1863.
Dear Sir:—I beg of you, Doctor, to give me a hearing this morning, the first moment practicable, and assure you it is really very necessary that I leave the city tonight. Thanking you for kind attention on the l7th, and trusting you will send a messenger to the door for me, I am, very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,
Dr. Jno. L. Trowbridge, Buffalo, N. Y.

Dr. Trowbridge at once sent the note of which the above is a copy, with its contents to the Ladies' Christian Commission with the following note:

Fort Porter, BUFFALO, Aug. 25th 1863.
To the Ladies Christain [sic] Commission:
The accompanying note will explain itself. As I am debarred by regulations governing this office from accepting those kind of offerings, I take the liberty of enclosing the sum of Five Dollars to your society, hoping in a small way it may be useful. Any sum of the sort will be accepted and disposed of in the same way. Further donations of a similar character are solicited. Yours Respectfully
JNO. L. Trowbridge,
Surgeon 30th District, N. Y.

It is entirely probable that the Doctor will not be afflicted with many more such donations.

 

 

 

New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History
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